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Sample records for phytoestrogen genistein induce

  1. Potential Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein in Modulating Acute Methotrexate Chemotherapy-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    King, Tristan J.; Shandala, Tetyana; Lee, Alice M.; Foster, Bruce K.; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced bone damage is a frequent side effect which causes diminished bone mineral density and fracture in childhood cancer sufferers and survivors. The intensified use of anti-metabolite methotrexate (MTX) and other cytotoxic drugs has led to the need for a mechanistic understanding of chemotherapy-induced bone loss and for the development of protective treatments. Using a young rat MTX-induced bone loss model, we investigated potential bone protective effects of phytoestrogen genistein. Oral gavages of genistein (20 mg/kg) were administered daily, for seven days before, five days during, and three days after five once-daily injections (sc) of MTX (0.75 mg/kg). MTX treatment reduced body weight gain and tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone volume (p < 0.001), increased osteoclast density on the trabecular bone surface (p < 0.05), and increased the bone marrow adipocyte number in lower metaphyseal bone (p < 0.001). Genistein supplementation preserved body weight gain (p < 0.05) and inhibited ex vivo osteoclast formation of bone marrow cells from MTX-treated rats (p < 0.001). However, MTX-induced changes in bone volume, trabecular architecture, metaphyseal mRNA expression of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines, and marrow adiposity were not significantly affected by the co-administration of genistein. This study suggests that genistein may suppress MTX-induced osteoclastogenesis; however, further studies are required to examine its potential in protecting against MTX chemotherapy-induced bone damage. PMID:26258775

  2. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling.

  3. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  4. Improvement of the circulatory function partially accounts for the neuroprotective action of the phytoestrogen genistein in experimental ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cortina, Belén; Torregrosa, Germán; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Burguete, María C; Moscardó, Antonio; Latorre, Ana; Salom, Juan B; Vallés, Juana; Santos, María T; Alborch, Enrique

    2013-05-15

    We tested the hypothesis that the phytoestrogen genistein protects the brain against ischemic stroke by improving the circulatory function in terms of reduced production of thromboxane A2 and leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and of preserved vascular reactivity. Ischemia-reperfusion (90 min-3 days, intraluminal filament) was induced in male Wistar rats, and functional score and cerebral infarct volume were the end points examined. Genistein (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle (β-cyclodextrin) was administered at 30 min after ischemia or sham-operation. Production of thromboxane A2 and leukocyte-platelet aggregates, as well as reactivity of carotid artery to U-46619 (thromboxane A2 analogue) and to platelet releasate was measured. At 3 days post-ischemia, both improvement in the functional examination and reduction in the total infarct volume were shown in the ischemic genistein-treated group. Genistein significantly reverted both the increased thromboxane A2 concentration and the increased leukocyte-platelet aggregates production found in samples from the ischemic vehicle-treated group. Both U-46619 and platelet releasate elicited contractions of the carotid artery, which were significantly lower in the ischemic vehicle-treated group. Genistein significantly restored both the decreased U-46619- and the decreased platelet releasate-elicited contractile responses. In conclusion, genistein protects the brain against an ischemia-reperfusion challenge, at least in part, by its beneficial effects on the circulatory function.

  5. Genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, upregulates the expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase and lowers blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Si, Hongwei; Liu, Dongmin

    2008-02-01

    Genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, may improve vascular function, but the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of vascular tone and atherogenesis. Previous studies have established that estrogen can act directly on vascular endothelial cells (EC) to enhance NO synthesis through genomic stimulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression. However, it is unknown whether genistein has a similar effect. We therefore investigated whether genistein directly regulates NO synthesis in primary human aortic EC (HAEC) and human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC). Genistein, at physiologically achievable concentrations in individuals consuming soy products, enhanced the expression of eNOS and subsequently elevated NO synthesis in both HAEC and HUVEC, with 1-10 micromol/L genistein inducing the maximal effects. However, the effects of genistein on eNOS and NO were not mediated by activation of estrogen signaling or inhibition of tyrosine kinases, 2 known biological actions of genistein. Genistein (1-10 micromol/L) increased eNOS gene expression (1.8- to 2.6-fold of control) and significantly increased eNOS promoter activity of the human eNOS gene in HAEC and HUVEC, suggesting that genistein activates eNOS transcription. Dietary supplementation of genistein to spontaneously hypertensive rats restored aortic eNOS levels, improved aortic wall thickness, and alleviated hypertension, confirming the biological relevance of the in vitro findings. Our data suggest that genistein has direct genomic effects on the vascular wall that are unrelated to its known actions, leading to increased eNOS expression and NO synthesis, thereby improving hypertension.

  6. Are the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein anti-herbivore defenses? A test using the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar).

    PubMed

    Karowe, David Nathan; Radi, Joshua Karl

    2011-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are compounds that have moderate estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activity toward mammals. Although genistein and daidzein, the main phytoestrogens of soybean, have been the subject of thousands of studies that address their benefit to human health, relatively little is known about their benefits to plants that produce them. It has been suggested that genistein and daidzein protect plants against arthropod herbivores, but direct tests of this hypothesis are rare. In this study, we evaluated the effect of genistein and daidzein on the survivorship, growth, and fecundity of the gypsy moth, a generalist insect herbivore that does not encounter phytoestrogens in its normal diet. We compared survivorship, egg-to-pupa growth rate, and 4th instar performance of gypsy moth caterpillars on artificial diets containing no phytoestrogen, genistein, daidzein, or a combination of genistein and daidzein. Our results indicate that genistein and daidzein do not decrease survivorship, growth, or fecundity of this insect herbivore. Therefore, it seems unlikely that the primary function of these compounds in aboveground plant tissues is anti-herbivore defense.

  7. Phytoestrogens β -sitosterol and genistein have limited effects on reproductive endpoints in a female fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Stevenson, L M; Leonard, H M; Nieves-Puigdoller, K; Clotfelter, E D

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish.

  8. Phytoestrogens β-Sitosterol and Genistein Have Limited Effects on Reproductive Endpoints in a Female Fish, Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. C.; Stevenson, L. M.; Leonard, H. M.; Nieves-Puigdoller, K.; Clotfelter, E. D.

