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Sample records for phytoestrogen genistein induce

  1. Potential Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein in Modulating Acute Methotrexate Chemotherapy-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    King, Tristan J; Shandala, Tetyana; Lee, Alice M; Foster, Bruce K; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R; Xian, Cory J

    2015-08-06

    Chemotherapy-induced bone damage is a frequent side effect which causes diminished bone mineral density and fracture in childhood cancer sufferers and survivors. The intensified use of anti-metabolite methotrexate (MTX) and other cytotoxic drugs has led to the need for a mechanistic understanding of chemotherapy-induced bone loss and for the development of protective treatments. Using a young rat MTX-induced bone loss model, we investigated potential bone protective effects of phytoestrogen genistein. Oral gavages of genistein (20 mg/kg) were administered daily, for seven days before, five days during, and three days after five once-daily injections (sc) of MTX (0.75 mg/kg). MTX treatment reduced body weight gain and tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone volume (p < 0.001), increased osteoclast density on the trabecular bone surface (p < 0.05), and increased the bone marrow adipocyte number in lower metaphyseal bone (p < 0.001). Genistein supplementation preserved body weight gain (p < 0.05) and inhibited ex vivo osteoclast formation of bone marrow cells from MTX-treated rats (p < 0.001). However, MTX-induced changes in bone volume, trabecular architecture, metaphyseal mRNA expression of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines, and marrow adiposity were not significantly affected by the co-administration of genistein. This study suggests that genistein may suppress MTX-induced osteoclastogenesis; however, further studies are required to examine its potential in protecting against MTX chemotherapy-induced bone damage.

  2. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling. PMID:14605006

  3. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  4. Are the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein anti-herbivore defenses? A test using the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).

    PubMed

    Karowe, David Nathan; Radi, Joshua Karl

    2011-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are compounds that have moderate estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity toward mammals. Although genistein and daidzein, the main phytoestrogens of soybean, have been the subject of thousands of studies that address their benefit to human health, relatively little is known about their benefits to plants that produce them. It has been suggested that genistein and daidzein protect plants against arthropod herbivores, but direct tests of this hypothesis are rare. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genistein and daidzein on the survivorship, growth, and fecundity of the gypsy moth, a generalist insect herbivore that does not encounter phytoestrogens in its normal diet. We compared survivorship, egg-to-pupa growth rate, and 4th instar performance of gypsy moth caterpillars on artificial diets containing no phytoestrogen, genistein, daidzein, or a combination of genistein and daidzein. Our results indicate that genistein and daidzein do not decrease survivorship, growth, or fecundity of this insect herbivore. Therefore, it seems unlikely that the primary function of these compounds in aboveground plant tissues is anti-herbivore defense.

  5. Effects of phytoestrogen genistein on cytogenetic biomarkers in postmenopausal women: 1 year randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Atteritano, Marco; Pernice, Francesco; Mazzaferro, Susanna; Mantuano, Stefania; Frisina, Alessia; D'Anna, Rosario; Cannata, Maria Letizia; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Frisina, Nicola; Buemi, Michele

    2008-07-28

    To evaluate in a twelve-month, randomized placebo-controlled study whether pure administration of phytoestrogen genistein (54 mg/day) might reduce cytogenetic biomarkers in peripheral lymphocytes of postmenopausal women. A total of 57 postmenopausal women met the criteria and were randomly assigned to receive phytoestrogen genistein (n = 30) or placebo (n = 27). There was no significant difference in age, length of time since menopause or body mass index between the two groups. After one year, plasma genistein level was 0.14 +/- 0.01 micromol/L in the control group and 0.72 +/- 0.08 micromol/L in the genistein group (P < 0.0001). At baseline, sister chromatid exchange rate was 4.97 +/- 2.17 in the control group and 4.96 +/- 1.83 in the genistein group (P = 0.89). After one year, sister chromatid exchange rate was 4.96 +/- 2.16 in the control group and 3.98 +/- 1.14 in the genistein group (P < 0.05). High frequency cells count was 3% in the genistein group and 5% in the control group (P < 0.05) at the end of the study. Chromosomal aberration frequency was 5.55% in the control group at time 0 and 5.75% in the genistein group; after one year, the figures were 5.86% in the control group and 4.5% in the genistein group (P < 0.05). After one year, there was a negative relationship between sister chromatid exchange rate and plasma levels (r = - 0.43; P < 0.05) in the genistein group. Phytoestrogen genistein has been shown in postmenopausal women to be effective in the reduction of cytogenetic biomarkers. The protective effect on genomic damage appears to be a particularly promising tool in reducing the risk of cancer.

  6. Multiple phytoestrogens inhibit cell growth and confer cytoprotection by inducing manganese superoxide dismutase expression.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are of interest because of their reported beneficial effects on many human maladies including cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. As data on phytoestrogens continues to accumulate, it is clear that there is significant overlap in the cellular effects elicited by these various compounds. Here, we show that one mechanism by which a number of phytoestrogens achieve their growth inhibitory and cytoprotective effects is via induction of the mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Eight phytoestrogens, including resveratrol, coumestrol, kaempferol, genistein, daidzein, apigenin, isoliquirtigenin and glycitin, were tested for their ability to induce MnSOD expression in mouse C2C12 and primary myoblasts. Five of these, resveratrol, coumestrol, kaempferol, genistein and daidzein, significantly increased MnSOD expression, slowed proliferative growth and enhanced stress resistance (hydrogen peroxide LD50) . When siRNA was used to prevent the MnSOD induction by genistein, coumestrol or daidzein, none of these compounds exerted any effect on proliferative growth, and only the effect of coumestrol on stress resistance persisted. The estrogen antagonist ICI182780 prevented the increased MnSOD expression and also the changes in cell growth and stress resistance, indicating that these effects are mediated by estrogen receptors (ER). The absence of effects of resveratrol or coumestrol, but not genistein, in ERβ-null cells further indicated that this ER in particular is important in mediating these effects. Thus, an ER-mediated induction of MnSOD expression appears to underlie the growth inhibitory and cytoprotective activities of multiple phytoestrogens.

  7. Genistein protects dermal fibrosis in bleomycin-induced experimental scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Süleyman Serdar; Dağlı, Adile Ferda; Yolbaş, Servet; Gözel, Nevzat; Işık, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the protective effect of genistein in bleomycin (BLM)-induced dermal fibrosis. Material and Methods This study involved four groups of Balb/c mice (n=10 per group). Mice in three groups were administered BLM [100 μg/day in 100 μL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)] subcutaneously for 4 weeks; the remaining (control) group received only 100 μL/day of PBS subcutaneously. PBS or BLM was injected into the shaved upper back. Two of the BLM-treated groups also received genistein (1 or 3 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously, to the dorsal front of neck). At the end of the fourth week, all mice were sacrificed and blood and tissue samples were obtained. Results The BLM applications increased the dermal thicknesses, tissue hydroxyproline contents, α-smooth muscle actin-positive cell counts, and led to histopathologically prominent dermal fibrosis. The genistein treatments decreased the tissue hydroxyproline contents and dermal thicknesses, in the BLM-injected mice. Conclusion Genistein has antifibrotic potential in BLM-induced dermal fibrosis model. However, its therapeutic potentials on human scleroderma require evaluation in future studies.

  8. Phytoestrogens β-Sitosterol and Genistein Have Limited Effects on Reproductive Endpoints in a Female Fish, Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. C.; Stevenson, L. M.; Leonard, H. M.; Nieves-Puigdoller, K.; Clotfelter, E. D.

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish. PMID:24707495

  9. Phytoestrogens β -sitosterol and genistein have limited effects on reproductive endpoints in a female fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Stevenson, L M; Leonard, H M; Nieves-Puigdoller, K; Clotfelter, E D

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish.

  10. Phytoestrogens β -sitosterol and genistein have limited effects on reproductive endpoints in a female fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Stevenson, L M; Leonard, H M; Nieves-Puigdoller, K; Clotfelter, E D

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish. PMID:24707495

  11. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-09-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents. PMID:27574003

  12. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B.; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents. PMID:27574003

  13. The Phytoestrogen Genistein Affects Breast Cancer Cells Treatment Depending on the ERα/ERβ Ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soybeans. GEN exerts its functions through its interaction with the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and we previously reported that the ERα/ERβ ratio is an important factor to consider in GEN-treated breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GEN in breast cancer cells with different ERα/ERβ ratio: MCF-7 (high ratio), T47D (low ratio), and MCF-7 overexpressing ERβ (MCF7 + ERβ) treated with cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) or tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, ROS production, autophagy, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes protein levels, and cell cycle were analyzed. GEN treatment provoked an increase in cell viability in MCF-7 cells and in the antioxidant enzymes protein levels in combination with the cytotoxic agents, decreasing ROS production (CDDP + GEN and TAM+GEN) and autophagy (TAM + GEN) or apoptosis (CDDP + GEN and TAM + GEN). Moreover GEN treatment enhanced the cell cycle S phase entry in CDDP+GEN- and TAM + GEN-treated MCF-7 cells and, in the case of CDDP + GEN, increased the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase and decreased it in the subG0 /G1 phase. Otherwise, in the T47D and MCF7 + ERβ cells the combination of GEN with cytotoxic treatments did not cause significant changes in these parameters, even TAM + GEN-treated T47D cells showed less cell viability due to an increment in the autophagy. In conclusion, GEN consumption may be counterproductive in those patients receiving anticancer treatment with a high ERα/ERβ ratio diagnosed breast cancer and it could be harmless or even beneficial in those patients with a lower ERα/ERβ ratio breast cancer cells.

  14. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements.

  15. Dietary soy oil content and soy-derived phytoestrogen genistein increase resistance to alopecia areata onset in C3H/HeJ mice.

    PubMed

    McElwee, K J; Niiyama, S; Freyschmidt-Paul, P; Wenzel, E; Kissling, S; Sundberg, J P; Hoffmann, R

    2003-02-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a complex, multi-factorial disease where genes and the environment may affect susceptibility and severity. Diet is an environmental factor with the potential to influence disease susceptibility. We considered dietary soy (soya) oil content and the soy-derived phytoestrogen genistein as potential modifying agents for C3H/HeJ mouse AA. Normal haired C3H/HeJ mice were grafted with skin from spontaneous AA affected mice, a method previously shown to induce AA. Grafted mice were given one of three diets containing 1%, 5% or 20% soy oil and observed for AA development. In a separate study, mice on a 1% soy oil diet were injected with 1 mg of genistein three times per week for 10 weeks or received the vehicle as a control. Of mice on 1%, 5%, and 20% soy oil diets, 43 of 50 mice (86%), 11 of 28 mice (39%), and 2 of 11 mice (18%) developed AA, respectively. Four of 10 mice injected with genistein and 9 of 10 controls developed AA. Mice with AA had hair follicle inflammation consistent with observations for spontaneous mouse AA, but no significant association was observed between the extent of hair loss and diet or genistein injection. Mice that failed to develop AA typically experience white hair regrowth from their skin grafts associated with a moderate macrophage and dendritic cell infiltration. Soy oil and derivatives have previously been reported to modify inflammatory conditions. Hypothetically, soy oil compounds may act on C3H/HeJ mice through modulating estrogen-dependent mechanisms and/or inflammatory activity to modify AA susceptibility. PMID:12631244

  16. Combined effects of dietary phytoestrogen and synthetic endocrine-active compound on reproductive development in Sprague-Dawley rats: genistein and methoxychlor.

    PubMed

    You, Li; Casanova, Mercedes; Bartolucci, Erika J; Fryczynski, Mary W; Dorman, David C; Everitt, Jeffrey I; Gaido, Kevin W; Ross, Susan M; Heck Hd, Henry d'A

    2002-03-01

    Humans and wildlife are frequently exposed to mixtures of endocrine active-compounds (EAC). The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of the phytoestrogen genistein to influence the reproductive developmental toxicity of the endocrine-active pesticide methoxychlor. Three levels of genistein (0, 300, or 800 ppm) and two levels of methoxychlor (0 or 800 ppm) were used in this study. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to the two compounds, either alone or in combinations, through dietary administration to dams during pregnancy and lactation and to the offspring directly after weaning. Both compounds, methoxychlor in particular, were associated with reduced body growth at 800 ppm, but pregnancy outcome was not affected by either treatment. An acceleration of vaginal opening (VO) in the exposed female offspring was the only observed effect of genistein at 300 ppm. Exposure to 800 ppm genistein or 800 ppm methoxychlor caused accelerated VO and also altered estrous cyclicity toward persistent estrus in the female offspring. The estrogenic responses to genistein and methoxychlor administered together were apparently accumulative of the effects associated with each compound alone. Methoxychlor, but not genistein, delayed preputial separation (PPS) in the male rats. When administered with methoxychlor, genistein at 800 ppm enhanced the effect of methoxychlor on delaying PPS. Genistein and methoxychlor treatment did not change gender-specific motor activity patterns in either sex. To explore possible mechanisms for interaction between the two compounds on development, we performed estrogen receptor (ER)- and androgen receptor (AR)-based in vitro transcriptional activation assays using genistein and the primary methoxychlor metabolite 2,2-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE). While the in vitro assays supported the estrogenic effects of genistein and methoxychlor and the antiandrogenic effects of methoxychlor, the reactivity of these

  17. Effects of the phytoestrogen genistein on the development of the reproductive system of Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Zin, Siti Rosmani Md; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Khan, Norhayati Liaqat Ali; Musameh, Nurul Iftitah; Das, Srijit; Kassim, Normadiah M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genistein is known to influence reproductive system development through its binding affinity for estrogen receptors. The present study aimed to further explore the effect of Genistein on the development of the reproductive system of experimental rats. METHODS: Eighteen post-weaning female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the following groups: (i) a control group that received vehicle (distilled water and Tween 80); (ii) a group treated with 10 mg/kg body weight (BW) of Genistein (Gen 10); and (iii) a group treated with a higher dose of Genistein (Gen 100). The rats were treated daily for three weeks from postnatal day 22 (P22) to P42. After the animals were sacrificed, blood samples were collected, and the uteri and ovaries were harvested and subjected to light microscopy and immunohistochemical study. RESULTS: A reduction of the mean weekly BW gain and organ weights (uteri and ovaries) were observed in the Gen 10 group compared to the control group; these findings were reversed in the Gen 100 group. Follicle stimulating hormone and estrogen levels were increased in the Gen 10 group and reduced in the Gen 100 group. Luteinizing hormone was reduced in both groups of Genistein-treated animals, and there was a significant difference between the Gen 10 and control groups (p<0.05). These findings were consistent with increased atretic follicular count, a decreased number of corpus luteum and down-regulation of estrogen receptors-α in the uterine tissues of the Genistein-treated animals compared to the control animals. CONCLUSION: Post-weaning exposure to Genistein could affect the development of the reproductive system of ovarian-intact experimental rats because of its action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by regulating hormones and estrogen receptors. PMID:23525324

  18. Phytoestrogens directly inhibit TNF-α-induced bone resorption in RAW264.7 cells by suppressing c-fos-induced NFATc1 expression.

    PubMed

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W

    2011-02-01

    TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis is central to post-menopausal and inflammatory bone loss, however, the effect of phytoestrogens on TNF-α-induced bone resorption has not been studied. The phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol directly suppressed TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. TRAP positive osteoclast formation and resorption area were significantly reduced by genistein (10(-7)  M), daidzein (10(-5)  M), and coumestrol (10(-7)  M), which was prevented by the estrogen antagonist ICI 182,780. TRAP expression in mature TNF-α-induced osteoclasts was also significantly reduced by these phytoestrogen concentrations. In addition, in the presence of ICI 182,780 genistein and coumestrol (10(-5) -10(-6)  M) augmented TNF-α-induced osteoclast formation and resorption. However, this effect was not observed in the absence of estrogen antagonist indicating that genistein's and coumestrol's ER-dependent anti-osteoclastic action normally negates this pro-osteoclastic effect. To determine the mechanism mediating the anti-osteoclastic action we examined the effect of genistein, coumestrol, and daidzein on caspase 3/7 activity, cell viability and expression of key genes regulating osteoclast differentiation and fusion. While anti-osteoclastic phytoestrogen concentrations had no effect on caspase 3/7 activity or cell viability they did significantly reduce TNF-α-induced c-fos and NFATc1 expression in an ER dependent manner and also inhibited NFATc1 nuclear translocation. Significant decreases in NFκB and DC-STAMP levels were also noted. Interestingly, constitutive c-fos expression prevented the anti-osteoclastic action of phytoestrogens on differentiation, resorption and NFATc1. This suggests that phytoestrogens suppress TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis via inhibition of c-fos-dependent NFATc1 expression. Our data provides further evidence that phytoestrogens have a potential role in the treatment of post-menopausal and inflammatory

  19. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  20. Modulation of Expression and Activity of ABC Transporters by the Phytoestrogen Genistein. Impact on Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2016-01-01

    ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in drug absorption, distribution and elimination. They also mediate multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Isoflavones, such as genistein (GNT), belong to a class of naturally-occurring compounds found at high concentrations in commonly consumed soya based-foods and dietary supplements. GNT and its metabolites interact with ABC transporters as substrates, inhibitors and/or modulators of their expression. This review compiles information about regulation of ABC transporters by GNT with special emphasis on the three major groups of ABC transporters involved in excretion of endo- and xenobiotics as follows: Pglycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1), a group of multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs, ABCC subfamily) and ABCG2 (BCRP), an ABC half-transporter. The impact of these regulations on potential GNT-drug interactions is further considered. PMID:27048380

  1. Genistein prevents isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Subir Kumar; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Seth, Sandeep

    2012-08-01

    Genistein, an isoflavone and a rich constituent of soy, possesses important regulatory effects on nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and oxidative stress. Transient and low release of NO by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been shown to be beneficial, while high and sustained release by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) may be detrimental in pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The present study was designed to evaluate whether genistein could prevent isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in male Wistar rats (150-200 g, 10-12 weeks old) rats. Isoproterenol (5 mg·(kg body weight)(-1)) was injected subcutaneously once daily for 14 days to induced cardiac hypertrophy. Genistein (0.1 and 0.2 mg·kg(-1), subcutaneous injection once daily) was administered along with isoproterenol. Heart tissue was studied for myocyte size and fibrosis. Myocardial thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase levels, and 1-OH proline (collagen content) were also estimated. Genistein significantly prevented any isoproterenol-induced increase in heart weight to body weight ratio, left ventricular mass (echocardiographic), myocardial 1-OH proline, fibrosis, myocyte size and myocardial oxidative stress. These beneficial effects of genistein were blocked by a nonselective NOS inhibitor (L-NAME), but not by a selective iNOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine). Thus, the present study suggests that the salutary effects of genistein on isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy may be mediated through inhibition of iNOS and potentiation of eNOS activities. PMID:22808991

  2. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and genistein induces apoptosis synergistically in chemo-resistant cancer cells through the modulation of AMPK and COX-2 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Ha, Joohun; Park, Ock Jin . E-mail: ojpark@hannam.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the widely used chemotherapeutic drugs targeting various cancers, but its chemo-resistance remains as a major obstacle in clinical settings. In the present study, HT-29 colon cancer cells were markedly sensitized to apoptosis by both 5-FU and genistein compared to the 5-FU treatment alone. There is an emerging evidence that genistein, soy-derived phytoestrogen, may have potential as a chemotherapeutic agent capable of inducing apoptosis or suppressing tumor promoting proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the precise mechanism of cellular cytotoxicity of genistein is not known. The present study focused on the correlation of AMPK and COX-2 in combined cytotoxicity of 5-FU and genistein, since AMPK is known as a primary cellular homeostasis regulator and a possible target molecule of cancer treatment, and COX-2 as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic molecule. Our results demonstrated that the combination of 5-FU and genistein abolished the up-regulated state of COX-2 and prostaglandin secretion caused by 5-FU treatment in HT-29 colon cancer cells. These appear to be followed by the specific activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and Bax by genistein. Under same conditions, the induction of Glut-1 by 5-FU was diminished by the combination treatment with 5-FU and genistein. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found as an upstream signal for AMPK activation by genistein. These results suggested that the combination of 5-FU and genistein exert a novel chemotherapeutic effect in colon cancers, and AMPK may be a novel regulatory molecule of COX-2 expression, further implying its involvement in cytotoxicity caused by genistein.

  3. Inhibition of Adipocyte Differentiation by Phytoestrogen Genistein Through a Potential Downregulation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qing-Chuan; Li, Ya-Lin; Qin, Yan-Fang; Quarles, L. Darryl; Xu, Kang-Kang; Li, Rong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Xiao, Zhou-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effects of genistein on adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) cultures and its potential signaling pathway. The terminal adipogenic differentiation was assessed by western-blotting analysis of adipogenic-specific proteins such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, and aP2 and the formation of adipocytes. Treatment of mouse BMSC cultures with adipogenic cocktail resulted in sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), which are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, at the early phase of adipogenesis (from days 3 to 9). Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by PD98059, a specific MEK inhibitor, reversed the induced adipogenic differentiation. Genistein dose-dependently decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in mouse BMSC cultures. Genistein incubation for the entire culture period, as well as that applied during the early phase of the culture period, significantly inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of mouse BMSC cultures. While genistein was incubated at the late stage (after day 9), no inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation was observed. BMSC cultures treated with genistein in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an activator of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, expressed normal levels of ERK1/2 activity, and, in so doing, are capable of undergoing adipogenesis. Our results suggest that activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway during the early phase of adipogenesis (from days 3 to 9) is essential to adipogenic differentiation of BMSC cultures, and that genistein inhibits the adipogenic differentiation through a potential downregulation of ERK1/2 activity at this early phase of adipogenesis. PMID:18384126

  4. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake.

  5. Vascular effects of phytoestrogens and alternative menopausal hormone therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gencel, V B; Benjamin, M M; Bahou, S N; Khalil, R A

    2012-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are estrogenic compounds of plant origin classified into different groups including isoflavones, lignans, coumestans and stilbenes. Isoflavones such as genistein and daidzein are the most studied and most potent phytoestrogens, and are found mainly in soy based foods. The effects of phytoestrogens are partly mediated via estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα, ERβ and possibly GPER. The interaction of phytoestrogens with ERs is thought to induce both genomic and non-genomic effects in many tissues including the vasculature. Some phytoestrogens such as genistein have additional non-ER-mediated effects involving signaling pathways such as tyrosine kinase. Experimental studies have shown beneficial effects of phytoestrogens on endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix. Phytoestrogens may also affect other pathophysiologic vascular processes such as lipid profile, angiogenesis, inflammation, tissue damage by reactive oxygen species, and these effects could delay the progression of atherosclerosis. As recent clinical trials showed no vascular benefits or even increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CV events with conventional menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), phytoestrogens are being considered as alternatives to pharmacologic MHT. Epidemiological studies in the Far East population suggest that dietary intake of phytoestrogens may contribute to the decreased incidence of postmenopausal CVD and thromboembolic events. Also, the WHO-CARDIAC study supported that consumption of high soybean diet is associated with lower mortalities from coronary artery disease. However, as with estrogen, there has been some discrepancy between the experimental studies demonstrating the vascular benefits of phytoestrogens and the data from clinical trials. This is likely because the phytoestrogens clinical trials have been limited in many aspects including the number of participants enrolled, the clinical end points investigated, and the lack of

  6. Changes in the histomorphometric and biomechanical properties of the proximal femur of ovariectomized rat after treatment with the phytoestrogens genistein and equol.

    PubMed

    Tezval, Mohammad; Sehmisch, Stephan; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana; Rack, Thomas; Kolios, Leila; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Stuermer, Klaus Michael; Stuermer, Ewa Klara

    2010-02-01

    The isoflavonoids found in soy have attracted great interest as dietary phytoestrogens that might be effective for postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy. Special attention has been devoted to the hormonal effects of various isoflavonoids, like genistein (GEN) and daidzein's (DAID) potent metabolite, equol (EQ). Here we aimed to investigate the short-term effects of genistein and equol on the proximal femur of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty-eight, 3-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovarectomized; after eight weeks the bilateral osteotomy and osteosynthesis (OS) of their tibiae was performed and the rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: OVX control group (C), treated with estradiol-17beta (E2) -benzoate (E; daily intake 0.086 mg/d per animal), genistein (GEN; daily intake 12.7 mg/d per animal) and equol (EQ; daily intake 4.65 mg/d per animal). At 5 weeks postoperatively (OS), the breaking test was performed on the trochanteric region of femur. Additionally, histomorphometric assessment, and trabecular and cortical bone microstructure analyses were performed. The relative gain of body weight (BW) in the EQ (24 %) group was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than in the C (33 %) and GEN (30 %) groups. After treatment for 5 weeks, the maximal load (F(max)) and yield load (yL) were higher (p < 0.05 for the weight-adapted results) in the E (188.4 N resp. 113.1 N) and EQ (177.3 N resp. 112 N) groups as compared to C (162.8 N resp. 109.1 N) and GEN (165.7 N resp. 108.8 N). In the histomorphometric tests the E- (trabecular area (Tb.Ar) = 74.93 %, trabecular nodes/mm(2) (N.Nd/mm(2)) = 48.65) and EQ-treated (Tb.Ar = 63.13 %, N.Nd/mm(2) = 43.72) animals showed significant improvement with regard to Tb.Ar and trabecular connectivity (N.Nd./mm(2)) in comparison to C (Tb.Ar = 46.84, N.Nd/mm(2) = 31.86) and GEN (Tb.Ar = 48.22 %, N.Nd/mm(2) = 34.15). There were no differences in relative cortical width (Ct.Wi) among the four groups. The treatment

  7. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tai L.; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100 mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2 weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20 mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. - Highlights: • Diets affected streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice. • Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes can be induced by diet.

  8. Genistein and daidzein induce cell proliferation and their metabolites cause oxidative DNA damage in relation to isoflavone-induced cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Koh, Masashi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-03-01

    The soy isoflavones, genistein (5,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone) and daidzein (7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone), are representative phytoestrogens that function as chemopreventive agents against cancers, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies indicated that genistein and/or daidzein induced cancers of reproductive organs in rodents, such as the uterus and vulva. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of carcinogenesis by soy isoflavones, we examined the ability of genistein, daidzein, and their metabolites, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (orobol), 7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-OH-IF), and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (6,7,4'-OH-IF), to cause DNA damage and cell proliferation. An E-screen assay revealed that genistein and daidzein enhanced proliferation of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer MCF-7 cells, while their metabolites had little or no effect. A surface plasmon resonance sensor showed that binding of isoflavone-liganded estrogen receptors (ER) to estrogen response elements (ERE) was largely consistent with cell proliferative activity of isoflavones. Orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF significantly increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells, while genistein, daidzein, and 6,7,4'-OH-IF did not. Experiments using isolated DNA revealed a metal-dependent mechanism of oxidative DNA damage induced by orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF. DNA damage was enhanced by the addition of endogenous reductant NADH, formed via the redox cycle. These findings suggest that oxidative DNA damage by isoflavone metabolites plays a role in tumor initiation and that cell proliferation by isoflavones via ER-ERE binding induces tumor promotion and/or progression, resulting in cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

  9. Endocrine disrupting effects in rats perinatally exposed to a dietary relevant mixture of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boberg, Julie; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Isling, Louise Krag; Hadrup, Niels; Berthelsen, Line; Elleby, Anders; Kiersgaard, Maria; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hass, Ulla; Nellemann, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may prevent certain human diseases, but endocrine activity has been reported in animal studies. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed perinatally to a 1-, 10- or 100-fold "high human dietary intake" mixture of 12 phytoestrogens consisting of mainly the lignan secoisolarici resinol and the isoflavones genistein and daidzein. This mixture induced persistent adverse effects, as adult male mammary glands showed hypertrophic growth. A reduced anogenital distance in newborn males indicated an anti-androgenic mode of action. Testosterone levels, testis and prostate weights, and expression of selected genes in testis and prostate were unaffected. Decreased serum estradiol was seen in genistein-exposed dams. This study indicated adverse effects at high intake levels in rats, but does not provide evidence for risk of phytoestrogen-mediated endocrine disruption at normal human dietary consumption levels. Further studies are warranted to increase the knowledge upon which risk assessment on dietary phytoestrogen exposure during pregnancy and infancy is based.

  10. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  11. Genistein improves 3-NPA-induced memory impairment in ovariectomized rats: impact of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and acetylcholinesterase modulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Menze, Esther T; Esmat, Ahmed; Tadros, Mariane G; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Khalifa, Amani E

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The pre-motor symptomatic stages of the disease are commonly characterized by cognitive problems including memory loss. 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin that produces selective lesions in the brain similar to that of HD and was proven to cause memory impairment in rodents. Phytoestrogens have well-established neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects with fewer side effects in comparison to estrogens. This study investigated the potential neuroprotective and memory enhancing effect of genistein (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), a phytoestrogen, in ovariectomized rats challenged with 3-NPA (20 mg/kg). These potential effects were compared to those of 17β-estradiol (2.5 mg/kg). Systemic administration of 3-NPA for 4 consecutive days impaired locomotor activity, decreased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, decreased striatal, cortical and hippocampal ATP levels, increased oxidative stress, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions. Pretreatment with genistein and 17β-estradiol attenuated locomotor hypoactivity, increased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, increased ATP levels, improved the oxidative stress profile, attenuated the increase in AChE activity and decreased the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Overall, the higher genistein dose (20 mg/kg) was the most effective. In conclusion, this study suggests neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects for genistein in a rat model of HD. These effects might be attributed to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cholinesterase inhibitory activities.

  12. Genistein Improves 3-NPA-Induced Memory Impairment in Ovariectomized Rats: Impact of Its Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Acetylcholinesterase Modulatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Menze, Esther T.; Esmat, Ahmed; Tadros, Mariane G.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.; Khalifa, Amani E.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The pre-motor symptomatic stages of the disease are commonly characterized by cognitive problems including memory loss. 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin that produces selective lesions in the brain similar to that of HD and was proven to cause memory impairment in rodents. Phytoestrogens have well-established neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects with fewer side effects in comparison to estrogens. This study investigated the potential neuroprotective and memory enhancing effect of genistein (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), a phytoestrogen, in ovariectomized rats challenged with 3-NPA (20 mg/kg). These potential effects were compared to those of 17β-estradiol (2.5 mg/kg). Systemic administration of 3-NPA for 4 consecutive days impaired locomotor activity, decreased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, decreased striatal, cortical and hippocampal ATP levels, increased oxidative stress, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions. Pretreatment with genistein and 17β-estradiol attenuated locomotor hypoactivity, increased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, increased ATP levels, improved the oxidative stress profile, attenuated the increase in AChE activity and decreased the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Overall, the higher genistein dose (20 mg/kg) was the most effective. In conclusion, this study suggests neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects for genistein in a rat model of HD. These effects might be attributed to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cholinesterase inhibitory activities. PMID:25675218

  13. Effect of phytoestrogens on basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion.

    PubMed

    Arispe, Sergio A; Adams, Betty; Adams, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Plant-derived estrogens (phytoestrogens, PEs), like endogenous estrogens, affect a diverse array of tissues, including the bone, uterus, mammary gland, and components of the neural and cardiovascular systems. We hypothesized that PEs act directly at pituitary loci to attenuate basal FSH secretion and increase gonadotrope sensitivity to GnRH. To examine the effect of PEs on basal secretion and total production of FSH, ovine pituitary cells were incubated with PEs for 48 h. Conditioned media and cell extract were collected and assayed for FSH. Estradiol (E₂) and some PEs significantly decreased basal secretion of FSH. The most potent PEs in this regard were coumestrol (CM), zearalenone (ZR), and genistein (GN). The specificity of PE-induced suppression of basal FSH was indicated by the absence of suppression in cells coincubated with PEs and an estrogen receptor (ER) blocker (ICI 182 780; ICI). Secretion of LH during stimulation by a GnRH agonist (GnRH-A) was used as a measure of gonadotrope responsiveness. Incubation of cells for 12 h with E₂, CM, ZR, GN, or daidzein (DZ) enhanced the magnitude and sensitivity of LH secretion during subsequent exposure to graded levels of a GnRH-A. The E₂- and PE-dependent augmentation of gonadotrope responsiveness was nearly fully blocked during coincubation with ICI. Collectively, these data demonstrate that selected PEs (CM, ZR, and GN), like E₂, decrease basal secretion of FSH, reduce total FSH production, and enhance GnRH-A-induced LH secretion in a manner that is dependent on the ER. PMID:24050980

  14. Effect of phytoestrogens on basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion.

    PubMed

    Arispe, Sergio A; Adams, Betty; Adams, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Plant-derived estrogens (phytoestrogens, PEs), like endogenous estrogens, affect a diverse array of tissues, including the bone, uterus, mammary gland, and components of the neural and cardiovascular systems. We hypothesized that PEs act directly at pituitary loci to attenuate basal FSH secretion and increase gonadotrope sensitivity to GnRH. To examine the effect of PEs on basal secretion and total production of FSH, ovine pituitary cells were incubated with PEs for 48 h. Conditioned media and cell extract were collected and assayed for FSH. Estradiol (E₂) and some PEs significantly decreased basal secretion of FSH. The most potent PEs in this regard were coumestrol (CM), zearalenone (ZR), and genistein (GN). The specificity of PE-induced suppression of basal FSH was indicated by the absence of suppression in cells coincubated with PEs and an estrogen receptor (ER) blocker (ICI 182 780; ICI). Secretion of LH during stimulation by a GnRH agonist (GnRH-A) was used as a measure of gonadotrope responsiveness. Incubation of cells for 12 h with E₂, CM, ZR, GN, or daidzein (DZ) enhanced the magnitude and sensitivity of LH secretion during subsequent exposure to graded levels of a GnRH-A. The E₂- and PE-dependent augmentation of gonadotrope responsiveness was nearly fully blocked during coincubation with ICI. Collectively, these data demonstrate that selected PEs (CM, ZR, and GN), like E₂, decrease basal secretion of FSH, reduce total FSH production, and enhance GnRH-A-induced LH secretion in a manner that is dependent on the ER.

  15. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai L; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. PMID:25178718

  16. Influence of long-term dietary administration of procymidone, a fungicide with anti-androgenic effects, or the phytoestrogen genistein to rats on the pituitary-gonadal axis and Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svechnikov, K; Supornsilchai, V; Strand, M-L; Wahlgren, A; Seidlova-Wuttke, D; Wuttke, W; Söder, O

    2005-10-01

    Procymidone is a fungicide with anti-androgenic properties, widely used to protect fruits from fungal infection. Thereby it contaminates fruit products prepared for human consumption. Genistein-containing soy products are increasingly used as food additives with health-promoting properties. Therefore we examined the effects of long-term dietary administration (3 months) of the anti-androgen procymidone (26.4 mg/animal per day) or the phytoestrogen genistein (21.1 mg/animal per day) to rats on the pituitary-gonadal axis in vivo, as well as on Leydig cell steroidogenesis and on spermatogenesis ex vivo. The procymidone-containing diet elevated serum levels of LH and testosterone and, furthermore, Leydig cells isolated from procymidone-treated animals displayed an enhanced capacity for producing testosterone in response to stimulation by hCG or dibutyryl cAMP, as well as elevated expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (P450 scc) and cytochrome P450 17alpha (P450c17). In contrast, the rate of DNA synthesis during stages VIII and IX of spermatogenesis in segments of seminiferous tubules isolated from genistein-treated rats was decreased without accompanying changes in the serum level of either LH or testosterone. Nonetheless, genistein did suppress the ex vivo steroidogenic response of Leydig cells to hCG or dibutyryl cAMP by down-regulating their expression of P450 scc. Considered together, our present findings demonstrate that long-term dietary administration of procymidone or genistein to rats exerts different effects on the pituitary-gonadal axis in vivo and on Leydig cell steroidogenesis ex vivo. Possibly as a result of disruption of hormonal feedback control due to its anti-androgenic action, procymidone activates this endocrine axis, thereby causing hyper-gonadotropic activation of testicular steroidogenesis. In contrast, genistein influences spermatogenesis and significantly inhibits Leydig cell

  17. Genistein as antioxidant and antibrowning agents in in vivo and in vitro: A review.

    PubMed

    Rahman Mazumder, Md Anisur; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2016-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen with diverse biological activities. It is a potent antioxidant and antibrowning agent in in vivo and in vitro. Genistein acts as a preventative and therapeutic effects for cancers, postmenopausal syndrome, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases in animals and humans. Gensitein possesses cancer related enzyme-inhibitory effect and substantially inhibits skin carcinogenesis and cutaneous aging induced by ultraviolet (UV) light in mice and photodamage in humans. Two-stage skin carcinogenesis showed genistein exhibited a moderate inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity through blockage of DNA adducts formation. The anticancer, anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and enzyme-inhibitory effects of genistein might be related to their antioxidant activities. Genistein also altered the Maillard reaction pathway by trapping the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) both in biological and protein-lactose suspensions. As a result, soy isoflavone can be used to enrich or fortify different types of food products. PMID:27470376

  18. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  19. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Smeets, Evelien E J W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Nijmeijer, Sandra M; van den Berg, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. PMID:23541764

  20. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Smeets, Evelien E J W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Nijmeijer, Sandra M; van den Berg, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided.

  1. ALTERED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO GENISTEIN AND METHOXYCHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genistein is a prevalent phytoestrogen whose presence in human and animal foods may affect biological actions of synthetic endocrine active compounds. We have previously reported that in utero and lactational exposure to genistein and the endocrine active pesticide methoxychlor c...

  2. Breast cancer cell apoptosis with phytoestrogens is dependent on an estrogen-deprived state.

    PubMed

    Obiorah, Ifeyinwa E; Fan, Ping; Jordan, V Craig

    2014-09-01

    Phytoestrogens have been investigated as natural alternatives to hormone replacement therapy and their potential as chemopreventive agents. We investigated the effects of equol, genistein, and coumestrol on cell growth in fully estrogenized MCF7 cells, simulating the perimenopausal state, and long-term estrogen-deprived MCF7:5C cells, which simulate the postmenopausal state of a woman after years of estrogen deprivation, and compared the effects with that of steroidal estrogens: 17β estradiol (E2) and equilin present in conjugated equine estrogen. Steroidal and phytoestrogens induce proliferation of MCF7 cells at physiologic concentrations but inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of MCF7:5C cells. Although steroidal and phytoestrogens induce estrogen-responsive genes, their antiproliferative and apoptotic effects are mediated through the estrogen receptor. Knockdown of ERα using siRNA blocks all estrogen-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition. Phytoestrogens induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response stress-related genes in a comparable manner as the steroidal estrogens. Inhibition of inflammation using dexamethasone blocked both steroidal- and phytoestrogen-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition as well as their ability to induce apoptotic genes. Together, this suggests that phytoestrogens can potentially be used as chemopreventive agents in older postmenopausal women but caution should be exercised when used in conjunction with steroidal anti-inflammatory agents due to their antiapoptotic effects.

  3. The effect of zinc and phytoestrogen supplementation on the changes in mineral content of the femur of rats with chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Korczak, Barbara Bobrowska-; Tokarz, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Agata; Klepacz, Marta; Makowska, Justyna; Gadzinski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess skeletal effects of zinc or zinc with phytoestrogen (resveratrol or genistein) supplementation in an animal model of rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The changes in bone parameters such as the length and mass were examined, as well as the changes in concentrations of selected minerals: calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and phosphorus. Moreover, the investigations focused on finding the differences between the levels of iron and zinc in other tissues: the liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. Fifty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats, 40 days old, were divided into four groups, regardless of the diets: standard (77mg Zn kg/food), zinc (4.6mg/mL via gavage), zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus resveratrol (0.2mg/kgbw), and zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus genistein (0.2mg/kgbw) for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The study rats were also treated with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The applied diet and the advanced mammary cancer did not affect macrometric parameters of the rats' bones, but they strongly affected their mineral content. It was found that mammary cancer, irrespectively of the applied diet, significantly modified the iron level in the femur, liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. In addition, zinc supplementation significantly lowered the levels of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the femur of rats with mammary cancer as compared with respective levels in the control group. So, it was found that additional supplementation with zinc, which is generally considered to be an antioxidant, with the co-existing mammary carcinoma, increased the unfavorable changes as concerns the stability of bone tissue. The appropriate combination of zinc and phytoestrogens (resveratrol or genistein) could help prevent or slow bone loss associated with a range of skeletal disorders in breast cancer.

  4. Comparative study of dietary soy phytoestrogens genistein and equol effects on growth parameters and ovarian development in farmed female beluga sturgeon, Huso huso.

    PubMed

    Yousefi Jourdehi, A; Sudagar, M; Bahmani, M; Hosseini, S A; Dehghani, A A; Yazdani, M A

    2014-02-01

    Oocyte maturation in fish is a hormonally regulated process. In the light of long-term oocyte maturation in beluga, the aim of this research was to study the estrogenic effects of different concentrations of soy dietary genistein (GE) and equol (EQ) on the growth performance and ovary development in farmed female Huso huso. Fish were fed with concentrations 0 (control), 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 g of EQ and GE per kg of isoproteic (CP 45 %) and isoenergetic (19.5 MJ/kg) diets during a year. Blood samples and ovary biopsies were collected from each fish seasonally. The main results of the present experimentation are that growth performance was not affected significantly both in GE and EQ (P > 0.05). EQ at concentration 0.4 g/kg had more estrogenic effects than other concentrations of EQ and GE in beluga so that 64 % of fish were matured sexually. Some reproductive indices such as oocyte diameter, testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E₂) increased significantly at EQ 0.4 g/kg at the end of experiment (P < 0.05), while 17α-hydroxy progesterone level (17α-OHP) showed no significant changes at all concentrations. Biochemical indices such as calcium, phosphorous and cholesterol increased at GE concentrations, but decreased at EQ concentrations similarly at the end of experiment. There was a negative relationship between plasma phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels. Based on results, EQ at concentration 0.4 g/kg improved oocyte development more than the other concentrations of GE and EQ, and therefore, it can be used as an additive to diets for inducing ovary development in this species.

  5. Endogenous estrogen status, but not genistein supplementation, modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mutation in the liver cII gene of transgenic big blue rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hutts, Robert C; Mei, Nan; Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Michelle E; Shelton, Sharon; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane

    2005-06-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that isoflavones found in soybeans have estrogenic activity and may safely alleviate the symptoms of menopause. One of these isoflavones, genistein, is commonly used by postmenopausal women as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Although sex hormones have been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, there are limited data on the potential effects of the estrogens, including phytoestrogens, on chemical mutagenesis in liver. Because of the association between mutation induction and the carcinogenesis process, we investigated whether endogenous estrogen and supplemental genistein affect 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in rat liver. Intact and ovariectomized female Big Blue rats were treated with 80 mg DMBA/kg body weight. Some of the rats also received a supplement of 1,000 ppm genistein. Sixteen weeks after the carcinogen treatment, the rats were sacrificed, their livers were removed, and mutant frequencies (MFs) and types of mutations were determined in the liver cII gene. DMBA significantly increased the MFs in liver for both the intact and ovariectomized rats. While there was no significant difference in MF between the ovariectomized and intact control animals, the mutation induction by DMBA in the ovariectomized groups was significantly higher than that in the intact groups. Dietary genistein did not alter these responses. Molecular analysis of the mutants showed that DMBA induced chemical-specific types of mutations in the liver cII gene. These results suggest that endogenous ovarian hormones have an inhibitory effect on liver mutagenesis by DMBA, whereas dietary genistein does not modulate spontaneous or DMBA-induced mutagenesis in either intact or ovariectomized rats.

  6. The soy-associated phytoestrogen, genistein, does not protect against alcohol induced osteoporosis in male mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol abuse acts as a risk factor for osteoporosis by increasing osteoclast activity and decreasing osteoblast activity in bone. These effects can be reversed by estradiol. Soy diets are also suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy pro...

  7. Alterations in the Rat Serum Proteome Induced by Prepubertal Exposure to Bisphenol A and Genistein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Humans are exposed to an array of chemicals via the food, drink and air, including a significant number that can mimic endogenous hormones. One such chemical is Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical that has been shown to cause developmental alterations and to predispose for mammary cancer in rodent models. In contrast, the phytochemical genistein has been reported to suppress chemically induced mammary cancer in rodents, and Asians ingesting a diet high in soy containing genistein have lower incidence of breast and prostate cancers. In this study, we sought to: (1) identify protein biomarkers of susceptibility from blood sera of rats exposed prepubertally to BPA or genistein using Isobaric Tandem Mass Tags quantitative mass spectrometry (TMT-MS) combined with MudPIT technology and, (2) explore the relevance of these proteins to carcinogenesis. Prepubertal exposures to BPA and genistein resulted in altered expression of 63 and 28 proteins in rat sera at postnatal day (PND) 21, and of 9 and 18 proteins in sera at PND35, respectively. This study demonstrates the value of using quantitative proteomic techniques to explore the effect of chemical exposure on the rat serum proteome and its potential for unraveling cellular targets altered by BPA and genistein involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:24552547

  8. A High Concentration of Genistein Induces Cell Death in Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cells by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Lysandra; Gao, Xioahua; Moore, Alicia B; Yu, Linda; Di, Xudong; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Genistein, an estrogenic, soy-derived isoflavone, may play a protective role against hormone-related cancers. We have reported that a high concentration of genistein inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human uterine smooth muscle cells, but not in leiomyoma (fibroid) cells. To better understand the differential cell death responses of normal and tumor cells to a high concentration of genistein, we treated uterine smooth muscle cells and uterine leiomyoma cells with 50 μg/ml of genistein for 72 h and 168 h, and assessed for mediators of apoptosis, cytotoxicity and autophagy. We found that leiomyoma cells had increased protection from apoptosis by expressing an increased ratio of Bcl-2: bak at 72 h and 168 h; however, in smooth muscle cells, the Bcl-2: bak ratio was decreased at 72 h, but significantly rebounded by 168 h. The apoptosis extrinsic factors, Fas ligand and Fas receptor, were highly expressed in uterine smooth muscle cells following genistein treatment at both time points as evidenced by confocal microscopy. This was not seen in the uterine leiomyoma cells; however, cytotoxicity as indicated by elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels was significantly enhanced at 168 h. Increased immunoexpression of an autophagy/autophagosome marker was also observed in the leiomyoma cells, although minimally present in smooth muscle cells at 72 h. Ultrastructurally, there was evidence of autophagic vacuoles in the leiomyoma cells; whereas, the normal smooth muscle cells showed nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. In summary, our data show differential cell death pathways induced by genistein in tumor and normal uterine smooth muscle cells, and suggest novel cell death pathways that can be targeted for preventive and intervention strategies for inhibiting fibroid tumor cell growth in vivo. PMID:27512718

  9. Overlapping but distinct effects of genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in female Sprague-Dawley rats in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, K. Barry; Weis, Constance C.; Bucci, Thomas J.; Olson, Greg; Mellick, Paul; Sadovova, Natalya; Latendresse, John R.; Thorn, Brett; Newbold, Retha R.

    2009-01-01

    Genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) were examined in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies that had different treatment intervals among generations. Sprague-Dawley rats received genistein (0, 5, 100, or 500 ppm) or EE2 (0, 2, 10, or 50 ppb) in a low phytoestrogen diet. Nonneoplastic effects in females are summarized here. Genistein at 500 ppm and EE2 at 50 ppb produced similar effects in continuously exposed rats, including decreased body weights, accelerated vaginal opening, and altered estrous cycles in young animals. At the high dose, anogenital distance was subtly affected by both compounds, and a reduction in litter size was evident in genistein-treated animals. Genistein at 500 ppm induced an early onset of aberrant cycles relative to controls in the chronic studies. EE2 significantly increased the incidence of uterine lesions (atypical focal hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia). These compound-specific effects appeared to be enhanced in the offspring of prior exposed generations. PMID:19159674

  10. Genistein as an inducer of tumor cell differentiation : possible mechanisms of action.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, A.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-01-01

    Decreased activity of either topoisomerases or tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the differentiation of a number of cell types. It is therefore conceivable that genistein, because of its reported ability to inhibit these activities in vitro, may be an inducer of cellular differentiation. We investigated this possibility in human promyelocytic HL-60 and erythroid K-562 leukemia cells and in human SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells. Our results indicated that genistein, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited cell multiplication and induced cell differentiation. The maturing HL-60 cells acquired granulocytic and monocytic markers. The differentiating K-562 cells stained positively with benzidine, which indicates the production of hemoglobin, an erythroid marker. Following genistein treatment, maturing SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells formed dendrite-like structures and exhibited increased tyrosinase activity and melanin content. Experiments were designed to identify the molecular mechanism of genistein's action. Data from our laboratory suggest that this isoflavone triggers the pathway that leads to cellular differentiation by stabilizing protein-linked DNA strand breakage. Other possible mechanisms reported in the literature are discussed.

  11. Chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of genistein, a soy isoflavone, upon cancer development and progression in preclinical animal models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hee; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Go, Ryeo-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Genistein is one of isoflavones mostly derived in a leguminous plant. It is well known as one of phytoestrogens that have structures similar to the principal mammalian estrogen. It has diverse biological functions including chemopreventive properties against cancers. Anticancer efficacies of genistein have been related with the epidemiological observations indicating that the incidence of some cancers is much lower in Asia, where diets are rich in soyfoods, than Western countries. This review deals with in vivo anticancer activities of genistein identified in animal studies being divided into its effects on carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Because animal studies have advantages in designing the experiments to suit the goals, they imply diverse information on the anticancer activity of genistein. The in vivo animal studies have adopted the specific animal models according to a developmental stage of cancer to prove the anticancer efficacies of genistein against diverse types of cancer. The numerous previous studies insist that genistein effectively inhibits carcinogenesis in the DMBA-induced animal cancer models by reducing the incidence of adenocarcinoma and cancer progression in the transgenic and xenograft animal models by suppressing the tumor growth and metastatic transition. Although the protective effect of genistein against cancer has been controversial, genistein may be a candidate for chemoprevention of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may deserve to be the central compound supporting the epidemiological evidence. PMID:25628724

  12. Genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI-YAN; XUE, HAO-GANG; CHEN, JI-YING; CHAI, WEI; NI, MING

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone that exists in the form of an aglycone. It is the primary active component in soy isoflavone and has a number of biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative). However, the specific effect of genistein on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the effect of genistein on the suppression of BMSC adipogenic differentiation and the enhancement of osteogenic potential was investigated using an MTT assay. It was observed that genistein significantly increased BMSC cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that genistein significantly inhibited the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), type I collagen (Col I) and osteocalcin (OC; P<0.01). Furthermore, 20 µm genistein significantly inhibited the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and increased the activity of triglycerides (TGs) increased (P<0.01) as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, western blotting revealed that BMSC pretreatment with 20 µm genistein significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) protein expression (P<0.01). This suggests that the downregulation of PPARγ may significantly reduce the effect of genistein on cell proliferation, suppress the expression of Runx2, Col I and OC mRNA, and reduce ALP and promote TG activity in BMSCs. Thus, the results of the present study conclude that genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human BMSCs and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, genistein may be a promising candidate drug for treatment against osteogenesis. PMID:27168816

  13. Effect of the supplementation of dietary rich phytoestrogens in altering the vitamin D levels in diet induced osteoporotic rat model.

    PubMed

    Chennaiah, S; Vijayalakshmi, V; Suresh, C

    2010-07-01

    Plant-derived estrogen-like compounds such as isoflavones (IF) especially daidzein and genistein are said to be preserving the bone in the osteoporotic conditions. However, it is not known whether a combination of IF and calcium (Ca) supplementation attenuates losses in bone mass and prevents the loss of vitamin D (VD). The present study addresses the role of phytoestrogens (PE) and Ca supplementation in low Ca and low VD diet induced osteoporosis (OSP). Cowpea (CP) which has high amount of the IF was selected to study its effect on diet induced osteoporotic conditions. Female weanling WNIN rats (total of 68) were divided into five groups and fed for five weeks on semisynthetic diet with low Ca (0.15%) and low VD (0.1IU/day/rat) in combination with low (10 mg/kg) or high (25 mg/kg) concentrations of PEs derived from CPIF. The study groups are: (I) normal Ca(0.47%) and normal VD (25IU/day/rat), (II) low Ca+low VD, (III) low Ca+low VD+low CPIF (10 mg/kg diet), (IV) low Ca+low VD+high CPIF (25 mg/kg diet) and (V) low Ca+low VD+17-(-estradiol (3.2 mg/kg diet). After the development of OSP the group II was subgrouped into: (SG I) continued on low Ca+VD, (SG II) low CPIF, (SG III) high CPIF, (SG IV) 17-beta-estradiol and (SG V) normal Ca and VD. Serum 25-VD levels were in the range of 14-38 ng/ml in groups I, III, IV and V, where as the values were very low in the group II (5.8 ng/ml). These were partially reversed upon supplementation of CPIF. The results correlated with altered Ca levels, body weight, bone mineral density and content and other related biochemical parameters. The paper further explains the possibility of protective and therapeutic role of VD in the presence of CPIF in osteoporotic health manifestations. PMID:20362669

  14. Perinatal exposure to genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, improves spatial learning and memory but impairs passive avoidance learning and memory in offspring.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Yumi; Kuwahara, Rika; Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Jojima, Takeshi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2014-05-10

    This study investigated the effects of perinatal genistein (GEN) exposure on the central nervous system of rat offspring. Pregnant dams orally received GEN (1 or 10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (1 ml/kg/day) from gestation day 10 to postnatal day 14. In order to assess the effects of GEN on rat offspring, we used a battery of behavioral tests, including the open-field, elevated plus-maze, MAZE and step-through passive avoidance tests. MAZE test is an appetite-motivation test, and we used this mainly for assessing spatial learning and memory. In the MAZE test, GEN groups exhibited shorter latency from start to goal than the vehicle-treated group in both sexes. On the other hand, performances in the step-through passive avoidance test were non-monotonically inhibited by GEN in both sexes, and a significant difference was observed in low dose of the GEN-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group in female rats. Furthermore, we found that perinatal exposure to GEN did not significantly alter locomotor activity or emotionality as assessed by the open-field and elevated-plus maze tests. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to GEN improved spatial learning and memory of rat offspring, but impaired their passive avoidance learning and memory.

  15. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M

    2014-09-01

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whether phytoestrogens promote similar effects. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocyte cultures, the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and R- and S-equol reduced rates of protein synthesis and genistein, the phytoestrogen of greatest abundance in soy, also increased rates of protein degradation. Increased expression of the ubiquitin ligase fbxo32 and autophagy-related genes was observed with high concentrations of genistein (100 μM), and R- and S-equol (100 μM) also up-regulated autophagy-related genes. In contrast, low genistein concentrations in vitro (0.01-0.10 μM) and in vivo (5 μg/g body mass) decreased fbxo32 expression, suggesting a potential metabolic benefit for low levels of genistein exposure. Phytoestrogens reduced cell proliferation, indicating that effects of phytoestrogens extend from metabolic to mitogenic processes. Co-incubation of genistein with the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182,780, ameliorated effects of genistein on protein degradation, but not protein synthesis or cell proliferation, indicating that effects of genistein are mediated through ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms. Collectively, these data warrant additional studies to determine the extent to which dietary phytoestrogens, especially genistein, affect physiological processes that impact growth and nutrient retention.

  16. Comparative effects of soy phytoestrogens and 17β-estradiol on DNA methylation of a panel of 24 genes in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Adjakly, Mawussi; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Lebert, André; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Guy, Laurent; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Major phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein have been reported to have the ability to reverse DNA methylation in cancer cell lines. The mechanism by which genistein and daidzein have an inhibiting action on DNA methylation is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soy phytoestrogens and the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2) to determine whether one of the estrogen receptors is mobilized for the action of these compounds on DNA methylation. We also made a comparative study with a DNA methylation inhibitor (5-azacytidine) and a DNA methylation activator (budesonide). Three prostate cell lines, PC-3, DU-145, and LNCaP, were treated with 40 μM genistein, 110 μM daidzein, 2 μM budesonide, 2 μM 5-azacytidine, and 10 μM E2. In these 3 human prostate cancer cell lines, we performed methylation quantification using methyl-profiler-DNA-methylation analysis. Soy phytoestrogens and E2 induced a demethylation of all the promoter regions studied except for those that were unmethylated in control cells. Our results showed that E2 induces, like soy phytoestrogen, a decrease in DNA methylation in prostate cancer cell lines. This action may be mediated through ERβ.

  17. Phytoestrogens and bone.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J J; Garner, S C

    1998-12-01

    Practically all plant foods contain small amounts of the diverse phytoestrogen molecules that have the potential to improve health. Phytoestrogens, especially the soy-derived isoflavones, are receiving great scrutiny as food supplements for the purposes of both enhancing the health of tissues and preventing several common diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers of reproductive tissues and osteoporosis. Investigations of isoflavones, in particular, have recently become more prominent because of their oestrogenic activities. These actions may be as either partial oestrogen agonists or anti-oestrogens (inhibitors of natural oestrogen activity). For example, the isoflavones of soy, mainly genistein and daidzein, have been shown by at least three different laboratories to conserve bone in ovariectomized rodent models, and they probably have similar conservatory effects in higher mammalian species. Nevertheless, the only positive effects of phytoestrogens on bone observed so far in post-menopausal women have been small and limited to the lumbar vertebrae. Additional information on human studies currently in progress is needed before the efficacy of these preparations in human subjects is known.

  18. Genotoxicity of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Stopper, H; Schmitt, E; Kobras, K

    2005-07-01

    Plant extracts containing phytohormones are very popular as 'alternative' medicine for many kinds of diseases. They are especially favored by women who enter menopause and are concerned about the side effects of hormone replacement therapy. However, adverse health effects of phytoestrogens have often been ignored. This review examines the literature on genotoxicity and apoptotic effects of phytohormones. Genistein, coumestrol, quercetin, zearalenone, and resveratrol exerted genotoxic effects in in vitro test systems. Other phytoestrogens such as lignans, the isoflavones daidzein and glycetein, anthocyanidins, and the flavonol fisetin exhibited only weak or no effects in vitro. However, some metabolites of daidzein showed a genotoxic activity in vitro. Practically all of the phytoestrogens exhibit pro-apoptotic effects in some cell systems. Further investigations regarding dose-response-relationships and other aspects relevant for extrapolation to human exposure seem necessary. Until then, care may be advised in taking concentrated phytohormones. Nevertheless, the intake of substantial amounts of plant-food in a normal diet constitutes an important, individual contribution to cancer prevention.

  19. Dietary genistein results in larger MNU-induced, estrogen-dependent mammary tumors following ovariectomy of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Allred, Clinton D; Allred, Kimberly F; Ju, Young H; Clausen, Laura M; Doerge, Daniel R; Schantz, Susan L; Korol, Donna L; Wallig, Matthew A; Helferich, William G

    2004-02-01

    endogenous estrogen environment similar to that of a postmenopausal woman, dietary genistein can stimulate the growth of a mammary carcinogen MNU-induced estrogen-dependent mammary tumors.

  20. Genistein modulates proliferation and mitochondrial functionality in breast cancer cells depending on ERalpha/ERbeta ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Blanquer-Rossello, M Mar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of developed countries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, and 17β-estradiol (E2) could have effects on the cell cycle and mitochondrial function and dynamics. Three human breast cancer cell lines with different estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) ratio were used: MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio), T47D (low ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, mitochondrial functionality, and mitochondrial dynamics parameters were analyzed. E2 and genistein treatment induced cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition in MCF-7, but not in T47D and MDA-MB-231. Moreover, genistein treatment produced an up-regulation of ERβ and a rise in cytochrome c oxidase activity in T47D cells, decreasing the ATP synthase/cytochrome c oxidase ratio. Finally, genistein treatment produced a drop in mitochondrial dynamics only in MCF-7 cells. In summary, the beneficial effects of genistein consumption depend on the ERα/ERβ ratio in breast cells. Therefore, genistein treatment produces cell cycle arrest and an improvement of mitochondrial functionality in T47D cells with a low ERα/ERβ ratio, but not in MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) ones.