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish. PMID:24707495

  9. The Phytoestrogen Genistein Affects Breast Cancer Cells Treatment Depending on the ERα/ERβ Ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soybeans. GEN exerts its functions through its interaction with the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and we previously reported that the ERα/ERβ ratio is an important factor to consider in GEN-treated breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GEN in breast cancer cells with different ERα/ERβ ratio: MCF-7 (high ratio), T47D (low ratio), and MCF-7 overexpressing ERβ (MCF7 + ERβ) treated with cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) or tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, ROS production, autophagy, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes protein levels, and cell cycle were analyzed. GEN treatment provoked an increase in cell viability in MCF-7 cells and in the antioxidant enzymes protein levels in combination with the cytotoxic agents, decreasing ROS production (CDDP + GEN and TAM+GEN) and autophagy (TAM + GEN) or apoptosis (CDDP + GEN and TAM + GEN). Moreover GEN treatment enhanced the cell cycle S phase entry in CDDP+GEN- and TAM + GEN-treated MCF-7 cells and, in the case of CDDP + GEN, increased the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase and decreased it in the subG0 /G1 phase. Otherwise, in the T47D and MCF7 + ERβ cells the combination of GEN with cytotoxic treatments did not cause significant changes in these parameters, even TAM + GEN-treated T47D cells showed less cell viability due to an increment in the autophagy. In conclusion, GEN consumption may be counterproductive in those patients receiving anticancer treatment with a high ERα/ERβ ratio diagnosed breast cancer and it could be harmless or even beneficial in those patients with a lower ERα/ERβ ratio breast cancer cells.

  10. Phytoestrogens induce differential estrogen receptor alpha- or Beta-mediated responses in transfected breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, D M; Besselink, E; Henning, S M; Go, V L W; Heber, D

    2005-09-01

    Increased intake of phytoestrogens may be associated with a lower risk of cancer in the breast and several other sites, although there is controversy surrounding this activity. One of the mechanisms proposed to explain the activity of phytoestrogens is their ability to bind and activate human estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and human estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Nine phytoestrogens were tested for their ability to transactivate ERalpha or ERbeta at a range of doses. Mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells were co-transfected with either ERalpha or ERbeta, and an estrogen-response element was linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Dose-dependent responses were compared with the endogenous ligand 17beta-estradiol. Purified genistein, daidzein, apigenin, and coumestrol showed differential and robust transactivation of ERalpha- and ERbeta-induced transcription, with an up to 100-fold stronger activation of ERbeta. Equol, naringenin, and kaempferol were weaker agonists. When activity was evaluated against a background of 0.5 nM 17beta-estradiol, the addition of genistein, daidzein, and resveratrol superstimulated the system, while kaempferol and quercetin were antagonists at the highest doses. This transfection assay provides an excellent model to evaluate the activation of ERalpha and ERbeta by different phytoestrogens in a breast cancer context and can be used as a screening bioassay tool to evaluate the estrogenic activity of extracts of herbs and foods.

  11. Soya phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease apolipoprotein B secretion from HepG2 cells through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; de Dreu, Linda E; Wilcox, Lisa J; Edwards, Jane Y; Huff, Murray W

    2002-09-01

    Diets containing the soya-derived phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease plasma cholesterol in humans and experimental animals. The mechanisms responsible for the hypocholesterolaemic effects of these isoflavones are unknown. The present study was conducted to determine if genistein and daidzein regulate hepatocyte cholesterol metabolism and apolipoprotein (apo) B secretion in cultured human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. ApoB secretion was decreased dose-dependently by up to 63% and 71% by genistein and daidzein (100 microM; P<0.0001) respectively. In contrast, no effect on apoAI secretion was observed. Cellular cholesterol synthesis was inhibited 41% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.005) and 18% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.05), which was associated with significant increases in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA. Cellular cholesterol esterification was decreased 56% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.04) and 29% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.04); however, mRNA levels for acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) 1 and ACAT2 were unaffected. At 100 microM, both isoflavones equally inhibited the activities of both forms of ACAT in cells transfected with either ACAT1 or ACAT2. Genistein (100 microM) and daidzein (100 microM) significantly decreased the activity of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) by 30% and 24% respectively, and significantly decreased MTP mRNA levels by 35% and 55%. Both isoflavones increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor mRNA levels by 3- to 6-fold (100 microM; P<0.03) and significantly increased the binding, uptake and degradation of (125)I-labelled LDL, suggesting that enhanced reuptake of newly secreted apoB-containing lipoproteins contributed to the net decrease in apoB secretion. These results indicate that genistein and daidzein inhibit hepatocyte apoB secretion through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and esterification, inhibition of MTP activity and expression and

  12. Soya phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease apolipoprotein B secretion from HepG2 cells through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Nica M; de Dreu, Linda E; Wilcox, Lisa J; Edwards, Jane Y; Huff, Murray W

    2002-01-01

    Diets containing the soya-derived phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease plasma cholesterol in humans and experimental animals. The mechanisms responsible for the hypocholesterolaemic effects of these isoflavones are unknown. The present study was conducted to determine if genistein and daidzein regulate hepatocyte cholesterol metabolism and apolipoprotein (apo) B secretion in cultured human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. ApoB secretion was decreased dose-dependently by up to 63% and 71% by genistein and daidzein (100 microM; P<0.0001) respectively. In contrast, no effect on apoAI secretion was observed. Cellular cholesterol synthesis was inhibited 41% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.005) and 18% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.05), which was associated with significant increases in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA. Cellular cholesterol esterification was decreased 56% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.04) and 29% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.04); however, mRNA levels for acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) 1 and ACAT2 were unaffected. At 100 microM, both isoflavones equally inhibited the activities of both forms of ACAT in cells transfected with either ACAT1 or ACAT2. Genistein (100 microM) and daidzein (100 microM) significantly decreased the activity of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) by 30% and 24% respectively, and significantly decreased MTP mRNA levels by 35% and 55%. Both isoflavones increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor mRNA levels by 3- to 6-fold (100 microM; P<0.03) and significantly increased the binding, uptake and degradation of (125)I-labelled LDL, suggesting that enhanced reuptake of newly secreted apoB-containing lipoproteins contributed to the net decrease in apoB secretion. These results indicate that genistein and daidzein inhibit hepatocyte apoB secretion through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and esterification, inhibition of MTP activity and expression and

  13. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    PubMed

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  14. Effects of the phytoestrogen genistein on the development of the reproductive system of Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Zin, Siti Rosmani Md; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Khan, Norhayati Liaqat Ali; Musameh, Nurul Iftitah; Das, Srijit; Kassim, Normadiah M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genistein is known to influence reproductive system development through its binding affinity for estrogen receptors. The present study aimed to further explore the effect of Genistein on the development of the reproductive system of experimental rats. METHODS: Eighteen post-weaning female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the following groups: (i) a control group that received vehicle (distilled water and Tween 80); (ii) a group treated with 10 mg/kg body weight (BW) of Genistein (Gen 10); and (iii) a group treated with a higher dose of Genistein (Gen 100). The rats were treated daily for three weeks from postnatal day 22 (P22) to P42. After the animals were sacrificed, blood samples were collected, and the uteri and ovaries were harvested and subjected to light microscopy and immunohistochemical study. RESULTS: A reduction of the mean weekly BW gain and organ weights (uteri and ovaries) were observed in the Gen 10 group compared to the control group; these findings were reversed in the Gen 100 group. Follicle stimulating hormone and estrogen levels were increased in the Gen 10 group and reduced in the Gen 100 group. Luteinizing hormone was reduced in both groups of Genistein-treated animals, and there was a significant difference between the Gen 10 and control groups (p<0.05). These findings were consistent with increased atretic follicular count, a decreased number of corpus luteum and down-regulation of estrogen receptors-α in the uterine tissues of the Genistein-treated animals compared to the control animals. CONCLUSION: Post-weaning exposure to Genistein could affect the development of the reproductive system of ovarian-intact experimental rats because of its action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by regulating hormones and estrogen receptors. PMID:23525324

  15. Phytoestrogens genistein and daidzin enhance the acetylcholinesterase activity of the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by binding to the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Hiroko; Talorete, Terence P N; Kimura, Momoko; Maekawa, Takaaki; Inamori, Yuhei; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Seki, Humitake

    2002-11-01

    Some compounds derived from plants have been known to possess estrogenic properties and can thus alter the physiology of higher organisms. Genistein and daidzin are examples of these phytoestrogens, which have recently been the subject of extensive research. In this study, genistein and daidzin were found to enhance the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of the rat neuronal cell line PC12 at concentrations as low as 0.08 muM by binding to the estrogen receptor (ER). Results have shown that this enhancement was effectively blocked by the known estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, indicating the involvement of the ER in AChE induction. That genistein and daidzin are estrogenic were confirmed in a cell proliferation assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF7. This proliferation was also blocked by tamoxifen, again indicating the involvement of the ER. On the other hand, incubating the PC12 cells in increasing concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol (E2) did not lead to enhanced AChE activity, even in the presence of genistein or daidzin. This suggests that mere binding of an estrogenic compound to the ER does not necessarily lead to enhanced AChE activity. Moreover, the effect of the phytoestrogens on AChE activity cannot be expressed in the presence of E2 since they either could not compete with the natural ligand in binding to the ER or that E2 down-regulates its own receptor. This study clearly suggests that genistein and daidzin enhance AChE activityin PC12 cells by binding to the ER; however, the actual mechanism of enhancement is not known.

  16. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and genistein induces apoptosis synergistically in chemo-resistant cancer cells through the modulation of AMPK and COX-2 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Ha, Joohun; Park, Ock Jin . E-mail: ojpark@hannam.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the widely used chemotherapeutic drugs targeting various cancers, but its chemo-resistance remains as a major obstacle in clinical settings. In the present study, HT-29 colon cancer cells were markedly sensitized to apoptosis by both 5-FU and genistein compared to the 5-FU treatment alone. There is an emerging evidence that genistein, soy-derived phytoestrogen, may have potential as a chemotherapeutic agent capable of inducing apoptosis or suppressing tumor promoting proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the precise mechanism of cellular cytotoxicity of genistein is not known. The present study focused on the correlation of AMPK and COX-2 in combined cytotoxicity of 5-FU and genistein, since AMPK is known as a primary cellular homeostasis regulator and a possible target molecule of cancer treatment, and COX-2 as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic molecule. Our results demonstrated that the combination of 5-FU and genistein abolished the up-regulated state of COX-2 and prostaglandin secretion caused by 5-FU treatment in HT-29 colon cancer cells. These appear to be followed by the specific activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and Bax by genistein. Under same conditions, the induction of Glut-1 by 5-FU was diminished by the combination treatment with 5-FU and genistein. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found as an upstream signal for AMPK activation by genistein. These results suggested that the combination of 5-FU and genistein exert a novel chemotherapeutic effect in colon cancers, and AMPK may be a novel regulatory molecule of COX-2 expression, further implying its involvement in cytotoxicity caused by genistein.

  17. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Genistein and Related Phytoestrogens in Estrogen Receptor Dependent & Independent Growth of Breast Cancer Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    of 900 nM (task 1). Quercetin and genistein also bind to the type-II estrogen binding sites, and exert cell growth inhibition in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468...In addition, we show that cell growth inhibition by genistein and quercetin is associated with decreased polyamine levels. Our results provide

  18. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tai L.; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100 mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2 weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20 mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. - Highlights: • Diets affected streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice. • Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes can be induced by diet.