  1. The enhancing effect of genistein on apoptosis induced by trichostatin A in lung cancer cells with wild type p53 genes is associated with upregulation of histone acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Pei-Ru; Liu, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2016-02-01

    Genistein has been shown to enhance the antitumor activity of trichostatin A (TSA) in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. However, whether the combined treatment exerts the same effect in other lung cancer cells is unclear. In the present study we first compared the enhancing effect of genistein on the antitumor effect of TSA in ABC-1, NCI-H460 (H460) and A549 cells. Second, we investigated whether the effects of genistein are associated with increased histone/non-histone protein acetylation. We found that the enhancing effect of genistein on cell-growth-arrest in ABC-1 cells (p53 mutant) was less than in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein enhanced TSA induced apoptosis in A549 and H460 cells rather than in ABC-1 cells. After silencing p53 expression in A549 and H460 cells, the enhancing effect of genistein was diminished. In addition, genistein increased TSA-induced histone H3/H4 acetylation in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein also increased p53 acetylation in H460 cells. The inhibitor of acetyltransferase, anacardic acid, diminished the enhancing effect of genistein on all TSA-induced histone/p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Genistein in combination with TSA increased the expression of p300 protein, an acetyltransferase, in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that genistein also enhanced the antitumor effect of genistein in A549-tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhancing effects of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells were p53-dependent and were associated with histone/non-histone protein acetylation.

  2. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage. PMID:25668145

  3. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage.

  4. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  5. Effect of Genistein on reproductive parameter and serum nitric oxide levels in morphine-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Cyrus; Ahmadi, Sharareh; Roshankhah, Shiva; Salahshoor, MohammadReza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The predominant phytoestrogen in soy and derived products is the isoflavone Genistein. Genistein has antioxidant properties. Morphine is a main psychoactive chemical in opium that can increase the generation of free radicals and therefore it could adversely affects the spermatogenesis. Objective: The main goal was to investigate whether the Genistein could protect morphine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone and nitric oxide in blood serum. Materials and Methods: In this study, various doses of Genistein (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) and Genistein plus morphine (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) were administered interaperitoneally to 48 male mice for 30 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=6) and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility and morphology), testis weight and histology, testosterone hormone (ELISA method), FSH and LH hormones (immunoradiometry) and serum nitric oxide (griess assay) were analyzed and compared. Results: The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased testosterone (0.03 ng/mg) LH and FSH level, histological parameters, count, viability (55.3%), morphology and motility of sperm cells (1%), testis weight (0.08 gr) and increase nitric oxide compared to saline group (p=0.00). However, administration of Genistein and Genistein plus morphine significantly boosted motility, morphology, count, viability of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, germinal thickness, testosterone, LH and FSH while decrease nitric oxide level in all groups compared to morphine group (p<0.025). Conclusion: It seems that Genistein administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and prevent morphine- induced adverse effects on sperm parameters. PMID:27200423

  6. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B. King, Audrey A.

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 {mu}M as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  7. Genistein genotoxicity: critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose.

    PubMed

    Klein, Catherine B; King, Audrey A

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein >5 microM as non-physiological, and thus "high" doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of "the dose defines the poison" applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein. PMID:17688899

  8. Genistein Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Increases Hepatic PPARγ in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Susutlertpanya, Warinda; Werawatganon, Duangporn; Siriviriyakul, Prasong; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become a global chronic liver disease, but no effective medicine has been proven to cure it. This study investigated the protective effects of genistein, a phytoestrogen, on NASH and examined whether it has any effect on hepatic PPARγ. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group fed ad libitum with standard rat diet, NASH group fed ad libitum with high-fat diet to induce NASH and NASH + Gen8 group and NASH + Gen16 group fed with high-fat diet plus intragastric administration of 8 or 16 mg/kg genistein once daily. After 6 weeks, liver samples were collected to determine MDA, TNF-α, PPARγ, and histopathology. The findings were that levels of hepatic MDA and TNF-α increased in NASH group, but 16 mg/kg genistein reduced these levels significantly. Downregulation of hepatic PPARγ was observed in NASH group, but genistein significantly upregulated the expression of PPARγ in both NASH + Gen groups. The histological appearance of liver in NASH group presented pathological features of steatohepatitis which were diminished in both NASH + Gen groups. The results suggest that genistein attenuates the liver histopathology of NASH with upregulation of hepatic PPARγ, reduction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26246839

  9. Comparison of the effects of melatonin and genistein on radiation-induced nephrotoxicity: Results of an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    CANYILMAZ, EMINE; USLU, GONCA HANEDAN; BAHAT, ZUMRUT; KANDAZ, MUSTAFA; MUNGAN, SEVDEGUL; HACIISLAMOGLU, EMEL; MENTESE, AHMET; YONEY, ADNAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of melatonin and genistein on radiation-induced nephrotoxicity (RIN). A total of 70 Swiss Albino mice were divided into 7 groups. Five control groups were defined, which were sham irradiation (C, G1), radiation therapy only (RT, G2), melatonin (M, G3), genistein (G, G4) and polyethylene glycol-400 (G5), respectively. The co-treatment groups were the RT plus melatonin (RT+M, G6) and RT plus genistein (RT+G, G7) groups. Irradiation was applied using a cobalt-60 teletherapy machine (80-cm fixed source-to-surface distance, 2.5-cm depth). Melatonin was administered (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) 30 min before the single dose of irradiation, whereas genistein was administered (200 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection) 1 day before the single dose of irradiation. All the mice were sacrificed 6 months after irradiation. As an end point, the extent of renal tubular atrophy for each mouse was quantified with image analysis of histological sections of the kidney. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured in each animal. In the histopathological examination of the mouse kidneys, there was a statistically significant reduction (P<0.05) in the presence of tubular atrophy between the RT+M and RT+G groups and the RT group. There was a statistically significant increase in MDA levels in the irradiated versus sham groups (RT vs. C; P<0.05); however, MDA levels were significantly decreased by co-treatment with melatonin or genistein vs. RT alone (RT+M and RT+G vs. RT; P<0.05). In conclusion, the present experimental study showed that melatonin and genistein supplementation prior to irradiation-protected mice against RIN, which may have therapeutic implications for radiation-induced injuries. PMID:26870332

  10. Phytoestrogens mediated anti-inflammatory effect through suppression of IRF-1 and pSTAT1 expressions in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak; Sanvarinda, Pimtip; Thampithak, Anusorn; Sanvarinda, Yupin

    2013-10-01

    Microglial activation has been implicated in various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and HIV encephalopathy. Phytoestrogens have been shown to be neuroprotective in neurotoxicity models; however, their effect on microglia has not been well established. In the current study, we report that the soy phytoestrogens, genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol, decreased nitric oxide (NO) production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the rat microglial cell line (HAPI). The levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression were also reduced. Transcription factors known to govern iNOS expression including interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and phosphorylated STAT1 were down regulated. These observations explain, at least in part, the inhibitory effect of phytoestrogens on NO production. The levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-6 mRNA, proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine associated with various neurological disorders, were also reduced following LPS stimulation when HAPI cells were pretreated with phytoestrogens. Hence, genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol could serve as anti-inflammatory agents and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Phytoestrogens in the environment, II: microbiological degradation of phytoestrogens and the response of fathead minnows to degradate exposure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Megan M; Fleischhacker, Nathan T; Rearick, Daniel C; Arnold, William A; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Novak, Paige J

    2014-03-01

    Phytoestrogens are endocrine active compounds derived from plants, including the isoflavones genistein and daidzein, and their methylated derivatives biochanin A and formononetin. These compounds have been detected at the µg/L level in the effluents of plant-processing industries and municipal treatment plants and at the ng/L level in surface waters worldwide. The present study assessed the persistence of genistein and daidzein in natural aquatic systems, specifically riverine samples. Initial concentration, temperature, sample location, and time of sample collection varied. Genistein and daidzein were found to be readily biodegradable at all tested concentrations, at both 10 °C and 20 °C, in samples collected during different seasons, and in samples from 3 different rivers. In addition, organismal responses in larval and sexually mature fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were quantified following exposure to microbiologically degraded phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, and formononetin). Products of the microbiological degradation of parent phytoestrogens did not affect larval survival, growth, or predator avoidance. Female adult fathead minnows exposed to these degradation products produced significantly fewer eggs than those exposed to a control, but no other morphological, physiological, or behavioral changes were observed with male or female minnows. The present research suggests that although phytoestrogens are not likely to persist in aquatic systems, they may pseudo-persist if discharges are continuous; in addition, caution should be exercised with respect to high-concentration effluents because of the potentially antiestrogenic effects of phytoestrogen degradates.

  12. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  13. Roles of Dietary Phytoestrogens on the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Diverse Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geum-A.; Hwang, Kyung-A.; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in tumor progression. The cells undergoing EMT upregulate the expression of cell motility-related proteins and show enhanced migration and invasion. The hallmarks of EMT in cancer cells include changed cell morphology and increased metastatic capabilities in cell migration and invasion. Therefore, prevention of EMT is an important tool for the inhibition of tumor metastasis. A novel preventive therapy is needed, such as treatment of natural dietary substances that are nontoxic to normal human cells, but effective in inhibiting cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, such as genistein, resveratrol, kaempferol and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), can be raised as possible candidates. They are plant-derived dietary estrogens, which are found in tea, vegetables and fruits, and are known to have various biological efficacies, including chemopreventive activity against cancers. Specifically, these phytoestrogens may induce not only anti-proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also anti-metastasis by inhibiting the EMT process in various cancer cells. There have been several signaling pathways found to be associated with the induction of the EMT process in cancer cells. Phytoestrogens were demonstrated to have chemopreventive effects on cancer metastasis by inhibiting EMT-associated pathways, such as Notch-1 and TGF-beta signaling. As a result, phytoestrogens can inhibit or reverse the EMT process by upregulating the expression of epithelial phenotypes, including E-cadherin, and downregulating the expression of mesenchymal phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Snail, Slug, and vimentin. In this review, we focused on the important roles of phytoestrogens in inhibiting EMT in many types of cancer and suggested phytoestrogens as prominent alternative compounds to chemotherapy. PMID:27231938

  14. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer.

  15. Behavioral changes in fish exposed to phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Rodriguez, Alison C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the behavioral effects of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish, Betta splendens. Adult fish were exposed to a range of concentrations of genistein, equol, beta-sitosterol, and the positive control 17beta-estradiol. The following behaviors were measured: spontaneous swimming activity, latency to respond to a perceived intruder (mirror reflection), intensity of aggressive response toward a perceived intruder, probability of constructing a nest in the presence of a female, and the size of the nest constructed. We found few changes in spontaneous swimming activity, the latency to respond to the mirror, and nest size, and modest changes in the probability of constructing a nest. There were significant decreases, however, in the intensity of aggressive behavior toward the mirror following exposure to several concentrations, including environmentally relevant ones, of 17beta-estradiol, genistein, and equol. This suggests that phytoestrogen contamination has the potential to significantly affect the behavior of free-living fishes.

  16. Behavioral changes in fish exposed to phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Rodriguez, Alison C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the behavioral effects of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish, Betta splendens. Adult fish were exposed to a range of concentrations of genistein, equol, beta-sitosterol, and the positive control 17beta-estradiol. The following behaviors were measured: spontaneous swimming activity, latency to respond to a perceived intruder (mirror reflection), intensity of aggressive response toward a perceived intruder, probability of constructing a nest in the presence of a female, and the size of the nest constructed. We found few changes in spontaneous swimming activity, the latency to respond to the mirror, and nest size, and modest changes in the probability of constructing a nest. There were significant decreases, however, in the intensity of aggressive behavior toward the mirror following exposure to several concentrations, including environmentally relevant ones, of 17beta-estradiol, genistein, and equol. This suggests that phytoestrogen contamination has the potential to significantly affect the behavior of free-living fishes. PMID:16584819

  17. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  18. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  19. Genistein reduces tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 transcription but not urokinase expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Vermeer, M; Koolwijk, P; Grimbergen, J; Kooistra, T

    1994-11-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 is markedly elevated in vivo and in vitro upon exposure to the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Here we report that the isoflavone compound genistein prevents the increase in synthesis of PAI-1 induced by these inflammatory mediators in human endothelial cells in vitro, and partially reduces the basal PAI-1 production by these cells. These effects of genistein were accompanied by a decrease in PAI-1 mRNA and in a suppression of the PAI-1 transcription rate as shown by run-on assay. A specific action of genistein, probably by inhibiting a tyrosine protein kinase, is likely, because the structural genistein analogue daidzein, which has a low tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor activity, did not inhibit PAI-1 synthesis. Vanadate, a tyrosine protein phosphatase inhibitor, increased PAI-1 production. The effect of genistein on PAI-1 synthesis was rather selective. Herbimycin A also reduced PAI-1 synthesis, but several other tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors, namely tyrphostin A47, methyl-2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate, and compound 5, were unable to do so. All these tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors reduced basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in endothelial cells. This indicates that the effect of genistein on PAI-1 transcription proceeds independently of its effect on mitogenesis. In contrast to TNF-alpha-induced PAI-1 production, the transcription and synthesis of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was not inhibited by genistein. A TNF-alpha-mutant (Trp32Thr86TNF alpha) that specifically recognizes the 55-kD TNF-receptor, mimicked the effects of TNF alpha on both PAI-1 and u-PA. Because genistein affected PAI-1, but not u-PA induced by this mutant, involvement of different TNF-receptors cannot underlie the difference in the effects of genistein on PAI-1 and u-PA synthesis. Because genistein also

  20. Ameliorative effect of dietary genistein on diabetes induced hyper-inflammation and oxidative stress during early stage of wound healing in alloxan induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyeyoon; Lee, Hea-Ji; Lim, Yunsook

    2016-09-23

    Among the diabetic complications, diabetic foot ulcer due to delayed wound healing is one of the most significant clinical problems. Early inflammatory stage is important for better prognosis during wound healing. Thus, regulation of inflammatory response during early stage of wound healing is main target for complete cutaneous recovery. This study investigated the role of genistein supplementation in inflammation and oxidative stress, which are related to NLRP3 inflammasome, NFκB and Nrf2 activation, during cutaneous wound healing in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Mice with diabetes with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels > 250 mg/dl were fed diets with AIN-93G rodent diet containing 0%, 0.025% (LG) or 0.1% (HG) genistein. After 2 weeks of genistein supplementation, excisional wounds were made by biopsy punches (4 mm). Genistein supplementation improved fasting glucose levels and wound closure rate. Moreover, genistein supplementation restored NLRP3 inflammasome (NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1) at the basal level and ameliorated both inflammation (TNFα, iNOS, COX2 and NFκB) and antioxidant defense system (Nrf2, HO-1, GPx, and catalase) during early stage of wound healing in diabetic mice. Taken together, genistein supplementation would be a potential therapeutic nutrient in prevention and treatment of delayed wound healing by modulation of inflammation and oxidative stress during inflammatory stage.

  1. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. PMID:27235295

  2. Induction of apoptotic cell death by phytoestrogens by up-regulating the levels of phospho-p53 and p21 in normal and malignant estrogen receptor α-negative breast cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ju, Ji-Hyun; Jang, Kibeom; Shin, Incheol

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism by which phytoestrogens suppress the growth of normal (MCF-10A) and malignant (MDA-MB-231) estrogen receptor α (ERα)-negative breast cells. We hypothesized that phytoestrogen inhibits the proliferation of ERα-negative breast cancer cells. We found that all tested phytoestrogens (genistein, apigenin, and quercetin) suppressed the growth of both MCF-10A and MDA-MB-231 cells, as revealed by proliferation assays. These results were accompanied by an increase in the sub-G0/G1 apoptotic fractions as well as an increase in the cell population in the G2/M phase in both cell types, as revealed by cell cycle analysis. When we assessed the effect of phytoestrogens on the level of intracellular signaling molecules by Western blot analysis, we found that phytoestrogens increased the level of active p53 (phospho-p53) without changing the p53 level in both MCF-10A and MDA-MB-231 cells. Phytoestrogens also induced an increase in p21, a p53 target gene, and a decrease in either Bcl-xL or cyclin B1 in both cell types. In contrast, the protein levels of phosphatase and tensin homolog, cyclin D1, cell division control protein 2 homolog, phospho-cell division control protein 2 homolog, and p27 were not changed after phytoestrogen treatment. Our data indicate that phytoestrogens induce apoptotic cell death of ERα-negative breast cancer cells via p53-dependent pathway and suggest that phytoestrogens may be promising agents in the treatment and prevention of ERα-negative breast cancer.

  3. Differential Effects of Genistein on Prostate Cancer Cells Depend on Mutational Status of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Abeer M.; Zhu, Tian; Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Yang, Wancai; Saleem, Mohammad; Bosland, Maarten C.

    2013-01-01

    Blocking the androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent) activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A) mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L) stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy. PMID:24167630

  4. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Abeer M; Zhu, Tian; Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Yang, Wancai; Saleem, Mohammad; Bosland, Maarten C

    2013-01-01

    Blocking the androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent) activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A) mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L) stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  5. Genistein suppresses proliferation and MET oncogene expression and induces EGR-1 tumor suppressor expression in immortalized human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singletary, Keith; Ellington, Allison

    2006-01-01

    Higher soy food intake has been hypothesized to be a major factor explaining the decreased breast cancer risk in Asian countries, compared to those regions of the world consuming predominantly Western-style diets. Consumption of soy isoflavones, particularly genistein, has received considerable attention as the soy component largely responsible for the protective effects hypothesized to result from soy food consumption. However, the impact of adult consumption of soy foods on breast cancer risk in pre-menopausal and menopausal women is not consistent. There are recent epidemiological reports that consumption of soy foods can most effectively reduce breast cancer risk when consumed early in life during the pre-pubertal or adolescent periods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of physiologically-relevant levels of genistein (0.5 microM and 1 microM), concentrations achievable in the plasma following soy food consumption, on proliferation and expression of select genes in the human breast epithelial cell model. Treatment of the non-neoplastic, immortalized human breast epithelial MCF-10F cells with these low concentrations of genistein was associated with decreased cell proliferation, down-regulation of the protooncogene MET, up-regulation of the breast tumor suppressor gene EGR-1, and up-regulation of the immediate-early response genes FOS and JUN. In addition, genistein treatment was associated with a significant increase in Egr-1 binding to the transcription factor Sp1. Taken together, these genistein-induced changes in gene expressions provide insights into potential mechanisms by which this isoflavone may protect human breast cells against neoplastic transformation. PMID:16619504

  6. Anticarcinogenic Effects of Dietary Phytoestrogens and Their Chemopreventive Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are phenolic compounds derived from plants and exert an estrogenic as well as an antiestrogenic effect and also various biological efficacies. Chemopreventive properties of phytoestrogens has emerged from epidemiological observations indicating that the incidence of some cancers including breast and prostate cancers is much lower in Asian people, who consume significantly higher amounts of phytoestrogens than Western people. There are 4 main classes of phytoestrogens: isoflavones, stilbenes, coumestans, and lignans. Currently, resveratrol is recognized as another major phytoestrogen present in grape and red wine and has been studied in many biological studies. Phytoestrogens have biologically diverse profitabilities and advantages such as low cytotoxicity to patients, lack of side effects in clinical trials, and pronounced benefits in a combined therapy. In this review, we highlighted the effects of genistein, daidzein, and resveratrol in relation with their anticarcinogenic activity. A lot of in vitro and in vivo results on their chemopreventive properties were presented along with the underlying mechanisms. Besides well-known mechanisms such as antioxidant property and apoptosis, newly elucidated anticarcinogenic modes of action including epigenetic modifications and topoisomerase inhibition have been provided to examine the possibility of phytoestrogens as promising reagents for cancer chemoprevention and/or treatment and to suggest the importance of plant-based diet of phytoestrogens.

  7. Prepubertal Exposure to Genistein Alleviates Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate Induced Testicular Oxidative Stress in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lian-Dong; Li, He-Cheng; Chong, Tie; Gao, Ming; Yin, Jian; Fu, De-Lai; Deng, Qian; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most widely used plastizer in the world and can suppress testosterone production via activation of oxidative stress. Genistein (GEN) is one of the isoflavones ingredients exhibiting weak estrogenic and potentially antioxidative effects. However, study on reproductive effects following prepubertal multiple endocrine disrupters exposure has been lacking. In this study, DEHP and GEN were administrated to prepubertal male Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage from postnatal day 22 (PND22) to PND35 with vehicle control, GEN at 50 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day (G), DEHP at 50, 150, 450 mg/kg bw/day (D50, D150, D450) and their mixture (G + D50, G + D150, G + D450). On PND90, general morphometry (body weight, AGD, organ weight, and organ coefficient), testicular redox state, and testicular histology were studied. Our results indicated that DEHP could significantly decrease sex organs weight, organ coefficient, and testicular antioxidative ability, which largely depended on the dose of DEHP. However, coadministration of GEN could partially alleviate DEHP-induced reproductive injuries via enhancement of testicular antioxidative enzymes activities, which indicates that GEN has protective effects on DEHP-induced male reproductive system damage after prepubertal exposure and GEN may have promising future in its curative antioxidative role for reproductive disorders caused by other environmental endocrine disruptors. PMID:25530965

  8. Genistein decreases cellular redox potential, partially suppresses cell growth in HL-60 leukemia cells and sensitizes cells to γ-radiation-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    KIM, IN GYU; KIM, JIN SIK; LEE, JAE HA; CHO, EUN WIE

    2014-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the cellular activity of genistein, based on biological experiments and epidemiological studies. The present study demonstrated that genistein inhibited the expression of cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (cICDH), thus increasing levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human promyeloid leukemia HL-60 cells. In genistein-treated cells, the cellular redox potential (GSH/GSSG) was significantly decreased. This decrease in redox potential was caused by significant downregulation of the cICDH gene, generating the reducing equivalents (NADPH) for maintenance of cellular redox potential and cellular ROS level, which may regulate cell growth and cell death. Genistein-induced ROS partially induced rapid transition into the G2/M phase by upregulation of p21wap1/cip1 and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known antioxidant (ROS scavenger), not only partially restored cell growth and inhibited cell cycle arrest in G2/M, but also prevented apoptotic cell death. By contrast, normal lymphocytes did not significantly progress into the G2/M phase and radiation-induced cell death was inhibited by genistein treatment. Therefore, genistein and γ-irradiation together synergistically cause cell death in leukemia cells, however, genistein has a radioprotective effect in normal human lymphocytes. In conclusion, it was suggested that genistein selectively functions, not as an antioxidant, but as a pro-oxidant in HL-60 cells. This property can increase ionizing radiation-induced cell cycle arrest and sensitivity to apoptotic cell death in human promyeloid leukemia HL-60 cells, but does not cause significant damage to normal cells. PMID:25310747

  9. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein induces the detachment of rotavirus particles from the cell surface.

    PubMed

    López, Tomás; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses are a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young infants. In this work we evaluated the potential role of protein tyrosine kinases on rotavirus infectivity and viral progeny production. From the broad-spectrum inhibitors tested, only genistein, a flavonoid, inhibited rotavirus infectivity. The inhibition observed was dose and strain dependent, with more than 10-fold IC50 differences for some rotavirus strains, and the effect of the drug was shown to be dependent of their activity as a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, since the inactive analogue of genistein, daidzein, had no effect on virus infection. Investigation of the stage of virus replication blocked by the drug showed that it interferes with the early interactions of the virus with receptors and/or co-receptors, since treatment of the cells with genistein promoted the detachment of the virus from the cell surface.

  10. Genistein treatment increases bone mass in obese, hyperglycemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Richard M; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Broderick, Tom L; Plochocki, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with elevated risk of limb bone fracture. Incidences of these conditions are on the rise worldwide. Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been shown by several studies to demonstrate bone-protective properties and may improve bone health in obese type 2 diabetics. Methods In this study, we test the effects of genistein treatment on limb bone and growth plate cartilage histomorphometry in obese, hyperglycemic ob/ob mice. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were divided into control and genistein-treated groups. Genistein-treated mice were fed a diet containing 600 mg genistein/kg for a period of 4 weeks. Cross-sectional geometric and histomorphometric analyses were conducted on tibias. Results Genistein-treated mice remained obese and hyperglycemic. However, histomorphometric comparisons show that genistein-treated mice have greater tibial midshaft diameters and ratios of cortical bone to total tissue area than the controls. Genistein-treated mice also exhibit decreased growth plate thickness of the proximal tibia. Conclusion Our results indicate that genistein treatment affects bone of the tibial midshaft in the ob/ob mouse, independent of improvements in the hyperglycemic state and body weight. PMID:27042131

  11. Methylation profile and amplification of proto-oncogenes in rat pancreas induced with phytoestrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn-Cook, B.D.; Blann, E.; Bo, J.

    1995-01-01

    Specific gene hypermethylation has been shown in DNA from neonatal rats exposed to the phytoestrogens, coumestrol, and equol. The pancreas is an organ in which estrogen receptors have been shown to be present. Studies have correlated the development of acute pancreatitis with rising levels of human estrogen binding proteins. Neonatal rats were dosed with 10 or 100 {mu}g of coumestrol or equol on postnatal day (PND) 1-10. The animals were sacrificed at Day 15. The pancreas was excised and pancreatic acinar cells isolated for molecular analysis. DNA was isolated from the cells by lysis in TEN-9 buffer supplemented with proteinase K and 0.1% SDS. High molecular weight (HMW) DNA was digested with the methylated DNA specific restriction enzymes, Hpa II and Msp I, for determination of methylation profiles. Both coumestrol and equol at high doses caused hypermethylation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene. No hypermethylation or hypomethylation was observed in the proto-oncogenes, c-myc or c-fos. Methylation is thought to be an epigenetic mechanism involved in the activation (hypomethylation) or inactivation (hypermethylation) of cellular genes which are known to play a role in carcinogenesis. Epidemiology studies have shown that equol may have anti-carcinogenic effects on some hormone-dependent cancers. Additional studies are needed to further understand the role of phytoestrogens and methylation in relation to pancreatic disorders. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Hypospadias and maternal intake of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Suzan L; Cogswell, Mary E; Ma, Chen; Gonzalez-Feliciano, Amparo; Olney, Richard S; Correa, Adolfo; Shaw, Gary M

    2013-08-01

    Experimental data indicate that gestational exposures to estrogenic compounds impact risk of hypospadias. We examined whether risk of hypospadias (i.e., a congenital malformation in which the opening of the penile urethra occurs on the ventral side of the penis) was associated with maternal intake of phytoestrogens, given their potential impact on estrogen metabolism. The analysis included data on mothers of 1,250 hypospadias cases and 3,118 controls who delivered their infants from 1997 to 2005 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multistate, population-based, case-control study. After adjustment for several covariates, high intakes of daidzein, genistein, glycetin, secoisolariciresinol, total isoflavones, total lignans, and total phytoestrogens were associated with reduced risks; odds ratios comparing intakes ≥90th percentile with intakes between the 11th and 89th percentiles ranged from 0.6 to 0.8. For example, the odds ratio for total phytoestrogen intake was 0.7 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 1.0). This study represents the first large-scale analysis of phytoestrogen intake and hypospadias. The observed associations merit investigation in additional populations before firm conclusions can be reached.

  13. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C.; Lee, Lai S.; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0–1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  14. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C; Lee, Lai S; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0-1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  15. Phytoestrogens Activate the Estrogen Receptor in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lynne A

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are popular alternatives to estrogen therapy however their effects on hemostasis in postmenopausal women are unknown. This chapter describes a protocol to determine the effect of the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein and equol, on the expression of key genes from the hemostatic system in human hepatocyte cell models and to determine the role of estrogen receptors in mediating any response seen using in vitro culture systems and Taqman(®) gene expression analysis. PMID:26585156

  16. Phytoestrogens Activate the Estrogen Receptor in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lynne A

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are popular alternatives to estrogen therapy however their effects on hemostasis in postmenopausal women are unknown. This chapter describes a protocol to determine the effect of the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein and equol, on the expression of key genes from the hemostatic system in human hepatocyte cell models and to determine the role of estrogen receptors in mediating any response seen using in vitro culture systems and Taqman(®) gene expression analysis.

  17. Phytoestrogens in the environment, I: occurrence and exposure effects on fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Rearick, Daniel C; Fleischhacker, Nathan T; Kelly, Megan M; Arnold, William A; Novak, Paige J; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2014-03-01

    Naturally occurring phytoestrogens may mimic biogenic estrogens and modulate endocrine action in vertebrates. Little is known, however, about their temporal and spatial variability in the environment and the biological effects associated with exposures. The present study assessed the environmental presence of phytoestrogens in human-impacted and relatively pristine areas. The response in larval and sexually mature fathead minnows to environmentally relevant concentrations of 3 common phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, and formononetin), both singly and in mixture, was also quantified. Phytoestrogens were only present in the human-impacted surface waters. When detected, mean concentrations were low (± standard deviation) in an urban lake: 1.4 ± 0.5 ng/L, 1.6 ± 0.7 ng/L, and 1.1 ± 0.2 ng/L for genistein, daidzein, and formononetin, respectively, and in treated wastewater effluent: 1.6 ± 0.4 ng/L, 1.8 ± 1.3 ng/L, and 2.0 ng/L. Biochanin A was detected twice, whereas zearalenone and coumestrol were never detected. No clear temporal trends of aqueous phytoestrogen concentration were evident. Larval survival was significantly reduced in genistein, formononetin, and mixture treatments, whereas adult male fish only exhibited subtle changes to their anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Daidzein-exposed adult females produced greater quantities of eggs. The present study indicates that genistein, daidzein, and formononetin are likely attenuated rapidly and are unlikely to cause widespread ecological harm in the absence of other stressors.

  18. Apoptosis induced by 7-difluoromethoxyl-5,4'-di-n-octyl genistein via the inactivation of FoxM1 in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yingxia; Li, Qingxiu; Xiang, Honglin; Liu, Fei; Cao, Jianguo

    2012-06-01

    Genistein, 5,7,4'-trihydroxylisoflavone, a major component of soybean products, has been reported to possess anticancer activities. We examined the antitumor effects of 7-difluoromethoxyl-5,4'-di-n-octylgenistein (DFOG), a novel synthetic genistein derivative, on human ovarian cancer cells as well as the molecular mechanism. The growth-inhibitory effects of genistein and DFOG were determined using MTT assay and clonogenic assay in CoC1 and SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells. Apoptotic activities of DFOG were observed using histone/DNA ELISA assay and flow cytometry with propidium iodide (PI) staining. Multiple molecular techniques, such as RT-PCR, western blot analysis, siRNA and cDNA transfection were used to explore the molecular mechanism. We demonstrated that nine of the genistein derivatives had a more effective antitumor activity than genistein. Among the afore-mentioned derivatives, DFOG presented with the strongest activity against CoC1 and SKOV3 cells in vitro. DFOG and genistein inhibited the growth of CoC1 and SKOV3 cells, accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. DFOG caused apoptotic cell death with concomitant attenuation of Forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) and its downstream genes, such as survivin, cdc25B, cyclin B, and increased p27KIP1. Downregulation of FoxM1 by siRNA followed by DFOG treatment resulted in enhanced cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Upregulation of FoxM1 by cDNA transfection attenuated DFOG-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death. Our results show that the molecular role of FoxM1 in mediating the biological effects of DFOG and genistein in human ovarian cancer cells suggests that FoxM1 could be a novel target for the treatment of human ovarian cancer.

  19. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay. Phase 2: dietary phytoestrogen analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Owens, William; Ashby, John; Odum, Jenny; Onyon, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    Many commercial laboratory diets have detectable levels of isoflavones (e.g., phytoestrogens such as genistein [GN]) that have weak estrogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. During validation studies of the uterotrophic bioassay, diet samples from 20 participating laboratories were collected and analyzed for three major phytoestrogens: GN, daidzein (DN), and coumestrol (CM). Soy phytoestrogens GN and DN were found at total phytoestrogen levels from 100 to 540 microg/g laboratory diet; a forage phytoestrogen, CM, ranged from nondetectable to 4 microg/g laboratory diet. The phytoestrogen levels were compared with both baseline uterine weights of the control groups and with the relative uterine weight increase of groups administered two weak estrogen agonists: bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP). The comparison uses a working assumption of additivity among the phytoestrogens, despite several significant qualifications to this assumption, to estimate total genistein equivalents (TGE). Some evidence was found that phytoestrogen levels in the diet > 325-350 microg/g TGE could diminish the responsiveness of the uterotrophic bioassay to weak agonists. This was especially true for the case of the intact, immature female version of the uterotrophic bioassay, where higher food consumption relative to body weight leads to higher intakes of dietary phytoestrogens versus ovariectomized adults. This dietary level is sufficient in the immature female to approach a biological lowest observable effect level for GN of 40-50 mg/kg/day. These same data, however, show that low to moderate levels of dietary phytoestrogens do not substantially affect the responsiveness of the assay with weak estrogen receptor agonists such as NP and BPA. Therefore, laboratories conducting the uterotrophic bioassay for either research or regulatory purposes may routinely use diets containing levels of phytoestrogens < 325-350 microg/g TGE without impairing the responsiveness of the bioassay. PMID

  20. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  1. Genistein modulates the expression of NF-κB and MAPK (p-38 and ERK1/2), thereby attenuating D-Galactosamine induced fulminant hepatic failure in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ganai, Ajaz A. Khan, Athar A. Malik, Zainul A. Farooqi, Humaira

    2015-03-01

    Genistein is an isoflavanoid abundantly found in soy. It has been found to play an important role in the prevention of various chronic diseases including cancer. In this study, we evaluated potential therapeutic properties of Genistein against D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced inflammation and hepatotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW). Genistein (5 mg/kgBW/day) was given as pre-treatment for 30 days via intra-gastric route followed by D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW) injection. The hepatoprotective and curative effects of Genistein were evident from a significant decrease in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels as well as prevention of histological damage by pre-treatment of Genistein. Genistein pre-treatment significantly inhibited the increased protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), thereby reducing nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE) levels, respectively. In addition Genistein significantly suppressed the production of D-GalN-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. These inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) activation, IKKα/β and Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation by Genistein in D-GalN-treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that Genistein may serve as a potential supplement in the prevention of hepatic and inflammatory diseases. Furthermore Genistein is able to maintain the redox potential and strengthens the antioxidant defense system of a cell. - Highlights: • First study to evaluate hepatoprotective effect of Genistein against D-GalN • Genistein prevents oxidative damage induced by D-GalN. • Genistein blunts iNOS, COX-2, NF-ĸB, IKKα/β and MAPK expression. • Genistein prevents D-GalN induced apoptosis and

  2. Phytoestrogens and their effects.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2014-10-15

    The chemical structure, classification, source, metabolism, physiological and health effects of plant phytoestrogens and mechanisms of their action are reviewed. The available knowledge suggests that phytoestrogens can affect a number of physiological and pathological processes related to reproduction, bone remodeling, skin, cardiovascular, nervous, immune systems and metabolism. Due to these effects, phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing diet can be useful for the prevention and treatment of menopausal symptoms, skin aging, osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, immune and metabolic diseases. Possible problems in understanding and application of phytoestrogens (multiple targets and multiple estrogen receptor -dependent and -independent mechanisms of action, the discrepancy between the results of experimental and clinical studies, adequate source of phytoestrogen) have been discussed.

  3. Genistein inhibits phorbol ester-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and COX-2 expression by blocking the phosphorylation of p65/RelA in human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Do-Hee; Na, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Ha-Na; Haegeman, Guy; Surh, Young-Joon

    2014-10-01

    Genistein, an isoflavone present in soy products, has chemopreventive effects on mammary carcinogenesis. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of genistein on phorbol ester-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Pretreatment of cultured human breast epithelial (MCF10A) cells with genistein reduced COX-2 expression induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). There are multiple lines of evidence supporting that the induction of COX-2 is regulated by the eukaryotic transcription factor NF-κB. Genistein failed to inhibit TPA-induced nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB as well as degradation of IκB. However, genistein abrogated the TPA-induced transcriptional activity of NF-κB as determined by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Genistein inhibited phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and its interaction with cAMP regulatory element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and TATA-binding protein (TBP). TPA-induced NF-κB phosphorylation was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Likewise, pharmacologic inhibition or dominant negative mutation of ERK suppressed phosphorylation of p65. The above findings, taken together, suggest that genistein inhibits TPA-induced COX-2 expression in MCF10A cells by blocking ERK-mediated phosphorylation of p65 and its subsequent interaction with CBP and TBP.

  4. Phytoestrogens and avian reproduction: Exploring the evolution and function of phytoestrogens and possible role of plant compounds in the breeding ecology of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Rochester, Johanna R; Millam, James R

    2009-11-01

    Phytoestrogens are secondary plant compounds, which can act to mimic estrogen and cause the disruption of estrogenic responses in organisms. Although there is a substantial body of research studying phytoestrogens, including their mechanisms of estrogenic effects, evolution, and detection in biological systems, little is known about their ecological significance. There is evidence, however, that an ecological relationship involving phytoestrogens exists between plants and animals-plants may produce phytoestrogens to reduce fecundity of organisms that eat them. Birds and other vertebrates may also exploit phytoestrogens to regulate their own reproduction-there are well known examples of phytoestrogens inhibiting reproduction in higher vertebrates, including birds. Also, common plant stressors (e.g., high temperature) increase the production of secondary plant compounds, and, as evidence suggests, also induce phytoestrogen biosynthesis. These observations are consistent with the single study ever done on phytoestrogens and reproduction in wild birds [Leopold, A.S., Erwin, M., Oh, J., Browning, B., 1976. Phytoestrogens adverse effects on reproduction in California quail. Science 191, 98-100.], which found that drought stress correlated with increased levels of phytoestrogens in plants, and that increased phytoestrogen levels correlated with decreased young. This review discusses the hypothesis that plants may have an effect on the reproduction of avian species by producing phytoestrogens as a plant defense against herbivory, and that birds may "use" changing levels of phytoestrogens in the vegetation to ensure that food resources will support potential young produced. Evidence from our laboratory and others appear to support this hypothesis.

  5. Dietary phytoestrogens present in soy dramatically increase cardiotoxicity in male mice receiving a chemotherapeutic tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pamela Ann; Leinwand, Leslie Anne

    2015-01-01

    Use of soy supplements to inhibit cancer cell growth is increasing among patients due to the perception that phytoestrogens in soy inhibit carcinogenesis via induction of apoptosis. Genistein, the most prevalent phytoestrogen in soy, is a potent endocrine disruptor and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that causes apoptosis in many cells types. Chemotherapeutic TKIs limit cancer cell growth via the same mechanisms. However, TKIs such as Sunitinib cause cardiotoxicity in a significant number of patients. Molecular interactions between Sunitinib and dietary TKIs like genistein have not been examined in cardiomyocytes. Significant lethality occurred in mice treated with Sunitinib and fed a phytoestrogen-supplemented diet. Isolated cardiomyocytes co-treated with genistein and Sunitinib exhibited additive inhibition of signaling molecules important for normal cardiac function and increased apoptosis compared with Sunitinib alone. Thus, dietary soy supplementation should be avoided during administration of Sunitinib due to exacerbated cardiotoxicity, despite evidence for positive effects in cancer.

  6. Urinary phytoestrogens in relation to metabolic disturbances among children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna C; Kantaria, Khyati; Beydoun, Hind A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have examined whether phytoestrogens affect glucose and lipid metabolism. However, data on children and adolescents are still limited, with most of the evidence pertaining to one phytoestrogen, namely genistein. To investigate the effect of six phytoestrogens [daidezin, enterodiol, enterolactone, equol, genistein and O-Desmethylangolensin (O-DMA)] on metabolic disturbances among youths, a cross-sectional study was conducted using a sample of 2,429 children and adolescents, 6-18 years, from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The main outcome measures were body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC), fasting glucose, triglycerides and glycohemoglobin. SBP was inversely related to enterolactone and equol. Triglycerides were inversely related to daidezin, equol, genistein and O-DMA. Whereas TC and LDL-C were inversely related to equol, an HDL-C was inversely related to genistein and O-DMA. Whereas fasting glucose was associated with enterodiol (β = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.028, 0.63), a positive relationship was observed between enterodiol and risk of HDL-C ≥ 35 mg dl(-1) (β = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.07). In conclusion, certain phytoestrogens may contribute either positively or negatively to disturbances in lipid and glucose metabolism. Large prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm our study findings.

  7. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether estradiol (E2) or the primary soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile rainbow trout (5 mon, 65.8 ± 1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, gen...

  8. Profiles of phytoestrogens in human urine from several Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Isobe, Tomohiko; Aldous, Kenneth M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2010-09-01

    Intake of a diet rich in phytoestrogens has been associated with a decreased risk for hormone-dependent cancers in humans. Biomonitoring of phytoestrogens in human urine has been used to assess the intake of phytoestrogens. Although studies have reported phytoestrogen levels in urine specimens from the United States and Japan, little is known of human intake of phytoestrogens in other Asian countries. In this study we determined the concentrations of seven phytoestrogens, namely, enterolactone, enterodiol, daidzein, equol, O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA), genistein, and coumestrol, in 199 human urine samples from three Asian countries, Vietnam (Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh), Cambodia (Phnom Penh), and India (Chennai and Kolkata), using a simple, sensitive, and reliable liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method. The residue levels of phytoestrogens in urine samples from the three Asian countries were compared with the concentrations in 26 urine samples from Japan (Ehime) and 16 urine samples from the United States (Albany), analyzed in this study. Among the phytoestrogens analyzed, isoflavones such as daidzein and genistein were predominant in urine samples from Vietnam; samples from Cambodia and India contained higher concentrations of enterolactone than isoflavones. Urinary concentrations of isoflavones in samples from Hanoi, Vietnam, were notably higher than the concentrations in samples from Cambodia, India, and the United States and similar to the concentrations in samples from Japan. The lowest concentrations of daidzein and the highest concentrations of enterolactone were found in urine samples from India. Concentrations of equol and O-DMA, which are microbial transformation products of daidzein (produced by gut microflora), were notably high in urine samples from Hanoi, Vietnam. The ratios of the concentration of equol or O-DMA to that of daidzein were significantly higher in samples from Hanoi than from Japan, indicating high

  9. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury with EUK-207 and Genistein: Effects in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, J.; Jelveh, S.; Zaidi, A.; Doctrow, S. R.; Hill, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of civilian populations to radiation due to accident, war or terrorist act is an increasing concern. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs that may be affected in people receiving partial-body irradiation and radiation injury in lung is thought to be associated with the development of a prolonged inflammatory response. Here we examined how effectively damage to the lung can be mitigated by administration of drugs initiated at different times after radiation exposure and examined response in adolescent animals for comparison with the young adult animals that we had studied previously. We studied the mitigation efficacy of the isoflavone genistein (50 mg/kg) and the salen-Mn superoxide dismutase-catalase mimetic EUK-207 (8 mg/kg), both of which have been reported to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reduce activity of the NFkB pathway. The drugs were given by subcutaneous injection to 6- to 7-week-old Fisher rats daily starting either immediately or 2 weeks after irradiation with 12 Gy to the whole thorax. The treatment was stopped at 28 weeks post irradiation and the animals were assessed for levels of inflammatory cytokines, activated macrophages, oxidative damage and fibrosis at 48 weeks post irradiation. We demonstrated that both genistein and EUK-207 delayed and suppressed the increased breathing rate associated with pneumonitis. These agents also reduced levels of oxidative damage (50–100%), levels of TGF-β1 expression (75–100%), activated macrophages (20–60%) and fibrosis (60–80%). The adolescent rats developed pneumonitis earlier following irradiation of the lung than did the adult rats leading to greater severe morbidity requiring euthanasia (~37% in adolescents vs. ~10% in young adults) but the extent of the mitigation of the damage was similar or slightly greater. PMID:23237541

  10. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M; Manor, Meghan L

    2015-04-01

    This study determined whether estradiol (E2) or the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile fish (5 mon, 65.8±1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, genistein, or daidzein (5 μg/g body weight) or a higher dose of genistein (50 μg/g body weight). Liver and white muscle were harvested 24h post-injection. In liver, expression of vitellogenin (vtg) and estrogen receptor alpha (era1) increased in all treatments and reflected treatment estrogenicity (E2>genistein (50 μg/g)>genistein (5 μg/g)=daidzein (5 μg/g)). Estradiol and genistein (50 μg/g) reduced components of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis in liver, including increased expression of IGF binding protein-2b1 (igfbp2b1) and reduced igfbp5b1. In liver E2 and genistein (50 μg/g) affected expression of components of the transforming growth factor beta signaling mechanism, reduced expression of ppar and rxr transcription factors, and increased expression of fatty acid synthesis genes srebp1, acly, fas, scd1, and gpat and lipid binding proteins fabp3 and lpl. In muscle E2 and genistein (50 μg/g) increased era1 and erb1 expression and decreased erb2 expression. Other genes responded to phytoestrogens in a manner that suggested regulation by estrogen receptor-independent mechanisms, including increased ghr2, igfbp2a, igfbp4, and igfbp5b1. Expression of muscle regulatory factors pax7 and myod was increased by E2 and genistein. These data indicate that genistein and daidzein affect expression of genes in rainbow trout that regulate physiological mechanisms central to growth and nutrient retention.

  11. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  12. Serum levels of phytoestrogens as biomarkers of intake in Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Palma-Duran, Susana Alejandra; Caire-Juvera, Graciela; Robles-Burgeño, María del Refugio; Ortega-Vélez, María Isabel; Gutiérrez-Coronado, María de Lourdes; Almada, María del Carmen Bermúdez; Chávez-Suárez, Karina; Campa-Siqueiros, Melissa; Grajeda-Cota, Patricia; Saucedo-Tamayo, María del Socorro; Valenzuela-Quintanar, Ana Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have generated interest in human health in view of their potential effect to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases. Serum levels of phytoestrogens have been proposed as an alternative to measure the exposure of phytoestrogens. We evaluated the use of serum as a biomarker of phytoestrogen's intake in healthy women. Phytoestrogens in serum (luteolin, kaempferol, equol, biochanin A, formononetin, quercetin, naringenin, coumestrol, secoisolariciresinol, genistein, matairesinol, enterolactone, enterodiol, daidzein, glycitein and resveratrol) were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS. Subjects were asked to recall all foods and beverages consumed the previous 24 h. Association of dietary intake and serum concentrations was performed by Spearman correlation. Correlations were found for naringenin (r = 0.47, p < 0.001), luteolin (r = 0.4 p < 0.001), genistein (r = 0.32, p < 0.01) enterolactone (r = 0.35, p = 0.0553), coumestrol (r = 0.26, p = 0.0835) and resveratrol (r = 0.29, p = 0.0517). Serum levels as biomarkers of intake along with a 24-h recall would be useful in order to investigate the relationship between phytoestrogens and health.

  13. Is genistein neuroprotective in traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Soltani, Zahra; Khaksari, Mohammad; Jafari, Elham; Iranpour, Maryam; Shahrokhi, Nader

    2015-12-01

    The concerns about negative consequences of estrogen therapy have led to introduce other strategies to obtain estrogen's benefits in the brain. The present study tests the hypothesis that a major isoflavone of soy; genistein with estrogen-like activity can be neuroprotective in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The male Wistar rats were randomly divided to four groups: sham, TBI, vehicle and genistein. The TBI was induced by Marmarou method. The brain edema and the disruption of blood-brain-barrier (BBB) were evaluated 48 h post-TBI. Genistein (15 mg/kg) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was injected i.p., twice after TBI. The intracranial pressure (ICP), the motor performance, and the beam-walk task (WB) were determined before trauma, on trauma day (D0), and first (D1) and second (D2) days post-TBI. Genistein inhibited a development of brain edema and a BBB permeability in TBI animals. An increase of ICP and a defect in motor and WB performance were showed following TBI, in all times evaluated. An increase of ICP induced by TBI was suppressed by genistein on D1 and D2 times. Genistein improved a motor disorder induced by TBI, on D1 and D2 times. Also an increase of traversal time in WB task was suppressed by genistein in TBI animals, on D1 and D2 times. The results of this study demonstrated that genistein can be neuroprotective in TBI. Genistein inhibited the disruption of BBB, the brain edema and the increase of ICP, and the disturbance of neurobehavioral performance in TBI. PMID:26367454

  14. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  15. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  16. Mechanisms of phytoestrogen biochanin A-induced vasorelaxation in renovascular hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok; Jung, Won Suk; Cho, Nam Soo; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Jun, Jae Yeoul; Shin, Byung Chul; Chung, Jong Hoon; Yeum, Cheol Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background The plant-derived estrogen biochanin A is known to cause vasodilation, but its mechanism of action in hypertension remains unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects and mechanisms of biochanin A on the thoracic aorta in two-kidney, one clip (2K1C) renovascular hypertensive rats. Methods Hypertension was induced by clipping the left renal artery, and control age-matched rats were sham treated. Thoracic aortae were mounted in tissue baths to measure isometric tension. Results Biochanin A caused concentration-dependent relaxation in aortic rings from 2K1C hypertensive and sham-treated rats, which was greater in 2K1C rats than in sham rats. Biochanin A-induced relaxation was significantly attenuated by removing the endothelium in aortic rings from 2K1C rats, but not in sham rats. Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not affect the biochanin A-induced relaxation in aortic rings from 2K1C and sham rats. By contrast, treatment with glibenclamide, a selective inhibitor of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K+ channels, or tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of Ca2+-activated K+ channels, significantly reduced biochanin A-induced relaxation in aortic rings from both groups. However, 4-aminopyridine, a selective inhibitor of voltage-dependent K+ channels, inhibited the relaxation induced by biochanin A in 2K1C rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in sham rats. Conclusion These results suggest that the enhanced relaxation caused by biochanin A in aortic rings from hypertensive rats is endothelium dependent. Vascular smooth muscle K+ channels may be involved in biochanin A-induced relaxation in aortae from hypertensive and normotensive rats. In addition, an endothelium-derived activation of voltage-dependent K+ channels contributes, at least in part, to the relaxant effect of biochanin A in renovascular hypertension. PMID:26885474

  17. Genistein Alleviates β-Amyloid-Induced Inflammatory Damage Through Regulating Toll-Like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor κB

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weiwei; Ding, Bingjie; Yu, Huanling; Yuan, Linhong; Xi, Yuandi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genistein (GEN), a major soybean isoflavone (SIF), might possess neuroprotective properties through its anti-inflammatory activity. We hypothesized that GEN could prevent the inflammatory damage detected in C6 cells induced by β-amyloid peptides 25-35 (Aβ25-35). Accordingly, we evaluated the inflammatory damage induced by Aβ25-35 and the protective effect of GEN against Aβ25-35 in C6 cells. In our study, the C6 glial cells (rats glioma cell lines) were preincubated with or without GEN for 2 h following incubation with Aβ25-35 for another 24 h. Then, methylthiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to assess the cell viability. Immunofluorescence staining was used to identify the C6 cells. Inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β were analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed to assess the expression of Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4), inhibitor of kappaB-alpha (IκB-α). The current results showed that GEN could alleviate Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis and prevent Aβ25-35-induced TNF-α and IL-1β release from C6 cells. In addition, GEN prevented Aβ25-35-induced upregulation of the gene and protein expression of TLR4, and GEN significantly upregulated the expression of IκB-α in C6 cells damaged by Aβ25-35. These results suggest that GEN can alleviate the inflammatory stress caused by Aβ25-35 treatment, which might be associated with the neuroprotective effect of GEN regulating the TLR4/NFκB signaling pathway. PMID:25384233

  18. Developing phytoestrogens for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mandy M; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Chemoprevention using phytoestrogens (PEs) for breast cancer may be a valid strategy. PEs are phytochemicals with estrogen-like structures and can be classified into four types: isoflavones, lignans, stilbenes and coumestans. They are widely distributed in diet and herbs and have shown anti-cancer activity via mechanisms including estrogen receptor modulation, aromatase inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Genistein, daidzein and resveratrol are some of the most studied PE examples. Quality control in product manufacturing and clinical study design is a critical issue in developing them as clinically effective chemopreventive agents for breast cancer.

  19. Effects of isoflavones equol and genistein on bone quality in a rat osteopenia model.

    PubMed

    Sehmisch, S; Erren, M; Kolios, L; Tezval, M; Seidlova-Wuttke, D; Wuttke, W; Stuermer, K M; Stuermer, E K

    2010-06-01

    Phytoestrogens might be an alternative medication in prophylaxis and treatment of osteoporosis. In this study, the osteoprotective effects of genistein (GEN) and equol (EQO) were evaluated. After ovariectomy, 44 rats received soy-free food (Control, C) and developed substantial osteoporosis over the course of two months. After that period, the rats were divided into different groups and fed estradiol (E), GEN or EQO for 35 days. To analyze the osteoprotective effects of the tested substances, bone biomechanical properties and histomorphometric changes of the lumbar vertebrae were evaluated. In analyzing the vertebral body compression strength, we found that the EQO (103.8%) and GEN (96.8%) groups reached similar levels relative to the E group, while the C group reached 77.7% of the biomechanical properties of the E group. EQO was significantly superior to C. The histomorphometric evaluation demonstrated an increased number of nodes in EQO- and E-treated rats compared to GEN- and C-treated rats. E led to an improvement of cortical as well as trabecular bone, an advantage that was only partly seen in the other groups. Treatment with phytoestrogens induced improved bone quality. EQO and GEN might be alternatives for hormone replacement therapy, although further studies are needed to elucidate possible side effects. PMID:20013821

  20. Reproductive consequences of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Brown, Alexandria C; Montgomery, Tracy M; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2011-04-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that can act as endocrine disruptors in vertebrates. Biologically active levels of phytoestrogens have been found in aquatic habitats near wood pulp and paper mills, biofuel manufacturing plants, sewage-treatment plants, and agricultural fields. Phytoestrogens are known to cause hormonal and gonadal changes in male fish, but few studies have connected these effects to outcomes relevant to reproductive success. In one experiment, we exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant (1 μg L(-1)) and pharmacological concentrations (1000 μg L(-1)) of the phytoestrogen genistein as well as to a positive control of waterborne 17β-estradiol (E2; 1 μg L(-1)), and a negative control of untreated water. In a second experiment, we exposed male B. splendens to environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg L(-1)) of genistein and β-sitosterol singly and in combination as well as to the positive and negative controls. All exposures were 21 days in duration. We measured sex-steroid hormone levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm concentration and motility, and fertilization success in these fish. We found that exposure to genistein did not affect circulating levels of the androgen 11-ketotestosterone or the estrogen E2 relative to negative-control fish. We also found that neither of the compounds nor their mixture affected GSI, sperm concentration or motility, or fertilization success in exposed fish relative to negative-control fish. However, fish exposed to phytoestrogens showed some evidence of fewer but more motile sperm than fish exposed to the positive control E2. We conclude that sexually mature male B. splendens are relatively immune to reproductive impairments from short-term exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens.

  1. Reproductive consequences of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Brown, Alexandria C; Montgomery, Tracy M; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2011-04-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that can act as endocrine disruptors in vertebrates. Biologically active levels of phytoestrogens have been found in aquatic habitats near wood pulp and paper mills, biofuel manufacturing plants, sewage-treatment plants, and agricultural fields. Phytoestrogens are known to cause hormonal and gonadal changes in male fish, but few studies have connected these effects to outcomes relevant to reproductive success. In one experiment, we exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant (1 μg L(-1)) and pharmacological concentrations (1000 μg L(-1)) of the phytoestrogen genistein as well as to a positive control of waterborne 17β-estradiol (E2; 1 μg L(-1)), and a negative control of untreated water. In a second experiment, we exposed male B. splendens to environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg L(-1)) of genistein and β-sitosterol singly and in combination as well as to the positive and negative controls. All exposures were 21 days in duration. We measured sex-steroid hormone levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm concentration and motility, and fertilization success in these fish. We found that exposure to genistein did not affect circulating levels of the androgen 11-ketotestosterone or the estrogen E2 relative to negative-control fish. We also found that neither of the compounds nor their mixture affected GSI, sperm concentration or motility, or fertilization success in exposed fish relative to negative-control fish. However, fish exposed to phytoestrogens showed some evidence of fewer but more motile sperm than fish exposed to the positive control E2. We conclude that sexually mature male B. splendens are relatively immune to reproductive impairments from short-term exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens. PMID:20589370

  2. Effects of genistein in the maternal diet on reproductive development and spatial learning in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Evan R.; Caniglia, Mary Kay; Wilcox, Jenna L.; Overton, Karla A.; Burr, Marra J.; Wolfe, Brady D.; Sanders, Brian J.; Wisniewski, Amy B.; Wrenn, Craige C.

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors, chemicals that disturb the actions of endogenous hormones, have been implicated in birth defects associated with hormone-dependent development. Phytoestrogens are a class of endocrine disruptors found in plants. In the current study we examined the effects of exposure at various perinatal time periods to genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, on reproductive development and learning in male rats. Dams were fed genistein-containing (5 mg/kg feed) food during both gestation and lactation, during gestation only, during lactation only, or during neither period. Measures of reproductive development and body mass were taken in the male offspring during postnatal development, and learning and memory performance was assessed in adulthood. Genistein exposure via the maternal diet decreased body mass in the male offspring of dams fed genistein during both gestation and lactation, during lactation only, but not during gestation only. Genistein decreased anogenital distance when exposure was during both gestation and lactation, but there was no effect when exposure was limited to one of these time periods. Similarly, spatial learning in the Morris water maze was impaired in male rats exposed to genistein during both gestation and lactation, but not in rats exposed during only one of these time periods. There was no effect of genistein on cued or contextual fear conditioning. In summary, the data indicate that exposure to genistein through the maternal diet significantly impacts growth in male offspring if exposure is during lactation. The effects of genistein on reproductive development and spatial learning required exposure throughout the pre- and postnatal periods. PMID:20053350

  3. Phytoestrogens in milk: Overestimations caused by contamination of the hydrolytic enzyme used during sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, L; Kohoutek, J; Procházková, T; Prudíková, M; Bláha, L

    2016-09-01

    Isoflavones are natural phytoestrogens with antioxidant and endocrine-disrupting potencies. Monitoring of their levels is important to ensure the high quality and safety of food, milk, and dairy products. The efficiency and accuracy of phytoestrogen analyses in complex matrices such as milk depend on the extraction procedure, which often uses hydrolysis by means of the β-glucuronidase/sulfatase enzyme originating from Helix pomatia. The present study reveals that the commercially available hydrolytic enzyme is contaminated by several phytoestrogen isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, formononetin, and biochanin A) and their metabolite equol, as well as flavones (naringenin and apigenin) and coumestrol. We show that the concentrations of daidzein and genistein in the enzyme could have impaired the results of analyses of the main isoflavones in several previously published studies. Of 8 analyzed compounds, only equol was confirmed in the present study and it serves as a reliable marker of phytoestrogens originating from cow feed. Critical reassessment of phytoestrogen concentrations in milk is needed because several previously published studies might have overestimated the concentrations depending on the extraction procedure used. PMID:27394955

  4. Phytoestrogens in milk: Overestimations caused by contamination of the hydrolytic enzyme used during sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, L; Kohoutek, J; Procházková, T; Prudíková, M; Bláha, L

    2016-09-01

    Isoflavones are natural phytoestrogens with antioxidant and endocrine-disrupting potencies. Monitoring of their levels is important to ensure the high quality and safety of food, milk, and dairy products. The efficiency and accuracy of phytoestrogen analyses in complex matrices such as milk depend on the extraction procedure, which often uses hydrolysis by means of the β-glucuronidase/sulfatase enzyme originating from Helix pomatia. The present study reveals that the commercially available hydrolytic enzyme is contaminated by several phytoestrogen isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, formononetin, and biochanin A) and their metabolite equol, as well as flavones (naringenin and apigenin) and coumestrol. We show that the concentrations of daidzein and genistein in the enzyme could have impaired the results of analyses of the main isoflavones in several previously published studies. Of 8 analyzed compounds, only equol was confirmed in the present study and it serves as a reliable marker of phytoestrogens originating from cow feed. Critical reassessment of phytoestrogen concentrations in milk is needed because several previously published studies might have overestimated the concentrations depending on the extraction procedure used.