  19. Genistein and daidzein induce cell proliferation and their metabolites cause oxidative DNA damage in relation to isoflavone-induced cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Koh, Masashi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-03-09

    The soy isoflavones, genistein (5,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone) and daidzein (7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone), are representative phytoestrogens that function as chemopreventive agents against cancers, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies indicated that genistein and/or daidzein induced cancers of reproductive organs in rodents, such as the uterus and vulva. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of carcinogenesis by soy isoflavones, we examined the ability of genistein, daidzein, and their metabolites, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (orobol), 7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-OH-IF), and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (6,7,4'-OH-IF), to cause DNA damage and cell proliferation. An E-screen assay revealed that genistein and daidzein enhanced proliferation of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer MCF-7 cells, while their metabolites had little or no effect. A surface plasmon resonance sensor showed that binding of isoflavone-liganded estrogen receptors (ER) to estrogen response elements (ERE) was largely consistent with cell proliferative activity of isoflavones. Orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF significantly increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells, while genistein, daidzein, and 6,7,4'-OH-IF did not. Experiments using isolated DNA revealed a metal-dependent mechanism of oxidative DNA damage induced by orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF. DNA damage was enhanced by the addition of endogenous reductant NADH, formed via the redox cycle. These findings suggest that oxidative DNA damage by isoflavone metabolites plays a role in tumor initiation and that cell proliferation by isoflavones via ER-ERE binding induces tumor promotion and/or progression, resulting in cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

  20. Genistein Improves 3-NPA-Induced Memory Impairment in Ovariectomized Rats: Impact of Its Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory and Acetylcholinesterase Modulatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Menze, Esther T.; Esmat, Ahmed; Tadros, Mariane G.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.; Khalifa, Amani E.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The pre-motor symptomatic stages of the disease are commonly characterized by cognitive problems including memory loss. 3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin that produces selective lesions in the brain similar to that of HD and was proven to cause memory impairment in rodents. Phytoestrogens have well-established neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects with fewer side effects in comparison to estrogens. This study investigated the potential neuroprotective and memory enhancing effect of genistein (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), a phytoestrogen, in ovariectomized rats challenged with 3-NPA (20 mg/kg). These potential effects were compared to those of 17β-estradiol (2.5 mg/kg). Systemic administration of 3-NPA for 4 consecutive days impaired locomotor activity, decreased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, decreased striatal, cortical and hippocampal ATP levels, increased oxidative stress, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions. Pretreatment with genistein and 17β-estradiol attenuated locomotor hypoactivity, increased retention latencies in the passive avoidance task, increased ATP levels, improved the oxidative stress profile, attenuated the increase in AChE activity and decreased the expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Overall, the higher genistein dose (20 mg/kg) was the most effective. In conclusion, this study suggests neuroprotective and memory enhancing effects for genistein in a rat model of HD. These effects might be attributed to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cholinesterase inhibitory activities. PMID:25675218

  1. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  2. Effect of phytoestrogens on basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion.

    PubMed

    Arispe, Sergio A; Adams, Betty; Adams, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Plant-derived estrogens (phytoestrogens, PEs), like endogenous estrogens, affect a diverse array of tissues, including the bone, uterus, mammary gland, and components of the neural and cardiovascular systems. We hypothesized that PEs act directly at pituitary loci to attenuate basal FSH secretion and increase gonadotrope sensitivity to GnRH. To examine the effect of PEs on basal secretion and total production of FSH, ovine pituitary cells were incubated with PEs for 48 h. Conditioned media and cell extract were collected and assayed for FSH. Estradiol (E₂) and some PEs significantly decreased basal secretion of FSH. The most potent PEs in this regard were coumestrol (CM), zearalenone (ZR), and genistein (GN). The specificity of PE-induced suppression of basal FSH was indicated by the absence of suppression in cells coincubated with PEs and an estrogen receptor (ER) blocker (ICI 182 780; ICI). Secretion of LH during stimulation by a GnRH agonist (GnRH-A) was used as a measure of gonadotrope responsiveness. Incubation of cells for 12 h with E₂, CM, ZR, GN, or daidzein (DZ) enhanced the magnitude and sensitivity of LH secretion during subsequent exposure to graded levels of a GnRH-A. The E₂- and PE-dependent augmentation of gonadotrope responsiveness was nearly fully blocked during coincubation with ICI. Collectively, these data demonstrate that selected PEs (CM, ZR, and GN), like E₂, decrease basal secretion of FSH, reduce total FSH production, and enhance GnRH-A-induced LH secretion in a manner that is dependent on the ER.

  3. Acute effects of three isoflavone class phytoestrogens and a mycoestrogen on cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Salom, Juan B; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Pérez-Asensio, Fernando J; Burguete, María C; Torregrosa, Germán; Alborch, Enrique

    2007-08-01

    Phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens are naturally occurring plant and fungus secondary metabolites with estrogen-like structure and/or actions. We aimed to check the hypothesis that phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens, due to their ability to elicit cerebral vasodilation, can induce acute increases in brain blood perfusion. For this purpose, we continuously recorded cerebrocortical perfusion by laser-Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized rats receiving intracarotid infusions (1 mg/kg) of one of the following estrogenic compounds: biochanin A, daidzein, genistein or zearalanone. We have shown the ability of two isoflavone class phytoestrogens (daidzein and biochanin A) and the mycoestrogen zearalanone to induce acute increases in brain blood flow when locally infused into the cerebral circulation of anesthetized rats. The isoflavone genistein failed to induce a significant increase in brain perfusion. No concomitant changes in blood pressure were recorded during the cerebral effects of the estrogenic compounds. Therefore, these microcirculatory effects were due to direct actions of the estrogenic compounds on the cerebrovascular bed.

  4. Global gene expression profiles induced by phytoestrogens in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Lenz, Sarah; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Gmuender, Hans; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2008-03-01

    The nutritional intake of phytoestrogens seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer or other neoplastic diseases. However, these epidemiological findings remain controversial because low doses of phytoestrogens, achievable through soy-rich diets, stimulate the proliferation of estrogen-sensitive tumor cells. The question of whether such phytochemicals prevent cancer or rather pose additional health hazards prompted us to examine global gene expression programs induced by a typical soy product. After extraction from soymilk, phytoestrogens were deconjugated and processed through reverse- and normal-phase cartridges. The resulting mixture was used to treat human target cells that represent a common model system for mammary tumorigenesis. Analysis of mRNA on high-density microarrays revealed that soy phytoestrogens induce a genomic fingerprint that is indistinguishable from the transcriptional effects of the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Highly congruent responses were also observed by comparing the physiologic estradiol with daidzein, coumestrol, enterolactone, or resveratrol, each representing distinct phytoestrogen structures. More diverging transcriptional profiles were generated when an inducible promoter was used to reconstitute the expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Therefore, phytoestrogens appear to mitigate estrogenic signaling in the presence of both ER subtypes but, in late-stage cancer cells lacking ERbeta, these phytochemicals contribute to a tumor-promoting transcriptional signature.

  5. Effect of genistein against copper-induced lipid peroxidation of human high density lipoproteins (HDL).

    PubMed

    Ferretti, G; Bacchetti, T; Menanno, F; Curatola, G

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the isoflavone genistein exerts a protective effect against lipid peroxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL). Aim of our study was to investigate whether genistein protects high density lipoproteins (HDL), isolated from normolipemic subjects, against Cu(++)-induced lipid peroxidation. Our results demonstrated that genistein exerts an inhibitory effect against Cu(++)-induced lipid peroxidation of HDL, as shown by the lower increase in the levels of conjugated dienes in lipoproteins oxidized after preincubation with different concentrations of genistein (0.5-2.5microM). Moreover the analysis of fluorescence emission spectra of tryptophan (Trp) and Laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethyl-aminonaphthalene) demonstrated that genistein prevents the alterations of apoprotein structure and physico-chemical properties, associated with Cu(++)-triggered lipid peroxidation of lipoproteins. The protective effect exerted by genistein against oxidative damage of lipoproteins was realized at concentrations similar to those observed in plasma of human subjects consuming a traditional soy diet or receiving a soy supplement. Therefore, we suggested that antioxidant activity exerted by genistein against lipid peroxidation of HDL in vitro could be of physiological relevance.

  6. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  7. Genistein regulates tumor microenvironment and exhibits anticancer effect in dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Vasudevan; Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2016-11-12

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality, worldwide. Cancer stem cells are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions since their abnormal growth may trigger tumor initiation, progression, and recurrence. Colon cancer in rats were induced with 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) and treated with genistein, an isoflavone rich in the soy food products, which also possesses various biological activities. Genistein treatment regulates enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants in the DMH-induced colonic tissue microenvironment. Alcian blue staining in colonic tissue reveals that mucin secretion was found to be depleted in DMH-induced group of animals. The alterations were normalized in the genistein-treated groups. Also, the mast cell population and collagen deposition were reduced as compared to induced group. Genistein treatment reduces the prognostic marker Argyrophilic nuclear organizer region (AgNOR) and proliferating cell nucleolar antigen (PCNA) in DMH-induced group of rats. DMH administration induces oxidative stress, whereas genistein activates nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and its downstream target hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Colonic stem cell marker protein CD133, CD44, and β-catenin expressions were found to be increased in DMH-induced group of animals as compared to control group of rats. Genistein treatment suppressed the expression of these stem cell markers suggesting rapid dysfunctional activation and proliferation of colonic stem cell-induced by DMH. The results of this study indicate that genistein administration in rats restored the colonic niche that was damaged by DMH and inhibits colon cancer progression. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):623-637, 2016.

  8. ALTERED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO GENISTEIN AND METHOXYCHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genistein is a prevalent phytoestrogen whose presence in human and animal foods may affect biological actions of synthetic endocrine active compounds. We have previously reported that in utero and lactational exposure to genistein and the endocrine active pesticide methoxychlor c...

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Genistein and Related Phytoestrogens in Estrogen-Receptor Dependent and Independent Growth of Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    quercetin inhibited ER-negative MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell growth with 1050 values of 8.8 and 18.1 Micronmeter, respectively. The other compounds...were less effective. The mechanism of growth inhibition by genistein and quercetin involved G2/M cell cycle arrest, changes in cyclin B1 levels and...apoptosis. Our results indicate that genistein and quercetin may be useful in the treatment of ER-negative tumors. Results of our studies on MDA-MB-468 cells have been documented and submitted for publication.

  10. Genistein Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of HT29 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Gholamreza; Saidijam, Massoud; Tavilani, Heidar; Ghasemkhani, Neda; Khodadadi, Iraj

    2016-01-01

    Soybean isoflavone genistein has multiple anticancer properties and its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects have been studied in different cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of action of genistein and its molecular targets on human colon cells have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, caspase-3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) as the main therapeutic targets were investigated in this study at both gene expression and protein levels in HT29 colon cancer cells. The caspase-3 and p38 MAPK gene expression levels were examined by real time PCR whereas flow cytometry technique was performed to determine their intracellular protein levels. The caspase-3 enzyme activity was obtained by colorimetric method while the gelatinase activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) was determined by zymography. In addition, MTT test, wound healing assay and clonogenic assay were carried out to determine the effect of genistein on HT29 cell viability, migration, and proliferation, respectively. Genistein induced apoptotic death in HT29 cells through activation of caspase-3 pathway at the transcriptional, protein, and enzymatic levels. Moreover, genistein inhibited the proliferation of HT29 cells by reducing of both p38 MAPK gene expression and its active phosphorylated protein level. Also, we showed that genistein strongly suppressed the metastatic potency of HT29 colon cancer cells via the reduction of MMP2 activity. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that genistein may exhibit its anticancer properties on HT29 colon cancer cells by modulating caspase-3 and p38 MAPK pathway at different transcriptional and protein levels. PMID:27942504

  11. Comparative study of dietary soy phytoestrogens genistein and equol effects on growth parameters and ovarian development in farmed female beluga sturgeon, Huso huso.