  5. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric fragmentation study of phytoestrogens as their trimethylsilyl derivatives: Identification in soy milk and wastewater samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barber, L.B.; Thurman, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical method for the identification of eight plant phytoestrogens (biochanin A, coumestrol, daidzein, equol, formononetin, glycitein, genistein and prunetin) in soy products and wastewater samples was developed using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS). The phytoestrogens were derivatized as their trimethylsilyl ethers with trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). The phytoestrogens were isolated from all samples with liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Daidzein-d4 and genistein-d4 labeled standards were used as internal standards before extraction and derivatization. The fragmentation patterns of the phytoestrogens were investigated by isolating and fragmenting the precursor ions in the ion-trap and a typical fragmentation involved the loss of a methyl and a carbonyl group. Two characteristic fragment ions for each analyte were chosen for identification and confirmation. The developed methodology was applied to the identification and confirmation of phytoestrogens in soy milk, in wastewater effluent from a soy-milk processing plant, and in wastewater (influent and effluent) from a treatment plant. Detected concentrations of genistein ranged from 50,000 ??g/L and 2000 ??g/L in soy milk and in wastewater from a soy-plant, respectively, to 20 ??g/L and <1 ??g/L for influent and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, respectively. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. ERβ-specific agonists and genistein inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in the large and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Schleipen, B; Hertrampf, T; Fritzemeier, K H; Kluxen, F M; Lorenz, A; Molzberger, A; Velders, M; Diel, P

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that intake of estrogens and isoflavones may be beneficial for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). Based on this data, the aim of the study was to investigate estrogen receptor (ER) subtype-specific effects on intestinal homeostasis. Ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were either treated with 17β-estradiol (4 μg/kg body wt/day) (E2), an ERα-specific agonist (ALPHA) (10 μg/kg body wt/day), an ERβ-specific agonist (BETA) (100 μg/kg body wt/day) or genistein (GEN) (10 mg/kg body wt/day) for three weeks. Vehicle-treated OVX and SHAM animals and those cotreated with BETA and the pure antiestrogen Fulvestrant (ICI 182780) (100 μg/kg body wt/day and 3 mg/kg body wt/day) served as controls. GEN and BETA treatment but not E2 and ALPHA administration reduced proliferation in ileal and colonic mucosa cells. The rate of apoptosis in the small intestine and colon was increased by treatment with BETA and GEN, but not by E2. BETA induced antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity also in SHAM animals. The effects were antagonized by the pure antiestrogen Fulvestrant. Polymerase chain reaction gene array analysis revealed that BETA resulted in the downregulation of the oncogene transformation-related protein 63 (p63). Our data indicate that activation of the ERβ by specific ERβ agonists and GEN induces antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in the intestinal tract. This observation can be taken as an indication that intake of GEN and specific ERβ agonists may protect the ileal and colonic epithelium from tumor development via modulation of tissue homeostasis.

  7. The phytoestrogenic Cyclopia extract, SM6Met, increases median tumor free survival and reduces tumor mass and volume in chemically induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Visser, Koch; Zierau, Oliver; Macejová, Dana; Goerl, Florian; Muders, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B; Vollmer, Günter; Louw, Ann

    2016-10-01

    SM6Met, a phytoestrogenic extract of Cyclopia subternata indigenous to the Western Cape province of South Africa, displays estrogenic attributes with potential for breast cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we report that SM6Met, in the presence of estradiol, induces a significant cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, in the N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis model, SM6Met increases tumor latency by 7days and median tumor free survival by 42 days, while decreasing palpable tumor frequency by 32%, tumor mass by 40%, and tumor volume by 53%. Therefore, the current study provides proof of concept that SM6Met has definite potential as a chemopreventative agent against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:27142456

  8. Bioactivity of genistein: A review of in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad; Farooqi, Humaira

    2015-12-01

    Genistein is a soy derived isoflavanoid compound with multitude of health benefits. This compound is found to be a potent agent in both prophylaxis and treatment of cancer and various other chronic diseases. Ranging from its antioxidant activity to its effect on various cancer types, genistein has been a compound of interest in a number of studies carried out so far. The great interest that has focused on genistein led to the identification of numerous intracellular targets of its action in the live cells. Retardation of atherogenic activity and increasing the antioxidant defense of a cell has been attributed to genistein while as it has also been reported that genistein possesses suppressive effects on both the cell-mediated and humoral components of the adaptive immune system. At the molecular level, genistein reduces the number of developing CD4(+) and CD8(+) thymocytes suggesting a possible mechanism for genistein effects on cell-mediated immunity. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation. In addition, genistein has its prominent role in preventing the DNA damage. Apolipoprotein B secretion gets reduced when the subjects are administered with genistein. Genistein confers a better protection to ischemic conditions thereby giving a significant cardioprotection. At cellular level adipocyte differentiation is another property of genistein which makes it a better neutraceutical which can reduce the atherogenic condition and hypercholesterolemia. Expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase is associated with genistein supplementation. The advantage of using genistein is its multidirectional action and its lesser toxicity. PMID:26653547

  9. Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of plasma daidzein and genistein.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Lapcík, O; Hampl, R; Uehara, M; Al-Maharik, N; Stumpf, K; Mikola, H; Wähälä, K; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for the determination of the phytoestrogens daidzein and genistein in plasma (serum). These weakly estrogenic isoflavones occur in soybeans and in smaller amounts in some other beans and plants. It has been suggested that they may afford protection against prostate and breast cancer. The method is based on time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) using a europium chelate as a label. After synthesis of 4'-O-carboxymethyl-daidzein and 4'-O-carboxymethyl-genistein the compounds are coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), then used as antigens to immunize rabbits. The tracers with the europium chelate are synthesized using the same 4'-O-derivative of the isoflavones. After enzymatic hydrolysis and ether extraction the immunoassay is carried out using the VICTOR 1420 multilabel counter (Wallac Oy, Turku, Finland). The antisera cross-reacted to some extent with some isoflavonoids but not with flavonoids. The cross-reactivity seems not to influence the results, which were highly specific for both compounds. The correlation coefficients between the TR-FIA methods and the reference method based on isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were high; r-values were about 0.95-0.99 depending on concentration. The intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) for daidzein and genistein at three different concentrations vary 3.2-4.5 and 3.2-4.1, respectively. The inter-assay CVs vary 5.0-6.3 and 4.5-5.3, respectively. The working ranges of the daidzein and genistein assays are 1.0-216 and 1.7-370 nmol/l, respectively. The plasma values (n = 80) of daidzein and genistein are very low in Finnish subjects (mean for daidzein, 3.8+/-6.8 and for genistein, 3.2+/-7.6 nmol/l; median value for daidzein 1.5 and for genistein 1.4 nmol/l). PMID:10802284

  10. Tissue responsiveness to estradiol and genistein in the sea bass liver and scale.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Andrade, André; Santos, Soraia; Power, Deborah M

    2016-04-01

    As in mammals, estrogens in fish are essential for reproduction but also important regulators of mineral homeostasis. Fish scales are a non-conventional target tissue responsive to estradiol and constitute a good model to study mineralized tissues effects and mechanisms of action of estrogenic compounds, including phytoestrogens. The responsiveness to estradiol and the phytoestrogen genistein, was compared between the scales and the liver, a classical estrogenic target, in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Injection with estradiol and genistein significantly increased circulating vitellogenin (for both compounds) and mineral levels (estradiol only) and genistein also significantly increased scale enzymatic activities suggesting it increased mineral turnover. The repertoire, abundance and estrogenic regulation of nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR1, 2a and 2b) and membrane G-protein receptors (GPER and GPER-like) were different between liver and scales, which presumably explains the tissue-specific changes detected in estrogen-responsive gene expression. In scales changes in gene expression mainly consisted of small rapid increases, while in liver strong, sustained increases/decreases in gene expression occurred. Similar but not overlapping gene expression changes were observed in response to both estradiol and genistein. This study demonstrates for the first time the expression of membrane estrogen receptors in scales and that estrogens and phytoestrogens, to which fish may be exposed in the wild or in aquaculture, both affect liver and mineralized tissues in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:26718875

  11. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  12. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual.

  13. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm.

  14. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  15. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation modified by soy phytoestrogens: role for epigenetic therapeutics in prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Karsli-Ceppioglu, Seher; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Adjakly, Mawussi; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Judes, Gaëlle; Lebert, André; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Penault-LLorca, Frédérique; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Guy, Laurent; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    In prostate cancer, DNA methylation is significantly associated with tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. Previous studies have suggested that soy phytoestrogens might regulate DNA methylation at individual candidate gene loci and that they play a crucial role as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. The purpose of our study was to examine the modulation effects of phytoestrogens on a genome-wide scale in regards to DNA methylation in prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cell lines DU-145 and LNCaP were treated with 40 μM of genistein and 110 μM of daidzein. DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine (2 μM) and the methylating agent budesonide (2 μM) were used to compare their demethylation/methylation effects with phytoestrogens. The regulatory effects of phytoestrogens on DNA methylation were analyzed by using a methyl-DNA immunoprecipitation method coupled with Human DNA Methylation Microarrays (MeDIP-chip). We observed that the methylation profiles of 58 genes were altered by genistein and daidzein treatments in DU-145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. In addition, the methylation frequencies of the MAD1L1, TRAF7, KDM4B, and hTERT genes were remarkably modified by genistein treatment. Our results suggest that the modulation effects of phytoestrogens on DNA methylation essentially lead to inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Genome-wide methylation profiling reported here suggests that epigenetic regulation mechanisms and, by extension, epigenetics-driven novel therapeutic candidates warrant further consideration in future "omics" studies of prostate cancer.

  17. Phytoestrogens alter the reproductive organ development in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoekkynen, Ari . E-mail: ryokkyne@cc.joensuu.fi; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykoenen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Haenninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Kukkonen, Jussi V.K.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reproductive effects of two perorally applied phytoestrogens, genistein (8 mg/kg/day) and {beta}-sitosterol (50 mg/kg/day), on the mink (Mustela vison) at human dietary exposure levels. Parental generations were exposed over 9 months to these phytoestrogens and their offspring were exposed via gestation and lactation. Parents and their offspring were sampled 21 days after the birth of the kits. Sex hormone levels, sperm quality, organ weights, and development of the kits were examined. The exposed females were heavier than the control females at the 1st postnatal day (PND). The control kits were heavier than the exposed kits from the 1st to the 21st PND. Phytoestrogens did not affect the organ weights of the adult minks, but the relative testicular weight of the exposed kits was higher than in the control kits. The relative prostate weight was higher and the relative uterine weight lower in the {beta}-sitosterol-exposed kits than in the control kits. Moreover, the plasma dihydrotestosterone levels were lower in the genistein-exposed male kits compared to the control male kits. This study could not explain the mechanisms behind these alterations. The results indicate that perinatal phytoestrogen exposures cause alterations in the weight of the reproductive organs of the mink kits.

  18. Phytoestrogens levels determination in the cord blood from Malaysia rural and urban populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, A.M. . E-mail: mustafa@ummc.edu.my; Malintan, N.T.; Seelan, S.; Zhan, Z.; Mohamed, Z.; Hassan, J.; Pendek, R.; Hussain, R.; Ito, N.

    2007-07-01

    This study is a result of an analysis of free and conjugated phytoestrogens daidzein, genistein, daidzin, genistin and coumesterol in human cord blood plasma using LCMS. Cord blood was collected from urban and rural populations of Malaysia (n = 300) to establish a simple preliminary database on the levels of the analyzed compounds in the collected samples. The study also aimed to look at the levels of phytoestrogens in babies during birth as this may have a profound effect on the developmental process. The sample clean up was carried out by solid-phase extraction using C18 column and passed through DEAE sephadex gel before analysis by LCMS. The mean concentrations of total phytoestrogens were daidzein (1.4 {+-} 2.9 ng/ml), genistein (3.7 {+-} 2.8 ng/ml), daidzin (3.5 {+-} 3.1 ng/ml), genistin (19.5 {+-} 4.2 ng/ml) and coumesterol (3.3 {+-} 3.3 ng/ml). Distribution of phytoestrogen was found to be higher in samples collected from rural areas compared to that of urban areas.

  19. Estrogen receptor alpha augments changes in hemostatic gene expression in HepG2 cells treated with estradiol and phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lynne A; Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Wuttke, Wolfgang; O'Leary, John J; Norris, Lucy A

    2014-01-15

    Phytoestrogens are popular alternatives to estrogen therapy however their effects on hemostasis in post-menopausal women are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the phytoestrogens, genistein, daidzein and equol on the expression of key genes from the hemostatic system in human hepatocyte cell models and to determine the role of estrogen receptors in mediating any response seen. HepG2 cells and Hep89 cells (expressing estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)) were incubated for 24 h with 50 nM 17β-estradiol, genistein, daidzein or equol. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), Factor VII, fibrinogen γ, protein C and protein S mRNA expression were determined using TaqMan PCR. Genistein and equol increased tPA and PAI-1 expression in Hep89 cells with fold changes greater than those observed for estradiol. In HepG2 cells (which do not express ERα), PAI-1 and tPA expression were unchanged. Increased expression of Factor VII was observed in phytoestrogen treated Hep89 cells but not in similarly treated HepG2s. Prothrombin gene expression was increased in equol and daidzein treated HepG2 cells in the absence of the classical estrogen receptors. These data suggest that phytoestrogens can regulate the expression of coagulation and fibrinolytic genes in a human hepatocyte cell line; an effect which is augmented by ERα.

  20. Pharmaceutical prospects of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Usui, Takeshi

    2006-02-01

    Interest in the physiologic and pharmacologic role of bioactive compounds present in plants has increased dramatically over the last decade. Of particular interest in relation to human health are the classes of compounds known as the phytoestrogens, which embody several groups of non-steroidal estrogens, including isoflavones and lignans that are widely distributed within nature. The impact of dietary phytoestrogens on normal biologic processes was first recognized in sheep. Observations of sheep grazing on fields rich in clover and cheetahs fed high soy diets in zoos suggested that flavonoids and related phytochemicals can affect mammalian health. Endogenous estrogens have an important role not only in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, but also in various non-gonadal systems, such as cardiovascular systems, bone, and central nervous systems, and lipid metabolism. There have been several clinical studies of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in post-menopausal women to examine whether HRT has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system, bone fractures, lipid metabolism, and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, estrogen contributes to the development of some estrogen-dependent cancers, such as breast cancer and prostate cancer and the number of patients with these cancers is increasing in developed countries. Although recent mega-studies showed negative results for classical HRT in the prevention of some of these diseases, the molecules that interact with estrogen receptors are candidate drugs for various diseases, including hormone-dependent cancers. This review focuses on the molecular properties and pharmaceutical potential of phytoestrogens.

  1. Modulation of Aromatase by Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lephart, Edwin D.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatase enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many human tissues. Estrogens are known to stimulate cellular proliferation associated with certain cancers and protect against adverse symptoms during the peri- and postmenopausal intervals. Phytoestrogens are a group of plant derived naturally occurring compounds that have chemical structures similar to estrogen. Since phytoestrogens are known to be constituents of animal/human food sources, these compounds have received increased research attention. Phytoestrogens may contribute to decreased cancer risk by the inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity and CYP19 gene expression in human tissues. This review covers (a) the aromatase enzyme (historical descriptions on function, activity, and gene characteristics), (b) phytoestrogens in their classifications and applications to human health, and (c) a chronological coverage of aromatase activity modulated by phytoestrogens from the early 1980s to 2015. In general, phytoestrogens act as aromatase inhibitors by (a) decreasing aromatase gene expression, (b) inhibiting the aromatase enzyme itself, or (c) in some cases acting at both levels of regulation. The findings presented herein are consistent with estrogen's impact on health and phytoestrogen's potential as anticancer treatments, but well-controlled, large-scale studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of phytoestrogens on breast cancer and age-related diseases. PMID:26798508

  2. Aquatic photochemistry of isoflavone phytoestrogens: degradation kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Felcyn, Jacob R; Davis, Jasmine C C; Tran, Loan H; Berude, John C; Latch, Douglas E

    2012-06-19

    Isoflavones are plant-derived chemicals that are potential endocrine disruptors. Although some recent studies have detected isoflavones in natural waters, little is known about their aquatic fates. The photochemical behaviors of the isoflavones daidzein, formononetin, biochanin A, genistein, and equol were studied under simulated solar light and natural sunlight. All of these phytoestrogens were found to be photolabile under certain conditions. Daidzein and formononetin degraded primarily by direct photolysis. Their expected near-surface summer half-lives in pH 7 water at 47° latitude are expected to be 10 and 4.6 h, respectively. Biochanin A, genistein, and equol degraded relatively slowly by direct photolysis at environmentally realistic pH values, though they showed significant degradation rate enhancements in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). The indirect photolysis rates for these compounds scaled with NOM concentration, and NOM from microbial origin was found to be a more potent photosensitizer than NOM from terrestrial sources. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the indirect photolysis pathways responsible for the rate enhancements. Results of these studies implicate reaction with both singlet oxygen and excited state triplet NOM. Environmental half-lives for biochanin A, genistein, and equol are expected to vary on the basis of pH as well as NOM source and concentration.

  3. Phytoestrogens and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Alois; Medjakovic, Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are a diverse class of non-steroidal compounds that have an affinity for estrogen receptors α and β, for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family and for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Examples of phytoestrogens include prenylated flavonoids, isoflavones, coumestans and lignans. Many phytoestrogens counteract the cellular derailments that are responsible for the development of metabolic syndrome. Here we propose a mechanism of action which is based on five pillars/principles. First, phytoestrogens are involved in the downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as COX-2 and iNOS, by activating PPAR and by inhibiting IκB activation. Second, they increase reverse cholesterol transport, which is mediated by PPARγ. Third, phytoestrogens increase insulin sensitivity, which is mediated via PPARα. Fourth, they exert antioxidant effects by activating antioxidant genes through KEAP. Fifth, phytoestrogens increase energy expenditure by affecting AMP-activated kinase signaling cascades, which are responsible for the inhibition of adipogenesis. In addition to these effects, which have been demonstrated in vivo and in clinical trials, other effects, such as eNOS activation, may also be important. Some plant extracts from soy, red clover or licorice can be described as panPPAR activators. Fetal programming for metabolic syndrome has been hypothesized; thus, the consumption of dietary phytoestrogens during pregnancy may be relevant. Extracts from soy, red clover or licorice oil have potential as plant-derived medicines that could be used to treat polycystic ovary syndrome, a disease linked to hyperandrogenism and obesity, although clinical trials have not yet been conducted. Phytoestrogens may help prevent metabolic syndrome, although intervention studies will be always be ambiguous, because physical activity and reduced calorie consumption also have a significant impact. Nevertheless, extracts rich in phytoestrogens may be an

  4. Rapid analysis of phytoestrogens in human urine by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Lapcík, O; Hampl, R; Al-Maharik, N; Mäkelä, T; Wähälä, K; Mikola, H; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-04-01

    A time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA), with europium labeled phytoestrogens as tracers, was developed for the quantitative determination of enterolactone, genistein and daidzein in human urine. The aim was to create a method for the screening of large populations in order to assess the possible correlations between the urinary levels and the risk of Western diseases. After the synthesis of the 5'-carboxymethoxy derivative of enterolactone and 4'-O-carboxymethyl derivatives of daidzein and genistein, the respective compound was coupled to bovine serum albumin and then used as an antigen in the immunization of rabbits. The same derivatives of the phytoestrogen were used in preparing the europium tracers. After the enzymatic hydrolysis, the TR-FIA was carried out using the Victor 1420 multilabel counter. The method has sufficient sensitivity to measure the phytoestrogens at concentrations even below 5 nmol/l. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation, at three different concentrations, varied from 1.9 to 5.3 and from 2.4 to 9.7, respectively. We measured urinary enterolactone, genistein and daidzein in 215 samples from Finnish healthy women and found that more than 50% of the values ranged between 1 and 7, <0.1 and 0.6 and below 0.6 micromol/24 h, respectively. The TR-FIA method including only a hydrolysis step gave higher values than those measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, the assay results by the present method showed strong correlation with those obtained by GC-MS. It is concluded that the TR-FIA is suitable for population screening of urinary phytoestrogens. PMID:10822017

  5. Genistein alters growth but is not toxic to the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Wayne A; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2002-10-01

    The mortality of clinical prostate cancer is lower in Asian populations than in American or European men. Asian men typically consume more soy than their Western counterparts, leading to the investigation of individual components, particularly phytoestrogens, as protective factors against prostate cancer. Genistein, the predominant isoflavone in soy, has been reported to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer in animal models, but the underlying biological action remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the effects of the phytoestrogen, genistein and the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), as a control, on development and function of the rat dorsolateral prostate (DLP) when given in the diet. The effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) injections were also tested. Analysis of individual lobes of the DLP revealed that 1000 mg/kg, but not 250 mg/kg, of a genistein AIN-76A diet slightly reduced lateral prostate type 1 (LP1) bud perimeter. However, expression of the secretory dorsal protein 1 (DP1) and 5alpha-reductase type II activity were not altered in the prostate. This suggested that prostate differentiation, and not toxicity, had occurred. DES in the diet reduced and testosterone injections elevated relative prostate weights and perimeters of the dorsal, LP1, lateral prostate type 2 and DP1 expression. DHT increased relative prostate weights but did not significantly increase individual lobe perimeter. Unlike DES, maximally tolerated doses of genistein in the diet were not toxic to the rat prostate. PMID:12368387

  6. [Phytoestrogens and menopause].

    PubMed

    Torella, M; La Rezza, F; Labriola, D; Ammaturo, F P; Ambrosio, D; Zarcone, R; Trotta, C; Schettino, M T; De Franciscis, P

    2013-12-01

    Menopause is the interruption of menstrual and reproductive capacity, therefore, that occurs naturally in all women between 48 and 55 years, due to a lower production of gonadal steroids. The period becomes progressively irregular and lack of ovulation and menstrual flow decrease, and finally disappears. The time between the first symptoms and the cessation of the menstrual cycle is called menopause. With the onset of menopause the woman undergoes a series of changes related to estrogen deficiency, which occur in all tissues of the body. In this period one can distinguish an early stage, characterized by hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats and insomnia, and a late phase in which we highlight more symptoms related to the interruption of hormonal such as osteoporosis, obesity, at urogenital and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. In Italy, only 5.2% of women aged 45-64 years used hormone replacement therapy, and only 20-30% follow a therapy for more than two years, both for psychological reasons, and for fear of side effects. Not surprisingly, therefore, phytoestrogens are given a high importance, as they are considered a natural alternative tank to to their plant origin. Interest in phytoestrogens was born from the observation that postmenopausal women who live in the East have a lower incidence of symptoms, cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis hormone use, compared to Western women.

  7. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  8. Effects of neonatal treatment with two phytoestrogens on male rat sexual behavior and partner preference.

    PubMed

    Morales-Otal, Adriana; Ferreira-Nuño, Armando; Olayo-Lortia, Jesús; Barrios-González, Javier; Tarragó-Castellanos, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effect of neonatal treatment with the phytoestrogens coumestrol (COU) and genistein (GEN), administered in equimolecular doses, on the sexual behavior and partner preference of male rats. Four groups of male rats were injected daily from day 1 to 5 with 150 µg of GEN, an equivalent amount of COU, 1 µg of β-estradiol 3-benzoato (EB), or olive oil (VEH) (control). A fifth group remained intact. In the GEN group, intromission and ejaculation latencies decreased, whereas ejaculatory frequency increased. Contrasting results were observed in COU males. EB males could not ejaculate and their mount and intromission latencies increased significantly. To determine sexual-partner preferences, a multiple partner preference arena was used and two types of tests were performed, the first one without allowing contact test (CT) with the stimulus animals, followed by a CT. COU and GEN groups did not show preference for any stimulus animal, whereas the EB males preferred the expert male. When CT with the stimulus animals was allowed, GEN-males preferred the receptive female, unlike the COU and EB groups. It is concluded that neonatal treatment with COU and GEN induced opposite effects, the effects of COU being more estrogenic.

  9. Effects of neonatal treatment with two phytoestrogens on male rat sexual behavior and partner preference.

    PubMed

    Morales-Otal, Adriana; Ferreira-Nuño, Armando; Olayo-Lortia, Jesús; Barrios-González, Javier; Tarragó-Castellanos, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effect of neonatal treatment with the phytoestrogens coumestrol (COU) and genistein (GEN), administered in equimolecular doses, on the sexual behavior and partner preference of male rats. Four groups of male rats were injected daily from day 1 to 5 with 150 µg of GEN, an equivalent amount of COU, 1 µg of β-estradiol 3-benzoato (EB), or olive oil (VEH) (control). A fifth group remained intact. In the GEN group, intromission and ejaculation latencies decreased, whereas ejaculatory frequency increased. Contrasting results were observed in COU males. EB males could not ejaculate and their mount and intromission latencies increased significantly. To determine sexual-partner preferences, a multiple partner preference arena was used and two types of tests were performed, the first one without allowing contact test (CT) with the stimulus animals, followed by a CT. COU and GEN groups did not show preference for any stimulus animal, whereas the EB males preferred the expert male. When CT with the stimulus animals was allowed, GEN-males preferred the receptive female, unlike the COU and EB groups. It is concluded that neonatal treatment with COU and GEN induced opposite effects, the effects of COU being more estrogenic. PMID:27482864

  10. Genistein increases glycosaminoglycan levels in mucopolysaccharidosis type I cell models.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by diminished degradation of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate, which results in the accumulation of these GAGs and subsequent cellular dysfunction. Patients present with a variety of symptoms, including severe skeletal disease. Genistein has been shown previously to inhibit GAG synthesis in MPS fibroblasts, presumably through inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To determine the potentials of genistein for the treatment of skeletal disease, MPS I fibroblasts were induced into chondrocytes and osteoblasts and treated with genistein. Surprisingly, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation levels (as a measure for tyrosine kinase inhibition) were decreased in all treated cell lines, there was a 1.3 and 1.6 fold increase in GAG levels in MPS I chondrocytes and fibroblast, respectively (p < 0.05). Sulfate incorporation in treated MPS I fibroblasts was 2.6 fold increased (p < 0.05), indicating increased GAG synthesis despite tyrosine kinase inhibition. This suggests that GAG synthesis is not exclusively regulated through the tyrosine kinase activity of the EGFR. We hypothesize that the differences in outcomes between studies on the effect of genistein in MPS are caused by the different effects of genistein on different growth factor signaling pathways, which regulate GAG synthesis. More studies are needed to elucidate the precise signaling pathways which are affected by genistein and alter GAG metabolism in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of genistein for MPS patients. PMID:24699889

  11. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  12. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes. PMID:20012186

  13. Extraction and quantification of phytoestrogens in foods using automated solid-phase extraction and LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, Gunter G C; Dell'aquila, Caterina; Low, Yen-Ling; Kussmaul, Michaela; Bingham, Sheila A

    2007-12-01

    Phytoestrogens are a group of polyphenolic plant metabolites that can induce biological responses. Their bioactivity is based on their similarity to 17beta-estradiol and their ability to bind to the beta-estrogen receptor. Although epidemiological data are inconclusive, phytoestrogens are considered to be beneficial for a variety of conditions, for example, hormone-related cancers like breast and prostate cancer. To investigate the biological effects of these compounds and to assess the exposure of larger cohorts or the general public, reliable data on the phytoestrogen content of food is necessary. Previously, food analysis for phytoestrogens was performed using either HPLC-UV or GC/MS. Here, we describe the development of the first generic method for the analysis of phytoestrogens in food, using automated solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The presented method shows a good reproducibility and can be easily adapted to other phytoestrogens if required.

  14. Effects of feeding dairy cows different legume-grass silages on milk phytoestrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Höjer, A; Adler, S; Purup, S; Hansen-Møller, J; Martinsson, K; Steinshamn, H; Gustavsson, A-M

    2012-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are hormone-like substances in plants that can substantially influence human health (positively or negatively), and when fed to dairy cows are partly transferred to their milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of varying the botanical composition and regrowth interval of legume-grass silage on phytoestrogen intake and milk phytoestrogen concentrations. In one experiment, 15 Swedish Red dairy cows were fed 2- or 3-cut red clover-grass silage, or 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage. In a second experiment, 16 Norwegian Red dairy cows were fed short-term ley silage with red clover or long-term ley silage with white clover, and the effects of supplementation with α-tocopherol were also tested. High concentrations of formononetin and biochanin A were found in all silage mixtures with red clover. The milk concentration of equol was highest for cows on the 2-cut red clover-grass silage diet (1,494 μg/kg of milk). Because of the metabolism of biochanin A, genistein, and prunetin, their concentrations in milk and the apparent recovery were low. Coumestrol was detected in only short-term and long-term ley silage mixtures, and its milk concentration was low. Concentrations of secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol were higher in 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass and long-term ley silage mixtures, those with legume species other than red clover, and the highest grass proportions. The 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet also resulted in higher enterolactone concentration than the other diets (226 μg/kg of milk). Lengthening the regrowth interval increased the intake of secoisolariciresinol and decreased the recovery of lignans. Feeding long-term ley silage resulted in higher milk lignan concentrations but lower milk isoflavone concentrations than feeding short-term ley silage. The apparent recovery of all phytoestrogens except prunetin was highest on the 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet. No effect of α-tocopherol supplementation

  15. Genistein treatment reduces arterial contractions by inhibiting tyrosine kinases in ovariectomized hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nevala, Riikka; Lassila, Markus; Finckenberg, Piet; Paukku, Kirsi; Korpela, Riitta; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2002-09-27

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the vascular effects of genistein in a short-term study. The ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided into four groups (n = 8 in each), which received the following subcutaneous treatments either for 2 days or for 2 weeks: (1) solvent control (96% dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) 1 ml/kg), (2) estradiol-17beta (25 microg/kg), (3) genistein (2.5 mg/kg; low-dose), and (4) genistein (25 mg/kg; high-dose). The renal arterial rings were studied using organ bath system. The renal artery contractions were attenuated by the 2-day low-dose genistein treatment as follows: angiotensin II (46%), noradrenaline (42%) KCl (36%), and endothelin-1 (34%). Only the angiotensin II-induced contractions were reduced by the 2-week treatment with estradiol-17beta (38%) and with the low-dose of genistein (31%). The 2-day genistein treatment reduced tyrosine phosphorylation, while the other treatments or treatment times had no effect. The 2-day low-dose genistein treatment had no estrogenic effect on the uterine morphology. The mechanism for attenuated contractility in the renal arteries after the 2-day low-dose genistein treatment is independent of the estrogenic effect of genistein, but is due to the tyrosine kinase inhibitory property of genistein.

  16. A Commentary on Phytoestrogens and Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Alison; Edelstein, Sari

    2015-01-01

    On the most basic level, phytoestrogens can be defined as compounds found in plants that exhibit estrogen-like activity in the human body. Phytoestrogens are considered functional foods because of their diverse physiological effects beyond basic nutritional functions. The 2 primary categories of phytoestrogens found in food are lignans and…

  17. The Stimulatory Effect of Strontium Ions on Phytoestrogens Content in Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Tomasz; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szymczak, Grażyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Kocjan, Ryszard; Świeboda, Ryszard

    2016-01-14

    The amount of secondary metabolites in plants can be enhanced or reduced by various external factors. In this study, the effect of strontium ions on the production of phytoestrogens in soybeans was investigated. The plants were treated with Hoagland's solution, modified with Sr(2+) with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mM, and were grown for 14 days in hydroponic cultivation. After harvest, soybean plants were separated into roots and shoots, dried, and pulverized. The plant material was extracted with methanol and hydrolyzed. Phytoestrogens were quantified by HPLC. The significant increase in the concentration of the compounds of interest was observed for all tested concentrations of strontium ions when compared to control. Sr(2+) at a concentration of 2 mM was the strongest elicitor, and the amount of phytoestrogens in plant increased ca. 2.70, 1.92, 3.77 and 2.88-fold, for daidzein, coumestrol, genistein and formononetin, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 liver cell models after treatment with extracts from 2 mM Sr(2+)-stressed soybean plants when compared to extracts from non-stressed plants. Our results indicate that the addition of strontium ions to the culture media may be used to functionalize soybean plants with enhanced phytoestrogen content.

  18. Antioxidant and antipromotional effects of the soybean isoflavone genistein.

    PubMed

    Wei, H; Bowen, R; Cai, Q; Barnes, S; Wang, Y

    1995-01-01

    Antioxidant and antipromotional effects of the soybean isoflavone genistein have been studied in HL-60 cells and the mouse skin tumorigenesis model. Effects of structure-related flavone/isoflavones on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-activated HL-60 cells and superoxide anion (O2-) generation by xanthine/xanthine oxidase were compared. Of tested isoflavones, genistein is the most potent inhibitor among TPA-induced H2O2 formation by (dimethyl sulfoxide) DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells, daidzein is second, and apigenin and biochanin A show little effect. In contrast, genistein, apigenin, and prunectin are equally potent in inhibiting O2- generation by xanthine/xanthine oxidase, with daidzein showing a moderate inhibitory effect and biochanin A exhibiting no effect. These results suggest that the antioxidant properties of isoflavones are structurally related and the hydroxy group at Position 4' is crucial in both systems. Dietary administration of 250 ppm genistein for 30 days significantly enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the skin and small intestine of mice. Further studies show that genistein significantly inhibits TPA-induced proto-oncogene expression (c-fos) in mouse skin in a dose-dependent manner. In a two-stage skin carcinogenesis study, low levels of genistein (1 and 5 mumol) significantly prolong tumor latency and decrease tumor multiplicity by approximately 50%. We conclude that genistein's antioxidant properties and antiproliferative effects may be responsible for its anticarcinogenic effect. Its high content in soybeans and relatively high bioavailability favor genistein as a promising candidate for the prevention of human cancers.

  19. Up-regulation of interleukin-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation in T cells by biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin; Chung, Su Wol; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung . E-mail: tskim@korea.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring compounds derived from plants. Although phytoestrogens exhibit many biological functions including estrogen agonist/antagonist properties, the effect on allergic responses remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether biochanin A, a phytoestrogen and its metabolites, genistein, p-ethylphenol and phenolic acid, affect production of IL-4, a pro-inflammatory cytokine closely associated with allergic immune responses, in primary CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 T lymphoma cells. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol significantly enhanced IL-4 production from both CD4{sup +} T cells and EL4 cells in a dose-dependent manner, while phenolic acid did not. Biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol also enhanced IL-4 gene promoter activity in EL4 cells transiently transfected with IL-4 promoter constructs, but this effect was impaired in EL4 cells transfected with an IL-4 promoter construct deleted of a P4 site carrying NF-AT and AP-1 binding sites. In addition, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased both NF-AT and AP-1 DNA binding activities, indicating that they might enhance IL-4 production via NF-AT/AP-1 activation. Furthermore, biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and PKC activity, while they did not affect ERK phosphorylation. The enhanced NF-AT DNA binding activities were suppressed by inhibitors for PI3-K and PKC, but not by p38 MAPK inhibitors. In contrast, the enhanced AP-1 DNA binding activities and p38 MAPK phosphorylation were significantly suppressed by specific inhibitors for PKC and p38 MAPK, but not by PI3-K inhibitors. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that biochanin A, genistein and p-ethylphenol enhance IL-4 production in activated T cells by two independent pathways, PI3-K/PKC/NF-AT and PKC/p38 MAPK/AP-1.

  20. Phytoestrogens and post reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Baber, Rod

    2010-08-01

    The use of phytoestrogens for various perceived health benefits is widespread. Despite 20 years of research the evidence for any significant health benefits remains inconclusive. Pre clinical trials have demonstrated both non-genomic and genomic actions of constituents of phytoestrogens including selective, but weak, binding to estrogen receptors, with a preference for ER B over ER A. Evidence of clinically relevant biological effects from observational studies and randomized trials has, in general, been lacking. Despite many trials there remains little evidence that phytoestrogens, whether dietary or supplemented, significantly relieve menopausal vasomotor symptoms or cognition. Several potential mechanisms for a positive effect on bone and cardiovascular health have been demonstrated however no fracture prevention data or cardiovascular end point benefit has yet been demonstrated. In vitro effects of phytoestrogens on breast cells have been both stimulatory and inhibitory however net effects appear neutral with observational studies finding no change in breast cancer risk. No effect has been seen on endometrial or other cancers and side effect profiles have, in general, been mild.

  1. Combined effects of urinary phytoestrogens metabolites and polymorphisms in metabolic enzyme gene on idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yufeng; Du, Guizhen; Chen, Minjian; Hu, Weiyue; Lu, Chuncheng; Wu, Wei; Hang, Bo; Zhou, Zuomin; Wang, Xinru; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may interact with estrogen receptors and mimic estrogenic effects. It remains unclear whether the individual variability in metabolizing phytoestrogens contributes to phytoestrogens-induced beneficial or detrimental effects. Our aim was to determine whether there is any interaction between metabolic rates (MR) of phytoestrogens and genetic polymorphisms in related xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme genes. MR was used to assess phytoestrogen exposure and individual metabolic ability. The amount of phytoestrogens in urine was measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 600 idiopathic infertile male patients and 401 controls. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform combined with the Taqman method. Prototypes and metabolites of secoisolariciresinol (SEC) have inverse effects on male reproduction. It was found that low MR of SEC increased the risk of male infertility (OR 2.49, 95 % CI 1.78, 3.48, P trend = 8.00 × 10(-8)). Novel interactions were also observed between the MR of SEC and rs1042389 in CYP2B6, rs1048943 in CYP1A1, and rs1799931 in NAT2 on male infertility (P inter = 1.06 × 10(-4), 1.14 × 10(-3), 3.55 × 10(-3), respectively). By analyzing the relationships between urinary phytoestrogen concentrations, their metabolites and male infertility, we found that individual variability in metabolizing SEC contributed to the interpersonal differences in SEC's effects on male reproduction.

  2. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  3. Development of a high-throughput LC/APCI-MS method for the determination of thirteen phytoestrogens including gut microbial metabolites in human urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Wyns, Ciska; Bolca, Selin; De Keukeleire, Denis; Heyerick, Arne

    2010-04-15

    The investigation into the potential usefulness of phytoestrogens in the treatment of menopausal symptoms requires large-scale clinical trials that involve rapid, validated assays for the characterization and quantification of the phytoestrogenic precursors and their metabolites in biological matrices, as large interindividual differences in metabolism and bioavailability have been reported. Consequently, a new sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (HPLC-MS) for the quantitative determination of thirteen phytoestrogens including their most important gut microbial metabolites (genistein, daidzein, equol, dihydrodaidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, coumestrol, secoisolariciresinol, matairesinol, enterodiol, enterolactone, isoxanthohumol, xanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin) in human urine and serum within one single analytical run was developed. The method uses a simple sample preparation procedure consisting of enzymatic deconjugation followed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) or solid-phase extraction (SPE) for urine or serum, respectively. The phytoestrogens and their metabolites are detected with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), operating both in the positive and the negative mode. This bioanalytical method has been fully validated and proved to allow an accurate and precise quantification of the targeted phytoestrogens and their metabolites covering the lower parts-per-billion range for the measurement of relevant urine and serum levels following ingestion of phytoestrogen-rich dietary supplements.

  4. Synergistic chemoprotective mechanisms of dietary phytoestrogens in a select combination against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Gupta, Gopal

    2011-08-01

    Combination of dietary phytoestrogens with diverse molecular mechanisms may enhance their anticancer efficacy at physiological concentrations, as evidenced in epidemiological studies. A select combination of three dietary phytoestrogens containing 8.33 μM each of genistein (G), quercetin (Q) and biochanin A (B) was found to be more potent in inhibiting the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) as well as DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro than either 25 μM of G, B or Q or 12.5+12.5 μM of G+Q, Q+B or G+B. Subsequent mechanistic studies in PC-3 cells indicated that the action of phytoestrogens was mediated both through estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent and ER-independent pathways as potent estrogen antagonist ICI-182780 (ICI, 5 μM) could not completely mask the synergistic anticancer effects, which were sustained appreciably in presence of ICI. G+Q+B combination was significantly more effective than individual compounds or their double combinations in increasing ER-β, bax (mRNA expression); phospho-JNK, bax (protein levels); and in decreasing bcl-2, cyclin E, c-myc (mRNA expression); phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK, bcl-2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (protein levels) in PC-3 cells. Phytoestrogens also synergistically stimulated caspase-3 activity. Our findings suggest that selectively combining anticancer phytoestrogens could significantly increase the efficacy of individual components resulting in improved efficacy at physiologically achievable concentrations. The combination mechanism of multiple anticancer phytochemicals may be indicative of the potential of some vegetarian diet components to elicit chemopreventive effects against prostate cancer at their physiologically achievable concentrations, in vivo.

  5. Effects of estrogen and phytoestrogens on endometrial leakage in ovariectomized rats and the related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Fang; Duan, Ying; Wang, Long-De; Tian, Zhi-Feng; Qiu, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Ying-Fu; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Li-Na

    2013-02-25

    Phytoestrogens, a group of plant-derived non-steroidal compounds that can behave as estrogens by binding to estrogen receptors, have drawn great attention for their potentially beneficial effects on human health. However, there are few studies investigating the potential side effects of phytoestrogens on the reproductive system. The present study was to elucidate the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and phytoestrogens genistein (Gen), resveratrol (Res), and phloretin (Phl) on eosinophilic infiltration of the ovariectomized rat uterus and endometrial vascular permeability, and to analyze the underlying mechanisms. The ovariectomized rats received daily subcutaneous injections of E2, E2+P4, P4, Gen, Res, Phl, or an equivalent volume of vehicle for 21 days, and sham-operated animals (Sham rats) were used as the controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed a marked increase in uterine eosinophilic infiltrations in ovariectomized rats treated with E2, E2+P4 or P4, which was associated with increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) proteins as determined by immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis. However, all three phytoestrogens had no markedly effect on the uterine eosinophilic infiltration and the expressions of VEGF, NF-κB, and TNF-α in the uterus of ovariectomized rats. Our data demonstrate that E2 alone or in combination with P4 increases uterine eosinophilic infiltration which is related with vascular hyperpermeability caused by VEGF, NF-κB and TNF-α, whereas phytoestrogens Gen, Res, and Phl, have no such an effect.

  6. Genistein at maximal physiologic serum levels induces G0/G1 arrest in MCF-7 and HB4a cells, but not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboy, Marcela S; Marcarini, Juliana C; de Souza, Alecsandra O; de Paula, Natália A; Dorta, Daniel J; Mantovani, Mário S; Ribeiro, Lucia R

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a balanced diet can contribute to better human health. For this reason, soy-based food and pure isoflavones (pills) are one of the most consumed. The association of this consumption and lower risks of chronic diseases and cancer is well established for the Asian population and has been attracting the attention of people worldwide, especially women at menopause who seek to alleviate the symptoms associated with the lack of estrogen. Despite positive epidemiological data, concerns still exist because of conflicting results found in scientific literature with relation to the role of isoflavones in breast and hormone-related cancers. The aim of our study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis, and changes in apoptosis-related genes of maximal physiological serum levels of the isoflavone genistein (Gen) in MCF-7 tumoral cells and in HB4a non-tumoral cells. In addition, induction of cell cycle arrest was also investigated. Only supraphysiological levels of Gen (50 and 100 μM) were cytotoxic to these cell lines. Concentrations of 10 and 25 μM did not induce apoptosis and significant changes in expression of the studied genes. Positive results were found only in cell cycle analysis: G0/G1 delay of MCF-7 cells in both concentrations of Gen and at 25 μM in HB4a cells. It is the first study investigating effects of Gen in the HB4a cell line. Thus, despite the lack of apoptosis induction (generally found with high concentrations), Gen at physiologically relevant serum levels still exerts chemopreventive effects through the modulation of cell cycle. PMID:24325455

  7. Soy diets containing varying amounts of genistein stimulate growth of estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) tumors in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Allred, C D; Allred, K F; Ju, Y H; Virant, S M; Helferich, W G

    2001-07-01

    We have demonstrated that the isoflavone, genistein, stimulates growth of estrogen-dependent human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells in vivo (C. Y. Hsieh et al., Cancer Res., 58: 3833-3838, 1998). The isoflavones are a group of phytoestrogens that are present in high concentrations in soy. Whether consumption of genistein from soy protein will have similar effects on estrogen-dependent tumor growth as pure genistein has not been investigated in the athymic mouse tumor implant model. Depending on processing, soy protein isolates vary widely in concentrations of genistein. We hypothesize that soy isolates containing different concentrations of genistein will stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent cells in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis we conducted experiments in which these soy protein isolates were fed to athymic mice implanted s.c. with estrogen-dependent tumors. Genistein content (aglycone equivalent) of the soy isolate diets were 15, 150, or 300 ppm. Positive (with 17beta-estradiol pellet implant) and negative (no 17beta-estradiol) control groups received casein-based (isoflavone-free) diets. Tumor size was measured weekly. At completion of the study animals were killed and tumors collected for evaluation of cellular proliferation and estrogen-dependent gene expression. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into cellular DNA was used as an indicator of cell proliferation, and pS2 mRNA was used as an estrogen-responsive gene. Soy protein diets containing varying amounts of genistein increased estrogen-dependent tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cell proliferation was greatest in tumors of animals given estrogen or dietary genistein (150 and 300 ppm). Expression of pS2 was increased in tumors from animals consuming dietary genistein (150 and 300 ppm). Here we present new information that soy protein isolates containing increasing concentrations of genistein stimulate the growth of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells in vivo in a dose

  8. Induction of apoptosis in breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 by genistein.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Upadhyay, S; Bhuiyan, M; Sarkar, F H

    1999-05-20

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, whereas Asian women, who consume a traditional diet high in soy products, have a relatively low incidence. Genistein is a prominent isoflavonoid in soy products and has been proposed as the agent responsible for lowering the rate of breast cancer in Asian women. We investigated the effects of genistein on cell growth and apoptosis-related gene expression in breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. We found up-regulation of Bax and p21WAF1 expressions and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and p53 expression in genistein-treated cells. Furthermore, DNA ladder formation, CPP32 activation, and PARP cleavage were observed after treatment with genistein, indicating apoptotic cell deaths. Flow cytometry with 7-amino actinomycin D staining showed that the number of apoptotic cells increased with longer treatment of genistein. From these results, we conclude that genistein inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, regulates the expression of apoptosis-related genes, and induces apoptosis through a p53-independent pathway. The up-regulation of Bax and p21WAF1 may be the molecular mechanisms by which genistein induces apoptosis, however, further definitive studies are needed. These results suggest that genistein may be a potentially effective chemopreventive or therapeutic agent against breast cancer. PMID:10340389

  9. Characterization of estrogenicity of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived experimental model.

    PubMed Central

    Hopert, A C; Beyer, A; Frank, K; Strunck, E; Wünsche, W; Vollmer, G

    1998-01-01

    Severe developmental and reproductive disorders in wild animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with hormonal activity. These adverse effects of environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern and have received increasing attention. Although numerous chemicals with the capacity to interfere with the estrogen receptor (ER) have been identified, information on their molecular mechanism of action and their relative potency is rather limited. For the endometrium, the lack of information is due to the lack of a suitable experimental model. We investigated the functions of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived model, RUCA-I rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane to preserve their functional differentiation and estrogen responsiveness. We assessed the relative binding affinity to the estrogen receptor of the selected phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein, daidzein, and the putative phytoestrogen mangostin compared to estradiol by a competitive Scatchard analysis. The following affinity ranking was measured: 17beta-estradiol >>> coumestrol > genistein > daidzein >>> mangostin. In addition, we investigated the capacity of these compounds to promote the increased production of complement C3, a well-known estradiol-regulated protein of the rat endometrium. All substances tested increased the production of complement C3, although different concentrations were necessary to achieve equivalent levels of induction compared to estradiol. Mechanistically we were able to demonstrate that the increase of complement C3 production was mediated by primarily increasing its steady-state mRNA level. These findings indicate that RUCA-I cells represent a sensitive model system to elucidate relative potencies and functions of environmental estrogens in an endometrium-derived model. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721258

  10. Prepubertal exposure to zearalenone or genistein reduces mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hilakivi-Clarke, L; Onojafe, I; Raygada, M; Cho, E; Skaar, T; Russo, I; Clarke, R

    1999-08-01

    Prepubertal exposure to a pharmacological dose (500 mg kg(-1)) of the phyto-oestrogen genistein can reduce the incidence and multiplicity of carcinogen-induced mammary tumours in rats. However, such an exposure also disrupts the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, making it unsuitable for breast cancer prevention. We studied whether prepubertal exposure to genistein at a total body dose broadly comparable to the level typical of Oriental countries, approximately 1 mg kg(-1) body weight, affects mammary tumorigenesis. We also studied whether prepubertal exposure to zearalenone, a major source for phyto-oestrogens in the USA, influences breast cancer risk. Prepubertal rats were treated between postnatal days 7 and 20, with 20 microg (approximately 1 mg kg(-1) body weight) of either genistein or zearalenone. Zearalenone exposure significantly reduced both the incidence and multiplicity of mammary tumours induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Genistein exposure significantly reduced tumour multiplicity, but not tumour incidence, when compared with vehicle-treated animals. Furthermore, 60% of the tumours in the genistein group were not malignant, while all the tumours analysed for histopathology in the vehicle and zearalenone groups were adenocarcinomas. A higher number of differentiated alveolar buds, and lower number of terminal ducts, were present in the DMBA-treated mammary glands of the phyto-oestrogen exposed rats. The concentration of oestrogen receptor (ER) binding sites after the DMBA treatment was low in the mammary glands of all groups but a significantly higher proportion of the glands in the zearalenone exposed rats were ER-positive (i.e. ER levels > or = 5 fmol mg(-1) protein) than the glands of the vehicle controls. Our data suggest that a prepubertal exposure to a low dose of either zearalenone or genistein may protect the mammary gland from carcinogen-induced malignant transformation, possibly by increasing differentiation

  11. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  12. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  13. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  14. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  15. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2. PMID:27238724

  16. Environmentally Relevant Dose of Bisphenol A Does Not Affect Lipid Metabolism and Has No Synergetic or Antagonistic Effects on Genistein's Beneficial Roles on Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shibin; Zuo, Xuezhi; Fan, Ying; Li, Hongyu; Zhao, Nana; Yang, Huiqin; Ye, Xiaolei; He, Dongliang; Yang, Hui; Jin, Xin; Tian, Chong; Ying, Chenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Both bisphenol A (BPA, an endocrine disrupting chemicals) and genistein (a phytoestrogen mainly derived from leguminosae) are able to bind to estrogen receptors, but they are considered to have different effects on metabolic syndrome, surprisingly. We here investigate the effects of an environmentally relevant dose of BPA alone and the combined effects with genistein on lipid metabolism in rats. Eight groups of adult male Wistar rats, fed with either standard chow diet or high-fat diet, were treated with BPA (50μg/kg/day), genistein (10mg/kg/day), and BPA plus genistein for 35 weeks, respectively. Metabolic parameters in serum and liver were determined; the hematoxylin/eosin and oil Red O staining were used to observe liver histologically; gene expressions related to hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed by Real-time PCR; protein expressions of PPARγ, PPARα and LC3 in liver were analyzed by western blotting. No difference of body weight gain, total energy intake, liver weight/body weight or body fat percentage in both STD- and HFD-fed sub-groups was observed after treatment with BPA, genistein, or BPA plus genistein (P>0.05). Genistein alleviated lipid metabolism disorder and decreased the mRNA and protein expression of PPARγ (P<0.05), and increased the protein expression of LC3II (P<0.05) in liver of HFD-fed rats. However, BPA treatment had no effect on lipid metabolism in rats alone (P>0.05) or combined with genistein. Our findings suggest that long-term environmentally relevant dose of BPA did not affect lipid metabolism, and had no synergetic or antagonistic roles on genistein's beneficial function on hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27171397

  17. Erythroidine alkaloids: a novel class of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Djiogue, Sefirin; Halabalaki, Maria; Njamen, Dieudonné; Kretzschmar, Georg; Lambrinidis, George; Hoepping, Josephine; Raffaelli, Francesca M; Mikros, Emmanuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Vollmer, Günter

    2014-07-01

    Erythrina poeppigiana is a medicinal plant which is widely used in Asia, Latin America, and Africa in traditional remedies for gynecological complications and maladies. In continuation of studies for the discovery of novel phytoestrogens, four erythroidine alkaloids, namely α-erythroidine, β-erythroidine, and their oxo-derivatives 8-oxo-α-erythroidine and 8-oxo-β-erythroidine, were isolated and structurally characterized from the methanolic extract of the stem bark of E. poeppigiana. Due to the high amounts of erythroidines in the extract and considering the widespread utilization of Erythrina preparations in traditional medicine, the exploration of their estrogenic properties was performed. The estrogenicity of the isolated erythroidines was assayed in various estrogen receptor-(ER)-dependent test systems, including receptor binding affinity, cell culture based ER-dependent reporter gene assays, and gene expression studies in cultured cells using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction techniques. α-Erythroidine and β-erythroidine showed binding affinity values for ERα of 0.015 ± 0.010% and 0.005 ± 0.010%, respectively, whereas only β-erythroidine bound to ERβ (0.006 ± 0.010%). In reporter gene assays, both erythroidines exhibited a significant dose-dependent estrogenic stimulation of ER-dependent reporter gene activity in osteosarcoma cells detectable already at 10 nM. Results were confirmed in the MVLN cells, a bioluminescent variant of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Further, α-erythroidine and β-erythroidine both induced the enhanced expression of the specific ERα-dependent genes trefoil factor-1 and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 3 in MCF-7 cells, confirming estrogenicity. Additionally, using molecular docking simulations, a potential mode of binding on ERα, is proposed, supporting the experimental evidences. This is the first time that an estrogenic profile is reported for erythroidine alkaloids, potentially a new class of

  18. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Hoerger, Corinne C.; Meyer, Michael T.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2 Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-of-reference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). The nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  19. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Hoerger, C.C.; Meyer, M.T.; Wettstein, F.E.; Hubbard, L.E.; Bucheli, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2. Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-ofreference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). Th e nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  20. Dose-response effects of phytoestrogens on the activity and expression of 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and aromatase in human granulosa-luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Michael; Bohday, Jemma; Fonseka, Shamara M R; Ullah, Amer I; Whitehead, Saffron A

    2005-08-01

    There is evidence that certain phytoestrogens can inhibit key steroidogenic enzymes although most studies have been carried out on microsomal or purified enzyme preparations, some using cell lines. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of phytoestrogens, at concentrations that would be attained through the diet, could inhibit 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and/or aromatase in primary cultures of human granulosa-luteal (GL) cells and that this effect was due to a decrease in the expression of these proteins. Based on published evidence, eight compounds were selected for investigation and these included the flavones apigenin and quercetin, the isoflavones genistein, biochanin A and daidzein, the lignans, enterodiol and enterolactone, and the mycotoxin zearalenone. Human GL cells were cultured for 48 h in the presence of these phytoestrogens at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 microM and after addition of fresh media the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone or androstenedione to oestradiol over a 4h period was measured. Biochanin A was the only phytoestrogen that displayed any dose-dependent inhibition of 3beta-HSD, others showing inhibition at doses >/=10 microM. Apigenin and quercetin only inhibited aromatase/17beta-HSD at high doses as did genistein, biochanin A and daidzein. The lignans had weak inhibitory effects on aromatase/17beta-HSD, whilst zearalenone showed potent inhibition at 0.1 microM. Phytoestrogens did not exert any significant effects on protein expression of 3beta-HSD or aromatase as determined by Western blots. It is concluded that steroidogenic enzymes are inhibited by phytoestrogens in primary cultures of human GL cells but these cells are less sensitive to the effects of phytoestrogens than cell-free systems. This may be due to poor lipid solubility or cellular metabolism. We have also shown for the first time that phytoestrogens do not act by inhibiting the cellular concentration of 3beta-HSD and

  1. Modulation of mammary gland development in prepubertal male rats exposed to genistein and methoxychlor.

    PubMed

    You, Li; Sar, Madhabananda; Bartolucci, Erika J; McIntyre, Barry S; Sriperumbudur, Rajagopal

    2002-04-01

    The estrogenic isoflavone genistein is a common dietary component that has been shown to affect reproductive development in experimental animals at high doses. The objective of the present study was to examine interactions of genistein and the hormonally active pesticide methoxychlor on mammary gland development in juvenile rats. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a soy- and alfalfa-free diet containing different combinations of genistein (300 and 800 ppm) and methoxychlor (800 ppm). Rats were fed these diets starting on gestation day (GD)1 and continuing through pregnancy and lactation until postnatal day (PND) 22, when the pups were killed. Inguinal mammary glands from both female and male pups were processed as whole-mount preparations for morphometric analysis. The total glandular area and the numbers of branch points, lateral buds, and terminal end buds in the male rats were found to be significantly greater in the groups exposed to methoxychlor than those exposed to genistein only. These effects were not observed in the female rats. In the male rats, methoxychlor had the most prominent effect on elongating the glandular ducts, while genistein enhanced the ductile branching. The 2 compounds in combination promoted the development of alveolar-lobular structure, an effect not observed with either compound alone. Immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed a high percentage of immunopositive cells in the mammary epithelia of the males exposed to methoxychlor and genistein (800 ppm) compared to the controls. While no significant changes in serum levels of mammotrophic hormones were detected, increased immunostaining for insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, estrogen receptor alpha, and progesterone receptor in the genistein + methoxychlor group suggested that local factors involved in regulating mammary growth may have played a role in propagating the endocrine effects of these two compounds. These results indicated that the mammary

  2. Effectiveness of phytoestrogens in climacteric medicine.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Wahab, May

    2010-09-01

    The increased interest in phytoestrogens in the management of menopausal symptoms followed the publication of the Women's Health Initiative study. A wide-spread perception that these plant-derived compounds are equivalent to estrogen was established. These compounds evolved to fulfill the needs of plant physiological processes and are natural for the plant cells but not natural to the human cell. Epidemiological data suggest a possible protective effect of phytoestrogen if consumed during adolescence, but later on in life this effect is not clear. The utility of phytoestrogen as a "natural and safe" alternative to estrogen in alleviating vasomotor symptoms has failed the test in randomized clinical trials. Because many breast cancer sufferers seek in phytoestrogen a relief of estrogen deficiency symptoms, the possible interaction of such remedies with risk of recurrence of breast cancer or interference with tamoxifen action should not be overlooked.

  3. Soy and phytoestrogens: possible side effects.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are present in certain edible plants being most abundant in soy; they are structurally and functionally analogous to the estrogens. Phytoestrogens have been applied for compensation of hormone deficiency in the menopause. At the same time, soy products are used in infant food and other foodstuffs. Furthermore, soy is applied as animal fodder, so that residual phytoestrogens and their active metabolites such as equol can remain in meat and influence the hormonal balance of the consumers. There have been only singular reports on modified gender-related behavior or feminization in humans in consequence of soy consumption. In animals, the intake of phytoestrogens was reported to impact fertility, sexual development and behavior. Feminizing effects in humans can be subtle and identifiable only statistically in large populations.