    PubMed

    Yousefi Jourdehi, A; Sudagar, M; Bahmani, M; Hosseini, S A; Dehghani, A A; Yazdani, M A

    2014-02-01

    Oocyte maturation in fish is a hormonally regulated process. In the light of long-term oocyte maturation in beluga, the aim of this research was to study the estrogenic effects of different concentrations of soy dietary genistein (GE) and equol (EQ) on the growth performance and ovary development in farmed female Huso huso. Fish were fed with concentrations 0 (control), 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 g of EQ and GE per kg of isoproteic (CP 45 %) and isoenergetic (19.5 MJ/kg) diets during a year. Blood samples and ovary biopsies were collected from each fish seasonally. The main results of the present experimentation are that growth performance was not affected significantly both in GE and EQ (P > 0.05). EQ at concentration 0.4 g/kg had more estrogenic effects than other concentrations of EQ and GE in beluga so that 64 % of fish were matured sexually. Some reproductive indices such as oocyte diameter, testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E₂) increased significantly at EQ 0.4 g/kg at the end of experiment (P < 0.05), while 17α-hydroxy progesterone level (17α-OHP) showed no significant changes at all concentrations. Biochemical indices such as calcium, phosphorous and cholesterol increased at GE concentrations, but decreased at EQ concentrations similarly at the end of experiment. There was a negative relationship between plasma phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels. Based on results, EQ at concentration 0.4 g/kg improved oocyte development more than the other concentrations of GE and EQ, and therefore, it can be used as an additive to diets for inducing ovary development in this species.

  12. Alterations in the Rat Serum Proteome Induced by Prepubertal Exposure to Bisphenol A and Genistein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Humans are exposed to an array of chemicals via the food, drink and air, including a significant number that can mimic endogenous hormones. One such chemical is Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic chemical that has been shown to cause developmental alterations and to predispose for mammary cancer in rodent models. In contrast, the phytochemical genistein has been reported to suppress chemically induced mammary cancer in rodents, and Asians ingesting a diet high in soy containing genistein have lower incidence of breast and prostate cancers. In this study, we sought to: (1) identify protein biomarkers of susceptibility from blood sera of rats exposed prepubertally to BPA or genistein using Isobaric Tandem Mass Tags quantitative mass spectrometry (TMT-MS) combined with MudPIT technology and, (2) explore the relevance of these proteins to carcinogenesis. Prepubertal exposures to BPA and genistein resulted in altered expression of 63 and 28 proteins in rat sera at postnatal day (PND) 21, and of 9 and 18 proteins in sera at PND35, respectively. This study demonstrates the value of using quantitative proteomic techniques to explore the effect of chemical exposure on the rat serum proteome and its potential for unraveling cellular targets altered by BPA and genistein involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:24552547

  13. Endogenous estrogen status, but not genistein supplementation, modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mutation in the liver cII gene of transgenic big blue rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hutts, Robert C; Mei, Nan; Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Michelle E; Shelton, Sharon; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane

    2005-06-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that isoflavones found in soybeans have estrogenic activity and may safely alleviate the symptoms of menopause. One of these isoflavones, genistein, is commonly used by postmenopausal women as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Although sex hormones have been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, there are limited data on the potential effects of the estrogens, including phytoestrogens, on chemical mutagenesis in liver. Because of the association between mutation induction and the carcinogenesis process, we investigated whether endogenous estrogen and supplemental genistein affect 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in rat liver. Intact and ovariectomized female Big Blue rats were treated with 80 mg DMBA/kg body weight. Some of the rats also received a supplement of 1,000 ppm genistein. Sixteen weeks after the carcinogen treatment, the rats were sacrificed, their livers were removed, and mutant frequencies (MFs) and types of mutations were determined in the liver cII gene. DMBA significantly increased the MFs in liver for both the intact and ovariectomized rats. While there was no significant difference in MF between the ovariectomized and intact control animals, the mutation induction by DMBA in the ovariectomized groups was significantly higher than that in the intact groups. Dietary genistein did not alter these responses. Molecular analysis of the mutants showed that DMBA induced chemical-specific types of mutations in the liver cII gene. These results suggest that endogenous ovarian hormones have an inhibitory effect on liver mutagenesis by DMBA, whereas dietary genistein does not modulate spontaneous or DMBA-induced mutagenesis in either intact or ovariectomized rats.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of genistein in Mongolian gerbils: estrogen receptor-β involvement.

    PubMed

    Donzelli, Andrea; Braida, Daniela; Finardi, Annamaria; Capurro, Valeria; Valsecchi, Anna Elisa; Colleoni, Mariapia; Sala, Mariaelvina

    2010-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring plant-derived phytoestrogen, present in the human diet, known to possess some beneficial effects. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on neuroprotection evaluated through electroencephalographic and behavioural correlates in a model of global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Over the dose range tested, genistein (3 and 10 mg/kg), given 5 min after recirculation antagonized the ischemia-induced electroencephalographic total spectral power decrease 7 days after ischemia; fully prevented ischemia-induced hyperlocomotion evaluated 1 day after ischemia; reversed ischemia-induced memory impairment evaluated through both nest building behaviour and object recognition test; decreased malondialdehyde overproduction in the brain, evaluated 7 days after reperfusion; and fully promoted the survival of pyramidal cells in the CA(1) hippocampal subfield. The selective antagonist for estrogen receptor-β (ERβ), 4-[2-phenyl-5,7-bis(trifluoromethyl) pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]phenol (PHTPP) given 30 min before carotid occlusion, fully prevented the neuroprotective effect of genistein at the dose of 3 mg/kg. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of genistein through the activation of ERβ and provide further grounds for the growing interest concerning the true potential of phytoestrogens as compounds to beneficially affect brain injury without having the disadvantages of estrogens.

  15. A High Concentration of Genistein Induces Cell Death in Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cells by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Lysandra; Gao, Xioahua; Moore, Alicia B; Yu, Linda; Di, Xudong; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Genistein, an estrogenic, soy-derived isoflavone, may play a protective role against hormone-related cancers. We have reported that a high concentration of genistein inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human uterine smooth muscle cells, but not in leiomyoma (fibroid) cells. To better understand the differential cell death responses of normal and tumor cells to a high concentration of genistein, we treated uterine smooth muscle cells and uterine leiomyoma cells with 50 μg/ml of genistein for 72 h and 168 h, and assessed for mediators of apoptosis, cytotoxicity and autophagy. We found that leiomyoma cells had increased protection from apoptosis by expressing an increased ratio of Bcl-2: bak at 72 h and 168 h; however, in smooth muscle cells, the Bcl-2: bak ratio was decreased at 72 h, but significantly rebounded by 168 h. The apoptosis extrinsic factors, Fas ligand and Fas receptor, were highly expressed in uterine smooth muscle cells following genistein treatment at both time points as evidenced by confocal microscopy. This was not seen in the uterine leiomyoma cells; however, cytotoxicity as indicated by elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels was significantly enhanced at 168 h. Increased immunoexpression of an autophagy/autophagosome marker was also observed in the leiomyoma cells, although minimally present in smooth muscle cells at 72 h. Ultrastructurally, there was evidence of autophagic vacuoles in the leiomyoma cells; whereas, the normal smooth muscle cells showed nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. In summary, our data show differential cell death pathways induced by genistein in tumor and normal uterine smooth muscle cells, and suggest novel cell death pathways that can be targeted for preventive and intervention strategies for inhibiting fibroid tumor cell growth in vivo. PMID:27512718

  16. Genistein-induced histomorphometric and hormone secreting changes in the adrenal cortex in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajdzanović, Vladimir; Sosić-Jurjević, Branka; Filipović, Branko; Trifunović, Svetlana; Manojlović-Stojanoski, Milica; Sekulić, Milka; Milosević, Verica

    2009-02-01

    The soybean phytoestrogen, genistein, is increasingly consumed as an alternative therapeutic for age-related diseases, namely cardiovascular conditions, cancer and osteoporosis. Besides estrogenic/antiestrogenic action, this isoflavone exerts a prominent inhibitory effect on tyrosine kinase and the steroidogenic enzyme families, thus affecting hormonal homeostasis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genistein on: histomorphometric features of the adrenal cortex, blood concentrations of aldosterone, corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and adrenal tissue corticosterone content in orchidectomized middle-aged male rats. Sixteen-month-old Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated (SO), orchidectomized (Orx) and genistein-treated orchidectomized (Orx+G) groups. Genistein (30 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously for three weeks, while the control groups received the vehicle alone. The adrenal cortex was analysed histologically and morphometrically. Circulating concentrations of aldosterone, corticosterone and DHEA, as well as adrenal tissue corticosterone levels, were determined by immunoassay. When compared to the SO group, orchidectomy decreased the ZG and ZR cell volume by 43% and 29%, respectively (P<0.05). Serum concentrations of aldosterone and DHEA were markedly lower [13% and 41%, respectively (P<0.05)], while serum and adrenal tissue levels of corticosterone did not change after orchidectomy. Orchidectomy followed by genistein treatment increased the ZG, ZF and ZR cell volume by 54%, 34% and 77%, respectively (P<0.05), compared to the untreated orchidectomized group. Histological analysis revealed noticeable vacuolization of the ZG and ZF cells in the Orx+G group. Serum aldosterone and corticosterone concentrations together with adrenal tissue corticosterone were 47%, 31% and 44% lower, respectively (P<0.05), whereas serum DHEA concentration was 342% higher (P<0.05) in this group in comparison with the Orx group. This study

  17. The soy-associated phytoestrogen, genistein, does not protect against alcohol induced osteoporosis in male mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol abuse acts as a risk factor for osteoporosis by increasing osteoclast activity and decreasing osteoblast activity in bone. These effects can be reversed by estradiol. Soy diets are also suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy pro...

  18. Genistein alters methylation patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Day, J Kevin; Bauer, Andrew M; DesBordes, Charles; Zhuang, Yi; Kim, Byung-Eun; Newton, Leslie G; Nehra, Vedika; Forsee, Kara M; MacDonald, Ruth S; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2002-08-01

    In this study we examine the effect of the phytoestrogen genistein on DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to inhibit transcription of genes by regulating alterations in chromatin structure. Estrogenic compounds have been reported to regulate DNA methylation in a small number of studies. Additionally, phytoestrogens are believed to affect progression of some human diseases, such as estrogen-dependent cancers, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, our working hypothesis is that certain soy phytoestrogens, such as genistein, may be involved in preventing the development of certain prostate and mammary cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation profile. The objective of the present study is to use mouse differential methylation hybridization (DMH) arrays to test for changes in the methylation status of the cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) islands in the mouse genome by examining how these methylation patterns are affected by genistein. Male mice were fed a casein-based diet (control) or the same diet containing 300 mg genistein/kg according to one of four regimens: control diet for 4 wk, genistein diet for 4 wk, control diet for 2 wk followed by genistein diet for 2 wk and genistein diet for 2 wk followed by control diet for 2 wk. DNA from liver, brain and prostate were then screened with DMH arrays. Clones with methylation differences were sequenced and compared with known sequences. In conclusion, consumption of genistein diet was positively correlated with changes in prostate DNA methylation at CpG islands of specific mouse genes.

  19. The combined effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and the phytoestrogen genistein on steroid hormone secretion, AhR and ERβ expression and the incidence of apoptosis in granulosa cells of medium porcine follicles

    PubMed Central

    PIASECKA-SRADER, Joanna; SADOWSKA, Agnieszka; NYNCA, Anna; ORLOWSKA, Karina; JABLONSKA, Monika; JABLONSKA, Olga; PETROFF, Brian K.; CIERESZKO, Renata E.

    2015-01-01

    Low doses of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) used in combination may act in a manner different from that of individual compounds. The objective of the study was to examine in vitro effects of low doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 100 pM) and genistein (500 nM) on: 1) progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) secretion (48 h); 2) dynamic changes in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mRNA and protein expression (1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h); 3) dynamic changes in estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA and protein expression (1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h); and 4) induction of apoptosis in porcine granulosa cells derived from medium follicles (3, 6 and 24 h). TCDD had no effect on P4 or E2 production, but potentiated the inhibitory effect of genistein on P4 production. In contrast to the individual treatments which did not produce any effects, TCDD and genistein administered together decreased ERβ and AhR protein expression in granulosa cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of TCDD on AhR mRNA expression was abolished by genistein. The treatments did not induce apoptosis in the cells. In summary, combined effects of low concentrations of TCDD and genistein on follicular function of pigs differed from that of individual compounds. The results presented in the current paper clearly indicate that effects exerted by low doses of EDCs applied in combination must be taken into consideration when studying potential risk effects of EDCs on biological processes. PMID:26568065

  20. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake.