  4. Genistein supplementation prevents weight gain but promotes oxidative stress and inflammation in the vasculature of female obese ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Simperova, Anna; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Faust, James J; Sweazea, Karen L

    2016-08-01

    Obesity, a state of chronic low-grade inflammation, is strongly associated with the development of hypertension and diabetes. Superoxide, a free radical elevated in obese individuals, promotes hypertension through scavenging the endogenous vasodilator nitric oxide. The hypothesis was a genistein-enriched diet would promote weight loss and reduce oxidative stress and inflammation in the vasculature of intact female ob/ob mice. Aortas and mesenteric arteries were isolated from female ob/ob mice fed genistein-free (0mg genistein/kg diet; n=6), standard chow (200-300mg genistein/kg diet; n=11) or genistein-enriched (600mg genistein/kg diet; n=9) diets for 4weeks. Sections of isolated vessels were labeled with the superoxide indicator dihydroethidium and fluorescence was measured by confocal microscopy. Protein expression of the inflammatory marker inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was measured in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) surrounding each vessel and plasma concentrations of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were quantified. Genistein-enriched diet promoted less weight gain compared to animals fed standard chow (P=.008). Standard chow promoted increased superoxide in the aorta (P=.030) and mesenteric arteries (P=.024) compared to a diet devoid of genistein. At all tested concentrations, genistein significantly increased iNOS expression in mesenteric artery PVAT (vs. standard chow, P<.001; vs. genistein-enriched, P=.002) and tended to increase iNOS within the aortic PVAT (standard chow, P=.075) compared to the genistein-free group. Plasma SOD activity was significantly downregulated in genistein-enriched animals as compared to those fed a genistein-free diet (P=.028). In summary, although genistein prevents weight gain, it promotes vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in obese ovarian-intact female mice. PMID:27440533

  5. Genistein Modified Polymer Blends for Hemodialysis Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Teng; Kyu, Thein; Define, Linda; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A soybean-derived phytochemical called genistein was used as a modifying agent to polyether sulfone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PES/PVP) blends to produce multi-functional hemodialysis membranes. With the aid of phase diagrams of PES/PVP/genistein blends, asymmetric porous membranes were fabricated by coagulating in non-solvent. Both unmodified and genistein modified PES/PVP membranes were shown to be non-cytotoxic to the blood cells. Unmodified PES/PVP membranes were found to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, whereas the genistein modified membranes exhibited suppression for ˜60% of the ROS levels. Also, the genistein modified membranes revealed significant suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, addition of PVP to PES showed the reduced trend of platelet adhesion and then leveled off. However, the modified membranes exhibited suppression of platelet adhesion at low genistein loading, but beyond 15 wt%, the platelet adhesion level rised up.

  6. The pros and cons of phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Patisaul, Heather B.; Jefferson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant derived compounds found in a wide variety of foods, most notably soy. A litany of health benefits including a lowered risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, and menopausal symptoms, are frequently attributed to phytoestrogens but many are also considered endocrine disruptors, indicating that they have the potential to cause adverse health effects as well. Consequently, the question of whether or not phytoestrogens are beneficial or harmful to human health remains unresolved. The answer is likely complex and may depend on age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut microflora. Clarity on this issue is needed because global consumption is rapidly increasing. Phytoestrogens are present in numerous dietary supplements and widely marketed as a natural alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Soy infant formula now constitutes up to a third of the US market, and soy protein is now added to many processed foods. As weak estrogen agonists/antagonists with molecular and cellular properties similar to synthetic endocrine disruptors such as Bisphenol A (BPA), the phytoestrogens provide a useful model to comprehensively investigate the biological impact of endocrine disruptors in general. This review weighs the evidence for and against the purported health benefits and adverse effects of phytoestrogens. PMID:20347861

  7. The pros and cons of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Patisaul, Heather B; Jefferson, Wendy

    2010-10-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant derived compounds found in a wide variety of foods, most notably soy. A litany of health benefits including a lowered risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, and menopausal symptoms, are frequently attributed to phytoestrogens but many are also considered endocrine disruptors, indicating that they have the potential to cause adverse health effects as well. Consequently, the question of whether or not phytoestrogens are beneficial or harmful to human health remains unresolved. The answer is likely complex and may depend on age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut microflora. Clarity on this issue is needed because global consumption is rapidly increasing. Phytoestrogens are present in numerous dietary supplements and widely marketed as a natural alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Soy infant formula now constitutes up to a third of the US market, and soy protein is now added to many processed foods. As weak estrogen agonists/antagonists with molecular and cellular properties similar to synthetic endocrine disruptors such as Bisphenol A (BPA), the phytoestrogens provide a useful model to comprehensively investigate the biological impact of endocrine disruptors in general. This review weighs the evidence for and against the purported health benefits and adverse effects of phytoestrogens.

  8. Suppressive effect of neonatal treatment with a phytoestrogen, coumestrol, on lordosis and estrous cycle in female rats.

    PubMed

    Kouki, Tom; Okamoto, Miho; Wada, Shizuko; Kishitake, Miki; Yamanouchi, Korehito

    2005-01-15

    The neural control systems for the ovulatory cycle and lordosis behavior are sexually differentiated by estrogen during the perinatal period in rats. In the present study, the effects of a single neonatal injection with the phytoestrogen, coumestrol, on female reproductive functions were investigated. Female rats were injected subcutaneously with 1 or 3mg coumestrol (CM1, CM3), 1mg genistein (GS1), 1mg estradiol (E2), or oil at day 5 after birth (birth day=day 1) and an estrous cycle check and lordosis behavior test were performed. As a result, vaginal opening was advanced in CM1-, CM3- or E2-treated females. A vaginal smear check indicated that oil- or GS1-treated females showed a constant 4- or 5-day estrous cycle, whereas CM1-, CM3- or E2-treated rats showed a persistent or prolonged estrus. Ovariectomy was performed in all females at 60 days of age. The ovary weights in the CM1-, CM3- or E2-treated groups were lower than those in the oil- and GS1-treated groups and no corpora lutea were found in any rats of these three groups, except for two E2-treated rats. Behavioral tests were carried out after implantation of E2-tubes. All rats in the CM1-, GS1-treated groups showed a high lordosis quotient (LQ), being comparable to that in the oil-treated females. On the other hand, LQs in the CM3, E2 or male groups were lower than that in the control female group. These results suggest that a single neonatal injection of 3 mg coumestrol was effective in suppressing the functions of ovulation-inducing mechanisms and the induction of lordosis, but 1mg coumestrol was effective in only the estrous cycle of female rats.

  9. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  10. Immunomodulatory effects and improved prognosis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis after O-tetradecanoyl-genistein treatment.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sandra B R; Junior, Celso O R; Alves, Caio C S; Dias, Alyria T; Alves, Lívia L; Mazzoccoli, Luciano; Mesquita, Felipe P; Figueiredo, Nathália S V; Juliano, Maria A; Castañon, Maria Christina M N; Gameiro, Jacy; Almeida, Mauro V; Teixeira, Henrique C; Ferreira, Ana Paula

    2012-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis (MS), a human inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Genistein, an isoflavonoid phytoestrogenic compound found in soy, is known to reverse clinical signs of EAE. Although genistein has some potential in clinical application, it has some disadvantages related to its chemical structure, such as rapid in vivo metabolism and a fast decline in serum after oral administration. The present work investigates the treatment of EAE by using 7-O-tetradecanoyl-genistein (TDG), a more lipophilic analog of genistein obtained by esterification. The clinical course of EAE was investigated in C57Bl/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG)(35-55) in complete Freund's adjuvant supplemented with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA. After 14 days of MOG immunization, mice were treated with TDG for seven days. Numbers of IL-17-producing cells and Foxp3 by CD4(+) T cells and CTLA-4 expression by CD3(+) T cells from brain were determined by flow cytometry. Levels of IL-6, IFN-γ and IL-10 were evaluated by ELISA. Brain sections were stained by hematoxylin and eosin method. The data obtained indicate that TDG treatment ameliorates the clinical signs of EAE, which correlates with a decrease of IL-17-producing cells and an increase in Foxp3(+)CD4(+) cells in the brain. TDG is also shown to enhance IL-10 production and CTLA-4 expression and to reduce IFN-γ and IL-6. Altogether, these findings suggest an immunomodulatory therapeutic role for TDG in EAE and multiple sclerosis.

  11. Different effects of genistein and resveratrol on oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Win, William; Cao, Zhuoxiao; Peng, Xingxiang; Trush, Michael A; Li, Yunbo

    2002-01-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that phenolic compounds, including genistein (4',5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), are able to protect against carcinogenesis in animal models. This study was undertaken to examine the ability of genistein and resveratrol to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated strand breaks in phi X-174 plasmid DNA. H(2)O(2)/Cu(II) and hydroquinone/Cu(II) were used to cause oxidative DNA strand breaks in the plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the presence of genistein at micromolar concentrations resulted in a marked inhibition of DNA strand breaks induced by either H(2)O(2)/Cu(II) or hydroquinone/Cu(II). Genistein neither affected the Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle nor reacted with H(2)O(2) suggest that genistein may directly scavenge the ROS that participate in the induction of DNA strand breaks. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of genistein, the presence of resveratrol at similar concentrations led to increased DNA strand breaks induced by H(2)O(2)/Cu(II). Further studies showed that in the presence of Cu(II), resveratrol, but not genistein was able to cause DNA strand breaks. Moreover, both Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle and H(2)O(2) were shown to be critically involved in resveratrol/copper-mediated DNA strand breaks. The above results indicate that despite their similar in vivo anticarcinogenic effects, genistein and resveratrol appear to exert different effects on oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

  12. Sex differences in the mechano-energetic effects of genistein on stunned rat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Colareda, Germán A; Ragone, María I; Consolini, Alicia E

    2016-01-01

    Although the phytoestrogen genistein (Gen) is considered protective in cardiovascular diseases, its direct effects on stunned hearts after transient ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) are unknown. This report studied the effects of 20 μmol/L Gen on the mechano-calorimetric behaviour during I/R of rat and guinea pig hearts to evaluate the energetics of Ca(2+) homeostasis. Isolated beating hearts were perfused with control Krebs solution inside a calorimeter with or without perfusion of Gen before a transient period of I/R. Left ventricular pressure development (P) and total heat rate (Ht) were continuously measured. At 37°C, Gen did not change post-ischemic contractile recovery (PICR), but it increased the relaxation rate. However, PICR was reduced in hearts of male rats and guinea pigs at 30°C. Total muscle economy (P/Ht) showed the same behaviour as P at each temperature. Inhibition of phosphatases with orthovanadate during Gen perfusion prevented a decrease in PICR in male rat hearts, suggesting that this effect is due to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Reperfusing ischemic hearts with 10 mmol/L caffeine-36 mmol/L Na(+)-Krebs induced contracture dependent on the sarcoreticular Ca(2+) content. Contracture relaxation depends on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and Gen reduced the relaxation rate. Moreover, Gen prevented the increase in Rhod-2 fluorescence (free [Ca(2+)]m) of rat cardiomyocytes. In guinea pig hearts, Gen maintained ischemic preconditioning, but was reduced by 5-hydroxydecanoate, suggesting the participation of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent K channels. Results suggest that Gen acts on several mechanisms that regulate myocardial calcium homeostasis and energetics during I/R, which differ in a temperature- and sex-dependent manner. PMID:26452245

  13. Sex differences in the mechano-energetic effects of genistein on stunned rat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Colareda, Germán A; Ragone, María I; Consolini, Alicia E

    2016-01-01

    Although the phytoestrogen genistein (Gen) is considered protective in cardiovascular diseases, its direct effects on stunned hearts after transient ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) are unknown. This report studied the effects of 20 μmol/L Gen on the mechano-calorimetric behaviour during I/R of rat and guinea pig hearts to evaluate the energetics of Ca(2+) homeostasis. Isolated beating hearts were perfused with control Krebs solution inside a calorimeter with or without perfusion of Gen before a transient period of I/R. Left ventricular pressure development (P) and total heat rate (Ht) were continuously measured. At 37°C, Gen did not change post-ischemic contractile recovery (PICR), but it increased the relaxation rate. However, PICR was reduced in hearts of male rats and guinea pigs at 30°C. Total muscle economy (P/Ht) showed the same behaviour as P at each temperature. Inhibition of phosphatases with orthovanadate during Gen perfusion prevented a decrease in PICR in male rat hearts, suggesting that this effect is due to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Reperfusing ischemic hearts with 10 mmol/L caffeine-36 mmol/L Na(+)-Krebs induced contracture dependent on the sarcoreticular Ca(2+) content. Contracture relaxation depends on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and Gen reduced the relaxation rate. Moreover, Gen prevented the increase in Rhod-2 fluorescence (free [Ca(2+)]m) of rat cardiomyocytes. In guinea pig hearts, Gen maintained ischemic preconditioning, but was reduced by 5-hydroxydecanoate, suggesting the participation of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent K channels. Results suggest that Gen acts on several mechanisms that regulate myocardial calcium homeostasis and energetics during I/R, which differ in a temperature- and sex-dependent manner.

  14. Phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in surface waters--Their sources, occurrence, and potential contribution to estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Jarošová, Barbora; Javůrek, Jakub; Adamovský, Ondřej; Hilscherová, Klára

    2015-08-01

    This review discusses the potential contribution of phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens to in vitro estrogenic activities occurring in surface waters and in vivo estrogenic effects in fish. Main types, sources, and pathways of entry into aquatic environment of these detected compounds were summarized. Reviewed concentrations of phyto/mycoestrogens in surface waters were mostly undetectable or in low ng/L ranges, but exceeded tens of μg/L for the flavonoids biochanin A, daidzein and genistein at some sites. While a few phytosterols were reported to occur at relatively high concentrations in surface waters, information about their potencies in in vitro systems is very limited, and contradictory in some cases. The relative estrogenic activities of compounds (compared to standard estrogen 17β-estradiol) by various in vitro assays were included, and found to differ by orders of magnitude. These potencies were used to estimate total potential estrogenic activities based on chemical analyses of phyto/mycoestrogens. In vivo effective concentrations of waterborne phyto/mycoestrogens were available only for biochanin A, daidzein, formononetin, genistein, equol, sitosterol, and zearalenone. The lowest observable effect concentrations in vivo were reported for the mycoestrogen zearalenone. This compound and especially its metabolites also elicited the highest in vitro estrogenic potencies. Despite the limited information available, the review documents low contribution of phyto/mycoestrogens to estrogenic activity in vast majority of surface waters, but significant contribution to in vitro responses and potentially also to in vivo effects in areas with high concentrations.

  15. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific.

    PubMed

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm(2), n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm(2), n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm(2), n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl(-) secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3 (-) secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route

  16. Environmental Epigenetics and Phytoestrogen/Phytochemical Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos M.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important environmental factors to promote epigenetic alterations in an individual is nutrition and exposure to plant compounds. Phytoestrogens and other phytochemicals have dramatic effects on cellular signaling events, so have the capacity to dramatically alter developmental and physiological events. Epigenetics provides one of the more critical molecular mechanisms for environmental factors such as phytoestrogens/phytochemicals to influence biology. In the event these epigenetic mechanisms become heritable through epigenetic transgenerational mechanisms the impacts on the health of future generations and areas such as evolutionary biology need to be considered. The current review focuses on available information on the environmental epigenetics of phytoestrogen/phytochemical exposures, with impacts on health, disease and evolutionary biology considered. PMID:23274117

  17. Sex-Dependent Effects of Dietary Genistein on Echocardiographic Profile and Cardiac GLUT4 Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lana; Martin, Joshua B.; Lawmaster, Todd; Arthur, Kathryn; Broderick, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether genistein diet resulted in changes in cardiac function, using echocardiography, and expression of key proteins involved in glucose uptake by the myocardium. Intact male and female C57BL/6J mice (aged 4–6 weeks) were fed either 600 mg genistein/kg diet (600 G) or 0 mg genistein/kg diet (0 G) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography data revealed sex-dependent differences in the absence of genistein: compared to females, hearts from males exhibited increased systolic left ventricle internal dimension (LVIDs), producing a decrease in function, expressed as fractional shortening (FS). Genistein diet also induced echocardiographic changes in function: in female hearts, 600G induced a 1.5-fold (P < 0.05) increase in LVIDs, resulting in a significant decrease in FS and whole heart surface area when compared to controls (fed 0 G). Genistein diet increased cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males (1.51-fold, P < 0.05) and females (1.76-fold, P < 0.05). However, no effects on the expression of notable intracellular signaling glucose uptake-regulated proteins were observed. Our data indicate that consumption of genistein diet for 4 weeks induces echocardiographic changes in indices of systolic function in females and has beneficial effects on cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males and females. PMID:27471542

  18. Phytoestrogens and cognitive function: a review.

    PubMed

    Soni, Mira; Rahardjo, Tri Budi W; Soekardi, Rodiyah; Sulistyowati, Yenny; Lestariningsih; Yesufu-Udechuku, Amina; Irsan, Atik; Hogervorst, Eef

    2014-03-01

    Neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogen compounds (found in soy) have been demonstrated in animal research and cell culture studies. In particular, phytoestrogens have been shown to reduce Alzheimer's Disease (AD) related pathology, potentially alleviating risk of AD progression. In addition to their antioxidant properties, soy products also have the ability to affect cognition via interaction with estrogen receptors. However, observational studies and randomised controlled trials in humans have resulted in inconclusive findings within this domain. There are several possible reasons for these discrepant data. Studies which report no effect of phytoestrogens on cognition have mainly been carried out in European cohorts, with an average low dietary consumption. In contrast, investigation of Asian populations, with a higher general intake of tofu (a non-fermented soy product) have shown negative associations with cognitive function in those over the age of 65. Consideration of type of soy product is important, as in the latter sample, protective effects of tempe (fermented soy) were also observed. Limited data provide evidence that effects of phytoestrogens on cognition may be modified by dosage, duration of consumption and cognitive test used. Additionally, characteristics of the study population including age, gender, ethnicity and menopausal status appear to be mediating variables. Phytoestrogen treatment interventions have also shown time-limited positive effects on cognition. These findings are consistent with estrogen treatment studies, where initial positive short-term cognitive effects may occur, which reverse with long-term continuous use in elderly women. Well controlled, large scale studies are needed to assess the effects of phytoestrogens on the aging brain and provide further understanding of this association.

  19. Differential sensitivity of normal and malignant breast epithelial cells to genistein is partly mediated by p21(WAF1).

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, S; Neburi, M; Chinni, S R; Alhasan, S; Miller, F; Sarkar, F H

    2001-06-01

    Genistein, a soy metabolite, is a potential chemopreventive agent against various types of cancer. There are several studies documenting molecular alterations leading to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells; however, no studies, to date, have shown the effect of genistein in isogenic normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated whether genistein shows any differential sensitivity to normal (MCF10A and MCF12A) and malignant (MCF10CA1a and MDA-MB-231) breast epithelial cells. We found that genistein causes a greater degree of G(2)-M arrest and induces apoptosis in malignant cell lines compared with normal breast epithelial cells. After genistein treatment, flow cytometric analysis revealed a hyperdiploid population in malignant cells that was not observed in normal cells. Cell cycle regulator p21(WAF1), which is known to be up-regulated by genistein treatment, was greatly induced at RNA and protein levels in normal cells, whereas its level was only slightly induced in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells and not detectable in malignant MCF10CA1a cells. Therefore, we investigated the causal role of p21(WAF1) in the differential sensitivity of genistein among these cell lines. We examined the effects of genistein on p21(WAF1) -/- and p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells, which were used as controls prior to studies on breast cancer cells. We found that there was a greater degree of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p21(WAF1) -/- cells compared with p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells after genistein treatment. Flow cytometric analysis after genistein treatment showed a significant number of p21(WAF1) -/- cells in the hyperdiploid population, which are probably programmed to die through apoptotic processes. To further confirm the causal role of p21(WAF1) in genistein-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, we down-regulated p21(WAF1) by antisense p21(WAF1) cDNA transfection experiments. We found that both normal and malignant p

  20. Development and In Vitro Evaluation of Vitamin E-Enriched Nanoemulsion Vehicles Loaded with Genistein for Chemoprevention Against UVB-Induced Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Bill; Nagaraj, Vinay J; Nayel, Amy; Joshi, Megha; Elbayoumi, Tamer

    2015-10-01

    There is a great need for effective protection against cutaneous pathologies arising from chronic exposure to harmful solar UVB radiations. A promising pharmaceutical strategy to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic/preventative natural compounds (e.g., soy isoflavone Genistein, Gen) is to enhance their dermal delivery using nanoemulsion (NE) formulations. This report investigates the development of nanoemulsified tocotrienol(T3)-rich fraction of red palm oil (Tocomin®), to yield an optimal NE delivery system for dermal photoprotection (z-average size <150 nm, ζ-potential ≈ -30 mV, polydispersity index < 0.25). Physicochemical characterization and photostability studies indicate NE formulations utilizing surfactant mixture (Smix) of Solutol® HS-15 (SHS15) blended with vitamin E TPGS (TPGS) as cosurfactant was significantly superior to formulations that utilized Lutrol® F68 (LF68) as the cosurfactant. A ratio of 60:40 of SHS15-TPGS-NE was further identified as lead Tocomin® NE topical platform using in vitro pharmaceutical skin reactivity studies that assess cutaneous irritancy and cytotoxicity. Prototype Tocomin® NE loaded with the antiphotocarcinogenic molecule Gen (Gen-Tocomin® NE) showed slow-release profile in both liquid and cream forms. Gen-Tocomin® NE also showed excellent biocompatibility, and provided substantial UVB protection to cultured subcutaneous L929 fibroblasts, indicating the great potential of our Tocomin® NE warranting further prototype development as topical pharmaceutical platform for skin photoprotection applications. PMID:26108889

  1. Hormonal action of plant derived and anthropogenic non-steroidal estrogenic compounds: phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Lóránd, T; Vigh, E; Garai, J

    2010-01-01

    Herbivorous and omnivorous vertebrates have evolved in the presence of a variety of phytoestrogens, i.e., plant-derived compounds that can mimic, modulate or disrupt the actions of endogenous estrogens. Since the discovery of the estrus-inducing effects of some plant products in 1926, considerable effort has been devoted to the isolation and structural and pharmacological characterization of phytoestrogens. Recently, agricultural and industrial pollution has added anthropogenic estrogenic compounds to the list of environmental estrogens. Unlike phytoestrogens, these xenoestrogens tend to accumulate and persist in adipose tissue for decades and may cause long-lasting, adverse endocrine effects. Here we review the endocrine effects of known phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens with special emphasis on molecular structure-activity relationships. Phytoestrogens include flavonoids, isoflavonoids, chalcons, coumestans, stilbenes, lignans, ginsenosides and other saponins, as well as the recently discovered tetrahydrofurandiols. Fungal estrogenic compounds may enter the food chain via infested crops. Since some phytoestrogens have been shown to display organ-specific actions, pharmaceutical estrogen analogues with similar properties (selective estrogen receptor modulators, SERMs) are also discussed. Xenoestrogens include dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, bisphenols, alkylphenols, dichlorophenols, methoxychlor, chlordecone, polychlorinated benzol derivatives (PCBs), and dioxins. While most of these compounds act through estrogen receptors alpha and beta, some of their effects may be mediated by other nuclear or membrane-bound receptors or receptor-independent mechanisms. Some might also interfere with the production and metabolism of ovarian estrogens. Better understanding of the molecular pharmacology of phyto- and xenoestrogens may result in the development of novel compounds with therapeutic utility and improved environmental protection.

  2. Effects of phytoestrogens and other plant-derived compounds on mesenchymal stem cells, bone maintenance and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Tatjana; Ebert, Regina; Raaijmakers, Nadja; Schütze, Norbert; Jakob, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens and other plant-derived compounds and extracts have been developed for the treatment of menopause-related complaints and disorders, e.g. hot flushes and osteoporosis. Since estrogens have been discussed to enhance the risk for hormone-sensitive cancers, research activities try to find alternatives. Phytoestrogens like genistein and resveratrol as well as other plant-derived compounds are capable of substituting for estrogens to some extent. Their effects on mesenchymal stem cells and the tissues derived therefrom have been investigated in vitro and in preclinical settings. Besides their well-known estrogenic, i.e. mainly antiresorptive effects on bone via estrogen receptor (ER) signalling, they also directly or indirectly affect osteogenic and adipogenic pathways. As a novel mechanism, phytoestrogens and plant-derived saponins and flavonoids like kaempferol and xanthohumol have been described to reciprocally affect the osteogenic versus the adipogenic differentiation pathway. Both, ER-mediated and other pathways mediate a shift towards osteogenesis by inhibiting PPARγ and C/EBPα, the key adipogenic transcription factors (TFs), while stimulating the key osteogenic TFs Runx2 and Sp7. Besides ER signalling, the broad spectrum of molecular mechanisms supporting osteogenesis comprises the modulation of PPARγ, Wnt/β-catenin, and Sirt1 signalling, which inversely influence the transcription or transactivation of osteogenic versus adipogenic TFs. Preventing the age- and hormone deficiency-related shift towards adipogenesis without provoking adverse estrogenic effects represents a very promising strategy for treating bone loss and other metabolic diseases beyond bone. Research on plant-derived compounds will have to be pursued in vitro as well as in preclinical studies and controlled clinical trials in humans are urgently needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  3. Genistein induces increase in fluid pH, Na+ and HCO3(-) concentration, SLC26A6 and SLC4A4 (NBCe1)-B expression in the uteri of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Chinigarzadeh, Asma; Kasim, Nor Fadila; Muniandy, Sekaran; Kassim, Normadiah M; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-10

    Genistein has been reported to stimulate luminal HCO3(-) secretion. We hypothesized that genistein mediates this effect via SLC26A6 and SLC4A4 (NBCe1) transporters. Our study aimed to: investigate changes in uterine fluid pH, Na+ and HCO3(-) concentration and expression of uterine SLC26A6 and NBCe1 under genistein effect. Ovariectomized adult female rats received 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg/day genistein for a week with and without ICI 182780. A day after the last injection, in vivo uterine perfusion was performed to collect uterine fluid for Na+, HCO3(-) and pH determination. The animals were then sacrificed and uteri were removed for mRNA and protein expression analyses. SLC26A6 and NBCe1-A and NBCe1-B distribution were visualized by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Genistein at 50 and 100 mg/kg/day stimulates uterine fluid pH, Na+ and HCO3(-) concentration increase. Genistein at 100 mg/kg/day up-regulates the expression of SLC26A6 and SLC4A4 mRNA, which were reduced following concomitant ICI 182780 administration. In parallel, SLC26A6 and NBCe1-B protein expression were also increased following high dose genistein treatment and were localized mainly at the apical membrane of the luminal epithelia. SLC26A6 and NBCe1-B up-regulation by genistein could be responsible for the observed increase in the uterine fluid pH, Na+ and HCO3(-) concentration under this condition.

  4. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-08-09

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed.

  5. Anticancer effect of genistein on BG-1 ovarian cancer growth induced by 17 β-estradiol or bisphenol A via the suppression of the crosstalk between estrogen receptor alpha and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Min-Ah; Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between estrogen receptor (ER) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway plays an important role in proliferation of and resistance to endocrine therapy to estrogen dependent cancers. Estrogen (E2) upregulates the expression of components of IGF-1 system and induces the downstream of mitogenic signaling cascades via phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). In the present study, we evaluated the xenoestrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA) and antiproliferative activity of genistein (GEN) in accordance with the influence on this crosstalk. BPA was determined to affect this crosstalk by upregulating mRNA expressions of ERα and IGF-1R and inducing phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt in protein level in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells as E2 did. In the mouse model xenografted with BG-1 cells, BPA significantly increased a tumor burden of mice and expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and cyclin D1 in tumor mass compared to vehicle, indicating that BPA induces ovarian cancer growth by promoting the crosstalk between ER and IGF-1R signals. On the other hand, GEN effectively reversed estrogenicity of BPA by reversing mRNA and protein expressions of ERα, IGF-1R, pIRS-1, and pAkt induced by BPA in cellular model and also significantly decreased tumor growth and in vivo expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and pAkt in xenografted mouse model. Also, GEN was confirmed to have an antiproliferative effect by inducing apoptotic signaling cascades. Taken together, these results suggest that GEN effectively reversed the increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer by suppressing the crosstalk between ERα and IGF-1R signaling pathways upregulated by BPA or E2.

  6. Genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation via miR-27a and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zang, Aimin; Jia, Youchao; Shang, Yanhong; Zhang, Zhuoqi; Ge, Kun; Zhang, Jinchao; Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soybean isoflavone; in its aglycone it has various biological activities. Animal experiments, clinical studies and epidemiological investigations suggest that genistein has preventative and curative functions for a number of diseases, particularly in cancer. The present study explored the potential anti-cancer effect of genistein by observing its role in inhibiting A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation and investigating the possible mechanism. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of genistein (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM; dissolved in physiological saline) for 1, 2 and 3 days. Subsequently, the viability of A549 cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell apoptosis was examined using a flow cytometer, caspase 3/9 activity was measured using commercial kits, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the miR-27a expression and western blotting was used to investigate MET protein expression. The results suggested a significant inhibition of A549 cell growth following treatment with genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The current study also indicated that treatment with genistein significantly induces cell apoptosis and promotes caspase-3/9 activation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further functional assays revealed that the anti-cancer effect of genistein activated microRNA-27a (miR-27a) expression levels and reduced MET protein expression in A549 cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, this study reports, for the first time, a correlation between the anti-cancer effect of genistein and miR-27a-mediated MET signaling.

  7. Genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation via miR-27a and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zang, Aimin; Jia, Youchao; Shang, Yanhong; Zhang, Zhuoqi; Ge, Kun; Zhang, Jinchao; Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soybean isoflavone; in its aglycone it has various biological activities. Animal experiments, clinical studies and epidemiological investigations suggest that genistein has preventative and curative functions for a number of diseases, particularly in cancer. The present study explored the potential anti-cancer effect of genistein by observing its role in inhibiting A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation and investigating the possible mechanism. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of genistein (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM; dissolved in physiological saline) for 1, 2 and 3 days. Subsequently, the viability of A549 cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell apoptosis was examined using a flow cytometer, caspase 3/9 activity was measured using commercial kits, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the miR-27a expression and western blotting was used to investigate MET protein expression. The results suggested a significant inhibition of A549 cell growth following treatment with genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The current study also indicated that treatment with genistein significantly induces cell apoptosis and promotes caspase-3/9 activation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further functional assays revealed that the anti-cancer effect of genistein activated microRNA-27a (miR-27a) expression levels and reduced MET protein expression in A549 cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, this study reports, for the first time, a correlation between the anti-cancer effect of genistein and miR-27a-mediated MET signaling. PMID:27602162

  8. Arctigenin, a dietary phytoestrogen, induces apoptosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the anticancer effect of arctigenin (ATG), a natural lignan product of Arctium lappa L., in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Results indicate that ATG inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. ATG triggers the mitochondrial caspase-independent pathways, as indicated by changes in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, resulting in AIF and EndoG nuclear translocation. ATG increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by increasing p22(phox)/NADPH oxidase 1 interaction and decreasing glutathione level. ATG clearly increases the activation of p38 MAPK, but not JNK and ERK1/2. Antioxidant EUK-8, a synthetic catalytic superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavenger, significantly decreases ATG-mediated p38 activation and apoptosis. Blocking p38 with a specific inhibitor suppresses ATG-mediated Bcl-2 downregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, ATG activates ATF-2, a transcription factor activated by p38, and then upregulates histone H3K9 trimethylation in the Bcl-2 gene promoter region, resulting in Bcl-2 downregulation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG induces apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation of Bcl-2 by upregulation of histone H3K9 trimethylation.

  9. Arctigenin, a dietary phytoestrogen, induces apoptosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the anticancer effect of arctigenin (ATG), a natural lignan product of Arctium lappa L., in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Results indicate that ATG inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. ATG triggers the mitochondrial caspase-independent pathways, as indicated by changes in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, resulting in AIF and EndoG nuclear translocation. ATG increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by increasing p22(phox)/NADPH oxidase 1 interaction and decreasing glutathione level. ATG clearly increases the activation of p38 MAPK, but not JNK and ERK1/2. Antioxidant EUK-8, a synthetic catalytic superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavenger, significantly decreases ATG-mediated p38 activation and apoptosis. Blocking p38 with a specific inhibitor suppresses ATG-mediated Bcl-2 downregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, ATG activates ATF-2, a transcription factor activated by p38, and then upregulates histone H3K9 trimethylation in the Bcl-2 gene promoter region, resulting in Bcl-2 downregulation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG induces apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation of Bcl-2 by upregulation of histone H3K9 trimethylation. PMID:24140706

  10. Effects of the isoflavones genistein and equol on the gonadal development of Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed Central

    Kiparissis, Yiannis; Balch, Gordon C; Metcalfe, Tracy L; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2003-01-01

    The estrogenic isoflavone compound genistein recently has been found in the effluents of sewage treatment plants and pulp mills, and the related compound equol has been detected in the runoff from agricultural fields treated with hog manure. Waterborne exposures of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) to equol from soon after hatch to approximately 100 days posthatch induced gonadal intersex (i.e., testis-ova) in males at incidences of 10 and 87% in equol treatments of 0.4 and 0.8 micro g/L, respectively. Exposure to the highest test concentration of genistein, 1,000 micro g/L, also caused a low incidence (i.e., 12%) of gonadal intersex in male medaka. The ovaries of female medaka from both equol and genistein treatments showed delayed oocyte maturation, atretic oocytes, an enlarged ovarian lumen, proliferation of somatic stromal tissue, and primordial germ cells; responses were concentration dependent. Alterations to externally visible secondary sex characteristics occurred in medaka exposed to both equol and genistein. In treatments with 1,000 micro g/L genistein, 72% of male medaka (as identified by the gonadal phenotype) showed feminized secondary sex characteristics. Gonadal intersex and alterations to secondary sex characteristics have been noted in several fish populations around the world. This laboratory study indicates that isoflavone compounds should be considered candidate estrogenic compounds that may be involved in the alteration of sexual development in feral fish populations. PMID:12842767

  11. Regulation of phase II enzymes by genistein and daidzein in male and female Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Erik B; Reeves, Jaime L Rudolf; Mitchell, Alyson E; Steinberg, Francene M

    2009-12-01

    The consumption of soy and soy isoflavones has been associated with a decreased risk of certain cancers. A factor contributing to this dietary chemoprevention is the activity of phase I and II biotransformation enzymes. This study evaluated the hypothesis that dietary soy isoflavones will increase hepatic and extrahepatic quinone reductase (QR), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) phase II enzyme activities, under short-term feeding and basal (non-pharmacologic-induced) conditions. Male and female Swiss Webster mice were fed for 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of one of four treatments: control (casein AIN-93G) or control supplemented with flavone (positive control), genistein, or daidzein aglycones at 1,500 mg/kg of diet. QR activity was increased by daidzein in the liver, by both isoflavones in the kidney and small intestine, and by genistein in the heart. Genistein and daidzein slightly decreased UGT activities in some tissues. Liver GST activity was decreased by genistein in females. In contrast, genistein and daidzein increased kidney GST activity. In general, the greatest effects of isoflavones on phase II enzymes were observed in liver and kidney tissues, occurring at day 3, and peaking at day 5. Sex effects in the liver and kidney included females exhibiting higher QR activities and males exhibiting higher UGT and GST activities. In conclusion, individual soy isoflavones modulate phase II enzymes in mice under short-term feeding and basal conditions. This study provides insights into the actions of isolated isoflavones in mice.

  12. Osteogenic activities of genistein derivatives were influenced by the presence of prenyl group at ring A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiao-Li; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Wong, Man-Sau

    2008-12-01

    Our recent report indicated that the crude extract from stem bark of Erythrina variegata L. (Leguminosae) (EV) exerted beneficial effects against osteoporosis induced by estrogen deficiency in vivo. Follow-up phytochemical study has isolated genistein-derivatives mainly in the form of prenylgenistein from this extract, including 6-prenylgenistein, 8-prenylgenistein, and 6, 8-diprenylgenistein. The present study was performed to investigate the structure-function relationship of these compounds on osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and mineralization in UMR 106 cells. Our results showed that genistein did not stimulate cell growth while 8-prenylgenistein promoted cell growth significantly by 10 approximately 23%. In contrast, the treatment by 6-prenylgenistein for 48 h reduced UMR 106 cell proliferation when compared to cells treated with genistein. The proliferation of 6,8-diprenylgenistein-treated cells was greater than those treated by 6-prenylgenistein at all testing concentrations. For ALP activity, significant increase was found in cells treated by either 8-prenylgenistein or 6,8-diprenylgenistein for 48 h at the concentration of 10(-10) M. In mineralization study, the content of Ca and P in extracellular matrix were significantly increased in 8-prenylgenistein treated cells. The results showed that genistein derivatives isolated from EV demonstrated stimulatory effects on osteogenesis in UMR 106 cells. Based on the study of structure-activity relationship, it appears that prenylation at C-8, but not at C-6, could increase the bone-protective effect of genistein. PMID:19099220

  13. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  14. Gastroschisis and maternal intake of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Elizabeth L; Ma, Chen; Shaw, Gary M; Carmichael, Suzan L

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroschisis has increased significantly in the past few decades. The strongest risks have been observed for women <25 years old or of low body mass index, and maternal diet also been proposed to be associated with risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the risk of gastroschisis is associated with maternal dietary intake of phytoestrogens. The analysis includes data on mothers of 409 gastroschisis cases and 3,007 controls who delivered their infants from 2005 to 2010 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multistate, population-based, case-control study. Detailed information was obtained from maternal telephone interviews that included a validated food frequency questionnaire. We conducted logistic regression analyses that included each phytoestrogen in its continuous form (to test for linearity) and quadratic form (to test for non-linearity), adjusted for maternal energy intake, age, BMI, race-ethnicity, and smoking in 1st trimester. Logistic regression analysis indicated that biochanin A, formonoetin, and coumestrol had a significant non-linear association with gastroschisis (P-value <0.05 for quadratic term). Lower intakes were associated with increased risk, with somewhat stronger but relatively modest associations at the lower end of the distribution; for example, the ORs for the 10th versus 50th percentiles ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. Associations were not significant for the other phytoestrogens. This study provides some evidence for association with certain phytoestrogens, after adjusting for covariates. The implications of our findings for clinical practice are uncertain pending other studies examining this association. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232448

  15. Maternal exposure to bisphenol A and genistein has minimal effect on A(vy)/a offspring coat color but favors birth of agouti over nonagouti mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Sieli, Paizlee T; Warzak, Denise A; Ellersieck, Mark R; Pennington, Kathleen A; Roberts, R Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reports that maternal diet influences coat color in mouse offspring carrying the agouti A(vy) allele have received considerable attention because the range, from pseudoagouti (brown) to yellow, predicts adult health outcomes, especially disposition toward obesity and diabetes, in yellower mice. Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting compound with estrogenic properties, fed to a/a dams harboring A(vy)/a conceptuses has been reported to induce a significant shift toward yellower mice, whereas consumption of either genistein (G) alone or in combination with BPA led to greater numbers of healthy, brown offspring. Groups of C57/B6 a/a females, which are nonagouti, were fed either a phytoestrogen-free control diet or one of six experimental diets: diets 1-3 contained BPA (50 mg, 5 mg, and 50 μg BPA/kg food, respectively); diet 4 contained G (250 mg/kg food); diet 5 contained G plus BPA (250 and 50 mg/kg food, respectively); and diet 6 contained 0.1 μg of ethinyl estradiol (EE)/kg food. Mice were bred to A(vy)/a males over multiple parities. In all, 2,824 pups from 426 litters were born. None of the diets provided any significant differences in relative numbers of brown, yellow, or intermediate coat color A(vy)/a offspring. However, BPA plus G (P < 0.0001) and EE diets (P = 0.005), but not the four others, decreased the percentage of black (a/a) to A(vy)/a offspring from the expected Mendelian ratio of 1:1. Data suggest that A(vy)/a conceptuses, which may possess a so-called "thrifty genotype," are at a competitive advantage over a/a conceptuses in certain uterine environments. PMID:23267115

  16. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens.

  17. Physico-chemical characterization of asolectin-genistein liposomal system: An approach to analyze its in vitro antioxidant potential and effect in glioma cells viability.

    PubMed

    Lopes de Azambuja, Carla Roberta; dos Santos, Lurdiane Gomes; Rodrigues, Marisa Raquel; Rodrigues, Renan Ferreira Meneses; da Silveira, Elita Ferreira; Azambuja, Juliana Hofstatter; Flores, Alex F C; Horn, Ana Paula; Dora, Cristiana Lima; Muccillo-Baisch, Ana Luisa; Braganhol, Elizandra; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Parize, Alexandre Luís; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the interaction between soy isoflavone genistein and asolectin liposomes was investigated by monitoring the effects of isoflavone on lipidic hydration, mobility, location and order. These properties were analyzed by the following techniques: horizontal attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (HATR-FTIR), low-field (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-field (31)P NMR, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The antioxidant and antitumoral activities of the genistein liposomal system were also studied. The genistein saturation concentration in ASO liposomes corresponded to 484 μM. HATR-FTIR results indicated that genistein influences the dynamics of the lipidic phosphate, choline, carbonyl and acyl chain methylenes groups. At the lipid polar head, HATR-FTIR and (31)P NMR results showed that the isoflavone reduces the hydration degree of the phosphate group, as well as its mobility. Genistein ordered the lipid interfacial carbonyl group, as evidenced by the HATR-FTIR bandwidth analysis. This ordering effect was also observed in the lipidic hydrophobic region, by HATR-FTIR, NMR, DSC and turbidity responses. At the saturation concentration, liposome-loaded genistein inhibits the lipid peroxidation induced by hydroxyl radical in 90.9%. ASO liposome-loaded genistein at 100 μM decreased C6 glioma cell viability by 57% after 72 h of treatment. Results showed an increase of the genistein in vitro activities after its incorporation in liposomes. The data described in this work will contribute to a better understanding of the interaction between genistein and a natural-source membrane and of its influence on isoflavone biological activities. Furthermore, the antitumoral results showed that genistein-based liposomes, which contain natural-sourced lipids, may be promising as a drug delivery system to be used in the glioma therapy.

  18. In vitro metacestodicidal activities of genistein and other isoflavones against Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Spicher, Martin; Vonlaufen, Nathalie; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Torgerson, Paul; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus metacestode infections in humans cause alveolar echinococcosis and cystic echinococcosis, respectively, in which metacestode development in visceral organs often results in particular organ failure. Further, cystic hydatidosis in farm animals causes severe economic losses. Although benzimidazole derivatives such as mebendazole and albendazole are being used as therapeutic agents, there is often no complete recovery after treatment. Hence, in searching for novel treatment options, we examined the in vitro efficacies of a number of isoflavones against Echinococcus metacestodes and protoscoleces. The most prominent isoflavone, genistein, exhibits significant metacestodicidal activity in vitro. However, genistein binds to the estrogen receptor and can thus induce estrogenic effects, which is a major concern during long-term chemotherapy. We have therefore investigated the activities of a number of synthetic genistein derivatives carrying a modified estrogen receptor binding site. One of these, Rm6423, induced dramatic breakdown of the structural integrity of the metacestode germinal layer of both species within 5 to 7 days of in vitro treatment. Further, examination of the culture medium revealed increased leakage of parasite proteins into the medium during treatment, but zymography demonstrated a decrease in the activity of metalloproteases. Moreover, two of the genistein derivatives, Rm6423 and Rm6426, induced considerable damage in E. granulosus protoscoleces, rendering them nonviable. These findings demonstrate that synthetic isoflavones exhibit distinct in vitro effects on Echinococcus metacestodes and protoscoleces, which could potentially be exploited further for the development of novel chemotherapeutical tools against larval-stage Echinococcus infection.

  19. Phytoestrogens and their metabolites in bulk-tank milk: effects of farm management and season.

    PubMed

    Adler, Steffen A; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  20. Phytoestrogens and their metabolites in bulk-tank milk: effects of farm management and season.

    PubMed

    Adler, Steffen A; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  1. Phytoestrogens and Their Metabolites in Bulk-Tank Milk: Effects of Farm Management and Season

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Steffen A.; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  2. Comparison of the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts with phytoestrogens on the reproductive physiology and sexual behavior in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Juárez-Rojas, L; Hernández, A; Romero, C; López, G; Miranda, L; Guerrero-Aguilera, A; Solano, F; Hernández, E; Chemineau, P; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2016-10-01

    Mesquite (Prosopis sp.) and Leucaena leucocephala are widespread legumes, widely used to feed several livestock species and as food source for human populations in several countries. Both mesquite and Leucaena contain several phytoestrogens which might have potential estrogenic effects. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts on several aspects of behavior and reproductive physiology of the male rat. The effects of the extracts were compared with those of estradiol (E2) and of two isoflavones: daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN). The following treatments were given to groups of intact male rats: vehicle; mesquite pod extract; Leucaena extract; E2; DAI; GEN. The results indicate that mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts disrupt male sexual behavior in a similar way to DAI and GEN, but less than E2. The main disruptor of sexual behavior was E2, however after 40 and 50days of administration, both extracts and phytoestrogens disrupted sexual behavior in a similar way to E2. The extracts also increased testicular germ cell apoptosis, decreased sperm quality, testicular weight, and testosterone levels, as phytoestrogens did, although these effects were less than those caused by estradiol. The number of seminiferous tubules with TUNEL-positive germ cells increased in extracts treated groups in a similar way to phytoestrogens groups, and E2 caused the greatest effect. The number of TUNEL-positive cells per tubule increased only in Leucaena extract and E2 groups, but not in mesquite- and phytoestrogens-treated groups. Spermatocytes and round spermatids were the TUNEL-positive cells observed in all experimental groups. This effect was associated with smaller testicular weights without atrophy in experimental groups compared with control. Testicular atrophy was only observed in estradiol-treated males. Testosterone decreased in males of all experimental groups, compared with control, this androgen was undetectable in E2

  3. Comparison of the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts with phytoestrogens on the reproductive physiology and sexual behavior in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Juárez-Rojas, L; Hernández, A; Romero, C; López, G; Miranda, L; Guerrero-Aguilera, A; Solano, F; Hernández, E; Chemineau, P; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2016-10-01

    Mesquite (Prosopis sp.) and Leucaena leucocephala are widespread legumes, widely used to feed several livestock species and as food source for human populations in several countries. Both mesquite and Leucaena contain several phytoestrogens which might have potential estrogenic effects. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts on several aspects of behavior and reproductive physiology of the male rat. The effects of the extracts were compared with those of estradiol (E2) and of two isoflavones: daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN). The following treatments were given to groups of intact male rats: vehicle; mesquite pod extract; Leucaena extract; E2; DAI; GEN. The results indicate that mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts disrupt male sexual behavior in a similar way to DAI and GEN, but less than E2. The main disruptor of sexual behavior was E2, however after 40 and 50days of administration, both extracts and phytoestrogens disrupted sexual behavior in a similar way to E2. The extracts also increased testicular germ cell apoptosis, decreased sperm quality, testicular weight, and testosterone levels, as phytoestrogens did, although these effects were less than those caused by estradiol. The number of seminiferous tubules with TUNEL-positive germ cells increased in extracts treated groups in a similar way to phytoestrogens groups, and E2 caused the greatest effect. The number of TUNEL-positive cells per tubule increased only in Leucaena extract and E2 groups, but not in mesquite- and phytoestrogens-treated groups. Spermatocytes and round spermatids were the TUNEL-positive cells observed in all experimental groups. This effect was associated with smaller testicular weights without atrophy in experimental groups compared with control. Testicular atrophy was only observed in estradiol-treated males. Testosterone decreased in males of all experimental groups, compared with control, this androgen was undetectable in E2

  4. Urinary phytoestrogen levels related to idiopathic male infertility in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yankai; Chen, Minjian; Zhu, Pengfei; Lu, Chuncheng; Fu, Guangbo; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chen, Daozhen; Wang, Honghua; Hang, Bo; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2013-09-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are naturally occurring chemical constituents of certain plants. The internal PE exposures, mainly from diet, vary among different populations and in different regions due to various eating habits. To investigate the potential relationship between urinary PE levels and idiopathic male infertility and semen quality in Chinese adult males, 608 idiopathic infertile men and 469 fertile controls were recruited by eligibility screening procedures. Individual exposure to PEs was measured using UPLC-MS/MS as spot urinary concentrations of 6 PEs (daidzein, DAI; equol, EQU; genistein, GEN; naringenin, NAR; coumestrol, COU; and secoisolariciresinol, SEC), which were adjusted with urinary creatinine (CR). Semen quality was assessed by sperm concentration, number per ejaculum and motility. We found that exposures to DAI, GEN and SEC were significantly associated with idiopathic male infertility (P-value for trend=0.036; 0.002; and 0.0001, respectively), while these exposures had stronger association with infertile subjects with at least one abnormal semen parameter than those with all normal semen parameters. Exposures to DAI, GEN and SEC were also related to idiopathic male infertility with abnormal sperm concentration, number per ejaculum and motility (P-value for trend<0.05), while these exposures had stronger association with the infertile men with abnormal sperm number per ejaculum. These findings provide the evidence that PE exposures are related to male reproductive function and raise a public health concern because that exposure to PEs is ubiquitous in China.

  5. Major isoflavonoid contents of the 1-year-cultivated phytoestrogen-rich herb, Pueraria mirifica.

    PubMed

    Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sriwatcharakul, Suttijit

    2007-10-01

    Pueraria mirifica is a tuberous plant enriched with active phytoestrogens. There is no established information about the factors influencing isoflavonoid storage in the tubers. We investigated the tuberous storage of the major isoflavonoids of 1-year-old plants. Four cultivars of P. mirifica were cultivated in the same field trial during the same period to establish a unique plant age and differentiation under the same environment and soil conditions. The tubers collected from the 1-year-old plants in the summer, rainy season and winter were submitted to an HPLC analysis with a gradient system comprising 0.1% acetic acid and acetonitrile. Five major isoflavonoids, puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein and genistein, were adopted as standards. P. mirifica tubers of different cultivars collected in the same season exhibited significant differences in individual and total isoflavonoid contents, showing chemovariety. P. mirifica tubers of the same cultivar collected from different seasons also exhibited significant differences in individual and total isoflavonoid contents, showing the influence of season. In conclusion, the tuberous storage of major isoflavonoids in 1-year-cultivated plants was greatly diverse and was strongly influenced by the season and plant genetics.

  6. Genistein enhances the effect of trichostatin A on inhibition of A549 cell growth by increasing expression of TNF receptor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Yang, Ying-Chihi; Huang, Pei-Ru; Wen, Yu-Der; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study has shown that genistein enhances apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells induced by trichostatin A (TSA). The precise molecular mechanism underlying the effect of genistein, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein enhances the anti-cancer effect of TSA through up-regulation of TNF receptor-1 (TNFR-1) death receptor signaling. We incubated A549 cells with TSA (50 ng/mL) alone or in combination with genistein and then determined the mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 as well as the activation of downstream caspases. Genistein at 5 and 10 μM significantly enhanced the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The combined treatment significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 at 6 and 12 h, respectively, compared with that of the control group; while TSA alone had no effect. TSA in combination with 10 μM of genistein increased TNFR-1 mRNA and protein expression by about 70% and 40%, respectively. The underlying mechanism for this effect of genistein may be partly associated with the estrogen receptor pathway. The combined treatment also increased the activation of caspase-3 and ‐10 as well as p53 protein expression in A549 cells. The enhancing effects of genistein on the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and on the expression of caspase-3 in A549 cells were suppressed by silencing TNFR-1 expression. These data demonstrated that the upregulation of TNFR-1 death receptor signaling plays an important role, at least in part, in the enhancing effect of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. -- Highlights: ► TSA combined with genistein rather than TSA alone increases the expression of TNFR-1. ► Genistein may exert such an effect partly through estrogen receptor pathway. ► The combined treatment increases the activation of caspase-10 and caspase-3. ► The combined treatment also increases the expression of p53 protein. ► TNFR-1 si

  7. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schexnayder, Chandler; Stratford, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichloroflourescein (CDF) was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly. PMID:26703673

  8. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  9. Genistein, Resveratrol, and 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside Induce Cytochrome P450 4F2 Expression through an AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent PathwayS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mei-Hui; Savas, Üzen; Lasker, Jerome M.

    2011-01-01

    Activators of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increase the expression of the human microsomal fatty acid ω-hydroxylase CYP4F2. A 24-h treatment of either primary human hepatocytes or the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), which is converted to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl 5′-monophosphate, an activator of AMPK, caused an average 2.5- or 7-fold increase, respectively, of CYP4F2 mRNA expression but not of CYP4A11 or CYP4F3, CYP4F11, and CYP4F12 mRNA. Activation of CYP4F2 expression by AICAR was significantly reduced in HepG2 cells by an AMPK inhibitor, 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyrrazolo[1,5-a]-pyrimidine (compound C) or by transfection with small interfering RNAs for AMPKα isoforms α1 and α2. A 2.5-fold increase in CYP4F2 mRNA expression was observed upon treatment of HepG2 cells with 6,7-dihydro-4-hydroxy-3-(2′-hydroxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)-6-oxo-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-5-carbonitrile (A-769662), a direct activator for AMPK. In addition, the indirect activators of AMPK, genistein and resveratrol increased CYP4F2 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. Pretreatment with compound C or 1,2-dihydro-3H-naphtho[2,1-b]pyran-3-one (splitomicin), an inhibitor of the NAD+ activated deacetylase SIRT1, only partially blocked activation of CYP4F2 expression by resveratrol, suggesting that a SIRT1/AMPK-independent pathway also contributes to increased CYP4F2 expression. Compound C greatly diminished genistein activation of CYP4F2 expression. 7H-benz[de]benzimidazo[2,1-a]isoquinoline-7-one-3-carboxylic acid acetate (STO-609), a calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor, reduced the level of expression of CYP4F2 elicited by genistein, suggesting that CaMKK activation contributed to AMPK activation by genistein. Transient transfection studies in HepG2 cells with reporter constructs containing the CYP4F2 proximal promoter demonstrated that AICAR, genistein, and

  10. Biodegradation of the phytoestrogen luteolin by the endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Su, Chun-Lun; Zhu, Hong; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived hormonally-active compounds known to cause varied reproductive, immunosuppressive and behavioral effects in vertebrates. In this study, biodegradation of luteolin, a common phytoestrogen, was investigated during incubation with endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari. The optimum concentration of luteolin as sole carbon source supplied in culture was 200 mg L(-1), which allowed 97 and 99 % degradation of luteolin by P. liquidambari in liquid culture and soil conditions, respectively. The investigation of the fungal metabolic pathway showed that luteolin was first decomposed to caffeic acid and phloroglucinol. These intermediate products were degraded to protocatechuic acid and hydroxyquinol, respectively, and then rings were opened by ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Two novel genes encoding the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase were successfully cloned. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that expression levels of mRNA of these two genes increased significantly after P. liquidambari was induced by the intermediate products caffeic acid and phloroglucinol, respectively. These results revealed that P. liquidambari can biodegrade luteolin efficiently and could potentially be used to bioremediate phytoestrogen contamination.

  11. Biodegradation of the phytoestrogen luteolin by the endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Su, Chun-Lun; Zhu, Hong; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived hormonally-active compounds known to cause varied reproductive, immunosuppressive and behavioral effects in vertebrates. In this study, biodegradation of luteolin, a common phytoestrogen, was investigated during incubation with endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari. The optimum concentration of luteolin as sole carbon source supplied in culture was 200 mg L(-1), which allowed 97 and 99 % degradation of luteolin by P. liquidambari in liquid culture and soil conditions, respectively. The investigation of the fungal metabolic pathway showed that luteolin was first decomposed to caffeic acid and phloroglucinol. These intermediate products were degraded to protocatechuic acid and hydroxyquinol, respectively, and then rings were opened by ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Two novel genes encoding the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase were successfully cloned. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that expression levels of mRNA of these two genes increased significantly after P. liquidambari was induced by the intermediate products caffeic acid and phloroglucinol, respectively. These results revealed that P. liquidambari can biodegrade luteolin efficiently and could potentially be used to bioremediate phytoestrogen contamination. PMID:25794548

  12. Dietary Phytoestrogen Intakes and Cognitive Function During the Menopause Transition: Results from the SWAN Phytoestrogen Study

    PubMed Central

    Greendale, Gail A.; Huang, Mei-Hua; Leung, Katherine; Crawford, Sybil L.; Gold, Ellen B.; Wight, Richard; Waetjen, Elaine; Karlamangla, Arun S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Phytoestrogens, which consist mainly of isoflavones, lignans and coumestans have estrogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Prior research suggests that higher dietary or supplemental intakes of isoflavones and lignans are related to better cognitive performance in middle aged and older women. Methods We conducted longitudinal analysis of dietary phytoestrogens and cognitive performance in a cohort of African-American, white, Chinese and Japanese women undergoing the menopause transition (MT). Tests were: Symbol Digit Modalities, East Boston Memory and Digits Span Backward. Phytoestrogens were assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire. We modeled each cognitive score as a function of concurrent value of the primary predictors (highest tertile of isoflavones, lignans or coumestrol) and covariates including MT stage. Results Coumestrol and isoflavone intakes were 10 and 25 times greater, respectively, in Asian versus non-Asian participants. During late perimenopause and postmenopause, Asian women with high isoflavone intakes did better on processing speed, but during early perimenopause and postmenopause, high isoflavone Asian consumers performed worse on verbal memory. The highest isoflavone consumers among non-Asians likewise posted lower verbal memory scores during early perimenopause. A verbal memory benefit of higher dietary lignan consumption was apparent only during late perimenopause, when women from all ethnic/racial groups who were in the highest tertile of intake demonstrated a small advantage. Coumestrol was unrelated to cognitive performance. Conclusions Cognitive effects of dietary phytoestrogens are small, appear to be class-specific, vary by menopause stage and cognitive domain and differ among ethic/racial groups (but whether this is related to dose or to host factors cannot be discerned). PMID:22415567

  13. Genistein improves spatial learning and memory in male rats with elevated glucose level during memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Yumi; Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Kuwahara, Rika; Uchida, Yutaro; Oku, Yushi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction due to higher blood glucose level has been reported previously. Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen that we hypothesized might lead to improved memory, despite elevated blood glucose levels at the time of memory consolidation. To investigate this hypothesis, we compared the effects of orally administered GEN on the central nervous system in normal versus glucose-loaded adult male rats. A battery of behavioral assessments was carried out. In the MAZE test, which measured spatial learning and memory, the time of normal rats was shortened by GEN treatment compared to the vehicle group, but only in the early stages of testing. In the glucose-loaded group, GEN treatment improved performance as mazes were advanced. In the open-field test, GEN treatment delayed habituation to the new environment in normal rats, and increased the exploratory behaviors of glucose-loaded rats. There were no significant differences observed for emotionality or fear-motivated learning and memory. Together, these results indicate that GEN treatment improved spatial learning and memory only in the early stages of testing in the normal state, but improved spatial learning and memory when glucose levels increased during memory consolidation.

  14. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  15. Phytoestrogens and human health effects: weighing up the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Humfrey, C D

    1998-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring plant compounds which have oestrogenic and/or anti-oestrogenic activity. They are present in many human foodstuffs including beans, sprouts, cabbage, spinach, soyabean, grains and hops. The main classes are the isoflavones, coumestans and lignans. This review assesses the evidence that these substances may have adverse and/or beneficial impacts on the risk of several hormone-dependent diseases in humans. Evidence from studies of various animal species has demonstrated that ingestion of high levels of phytoestrogens can produce adverse effects on reproductive endpoints including fertility. Studies in laboratory animals have also shown that exposure to high doses of phytoestrogens during development can adversely affect brain differentiation and reproductive development in rodents, but may also have possible beneficial effects. In humans, there is a lack of information concerning the possible effects of high doses of phytoestrogens in infants and this should be addressed as a matter of priority so that any risks (or benefits) can be established. In adults, no current data exist to suggest that consumption of phytoestrogens at the levels normally encountered in the diet is likely to be harmful. Epidemiological studies suggest that foodstuffs containing phytoestrogens may have a beneficial role in protecting against a number of chronic diseases and conditions. For cancer of the prostate, colon, rectum, stomach and lung, the evidence is most consistent for a protective effect resulting from a high intake of grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables; it is not possible to identify particular food types or components that may be responsible. Dietary intervention studies indicate that in women soya and linseed may have beneficial effects on the risk of breast cancer and may help to alleviate postmenopausal symptoms. For osteoporosis, tentative evidence suggests phytoestrogens may have similar effects in maintaining bone density to those

  16. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells through suppression of nuclear factor-κB and upregulation of microRNA-29b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zhu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor and is the most common primary tumor of the bone marrow in the USA. Genistein is predominantly found in Leguminosae and various lines of evidence have indicated that it suppresses cell growth, induces programmed cell death and inhibits angiogenesis. As a result of these capabilities, genistein presents as a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. However, the effect of genistein on MM remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells through the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and microRNA-29b (miR-29b). In the present study, cell proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, apoptosis was detected using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis assay and caspase-3 activation assay. The expression of NF-κB and miR-29b was analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-29b and anti-miR-29b plasmids were transfected into U266 cells to determine the effect of genistein on MM. In the present study, the results demonstrated that genistein could significantly reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and increase the activity of caspase-3 in U266 cells. Furthermore, it was found that genistein could suppress the protein level of NF-κB and promote the expression of miR-29b in U266 cells. The results also indicated that miR-29b could alter the expression of NF-κB in U266 cells. These findings suggest that genistein inhibits the proliferation of human MM cells by upregulating miR-29b resulting in suppression of NF-κB.

  17. Effects of phytoestrogens on expression of genes regulating growth-related processes in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived isoflavones that activate estrogen receptors. Phytoestrogen content of aquafeeds is increasing due to higher inclusion levels of soy and other legumes rich in these compounds. It is unknown whether phytoestrogens affect growth-related processes in a manner similar...

  18. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Honndorf, Valerie S.; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J.

    2016-01-01

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. Procedures A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Results Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. Conclusions As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting. PMID:27070087

  19. Effects of soy phytoestrogens on pituitary-ovarian function in middle-aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Medigović, Ivana M; Živanović, Jasmina B; Ajdžanović, Vladimir Z; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra L; Stanković, Sanja D; Trifunović, Svetlana L; Milošević, Verica Lj; Nestorović, Nataša M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of genistein (G) and daidzein (D) on the histological, hormonal, and functional parameters of the pituitary-ovarian axis in middle-aged female rats, and to compare these effects with the effects of estradiol (E), commonly used in the prevention and treatment of menopausal symptoms. Middle-aged (12 month old) Wistar female rats subcutaneously received 35 mg/kg of G, or 35 mg/kg of D, or 0.625 mg/kg of E every day for 4 weeks. Each of the treated groups had a corresponding control group. An intact control group was also established. G and D did not change the intracellular protein content within gonadotropic and lactotropic cells, but vacuolization was observed in all the cell types. In contrast, E caused an inhibition of gonadotropic and stimulation of lactotropic cells. Also, ovaries of middle-aged female rats exposed to G or D have more healthy primordial and primary follicles and less atretic follicles. E treatment in the ovaries had a mostly negative effect, which is reflected by the increased number of atretic follicles in all tested classes. G and D provoked decrease in CuZnSOD and CAT activity, while E treatment increased MnSOD and decreased CuZnSOD and GSHPx activity. All the treatments increased serum estradiol and decreased testosterone levels, while D and E increased the serum progesterone level. In conclusion, soy phytoestrogens exhibited beneficial effects on pituitary-ovarian function in middle-aged female rats, as compared to estradiol.

  20. Genistein isoflavone glycoconjugates in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Abrankó, László; Nagy, Ádám; Szilvássy, Blanka; Stefanovits-Bányai, Éva; Hegedűs, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The isoflavone genistein on the contrary to its well-established health-beneficial effects is not a major component of the Western diet, since soy consumption, considered as the main dietary source of genistein, in these populations is low. Genistein compounds in twelve commercial sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) cultivars grown in Hungary were studied. High performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-qToF-MS) was used for screening and confirmatory analyses. Genistin and genistein were found in 'Pipacs1', 'Kántorjánosi', 'Debreceni bőtermő' and 'Éva', which are native cultivars to Hungary. Genistein content of the latter three were in the range of 0.4-0.6, while in 'Pipacs1' in total 4.4 mg genistein compounds were measured expressed as aglycone equivalents per 100g of fresh fruit flesh. These cultivars may play important role as complementary genistein sources in the Western diet. Especially 'Pipacs 1', may be best utilised in functional food products. PMID:25053048

  1. Cross-species and interassay comparisons of phytoestrogen action.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Patisaul, H B

    2001-03-01

    This paper compiles animal and human data on the biologic effects and exposure levels of phytoestrogens in order to identify areas of research in which direct species comparisons can be made. In vitro and in vivo assays of phytoestrogen action and potency are reviewed and compared to actions, dose-response relationships, and estimates of exposure in human subjects. Binding studies show that the isoflavonoid phytoestrogens are high-affinity ligands for estrogen receptors (ERs), especially ER beta, but have lower potency in whole-cell assays, perhaps because of interactions with binding proteins. Many other enzymatic actions require concentrations higher than those normally seen in plasma. In vivo data show that phytoestrogens have a wide range of biologic effects at doses and plasma concentrations seen with normal human diets. Significant in vivoresponses have been observed in animal and human tests for bone, breast, ovary, pituitary, vasculature, prostate, and serum lipids. The doses reported to be biologically active in humans (0.4--10 mg/kg body weight/day) are lower than the doses generally reported to be active in rodents (10--100 mg/kg body weight/day), although some studies have reported rodent responses at lower doses. However, available estimates of bioavailability and peak plasma levels in rodents and humans are more similar. Steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appear to be important loci of phytoestrogen actions, but these inferences must be tentative because good dose-response data are not available for many end points. The similarity of reported proliferative and antiproliferative doses illustrates the need for fuller examination of dose-response relationships and multiple end points in assessing phytoestrogen actions.

  2. Cross-species and interassay comparisons of phytoestrogen action.

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, P L; Patisaul, H B

    2001-01-01

    This paper compiles animal and human data on the biologic effects and exposure levels of phytoestrogens in order to identify areas of research in which direct species comparisons can be made. In vitro and in vivo assays of phytoestrogen action and potency are reviewed and compared to actions, dose-response relationships, and estimates of exposure in human subjects. Binding studies show that the isoflavonoid phytoestrogens are high-affinity ligands for estrogen receptors (ERs), especially ER beta, but have lower potency in whole-cell assays, perhaps because of interactions with binding proteins. Many other enzymatic actions require concentrations higher than those normally seen in plasma. In vivo data show that phytoestrogens have a wide range of biologic effects at doses and plasma concentrations seen with normal human diets. Significant in vivoresponses have been observed in animal and human tests for bone, breast, ovary, pituitary, vasculature, prostate, and serum lipids. The doses reported to be biologically active in humans (0.4--10 mg/kg body weight/day) are lower than the doses generally reported to be active in rodents (10--100 mg/kg body weight/day), although some studies have reported rodent responses at lower doses. However, available estimates of bioavailability and peak plasma levels in rodents and humans are more similar. Steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appear to be important loci of phytoestrogen actions, but these inferences must be tentative because good dose-response data are not available for many end points. The similarity of reported proliferative and antiproliferative doses illustrates the need for fuller examination of dose-response relationships and multiple end points in assessing phytoestrogen actions. PMID:11250801

  3. Topoisomerase poisoning by genistein in the intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Simone A; Soukup, Sebastian T; Molzberger, Almut F; Kulling, Sabine E; Diel, Patrick; Marko, Doris

    2016-01-22

    The isoflavone genistein has been shown to act as topoisomerase II poison in various cell lines. Here, we address the question whether genistein is able to affect topoisomerase II in vivo. Juvenile male Wistar rats received either a single dose of genistein subcutaneously (s.c.; 10 mg/kg BW) or a lifelong isoflavone-rich diet encompassing in utero, lactation phase and 10 days of oral consumption, whereas genistein was mainly taken up as glycosides (25-50 mg/kg BW). The effects on the level of covalent topoisomerase II-DNA-complexes in the duodenum and colon were measured using the "Isolation of in vivo complexes of enzyme to DNA" (ICE)-bioassay. Simultaneously, serum as well as tissue concentrations of genistein and its metabolites were quantified by LC-MS. Genistein (s.c.) significantly increased the amount of covalent topoisomerase IIα and β-DNA complexes in the gut, showing more persistent effects in the colon than in the duodenum. In case of a lifelong dietary isoflavone exposure, no effects on the stabilization of cleavage complexes was observed, except a slight increase of topoisomerase IIα-DNA-complexes in the colon. The differences between the exposure routes might be attributed to the higher serum concentration of the genistein aglycon after subcutaneous treatment probably due to circumvention of first-pass metabolism compared to oral consumption of an isoflavone-rich diet. These data indicate that subcutaneously administrated genistein clearly possesses topoisomerase poisoning properties in vivo, whereas an isoflavone-rich diet containing genistein only caused a slight effect which relevance has to be clarified in further studies.

  4. E-Screen evaluation of sugar beet feedstuffs in a case of reduced embryo transfer efficiencies in cattle: the role of phytoestrogens and zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Shappell, N W; Mostrom, M S; Lenneman, E M

    2012-04-01

    The E-Screen assay was used to evaluate the estrogenicity of sugar beet by-products obtained from a dairy farm experiencing low success rates of embryo transfer. The beet tailings had ~3-fold the estradiol equivalents of the pelleted beet pulp (3.9 and 1.2 μg estradiol equivalents or E(2)Eq/kg dry matter, respectively). Whole sugar beets, sugar beet pellets, and shreds from several Midwest US locations were also evaluated by E-Screen. All pellets examined were found to have some estrogenic activity (range ~0.1-2.0 μg E(2)Eq/kg DM) with a mean of 0.46 μg/kg dry matter and median of 0.28 μg/kg dry matter. Relative E(2)Eq ranked as follows: pellets > shreds > most unprocessed roots. Using recommended feeding levels and conservative absorption estimates (10%), the estrogenic activity in the original samples could result in blood estradiol equivalents ≥ those found at estrus (10 pg/mL, cows). Chemical analyses revealed no known phytoestrogens, but the estrogenic mycotoxin, zearalenone, was found in 15 of 21 samples. Of significance to those using the E-Screen are our findings that contradict previous reports: ß-sitosterol has no proliferative effect and genistein's glucuronidated form-genistin-is equal to genistein in proliferative effect. The latter is the result of deconjugation of genistin to genistein in the presence of fetal bovine serum (determined by LC MSMS). These data show the usefulness and caveats of the E-Screen in evaluation of feedstuffs, and indicate a potential for sugar beet by-products to contain zearalenone at concentrations that may impact reproduction. PMID:22350809

  5. Individual and combined effects of genistein and hesperidin on immunity and intestinal morphometry in lipopolysacharide-challenged broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kamboh, A A; Zhu, W-Y

    2014-09-01

    Genistein and hesperidin have been shown to have beneficial effects in several animal models including mice, rats, pigs, and humans. This study investigated the individual and combined effects of genistein (an isoflavone) and hesperidin (a flavanone) on immunity and intestinal morphometry in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged broiler chickens. Seven hundred twenty 1-d-old commercial Arbor Acres broiler chicks were randomly divided into 6 treatments, with 6 replicates of 20 birds each. Chicks were fed a basal diet without any additive (control), supplemented with 5 mg of genistein/kg of feed (G5) and 20 mg of hesperidin/kg of feed (H20), or a mixture of genistein and hesperidin (1:4) with doses of 5 (GH5), 10 (GH10), and 20 (GH20) mg/kg of feed for 42 d. On d 16, 18, and 20, one-half the birds from each group were separated and injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli LPS (250 µg/kg of BW) to induce the immunological stimulation. Samples were collected on 21 and 42 d. The results showed that LPS treatment exerts immunomodulatory effects (P < 0.05) in phagocytic activity at 21 d, whereas a few negative effects including reduced villus length and increased crypt depth were observed in some segments of the small intestine. Both genistein and hesperidin seemed to modify the immunity positively by altering the phagocytic activity (P < 0.01). Parameters of intestinal morphometry such as villus length, crypt depth, villus width, and villus length/crypt depth ratios were also improved (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05) by the supplemental genistein and hesperidin in both LPS-unchallenged and -challenged groups. However, no effect (P > 0.05) was observed for BWG, FI, and FCR of broilers. Overall, genistein and hesperidin improved the immunity and the morphometry of small intestine in a dose-dependent manner. These findings provided the first account on the in vivo effects of genistein and hesperidin for immunostimulation and morphometric gut development in LPS

  6. [Research progress of phytoestrogens-like chemical constituents in natural medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Nai-Dan; He, Yong-Jing; Li, Mei; Xu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Qiao-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Phytoestrogens, which can bind with estrogen receptor and produce estrogen-like effects, are a kind of nonsteroidal compound in plant. Phytoestrogens chemically include isoflavones, coumarins, lignans and other compounds. Phytoestrogens are selective estrogen receptor modulator, and have therapeutical effects on breast cancer, prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease, menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis and other disease, however, do not produce stimulatory hyperplasia effects on uterus, mammary glands and other tissues and organs with positive estrogen receptor. Long-term exposure or excessive use of phytoestrogens maybe affects male reproductive system and hematopoietic function of fetus. Some questions need to be further studied, such as evaluation criteria on biological activity, adverse effects, and action mechanism of phytoestrogen. This review covers plant sources, chemical structure, pharmacological activity and safety of phytoestrogens. It will provide a useful reference for intensive research and rational utilization the phytoestrogens. PMID:25911795

  7. [Research progress of phytoestrogens-like chemical constituents in natural medicines].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Nai-Dan; He, Yong-Jing; Li, Mei; Xu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Qiao-Yan

    2014-12-01

    Phytoestrogens, which can bind with estrogen receptor and produce estrogen-like effects, are a kind of nonsteroidal compound in plant. Phytoestrogens chemically include isoflavones, coumarins, lignans and other compounds. Phytoestrogens are selective estrogen receptor modulator, and have therapeutical effects on breast cancer, prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease, menopausal symptoms, osteoporosis and other disease, however, do not produce stimulatory hyperplasia effects on uterus, mammary glands and other tissues and organs with positive estrogen receptor. Long-term exposure or excessive use of phytoestrogens maybe affects male reproductive system and hematopoietic function of fetus. Some questions need to be further studied, such as evaluation criteria on biological activity, adverse effects, and action mechanism of phytoestrogen. This review covers plant sources, chemical structure, pharmacological activity and safety of phytoestrogens. It will provide a useful reference for intensive research and rational utilization the phytoestrogens.

  8. Phytoestrogens enhance antioxidant enzymes after swimming exercise and modulate sex hormone plasma levels in female swimmers.

    PubMed

    Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Ferrer, Miguel D; Sureda, Antoni; Tauler, Pedro; Martínez, Elisa; Bibiloni, Maria M; Micol, Vicente; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2011-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the effects of diet supplementation with phytoestrogens on sex hormone levels, antioxidant adaptive responses and oxidative damage induced by exercise. Ten female swimmers participated for 26 days in a diet intervention with either a functional beverage rich in vitamins C and E or the same beverage but also supplemented with Lippia citriodora extract (PLX) containing 20 mg/100 ml verbascoside. After the intervention all subjects participated in a swimming session for 30 min maintaining the intensity at about 75-80% of their individual best performance time for a 50-m swim. In lymphocytes, the superoxide dismutase activity increased after exercise, with a higher increase in the PLX group. Swimming increased the erythrocyte activity of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in the PLX group. Purified glutathione reductase activity increased after an in vitro incubation with PLX. No effects were observed on the lymphocyte levels of malondialdehyde and carbonyls, but exercise increased the percentage of high-damaged lymphocytes 2.8 times in the placebo group and 1.5 times in the PLX group. PLX decreased the levels of 17-β-estradiol and testosterone and increased the levels of the sex hormone binding globulin. In conclusion, supplementation with phytoestrogens enhances the glutathione-dependent enzyme activities in erythrocytes and the superoxide dismutase activity in lymphocytes in response to exercise. PLX also shows direct antioxidant properties, by increasing glutathione reductase enzyme activity in vitro. Supplementation with phytoestrogens also decreases the plasma steroid hormone levels, pointing towards a possible agonistic effect of verbascoside in the hypothalamic regulation of estradiol synthesis.

  9. Modulation of liver canalicular transport processes by the tyrosine-kinase inhibitor genistein: implications of genistein metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jäger, W; Winter, O; Halper, B; Salamon, A; Sartori, M; Gajdzik, L; Hamilton, G; Theyer, G; Graf, J; Thalhammer, T

    1997-12-01

    Rat liver cells express the multispecific organic anion transporter (cmoat, cmrp, mrp2) and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in their canalicular membranes, proteins that are homologous to the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) and multidrug resistance (MDR) gene products in multidrug resistant tumor cells. We tested whether genistein, a modulator of drug resistance in tumor cells, affects biliary secretion of substrates of canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cmoat) (glucuronides of bilirubin and rhodamine, glutathione conjugate of bromsulphthalein) and of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) (rhodamine), respectively. Using the isolated perfused rat liver of control Wistar rats (TR+) and of a mutant strain (TR-) that expresses Pgp but not cmoat, we show that genistein effectively inhibits the secretion of anionic substrates of cmoat in Wistar rats but stimulates secretion of cationic rhodamine in TR- rats. Genistein is subject to glucuronidation and sulfatation and secretion of genistein and its metabolites stimulates bile flow in Wistar rats, but secretion is nearly absent in TR- rats. Because genistein and its metabolites are substrates for cmoat, inhibition of anion secretion by genistein is partially explained by competition for this transporter. Genistein is also a substrate of uridindiphosphate (UDP)-glucuronyltransferase isoenzyme(s). Inhibition of glucuronidation reduces the availability of bilirubin and rhodamine glucuronates for transport via cmoat, but unconjugated cationic rhodamine becomes available for transport via Pgp at an increased cellular concentration. Daidzein, a genistein analogue with no effect on protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) shows Similar effects on secretion of organic anions and cations supporting the conclusion that genistein affects transport in liver mainly through competition with other substrates at the sites of glucuronidation and transport via cmoat.

  10. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bayele, Henry K.; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis. PMID:26546695

  11. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bayele, Henry K; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K S

    2015-12-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis.

  12. Interaction of bisphenol A (BPA) and soy phytoestrogens on sexually dimorphic sociosexual behaviors in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Kimani D; Sullivan, Alana W; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Rebuli, Meghan; Patisaul, Heather B

    2016-08-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the potential for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) to alter brain development and behavior. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous EDC, has been linked to altered sociosexual and mood-related behaviors in various animal models and children but effects are inconsistent across laboratories and animal models creating confusion about potential risk in humans. Exposure to endocrine active diets, such as soy, which is rich in phytoestrogens, may contribute to this variability. Here, we tested the individual and combined effects of low dose oral BPA and soy diet or the individual isoflavone genistein (GEN; administered as the aglycone genistin (GIN)) on rat sociosexual behaviors with the hypothesis that soy would obfuscate any BPA-related effects. Social and activity levels were unchanged by developmental exposure to BPA but soy diet had sex specific effects including suppressed novelty preference, and open field exploration in females. The data presented here reinforce that environmental factors, including anthropogenic chemical exposure and hormone active diets, can shape complex behaviors and even reverse expected sex differences.

  13. Simultaneous determination of phytoestrogens in different medicinal parts of Sophora japonica L. by capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qingcui; Fu, Liang; Wu, Ting; Ye, Jiannong

    2005-03-01

    A high-performance capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection (CE-ED) method has been developed for the determination of phytoestrogens from the pericarps and seeds of Sophora japonica L. in this work. Genistin, genistein, rutin, kaempferol and quercetin are important bioactive constituents in these plants. The effects of several factors such as the acidity and concentration of running buffer, the separation voltage, the applied potential and the injection time on the CE-ED procedure were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the five analytes could be well separated within 18 min in a 75 cm length capillary (i.d. 25 microm) at the separation voltage of 16 kV in a 50 mmol L(-1) borax running buffer (pH 9.0). A 300 microm diameter carbon disk electrode was used as the working electrode positioned carefully opposite the outlet of the capillary in a wall-jet configuration at the potential of +950 mV (vs SCE). Detection limits (S/N = 3) ranged from 1.1 x 10(-7) to 2.8 x 10(-7) g mL(-1) for all fi ve analytes. This method was successfully used to analyse dried Flos sophorae immaturus, pericarps and seeds of dried Fructus sophorae after a relatively simple extraction procedure, and the assay results were satisfactory. PMID:15558700

  14. Interaction of bisphenol A (BPA) and soy phytoestrogens on sexually dimorphic sociosexual behaviors in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Kimani D; Sullivan, Alana W; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Rebuli, Meghan; Patisaul, Heather B

    2016-08-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the potential for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) to alter brain development and behavior. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous EDC, has been linked to altered sociosexual and mood-related behaviors in various animal models and children but effects are inconsistent across laboratories and animal models creating confusion about potential risk in humans. Exposure to endocrine active diets, such as soy, which is rich in phytoestrogens, may contribute to this variability. Here, we tested the individual and combined effects of low dose oral BPA and soy diet or the individual isoflavone genistein (GEN; administered as the aglycone genistin (GIN)) on rat sociosexual behaviors with the hypothesis that soy would obfuscate any BPA-related effects. Social and activity levels were unchanged by developmental exposure to BPA but soy diet had sex specific effects including suppressed novelty preference, and open field exploration in females. The data presented here reinforce that environmental factors, including anthropogenic chemical exposure and hormone active diets, can shape complex behaviors and even reverse expected sex differences. PMID:27373758

  15. Abnormal peripubertal development of the rat mammary gland following exposure in utero and during lactation to a mixture of genistein and the food contaminant vinclozolin.

    PubMed

    El Sheikh Saad, H; Meduri, G; Phrakonkham, P; Bergès, R; Vacher, S; Djallali, M; Auger, J; Canivenc-Lavier, M C; Perrot-Applanat, M

    2011-07-01

    The impact of early exposure to endocrine disruptor mixtures on mammary gland development is poorly known. Here, we identify the effects of a conception to weaning exposure of rats to the phytoestrogen genistein (G) and/or the antiandrogen vinclozolin (V) at 1mg/kg-d, alone or in association. Using several approaches, we found that G- and GV-exposed rats displayed significantly greater epithelial branching and proliferation, wider terminal end buds than controls at PND35, as well as ductal hyperplasia and periductal fibrosis. Focal branching defects were present in V-exposed rats. An increased ER and AR expression was observed in G- and GV- as compared to V-exposed rats at PND35. Surprisingly, a significant number of GV- and to a lesser extent, V-exposed animals displayed abnormal hyperplasic alveolar structures at PND50. Thus, gestational and lactational exposure to low doses of genistein plus vinclozolin may seriously affect peripubertal development of the rat mammary gland.

  16. Phytoestrogens for menopausal bone loss and climacteric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lagari, Violet S; Levis, Silvina

    2014-01-01

    Women have always looked for non-hormonal options to alleviate menopausal vasomotor symptoms and prevent menopausal bone loss. The use of complementary and alternative medicine for these purposes has particularly increased after the publication of the Women's Health Initiative's results suggesting that there might be more risks than benefits with hormone replacement. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived estrogens that, although less potent than estradiol, bind to the estrogen receptor and can function as estrogen agonists or antagonists. Soy isoflavones extracted from soy are the phytoestrogens most commonly used by menopausal women. Because typical Western diets are low in phytoestrogens and taking into account the general difficulty in changing dietary habits, most clinical trials in Western women have used isoflavone-fortified foods or isoflavone tablets. Although some women might experience a reduction in the frequency or severity of hot flashes, most studies point towards the lack of effectiveness of isoflavones derived from soy or red clover, even in large doses, in the prevention of hot flashes and menopausal bone loss. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  17. Phytoestrogens for menopausal bone loss and climacteric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lagari, Violet S; Levis, Silvina

    2014-01-01

    Women have always looked for non-hormonal options to alleviate menopausal vasomotor symptoms and prevent menopausal bone loss. The use of complementary and alternative medicine for these purposes has particularly increased after the publication of the Women's Health Initiative's results suggesting that there might be more risks than benefits with hormone replacement. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived estrogens that, although less potent than estradiol, bind to the estrogen receptor and can function as estrogen agonists or antagonists. Soy isoflavones extracted from soy are the phytoestrogens most commonly used by menopausal women. Because typical Western diets are low in phytoestrogens and taking into account the general difficulty in changing dietary habits, most clinical trials in Western women have used isoflavone-fortified foods or isoflavone tablets. Although some women might experience a reduction in the frequency or severity of hot flashes, most studies point towards the lack of effectiveness of isoflavones derived from soy or red clover, even in large doses, in the prevention of hot flashes and menopausal bone loss. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'. PMID:23246986

  18. The soyabean isoflavone genistein modulates endothelial cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Marisa J; Cutini, Pablo H; Rauschemberger, María Belén; Massheimer, Virginia L

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the direct action of the phyto-oestrogen genistein (Gen) on vascular endothelial behaviour, either in the presence or absence of proinflammatory agents. In rat aortic endothelial cell (EC) cultures, 24 h of treatment with Gen significantly increased cell proliferation in a wide range of concentration (0.001-10 nm). This mitogenic action was prevented by the oestrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182780 or by the presence of the specific NO synthase inhibitor l-nitro-arginine methyl ester. When monocytes adhesion to EC was measured, Gen partially attenuated leucocyte adhesion not only under basal conditions, but also in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The effect of the phyto-oestrogen on the expression of EC adhesion molecules was evaluated. Gen down-regulated the enhancement in mRNA levels of E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and P-selectin elicited by the proinflammatory agent bacterial LPS. The regulation of EC programmed death induced by the isoflavone was also demonstrated. Incubation with 10 nm Gen prevented DNA fragmentation induced by the apoptosis inductor H2O2. The results presented suggest that Gen would exert a protective effect on vascular endothelium, due to its regulatory action on endothelial proliferation, apoptosis and leucocyte adhesion, events that play a critical role in vascular diseases. The molecular mechanism displayed by the phyto-oestrogen involved the participation of the ER and the activation of the NO pathway.

  19. Determination of Phytoestrogen Content in Fresh-Cut Legume Forage

    PubMed Central

    Hloucalová, Pavlína; Skládanka, Jiří; Horký, Pavel; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pelikán, Jan; Knotová, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Phytoestrogens comprise a group of substances negatively influencing the development and function of animal reproductive organs. Their appearance in forage crops can reduce feeding values, cause dietary disorders, and lead to animal health damage. This study evaluated the occurrence of individual phytoestrogens in various species of annual and perennial legumes and their levels in dry forage. It appeared that feeding large amounts of red clover presents a potential risk, but red clover can be replaced with the annual Persian clover, in which markedly lower phytoestrogen levels were detected. Abstract The aim of the study was to determine phytoestrogen content in fresh-cut legume forage. This issue has been much discussed in recent years in connection with the health and safety of feedstuffs and thus livestock health. The experiments were carried out on two experimental plots at Troubsko and Vatín, Czech Republic during June and July in 2015. Samples were collected of the four forage legume species perennial red clover (variety “Amos”), alfalfa (variety “Holyně”), and annuals Persian clover and Alexandrian clover. Forage was sampled twice at regular three to four day intervals leading up to harvest and a third time on the day of harvest. Fresh and wilted material was analyzed using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Higher levels (p < 0.05) of isoflavones biochanin A (3.697 mg·g−1 of dry weight) and formononetin (4.315 mg·g−1 of dry weight) were found in red clover than in other species. The highest isoflavone content was detected in red clover, reaching 1.001% of dry matter (p < 0.05), representing a risk for occurrence of reproduction problems and inhibited secretion of animal estrogen. The phytoestrogen content was particularly increased in wilted forage. Significant isoflavone reduction was observed over three to four day intervals leading up to harvest. PMID:27429009

  20. Altered mammary gland development in male rats exposed to genistein and methoxychlor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Bartolucci-Page, Erika; Fenton, Suzanne E; You, Li

    2006-05-01

    Genistein (GE) is a prevalent phytoestrogen whose presence in human and animal foods may affect biological actions of synthetic endocrine active compounds. We have previously reported that in utero and lactational exposure to high doses of GE or the endocrine active pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) caused mammary epithelial proliferation in 21-day-old male rats. Combined exposure to GE and MXC resulted in significant feminization of the male mammary glands. The goals of the current study were to evaluate mammary responses to GE and MXC at the adult stage and investigate relevant mechanisms. Following in utero, lactational exposure (through maternal diet), and direct dietary exposure, the inguinal mammary gland of male rats (90 days of age) was found to exhibit significant morphological alterations in the groups treated with GE and/or MXC compared to the control. GE exposure (at 300 and 800 ppm concentrations) caused lobular enlargement and epithelial proliferation, whereas MXC exposure (800 ppm) led to ductal elongation and lobular enlargement. Combining the two treatments caused prominent proliferation of both ducts and alveoli; secretory material was seen in readily recognizable alveolar lumens, which are absent in untreated male mammary. We also surveyed gene expression in the mammary tissue using a cDNA microarray and evaluated relevant protein factors. The results indicated that the treatment effects are likely due to interactions between steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals and growth factor-driven cellular pathways. The distinctive responses associated with the GE+MXC combination were likely linked to enhanced actions of insulin-like growth factor 1 and related downstream pathways.

  1. Hormonal concentrations and reproductive performance of Holstein heifers fed Trifolium alexandrinum as a phytoestrogenic roughage.

    PubMed

    Hashem, N M; El-Azrak, K M; Sallam, S M A

    2016-07-01

    Effects of phytoestrogen isoflavones in Berseem clover on hormonal balance during early pregnancy and fertility of heifers were studied. Holstein heifers (n=26) were divided into two equal homogenous groups. Heifers in the first group (Clover-fed group) were fed Egyptian clover (Trifolium alexandrinum) as oestrogenic roughage; whereas the heifers in the second group (Silage-fed group) were fed maize silage. Concentrations of four isoflavone aglycones (genistein. Daidzein, biochanin A and formononetein) were determined in the two roughages. Treatment lasted for 20 consecutive weeks (5 months) during which blood samples were collected biweekly for determining the metabolic profile of heifers. Heifers were subjected to oestrous synchronisation using a double prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) based protocol, 14days apart (week 10 and 12), and were artificially inseminated 12h following detection of overt signs of oestrus. Concentrations of serum oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on the day of insemination (Day 0) and on Days 7, 14 and 21 post-insemination (early pregnancy) were determined and P4 to E2 ratio was calculated. Clover had greater total isoflavone content than maize silage. The dominant isoflavone detected in Berseem clover was biochanin A, whereas the least was formononetein. Metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by the type of roughage and was in the same trend in both experimental groups. The overall mean concentration of serum E2 was greater (P<0.05) in the clover-fed group than in the silage-fed group. The overall mean concentration of serum P4 was less (P<0.05) in the clover-fed group than in the silage-fed group. During the period of early pregnancy (from Day 7-21 post-insemination) the concentration of serum P4 increased in the silage-fed group, however, no change was observed in the clover-fed group. The overall mean of P4 to E2 ratio was greater (P<0.001) in the silage-fed group compared with that in the clover-fed group. Heifers fed clover had

  2. Sociodemographic and lifestyle variables are compound- and class-specific correlates of urine phytoestrogen concentrations in the U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Michael E; Sternberg, Maya R; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2013-06-01

    Isoflavones and lignans are plant-derived dietary compounds generally believed to be beneficial to human health. We investigated the extent to which sociodemographic (age, sex, race-ethnicity, education, and income) and lifestyle variables (smoking, alcohol consumption, BMI, physical activity, and dietary supplement use) were correlates of spot urine concentration for daidzein, genistein, O-desmethylangolensin (DMA), equol, enterodiol, and enterolactone in the U.S. population aged ≥ 20 y (NHANES 2003-2006). We performed correlation analyses with continuous variables and calculated stratified unadjusted geometric means for each sociodemographic and lifestyle variable. We used bivariate significance testing and covariate adjustment by use of multiple regression models to identify influential variables and used β coefficients to estimate relative effects. Urine creatinine was also included in our analyses because of its use in correcting for variable dilution in spot urine samples. We observed many significant (P < 0.05) associations with the sociodemographic and lifestyle variables that withstood covariate adjustment. Smoking was a significant correlate of urine DMA and enterolactone, with concentrations at least 25% lower in smokers vs. nonsmokers. Consumers of 1 daily alcoholic drink vs. none were estimated to have 18-21% lower urine equol and DMA concentrations. A 25% increase in BMI was associated with a 21% lower urine enterolactone concentration, and increasing physical activity was associated with a >6% higher urine enterolactone concentration. Dietary supplement use was not significantly associated with any of the urine phytoestrogens. Overall, we found that relationships between sociodemographic and lifestyle variables and urine phytoestrogen concentration were highly compound and class specific.

  3. A review of phytoestrogens: their occurrence and fate in the environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-hua; Kanjo, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds with estrogenic activities. Many edible plants, some of which are common in the human diet, are rich in phytoestrogens. Almost all phytoestrogens eaten daily by people were reported partly recovered in urine or feces, which can be regarded as one of the main sources of their occurrence in municipal wastewaters. As they may act as one part of the endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water systems, some phytoestrogens have been monitored and detected in wastewater and other various environments. It is very difficult to monitor numerous unknown EDCs in complex wastewater samples, and it is helpful if some estimation of target EDCs can be done before monitoring. With this in mind, this review will: (1) summarize estrogenic activities or estrogenic potencies of phytoestrogens by different bioassays; (2) summarize daily urinary excretion rates of phytoestrogens by humans, and compare their urinary excretion rates to that of estrone, which suggests that most phytoestrogens may occur in municipal wastewaters; (3) collect and summarize published data on the occurrence and fate of phytoestrogens in various environments.

  4. Genistein mediates the selective radiosensitizing effect in NSCLC A549 cells via inhibiting methylation of the keap1 gene promoter region

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiongxiong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Bingtao; Jin, Xiaodong; Li, Ping; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhao, Ting; Li, Feifei; Li, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells often possess a hypermethylated Keap1 promoter, which decreases Keap1 mRNA and protein expression levels, thus impairing the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway and thereby leading to chemo- or radio-resistance. In this study, we showed that genistein selectively exhibited a radiosensitizing effect on NSCLC A549 cells but not on normal lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. Genistein caused oxidative stress in A549 cells rather than MRC-5 cells, as determined by the oxidation of the ROS-sensitive probe DCFH-DA and oxidative damage marked by MDA, PCO or 8-OHdG content. In A549 instead of MRC-5 cells, genistein reduced the level of methylation in the Keap1 promoter region, leading to an increased mRNA expression, thus effectively inhibited the transcription of Nrf2 to the nucleus, which suppressed the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant and resulted in the upregulation of ROS. Importantly, when combined with radiation, genistein further increased the ROS levels in A549 cells whereas decreasing the radiation-induced oxidative stress in MRC-5 cells, possibly via increasing the expression levels of Nrf2, GSH and HO-1. Moreover, radiation combined with genistein significantly increased cell apoptosis in A549 but not MRC-5 cells. Together, the results herein show that the intrinsic difference in the redox status of A549 and MRC-5 cells could be the target for genistein to selectively sensitize A549 cells to radiation, thereby leading to an increase in radiosensitivity for A549 cells. PMID:27029077

  5. Phytoestrogens and mitochondrial biogenesis in breast cancer. Influence of estrogen receptors ratio.

    PubMed

    Roca, Pilar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Blanquer-Rosselló, Ma del Mar; Oliver, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens were originally identified as compounds having a close similarity in structure to estrogens and harboring weak estrogen activity. The interest in phytoestrogens as potential therapeutic agents has recently risen in the field of oncology, since population based studies have linked phytoestrogens consumption with a decreased risk of mortality due to several types of cancer. This review departs from the main focus of these articles by describing recent advances in our understanding of phytoestrogen potential action on mitochondria, specifically on mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and functionality, as well as mitoptosis in breast cancer. Further studies are necessary to explain the effects of individual phytoestrogens on mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics and for designing of new therapy targets for cancer treatment, nevertheless area promising therapeutic approach.

  6. Genistein affects parathyroid gland and NaPi 2a cotransporter in an animal model of the andropause.

    PubMed

    Pantelic, J; Ajdzanovic, V; Medigovic, I; Mojic, M; Trifunovic, S; Milosevic, V; Filipovic, B

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of genistein on the structural and functional changes in parathyroid glands (PTG) and sodium phosphate cotransporter 2a (NaPi 2a) in orchidectomized rats. Sixteen-month-old Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated (SO), orchidectomized (Orx) and genistein-treated orchidectomized (Orx+G) groups. Genistein (30 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously for 3 weeks, while the controls received vehicle alone. PTG was analyzed histomorphometrically, while the expressions of NaPi 2a mRNA/protein levels from kidneys were determined by real time PCR and Western blots. Serum and urine parameters were determined biochemically. The PTG volume in Orx rats was increased by 30% (p<0.05), compared to the SO group. Orx+G treatment increased the PTG volume by 35% and 75% (p<0.05) respectively, comparing to Orx and SO animals. Orchidectomy led to increment of serum PTH by 27% (p<0.05) compared to the SO group, Orx+G decreased it by 18% (p<0.05) comparing to Orx animals. NaPi 2a expression in Orx animals was reduced in regards to its abundance in SO animals, although it was increased in Orx+G group compared to the Orx. Phosphorus urine content of Orx animals was raised by 12% (p<0.05) compared to that for the SO group, while Orx+G induced a 17% reduction (p<0.05) in regards to Orx animals. Our study shows that Orx increases PTG volume and serum PTH level, while protein expression of NaPi 2a is reduced. Application of genistein attenuates the orchidectomy-induced changes in serum PTH level, stimulates the expression of NaPi 2a and reduces urinary Pi excretion, implying potential beneficial effects on andropausal symptoms. PMID:23959733

  7. FEEDING GENISTEIN TO PREPUBERTAL GILTS STIMULATES THEIR MAMMARY DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of dietary genistein on mammary development of prepubertal gilts was investigated. Forty-five gilts were fed one of three diets from 90 d of age until slaughter (day 183 ± 1). Diets were: without soya (CTL0, n=15); soya-based commercial (CTLS, n=15); and soya-based commercial with ...

  8. Genistein and cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Primary prevention through lifestyle interventions is a cost-effective alternative for preventing a large burden of chronic and degenerative diseases, including cancer, which is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the past decade, epidemiologic and preclinical evidence suggested that polyphenolic phytochemicals present in many plant foods possess chemopreventive properties against several cancer forms. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the potential cancer chemopreventive agents obtained from natural sources, such as polyphenols, that may represent a new, affordable approach to curb the increasing burden of cancer throughout the world. Several epidemiologic studies showed a relation between a soy-rich diet and cancer prevention, which was attributed to the presence of a phenolic compound, genistein, present in soy-based foods. Genistein acts as a chemotherapeutic agent against different types of cancer, mainly by altering apoptosis, the cell cycle, and angiogenesis and inhibiting metastasis. Targeting caspases, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2, kinesin-like protein 20A (KIF20A), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), Wingless and integration 1 β-catenin (Wnt/β-catenin), and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathways may act as the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer, therapeutic effects of genistein. Genistein also shows synergistic behavior with well-known anticancer drugs, such as adriamycin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen, suggesting a potential role in combination therapy. This review critically analyzes the available literature on the therapeutic role of genistein on different types of cancer, focusing on its chemical features, plant food sources, bioavailability, and safety. PMID:26178025

  9. Genistein and Cancer: Current Status, Challenges, and Future Directions12

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Primary prevention through lifestyle interventions is a cost-effective alternative for preventing a large burden of chronic and degenerative diseases, including cancer, which is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the past decade, epidemiologic and preclinical evidence suggested that polyphenolic phytochemicals present in many plant foods possess chemopreventive properties against several cancer forms. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the potential cancer chemopreventive agents obtained from natural sources, such as polyphenols, that may represent a new, affordable approach to curb the increasing burden of cancer throughout the world. Several epidemiologic studies showed a relation between a soy-rich diet and cancer prevention, which was attributed to the presence of a phenolic compound, genistein, present in soy-based foods. Genistein acts as a chemotherapeutic agent against different types of cancer, mainly by altering apoptosis, the cell cycle, and angiogenesis and inhibiting metastasis. Targeting caspases, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)–associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2, kinesin-like protein 20A (KIF20A), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), Wingless and integration 1 β-catenin (Wnt/β-catenin), and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathways may act as the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer, therapeutic effects of genistein. Genistein also shows synergistic behavior with well-known anticancer drugs, such as adriamycin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen, suggesting a potential role in combination therapy. This review critically analyzes the available literature on the therapeutic role of genistein on different types of cancer, focusing on its chemical features, plant food sources, bioavailability, and safety. PMID:26178025

  10. The effect of phytoestrogens on the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J L; Wells, M

    2002-01-01

    Environmental oestrogens have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hormonally treated cancers (such as breast and prostate cancer), male infertility, and abnormalities of the male and female reproductive tracts. They may be derived from plants (phytoestrogens), pharmaceuticals, or other synthetic compounds not originally intended to have oestrogenic activity (including soy based infant formulas). This review will discuss the evidence from both animal studies and humans for an effect of these ubiquitous compounds on the development of the human female genital tract, in addition to prolonging the menstrual cycle, alleviating symptoms of the menopause, and protecting against the development of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:12037019

  11. Prevention of bone resorption by intake of phytoestrogens in postmenopausal women: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Salari Sharif, Pooneh; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-09-01

    Phytoestrogens as selective estrogen receptor modulators like compounds may consider as a therapeutic option in osteoporosis. In this regard, the effect of phytoestrogens on bone biomarkers was examined in several trials which their results are controversial. We aimed this meta-analysis to evaluate the net effect of phytoestrogens on bone markers. A thorough search was conducted from 2000 to 2010 in English articles. All randomized clinical trials were reviewed, and finally, 11 eligible randomized clinical trials were selected for meta-analysis. Totally 1,252 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the study by considering the changes of pyridinoline (Pyd), desoxypyridinoline (Dpyd), bone alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin concentrations in urine and serum after phytoestrogens consumption. The urine Pyd and Dpyd levels decreased significantly in phytoestrogens consumers. Effect size and effect size for weighted mean difference of urine Pyd levels showed -1.229171 (95% confidence interval (CI) = -1.927639 to -0.530703) and -9.780623 (95% CI = -14.240401 to -5.320845), respectively, a significant results in comparison to control group and significant results for Dpyd -0.520132 (95% CI = -0.871988 to -0.168275) and -0.818582 (95% CI = -1.247758 to -0.389407), respectively. Meta-analysis indicates that phytoestrogens intake can prevent bone resorption, but its benefits on bone formation are not significant. This favorable effect was observed in low doses and in at least 3 weeks of phytoestrogens intake.

  12. Phytoestrogenic effects of black tea extract (Camellia sinensis) in an oophorectomized rat (Rattus norvegicus) model of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Asankur Sekhar; Das, Dolan; Mukherjee, Maitrayee; Mukherjee, Sandip; Mitra, Chandan

    2005-10-28

    The adverse side effects of currently available anti-osteoporotic agents warrant the search for compounds with less toxic effects. In this study, we assessed the phytoestrogenic potentiality of whole aqueous extract of black tea (BTE) in a bilaterally oophorectomized rat model (2.5%, 1 ml/100 g body weight/day for 28 days). Although the supplementation was given for 28 days but, sign of revival of copulation period (estrous stage) from non-receptive diestrous stage was first noticed after 21 days of BTE supplementation in bilaterally oophorectomized rats. This was accompanied by a significant increase in serum estradiol level. To test whether this increase in serum estradiol level could have an influence upon the oophorectomy-induced damage of bone, we assessed marker parameters of bone resorption and osteoclastic activity (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase), collagen degradation (urinary hydroxyproline), bone loss (bone ash mineral content) and bone breaking strength (bone density). Results indicated that increase in serum estradiol level after BTE supplementation could significantly diminish oophorectomy-induced decaying changes in bone. This study proposes that aqueous BTE may be assessed as a phytoestrogenic compound for prevention against estrogen deficiency-related osteoporotic damages.

  13. Determination of Phytoestrogen Content in Fresh-Cut Legume Forage.

    PubMed

    Hloucalová, Pavlína; Skládanka, Jiří; Horký, Pavel; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pelikán, Jan; Knotová, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine phytoestrogen content in fresh-cut legume forage. This issue has been much discussed in recent years in connection with the health and safety of feedstuffs and thus livestock health. The experiments were carried out on two experimental plots at Troubsko and Vatín, Czech Republic during June and July in 2015. Samples were collected of the four forage legume species perennial red clover (variety "Amos"), alfalfa (variety "Holyně"), and annuals Persian clover and Alexandrian clover. Forage was sampled twice at regular three to four day intervals leading up to harvest and a third time on the day of harvest. Fresh and wilted material was analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Higher levels ( p < 0.05) of isoflavones biochanin A (3.697 mg·g (-1) of dry weight) and formononetin (4.315 mg·g (-1) of dry weight) were found in red clover than in other species. The highest isoflavone content was detected in red clover, reaching 1.001% of dry matter ( p < 0.05), representing a risk for occurrence of reproduction problems and inhibited secretion of animal estrogen. The phytoestrogen content was particularly increased in wilted forage. Significant isoflavone reduction was observed over three to four day intervals leading up to harvest. PMID:27429009

  14. Medical applications of phytoestrogens from the Thai herb Pueraria mirifica.

    PubMed

    Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2012-03-01

    Pueraria mirifica Airy Shaw et Suvatabandhu is a medicinal plant endemic to Thailand. It has been used in Thai folklore medicine for its rejuvenating qualities in aged women and men for nearly one hundred years. Indeed, it has been claimed that P. mirifica contains active phytoestrogens (plant substances with estrogen-like activity). Using high performance liquid chromatography, at least 17 phytoestrogens, mainly isoflavones, have been isolated. Thus, fairly considerable scientific researches, both in vitro in cell lines and in vivo in various species of animals including humans, have been conducted to date to address its estrogenic activity on the reproductive organs, bones, cardiovascular diseases and other climacteric related symptoms. The antioxidative capacity and antiproliferative effect on tumor cell lines have also been assessed. In general, P. mirifica could be applicable for preventing, or as a therapeutic for, the symptoms related to estrogen deficiency in menopausal women as well as in andropausal men. However, the optimal doses for each desirable effect and the balance to avoid undesired side effects need to be calculated before use.

  15. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the bone protective effect of phytoestrogens on osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Song-wen; Zeng, Gao-feng; Zong, Shao-hui; Zhang, Zhi-yong; Zou, Bin; Fang, Ye; Lu, Li; Xiao, De-qiang

    2014-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are candidate drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis. Many experiments have been designed to investigate the preventive effects of phytoestrogens for osteoporosis; however, it is easy for a single dissenting result from animal experiments to mislead clinical investigations. Herein, we use meta-analysis to assess the evidence for a protective effect of phytoestrogens on ovariectomized rat models of osteopenia. With respect to osteoporosis, PubMed and Web of Science were searched from January 2000 to March 2013 for relevant studies of phytoestrogens in ovariectomized rats. Two reviewers independently selected and assessed the studies. Data were aggregated using a random effects model. Meta-analysis revealed that the phytoestrogen treatment group demonstrated a significantly higher femur bone mineral density and trabecular bone and lower bone turnover markers (serum alkaline phosphatase and serum osteocalcin) compared with the control ovariectomized group, thus showing a bone protective effect of phytoestrogens in ovariectomized rats. Subsequent sensitivity analyses indicated that the effect of phytoestrogens on serum alkaline phosphatase and serum osteocalcin are not robust. Despite the high heterogeneity in the systematic review of animal experiments, the present results indicated that phytoestrogens may offer the most potential for the prevention of bone loss by reducing the expected loss of trabecular bone and bone mineral density. Their effects are likely due to inhibition of bone resorption, but their benefits on bone formation are still unclear. Further studies are needed to assess the effect of phytoestrogens on bone formation and the efficacy and safety of individual phytoestrogens.

  16. Adverse Effects of Genistein in a Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Seppen, Jurgen; Gijbels, Marion J J; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by diminished degradation of the glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate (HS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). Patients present with a variety of symptoms, including severe skeletal disease. Current therapeutic strategies have only limited effects on bone disease. The isoflavone genistein has been studied as a potential therapy for the mucopolysaccharidoses because of its putative ability to inhibit GAG synthesis and subsequent accumulation. Cell, animal, and clinical studies, however, showed variable outcomes. To determine the effects of genistein on MPS I-related bone disease, wild-type (WT) and MPS I mice were fed a genistein-supplemented diet (corresponding to a dose of approximately 160 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. HS and DS levels in bone and plasma remained unchanged after genistein supplementation, while liver HS levels were decreased in genistein-fed MPS I mice as compared to untreated MPS I mice. Unexpectedly, genistein-fed mice exhibited significantly decreased body length and femur length. In addition, 60% of genistein-fed MPS I mice developed a scrotal hernia and/or scrotal hydrocele, manifestations, which were absent in WT or untreated MPS I mice. In contrast to studies in MPS III mice, our study in MPS I mice demonstraes no beneficial but even potential adverse effects of genistein supplementation. Our results urge for a cautious approach on the use of genistein, at least in patients with MPS I. PMID:25854773

  17. Interactions of ATP, oestradiol, genistein and the anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) and tamoxifen, with the human erythrocyte glucose transporter, GLUT1.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (ED when subscript to K) and the phytoestrogen isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibit glucose transport in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts. The selective oestrogen receptor modulators or anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) (FAS) and tamoxifen (TAM), competitively antagonize oestradiol inhibition of glucose exit from erythrocytes (K(i(ED/FAS))=2.84+/-0.16 microM and K(i(ED/TAM))=100+/-2 nM). Faslodex has no significant inhibitory effect on glucose exit, but tamoxifen alone inhibits glucose exit (K(i(TAM))=300+/-100 nM). In ghosts, ATP (1-4 mM) competitively antagonizes oestradiol, genistein and cytochalasin B (CB)-dependent inhibitions of glucose exit, (K(i(ATP/ED))=2.5+/-0.23 mM, K(i(ATP/GEN))=0.99+/-0.17 mM and K(i(ATP/CB))=0.76+/-0.08 mM). Tamoxifen and faslodex reverse oestradiol-dependent inhibition of glucose exit with ATP>1 mM (K(i(ED/TAM))=130+/-5 nM and K(i(ED/FAS))=2.7+/-0.9 microM). The cytoplasmic surface of the glucose transporter (GLUT)1 contains four sequences with close homologies to sequences in the ligand-binding domain of human oestrogen receptor beta (hesr-2). One homology is adjacent to the Walker ATP-binding motif II (GLUT1, residues 225-229) in the large cytoplasmic segment linking transmembrane helices 6 and 7; another GLUT (residues 421-423) contains the Walker ATP-binding motif III. Mapping of these regions on to a three-dimensional template of GLUT indicates that a possible oestrogen-binding site lies between His(337), Arg(349) and Glu(249) at the cytoplasmic entrance to the hydrophilic pore spanning GLUT, which have a similar topology to His(475), Glu(305) and Arg(346) in hesr-2 that anchor the head and tail hydroxy groups of oestradiol and genistein, and thus are suitably placed to provide an ATP-sensitive oestrogen binding site that could modulate glucose export. PMID:12133004

  18. The Balance of Beneficial and Deleterious Health Effects of Quinones: A Case Study of the Chemical Properties of Genistein and Estrone Quinones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Tu, Tingting; d’Avignon, D. André; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Substances containing a phenolic moiety are often metabolized to quinones whose high reactivity makes them difficult to study. Some of these precursors have clear health benefits, and some quinones themselves are used in cancer therapy, whereas others are deleterious. For example, dietary intake of phytoestrogen, genistein (Gen), seems to play a preventive role in breast cancer (BC) whereas prolonged exposure to chemically similar mammalian estrogens is clearly associated with elevated incidence of BC. Although both can be metabolized to reactive quinones, the catechol estrogen quinones (CEQs) modify DNA by redox cycling and/or depurination via a Michael addition. Here, we report an investigation of the chemical reactivity of Gen and estrone quinones to determine the chemical differences in of these two biologically important molecules. The catechol genistein quinone (CGenQ), has a half life of 4 ± 1 s under physiological condition, as determined by glutathione trapping. It disappears by reacting with H2O to give a dihydrate, CGenQ·(H2O)2, whose structure was proved by NMR. Under reductive conditions, CGenQ·(H2O)2 is readily reduced to reform the catechol genistein (CGen). This reversible oxidation of CGen to CGenQ and the prompt moderation of its reactivity by hydration to CGenQ·(H2O)2 effectively moderates any redox cycling or depurination reaction of CGenQ with DNA. Catechol estrogen quinones, on the other hand, are sufficiently long-lived that they can damage DNA via a Michael addition or by redox cycling. Although the reactivity of CEQ in a nonaqueous solvent is similar to that of CGenQ, its reactivity in aqueous media with the free Ade base is more than 600 times that of CGenQ. These results suggest that rapid hydration of a quinone can moderate its reactivity toward biomolecules, allowing them to express, for example, estrogen-like properties without exhibiting the deleterious properties of redox cycling or directly damaging DNA via depurination

  19. Balance of beneficial and deleterious health effects of quinones: a case study of the chemical properties of genistein and estrone quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Tu, Tingting; d'Avignon, D André; Gross, Michael L

    2009-01-28

    Substances containing a phenolic moiety are often metabolized to quinones whose high reactivity makes them difficult to study. Some of these precursors have clear health benefits, and some quinones themselves are used in cancer therapy, whereas others are deleterious. For example, dietary intake of phytoestrogen, genistein (Gen), seems to play a preventive role in breast cancer (BC) whereas prolonged exposure to chemically similar mammalian estrogens is clearly associated with elevated incidence of BC. Although both can be metabolized to reactive quinones, the catechol estrogen quinones (CEQs) modify DNA by redox cycling and/or depurination via a Michael addition. Here, we report an investigation of the chemical reactivity of Gen and estrone quinones to determine the chemical differences of these two biologically important molecules. The catechol genistein quinone (CGenQ), has a half-life of 4 +/- 1 s under physiological condition, as determined by glutathione trapping. It disappears by reacting with H2O to give a dihydrate, CGenQ x (H2O)2, whose structure was proved by NMR. Under reductive conditions, CGenQ x (H2O)2 is readily reduced to reform the catechol genistein (CGen). This reversible oxidation of CGen to CGenQ and the prompt moderation of its reactivity by hydration to CGenQ x (H2O)2 effectively hinders any redox cycling or depurination reaction of CGenQ with DNA. Catechol estrogen quinones, on the other hand, are sufficiently long-lived that they can damage DNA via a Michael addition or by redox cycling. Although the reactivity of CEQ in a nonaqueous solvent is similar to that of CGenQ, its reactivity in aqueous media with the free Ade base is more than 600 times that of CGenQ. These results suggest that rapid hydration of a quinone can moderate its reactivity toward biomolecules, allowing them to express, for example, estrogen-like properties without exhibiting the deleterious properties of redox cycling or directly damaging DNA via depurination reactions.

  20. Estrogen depletion induces NaCl-sensitive hypertension in female spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Z; Carlson, S H; Chen, Y F; Oparil, S; Wyss, J M

    2001-12-01

    In women, arterial pressure generally increases after menopause, but several studies suggest that women who eat large amounts of plant estrogens (phytoestrogens) experience a slower rise in the incidence of postmenopausal hypertension. This suggests that both ovarian hormones (principally estrogen) and phytoestrogens may protect at least some women from hypertension. The present study tests the hypothesis that phytoestrogens blunt hypertension in estrogen-depleted female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Three-week-old ovariectomized SHR were fed one of four diets that contained basal (0.6%) or high (8%) NaCl with or without dietary phytoestrogens for 9 wk. In SHR on the basal NaCl diet, arterial pressure was unaffected by the removal of dietary phytoestrogens. In contrast, in SHR on the high-NaCl diet, arterial pressure was significantly higher in rats on the phytoestrogen-free (204 +/- 4 mmHg) compared with the phytoestrogen-replete (153 +/- 4 mmHg) diet. Ganglionic blockade resulted in reductions in arterial pressure that were directly related to the dietary NaCl-induced increases in arterial pressure. Together, these data indicate that dietary phytoestrogens protect ovariectomized female SHR from dietary NaCl-sensitive hypertension and that the sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in this effect. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that dietary phytoestrogens can have a major impact on the interpretation of studies into the physiological role of estrogen in females.

  1. Mechanism of phytoestrogen puerarin-mediated cytoprotection following oxidative injury: Estrogen receptor-dependent up-regulation of PI3K/Akt and HO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-15

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. The phytoestrogen puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside found in the root of Pueraria lobata, has been used for various medicinal purposes in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Recent studies have indicated that the estrogen receptor (ER), through interaction with p85, regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, revealing a physiologic, non-nuclear function of ER that may be relevant in cytoprotection. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen puerarin inhibits tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells with puerarin significantly reduced t-BHP-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Also, puerarin up-regulated HO-1 expression and this expression conferred cytoprotection against oxidative injury induced by t-BHP. Moreover, puerarin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of puerarin-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Puerarin-induced up-regulation of HO-1 and cytoprotection against t-BHP were abolished by silencing Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA. Also, puerarin-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that puerarin augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress.

  2. ADULT EXPOSURE TO PHYTOESTROGEN APIGENIN RESULTS IN CHANGES IN ENDOCRINE PARAMETERS BUT FAILS TO ALTER FECUNDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant-derived estrogens offer the opportunity to investigate the potential for weakly estrogenic compounds to influence endocrine function and reproduction. The presence of these phytoestrogens in foods, and agricultural and industrial runoff has the potential to increase the tot...

  3. Phytoestrogen-Rich Dietary Supplements in Anti-Atherosclerotic Therapy in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Sobenin, Igor A; Myasoedova, Veronica A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among postmenopausal women in western societies. There are still no specific and highly efficient methods of preservation of women's vascular health in modern preventive medicine. For many years physicians have assumed that hormone replacement therapy prevents the development of atherosclerosis in menopausal women. However, the results of the largest international trials involving thousands of women have completely destroyed this hope. The modern perspective for the development of effective and safe drugs to enhance the quality of life and to prevent atherosclerosis progression in postmenopausal women may be the use of phytoestrogens, the substances of plant origin possessing estrogen- like effects, and possibly providing anti-atherosclerotic and anti-climacteric action. Phytoestrogens are often considered as a possible alternative to hormone replacement therapy, since they are believed to alleviate some symptoms of menopause. However, until now there is no exact evidence to consider phytoestrogens as the substances that protect women from atherosclerosis. It should be noted that the data from clinical studies with inconsistent results are mainly inconsistent per se, as most of the studies have serious limitations due to the study design and the participants' compliance. Nevertheless, there is a substantial evidence that phytoestrogens have the potential to address several conditions and diseases associated with the menopausal transition. Phytoestrogens, at least, can potentially reduce atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis-related diseases through multiple mechanisms, by regulating serum lipid metabolism, arterial vessels, cytokine levels, and coagulation/fibrinolysis system. However, a skepticism exists concerning the true potential of phytoestrogens to beneficially modify these processes. An analysis of findings from supplementing the diet with phytoestrogens has failed, in general, to

  4. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  5. New concepts, experimental approaches, and dereplication strategies for the discovery of novel phytoestrogens from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Michel, Thomas; Halabalaki, Maria; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2013-05-01

    Phytoestrogens constitute an attractive research topic due to their estrogenic profile and their biological involvement in woman's health. Therefore, numerous studies are currently performed in natural products chemistry area aiming at the discovery of novel phytoestrogens. The main classes of phytoestrogens are flavonoids (flavonols, flavanones), isoflavonoids (isoflavones, coumestans), lignans, stilbenoids as well as miscellaneous chemical groups abundant in several edible and/or medicinal plants, belonging mostly to the Leguminosae family. As for other bioactives, the detection of new structures and more potent plant-derived phytoestrogens typically follows the general approaches currently available in the natural product discovery process. Plant-based approaches selected from traditional medicine knowledge and bioguided concepts are routinely employed. However, these approaches are associated with serious disadvantages such as time-consuming, repeated, and labor intensive processes as well as lack of specificity and reproducibility. In recent years, the natural products chemistry became more technology-driven, and several different strategies have been developed. Structure-oriented procedures and miniaturized approaches employing advanced hyphenated analytical platforms have recently emerged. They facilitate significantly not only the discovery of novel phytoestrogens but also the dereplication procedure leading to the anticipation of major drawbacks in natural products discovery. In this review, apart from the traditional concepts followed in phytochemistry for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds, recent applications in the field of extraction, analysis, fractionation, and identification of phytoestrogens will be discussed. Moreover, specific methodologies combining identification of actives and biological evaluation in parallel, such as liquid chromatography-biochemical detection, frontal affinity chromatography-mass spectrometry and pulsed

  6. Phytoestrogens in the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Lagari, Violet S; Levis, Silvina

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a condition associated with low bone mass resulting from the increased bone resorption that occurs following a decline in estrogen levels. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that have affinity to the estrogen receptor and are able to act as either estrogen agonists or antagonists. Because of their structural similarity to 17-beta-estradiol, they have been studied extensively for their role in the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss. An extensive number of studies employing different types of isoflavone preparations (including soy foods, soy-enriched foods, and soy isoflavone tablets) have been conducted in a wide range of populations, including Western and Asian women. Although there is considerable variability in study design and duration, study population, type of soy isoflavone employed in the intervention, and study outcomes, the evidence points to a lack of a protective role of soy isoflavones in the prevention of postmenopausal bone loss.

  7. Differential regulation of early response genes and cell proliferation through the human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor: selective activation of the c-fos promoter by genistein.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Muto, A; Yokota, T; Miyajima, A; Arai, K

    1993-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) binds to the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor (GMR) consisting of alpha and beta subunits and induces rapid tyrosine phosphorylation, activation of early response genes, and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. The alpha subunit is the primary cytokine binding component and the beta subunit is required for high-affinity binding as well as for signal transduction. Using tyrosine kinase inhibitors and cytoplasmic deletion mutants of the beta subunit, we obtained evidence that there are at least two distinct pathways downstream of the GMR in BA/F3 cell, one which is essential for proliferation, leads to the c-myc gene activation, and is sensitive to herbimycin and genistein. Activation of this pathway depends on the cytoplasmic region between amino acid positions 455 and 517 of the beta subunit. The second pathway, which leads to activation of c-fos and c-jun genes, is only partially sensitive to herbimycin, is resistant to genistein and depends on the region between amino acid positions 626 and 763 of the beta subunit. Unexpectedly, the c-fos mRNA induction was augmented by genistein. The enhanced expression of c-fos mRNA by genistein also occurred with stimulation with cAMP, PMA, or EGF in NIH3T3 cells. It thus seems likely that genistein affects a common pathway downstream of these signals. Images PMID:8298195

  8. Beneficial effects of phytoestrogens and their metabolites produced by intestinal microflora on bone health.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Shen-Shih; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are a class of bioactive compounds derived from plants and exert various estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Estrogen deficiency osteoporosis has become a serious problem in elderly women. The use of ovariectomized (OVX) rat or mice models to simulate the postmenopausal condition is well established. This review aimed to clarify the sources, biochemistry, absorption, metabolism, and mode of action of phytoestrogens on bone health in intervention studies. In vitro, phytoestrogens promote protein synthesis, osteoprotegerin/receptor activation of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand ratio, and mineralization by osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1). In the OVX murine model, administration of phytoestrogens can inhibit differentiation and activation of osteoclasts, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and secretion of pyridinoline compound. Phytoestrogens also enhance bone formation and increase bone mineral density and levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and α1(I) collagen. Results of mechanistic studies have indicated that phytoestrogens suppress the rate of bone resorption and enhance the rate of bone formation.

  9. Dietary withdrawal of phytoestrogens resulted in higher gene expression of 3-beta-HSD and ARO but lower 5-alpha-R-1 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María F; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phytoestrogens causes obesity and diabetes in adult male rats. Based on the facts that hypothalamic food intake control is disrupted in phytoestrogen-deprived animals and that several steroids affect food intake, we hypothesized that phytoestrogen withdrawal alters the expression of hypothalamic steroidogenic enzymes. Male Wistar rats fed with a high-phytoestrogen diet from conception to adulthood were subjected to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding them a low-phytoestrogen diet or a high-phytoestrogen, high-fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and P450 aromatase gene expression and decreased those of 5α-reductase-1. This is a direct effect of the lack of dietary phytoestrogens and not a consequence of obesity, as it was not observed in high-fat-fed rats. Phytoestrogen withdrawal and high-fat diet intake reduced hypothalamic expression of estrogen receptor (ER)α correlated with low levels of ERα-O, ERα-OS, and ERα-OT transcripts. Variations in gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes may affect the content of neurosteroids. As neurosteroids are related to food intake control, the changes observed may be a novel mechanism in the regulation of energy balance in obese phytoestrogen-deprived animals. In rats, steroidogenesis and ER signaling appear to be altered by phytoestrogen withdrawal in the rat. The ubiquity of phytoestrogens in the diet and changing intakes or withdrawal suggest that aspects of human health could be affected based on the rat and warrant further research. PMID:27632921

  10. Dietary withdrawal of phytoestrogens resulted in higher gene expression of 3-beta-HSD and ARO but lower 5-alpha-R-1 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María F; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phytoestrogens causes obesity and diabetes in adult male rats. Based on the facts that hypothalamic food intake control is disrupted in phytoestrogen-deprived animals and that several steroids affect food intake, we hypothesized that phytoestrogen withdrawal alters the expression of hypothalamic steroidogenic enzymes. Male Wistar rats fed with a high-phytoestrogen diet from conception to adulthood were subjected to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding them a low-phytoestrogen diet or a high-phytoestrogen, high-fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and P450 aromatase gene expression and decreased those of 5α-reductase-1. This is a direct effect of the lack of dietary phytoestrogens and not a consequence of obesity, as it was not observed in high-fat-fed rats. Phytoestrogen withdrawal and high-fat diet intake reduced hypothalamic expression of estrogen receptor (ER)α correlated with low levels of ERα-O, ERα-OS, and ERα-OT transcripts. Variations in gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes may affect the content of neurosteroids. As neurosteroids are related to food intake control, the changes observed may be a novel mechanism in the regulation of energy balance in obese phytoestrogen-deprived animals. In rats, steroidogenesis and ER signaling appear to be altered by phytoestrogen withdrawal in the rat. The ubiquity of phytoestrogens in the diet and changing intakes or withdrawal suggest that aspects of human health could be affected based on the rat and warrant further research.

  11. Genistein suppresses the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in hippocampal neurons in rats with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Cai, Biao; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ting-Ting; Cai, Run-Ze; Ma, Chang-Ju; Han, Tao; Du, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Genistein is effective against amyloid-β toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that genistein may protect neurons by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thereby play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. A rat model of Alzheimer's disease was established by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose and intracerebral injection of amyloid-β peptide (25-35). In the genistein treatment groups, a 7-day pretreatment with genistein (10, 30, 90 mg/kg) was given prior to establishing Alzheimer's disease model, for 49 consecutive days. Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated a reduction in apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats treated with genistein. Western blot analysis showed that expression levels of capase-3, Bax and cytochrome c were decreased compared with the model group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed reductions in cytochrome c and Bax immunoreactivity in these rats. Morris water maze revealed a substantial shortening of escape latency by genistein in Alzheimer's disease rats. These findings suggest that genistein decreases neuronal loss in the hippocampus, and improves learning and memory ability. The neuroprotective effects of genistein are associated with the inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as shown by its ability to reduce levels of caspase-3, Bax and cytochrome c. PMID:27630702

  12. Genistein suppresses the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in hippocampal neurons in rats with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Cai, Biao; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ting-ting; Cai, Run-ze; Ma, Chang-ju; Han, Tao; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is effective against amyloid-β toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that genistein may protect neurons by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thereby play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. A rat model of Alzheimer’s disease was established by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose and intracerebral injection of amyloid-β peptide (25–35). In the genistein treatment groups, a 7-day pretreatment with genistein (10, 30, 90 mg/kg) was given prior to establishing Alzheimer’s disease model, for 49 consecutive days. Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated a reduction in apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats treated with genistein. Western blot analysis showed that expression levels of capase-3, Bax and cytochrome c were decreased compared with the model group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed reductions in cytochrome c and Bax immunoreactivity in these rats. Morris water maze revealed a substantial shortening of escape latency by genistein in Alzheimer’s disease rats. These findings suggest that genistein decreases neuronal loss in the hippocampus, and improves learning and memory ability. The neuroprotective effects of genistein are associated with the inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as shown by its ability to reduce levels of caspase-3, Bax and cytochrome c. PMID:27630702

  13. Genistein: does it prevent or promote breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Bouker, K B; Hilakivi-Clarke, L

    2000-01-01

    Diet is estimated to contribute to approximately 50% of all newly diagnosed breast cancers. As such, a search for dietary factors differentially consumed among populations with increased breast cancer risk (e.g., Caucasians) compared to those with low risk (e.g., Asians) has become a priority. One such dietary component, which is typical to the Asian but not the Caucasian diet, is soy. We review data relevant to attempts to determine whether soy, and more specifically genistein, is a dietary component that may help to explain the dramatic disparity in breast cancer risk among these populations. Images Figure 1 PMID:10964789

  14. Impact of neonatal exposure to the ERα agonist PPT, bisphenol-a or phytoestrogens on hypothalamic kisspeptin fiber density in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Patisaul, Heather B.; Todd, Karina L.; Mickens, Jillian A.; Adewale, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) can impair reproductive physiology, but the specific mechanisms by which this occurs remain largely unknown. Growing evidence suggests that kisspeptin (KISS) neurons play a significant role in the regulation of pubertal onset and ovulation, therefore disruption of KISS signaling could be a mechanism by which EDCs impair reproductive maturation and function. We have previously demonstrated that neonatal exposure to phytoestrogens decreases KISS fiber density in the anterior hypothalamus of female rats, an effect which was associated with early persistent estrus and the impaired activation gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. The goals of the present study were to (1) determine if an ERα selective agonist (PPT) or bisphenol-A (BPA) could produce similar effects on hypothalamic KISS content in female rats and (2) to determine if male KISS fiber density was also vulnerable to disruption by EDCs. We first examined the effects of neonatal exposure to PPT, a low (50 μg/kg bw) BPA dose, and a high (50 mg/kg bw) BPA dose on KISS immunoreactivity (-ir) in the anterior ventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of adult female rats, using estradiol benzoate (EB) and a sesame oil vehicle as controls. AVPV KISS-ir, following ovariectomy (OVX) and hormone priming, was significantly lower in the EB and PPT groups but not the BPA groups. ARC KISS-ir levels were significantly diminished in the EB and high dose BPA groups, and there was a nonsignificant trend for lower KISS-ir in the PPT group. We next examined effects of neonatal exposure to a low (50μg/kg bw) dose of BPA and the phytoestrogens genistein (GEN) and equol (EQ) on KISS-ir in the AVPV and ARC of adult male rats, using OVX females as an additional control group. None of the compounds affected KISS-ir in the male hypothalamus. Our results suggest that the organization of hypothalamic KISS fibers may be vulnerable to disruption by EDC

  15. Epigenetic and phenotypic changes result from a continuous pre and post natal dietary exposure to phytoestrogens in an experimental population of mice

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos M; Sabat, Pablo; Valdovinos, Fernanda S; Valladares, Luis E; Clark, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    Background Developmental effects of exposure to endocrine disruptors can influence adult characters in mammals, but could also have evolutionary consequences. The aim of this study was to simulate an environmental exposure of an experimental population of mice to high amounts of nutritional phytoestrogens and to evaluate parameters of relevance for evolutionary change in the offspring. The effect of a continuous pre- and post-natal exposure to high levels of dietary isoflavones was evaluated on sexual maturity, morphometric parameters and DNA methylation status in mice. Adult mice male/female couples were fed ad libitum either with control diet (standard laboratory chow) or ISF diet (control diet plus a soy isoflavone extract at 2% (w/w) that contained the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein). In the offspring we measured: i) the onset of vaginal opening (sexual maturation) in females, ii) weight and size in all pups at 7, 14, 21 and 42 days post-natal (dpn) and iii) DNA methylation patterns in skeletal α-actin (Acta1), estrogen receptor-α and c-fos in adults (42 dpn). Results Vaginal opening was advanced in female pups in the ISF group, from 31.6 ± 0.75 dpn to 25.7 ± 0.48. No differences in size or weight at ages 7, 14 or 21 dpn were detected between experimental groups. Nevertheless, at age 42 dpn reduced size and weight were observed in ISF pups, in addition to suppression of normal gender differences in weight seen in the control group (males heavier that females). Also, natural differences seen in DNA methylation at Acta1 promoter in the offspring originated in the control group were suppressed in the ISF group. Acta1 is known to be developmentally regulated and related to morphomotric features. Conclusion This study demonstrates in mammals that individuals from a population subjected to a high consumption of isoflavones can show alterations in characters that may be of importance from an evolutionary perspective, such as epigenetic and morphometric

  16. Effect of genistein added to bull semen after thawing on pronuclear and sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, M A; Vicente-Fiel, S; Raga, E; Salvador, I; Soler, C; Yániz, J L

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of different genistein treatments on bull sperm after thawing on pronuclear formation after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and on different sperm quality variables. Three experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, three treatments (Control, sperm incubation for 1h at 37 °C with or without genistein) and two sperm concentrations during IVF (1 or 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL) were evaluated to study the influence of genistein on pronuclear formation (PNF). Sperm incubation for 1h before IVF reduced PNF regardless of sperm concentration. However, after sperm incubation and with 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL in IVF, the genistein treatment group had greater fertilization rates than the untreated group. In Experiment 2, six treatments plus the control group were performed to study the effect of genistein (presence or not) and incubation conditions (30 min at 37 °C, 1h at 27 °C or at 37 °C) on PNF using 3 × 10(6)sperm/mL for IVF. When incubation time was reduced to 30 min, PNF rate from the genistein treatment group was no different from either the control group or in the group in which incubation occurred for 1h at 27 °C. In Experiment 3, the effect of several genistein treatments (control; genistein treatment for 30 min of incubation at 37 °C; genistein treatment for 1h of incubation at 27 °C) on sperm motility, viability and DNA fragmentation were evaluated. Genistein did not improve sperm motility and, depending on the experimental group or time, it either reduced or had no effect on sperm motility. Genistein treatment did not improve sperm viability after 5h of incubation. However, genistein treatment for 1h at 27 °C decreased sperm DNA fragmentation compared with the control group after 5h of sperm incubation. In conclusion, the treatment of bull sperm with genistein for 1h at 27 °C could decrease sperm DNA fragmentation, although PNF rate after IVF and sperm motility were reduced.

  17. Phytoestrogens in Postmenopause: The State of the Art from a Chemical, Pharmacological and Regulatory Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; Ponti, Fabrizio De

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user’s initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements. PMID:24164197

  18. Phytoestrogens and other botanicals: on the problems of evidence-based evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2013-04-01

    Soy is the principal plant that produces phytoestrogens, named so because they bind to the estrogen receptors, however weakly compared to the estrogens. Recent reviews concluded that there is no convincing evidence in favor of alleviation of menopausal symptoms by phytoestrogens. However, some studies suggest their efficacy. The question is discussed here, whether vegetable analogues should be used for replacement therapy instead of physiological hormones, also because phytoestrogen preparations often contain a mixture of different components. There is a controversy: phytoestrogens are used to compensate for estrogen deficiency in menopause; but their estrogenic potential does not prevent from the use of soy in infant formulas and other foodstuffs. Feminizing effect of phytoestrogens and soy products may be subtle, detectable only in large populations. This matter should be clarified by independent research, which can be of importance for the future of soy in agriculture. Furthermore a tendency to present placebos and substances with unproven effects in the guise of evidence-based medications is discussed. In conclusion, research quality and possible influence by the industry should be taken into account defining inclusion criteria for studies into meta-analyses and reviews. The article presented patents discussion relevant to the article.

  19. Phytoestrogens in postmenopause: the state of the art from a chemical, pharmacological and regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user's initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements.

  20. Phytoestrogen consumption and risk for cognitive decline and dementia: With consideration of thyroid status and other possible mediators.

    PubMed

    Soni, M; White, L R; Kridawati, A; Bandelow, S; Hogervorst, E

    2016-06-01

    It is predicted that around 20% of the worlds population will be age 60 or above by 2050. Prevalence of cognitive decline and dementia is high in older adults and modifiable dietary factors may be able to reduce risk for these conditions. Phytoestrogens are bioactive plant chemicals found in soy, which have a similarity in structure to natural estradiol (the most abundant circulating estrogen). This structural likeness enables phytoestrogens to interact with estrogen receptors in the brain, potentially affecting cognition. However, findings in this domain are largely inconsistent, with approximately 50% of studies showing positive effects of phytoestrogens on cognition and the other half resulting in null/negative findings. This paper provides an updated review of the relationship between consumption of phytoestrogens and risk for cognitive decline and/or dementia. In particular, possible mediators were identified to explain discrepant findings and for consideration in future research. A case can be made for a link between phytoestrogen consumption, thyroid status and cognition in older age, although current findings in this area are very limited. Evidence suggests that inter-individual variants that can affect phytoestrogen bioavailability (and thus cognitive outcome) include age and ability to breakdown ingested phytoestrogens into their bioactive metabolites. Factors of the study design that must be taken into account are type of soy product, dosage, frequency of dietary intake and type of cognitive test used. Guidelines regarding optimal phytoestrogen dosage and frequency of intake are yet to be determined. PMID:26535810

  1. Phytoestrogen consumption and risk for cognitive decline and dementia: With consideration of thyroid status and other possible mediators.

    PubMed

    Soni, M; White, L R; Kridawati, A; Bandelow, S; Hogervorst, E

    2016-06-01

    It is predicted that around 20% of the worlds population will be age 60 or above by 2050. Prevalence of cognitive decline and dementia is high in older adults and modifiable dietary factors may be able to reduce risk for these conditions. Phytoestrogens are bioactive plant chemicals found in soy, which have a similarity in structure to natural estradiol (the most abundant circulating estrogen). This structural likeness enables phytoestrogens to interact with estrogen receptors in the brain, potentially affecting cognition. However, findings in this domain are largely inconsistent, with approximately 50% of studies showing positive effects of phytoestrogens on cognition and the other half resulting in null/negative findings. This paper provides an updated review of the relationship between consumption of phytoestrogens and risk for cognitive decline and/or dementia. In particular, possible mediators were identified to explain discrepant findings and for consideration in future research. A case can be made for a link between phytoestrogen consumption, thyroid status and cognition in older age, although current findings in this area are very limited. Evidence suggests that inter-individual variants that can affect phytoestrogen bioavailability (and thus cognitive outcome) include age and ability to breakdown ingested phytoestrogens into their bioactive metabolites. Factors of the study design that must be taken into account are type of soy product, dosage, frequency of dietary intake and type of cognitive test used. Guidelines regarding optimal phytoestrogen dosage and frequency of intake are yet to be determined.

  2. Determination of urinary lignans and phytoestrogen metabolites, potential antiestrogens and anticarcinogens, in urine of women on various habitual diets.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, H; Fotsis, T; Bannwart, C; Wähälä, K; Mäkelä, T; Brunow, G; Hase, T

    1986-11-01

    Recently two groups of compounds with diphenolic structure, the lignans and the isoflavonic phytoestrogens, were detected and identified in human urine and other biological fluids. These compounds are of great biological interest because they exhibit both in vitro and in vivo weak estrogenic and sometimes also antiestrogenic activities and many plant lignans have been shown to have anticarcinogenic, antiviral, antifungal and other interesting biological effects. The compounds found in relatively large amounts (10-1000 times more than estrogens) in urine are modified by intestinal bacteria from plant lignans and phytoestrogens, which are present in fiber-rich food such as grain and beans. They bind with low affinity to estrogen receptors and preliminary results suggest that they may induce production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in the liver and in this way may influence sex hormone metabolism and biological effects. Five compounds, the lignans enterolactone (Enl), enterodiol (End) and the isoflavonic phytoestrogen metabolites daidzein (Da), equol (Eq) and O-desmethylangolensin (O-Dma) were measured in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (selected ion monitoring) using deuterated internal standards in 5 groups of women (total number 53). The members of three dietary groups (omnivores, lactovegetarians and macrobiotics) were living in Boston and of two groups in Helsinki (omnivores and lactovegetarians). Until now measurements have been carried out in 94 72-h samples. The highest mean excretion of the most abundant compound, enterolactone, was found in the macrobiotic group and the lowest in the omnivoric groups. Total mean 24-h excretion of enterolactone was 17,680 nmol in the macrobiotics, 4,170 nmol in the Boston lactovegetarians, 3,650 nmol in the Helsinki lactovegetarians, 2,460 nmol in the Helsinki omnivores and 2,050 nmol in the Boston omnivores. The other diphenols followed approximately the same pattern. In an earlier study the lowest

  3. Phytoestrogens: epidemiology and a possible role in cancer protection.

    PubMed Central

    Adlercreutz, H

    1995-01-01

    Because many diseases of the Western Hemisphere are hormone-dependent cancers, we have postulated that the Western diet, compared to a vegetarian or semivegetarian diet, may alter hormone production, metabolism, or action at the cellular level by some biochemical mechanisms. Recently, our interest has been mainly focused on the cancer-protective role of some hormonelike diphenolic phytoestrogens of dietary origin, the lignans and the isoflavonoids. The precursors of the biologically active compounds originate in soybean products (mainly isoflavonoids), whole grain cereal food, seeds, and probably berries and nuts (mainly lignans). The plant lignan and isoflavonoid glycosides are converted by intestinal bacteria to hormonelike compounds with weak estrogenic but also antioxidative activity; they have now been shown to influence not only sex hormone metabolism and biological activity but also intracellular enzymes, protein synthesis, growth factor action, malignant cell proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis in a way that makes them strong candidates for a role as natural cancer-protective compounds. Epidemiologic investigations strongly support this hypothesis because the highest levels of these compounds in the diet are found in countries or regions with low cancer incidence. This report is a review on recent results suggesting that the diphenolic isoflavonoids and lignans are natural cancer-protective compounds. PMID:8593855

  4. Effects of dietary genistein on GH/IGF-I axis of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable concern that isoflavones, such as genistein in fish feed composed of soybean protein, aff ects somatic growth in fish. Our previous works demonstrated that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant eff ect on growth performance in Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus), but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed growth. This study was conducted to further examine the eff ects of dietary genistein on the endocrine disruption on growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis in Nile tilapia ( O. niloticus). Juvenile fish were fed by hand twice daily to satiation with one of four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets, each containing either 0, 30, 300 or 3 000 μg/g genistein. Following an 8-week feeding period, plasma GH and IGF-I levels were investigated by radioimmunoassay and gene expression levels of gh, ghrelin, gnrhs, ghr, npy, npyrs, pacap, ghrs, i gf-I, igf-Ir, and igfbp3 were examined by real-time PCR. The results show that no significant change in plasma GH and IGF-I levels in fish fed with diets containing 30 μg/g and 300 μg/g genistein. mRNA expression of genes along the GH/IGF-I axis remained unaff ected, except for igf-Ir, which was stimulated by the 300 μg/g genistein diet. While in fish fed the 3 000 μg/g genistein diet, the plasma GH and IGF-I levels decreased, and mRNA expression of gh, ghr2, npyr1, igf-I, and igf-Ir were also significantly depressed. In contrast, npy and igfbp3 mRNA expression were enhanced. This study provides convincing evidence for growth impediment by genistein by disturbing the GH/IGF-I axis in Nile tilapia O. niloticus.

  5. Genistein attenuates the hypertensive effects of dietary NaCl in hypertensive male rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, Taehyeon M; Peng, Ning; Clark, John T; Novak, Lea; Roysommuti, Sanya; Prasain, Jeevan; Wyss, J Michael

    2007-11-01

    Diets high in polyphenols may protect estrogen-depleted women and rats from hypertension, but there is little evidence for this beneficial effect in males. On a polyphenol-free diet, ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), high dietary NaCl increases arterial pressure, and this effect is greatly blunted by a soy-based diet. High NaCl diets also elevate arterial pressure in male SHRs, and pilot studies indicated that soy polyphenols blunt this effect. The present studies tested the hypothesis that genistein (the primary polyphenol in soy) reduces NaCl-sensitive hypertension in young, male stroke-prone SHRs (SHR-SP, a very NaCl-sensitive strain of SHR). Seven-week-old male SHR-SPs were placed on polyphenol-free diets with or without normal dietary amounts of genistein [0.06% (wt/wt)] and containing high (4%), moderate (2%), or basal (0.7%) NaCl. SHR-SP on the genistein-free diet displayed a dose-related increase in arterial pressure in response to dietary NaCl, and dietary genistein blunted this response. Ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium reduced arterial pressure to similar levels in all six groups, suggesting that the antihypertensive effects of genistein are influenced by the autonomic nervous system. We further hypothesized that genistein, like estrogen, would improve insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles. Thus, in study 2, 7-wk-old male SHR-SP were placed on high (6%) or basal (0.7%) NaCl diets with or without genistein (0.06%). Dietary genistein reduced plasma insulin and insulin resistance in SHR-SP on a high NaCl diet and decreased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in SHR-SP on the basal NaCl diet. Thus, in male SHR-SP, dietary genistein blunts NaCl-sensitive hypertension, and these effects may be regulated, in part, by the autonomic nervous system and/or metabolic mechanisms.

  6. Soya phytoestrogens change cortical and hippocampal expression of BDNF mRNA in male rats.

    PubMed

    File, Sandra E; Hartley, David E; Alom, Nazmul; Rattray, Marcus

    2003-02-27

    Adult male hooded Lister rats were either fed a diet containing 150 microg/g soya phytoestrogens or a soya-free diet for 18 days. This concentration of phytoestrogens should have been sufficient to occupy the oestrogen-beta, but not the oestrogen-alpha, receptors. Using in situ hybridisation, significant reductions were found in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the CA3 and CA4 region of the hippocampus and in the cerebral cortex in the rats fed the diet containing phytoestrogens, compared with those on the soya-free diet. No changes in glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 or glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA were found. This suggests a role for oestrogen-beta receptors in regulating BDNF mRNA expression.

  7. Polyurethane Microstructures--a Good or Bad in vitro Partner for the Isoflavone Genistein?

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Borcan, Florin; Soica, Codruta; Zupko, Istvan; Csányi, Erzsébet; Ambrus, Rita; Muntean, Delia; Sass, Camelia; Antal, Diana; Toma, Claudia; Dehelean, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    In recent years polyurethane microstructures (PM) have gained increasing attention in the pharmaceutical field due to the importance of their practical application. Since finding that such a formulation with genistein could improve its applications, we have conducted a preliminary study regarding the in vitro antiproliferative (MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D) and antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteritidis (D), Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, and Candida albicans) activity in order to test whether polyurethane micro structuresre present a good option for further modulation of genistein's bioavailability. It was concluded that the polyurethane micro structures are a bad in vitro partner for the isoflavone genistein. PMID:26197525

  8. Polyurethane Microstructures--a Good or Bad in vitro Partner for the Isoflavone Genistein?

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Borcan, Florin; Soica, Codruta; Zupko, Istvan; Csányi, Erzsébet; Ambrus, Rita; Muntean, Delia; Sass, Camelia; Antal, Diana; Toma, Claudia; Dehelean, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    In recent years polyurethane microstructures (PM) have gained increasing attention in the pharmaceutical field due to the importance of their practical application. Since finding that such a formulation with genistein could improve its applications, we have conducted a preliminary study regarding the in vitro antiproliferative (MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D) and antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteritidis (D), Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, and Candida albicans) activity in order to test whether polyurethane micro structuresre present a good option for further modulation of genistein's bioavailability. It was concluded that the polyurethane micro structures are a bad in vitro partner for the isoflavone genistein.

  9. Phytoestrogens regulate mRNA and protein levels of guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta-1 subunit (GNB1) in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Naragoni, Srivatcha; Sankella, Shireesha; Harris, Kinesha; Gray, Wesley G

    2009-06-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are non-steroidal ligands, which regulate the expression of number of estrogen receptor-dependent genes responsible for a variety of biological processes. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of action of these compounds is of great importance because it would increase our understanding of the role(s) these bioactive chemicals play in prevention and treatment of estrogen-based diseases. In this study, we applied suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes that are regulated by PEs through either the classic nuclear-based estrogen receptor or membrane-based estrogen receptor pathways. SSH, using mRNA from genistein (GE) treated MCF-7 cells as testers, resulted in a significant increase in GNB1 mRNA expression levels as compared with 10 nM 17beta estradiol or the no treatment control. GNB1 mRNA expression was up regulated two- to fivefold following exposure to 100.0 nM GE. Similarly, GNB1 protein expression was up regulated 12- to 14-fold. GE regulation of GNB1 was estrogen receptor-dependent, in the presence of the anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, both GNB1 mRNA and protein expression were inhibited. Analysis of the GNB1 promoter using ChIP assay showed a PE-dependent association of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and beta (ERbeta) to the GNB1 promoter. This association was specific for ERalpha since association was not observed when the cells were co-incubated with GE and the ERalpha antagonist, ICI. Our data demonstrate that the levels of G-protein, beta-1 subunit are regulated by PEs through an estrogen receptor pathway and further suggest that PEs may control the ratio of alpha-subunit to beta/gamma-subunits of the G-protein complex in cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 584-594, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19170076

  10. Relationships between urinary biomarkers of phytoestrogens, phthalates, phenols, and pubertal stages in girls.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tandra R; Alicea, Eilliut; Chakraborty, Sanjoy

    2012-01-01

    Phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols are estrogen-disrupting chemicals that have a pronounced effect at puberty. They are exogenous chemicals that are either plant-derived or man-made, and can alter the functions of the endocrine system and cause various health defects by interfering with the synthesis, metabolism, binding, or cellular responses of natural estrogens. Phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols are some of the potent estrogens detectable in urine. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived xenestrogens found in a wide variety of food products, like soy-based food, beverages, several fruits, and vegetables. Exposure to phytoestrogens can delay breast development and further lead to precocious puberty. The effect of phytoestrogens is mediated through estrogen receptors α and β or by binding with early immediate genes, such as jun and fos. Phthalates are multifunctional synthetic chemicals used in plastics, polyvinyl chloride products, cosmetics, hair spray, and children's toys. Phthalates have been shown to cause defeminization, thelarche, precocious puberty, and an increase in breast and pubic hair in pubertal girls. However, reports are also available that show no association of phthalates with precocious puberty in girls. Phthalates can act through a receptor-mediated signaling pathway or affect the production of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone that has a direct effect on estrogen formation. Phenols like bisphenol A are industrial chemicals used mainly in the manufacture of polycarbonates and plastic materials. Bisphenol A has been shown to cause precocious puberty and earlier menarche in pubertal girls. Reports suggest that the neurotoxic effect of bisphenol A can be mediated either by competing with estradiol for binding with estrogen receptors or via the ERK/NK-kappa or ERRγ pathway. This review demonstrates the effects of phytoestrogens, phthalates, and phenols on the development of girls during puberty.

  11. Pharmacological studies of the large-scaled purified genistein from Huaijiao (Sophora japonica-Leguminosae) on anti-osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Sun, J Y; Wang, D N; Xie, Y H; Wang, S W; Zhao, W M

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we used genistein that was extracted from a Chinese herbal medicine Huaijiao (Sophora japonica-Leguminosae) to evaluate its pharmacological function on anti-osteoporosis. This genistein is purified in a large-scale production from Huaijiao by a state-of-art method as described by Tian et al. [2004. The preparation of genistein and LC-MS/MS on-line analysis. Drug Devel. Res. 61, 6-12]. Chemical structure of the isolated genistein was examined by using various techniques including nuclear magnetic resonant spectrum, infrared absorption spectrum, ultraviolet absorption spectrum and mass spectrum, and was proved to be identical to those purified from soybean in a small scale as previously reported. We randomly divided female SD rats into 6 groups, including control, ovariectomized model, Nilestriol-treated, and three level of dosages of genistein-treated. We evaluated the pharmacological effects of genistein against osteoporosis by measuring the bone density of femur and bone mineral group including calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium. The consequences of genistein treatment on bone histology and morphology were also determined by measuring the trabcular area, thickness and number. Our results indicated that treatment with a 4.5 or 9 mg/kg dosage of genistein could also prevent osteoporosis significantly at the 4th week after treatment. In comparison with the anti-osteoporosis effects of soybean genistein, the genistein extracted from Huaijiao has the same beneficial effect on anti-osteoporosis. PMID:17085294

  12. Effects of genistein and daidzein on erythrocyte membrane fluidity: an electron paramagnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Ajdzanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Filipović, Branko; Sosić-Jurjević, Branka; Sekulić, Milka; Milosević, Verica

    2010-04-01

    The maintenance of erythrocyte membrane fluidity at the physiological level is an important factor affecting the ability of erythrocytes to pass through blood vessels of small luminal diameter. Genistein and daidzein, which are used as alternative therapeutics in cardiovascular conditions, can be incorporated into the cell membrane and change its fluidity. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genistein and daidzein on erythrocyte membrane fluidity at graded depths. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and fatty acid spin probes (5-DS and 12-DS) where EPR spectra were dependent on fluidity. The results showed that genistein significantly (p < 0.05) decreased erythrocyte membrane fluidity near the hydrophilic surface, while daidzein significantly (p < 0.05) increased the same parameter in deeper regions of the membrane. These data suggest that the deep fluidizing effects of daidzein on erythrocyte membranes make it a better therapeutic choice than genistein in some cardiovascular conditions.

  13. In vitro effect of genistein on DNA damage in leukocytes from mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients.

    PubMed

    Negretto, G W; Deon, M; Burin, M; Biancini, G B; Ribas, G; Garcia, S C; Goethel, G; Fracasso, R; Giugliani, L; Giugliani, R; Vargas, C R

    2014-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to an increase in glycosaminoglycans storage. Genistein is an isoflavone capable to inhibit glycosaminoglycans production. The objective of this study was to analyze the in vitro effect of different concentrations of genistein on DNA injury in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients. The lower concentration tested (10 μM) showed a significant increase on DNA injury in vitro, although higher concentrations (30 μM and 50 μM) showed higher DNA damage.

  14. Genistein-Supplemented Diet Decreases Malaria Liver Infection in Mice and Constitutes a Potential Prophylactic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Prudêncio, Miguel; Gonçalves, Lígia A.; Casalou, Cristina; Buger, Dominik; Sauerwein, Robert; Haas, Werner; Mota, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    In tropical regions millions of people still live at risk of malaria infection. Indeed the emergence of resistance to chloroquine and other drugs in use in these areas reinforces the need to implement alternative prophylactic strategies. Genistein is a naturally occurring compound that is widely used as a food supplment and is thought to be effective in countering several pathologies. Results presented here show that genistein inhibits liver infection by the Plasmodium parasite, the causative agent of malaria. In vitro, genistein decreased the infection rates of both mouse and human hepatoma cells by inhibiting the early stages of the parasite's intracellular development. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of genistein decreased the liver parasite load of P. berghei-infected mice. Moreover, mice fed on a genistein-supplemented diet showed a significant reduction in Plasmodium liver infection as well as a reduced blood parasitemia and partial protection from severe disease. Since genistein is a safe, low-cost, natural compound that can be used permanently in a diet, we propose its use as a prophylactic agent against malaria for endemic populations and long-time travelers. PMID:18628947

  15. Conversion of Daidzein and Genistein by an Anaerobic Bacterium Newly Isolated from the Mouse Intestine▿

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Anastasia; Clavel, Thomas; Gütschow, Michael; Engst, Wolfram; Haller, Dirk; Blaut, Michael; Braune, Annett

    2008-01-01

    The metabolism of isoflavones by gut bacteria plays a key role in the availability and bioactivation of these compounds in the intestine. Daidzein and genistein are the most common dietary soy isoflavones. While daidzein conversion yielding equol has been known for some time, the corresponding formation of 5-hydroxy-equol from genistein has not been reported previously. We isolated a strictly anaerobic bacterium (Mt1B8) from the mouse intestine which converted daidzein via dihydrodaidzein to equol as well as genistein via dihydrogenistein to 5-hydroxy-equol. Strain Mt1B8 was a gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium identified as a member of the Coriobacteriaceae. Strain Mt1B8 also transformed dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein to equol and 5-hydroxy-equol, respectively. The conversion of daidzein, genistein, dihydrodaidzein, and dihydrogenistein in the stationary growth phase depended on preincubation with the corresponding isoflavonoid, indicating enzyme induction. Moreover, dihydrogenistein was transformed even more rapidly in the stationary phase when strain Mt1B8 was grown on either genistein or daidzein. Growing the cells on daidzein also enabled conversion of genistein. This suggests that the same enzymes are involved in the conversion of the two isoflavones. PMID:18539813

  16. Factorial design applied to the optimization of lipid composition of topical antiherpetic nanoemulsions containing isoflavone genistein

    PubMed Central

    Argenta, Débora Fretes; de Mattos, Cristiane Bastos; Misturini, Fabíola Dallarosa; Koester, Leticia Scherer; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize topical nanoemulsions containing genistein, by means of a 23 full factorial design based on physicochemical properties and skin retention. The experimental arrangement was constructed using oil type (isopropyl myristate or castor oil), phospholipid type (distearoylphosphatidylcholine [DSPC] or dioleylphosphaditylcholine [DOPC]), and ionic cosurfactant type (oleic acid or oleylamine) as independent variables. The analysis of variance showed effect of third order for particle size, polydispersity index, and skin retention of genistein. Nanoemulsions composed of isopropyl myristate/DOPC/oleylamine showed the smallest diameter and highest genistein amount in porcine ear skin whereas the formulation composed of isopropyl myristate/DSPC/oleylamine exhibited the lowest polydispersity index. Thus, these two formulations were selected for further studies. The formulations presented positive ζ potential values (>25 mV) and genistein content close to 100% (at 1 mg/mL). The incorporation of genistein in nanoemulsions significantly increased the retention of this isoflavone in epidermis and dermis, especially when the formulation composed by isopropyl myristate/DOPC/oleylamine was used. These results were supported by confocal images. Such formulations exhibited antiherpetic activity in vitro against herpes simplex virus 1 (strain KOS) and herpes simplex virus 22 (strain 333). Taken together, the results show that the genistein-loaded nanoemulsions developed in this study are promising options in herpes treatment. PMID:25336951

  17. Genistein-inhibited cancer stem cell-like properties and reduced chemoresistance of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weifeng; Wan, Chunpeng; Luo, Qicong; Huang, Zhengjie; Luo, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, the predominant isoflavone found in soy products, has exerted its anticarcinogenic effect in many different tumor types in vitro and in vivo. Accumulating evidence in recent years has strongly indicated the existence of cancer stem cells in gastric cancer. Here, we showed that low doses of genistein (15 µM), extracted from Millettia nitida Benth var hirsutissima Z Wei, inhibit tumor cell self-renewal in two types of gastric cancer cells by colony formation assay and tumor sphere formation assay. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with genistein reduced its chemoresistance to 5-Fu (fluorouracil) and ciplatin. Further results indicated that the reduced chemoresistance may be associated with the inhibition of ABCG2 expression and ERK 1/2 activity. Furthermore, genistein reduced tumor mass in the xenograft model. Together, genistein inhibited gastric cancer stem cell-like properties and reduced its chemoresistance. Our results provide a further rationale and experimental basis for using the genistein to improve treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:24573253

  18. Genistein-Inhibited Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties and Reduced Chemoresistance of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weifeng; Wan, Chunpeng; Luo, Qicong; Huang, Zhengjie; Luo, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, the predominant isoflavone found in soy products, has exerted its anticarcinogenic effect in many different tumor types in vitro and in vivo. Accumulating evidence in recent years has strongly indicated the existence of cancer stem cells in gastric cancer. Here, we showed that low doses of genistein (15 μM), extracted from Millettia nitida Benth var hirsutissima Z Wei, inhibit tumor cell self-renewal in two types of gastric cancer cells by colony formation assay and tumor sphere formation assay. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with genistein reduced its chemoresistance to 5-Fu (fluorouracil) and ciplatin. Further results indicated that the reduced chemoresistance may be associated with the inhibition of ABCG2 expression and ERK 1/2 activity. Furthermore, genistein reduced tumor mass in the xenograft model. Together, genistein inhibited gastric cancer stem cell-like properties and reduced its chemoresistance. Our results provide a further rationale and experimental basis for using the genistein to improve treatment of patients with gastric cancer. PMID:24573253

  19. Effects of phytoestrogens on indices of protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as alternative ingredients in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens that act as endocrine disruptors, capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors, although at a much lower level of estrogenicity compared to estradiol. Estradiol has catabolic effects on...

  20. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  1. Exogenous hormonal regulation in breast cancer cells by phytoestrogens and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Albini, A; Rosano, C; Angelini, G; Amaro, A; Esposito, A I; Maramotti, S; Noonan, D M; Pfeffer, U

    2014-01-01

    Observations on the role of ovarian hormones in breast cancer growth, as well as interest in contraception, stimulated research into the biology of estrogens. The identification of the classical receptors ERα and ERβ and the transmembrane receptor GPER and the resolution of the structure of the ligand bound to its receptor established the principal molecular mechanisms of estrogen action. The presence of estrogen-like compounds in many plants used in traditional medicine or ingested as food ingredients, phytoestrogens, as well as the estrogenic activities of many industrial pollutants and pesticides, xenoestrogens, have prompted investigations into their role in human health. Phyto- and xenoestrogens bind to the estrogen receptors with a lower affinity than the endogenous estrogens and can compete or substitute the hormone. Xenoestrogens, which accumulate in the body throughout life, are believed to increase breast cancer risk, especially in cases of prenatal and prepuberal exposure whereas the role of phytoestrogens is still a matter of debate. At present, the application of phytoestrogens appears to be limited to the treatment of post-menopausal symptoms in women where the production of endogenous estrogens has ceased. In this review we discuss chemistry, structure and classification, estrogen signaling and the consequences of the interactions of estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens with their receptors, the complex interactions of endogenous and exogenous ligands, the evaluation of the health risks related to xenoestrogens, and the perspectives toward the synthesis of potent third generation selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs).

  2. Exogenous Hormonal Regulation in Breast Cancer Cells by Phytoestrogens and Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Albini, A.; Rosano, C.; Angelini, G.; Amaro, A.; Esposito, A.I.; Maramotti, S.; Noonan, D.M.; Pfeffer, U.

    2014-01-01

    Observations on the role of ovarian hormones in breast cancer growth, as well as interest in contraception, stimulated research into the biology of estrogens. The identification of the classical receptors ERα and ERβ and the transmembrane receptor GPER and the resolution of the structure of the ligand bound to its receptor established the principal molecular mechanisms of estrogen action. The presence of estrogen-like compounds in many plants used in traditional medicine or ingested as food ingredients, phytoestrogens, as well as the estrogenic activities of many industrial pollutants and pesticides, xenoestrogens, have prompted investigations into their role in human health. Phyto- and xenoestrogens bind to the estrogen receptors with a lower affinity than the endogenous estrogens and can compete or substitute the hormone. Xenoestrogens, which accumulate in the body throughout life, are believed to increase breast cancer risk, especially in cases of prenatal and prepuberal exposure whereas the role of phytoestrogens is still a matter of debate. At present, the application of phytoestrogens appears to be limited to the treatment of post-menopausal symptoms in women where the production of endogenous estrogens has ceased. In this review we discuss chemistry, structure and classification, estrogen signaling and the consequences of the interactions of estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens with their receptors, the complex interactions of endogenous and exogenous ligands, the evaluation of the health risks related to xenoestrogens, and the perspectives toward the synthesis of potent third generation selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). PMID:24304271

  3. A combination of genistein and magnesium enhances the vasodilatory effect via an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Hou, Yunlong; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaoran; Zhang, Liming; Yu, Guichun

    2015-04-01

    The phytoestrogen genistein (GST) and magnesium have been independently shown to regulate vascular tone; however, their individual vasodilatory effects are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the combined effects of GST plus magnesium on vascular tone in mesenteric arteries. The effects of pretreatment with GST (0-200 μmol/L), MgCl2 (0-4.8 mmol/L) and GST plus MgCl2 on 10 μmol/L phenylephrine (PE) precontracted mesenteric arteries in rats were assessed by measuring isometric force. BK(Ca) currents were detected by the patch clamp method. GST caused concentration- and partial endothelium-dependent relaxation. Magnesium resulted in dual adjustment of vascular tone. Magnesium-free solution eliminated the vasodilatation of GST in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. GST (50 μmol/L) plus magnesium (4.8 mmol/L) caused stronger relaxation in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-N-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the effects of GST, high magnesium, and the combination of GST and magnesium. BK(Ca) currents were amplified to a greater extent when GST (50 μmol/L) was combined with 4.8 versus 1.2 mmol/L Mg(2+). Our data suggest that GST plus magnesium provides enhanced vasodilatory effects in rat mesenteric arteries compared with that observed when either is used separately, which was related to an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

  4. Genistein mediates the anti-adipogenic actions of Sophora japonica L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Jung, So-Ra; Kim, Young-Jun; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Lee, Jina; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Hong, Joung-Woo; Park, Ki-Moon; Park, Kye Won

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies showed that feeding diets containing the mature fruits of Sophora japonica L. prevented body weight gain and reduced fat mass in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. This observation has led to the hypothesis that extracts from S. japonica L. may inhibit adipocyte differentiation of preadipocytes. To elucidate the possible mechanisms for the anti-obesity action of S. japonica L., its effects on adipocyte differentiation were investigated in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells. The mature fruit of S. japonica L. was partitioned with ethanol, hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and butanol to identify the active fractions. The EtOAc fraction extracts inhibited morphological differentiation and lipid accumulation in the C3H10T1/2 and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Molecular studies indicated that the EtOAc fraction extracts also reduced the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and other adipocyte markers. Furthermore, among the fractions, the EtOAc fraction extracts had the highest total phenolic contents, suggesting that the polyphenols in the EtOAc fractions mediated the anti-adipogenic effects. Finally, high-performance liquid chromatography identified genistein, a known anti-adipogenic compound, as the probable mediator of the anti-adipogenic effects of the EtOAc fractions. This work validates the beneficial roles of S. japonica L. in controlling body weight and obesity-related metabolic diseases. PMID:21303259

  5. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whet...

  6. Genistein as antiviral drug against HIV ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel; Schwarz, Silvia; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Ronghua; Sun, Bing; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Various drugs found in Chinese herbs are well known for their antiviral potency. We have tested several flavonoids with respect to their potency to block the viral protein U of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus, which is believed to form a cation-permeable ion channel in the infected cell. We used Xenopus oocytes with heterologously expressed viral protein U as model system to test the efficacy of the drugs in voltage-clamp experiments. This method had been demonstrated in the past as a useful tool to screen drugs for their potency in inhibition of ion channel activity. The viral protein U-mediated current could be inhibited by Ba(2+) with a K1/2 value of 1.6 mM. Therefore, we determined viral protein U-mediated current as current component blocked by 10 mM Ba(2+). We screened several flavonoids with respect to their effects on this current. The flavonols quercetin and kaempferol, and the flavanols (-)epigallochatechin and (-)epichatechin were ineffective. The flavanone naringenin showed at 20 µM slight (about 10%) inhibition. The most potent drug was the isoflavon genistein which exhibited at 20 µM significant inhibition of about 40% with a K1/2 value of 81 ± 4 µM. We suggest that viral ion channels, in general, may be a good target for development of antiviral agents, and that, in particular, isoflavons may be candidates for development of drugs targeting viral protein U.

  7. Increased Intestinal Absorption of Genistein by Coadministering Verapamil in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Baogang; Wang, Huiyun; Zou, Huiqin; Liu, Yalan; Kong, Xiangyu; Fang, Xiuzhong

    2016-10-01

    Combination of genistein (GT) and verapamil, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, can increase GT absorption in situ perfusion technology in rat. To date, little information is yet available about the effect of verapamil on oral absorption of GT in vivo. In this study, a simple and reproducible HPLC-UV method was developed and validated for determination of total GT in rat plasma. Based on this, a pharmacokinetic experiment was designed to characterize biopharmaceutical properties of GT with or without coadministration of verapamil (10.0, 20.0, 30.0 mg/kg) in rats. The coadministration of verapamil (30.0 mg/kg) with GT caused a significant increase of the maximum GT plasma concentration (1.31-fold vs. GT, P < 0.05) and area under the curve (1.39-fold vs. GT, P < 0.05). Our data show that verapamil would increase intestinal absorption of GT in rat, suggesting there is some drug-nutrition interaction between verapamil and GT. PMID:27604118

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of Mucosa Permeation/Retention and Antiherpes Activity of Genistein from Cationic Nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Argenta, D F; Bidone, J; Misturini, F D; Koester, L S; Bassani, V L; Simbes, C M; Teixeira, H F

    2016-02-01

    In this report, we described the genistein distribution on excised porcine esophageal mucosa from cationic nanoemulsions, as well as the anti-HSV-1 activity against a viral strain resistant to acyclovir. Genistein-loaded cationic nanoemulsions were prepared by spontaneous emulsification. This procedure yielded monodisperse nanoemulsions exhibiting a mean droplet size of approximately 200-300 nm. Hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was added at the end of the manufacturing process as a thickening agent (at 3%). Such formulations exhibit a non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior. The addition of HEC significantly reduces the genistein flux through excised porcine mucosa specimens as compared with values elicited by nanoemulsions before thickening. Furthermore, a significant increase of genistein retention in mucosa was observed as compared to the genistein propylene glycol solution, as illustrated by confocal fluorescence microscopy images. Formulations exhibited antiherpetic activity in vitro against HSV-1 (strain 29R). Taken together, these results suggest that these formulations have promising potential to be used topically for herpes infections. PMID:27433578

  9. Genistein exerts neuroprotective effect on focal cerebral ischemia injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Guven, Mustafa; Akman, Tarik; Alacam, Hasan; Kalkan, Yildiray; Silan, Coskun; Cosar, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Brain ischemia and treatment are one of the important topics in neurological science. Free oxygen radicals and inflammation formed after ischemia are accepted as the most important causes of damage. Currently, there are studies on many chemopreventive agents to prevent cerebral ischemia damage. Our aim is to research the preventive effect of the active ingredient in genistein, previously unstudied, on oxidative damage in cerebral ischemia. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group (no medication or surgical procedure), ischemia group, and artery ischemia+genistein group, sacrificed at 24 h after ischemia. The harvested brain tissue from the right hemisphere was investigated histopathologically and for tissue biochemistry. Superoxide dismutase and nuclear respiratory factor 1 values decreased after ischemia and they increased after genistein treatment, while increased malondialdehyde levels after ischemia reduced after treatment. Apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase caspase-3 and caspase-9 values increased after ischemia, but reduced after treatment. Our study revealed that genistein treatment in cerebral ischemia reduced oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration. We believe that genistein treatment may be an alternative treatment method.

  10. Genistein modulates the decreased drug accumulation in non-P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Versantvoort, C. H.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Eekman, C. A.; Kuiper, C. M.; Lankelma, J.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    In tumour cells the pharmacological basis for multidrug resistance (MDR) often appears to be a reduced cellular cytostatic drug accumulation caused by the drug efflux protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp MDR), or by other drug transporters (non-Pgp MDR). Here we report the reversal of the decreased daunorubicin (DNR) accumulation in five non-Pgp MDR cell lines (GLC4/ADR, SW-1573/2R120, HT1080/DR4, MCF7/Mitox and HL60/ADR) by genistein. Genistein inhibited the enhanced DNR efflux in the GLC4/ADR cells. In these cells the decreased VP-16 accumulation was also reversed by genistein. Three other (iso)flavonoids biochanin A, apigenin and quercetin also increased the DNR accumulation in the GLC4/ADR cells. In contrast to the effects on non-Pgp MDR cells, 200 microM genistein did not increase the reduced DNR accumulation in three Pgp MDR cell lines (SW-1573/2R160, MCF7/DOX40 and KB8-5) or in the parental cell lines. In conclusion the use of genistein provides a means to probe non-Pgp related drug accumulation defects. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8105867

  11. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and sulfotransferases contribute significantly to the disposition of genistein in mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Haiyan; Wang, Stephen W J; Hu, Ming

    2010-12-01

    The low bioavailability of genistein has impeded its development into a therapeutic agent. Our earlier studies indicate that glucuronidation is one of the major barriers to genistein oral bioavailability. This study will determine how sulfotransferases and efflux transporters affect its intestinal disposition. A rodent intestinal perfusion model and S9 fractions were used. Sulfate excretion rates were comparable to glucuronide excretion in mouse small intestine but significantly higher than glucuronide excretion in mouse colon, which is different from rat intestinal disposition but similar to disposition in Caco-2 cells. To define efflux transporter(s) involved in sulfate excretion, two organic anion inhibitors (estrone sulfate and dihydroepiandrosterone sulfate) or a multidrug resistance protein inhibitor (MK-571) were used but neither was able to decrease the excretion of genistein sulfates. In contrast, the excretion of genistein sulfate decreased substantially (>90%) in small intestine of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) knockout mice and became undetectable in colon of the knockout mice. The excretion rates of genistein glucuronide in the small intestine of BCRP knockout mice were also significant decreased (78%). This study shows clearly that BCRP facilitates the cellular genistein sulfate excretion by removing sulfates to prevent their backward hydrolysis and to limit substrate inhibition, indicating that BCRP plays a dominant role in genistein sulfate excretion and a significant role in genistein glucuronide excretion in the mouse intestine.

  12. Breast cancer: mechanisms involved in action of phytoestrogens and epigenetic changes.

    PubMed

    Dagdemir, Aslihan; Durif, Julie; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we consider phytoestrogens and different epigenetic modifications in breast cancer. Epigenetic phenomena are mediated by several molecular mechanisms comprising histone modifications, small non-coding or anti-sense RNA and DNA methylation. These different modifications are closely interrelated. De-regulation of gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Although genetic lesions have been the focus of cancer research for many years, it has become increasingly recognized that aberrant epigenetic modifications also play major roles in breast carcinogenesis. The incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer are high in the Western world compared with countries in Asia. There are also differences in the breast cancer incidence rates in different Western countries. This could be related to phytoestrogens.

  13. [ENHANCEMENT OF AGROBACTERIAL TRANSFORMATION OF PLANTS USING PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITORS TRIFLUOPERAZINE AND GENISTEIN].

    PubMed

    Yemets, A I; Fedorchuk, V V; Blume, Ya B

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein and serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor, trifluoperazine, on the frequency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of leaf explants of N. tabacum was investigated. The influence of different concentrations of trifluoperazine in the range from 10 to 300 μM was investigated. It was found that 10 μM trifluoperazine provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 25%. In parallel, the influence of different concentrations of genistein in the range from 10 to 100 μM was investigated. It was found 100 μM genistein provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 12%.

  14. [ENHANCEMENT OF AGROBACTERIAL TRANSFORMATION OF PLANTS USING PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITORS TRIFLUOPERAZINE AND GENISTEIN].

    PubMed

    Yemets, A I; Fedorchuk, V V; Blume, Ya B

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein and serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor, trifluoperazine, on the frequency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of leaf explants of N. tabacum was investigated. The influence of different concentrations of trifluoperazine in the range from 10 to 300 μM was investigated. It was found that 10 μM trifluoperazine provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 25%. In parallel, the influence of different concentrations of genistein in the range from 10 to 100 μM was investigated. It was found 100 μM genistein provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 12%. PMID:27266180

  15. Glycation of β-lactoglobulin and antiglycation by genistein in different reactive carbonyl model systems.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yanghui; Li, Xiaoming; Zheng, Tiesong; Lv, Lishuang

    2015-09-15

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are formed in β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) glycation systems via the Maillard reaction, have been implicated in diabetes-related long-term complications. In the present study, we found that reaction conditions, including temperature, time, pH, reactant type and molar ratio of beta-lg to a sugar/MGO/GO, can significantly affect the formation of AGEs. Using SDS-PAGE, we further demonstrated that genistein, a natural isoflavone found in a number of plants including soybeans and kudzu, can efficiently inhibit cross-links of the glycated β-lg, and suppress the formation AGEs in a dose-dependent manner by trapping reactive dicarbonyl compounds. The products formed from genistein and methylglyoxal (MGO) in the β-lg-MGO assay were analyzed using LC/MS. Both mono-MGO and di-MGO adducts of genistein were detected with this method. PMID:25863607

  16. Adsorption and recognition characteristics of surface molecularly imprinted polymethacrylic acid/silica toward genistein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Xu, Zeqing; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, on the basis of surface-initiated graft polymerization, a new surface molecular imprinting technique is established by molecular design. And molecularly imprinted polymer MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is successfully prepared with genistein as template. The adsorption and recognition characteristics of MIP-PMAA/SiO2 for genistein are studied in depth by using static method, dynamic method and competitive adsorption experiment. The experimental results show that MIP-PMAA/SiO2 possesses very strong adsorption affinity and specific recognition for genistein. The saturated adsorption capacity could reach to 0.36mmolg(-1). The selectivity coefficients relative to quercetin and rutin are 5.4 and 11.8, respectively. Besides, MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is regenerated easily and exhibits excellent reusability. PMID:25085816

  17. Genistein reduces lysosomal storage in peripheral tissues of mucopolysaccharide IIIB mice.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Marcelina; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Bennett, William; Langford-Smith, Kia J; O'Leary, H Angharad; Jakobkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Wynn, Rob; Wraith, J Ed; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Bigger, Brian W

    2009-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (Sanfilippo syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a genetic defect in the production of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase. This results in lysosomal and extracellular accumulation of the undegraded glycosaminoglycan (GAG) substrate, heparan sulphate. Affected patients show progressive CNS degeneration characterised by mental retardation, hyperactivity and seizures, with death usually in the mid teens to early twenties. Visceral organ storage is also present but is relatively mild compared to other MPS diseases storing similar substrates. No treatments currently exist for MPS IIIB. Genistein is a broad spectrum protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor which acts on several different growth factor receptors, notably EGF and IGF receptors, both of which are important for proteoglycan synthesis. Recent work has shown that genistein can reduce GAG synthesis in patients' fibroblasts in vitro and there is evidence in patients to suggest that it may be an effective substrate reduction therapy agent for MPS III. Here we have tested the dose responses of MPS IIIB mice to daily sub-chronic dosing of genistein in half log increments compared to carrier over 8 weeks. We show clear reductions in liver lysosome compartment size in both sexes and significant dose dependent improvements in total liver GAGs and hair morphology in male MPS IIIB animals following genistein treatment. Male MPS IIIB mice exhibited considerably more liver storage than females and responded better to treatment. No changes in total GAGs, lysosomal size or reactive astrogliosis in the brain cortex were observed after 8 weeks of treatment despite evidence that genistein can cross the blood brain barrier. This is the first demonstration of genistein treatment in MPS models in vivo. PMID:19632871

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of genistein 4'-O-glucoside specific glycosyltransferase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Ruby; Santosh Kumar, R J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Singh, Somesh; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-07-01

    Health related benefits of isoflavones such as genistein are well known. Glycosylation of genistein yields different glycosides like genistein 7-O-glycoside (genistin) and genistein 4'-O-glycoside (sophoricoside). This is the first report on isolation, cloning and functional characterization of a glycosyltransferase specific for genistein 4'-O-glucoside from Bacopa monniera, an important Indian medicinal herb. The glycosyltransferase from B. monniera (UGT74W1) showed 49% identity at amino acid level with the glycosyltransferases from Lycium barbarum. The UGT74W1 sequence contained all the conserved motifs present in plant glycosyltransferases. UGT74W1 was cloned in pET-30b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli. The molecular mass of over expressed protein was found to be around 52 kDa. Functional characterization of the enzyme was performed using different substrates. Product analysis was done using LC-MS and HPLC, which confirmed its specificity for genistein 4'-O-glucoside. Immuno-localization studies of the UGT74W1 showed its localization in the vascular bundle. Spatio-temporal expression studies under normal and stressed conditions were also performed. The control B. monniera plant showed maximum expression of UGT74W1 in leaves followed by roots and stem. Salicylic acid treatment causes almost tenfold increase in UGT74W1 expression in roots, while leaves and stem showed decrease in expression. Since salicylic acid is generated at the time of injury or wound caused by pathogens, this increase in UGT74W1 expression under salicylic acid stress might point towards its role in defense mechanism.

  19. Biomechanical properties of osteoporotic rat femurs after different hormonal treatments: genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Azboy, İbrahim; Özkaya, Mustafa; Demir, Teyfik; Demirtaş, Abdullah; Kağan Arslan, Arslan; Özkul, Emin; Akcan, Adnan; Tolunay, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the study is to compare the effects of genistein, estradiol, estradiol/progesterone combination on the bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of ovariectomized rats’ bone. Methods: 50 female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Bilaterally ovaeriectomy were performed in all groups except the sham-operated group. Groups were a sham-operated group and a control group (water was given), estradiol treated group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg per day), genistein treated group (genistein 10 mg/kg per day), and an estradiol/progesterone combination group (17-β estradiol 0.015 mg/kg plus drosperinone 0.028 mg/kg per day). The water or hormones were implemented in relevant groups for eight weeks by orogasthric catheter. The bone mineral density and biomechanical properties of the femur were analyzed. Results: Genistein, estradiol, and estradiol/progesterone groups increased bone mineral density significantly compared to the control group. In diaphysis and metaphysis bending test, all groups had higher peak load values than the control group. There were statistically significant differences between the estrogen/progesterone group and control group in diaphysis bending with regard to peak load. There were statistically significant differences between the estradiol and control groups in metaphysis bending with regard to peak load. In axial rotation test, all groups had higher peak torque values than the control groups. Conclusions: Genistein, estradiol and estrogen/progesterone combination improved the biomechanical properties of the ovariectomized rat bone. Genistein which has less side effects may be considered as an alternative in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27194109

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of genistein 4'-O-glucoside specific glycosyltransferase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Ruby; Santosh Kumar, R J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Singh, Somesh; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-07-01

    Health related benefits of isoflavones such as genistein are well known. Glycosylation of genistein yields different glycosides like genistein 7-O-glycoside (genistin) and genistein 4'-O-glycoside (sophoricoside). This is the first report on isolation, cloning and functional characterization of a glycosyltransferase specific for genistein 4'-O-glucoside from Bacopa monniera, an important Indian medicinal herb. The glycosyltransferase from B. monniera (UGT74W1) showed 49% identity at amino acid level with the glycosyltransferases from Lycium barbarum. The UGT74W1 sequence contained all the conserved motifs present in plant glycosyltransferases. UGT74W1 was cloned in pET-30b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli. The molecular mass of over expressed protein was found to be around 52 kDa. Functional characterization of the enzyme was performed using different substrates. Product analysis was done using LC-MS and HPLC, which confirmed its specificity for genistein 4'-O-glucoside. Immuno-localization studies of the UGT74W1 showed its localization in the vascular bundle. Spatio-temporal expression studies under normal and stressed conditions were also performed. The control B. monniera plant showed maximum expression of UGT74W1 in leaves followed by roots and stem. Salicylic acid treatment causes almost tenfold increase in UGT74W1 expression in roots, while leaves and stem showed decrease in expression. Since salicylic acid is generated at the time of injury or wound caused by pathogens, this increase in UGT74W1 expression under salicylic acid stress might point towards its role in defense mechanism. PMID:24664316

  1. Genistein potentiates the effect of 17-beta estradiol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Fraidoon; Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Valiani, Ali; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sanaei, Masumeh; Hakemi, Mazdak Ganjalikhani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors. This cancer may be due to a multistep process with an accumulation of epigenetic alterations in tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), leading to hypermethylation of the genes. Hypermethylation of TSGs is associated with silencing and inactivation of them. It is well-known that DNA hypomethylation is the initial epigenetic abnormality recognized in human tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is one of the TSGs which modulates gene transcription and its hypermethylation is because of overactivity of DNA methyltransferases. Fortunately, epigenetic changes especially hypermethylation can be reversed by pharmacological compounds such as genistein (GE) and 17-beta estradiol (E2) which involve in preventing the development of certain cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of GE on ERα and DNMT1 genes expression and also apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of GE and E2 on HCC. Materials and Methods: Cells were treated with various concentrations of GE and E2 and the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. Furthermore, cells were treated with single dose of GE and E2 (25 μM) and flow cytometry assay was performed. The expression level of the genes was determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: GE increased ERα and decreased DNMT1 genes expression, GE and E2 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis significantly. Conclusion: GE can epigenetically increase ERα expression by inhibition of DNMT1 expression which in turn increases apoptotic effect of E2. Furthermore, a combination of GE and E2 can induce apoptosis more significantly. PMID:27656602

  2. Genistein potentiates the effect of 17-beta estradiol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Fraidoon; Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Valiani, Ali; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sanaei, Masumeh; Hakemi, Mazdak Ganjalikhani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors. This cancer may be due to a multistep process with an accumulation of epigenetic alterations in tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), leading to hypermethylation of the genes. Hypermethylation of TSGs is associated with silencing and inactivation of them. It is well-known that DNA hypomethylation is the initial epigenetic abnormality recognized in human tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is one of the TSGs which modulates gene transcription and its hypermethylation is because of overactivity of DNA methyltransferases. Fortunately, epigenetic changes especially hypermethylation can be reversed by pharmacological compounds such as genistein (GE) and 17-beta estradiol (E2) which involve in preventing the development of certain cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of GE on ERα and DNMT1 genes expression and also apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of GE and E2 on HCC. Materials and Methods: Cells were treated with various concentrations of GE and E2 and the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. Furthermore, cells were treated with single dose of GE and E2 (25 μM) and flow cytometry assay was performed. The expression level of the genes was determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: GE increased ERα and decreased DNMT1 genes expression, GE and E2 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis significantly. Conclusion: GE can epigenetically increase ERα expression by inhibition of DNMT1 expression which in turn increases apoptotic effect of E2. Furthermore, a combination of GE and E2 can induce apoptosis more significantly.

  3. Fabrication of genistein-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-PCL nanoparticles for improved therapeutic effects in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Gan; Zeng, Xiaowei; Wu, Yanping; Yang, Chengming; Mei, Lin; Wang, Zhongyuan; Huang, Laiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Genistein is one of the most studied isoflavonoids with potential antitumor efficacy, but its poor water solubility limits its clinical application. Nanoparticles (NPs), especially biodegradable NPs, entrapping hydrophobic drugs have promising applications to improve the water solubility of hydrophobic drugs. In this work, TPGS-b-PCL copolymer was synthesized from ε-caprolactone initiated by d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) through ring-opening polymerization and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. The genistein-loaded NPs were prepared by a modified nanoprecipitation method and characterized in the aspects of particle size, surface charge, morphology, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, and physical state of the entrapped drug. The TPGS-b-PCL NPs were found to have higher cellular uptake efficiency than PCL NPs. MTT and colony formation experiments indicated that genistein-loaded TPGS-b-PCL NPs achieved the highest level of cytotoxicity and tumor cell growth inhibition compared with pristine genistein and genistein-loaded PCL NPs. Furthermore, compared with pristine genistein and genistein-loaded PCL NPs, the genistein-loaded TPGS-b-PCL NPs at the same dose were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in the subcutaneous HeLa xenograft tumor model in BALB/c nude mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that genistein-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-PCL nanoparticles could enhance the anticancer effect of genistein both in vitro and in vivo, and may serve as a potential candidate in treating cervical cancer.

  4. Exopolysaccharide Production by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Is Repressed by Genistein in a NodD1-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Crespo-Rivas, Juan-Carlos; Jie, Shi; Cuesta-Berrio, Lidia; Ruiz-Sainz, José-Enrique; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the rhizobia-legume symbiotic interaction, bacterial surface polysaccharides, such as exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K-antigen polysaccharide (KPS) or cyclic glucans (CG), appear to play crucial roles either acting as signals required for the progression of the interaction and/or preventing host defence mechanisms. The symbiotic significance of each of these polysaccharides varies depending on the specific rhizobia-legume couple. In this work we show that the production of exopolysaccharide by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, but not by other S. fredii strains such as USDA257 or NGR234, is repressed by nod gene inducing flavonoids such as genistein and that this repression is dependent on the presence of a functional NodD1 protein. In agreement with the importance of EPS for bacterial biofilms, this reduced EPS production upon treatment with flavonoids correlates with decreased biofilm formation ability. By using quantitative RT-PCR analysis we show that expression of the exoY2 and exoK genes is repressed in late stationary cultures of S. fredii HH103 upon treatment with genistein. Results presented in this work show that in S. fredii HH103 EPS production is regulated just in the opposite way than other bacterial signals such as Nod factors and type 3 secreted effectors: it is repressed by flavonoids and NodD1 and enhanced by the nod repressor NolR. These results are in agreement with our previous observations showing that lack of EPS production by S. fredii HH103 is not only non-detrimental but even beneficial for symbiosis with soybean. PMID:27486751

  5. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: An in vitro/in vivo comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, Grantley D. . E-mail: charles_grantley@allergan.com; Gennings, Chris; Tornesi, Belen; Kan, H. Lynn; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B.; Carney, Edward W.

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the

  6. Subtle side-chain modifications of the hop phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin result in distinct agonist/antagonist activity profiles for estrogen receptors alpha and beta.

    PubMed

    Roelens, Frederik; Heldring, Nina; Dhooge, Willem; Bengtsson, Martin; Comhaire, Frank; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Treuter, Eckardt; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2006-12-14

    In search of therapeutic agents for estrogen-related pathologies, phytoestrogens are being extensively explored. In contrast to naringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin is a potent hop-derived estrogenic compound, highlighting the importance of the prenyl group for hormonal activity. We investigated the effects of substituting the prenyl group at C(8) with alkyl chains of varying lengths and branching patterns on estrogen receptor (ER) subtype ERalpha- and ERbeta-binding affinities and transcriptional activities. In addition, features of the ligand-induced receptor conformations were explored using a set of specific ER-binding peptides. The new 8-alkylnaringenins were found to span an activity spectrum ranging from full agonism to partial agonism to antagonism. Most strikingly, 8-(2,2-dimethylpropyl)naringenin exhibited full agonist character on ERalpha, but pronounced antagonist character on ERbeta. Knowledge on how ER-subtype-selective activities can be designed provides valuable information for future drug or tool compound discovery.

  7. Phytoestrogens selective for the estrogen receptor beta exert anti-androgenic effects in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Paul; Wuttke, Wolfgang; Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men of the Western world. A castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) eventually will arise when a local restricted prostate carcinoma was not cured duly by radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. Although androgen ablation therapies are considered the gold standard for treatments of advanced prostate cancer there is no curative therapy available at present. In previous pre-clinical and clinical trials several phytoestrogens were investigated for their anticancer potential in various models for prostate cancer. Phytoestrogens feature tumour preventive characteristics and most probably are involved in the low incidence rate of hormone related cancers in Asian countries. Phytoestrogens such as isoflavones can have a marked impact on the most essential therapy target of CRPC i.e. the androgen receptor. Furthermore, functional analyses solidified the notion of such drugs as androgen antagonistic. Phytoestrogens commonly feature low toxicity combined with a potential of targeted therapy. Thus, these drugs qualify for conceivable implementation in prostate cancer patients under active surveillance. In addition, relapse prevention with these drugs after radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy might be considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  8. Simultaneous determination of phytoestrogens and key metabolites in breast cancer patients' urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Wu, Qian; Qiao, Shanlei; Yu, Zeping; Jin, Nianzu; Yu, Boyang

    2009-12-01

    A novel, selective and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of phytoestrogens and their key metabolites in human urine in this study. This method includes internal standard (IS) screening, analytical sample preparation procedure establishment, and linear range investigation. The analytical sample was extracted by liquid-liquid extraction from urine sample. The phytoestrogens and related key metabolites were separated with Agilent Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 chromatographic column using methanol and water as mobile phase. The Quattro premier MICROMASS mass spectrometer in negative ion selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode using electrospray ionization was applied to detect the phytoestrogens and key metabolites. To validate the developed liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method, the intra- and inter-day precisions, specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility, and sample detective concentration range were evaluated. This is the first reported phytoestrogens analysis and validation study that demonstrates the feasibility of using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to simultaneously analyze ten analytes including both phytoestrogens and their key metabolites in urine samples collected for epidemiological studies in human.

  9. The influence of common metal ions on the interactions of the isoflavone genistein with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Chatterjee, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of genistein with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been characterized via UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements under physiological conditions. In this study, we have investigated the effect of some common metal ions on the binding of genistein with BSA using fluorescence studies. The fluorescence data reveal that the binding affinity of genistein to BSA increases in presence of certain metal ions. The possibility of non-radiative energy transition from the donor tryptophan to the acceptor genistein has been observed in absence and presence of metal ions. The observed similarities in the values of efficiency of energy transfer (E) and the separation between the donor and acceptor (r) in both the cases may be correlated with the complexation between the genistein and metal ions, which is also observed from the UV-vis studies. The changes in enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) of the interaction were found to be -14.64 kJ mol-1 and +42.75 J mol-1 K-1 respectively. These values indicate the involvement of electrostatic interactions along with a hydrophobic association that results in a positive entropy change. CD analysis shows that there is a slight increase in the% α-helical content of BSA on binding with genistein at lower molar ratios. Warfarin and ibuprofen displacement studies in accordance with the molecular docking show that genistein binds to site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA.

  10. Genistein promotes cell death of ethanol-stressed HeLa cells through the continuation of apoptosis or secondary necrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a major target and treatment effect of multiple chemotherapeutical agents in cancer. A soybean isoflavone, genistein, is a well-studied chemopreventive agent and has been reported to potentiate the anticancer effect of some chemotherapeutics. However, its mechanistic basis of chemo-enhancement effect remains to be fully elucidated. Methods Apoptotic features of low concentration stressed cancer cells were studied by microscopic method, western blot, immunostaining and annexin V/PI assay. Genistein’s effects on unstressed cells and recovering cells were investigated using MTT cell viability assay and LDH cytotoxicity assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to analyze the possible gene targets involved in the recovery and genistein’s effect. Results Low-concentration ethanol stressed cancer cells showed apoptotic features and could recover after stress removal. In stressed cells, genistein at sub-toxic dosage promoted the cell death. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed the up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes MDM2 and XIAP during the recovery process in HeLa cells, and genistein treatment suppressed their expression. The application of genistein, MDM2 inhibitor and XIAP inhibitor to the recovering HeLa cells caused persistent caspase activity and enhanced cell death. Flow cytometry study indicated that genistein treatment could lead to persistent phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and necrotic events in the recovering HeLa cells. Caspase activity inhibition shifted the major effect of genistein to necrosis. Conclusions These results suggested two possible mechanisms through which genistein promoted cell death in stressed cancer cells. Genistein could maintain the existing apoptotic signal to enhance apoptotic cell death. It could also disrupt the recovering process in caspase-independent manner, which lead to necrotic events. These effects may be related to the enhanced antitumor effect of chemotherapeutic drugs when they were

  11. Prolonged treatment of cells with genistein modulates the expression and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Hughes, L K; Cai, Z; Mendes, F; Li, H; Sheppard, D N; Amaral, M D

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. In the search for new CF therapies, small molecules have been identified that rescue the defective channel gating of CF mutants (termed CFTR potentiators). Here, we investigate the long-term effects of genistein, the best-studied CFTR potentiator, on the expression and function of CFTR. Experimental approach: We pre-treated baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type or F508del-CFTR (the most common CF mutant) with concentrations of genistein that potentiate (30 μM) or inhibit (100 μM) CFTR function for 2 or 24 h at 37 °C before examining CFTR maturation, expression and single-channel activity. Key results: Using the iodide efflux technique, we found that genistein pre-treatment failed to restore function to F508del-CFTR, but altered that of wild-type CFTR. Pre-treatment of cells with genistein for 2 h had little effect on CFTR processing, whereas pre-treatment for 24 h either augmented (30 μM genistein) or impaired (100 μM genistein) CFTR maturation. Using immunocytochemistry, we found that all genistein pre-treatments increased the localization of CFTR protein to the cell surface. However, following the incubation of cells with genistein (100 μM) for 2 h, individual CFTR Cl− channels exhibited characteristics of channel block upon channel activation. Conclusions and implications: Genistein pre-treatment alters the maturation, cell surface expression and single-channel function of CFTR in ways distinct from its acute effects. Thus, CFTR potentiators have the potential to influence CFTR by mechanisms distinct from their effects on channel gating. PMID:18223673

  12. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocks HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, Tzanko S; Markovic, Ingrid; Telford, William G; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C

    2007-02-01

    Binding of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) to its cellular receptors elicits a variety of signaling events, including the activation of select tyrosine kinases. To evaluate the potential role of such signaling, we examined the effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, on HIV-1 entry and infection of human macrophages using a variety of assays. Without altering cell viability, cell surface expression of CD4 and CCR5 or their abilities to interact with Env, genistein inhibited infection of macrophages by reporter gene-encoding, beta-lactamase containing, or wild type virions, as well as Env-mediated cell-fusion. The observation that genistein blocked virus infection if applied before, during or immediately after the infection period, but not 24h later; coupled with a more pronounced inhibition of infection in the reporter gene assays as compared to both beta-lactamase and p24 particle entry assays, imply that genistein exerts its inhibitory effects on both entry and early post-entry steps. These findings suggest that other exploitable targets, or steps, of the HIV-1 infection process may exist and could serve as additional opportunities for the development of new therapeutics.

  13. Biotransformation and recovery of the isoflavones genistein and daidzein from industrial antibiotic fermentations.

    PubMed

    Weber, J Mark; Reeves, Andrew R; Seshadri, Ramya; Cernota, William H; Gonzalez, Melissa C; Gray, Danielle L; Wesley, Roy K

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to follow the metabolic fate of isoflavone glucosides from the soybean meal in a model industrial fermentation to determine if commercially useful isoflavones could be harvested as coproducts from the spent broth at the end of the fermentation. The isoflavone aglycones, genistein, and daidzein together make up 0.1-0.2 % of the soybean meal by weight but serve no known function in the manufacturing process. After feeding genistein to washed cells of the erythromycin-producing organism, Saccharopolyspora erythraea, the first biotransformation product (Gbp1) was determined by X-ray crystallography to be genistein-7-O-α-rhamnoside (rhamnosylgenistein). Subsequent feeding of rhamnosylgenistein to growing cells of Saccharopolyspora erythraea led to the production of a second biotransformation product, Gbp2. Chromatographic evidence suggested that Gbp2 accumulated in the spent broth of the erythromycin fermentation. When the spent broth was hydrolyzed with acid or industrial enzyme preparations, the isoflavone biotransformation products were returned back to their parental forms, genistein and daidzein, which were then recovered as coproducts. Desirable features of this method are that it does not require modification of the erythromycin manufacturing process or genetic engineering of the producing organism to be put into practice. A preliminary investigation of five additional antibiotic fermentations of industrial importance also found isoflavone coproduct potential. PMID:23604533

  14. Biotransformation and recovery of the isoflavones genistein and daidzein from industrial antibiotic fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J. Mark; Reeves, Andrew R.; Seshadri, Ramya; Cernota, William H.; Gonzalez, Melissa C.; Gray, Danielle L.; Wesley, Roy K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to follow the metabolic fate of isoflavone glucosides from the soybean meal in a model industrial fermentation to determine if commercially useful isoflavones could be harvested as coproducts from the spent broth at the end of the fermentation. The isoflavone aglycones, genistein and daidzein, together make up 0.1 - 0.2% of the soybean meal by weight but serve no known function in the manufacturing process. After feeding genistein to washed cells of the erythromycin-producing organism, Saccharopolyspora erythraea, the first biotransformation product (Gbp1) was determined by x-ray crystallography to be genistein-7-O-α-rhamnoside (rhamnosylgenistein). Subsequent feeding of rhamnosylgenistein to growing cells of S. erythraea led to the production of a second biotransformation product, Gbp2. Chromatographic evidence suggested that Gbp2 accumulated in the spent broth of the erythromycin fermentation. When the spent broth was hydrolyzed with acid or industrial enzyme preparations the isoflavone biotransformation products were returned back to their parental forms, genistein and daidzein, which were then recovered as coproducts. Desirable features of this method are that it does not require modification of the erythromycin manufacturing process or genetic engineering of the producing organism to be put into practice. A preliminary investigation of five additional antibiotic fermentations of industrial importance were also found to have isoflavone coproduct potential. PMID:23604533

  15. [Role of genistein in enzymatic albumin hydrolysis in the presence of nitrates (III) and (V)].

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Andrzej; Pokorska-Lis, Grazyna; Popiel, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Polyphenols and nitrates are essential ingredients of human diet. Harm caused by nitrates is well know and studied. Positive role of polyphenols is investigated. The aim of the study was to analyze interactions between nitrates (III) and (V) and genistein in systems of enzymatic protein (albumin) hydrolysis. In vitro model of enzymatic acidic-alkaline albumine hydrolysis in the presence of nitrates, polyphenols and vitamin C in different concentrations was used. Content of nitrates was measured in dialysation fluid spectrophotometrically according to Griess' method. The study revealed inhibiting influence of genistein on nitrares(III) concentration in external compartment. The influence depended on polyphenol dose (for nitrates (III) between 11.21% and 7.27%, for nitrates (V) between 95.64% and 79.64% of dialysis). When genistein was introduced in too high concentrations--over 2,4 mg/system--it did not improve the effect, but inhibited it. The influence of genistein was synergic with resveratrol and vitamin C.

  16. Effects of low doses of quercetin and genistein on oxidation and carbonylation in hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Boadi, William Y; Johnson, Damitea

    2014-09-01

    Protein-bound carbonyls have been shown to increase with age as well as in numerous diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, adult respiratory syndrome pulmonary fibrosis, diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's just to mention a few. The effects of the flavonoids quercetin and genistein were investigated according to their ability to inhibit the oxidation of hemoglobin and myoglobin via the Fenton's pathway. Antioxidative activity of the flavonoids were determined by oxidizing hemoglobin and myoglobin in separate experiments with 50 μM Fe(2+) and 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with and without quercetin and/or genistein. The samples were treated singly with either quercetin, genistein, or in combination at concentrations of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 μM, respectively, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Samples were then incubated in a water bath at 37°C for 8, 12, and 24 hr, respectively. Levels of carbonylation were assayed by the protein carbonyl assay and the carbonyl levels quantified and expressed per mg of protein. The results indicate that protein carbonyls for samples treated with quercetin or genistein decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to the controls. That of quercetin compared to genistein was more efficient in reducing the levels of protein carbonylation in hemoglobin and myoglobin, respectively. The combination of both flavonoids did show a gradual decrease in carbonyl compounds for only hemoglobin for all the doses and times tested. The results indicate that both flavonoids at low doses inhibited carbonylation in both hemoglobin and myoglobin and the inhibition may be attributed to the prevention of protein oxidation. PMID:25026201

  17. In vitro effects of diethylstilbestrol, genistein, 4-tert-butylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol on steroidogenic activity of isolated immature rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Myllymaeki, Sari . E-mail: saanmy@utu.fi; Haavisto, Tapio; Vainio, Minna; Toppari, Jorma; Paranko, Jorma

    2005-04-01

    Isolated rat ovarian follicles grow and produce steroid hormones in vitro and so provide a good model for studying the effects of hormonally active compounds on follicular steroidogenesis. We have evaluated the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), genistein (GEN) and two alkylphenols, 4-tert-butylphenol (BP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) on the growth, survival, and steroid hormone and cAMP production by isolated 14-day-old rat (Sprague-Dawley) ovarian follicles. During a 5-day culture, FSH was obligatory for follicle growth and increased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner. DES (10{sup -6} M) caused the strongest decline in estradiol and testosterone levels but did not have detectable effects on either cAMP production or aromatase enzyme activity. GEN caused a prominent decrease in cAMP and testosterone levels without significant changes in secreted estradiol. The latter, apparently, was due to a dose-dependent stimulation of aromatase enzyme activity in the presence of genistein. Both BP and OP decreased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner while no effect on aromatase activity was observed. OP, unlike BP, decreased forskolin-induced cAMP levels. Xenoestrogens at the used concentrations did not interfere with the growth and survival of the follicles. The results indicate that isolated ovarian follicles representing intact morphological and functional units offer a sensitive model system for elucidating the female-specific reproductive effects of environmental chemicals.

  18. Effect of dietary phytoestrogens on human growth regulation: imprinting in health & disease.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, K; Wilson, D W; Singh, R B; De Meester, F

    2014-11-01

    This group has advocated a return to the notional Palæolithic diet with fruits, vegetables, roots, leaves, seeds, phytochemical antioxidants and proteins, etc. Phytoestrogens, viz. lignans, isoflavonoids and flavonoids are weak oestrogenic constituents of such a diet and may have a considerable impact on human health and disease. The aim of this paper was to conduct a preliminary overview of about 2000 research-led studies from the 1930s to the present time reported in the literature on flavonoids/isoflavonoids/lignans and to assemble evidence for a future strictly formal literature review on the health benefits and risks of flavonoids in a variety of diseases. PMID:25673549

  19. Effect of dietary phytoestrogens on human growth regulation: imprinting in health & disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, K.; Wilson, D.W.; Singh, R.B.; De Meester, F.

    2014-01-01

    This group has advocated a return to the notional Palæolithic diet with fruits, vegetables, roots, leaves, seeds, phytochemical antioxidants and proteins, etc. Phytoestrogens, viz. lignans, isoflavonoids and flavonoids are weak oestrogenic constituents of such a diet and may have a considerable impact on human health and disease. The aim of this paper was to conduct a preliminary overview of about 2000 research-led studies from the 1930s to the present time reported in the literature on flavonoids/isoflavonoids/lignans and to assemble evidence for a future strictly formal literature review on the health benefits and risks of flavonoids in a variety of diseases. PMID:25673549

  20. Effect of dietary phytoestrogens on human growth regulation: imprinting in health & disease.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, K; Wilson, D W; Singh, R B; De Meester, F

    2014-11-01

    This group has advocated a return to the notional Palæolithic diet with fruits, vegetables, roots, leaves, seeds, phytochemical antioxidants and proteins, etc. Phytoestrogens, viz. lignans, isoflavonoids and flavonoids are weak oestrogenic constituents of such a diet and may have a considerable impact on human health and disease. The aim of this paper was to conduct a preliminary overview of about 2000 research-led studies from the 1930s to the present time reported in the literature on flavonoids/isoflavonoids/lignans and to assemble evidence for a future strictly formal literature review on the health benefits and risks of flavonoids in a variety of diseases.

  1. A comparative survey of leguminous plants as sources of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein: implications for human nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, P B; Duke, J A; Brielmann, H; Boik, J; Hoyt, J E

    1997-01-01

    Over 80 taxa of mostly agriculturally important legumes were surveyed as sources of the metabolites, genistein and daidzein. Remarkably high concentrations (over 2 g.kg-1 dry weight) of the anticancer metabolite, genistein, were found in the leaves of Psoralea corylifolia (Indian bread root). All other legumes, with the exception of fermented soybean miso, had genistein levels < 400 mg.kg-1 dry weight. Concentrations of over 1 g.kg-1 dry weight and 0.95 g.kg-1 dry weight of the anticancer metabolite, daidzein, were found in the stems of the fava bean (Vicia faba) and roots of kudzu vine (Pueraria lobata), respectively. From this survey, our results indicate that the legumes, lupine (Lupinus spp.), fava bean, (Vicia faba), soybeans (Glycine max), kudzu (Pueraria lobata), and psoralea (Psoralea corylifolia), are excellent food sources for both genistein and daidzein. Miso, a fermented soybean product, is also a rich source of both isoflavones.

  2. A comparative survey of leguminous plants as sources of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein: implications for human nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, P B; Duke, J A; Brielmann, H; Boik, J; Hoyt, J E

    1997-01-01

    Over 80 taxa of mostly agriculturally important legumes were surveyed as sources of the metabolites, genistein and daidzein. Remarkably high concentrations (over 2 g.kg-1 dry weight) of the anticancer metabolite, genistein, were found in the leaves of Psoralea corylifolia (Indian bread root). All other legumes, with the exception of fermented soybean miso, had genistein levels < 400 mg.kg-1 dry weight. Concentrations of over 1 g.kg-1 dry weight and 0.95 g.kg-1 dry weight of the anticancer metabolite, daidzein, were found in the stems of the fava bean (Vicia faba) and roots of kudzu vine (Pueraria lobata), respectively. From this survey, our results indicate that the legumes, lupine (Lupinus spp.), fava bean, (Vicia faba), soybeans (Glycine max), kudzu (Pueraria lobata), and psoralea (Psoralea corylifolia), are excellent food sources for both genistein and daidzein. Miso, a fermented soybean product, is also a rich source of both isoflavones. PMID:9395689

  3. Rapid gut transit time and slow fecal isoflavone disappearance phenotype are associated with greater genistein bioavailability in women.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan; Hu, Jiang; Murphy, Patricia A; Alekel, D Lee; Franke, Warren D; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2003-10-01

    The bioavailability of soybean isoflavones varies widely among individuals due to many factors, including activities of gut microflora. To characterize factors that affect fecal isoflavone disappearance phenotype and isoflavone bioavailability in women, 35 Asian and 33 Caucasian women, 18-43 y of age, provided fecal samples for anaerobic incubation with isoflavones in vitro at two times 5 mo apart (Phases I and II). Diet, physical activity and health history were investigated at these times. A single dose of soymilk powder [1.2 mg (4.57 micromol) total isoflavone/kg body] was given to all subjects with breakfast in phase II. Daidzein and genistein from fecal incubations, urine and fecal samples were measured by reverse-phase HPLC. Three significantly different daidzein and two genistein disappearance phenotypes were identified from fecal isoflavone incubations. More Asians than Caucasians were identified within the high daidzein disappearance phenotype. Caucasians and Asians differed significantly in daily intake of red meat (0.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.1 servings/d), dairy foods (2.9 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2 servings/d) and insoluble dietary fiber (3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.3 g). BMI, maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2 max)) and physical activity level were significantly greater in Caucasians than in Asians. Asian subjects of the low genistein disappearance phenotype had more rapid gut transit time (GTT) and greater isoflavone bioavailability as reflected in urinary genistein excretion than did Asians of the high genistein disappearance phenotype (GTT, 40 +/- 8 vs. 63 +/- 5 h; 11.0 +/- 2.7 vs. 4.0 +/- 1.7% of ingested genistein excreted in urine). Caucasians of both genistein disappearance phenotypes had longer GTT than did Asian subjects (84 +/- 5 vs. 56 +/- 6 h) and resembled Asians of the high genistein disappearance phenotype in genistein bioavailability. Relatively rapid GTT coupled with a low fecal isoflavone disappearance phenotype as occurred in Asian but not

  4. Flt1 peptide-hyaluronate conjugate micelle-like nanoparticles encapsulating genistein for the treatment of ocular neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyemin; Choi, Jun-Sub; Kim, Ki Su; Yang, Jeong-A; Joo, Choun-Ki; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2012-11-01

    Flt1 peptide of GNQWFI is an antagonistic peptide for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1 or Flt1). In this work, Flt1 peptide-hyaluronate (HA) conjugates were successfully synthesized and the resulting micelle-like nanoparticles were exploited to encapsulate genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine-specific protein kinases, for the treatment of ocular neovascularization. The mean diameter of genistein-loaded Flt1 peptide-HA conjugate micelles was measured to be 172.0±18.7 nm, with a drug-loading efficiency of 40-50%. In vitro release tests of genistein from the genistein-loaded Flt1 peptide-HA conjugate micelles exhibited the controlled release for longer than 24h. In vitro biological activity of genistein/Flt1 peptide-HA micelles was corroborated from the synergistic anti-proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Furthermore, we could confirm the anti-angiogenic effect of genistein/Flt1 peptide-HA micelles from the statistically significant suppression of corneal neovascularization in silver nitrate cauterized corneas of SD rats. The retinal vascular hyperpermeability was also drastically reduced by the treatment in diabetic retinopathy model rats. PMID:22824530

  5. Anti-Atherosclerotic Effects of a Phytoestrogen-Rich Herbal Preparation in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Myasoedova, Veronika A.; Kirichenko, Tatyana V.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Orekhova, Varvara A.; Ravani, Alessio; Poggio, Paolo; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis progression is significantly increased after menopause, probably due to the decrease of estrogen levels. The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for prevention of cardiovascular disease in older postmenopausal failed to meet expectations. Phytoestrogens may induce some improvements in climacteric symptoms, but their effect on the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. The reduction of cholesterol accumulation at the cellular level should lead to inhibition of the atherosclerotic process in the arterial wall. The inhibition of intracellular lipid deposition with isoflavonoids was suggested as the effective way for the prevention of plaque formation in the arterial wall. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was to investigate the effect of an isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation on atherosclerosis progression in postmenopausal women free of overt cardiovascular disease. One hundred fifty-seven healthy postmenopausal women (age 65 ± 6) were randomized to a 500 mg isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation containing tannins from grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cone powder, and garlic powder, or placebo. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (cIMT) were evaluated at the baseline and after 12 months of treatment. After 12-months follow-up, total cholesterol decreased by 6.3% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.011) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (p = 0.020); low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol decreased by 7.6% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.040) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (non-significant, NS); high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased by 3.4% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 4.5% in placebo recipients (p = 0.038); triglycerides decreased by 6.0% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 7.1% in

  6. Anti-Atherosclerotic Effects of a Phytoestrogen-Rich Herbal Preparation in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, Veronika A; Kirichenko, Tatyana V; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Orekhova, Varvara A; Ravani, Alessio; Poggio, Paolo; Sobenin, Igor A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis progression is significantly increased after menopause, probably due to the decrease of estrogen levels. The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for prevention of cardiovascular disease in older postmenopausal failed to meet expectations. Phytoestrogens may induce some improvements in climacteric symptoms, but their effect on the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. The reduction of cholesterol accumulation at the cellular level should lead to inhibition of the atherosclerotic process in the arterial wall. The inhibition of intracellular lipid deposition with isoflavonoids was suggested as the effective way for the prevention of plaque formation in the arterial wall. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was to investigate the effect of an isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation on atherosclerosis progression in postmenopausal women free of overt cardiovascular disease. One hundred fifty-seven healthy postmenopausal women (age 65 ± 6) were randomized to a 500 mg isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation containing tannins from grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cone powder, and garlic powder, or placebo. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (cIMT) were evaluated at the baseline and after 12 months of treatment. After 12-months follow-up, total cholesterol decreased by 6.3% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.011) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (p = 0.020); low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol decreased by 7.6% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.040) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (non-significant, NS); high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased by 3.4% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 4.5% in placebo recipients (p = 0.038); triglycerides decreased by 6.0% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 7.1% in

  7. NTP toxicity report of reproductive dose range-finding study of Genistein (CAS No. 446-72-0) administered in feed to Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Delclos, K B; Newbold, Retha

    2007-11-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone that interacts with estrogen receptors and multiple other molecular targets. Human exposure to genistein is predominantly through consumption of soy products, including soy-based infant formula and dietary supplements. A series of short-term studies with genistein was conducted with two goals: 1) to obtain data necessary to establish dose levels for subsequent multigeneration reproductive and chronic toxicity studies and 2) to evaluate the effects of genistein on endpoints outside the reproductive tract. The data generated from these studies have been reported previously in the peer-reviewed literature or in technical reports (Appendix C). In addition, selected data from these studies were analyzed and discussed in the National Toxicology Program's Report of the Endocrine Disruptors Low-Dose Peer Review (NTP, 2001). The present report focuses on the reproductive and general toxicology endpoints evaluated. Data obtained in separate evaluations of behavioral, neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and immunological endpoints, as well as the assessment of serum genistein levels, are also discussed to put in better perspective the selection of doses for the multigenerational and chronic studies. Genistein was administered in an irradiated soy- and alfalfa-free diet (Purina 5K96) at exposure concentrations of 0, 5, 25, 100, 250, 625, or 1,250 ppm to 10 vaginal plug-positive, female Sprague-Dawley rats starting on gestation day 7 and continuing throughout pregnancy. These dietary exposure concentrations resulted in ingested doses of approximately 0.3, 1.7, 6.4, 16, 38, and 72 mg genistein/kg body weight to dams in the 5, 25, 100, 250, 625, and 1,250 ppm groups, respectively. Dietary exposure of the dams continued through lactation, during which time ingested doses were approximately 0.6, 3.5, 14, 37, 84, and 167 mg/kg per day. Pups from five litters, culled to eight per litter with an equal sex distribution on postnatal day (PND) 2

  8. Activation of southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) estrogen receptors by phytoestrogens: potential role in the reproductive failure of captive-born females?

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Christopher; Hartig, Phillip; Cardon, Mary; Varga, Nicole; Milnes, Matthew

    2012-03-01

    The captive southern white rhinoceros (SWR; Ceratotherium simum simum) population serves as an important genetic reservoir critical to the conservation of this vulnerable species. Unfortunately, captive populations are declining due to the poor reproductive success of captive-born females. Captive female SWR exhibit reproductive problems suggested to result from continual ovarian follicular activity and prolonged exposure to endogenous estrogen. However, we investigated the potential role of exogenous dietary phytoestrogens in the reproductive failure of SWR by cloning and characterizing in vitro phytoestrogen binding and activation of recombinant SWR estrogen receptors (ESR). We compared those characteristics with recombinant greater one-horned rhinoceros (GOHR; Rhinoceros unicornis) ESR, a species that receives similar captive diets yet reproduces relatively well. Our results indicate that phytoestrogens bind rhino ESR in a manner similar to other vertebrate species, but there are no differences found in phytoestrogen binding affinity of SWR ESR compared with GOHR ESR. However, species-specific differences in ESR activation by phytoestrogens were detected. The phytoestrogen coumestrol stimulated greater maximal activation of SWR ESR1 than GOHR ESR1. SWR ESR2 were also more sensitive to phytoestrogens and were activated to a greater extent by both coumestrol and daidzein. The concentrations in which significant differences in ESR activation occurred (10(-7) to 10(-5) m) are consistent with circulating concentrations measured in other vertebrate species. Taken together, these findings suggest that phytoestrogens potentially pose a risk to the reproductive health of captive SWR. However, additional studies are needed to further clarify the physiological role of dietary phytoestrogens in the reduced fertility of this species.

  9. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadia, M. E.; Nazrun, A. S.; Norazlina, M.; Isa, N. M.; Norliza, M.; Ima Nirwana, S.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis. PMID:22611381

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory, Phytoestrogenic, and Antioxidative Role of Labisia pumila in Prevention of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nadia, M E; Nazrun, A S; Norazlina, M; Isa, N M; Norliza, M; Ima Nirwana, S

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by skeletal degeneration with low bone mass and destruction of microarchitecture of bone tissue which is attributed to various factors including inflammation. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone-formation and increase in bone-resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, and TNF-α. This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that estrogen reduction is able to stimulate focal inflammation in bone. Labisia pumila (LP) which is known to exert phytoestrogenic effect can be used as an alternative to ERT which can produce positive effects on bone without causing side effects. LP contains antioxidant as well as exerting anti-inflammatory effect which can act as free radical scavenger, thus inhibiting TNF-α production and COX-2 expression which leads to decline in RANKL expression, resulting in reduction in osteoclast activity which consequently reduces bone loss. Hence, it is the phytoestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidative properties that make LP an effective agent against osteoporosis.

  11. Gastrointestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition.

    PubMed

    Njåstad, K M; Adler, S A; Hansen-Møller, J; Thuen, E; Gustavsson, A-M; Steinshamn, H

    2014-12-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens are metabolized or converted in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants, only limited knowledge exists on the extent and location of this conversion in vivo. The objective of this study was to quantify the gastro-intestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition. Four lactating rumen cannulated Norwegian Red cattle were assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square with 1 cow per treatment period of 3 wk. The 4 treatment silages were prepared from grasslands with different botanical compositions: organically managed short-term timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) ley (2 yr old: ORG-SG); organically managed long-term grassland with a high proportion of unsown species (6 yr old; ORG-LG); conventionally managed perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) ley (CON-PR); and conventionally managed timothy ley (CON-TI). The herbages were cut, wilted, and preserved with additive in round bales, fed as a mix of the first and third cut at 90% of ad libitum intake, and contributed to 70% of the total dry matter intake. Milk, feed, omasal digesta, urine, and feces were collected at the end of each period and analyzed for the concentrations of phytoestrogens by using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique. Concentration of total isoflavones was highest in ORG-SG and lowest in CON-TI silage, whereas the content of total lignans was highest in the grass silages. The isoflavones were extensively metabolized in the rumen on all diets, and the recovery of formononetin and daidzein in omasum, mainly as equol, averaged 0.11 mg/mg. The apparent intestinal metabolism was less severe as, on average, 0.29 mg/mg of the omasal flow was recovered in feces. The plant lignans were also strongly degraded in the rumen. However, the flow of lignans to omasum and excretion in feces were, on average, 7.2- and 5.2-fold higher, respectively, than the intake of the plant lignans

  12. [Phytoestrogens--whether can they be an alternative to hormone replacement therapy for women during menopause period?].

    PubMed

    Dittfeld, Anna; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk, Anna Puzoń; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is a turning point in a woman's life. Decreasing of secretion of estrogens can cause appearing of many health problems, which make that life is becoming harder in each partof life. Hormonal ReplacementTherapy (HRT) is using for relieving the symptoms of menopause, however, because of the possibility of adverse reactions cannot be used by all women. Alternative for HTC are phytoestrogens--compounds naturally occurring in plants, structurally similar to endogenous estrogen, so that they have an affinity for estrogen receptors, and in this way they can modulate functions of endocrine system. Phytoestrogens can play an important role in symptoms of menopause, but their positive impacts are being described for cardiovascular system, especially for lipid metabolism, bone metabolism. Moreover consumption of phytoestrogens could relieve as symptoms as: fatigue, insomnia, problems with concentrations and depression symptoms. Phytoestrogens are acting as antioxidants against free radicals, and reactive oxygen forms which are known as carcinogenic factors. Article is a review of the most important information about phitoestrogens and their influence on women organism during menopausal period.

  13. Biophysical characterization of genistein-membrane interaction and its correlation with biological effect on cells - The case of EYPC liposomes and human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Pawlęga, Bożena; Misiak, Lucjan E; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Zarzyka, Barbara; Paduch, Roman; Gawron, Antoni; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2014-08-01

    With application of EPR and (1)H NMR techniques genistein interaction with liposomes formed with egg yolk lecithin and with erythrocyte membranes was assessed. The present study addressed the problem of genistein localization and its effects on lipid membrane fluidity and protein conformation. The range of microscopic techniques was employed to study genistein effects on HeLa cells and human erythrocytes. Moreover, DPPH bioassay, superoxide anion radical test and enzymatic measurements were performed in HeLa cells subjected to genistein. The gathered results from both EPR and NMR techniques indicated strong ordering effect of genistein on the motional freedom of lipids in the head group region and the adjacent hydrophobic zone in liposomal as well as in red blood cell membranes. EPR study of human ghost showed also the changes in the erythrocyte membrane protein conformation. The membrane effects of genistein were correlated with the changes in internal membranes arrangement of HeLa cells as it was noticed using transmission electron microscopic and fluorescent techniques. Scanning electron and light microscopy methods showed that one of the aftermaths of genistein incorporation into membranes was creation of echinocytic form of the red blood cells with reduced diameter. Genistein improved redox status of HeLa cells treated with H2O2 by lowering radicals' level. In conclusion, the capacity of genistein to incorporate, to affect membrane organization and to change its biophysical properties is correlated with the changes inside the cells.

  14. Genistein in 1:1 inclusion complexes with ramified cyclodextrins: theoretical, physicochemical and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Soica, Codruta; Oltean, Mircea; Avram, Stefana; Borcan, Florin; Csanyi, Erzsebet; Ambrus, Rita; Zupko, Istvan; Muntean, Delia; Dehelean, Cristina A; Craina, Marius; Popovici, Ramona A

    2014-01-27

    Genistein is one of the most studied phytocompound in the class of isoflavones, presenting a notable estrogenic activity and in vitro and/or in vivo benefits in different types of cancer such as those of the bladder, kidney, lung, pancreatic, skin and endometrial cancer. A big inconvenience for drug development is low water solubility, which can be solved by using hydrophilic cyclodextrins. The aim of this study is to theoretically analyze, based on the interaction energy, the possibility of a complex formation between genistein (Gen) and three different ramified cyclodextrins (CD), using a 1:1 molar ratio Gen:CD. Theoretical data were correlated with a screening of both in vitro and in vivo activity. Proliferation of different human cancer cell lines, antimicrobial activity and angiogenesis behavior was analyzed in order to see if complexation has a beneficial effect for any of the above mentioned activities and if so, which of the three CDs is the most suitable for the incorporation of genistein, and which may lead to future improved pharmaceutical formulations. Results showed antiproliferative activity with different IC50 values for all tested cell lines, remarkable antimicrobial activity on Bacillus subtilis and antiangiogenic activity as revealed by CAM assay. Differences regarding the intensity of the activity for pure and the three Gen complexes were noticed as explained in the text. The data represent a proof that the three CDs can be used for furtherer research towards practical use in the pharmaceutical and medical field.

  15. Solid-state characterization and solubility of a genistein-caffeine cocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Michał; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Matczak-Jon, Ewa

    2014-11-01

    Combination of genistein and caffeine leads to a 1:1 cocrystalline phase, which was identified by means of a solvent-drop grinding experiment and isolated afterwards in a solution-evaporation approach. Obtained cocrystal was characterized by X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction as well as investigated in terms of thermal stability and Hirshfeld surfaces. A scale-up procedure was provided by slurry technique, enabling solubility determination. Neutral forms of both compounds cocrystallize in a common P21/c space group of the monoclinic crystal system. Analysis of packing and interactions in the crystal lattice reveals formation of molecular layers, formed by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O-type contacts between genistein and caffeine molecules, whereas stabilization of the three-dimensional crystal lattice is provided by π⋯π interactions. Dissolution studies in a 50:50 v/v ethanol-water medium revealed that the maximum solubility of the cocrystalline phase reached 0.861 mg/mL after 8 h, revealing some degree of enhancement as compared to parent genistein, maximum solubility of which was also reached after 8 h and equalled 0.588 mg/mL.

  16. Genistein Improves Neuropathology and Corrects Behaviour in a Mouse Model of Neurodegenerative Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Langford-Smith, Alex; Brown, Jillian R.; Crawford, Brett E.; Vanier, Marie T.; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Wynn, Rob F.; Wraith, J. Ed; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Bigger, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neurodegenerative metabolic disorders such as mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB (MPSIIIB or Sanfilippo disease) accumulate undegraded substrates in the brain and are often unresponsive to enzyme replacement treatments due to the impermeability of the blood brain barrier to enzyme. MPSIIIB is characterised by behavioural difficulties, cognitive and later motor decline, with death in the second decade of life. Most of these neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases lack effective treatments. We recently described significant reductions of accumulated heparan sulphate substrate in liver of a mouse model of MPSIIIB using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here that high doses of genistein aglycone, given continuously over a 9 month period to MPSIIIB mice, significantly reduce lysosomal storage, heparan sulphate substrate and neuroinflammation in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, resulting in correction of the behavioural defects observed. Improvements in synaptic vesicle protein expression and secondary storage in the cerebral cortex were also observed. Conclusions/Significance Genistein may prove useful as a substrate reduction agent to delay clinical onset of MPSIIIB and, due to its multimodal action, may provide a treatment adjunct for several other neurodegenerative metabolic diseases. PMID:21152017

  17. Effect of exercise training combined with phytoestrogens on adipokines and C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Riesco, Eléonor; Choquette, Stéphane; Audet, Mélisa; Lebon, Johann; Tessier, Daniel; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2012-02-01

    Phytoestrogens and training could be effective to reduce cardiovascular and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, the impact of their combination on adipokines and systemic inflammation was never investigated. The objective was to verify if 6 months of mixed training combined with phytoestrogens could have an additional effect on adipokine levels and systemic inflammation in obese postmenopausal women. Fifty-two obese women aged between 50 and 70 years were randomly assigned to (1) exercise with placebo (EX + PL; n = 25) or (2) exercise with phytoestrogens (EX + PHY; n = 27). Body weight, waist circumference, fat mass, and lean body mass (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) were assessed. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin, adiponectin, leptin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were obtained after a 12-hour overnight fast. Total energy intake was measured with a 3-day dietary record. All measurements were performed before and after the 6-month intervention. Although energy intake remained unchanged, body composition was improved in all women (all Ps < .02). Plasma CRP and leptin levels decreased in both groups similarly (all Ps < .03), whereas plasma adiponectin and insulin did not change with exercise combined with placebo or phytoestrogens. Correlation analyses showed that homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r = -0.58, P = .02) and fasting insulin levels (r = -0.42, P = .02) at baseline were both correlated with changes in leptin levels. Baseline fasting glucose (r = -0.36, P = .03) and adiponectin (r = 0.45, P = .005) levels were associated with changes in CRP concentrations. Although mixed exercise program combined with phytoestrogens does not seem to provide any additional effect, mixed training improves systemic inflammation and leptin concentrations in obese postmenopausal women.

  18. Chemopreventive activity of GEN-27, a genistein derivative, in colitis-associated cancer is mediated by p65-CDX2-β-catenin axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Fan, Huimin; Li, Yan; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Jinrong; Ji, Hui; Hu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Nonresolving inflammation in the intestine predisposes individuals to colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), which leads to high morbidity and mortality. Here we show that genistein-27 (GEN-27), a derivative of genistein, inhibited proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells through inhibiting β-catenin activity. Our results showed that GEN-27 increased expressions of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2), and reduced β-catenin nuclear localization, which resulted from the inhibition of NF-κB/p65 nuclear localization and up-regulation of caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2). Furthermore, GEN-27 decreased binding of p65 to the silencer region of CDX2 and increased binding of CDX2 to the promoter regions of APC and AXIN2, thus inhibiting the activation of β-catenin induced by TNF-α. Importantly, GEN-27 protected mice from azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon carcinogenesis, with reduced mortality, tumor number and tumor volume. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry revealed that dietary GEN-27 significantly decreased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration. Moreover, GEN-27 inhibited AOM/DSS-induced p65 and β-catenin nuclear translocation, while promoted the expression of CDX2, APC, and AXIN2. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the anti-proliferation effect of GEN-27 in vitro and the prevention of CAC in vivo is mediated by p65-CDX2-β-catenin axis via inhibiting β-catenin target genes. Our results imply that GEN-27 could be a promising candidate for the chemoprevention of CAC. PMID:26910375

  19. Effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and body composition of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-01-01

    An 8-week feeding experiment was performed to evaluate the effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, body composition, and digestive enzymes activity of juvenile Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated containing four graded supplements of genistein: 0, 30, 300, and 3 000 μg/g. Each diet was randomly assigned in triplicate to tanks stocked with 15 juvenile tilapia (10.47±1.24 g). The results show that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant effect on growth performance of Nile tilapia, but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed the final body weight and specific growth rate. There was no significant difference in survival rate, feed intake, feed efficiency ratio or whole body composition among all dietary treatments. An assay of digestive enzymes showed that the diet containing 3 000 μg/ggenistein decreased stomach and hepatopancreas protease activity, and amylase activity in the liver and intestine, while a dietary level of 300 μg/g genistein depressed stomach protease and intestine amylase activities. However, no significant difference in stomach amylase activity was found among dietary treatments. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that a high level of dietary genistein (3 000 μg/g, or above) would significantly reduce the growth of Nile tilapia, partly because of its inhibitory effect on the activity of major digestive enzymes. Accordingly, the detrimental effects of genistein, as found in soybean products, should not be ignored when applied as an alternative ingredient source in aquaculture.

  20. Mixed Inhibition of cPEPCK by Genistein, Using an Extended Binding Site Located Adjacent to Its Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cPEPCK) is a critical enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis. cPEPCK converts oxaloacetic acid (OAA) into phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) in the presence of GTP. cPEPCK is known to be associated with type 2 diabetes. Genistein is an isoflavone compound that shows anti-diabetic and anti-obesitic properties. Experimental studies have shown a decrease in the blood glucose level in the presence of genistein by lowering the functional activity of cPEPCK, an enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Using computational techniques such as molecular modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations, we identified cPEPCK as a direct target of genistein. We studied the molecular interactions of genistein with three possible conformations of cPEPCK—unbound cPEPCK (u_cPEPCK), GTP bound cPEPCK (GTP_cPEPCK) and GDP bound cPEPCK (GDP_cPEPCK). Binding of genistein was also compared with an already known cPEPCK inhibitor. We analyzed the interactions of genistein with cPEPCK enzyme and compared them with its natural substrate (OAA), product (PEP) and known inhibitor (3-MPA). Our results demonstrate that genistein uses the mechanism of mixed inhibition to block the functional activity of cPEPCK and thus can serve as a potential anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drug candidate. We also identified an extended binding site in the catalytic cleft of cPEPCK which is used by 3-MPA to inhibit cPEPCK non-competitively. We demonstrate that extended binding site of cPEPCK can further be exploited for designing new drugs against cPEPCK. PMID:26528723

  1. The Steady-State Serum Concentration of Genistein Aglycone Is Affected by Formulation: A Bioequivalence Study of Bone Products

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandra; Burnett, Bruce P.; Polito, Francesca; Russo, Silvia; D'Anna, Rosario; Pillai, Lakshmi; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Levy, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    An FDA-regulated, prescription medical food (Fosteum; 27 mg natural genistein, 200 IU cholecalciferol, 20 mg citrated zinc bisglycinate (4 mg elemental zinc) per capsule) and an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement (Citracal Plus Bone Density Builder; 27 mg synthetic genistein, 600 mg elemental calcium (calcium citrate), 400 IU vitamin D3, 50 mg magnesium, 7.5 mg zinc, 1 mg copper, 75 μg molybdenum, 250 μg boron per two tablets) were compared to a clinically proven bone formulation (27 mg natural genistein, 400 IU cholecalciferol, 500 mg elemental calcium (calcium carbonate) per tablet; the Squadrito formulation) in an 8-day steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) study of healthy postmenopausal women (n = 30) randomized to receive 54 mg of genistein per day. Trough serum samples were obtained before the final dose on the morning of the ninth day followed by sampling at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hrs. Total serum genistein, after β-glucuronidase/sulfatase digestion, was measured by time-resolved fluorometric assay. Maximal time (Tmax), concentration (Cmax), half-life (T1/2), and area under the curve (AUC) were determined for genistein in each formulation. Fosteum and the Squadrito study formulation were equivalent for genistein Tmax (2 hrs), Cmax (0.7 μM), T1/2 (18 ± 6.9 versus 21 ± 4.9 hrs), and AUC (9221 ± 413 versus 9818 ± 1370 ng·hr/mL). The OTC supplement's synthetically derived genistein, however, showed altered Tmax (6 hrs), Cmax (0.57 μM), T1/2 (8.3 ± 1.9 hrs), and AUC (6474 ± 287 ng·hr/mL). Differences in uptake may be due to multiple ingredients in the OTC supplement which interfere with genistein absorption. PMID:23484100

  2. Genistein sensitizes sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo by enhancing apoptosis and by inhibiting DSB repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X.X.; Sun, C.; Jin, X.D.; Li, P.; Zheng, X.G.; Zhao, T.; Li, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the radiosensitization effects of genistein on mice sarcoma cells and the corresponding biological mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. Using the non-toxic dosage of 10 μM genistein, the sensitizer enhancement ratios after exposure to X-rays at 50% cell survival (IC50) was 1.45 for S180 cells. For mice cotreated with genistein and X-rays, the excised tumor tissues had reduced blood vessels and decreased size and volume compared with the control and irradiation-only groups. Moreover, a significant increase in apoptosis was accompanied by upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 in the mitochondria, and lots of cytochrome c being transferred to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, X-rays combined with genistein inhibited the activity of DNA-PKcs, so DNA-injured sites were dominated by Ku70/80, leading to incompleteness of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs and the eventual occurrence of cell apoptosis. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that genistein sensitized sarcoma cells to X-rays and that this radiosensitizing effect depended on induction of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and inhibition of the double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. PMID:26922091

  3. Chemical studies of phytoestrogens and related compounds in dietary supplements: flax and chaparral.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, W R; Musser, S M; Betz, J M; Casey, R E; Pohland, A E; Page, S W

    1995-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) and mass spectrometric (MS) procedures were developed to determine lignans in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) and chaparral (Larrea tridentata). Flaxseed contains high levels of phytoestrogens. Chaparral has been associated with acute nonviral toxic hepatitis and contains lignans that are structurally similar to known estrogenic compounds. Both flaxseed and chaparral products have been marketed as dietary supplements. A mild enzyme hydrolysis procedure to prevent the formation of artifacts in the isolation step was used in the determination of secoisolariciresinol in flaxseed products. HPLC with ultraviolet spectral (UV) or MS detection was used as the determinative steps. HPLC procedures with UV detection and mass spectrometry were developed to characterize the phenolic components, including lignans and flavonoids, of chaparral and to direct fractionation studies for the bioassays.

  4. A critical view of the effects of phytoestrogens on hot flashes and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    This, Pascale; de Cremoux, Patricia; Leclercq, Guy; Jacquot, Yves

    2011-11-01

    The increased risk of breast cancer recently observed with some specific estro-progestin associations has raised concerns about the harmful effects of menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT). It has been proposed that phytoestrogens (PEs), which have a similar chemical structure to estrogens, could be used as HRT. The main selling points of these preparations concern the management of hot flashes and their potential beneficial effects on breast tissue. In this review, we will address the effects of PE on hot flashes and breast cancer risk as well as the questions raised on a chemical point of view. We conclude that the efficacy of a PE rich diet or nutritional supplements is not clearly established. The use of PE as an alternative for HRT cannot be advocated for now, due to insufficient and conflicting data on efficacy and safety. Moreover, due to the hormone dependence of breast cancer, PE use must be contraindicated in breast cancer survivors.

  5. Phytoestrogens as alternative hormone replacement therapy in menopause: What is real, what is unknown.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Ana M; Santos, Maria S; Sardão, Vilma A

    2014-09-01

    Menopause is characterized by an altered hormonal status and by a decrease in life quality due to the appearance of uncomfortable symptoms. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend one-third of their lifetime under menopause. Understanding menopause-associated pathophysiology and developing new strategies to improve the treatment of menopausal-associated symptoms is an important topic in the clinic. This review describes physiological and hormone alterations observed during menopause and therapeutic strategies used during this period. We critically address the benefits and doubts associated with estrogen/progesterone-based hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and discuss the use of phytoestrogens (PEs) as a possible alternative. These relevant plant-derived compounds have structural similarities to estradiol, interacting with cell proteins and organelles, presenting several advantages and disadvantages versus traditional HRT in the context of menopause. However, a better assessment of PEs safety/efficacy would warrant a possible widespread clinical use.

  6. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  7. Genistein decreases basal hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 protein expression and activity in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Erik B; Steinberg, Francene M

    2016-05-01

    Soy consumption has been associated with risk reduction for chronic diseases such as cancer. One proposed mechanism for cancer prevention by soy is through decreasing cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1a1) activity. However, it is not known with certainty which soy components modulate Cyp1a1, or the characteristics or mechanisms involved in the responses after short-term (<20 days) dietary treatment without concomitant carcinogen-mediated induction. Therefore, the objective was to test the hypothesis that physiologic concentrations of dietary genistein and/or daidzein will decrease basal hepatic Cyp1a1 protein expression and activity in male and female Swiss Webster mice via inhibiting the bindings of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT) and estrogen receptor-α to the Cyp1a1 promoter region xenobiotic response element. The mice were fed the AIN-93G diet supplemented with 1500 mg/kg of genistein or daidzein for up to 1 week. Genistein, but not daidzein, significantly decreased basal hepatic microsomal Cyp1a1 protein expression and activity. AhR protein expression was not altered. Molecular mechanisms were investigated in Hepa-1c1c7 cells treated with 5 μmol/L purified aglycones genistein, daidzein, or equol. Cells treated with genistein exhibited inhibitions in ARNT and estrogen receptor-α bindings to the Cyp1a1 promoter region. This study demonstrated that genistein consumption reduced constitutive hepatic Cyp1a1 protein expression and activity, thereby contributing to the understanding of how soy isoflavone aglycones modulate cytochrome P450 biotransformation enzymes.

  8. Preventive effects of phytoestrogens against postmenopausal osteoporosis as compared to the available therapeutic choices: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Abdullah Foraih; Qureshi, Viquar Fatima; Javaid, Khalida; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been rampantly used to recompense for the bone loss, but the procedure is coupled with severe adverse effects. Hence, there is a boost in the production of newer synthetic products to ward off the effects of menopause-related osteoporosis. As of today, there are several prescription products available for the treatment of postmenopause osteoporosis; most of these are estrogenic agents and combination products. Nevertheless, in view of the lack of effect and/or toxicity of these products, majority of the postmenopausal women are now fascinated by highly publicized natural products. This is an offshoot of the generalized consensus that these products are more effective and free from any adverse effects. Recently, certain plant-derived natural products, mostly phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestanes, stilbenes, flavonoids) and many more novel estrogen-like compounds in plants have been immensely used to prevent menopause-related depletion in bone mineral density (BMD). Although, a number of papers are published on menopause-related general symptoms, sexual dysfunction, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon, and breast cancers, there is paucity of literature on the accompanying osteoporosis and its treatment. In view of the controversies on synthetic hormones and drugs and drift of a major population of patients toward natural drugs, it was found worthwhile to investigate if these drugs are suitable to be used in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Preparation of this paper is an attempt to review the (a) epidemiology of postmenopausal osteoporosis, (b) treatment modalities of postmenopausal osteoporosis by hormones and synthetic drugs and the associated drawbacks and adverse effects, and (c) prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis by phytoestrogens, their drawbacks and toxicity

  9. In vitro investigation of antioxidant, anti-Inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) hemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng; DeFine, Linda; Alexander, Thomas; Kyu, Thein

    2015-04-01

    Hemocompatibility of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PES/PVP) hemodialysis (HD) membranes has been investigated in vitro with emphasis on evaluation of cell viability, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties. Genistein modified PES/PVP membranes reveal significant reduction of the reactive oxygen species and also considerable suppression of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in whole blood, but to a lesser extent ininterleukin-6. The incorporation of PVP into the HD membrane reduces platelet adhesion by virtue of its hydrophilicity. Of particular importance is that platelet adhesion of the genistein modified membranes declines noticeably at low concentrations of genistein for about 5-10%, beyond which it raises the number of adhered platelets. The initial decline in the platelet adhesion is attributable to genistein's ability to inhibit intercellular and/or vascular cell adhesion, whereas the reversal of this adhesion trend with further increase of genistein loading is ascribed to the inherent hydrophobicity of the genistein modified HD membrane.

  10. The kinetic basis for age-associated changes in quercetin and genistein glucuronidation by rat liver microsomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dietary bioavailability of the isoflavone genistein is decreased in older rats compared to young adults. Since flavonoids are metabolized extensively by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), we hypothesized that UGT flavonoid conjugating activity changes with age. The effect of age on flavono...

  11. Genistein activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Nie, Wei; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhang, Bingkun; Wang, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Deregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the development of multiple cardiovascular diseases. Our recent study demonstrated that genistein supplementation attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers by restoration of endothelial function. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by using broiler pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs). Our results showed that genistein stimulated a rapid phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179 which was associated with activation of eNOS/NO axis. Further study indicated that the activation of eNOS was not mediated through estrogen receptors or tyrosine kinase inhibition, but via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-dependent signaling pathway, as the eNOS activity and related NO release were largely abolished by pharmacological inhibitors of PI3K or Akt. Thus, our findings revealed a critical function of Akt in mediating genistein-stimulated eNOS activity in PAECs, partially accounting for the beneficial effects of genistein on the development of cardiovascular diseases observed in animal models. PMID:20926919

  12. Segregated responses of mammary gland development and vaginal opening to prepubertal genistein exposure in Bscl2(-/-) female mice with lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Chen, Weiqin; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-07-01

    Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2-deficient (Bscl2(-/-)) mice recapitulate human BSCL2 disease with lipodystrophy. Bscl2-encoded seipin is detected in adipocytes and epithelium of mammary gland. Postnatal mammary gland growth spurt and vaginal opening signify pubertal onset in female mice. Bscl2(-/-) females have longer and dilated mammary gland ducts at 5-week old and delayed vaginal opening. Prepubertal exposure to 500ppm genistein diet increases mammary gland area and accelerates vaginal opening in both control and Bscl2(-/-) females. However, genistein treatment increases ductal length in control but not Bscl2(-/-) females. Neither prepubertal genistein treatment nor Bscl2-deficiency affects phospho-estrogen receptor α or progesterone receptor expression patterns in 5-week old mammary gland. Interestingly, Bscl2-deficiency specifically reduces estrogen receptor β expression in mammary gland ductal epithelium. In summary, Bscl2(-/-) females have accelerated postnatal mammary ductal development but delayed vaginal opening; they display segregated responses in mammary gland development and vaginal opening to prepubertal genistein treatment.

  13. Clearing Amyloid-β through PPARγ/ApoE Activation by Genistein is a Treatment of Experimental Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Blanco-Gandía, MariCarmen; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Inglés, Marta; Garcia-Tarraga, Patricia; Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance from brain, which is decreased in Alzheimer's disease, is facilitated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is upregulated by activation of the retinoid X receptor moiety of the RXR/PPARγ dimeric receptor. Genistein, a non-toxic, well-tested, and inexpensive drug activates the other moiety of the receptor PPARγ. Treatment of an Alzheimer's disease mouse model with genistein results in a remarkable and rapid improvement in various parameters of cognition, such as hippocampal learning, recognition memory, implicit memory, and odor discrimination. This is associated with a lowering of Aβ levels in brain, in the number and the area of amyloid plaques (confirmed in vivo by positron emission tomography) as well as in microglial reactivity. Finally, incubation of primary astrocytes with genistein results in a PPARγ-mediated increased release of ApoE. Our results strongly suggest that controlled clinical trials should be performed to test the effect of genistein as treatment of human Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Clearing Amyloid-β through PPARγ/ApoE Activation by Genistein is a Treatment of Experimental Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Blanco-Gandía, MariCarmen; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Inglés, Marta; Garcia-Tarraga, Patricia; Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance from brain, which is decreased in Alzheimer's disease, is facilitated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is upregulated by activation of the retinoid X receptor moiety of the RXR/PPARγ dimeric receptor. Genistein, a non-toxic, well-tested, and inexpensive drug activates the other moiety of the receptor PPARγ. Treatment of an Alzheimer's disease mouse model with genistein results in a remarkable and rapid improvement in various parameters of cognition, such as hippocampal learning, recognition memory, implicit memory, and odor discrimination. This is associated with a lowering of Aβ levels in brain, in the number and the area of amyloid plaques (confirmed in vivo by positron emission tomography) as well as in microglial reactivity. Finally, incubation of primary astrocytes with genistein results in a PPARγ-mediated increased release of ApoE. Our results strongly suggest that controlled clinical trials should be performed to test the effect of genistein as treatment of human Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26890773

  15. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  16. Occurrence and Profiles of the Artificial Endocrine Disruptor Bisphenol A and Natural Endocrine Disruptor Phytoestrogens in Urine from Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyue; Duan, Zhenghua; Wu, Yinghong; Liu, Zhen; Li, Ke; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to artificial or natural endocrine disruptors, such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phytoestrogens has been demonstrated to have health effects, especially in children. Biomonitoring of BPA and phytoestrogens in human urine can be used to assess the intake levels of these compounds. Methods: In this study, BPA and phytoestrogens in urine specimens (n = 256) collected from children in China were measured by liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Results: BPA was detected in most specimens, with a geometric mean concentration of 1.58 ng/mL. For the first time, levels of urinary phytoestrogens in Chinese children were reported. Daidzein and enterolactone are the typical isoflavones and lignans compounds in urine, respectively. Conclusions: Relatively high levels of urinary BPA indicate an increasing risk of BPA exposure to Chinese children. Urinary concentrations of daidzein in Chinese children are higher when compared with those reported in the U.S. children, while concentrations of urinary enterolactone and enterodiols are significantly lower. This suggests a significant difference in phytoestrogen intake between the children from China and from the U.S. PMID:26633438

  17. The phytoestrogen prunetin affects body composition and improves fitness and lifespan in male Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E

    2016-02-01

    Dietary isoflavones, a group of secondary plant compounds that exhibit phytoestrogenic properties, are primarily found in soy. Prunetin, a representative isoflavone, was recently found to affect cell signaling in cultured cells; however, in vivo effects remain elusive. In this study, the model organism Drosophila melanogaster was used to investigate the effects of prunetin in vivo with respect to lifespan, locomotion, body composition, metabolism, and gut health. Adult flies were chronically administered a prunetin-supplemented diet. Prunetin improved median survival by 3 d, and climbing activity increased by 54% in males. In comparison with the females, male flies exhibited lower climbing activity, which was reversed by prunetin intake. Furthermore, prunetin-fed males exhibited increased expression of the longevity gene Sirtuin 1 (Sir2) (22%), as well as elevated AMPK activation (51%) and triglyceride levels (29%), whereas glucose levels decreased (36%). As females are long-lived compared with their male counterparts and exhibit higher triglyceride levels, prunetin apparently "feminizes" male flies via its estrogenicity. We conclude that the lifespan-prolonging effects of prunetin in the male fruit fly depend on changes in AMPK-regulated energy homeostasis via male "feminization." Collectively, we identified prunetin as a plant bioactive compound capable of improving health status and survival in male D. melanogaster. PMID:26538555

  18. Suppression of dendritic cells' maturation and functions by daidzein, a phytoestrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yum, Min Kyu; Jung, Mi Young; Cho, Daeho; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-12-15

    Isoflavones are ubiquitous compounds in foods and in the environment in general. Daidzein and genistein, the best known of isoflavones, are structurally similar to 17{beta}-estradiol and known to exert estrogenic effects. They also evidence a broad variety of biological properties, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic and anti-osteoporotic activities. Previously, daidzein was reported to increase the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages and splenocyte proliferation, and to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. However, its potential impacts on immune response in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immunity, have yet to be clearly elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of isoflavones on the maturation and activation of DCs. Isoflavones (formononetin, daidzein, equol, biochanin A, genistein) were found to differentially affect the expression of CD86, a costimulatory molecule, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. In particular, daidzein significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the expression levels of maturation-associated cell surface markers including CD40, costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), and major histocompatibility complex class II (I-A{sup b}) molecule on LPS-stimulated DCs. Daidzein also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production such as IL-12p40, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}, whereas it didn't affect IL-10 and IL-1{beta} expression. Furthermore, daidzein enhanced endocytosis and inhibited the allo-stimulatory ability of LPS-stimulated DCs on T cells, indicating that daidzein treatment can inhibit the functional maturation of DCs. These results demonstrate that daidzein may exhibit immunosuppressive activity by inhibiting the maturation and activation of DCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein inhibited expression of maturation-associated cell surface markers in DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein suppressed expression of

  19. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of genistein capsules in healthy chinese subjects: A phase I, randomized, open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xing; Feng, Yi; Yang, Liu; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Dan; Sun, Jing; Liu, Yiming; Deng, Yuanhui

    2008-01-01

    Background: Genistein capsules are currently being developed to treat osteoporosis in China. Genistein is extracted from the fruit of Sophora japonica Leguminosae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of genistein capsules after single and multiple oral doses in healthy Chinese subjects. Methods: This was a Phase I, randomized, open-label, single- and multiple- dose study in healthy Chinese adults (aged 19–40 years). In the single-dose study, subjects were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive genistein 50, 100, or 300 mg (in 50-mg capsules). To assess the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics, subjects in the 50-mg group were equally randomized again into fasting and postprandial (genistein was administered after a high-fat breakfast) groups according to a 2-way cross-over design. A separate equal-sized group of subjects were administered genistein 50 mg on day 1 (single dose), received no treatment on days 2 and 3, and were administered genistein 50 mg QD for 6 days (days 4–9) to obtain a multiple-dose pharmacokinetic profile. Because genistein is converted so rapidly and completely to glucuronidated genistein after administration, plasma concentrations of glucuronidated genistein were determined using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry method. Drug tolerability was assessed by monitoring adverse events (AEs) and laboratory parameters. Results: The study enrolled 40 healthy subjects (24 men, 16 women; 10 each in the 50-, 100-, and 300-mg single-dose groups and 10 in the multiple-dose group). Three subjects voluntarily withdrew (2 in the 100-mg group and 1 in the 300-mg group) before study drug administration. Thirty-seven subjects (24 men, 13 women) completed the study and were included in the analysis. The mean (SD) values of the single-dose genistein 50-, 100-, and 300-mg groups were as follows: Tmax, 6.0 (2.4), 7.4 (2.4), and 5.6 (1.2) hours, respectively; tl/2, 13.0 (4

  20. Vasopressin elevation of Na+/H+ exchange is inhibited by genistein in human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Aharonovits, O; Zik, M; Livne, A A; Granot, Y

    1992-12-01

    The regulation of intracellular Na+ and pHi in human blood platelets is known to be controlled by the function of the Na+/H+ exchanger. The phosphorylation state of the Na+/H+ exchanger which determines the exchanger activity in human blood platelets is regulated by the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Observations in this study indicate that arginine vasopressin (AVP) that interacts with a V1 receptor, activates the Na+/H+ exchange in human blood platelets through a genistein-inhibited mechanism. The AVP-activated Na+/H+ exchange is probably not regulated by protein kinase C (PKC), since this activation is not inhibited by staurosporine. The multiple ways in which platelet Na+/H+ exchange can be modulated may indicate the critical role played by this exchanger in the homeostasis control of pHi in human blood platelets.

  1. Evaluation of bone quality and quantity in osteoporotic mice--the effects of genistein and equol.

    PubMed

    Sehmisch, S; Uffenorde, J; Maehlmeyer, S; Tezval, M; Jarry, H; Stuermer, K M; Stuermer, E K

    2010-05-01

    The technology of gene manipulation is often used in mice. A crucial point for osteoporosis research is the evaluation of biomechanical and morphologic parameters. These parameters, however, are difficult to measure in mice. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates the capability of using techniques for the evaluation of bone quality and quantity after various treatments in osteopenic mice. After ovariectomy, 60 C57BL/6J mice were divided into 4 groups and were fed a soy-free diet (C) supplemented with estradiol, genistein or equol for 3 months. To analyze the osteoprotective effects of the tested supplements, we evaluated the bone biomechanical properties, histomorphometric changes and bone mineral density of the proximal tibiae metaphysis. The biomechanical parameters of genistein (GEN) were shown to be similar to those levels observed with estradiol (E). The biomechanical parameters of both GEN and E were significantly superior to those observed with C. Supplementation with equol (EQO) demonstrated higher mean biomechanical values than those observed with C. The histomorphometric evaluation demonstrated an increased number of nodes in mice treated with GEN and E as compared to the mice treated with EQO and C. Treatment with E and EQO led to improved cortical bone, which was only partly seen with the mice treated with GEN. The analysis of the bone mineral density (BMD) demonstrated that treatment with GEN and E resulted in a significant improvement as compared to the mice treated with C, while the cancellous density was significantly increased in all of the supplementation groups. This study conclusively demonstrated that bone quality and quantity parameters can be measured in mice. Furthermore, biomechanical and morphologic evaluations were shown to be reliable for use in mice. Further studies may combine these techniques with gene manipulation technology to better understand osteoporosis. Treatment with GEN resulted in improved biomechanical results and

  2. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Li, Xue-Dong; Yang, Na; Pan, Wei-San; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC) to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) proliferation. METHODS Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS), zeta potentials (ZP), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), genistein (Gen) and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth. PMID:27275415

  3. [Experimental Evaluation of Radioprotective Efficacy of Synthetic Genistein on Criteria of Glutathione System and Lipid Peroxidation in Erythrocytes of Peripheral Blood in Irradiated Rats].

    PubMed

    Grebenyuk, A N; Tarumov, R A; Basharin, V A; Kovtun, V U

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate experimentally the radioprotective effectiveness of synthetic genistein in terms of the glutathione system and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes of irradiated rats. The animals were exposed to single acute X-ray irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy. Genistein was administered intraperitoneally at 200 mg/kg 1 hour before radiation exposure. The irradiation caused the initiation of lipid peroxidation in the background depletion of reduced glutathione. Decrease by 25% in the number of malondialdehyde in the rats treated with genistein was registered 5 min after irradiation compared with the control. It is established thatl day after irradiation the level of reduced glutathione in the rats treated with genistein was 26% higher. However, intraperitoneal administration of genistein did not cause statistically significant changes in the activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase during the whole period of observation. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of synthetic genistein is implemented, along with other mechanisms, by stimulating the glutathione system and reducing the severity of lipid peroxidation. PMID:26863780

  4. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, F.; Jiménez-Guerrero, I.; Acosta-Jurado, S.; Navarro-Gómez, P.; Ollero, F. J.; Ruiz-Sainz, J. E.; López-Baena, F. J.; Vinardell, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  5. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montaño, F; Jiménez-Guerrero, I; Acosta-Jurado, S; Navarro-Gómez, P; Ollero, F J; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; López-Baena, F J; Vinardell, J M

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  6. A novel UHPLC method for the rapid and simultaneous determination of daidzein, genistein and equol in human urine.

    PubMed

    Redruello, Begoña; Guadamuro, Lucía; Cuesta, Isabel; Álvarez-Buylla, Jorge R; Mayo, Baltasar; Delgado, Susana

    2015-11-15

    This work reports on a novel method involving reverse-phased ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) plus a spectrophotometric photodiode array/fluorescence (FLR) detection system for determining the concentration of equol and major soy isoflavones (daidzein and genistein) in human urine. The proposed method was validated in terms of its linearity, sensitivity, accuracy (recovery) and precision (intra- and inter-day repeatability). The isoflavone profiles of urine samples from a group of menopausal women following oral soy isoflavone supplementation were determined and compared. Screening for equol-producer status was accomplished with high sensitivity (detection limit of the FLR detector 2.93nM). The method involves a short chromatographic run time compared to conventional HPLC methods while allowing for the simultaneous and reliable quantification of daidzein, genistein and equol in human urine. It also allows for the rapid screening of multiple urine samples when testing for equol production status and checking patient adherence to isoflavone treatment regimens.

  7. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-07-08

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody.

  8. Phytoestrogens regulate the proliferation and expression of stem cell factors in cell lines of malignant testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Hasibeder, Astrid; Venkataramani, Vivek; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim; Schweyer, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Phytoestrogens have been shown to exert anti-proliferative effects on different cancer cells. In addition it could be demonstrated that inhibition of proliferation is associated with downregulation of the known stem cell factors NANOG, POU5F1 and SOX2 in tumor cells. We demonstrate the potential of Belamcanda chinensis extract (BCE) and tectorigenin as anticancer drugs in cell lines of malignant testicular germ cell tumor cells (TGCT) by inhibition of proliferation and regulating the expression of stem cell factors. The TGCT cell lines TCam-2 and NTera-2 were treated with BCE or tectorigenin and MTT assay was used to measure the proliferation of tumor cells. In addition, the expression of stem cell factors was analyzed by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, global expression analysis was performed by microarray technique. BCE and tectorigenin inhibited proliferation and downregulated the stem cell factors NANOG and POU5F1 in TGCT cells. In addition, gene expression profiling revealed induction of genes important for the differentiation and inhibition of oncogenes. Utilizing connectivity map in an attempt to elucidate mechanism underlying BCE treatments we found highly positive association to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) amongst others. Causing no histone deacetylase inhibition, the effects of BCE on proliferation and stem cell factors may be based on histone-independent mechanisms such as direct hyperacetylation of transcription factors. Based on these findings, phytoestrogens may be useful as new agents in the treatment of TGCT.

  9. Bilberry extract, its major polyphenolic compounds, and the soy isoflavone genistein antagonize the cytostatic drug erlotinib in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, G; Pahlke, G; Nagel, L J; Berger, W; Marko, D

    2016-08-10

    Erlotinib (Tarceva®) is a chemotherapeutic drug approved for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Its primary mode of action is the inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Recently, RTK-inhibiting polyphenols have been reported to interact synergistically with erlotinib. Furthermore some anthocyanidins and anthocyanin-rich berry extracts have been reported to inhibit tyrosine kinases, including the EGFR, which raises the question of potential interactions with erlotinib. Polyphenol-rich preparations such as berry- or soy-based products are commercially available as food supplements. In the present study we tested a bilberry extract, its major anthocyanin and potential intestinal degradation products, as well as genistein, with respect to possible interactions with erlotinib. Cell growth inhibition was assessed using the sulforhodamine B assay, while interactions with EGFR phosphorylation were analyzed by SDS-PAGE/western blotting with subsequent immunodetection. Genistein, bilberry extract, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and delphinidin were found to antagonize erlotinib whereas phloroglucinol aldehyde was found to enhance cytostatic effects of the drug on human epithelial A431 cells. Genistein also antagonized the EGFR inhibitory effects of erlotinib, whereas bilberry anthocyanins showed no significant interactions in this regard. Our data indicate that different polyphenols are potentially able to impair the cytostatic effect of erlotinib in vitro. Genistein interacts via the modulation of erlotinib-mediated EGFR inhibition whereas bilberry anthocyanins modulated the growth-inhibitory effect of erlotinib without affecting EGFR phosphorylation, thus indicating a different mechanism of interference. PMID:27485636

  10. Development of an updated phytoestrogen database for use with the SWAN food frequency questionnaire: intakes and food sources in a community-based, multiethnic cohort study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Hua; Norris, Jean; Han, Weijuan; Block, Torin; Gold, Ellen; Crawford, Sybil; Greendale, Gail A

    2012-01-01

    Phytoestrogens, heterocyclic phenols found in plants, may benefit several health outcomes. However, epidemiologic studies of the health effects of dietary phytoestrogens have yielded mixed results, in part due to challenges inherent in estimating dietary intakes. The goal of this study was to improve the estimates of dietary phytoestrogen consumption using a modified Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), a 137-item FFQ created for the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) in 1994. To expand the database of sources from which phytonutrient intakes were computed, we conducted a comprehensive PubMed/Medline search covering January 1994 through September 2008. The expanded database included 4 isoflavones, coumestrol, and 4 lignans. The new database estimated isoflavone content of 105 food items (76.6%) vs. 14 (10.2%) in the 1994 version and computed coumestrol content of 52 food items (38.0%), compared to 1 (0.7%) in the original version. Newly added were lignans; values for 104 FFQ food items (75.9%) were calculated. In addition, we report here the phytonutrient intakes for each racial and language group in the SWAN sample and present major food sources from which the phytonutrients came. This enhanced ascertainment of phytoestrogens will permit improved studies of their health effects.

  11. Influence of partial replacement of soya bean meal by faba beans or peas in heavy pigs diet on meat quality, residual anti-nutritional factors and phytoestrogen content.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Domenico; Russo, Claudia; Giuliotti, Lorella; Mannari, Claudio; Picciarelli, Piero; Lombardi, Lara; Giovannini, Luca; Ceccarelli, Nello; Mariotti, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    The study evaluated the partial substitution of soybean meal by faba beans (18%) or peas (20%) as additional protein sources in diets destined for typical Italian heavy pig production. It compared animal performances, meat quality, the presence of residual anti-nutritional factors (ANF) and phytoestrogens in plasma and meat and the possible effects on pig health, by evaluating oxidative, inflammatory and pro-atherogenic markers. The results showed that the productive performances, expressed as body weight and feed conversion ratio, of pigs fed with faba bean and pea diets were similar to those of pigs fed only the soybean meal. Meat quality of pigs fed with the three diets was similar in colour, water-holding capacity, tenderness and chemical composition. Despite the higher levels of phytoestrogen in the plasma of pigs fed only the soybean meal, phytoestrogen concentration in the muscle was equivalent to that of animals fed diets with faba beans, whereas pigs fed a diet with peas showed a lower concentration. Inflammation and pro-atherogenic parameters did not show significant differences among the three diets. Overall, the partial substitution of soybean meal by faba beans appears more interesting than with peas, particularly in relation to the higher amount of polyphenols in the diet and the highest concentration of phytoestrogens found in the plasma and muscle of animals, while the pyrimidine anti-nutritional compounds present in the diet did not appear to accumulate and had no effect on the growth performance of animals.

  12. The (pro)renin receptor mediates constitutive PLZF-independent pro-proliferative effects which are inhibited by bafilomycin but not genistein

    PubMed Central

    KIRSCH, SEBASTIAN; SCHREZENMEIER, EVA; KLARE, SABRINA; ZAADE, DANIELA; SEIDEL, KERSTIN; SCHMITZ, JENNIFER; BERNHARD, SARAH; LAUER, DILYARA; SLACK, MARK; GOLDIN-LANG, PETRA; UNGER, THOMAS; ZOLLMANN, FRANK S.; FUNKE-KAISER, HEIKO

    2014-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor [(P)RR] is crucial for cardio-renal pathophysiology. The distinct molecular mechanisms of this receptor are still incompletely understood. The (P)RR is able to interact with different signalling proteins such as promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF) and Wnt receptors. Moreover, domains of the (P)RR are essential for V-ATPase activity. V-ATPase- and Wnt-mediated effects imply constitutive, i.e., (pro)renin-independent functions of the (P)RR. Regarding ligand-dependent (P)RR signalling, the role of prorenin glycosylation is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the contribution of constitutive (P)RR activity to its cellular effects and the relevance of prorenin glycosylation on its ligand activity. We were able to demonstrate that high glucose induces (P)RR signal transduction whereas deglycosylation of prorenin abolishes its intrinsic activity in neuronal and epithelial cells. By using siRNA against (P)RR or PLZF as well as the PLZF translocation blocker genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin, we were able to dissect three distinct sub-pathways downstream of the (P)RR. The V-ATPase function is ligand-independently associated with strong pro-proliferative effects whereas prorenin causes moderate proliferation in vitro. In contrast, PLZF per se [i.e., in the absence of (pro)renin] does not interfere with cell number. PMID:24424509

  13. Synergistic reversal effect of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by miR-223 inhibitor and genistein in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jia; Zeng, Fanpeng; Ma, Cong; Pang, Haijie; Fang, Binbin; Lian, Chaoqun; Yin, Bin; Zhang, Xueping; Wang, Zhiwei; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies have demonstrated that EMT phenotype is closely related with tumor progression and drug resistance in a variety of human cancers. Recently, it has been extensively demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a pivotal role in regulating EMT. In our previously reports, we have reported that inhibition of miR-223 could reverse EMT phenotype and improve chemotherapeutic drug sensitivity. We also reported that genistein down-regulated miR-223 expression in gemcitabine-resistant (GR) pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we explored whether there was the synergistic effect between miR-223 inhibitor and genistein on cell growth, migration, invasion and reversal of EMT in GR pancreatic cancer. We found that the combination of miR-223 inhibitor and genistein synergistically reduced cell motility and invasion and enhanced gemcitabine sensitivity in GR cells. In addition, we further observed that miR-223 inhibitor and genistein reversed EMT features in GR cells. This study suggests that the combination of miR-223 inhibitor and genistein may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27429851

  14. Myelotoxicity in genistein-, nonylphenol-, methoxychlor-, vinclozolin- or ethinyl estradiol-exposed F1 generations of Sprague-Dawley rats following developmental and adult exposures.

    PubMed

    Guo, T L; Germolec, D R; Musgrove, D L; Delclos, K B; Newbold, R R; Weis, C; White, K L

    2005-08-01

    The myelotoxicity of five endocrine active chemicals was evaluated in F1 generation of Sprague-Dawley rats following developmental and adult exposures at three concentration levels. Rats were exposed to genistein (GEN: 25, 250 and 1250 ppm), nonylphenol (NPH: 25, 500 and 2000 ppm), methoxychlor (MXC: 10, 100 and 1000 ppm), vinclozolin (VCZ: 10, 150 and 750 ppm) and ethinyl estradiol (EE2: 5, 25 and 200 ppb) gestationally and lactationally through dams from day 7 of gestation and through feed after weaning on postnatal day (PND) 22 to PND 64. The parameters examined included the number of recovered bone marrow cells, DNA synthesis, and colony forming units (CFU) in the presence of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and erythropoietin. Except for the EE2, the concentrations of other individual chemicals in the diet were in an approximate range that allowed for a comparison to be made in terms of myelotoxic potency. Decreases in the DNA synthesis, CFU-GM and CFU-M seemed to be the common findings among the alterations induced by these compounds. Using the numbers of alterations induced by each chemical in the parameters examined as criteria for comparison, the order of myelotoxic potency in F(1) males was: GEN>MXC>NPH>VCZ; the order in females: GEN>NPH>VCZ. Additionally, some of the functional changes induced by these compounds were gender-specific or dimorphic. Overall, the results demonstrated that developmental and adult exposures of F1 rats to these endocrine active chemicals at the concentrations tested had varied degrees of myelotoxicity with GEN being the most potent. Furthermore, the sex-specific effects of these chemicals in F1 male and female rats suggest that there may be interactions between these compounds and sex hormone in modulating these responses.

  15. Combination of N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide and genistein increased apoptosis in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y xenografts.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Choudhury, S Roy; Banik, N L; Ray, S K

    2009-09-29

    Neuroblastoma is the childhood malignancy that mainly occurs in adrenal glands and is found also in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. New therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for successful treatment of this pediatric cancer. In this investigation, we examined efficacy of the retinoid N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR) and the isoflavonoid genistein (GST) alone and also in combination for controlling the growth of human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y xenografts in nude mice. Combination of 4-HPR and GST significantly reduced tumor volume in vivo due to overwhelming apoptosis in both neuroblastoma xenografts. Time-dependently, combination of 4-HPR and GST caused reduction in body weight, tumor weight, and tumor volume. Combination of 4-HPR and GST increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, mitochondrial release of Smac, downregulation of baculovirus inhibitor-of-apoptosis repeat containing (BIRC) proteins including BIRC-2 and BIRC-3, and activation of caspase-3 and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). Further, downregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was also detected. In situ immunofluorescent labelings of tumor sections showed overexpression of calpain, caspase-12, and caspase-3, and also AIF in the course of apoptosis. Combination therapy increased apoptosis in the xenografts but did not induce kidney and liver toxicities in the animals. Results demonstrated that combination of 4-HPR and GST induced multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis and thus could be highly effective for inhibiting growth of malignant neuroblastoma in preclinical animal models.

  16. Combination of LC3 shRNA plasmid transfection and genistein treatment inhibited autophagy and increased apoptosis in malignant neuroblastoma in cell culture and animal models.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Nishant; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2013-01-01

    Malignant neuroblastoma is an extracranial solid tumor that usually occurs in children. Autophagy, which is a survival mechanism in many solid tumors including malignant neuroblastoma, deters the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. To mimic starvation, we used 200 nM rapamycin that induced autophagy in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells in cell culture and animal models. Combination of microtubule associated protein light chain 3 short hairpin RNA (LC3 shRNA) plasmid transfection and genistein (GST) treatment was tested for inhibiting rapamycin-induced autophagy and promoting apoptosis. The best synergistic efficacy caused the highest decrease in cell viability due to combination of 50 nM LC3 shRNA plasmid transfection and 25 µM GST treatment in rapamycin-treated SK-N-BE2 cells while combination of 100 nM LC3 shRNA plasmid transfection and 25 µM GST treatment in rapamycin-treated IMR-32 cells. Quantitation of acidic vesicular organelles confirmed that combination of LC3 shRNA plasmid transfection and GST treatment prevented rapamycin-induced autophagy due to down regulation of autophagy promoting marker molecules (LC3 II, Beclin 1, TLR-4, and Myd88) and upregulation of autophagy inhibiting marker molecules (p62 and mTOR) in both cell lines. Apoptosis assays showed that combination therapy most effectively activated mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in human malignant neuroblastoma in cell culture and animal models. Collectively, our current combination of LC3 shRNA plasmid transfection and GST treatment could serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for inhibiting autophagy and increasing apoptosis in human malignant neuroblastoma in cell culture and animal models.

  17. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by two genistein derivatives: kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Wu, Ping; Yang, Ranyao; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Song; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2014-12-01

    In this study two genistein derivatives (G1 and G2) are reported as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and differences in the inhibition of AChE are described. Although they differ in structure by a single methyl group, the inhibitory effect of G1 (IC50=264 nmol/L) on AChE was 80 times stronger than that of G2 (IC50=21,210 nmol/L). Enzyme-kinetic analysis, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to better understand the molecular basis for this difference. The results obtained by kinetic analysis demonstrated that G1 can interact with both the catalytic active site and peripheral anionic site of AChE. The predicted binding free energies of two complexes calculated by the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms suggested that a difference between the net electrostatic contributions (ΔE ele+ΔG GB) was responsible for the binding affinities of these two inhibitors. Additionally, analysis of the molecular mechanics and MM/GBSA free energy decomposition revealed that the difference between G1 and G2 originated from interactions with Tyr124, Glu292, Val294 and Phe338 of AChE. In conclusion, the results reveal significant differences at the molecular level in the mechanism of inhibition of AChE by these structurally related compounds. PMID:26579414

  18. A newly constructed and validated isoflavone database for the assessment of total genistein and daidzein intake.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Margaret R; Cummings, John H; Morton, Michael S; Michael Steel, C; Bolton-Smith, Caroline; Riches, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    The principal phyto-oestrogens (PO) in food are isoflavones, lignans, coumestans and prenylated flavonoids, with isoflavones and lignans being the most commonly found in UK diets. Until recently obtaining accurate data on the PO content of foods was hampered by lack of suitable analytical methods and validation techniques. Furthermore, although PO data exist for some foods, these foods may not be available in the UK. The aim of the present study was to construct a new, comprehensive isoflavone (total genistein + daidzein) database. Using data, mainly from recent GC-MS analysis, for approximately 300 foods available in the UK, and extensive recipe calculations, a new database was constructed containing approximately 6000 foods allocated an isoflavone value. By analysing 7 d weighed food diaries, the database was subsequently used to estimate isoflavone intake in two groups of healthy volunteers, omnivores (n 9) and vegetarians (n 10). Mean isoflavone intake in the vegetarian and omnivorous group was 7.4 (sem 3.05) and 1.2 (sem 0.43) mg/d, respectively. Mean intake for the total group was 4.5 (sem 1.89) mg/d. Main food sources of isoflavones for the vegetarian group were soya milk (plain), meat-substitute foods containing textured vegetable protein and soya protein isolate, soya mince, wholemeal bread and rolls, white bread and rolls, croissants and pitta breads, beans, raisins and soya sauce. Main food sources of isoflavones for the omnivorous group were soya yogurts, wholemeal bread and rolls, white bread and rolls, garlic bread, nan bread and brown bread, sultanas and scones.

  19. Evaluation of the Isoflavone Genistein as Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and -B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective therapeutic drugs for managing Parkinson's disease (PD) and depression. However, their irreversibility may lead to rare but serious side effects. As finding safer and reversible MAOIs is our target, we characterized the recombinant human (h) MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition potentials of two common natural isoflavones, genistein (GST) and daidzein (DZ) using luminescence assay. The results obtained showed that DZ exhibits partial to no inhibition of the isozymes examined while GST inhibited hMAO-B (IC50 of 6.81 μM), and its hMAO-A inhibition was more potent than the standard deprenyl. Furthermore, the reversibility, mode of inhibition kinetics, and tyramine oxidation of GST were examined. GST was a time-independent reversible and competitive hMAO-A and hMAO-B inhibitor with a lower Ki of hMAO-B (1.45 μM) than hMAO-A (4.31 μM). GST also inhibited hMAO-B tyramine oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production more than hMAO-A. Docking studies conducted indicated that the GST reversibility and hMAO-B selectivity of inhibition may relate to C5-OH effects on its orientation and its interactions with the threonine 201 residue of the active site. It was concluded from this study that the natural product GST has competitive and reversible MAOs inhibitions and may be recommended for further investigations as a useful therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27118978

  20. Impact of trolox, quercetin, genistein and gallic acid on the oxidative damage to myofibrillar proteins: the carbonylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Utrera, Mariana; Estévez, Mario

    2013-12-15

    The carbonylation pathway involves the oxidative deamination of lysine residues to yield a carbonyl compound (α-aminoadipic semialdehyde) that can be further oxidised to α-aminoadipic acid and form Schiff bases structures. The effect of trolox and other phenolic compounds (PhC) (namely genistein, quercetin and gallic acid) on the protein carbonylation pathway occurred during the oxidation of myofibrillar proteins (MP) catalysed by a Fe(3+)/H2O2 system was studied. Trolox and PhC can exert either antioxidant or pro-oxidant capacities depending on their concentration, the oxidation conditions and the target in proteins. In general, quercetin and genistein showed an antioxidant activity towards lipid oxidation and the carbonylation pathway at different concentrations under the analysed conditions. Plausible mechanisms for the antioxidant and pro-oxidant effects of trolox and PhC on MP are discussed. Further research is needed to shed light on the effect of PhC mixtures on both lipid and protein oxidation. PMID:23993577

  1. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-01-01

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody. PMID:26184156

  2. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-01-01

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody. PMID:26184156

  3. Individual and combined developmental toxicity assessment of bisphenol A and genistein using the embryonic stem cell test in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kong, Dan; Xing, Lina; Liu, Ran; Jiang, Jianjun; Wang, Wanyi; Shang, Lanqin; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2013-10-01

    The potential developmental toxicity of environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptors have become a great concern in recent years. In this study, two typical environmental oestrogen, namely, bisphenol A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) were investigated for potential embryotoxicity using the embryonic stem cell test model. Afterwards, a 4×4 full factorial design and the estimated marginal means plot were performed to assess the combined effects of these two compounds. According to the linear discriminant functions and classification criteria, bisphenol A and genistein were classified as weakly embryotoxic and strongly embryotoxic respectively. As for combined effects, the overall interaction between BPA and GEN on embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiation was synergistic at low dosages, however, on ESCs and 3T3 cell proliferation, the predominate action was additive. Considering the actual daily intake of these chemicals, it is concluded that BPA alone might not have adverse reproductive or developmental effects on human being. However, given that BPA and GEN do have synergistic effect at low concentration, they may disturb normal embryo development together, which could result in birth defect and behavioral alterations later in life.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Flavonoids: Genistein, Kaempferol, Quercetin, and Daidzein Inhibit STAT-1 and NF-κB Activations, Whereas Flavone, Isorhamnetin, Naringenin, and Pelargonidin Inhibit only NF-κB Activation along with Their Inhibitory Effect on iNOS Expression and NO Production in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hämäläinen, Mari; Nieminen, Riina; Vuorela, Pia; Heinonen, Marina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2007-01-01

    In inflammation, bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines induce the formation of large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and compounds that inhibit NO production have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we systematically investigated the effects of 36 naturally occurring flavonoids and related compounds on NO production in macrophages exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and evaluated the mechanisms of action of the effective compounds. Flavone, the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, the flavonols isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin, the flavanone naringenin, and the anthocyanin pelargonidin inhibited iNOS protein and mRNA expression and also NO production in a dose-dependent manner. All eight active compounds inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which is a significant transcription factor for iNOS. Genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein also inhibited the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1), another important transcription factor for iNOS. The present study characterises the effects and mechanisms of naturally occurring phenolic compounds on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages. The results partially explain the pharmacological efficacy of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory compounds. PMID:18274639

  5. Effects of endogenous signals and Fusarium oxysporum on the mechanism regulating genistein synthesis and accumulation in yellow lupine and their impact on plant cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Formela, Magda; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Marczak, Łukasz; Nowak, Witold; Narożna, Dorota; Bednarski, Waldemar; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Morkunas, Iwona

    2014-08-29

    The aim of the study was to examine cross-talk interactions of soluble sugars (sucrose, glucose and fructose) and infection caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lupini on the synthesis of genistein in embryo axes of Lupinus luteus L.cv. Juno. Genistein is a free aglycone, highly reactive and with the potential to inhibit fungal infection and development of plant diseases. As signal molecules, sugars strongly stimulated accumulation of isoflavones, including genistein, and the expression of the isoflavonoid biosynthetic genes. Infection significantly enhanced the synthesis of genistein and other isoflavone aglycones in cells of embryo axes of yellow lupine with high endogenous sugar levels. The activity of β-glucosidase, the enzyme that releases free aglycones from their glucoside bindings, was higher in the infected tissues than in the control ones. At the same time, a very strong generation of the superoxide anion radical was observed in tissues with high sugar contents already in the initial stage of infection. During later stages after inoculation, a strong generation of semiquinone radicals was observed, which level was relatively higher in tissues deficient in sugars than in those with high sugar levels. Observations of actin and tubulin cytoskeletons in cells of infected embryo axes cultured on the medium with sucrose, as well as the medium without sugar, showed significant differences in their organization.

  6. NORMAL MAMMARY GLAND MORPHOLOGY IN PUBERTAL FEMALE MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO GENISTEIN AT LEVELS COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of in utero and lactational exposure to genistein (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) on mammary gland morphology in female B6D2F1 mice at levels comparable to or greater than human exposures. The effect of diethylstilbest...

  7. Effects of resveratrol and genistein on nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-JU; BAO, HAI-RONG; ZENG, XIAO-LI; WEI, JUN-MING

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation and airway remodeling are the major pathophysiological characteristics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Resveratrol and genistein have been previously demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The present study aimed to measure the inhibitory effects of resveratrol and genistein on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 concentration in patients with COPD. Lymphocytes were isolated from the blood of 34 patients with COPD and 30 healthy subjects, then randomly divided into the following four treatment groups: Control, dexamethasone (0.5 µmol/l), resveratrol (12.5 µmol/l) and genistein (25 µmol/l) groups. After 1 h of treatment, 100 µl lymphocytes were collected for nuclear factor (NF)-κB immunocytochemical staining. After 48 h treatment, the supernatant of the lymphocytes was collected for analysis of TNF-α and MMP-9 concentration levels. The percentage of lymphocytes with positive nuclear NF-κB expression was analyzed by immunocytochemical staining. The concentration levels of TNF-α and MMP-9 were measured using radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the percentage of NF-κB-positive cells, and the levels of TNF-α and MMP-9 in lymphocytes from patients with COPD patients were significantly higher compared with healthy subjects. Additionally, there were positive correlations between the percentage of NF-κB-positive cells, and the concentration levels of TNF-α and MMP-9 in patients with COPD. All three factors were significantly reduced in lymphocytes treated with resveratrol and genistein, and the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on NF-κB, TNF-α and MMP-9 were more potent than the effects of genistein. In conclusion, resveratrol and genistein may inhibit the NF-κB, TNF-α and MMP-9-associated pathways in patients with COPD. It is suggested that resveratrol and genistein may be potential

  8. Genistein-loaded nanoparticles of star-shaped diblock copolymer mannitol-core PLGA-TPGS for the treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binquan; Liang, Yong; Tan, Yi; Xie, Chunmei; Shen, Jin; Zhang, Mei; Liu, Xinkuang; Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Fujian; Liu, Liang; Cai, Shuyu; Huai, De; Zheng, Donghui; Zhang, Rongbo; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Ke; Tang, Xiaolong; Sui, Xuemei

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop nanoparticles (NPs) of star-shaped copolymer mannitol-functionalized PLGA-TPGS for Genistein delivery for liver cancer treatment, and evaluate their therapeutic effects in liver cancer cell line and hepatoma-tumor-bearing nude mice in comparison with the linear PLGA nanoparticles and PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. The Genistein-loaded M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles (MPTN), prepared by a modified nanoprecipitation method, were observed by FESEM and TEM to be near-spherical shape with narrow size distribution. The nanoparticles were further characterized in terms of their size, size distribution, surface charge, drug-loading content, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release profiles. The data showed that the M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles were found to be stable, showing almost no change in particle size and surface charge during 3-month storage of their aqueous solution. In vitro Genistein release from the nanoparticles exhibited biphasic pattern with burst release at the initial 4days and sustained release afterwards. The cellular uptake efficiency of fluorescent M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles was 1.25-, 1.22-, and 1.29-fold higher than that of the PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles at the nanoparticle concentrations of 100, 250, and 500μg/mL, respectively. In the MPTN group, the ratio of apoptotic cells increased with the drug dose increased, which exhibited dose-dependent effect and a significant difference compared with Genistein solution group (p<0.05). The data also showed that the Genistein-loaded M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles have higher antitumor efficacy than that of linear PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles and PLGA nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the star-shaped copolymer M-PLGA-TPGS could be used as a potential and promising bioactive material for nanomedicine development for liver cancer treatment.

  9. A robust analytical method for measurement of phytoestrogens and related metabolites in serum with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongmei; Liao, Xiangjun; Wood, Carla M; Xiao, Chao-Wu; Feng, Yong-Lai

    2016-02-15

    A sensitive and robust method using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was developed for quantitation of 13 phytoestrogens and related metabolites in rat serum samples. A new type of column, the Kinetex core-shell C18 column, was applied for rapid separation of the target analytes in 10min. Two enzymes, sulfatase H-1 and gulcuronidase H-5 from Helix pomatia were compared on the efficiency of releasing the conjugated forms of the target analytes to their free forms in serum samples. The method detection limit (MDL) defined as three times the signal to noise ratio in spiked serum matrix-based solutions was in the range of 0.1-3.5ng/mL. The linear dynamic calibration was in the broad range of 0.2-500ng/mL for all target compounds. Thirty-two rat serum samples from the rats that were fed with diets containing either casein or soy protein isolates with various amounts of isoflavones for 8 weeks were analyzed for the target analytes with the developed method. Nine target analytes were detected in the serum samples. Those detectable compounds are all the metabolites of the dietary isoflavones, suggesting that the diet isoflavones were mostly metabolized to their metabolites in rat.

  10. Combinatorial effects of genistein and sex-steroids on the level of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP in the cervix of ovariectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Naguib; Ismail, Nurain; Muniandy, Sekaran; Korla, Praveen Kumar; Giribabu, Nelli

    2015-12-01

    The combinatorial effects of genistein and estrogen (E) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) on CFTR, AC and cAMP levels in cervix were investigated. Ovariectomised adult female rats received 50 or 100mg/kg/day genistein with E or E followed by E+P [E+(E+P)] for seven consecutive days. Cervixes were harvested and analyzed for CFTR mRNA levels by Real-time PCR. Distribution of AC and CFTR proteins in endocervix were observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP were measured by enzyme-immunoassay. Molecular docking predicted interaction between genistein and AC. Our results indicate that levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of rats receiving genistein plus E were higher than E-only treatment (p<0.05) while genistein plus [E+(E+P)] were higher than E+(E+P)-only treatment (p<0.05). In conclusions, increased levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of E and E+(E+P)-treated rats by genistein could affect the cervical secretory function which could influence the female reproductive processes.

  11. Systemic administration of diarylpropionitrile (DPN) or phytoestrogens does not affect anxiety-related behaviors in gonadally intact male rats

    PubMed Central

    Patisaul, Heather B.; Burke, Katherine T.; Hinkle, Ruth E.; Adewale, Heather L.; Shea, Damian

    2009-01-01

    The development of highly selective agonists for the two major subforms of the estrogen receptor (ERa and ERϐ) has produced new experimental methodologies for delineating the distinct functional role each plays in neurobehavioral biology. It has also been suggested that these compounds might have the potential to treat estrogen influenced behavioral disorders, such as anxiety and depression. Prior work has established that the ERϐ agonist, diarylpropionitrile (DPN) is anxiolytic in gonadectomized animals of both sexes, but whether or not this effect persists in gonadally intact individuals is unknown. Isoflavone phytoestrogens, also potent but less selective ERϐ agonists, have also been shown to influence anxiety in multiple species and are becoming more readily available to humans as health supplements. Here we determined the effects of 0.5, 1 or 2 mg/kg DPN, 1 mg/kg of the ERa agonist propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), 3 or 20 mg/kg of the isoflavone equol (EQ) and 3 or 20 mg/kg of the isoflavone polyphenol resveratrol (RES) on anxiety behavior in the gonadally intact male rat using the light/dark box and the elevated plus maze. We first determined that DPN can be successfully administered either orally or by subcutaneous injection, although plasma DPN levels are significantly lower if given orally. Once injected, plasma levels peak rapidly and then decline to baseline levels within 3 hours of administration. For the behavioral studies, all compounds were injected and the animals were tested within 3 hours of treatment. None of the compounds, at any of the doses, significantly altered anxiety-related behavior. Plasma testosterone levels were also not significantly altered suggesting that these compounds do not interfere with endogenous androgen levels. The results suggest that the efficacy of ERϐ agonists may depend on gonadal status. Therefore the therapeutic potential of ERϐ selective agonists to treat mood disorders may be limited. PMID:19071129

  12. Antioxidant effect of a phytoestrogen equol on cultured muscle cells of embryonic broilers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Jing; Ni, Ying-Dong; Lu, Li-Zhi; Zhao, Ru-Qian

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the in ovo injection of equol can markedly improve the water-holding capacity of muscles of broilers chickens at 7 wk of age through promotion of the antioxidant status. We aimed to investigate directly the antioxidant effects of equol on muscle cells in broilers. Muscle cells were separated from leg muscle of embryos on the 11th day of incubation and treated with equol and H(2)O(2), either alone or together. Cells were pretreated with medium containing 1, 10, or 100 μM equol for 1 h prior to the addition of 1 mM H(2)O(2) for a further 1 h. Photomicrographs of cells were obtained. Cell viability, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the cell supernatant, as well as intracellular total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined. Treatment with 1 mM H(2)O(2) caused serious damage to cells, indicated by comets with no clear head region but a very apparent tail of DNA fragments. Pretreatment with low (1 μM) but not high concentrations of equol (10 μM) inhibited cell damage, while 100 μM equol caused more serious damage than H(2)O(2) alone. Pretreatment with 1 μM equol had no effect on cell viability, while pretreatment with 10 and 100 μM equol significantly decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with H(2)O(2) alone, pretreatment with low-dosage equol markedly decreased LDH activity and MDA production in the supernatant, significantly increased intracellular T-SOD activity (P < 0.05) and tended to increase intracellular GSH-Px activity (0.05 < P < 0.1). Pretreatment with high-dosage equol (10 and 100 μM) significantly enhanced LDH activity, but had no effect on MDA content, T-SOD or GSH-Px activity induced by H(2)O(2,) except for an obvious increase in GSH-Px activity caused by 10 μM equol. These results indicate that equol at low dosage can prevent skeletal muscle cell damage induced by H(2)O(2

  13. Biological Effects of the Herbal Plant-Derived Phytoestrogen Bavachin in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyeong-Je; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Kim, Do Kyung; Sohn, Hong-Moon; You, Jae-Won; Oh, Ji-Su; Seo, Yo-Seob; Yu, Sang-Joun; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the anabolic and anticatabolic functions of bavachin in primary rat chondrocytes. With bavachin treatment, chondrocytes survived for 21 d without cell proliferation, and the proteoglycan content and extracellular matrix increased. Short-term monolayer culture of chondrocytes showed that gene induction of both aggrecan and collagen type II, major extracellular matrix components, was significantly upregulated by bavachin. The expression and activities of cartilage-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs were inhibited significantly by bavachin, while tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease were significantly upregulated. Bavachin inhibits the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a representative catabolic factor, and downregulated the expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase-2, and prostaglandin E2 in a dose-dependent manner in chondrocytes. Our results suggest that the bavachin has anabolic and potent anticatabolic biological effects on chondrocytes, which may have considerable promise in treating articular cartilage degeneration in the future. PMID:26235583

  14. Glyceollins and dehydroglyceollins isolated from soybean act as SERMs and ER subtype-selective phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    van de Schans, Milou G M; Vincken, Jean-Paul; de Waard, Pieter; Hamers, Astrid R M; Bovee, Toine F H; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Seven prenylated 6a-hydroxy-pterocapans and five prenylated 6a,11a-pterocarpenes with different kinds of prenylation were purified from an ethanolic extract of fungus-treated soybean sprouts. The activity of these compounds toward both human estrogen receptors (hERα and hERβ) was determined in a yeast bioassay and the activity toward hERα was additionally tested in an U2-OS based hERα CALUX bioassay. In the yeast bioassay, compounds with chain prenylation showed in general an agonistic mode of action toward hERα, whereas furan and pyran prenylation led to an antagonistic mode of action. Five of these antagonistic compounds had an agonistic mode of action in the U2-OS based hERα CALUX bioassay, implying that these compounds can act as SERMs. The yeast bioassay also identified 8 ER subtype-selective compounds, with either an antagonistic mode of action or no response toward hERα and an agonistic mode of action toward hERβ. The ER subtype-selective compounds were characterized by 6a-hydroxy-pterocarpan or 6a,11a-pterocarpene backbone structure. It is suggested that either the extra D-ring or the increase in length to 12-13.5Å of these compounds is responsible for an agonistic mode of action toward hERβ and, thereby, inducing ER subtype-selective behavior.

  15. Phase IIa, randomized placebo-controlled trial of single high dose cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and daily Genistein (G-2535) versus double placebo in men with early stage prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jarrard, David; Konety, Badrinath; Huang, Wei; Downs, Tracy; Kolesar, Jill; Kim, Kyung Mann; Havighurst, Tom; Slaton, Joel; House, Margaret G; Parnes, Howard L; Bailey, Howard H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: Prostate cancer (PCa) represents an important target for chemoprevention given its prolonged natural history and high prevalence. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggest that vitamin D and genistein (soy isoflavone) may decrease PCa progression. The effect of vitamin D on prostate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation is well documented and genistein may augment this affect through inhibition of the CYP24 enzyme, which is responsible for intracellular vitamin D metabolism. In addition, both genistein and vitamin D inhibit the intraprostatic synthesis of prostaglandin E2, an important mediator of inflammation. The objectives of this prospective multicenter trial were to compare prostate tissue calcitriol levels and down-stream related biomarkers in men with localized prostate cancer randomized to receive cholecalciferol and genistein versus placebo cholecalciferol and placebo genistein during the pre-prostatectomy period. Methods: Men undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: (1) cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) 200,000 IU as one dose at study entry plus genistein (G-2535), 600 mg daily or (2) placebo cholecalciferol day 1 and placebo genistein PO daily for 21-28 days prior to radical prostatectomy. Serum and tissue analyses were performed and side-effects recorded. Results: A total of 15 patients were enrolled, 8 in the placebo arm and 7 in the vitamin D3 + genistein (VD + G) arm. All patients were compliant and completed the study. No significant differences in side effect profiles were noted. Utilization of the VD + G trended toward increased calcitriol serum concentrations when compared to placebo (0.104 ± 0.2 vs. 0.0013 ± 0.08; p=0.08); however, prostate tissue levels did not increase. Calcidiol levels did not change (p=0.5). Immunohistochemistry for marker analyses using VECTRA automated quantitation revealed a increase in AR expression (p=0.04) and a trend toward increased

  16. Genistein supplementation increases bone turnover but does not prevent alcohol-induced bone loss in male mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These effects can be reversed by estradiol (E2) supplementation. Soy diets are suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy prote...

  17. Molecular analysis of the genus Asparagus based on matK sequences and its application to identify A. racemosus, a medicinally phytoestrogenic species.

    PubMed

    Boonsom, Teerawat; Waranuch, Neti; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Sukrong, Suchada

    2012-07-01

    The plant Asparagus racemosus is one of the most widely used sources of phytoestrogens because of its high content of the steroidal saponins, shatavarins I-IV, in roots. The dry root of A. racemosus, known as "Rak-Sam-Sip" in Thai, is one of the most popular herbal medicines, used as an anti-inflammatory, an aphrodisiac and a galactagogue. Recently, the interest in plant-derived estrogens has increased tremendously, making A. racemosus particularly important and a possible target for fraudulent labeling. However, the identification of A. racemosus is generally difficult due to its similar morphology to other Asparagus spp. Thus, accurate authentication of A. racemosus is essential. In this study, 1557-bp nucleotide sequences of the maturase K (matK) gene of eight Asparagus taxa were analyzed. A phylogenetic relationship based on the matK gene was also constructed. Ten polymorphic sites of nucleotide substitutions were found within the matK sequences. A. racemosus showed different nucleotide substitutions to the other species. A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the matK gene was developed to discriminate A. racemosus from others. Only the 650-bp PCR product from A. racemosus could be digested with BssKI into two fragments of 397 and 253-bp while the products of other species remained undigested. Ten commercially crude drugs were analyzed and revealed that eight samples were derived from A. racemosus while two samples of that were not. Thus, the PCR-RFLP analysis of matK gene was shown to be an effective method for authentication of the medicinally phytoestrogenic species, A. racemosus.

  18. Urolithins, ellagic acid-derived metabolites produced by human colonic microflora, exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2006-03-01

    Urolithins A and B (hydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one derivatives) are colonic microflora metabolites recently proposed as biomarkers of human exposure to dietary ellagic acid derivatives. Molecular models suggest that urolithins could display estrogenic and/or antiestrogenic activity. To this purpose, both urolithins and other known phytoestrogens (genistein, daidzein, resveratrol, and enterolactone) were assayed to evaluate the capacity to induce cell proliferation on the estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells as well as the ability to bind to alpha- and beta-estrogen receptors. Both urolithins A and B showed estrogenic activity in a dose-dependent manner even at high concentrations (40 microM), without antiproliferative or toxic effects, whereas the other phytoestrogens inhibited cell proliferation at high concentrations. Overall, urolithins showed weaker estrogenic activity than the other phytoestrogens. However, both urolithins displayed slightly higher antiestrogenic activity (antagonized the growth promotion effect of 17-beta-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner) than the other phytoestrogens. The IC(50) values for the ERalpha and ERbeta binding assays were 0.4 and 0.75 microM for urolithin A; 20 and 11 microM for urolithin B; 3 and 0.02 for genistein; and 2.3 and 1 for daidzein, respectively; no binding was detected for resveratrol and enterolactone. Urolithins A and B entered into MCF-7 cells and were metabolized to yield mainly urolithin-sulfate derivatives. These results, together with previous studies regarding absorption and metabolism of dietary ellagitannins and ellagic acid in humans, suggest that the gut microflora metabolites urolithins are potential endocrine-disrupting molecules, which could resemble other described "enterophytoestrogens" (microflora-derived metabolites with estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity). Further research is warranted to evaluate the possible role of ellagitannins and ellagic acid as dietary "pro-phytoestrogens".

  19. Methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibits ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirke, Sarika S; Jadhav, Sanket R; Jagtap, Aarti G

    2008-11-01

    Several animal and clinical studies have shown that phytoestrogens, plant-derived estrogenic compounds, can be useful in treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing plants are currently under active investigation for their role in estrogen-related disorders. The present study deals with anti-osteoporotic evaluation of phytoestrogen-rich plant Cuminum cyminum, commonly known as cumin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) and randomly assigned to 3 groups (10 rats/group). Additional 10 animals were sham operated. OVX and sham control groups were orally administered with vehicle while the other two OVX groups were administered 0.15 mg/kg estradiol and 1 g/kg of methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum fruits (MCC) in two divided doses for 10 weeks. At the end of the study blood, bones and uteri of the animals were collected. Serum was evaluated for calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and tartarate resistant acid phosphatase. Bone density, ash density, mineral content and mechanical strength of bones were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of bones (tibia) was performed. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukeys multiple comparison test. MCC (1 g/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced urinary calcium excretion and significantly increased calcium content and mechanical strength of bones in comparison to OVX control. It showed greater bone and ash densities and improved microarchitecture of bones in SEM analysis. Unlike estradiol it did not affect body weight gain and weight of atrophic uterus in OVX animals. MCC prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats with no anabolic effect on atrophic uterus. The osteoprotective effect was comparable with estradiol.

  20. Soy but not bisphenol A (BPA) or the phytoestrogen genistin alters developmental weight gain and food intake in pregnant rats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Echelberger, Roger; Liu, Min; Sluzas, Emily; McCaffrey, Katherine; Buckley, Brian; Patisaul, Heather B

    2015-12-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are hypothesized to promote obesity and early puberty but their interactive effects with hormonally active diets are poorly understood. Here we assessed individual and combinatorial effects of soy diet or the isoflavone genistein (GEN; administered as the aglycone genistin GIN) with bisphenol A (BPA) on body weight, ingestive behavior and female puberal onset in Wistar rats. Soy-fed dams gained less weight during pregnancy and, although they consumed more than dams on a soy-free diet during lactation, did not become heavier. Their offspring (both sexes), however, became significantly heavier (more pronounced in males) pre-weaning. Soy also enhanced food intake and accelerated female pubertal onset in the offspring. Notably, pubertal onset was also advanced in females placed on soy diet at weaning. Males exposed to BPA plus soy diet, but not BPA alone, had lighter testes. BPA had no independent effects.