  1. Genistein as an inducer of tumor cell differentiation : possible mechanisms of action.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, A.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-01-01

    Decreased activity of either topoisomerases or tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the differentiation of a number of cell types. It is therefore conceivable that genistein, because of its reported ability to inhibit these activities in vitro, may be an inducer of cellular differentiation. We investigated this possibility in human promyelocytic HL-60 and erythroid K-562 leukemia cells and in human SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells. Our results indicated that genistein, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited cell multiplication and induced cell differentiation. The maturing HL-60 cells acquired granulocytic and monocytic markers. The differentiating K-562 cells stained positively with benzidine, which indicates the production of hemoglobin, an erythroid marker. Following genistein treatment, maturing SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells formed dendrite-like structures and exhibited increased tyrosinase activity and melanin content. Experiments were designed to identify the molecular mechanism of genistein's action. Data from our laboratory suggest that this isoflavone triggers the pathway that leads to cellular differentiation by stabilizing protein-linked DNA strand breakage. Other possible mechanisms reported in the literature are discussed.

  2. Overlapping but distinct effects of genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) in female Sprague-Dawley rats in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    Delclos, K. Barry; Weis, Constance C.; Bucci, Thomas J.; Olson, Greg; Mellick, Paul; Sadovova, Natalya; Latendresse, John R.; Thorn, Brett; Newbold, Retha R.

    2009-01-01

    Genistein and ethinyl estradiol (EE2) were examined in multigenerational reproductive and chronic toxicity studies that had different treatment intervals among generations. Sprague-Dawley rats received genistein (0, 5, 100, or 500 ppm) or EE2 (0, 2, 10, or 50 ppb) in a low phytoestrogen diet. Nonneoplastic effects in females are summarized here. Genistein at 500 ppm and EE2 at 50 ppb produced similar effects in continuously exposed rats, including decreased body weights, accelerated vaginal opening, and altered estrous cycles in young animals. At the high dose, anogenital distance was subtly affected by both compounds, and a reduction in litter size was evident in genistein-treated animals. Genistein at 500 ppm induced an early onset of aberrant cycles relative to controls in the chronic studies. EE2 significantly increased the incidence of uterine lesions (atypical focal hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia). These compound-specific effects appeared to be enhanced in the offspring of prior exposed generations. PMID:19159674

  3. VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT OPENING OF HCN CHANNELS: FACILITATION OR INHIBITION BY THE PHYTOESTROGEN, GENISTEIN, IS DETERMINED BY THE ACTIVATION STATUS OF THE CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE GATING RING

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Anjali. O.; Turbendian, Harma K.; Fogle, Keri J.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanistic bases and physiological importance of cAMP regulation of HCN channels has exploited an arginine to glutamate mutation in the nucleotide-binding fold, an approach critically dependent on the mutation selectively lowering the channel’s nucleotide affinity. In apparent conflict with this, in intact Xenopus oocytes, HCN and HCN-RE channels exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively distinct responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein – the estrogenic isoflavonoid strongly depolarizes the activation midpoint of HCN1-R538E, but not HCN1 channels (+9.8 mV ± 0.9 versus +2.2 mV ± 0.6) and hyperpolarizes gating of HCN2 (−4.8 mV ± 1.0) but depolarizes gating of HCN2-R591E (+13.2 mV ± 2.1). However, excised patch recording, X-ray crystallography and modeling reveal this is not due to either a fundamental effect of the mutation on channel gating per se or of genistein acting as a mutation-sensitive partial agonist at the cAMP site. Rather, we find that genistein equivalently moves both HCN and HCN-RE channels closer to the open state (rendering the channels inherently easier to open but at a cost of decreasing the coupling energy of cAMP) and that the anomaly reflects a balance of these energetic effects with the isoform specific inhibition of activation by the nucleotide gating ring and relief of this by endogenous cAMP. These findings have specific implications with regard to findings based on HCN-RE channels and kinase antagonists and general implications with respect to interpretation of drug effects in mutant channel backgrounds. PMID:19524546

  4. Genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI-YAN; XUE, HAO-GANG; CHEN, JI-YING; CHAI, WEI; NI, MING

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone that exists in the form of an aglycone. It is the primary active component in soy isoflavone and has a number of biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative). However, the specific effect of genistein on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the effect of genistein on the suppression of BMSC adipogenic differentiation and the enhancement of osteogenic potential was investigated using an MTT assay. It was observed that genistein significantly increased BMSC cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that genistein significantly inhibited the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), type I collagen (Col I) and osteocalcin (OC; P<0.01). Furthermore, 20 µm genistein significantly inhibited the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and increased the activity of triglycerides (TGs) increased (P<0.01) as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, western blotting revealed that BMSC pretreatment with 20 µm genistein significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) protein expression (P<0.01). This suggests that the downregulation of PPARγ may significantly reduce the effect of genistein on cell proliferation, suppress the expression of Runx2, Col I and OC mRNA, and reduce ALP and promote TG activity in BMSCs. Thus, the results of the present study conclude that genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human BMSCs and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, genistein may be a promising candidate drug for treatment against osteogenesis. PMID:27168816

  5. Chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of genistein, a soy isoflavone, upon cancer development and progression in preclinical animal models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hee; Kim, Cho-Won; Jeon, So-Ye; Go, Ryeo-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Genistein is one of isoflavones mostly derived in a leguminous plant. It is well known as one of phytoestrogens that have structures similar to the principal mammalian estrogen. It has diverse biological functions including chemopreventive properties against cancers. Anticancer efficacies of genistein have been related with the epidemiological observations indicating that the incidence of some cancers is much lower in Asia, where diets are rich in soyfoods, than Western countries. This review deals with in vivo anticancer activities of genistein identified in animal studies being divided into its effects on carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Because animal studies have advantages in designing the experiments to suit the goals, they imply diverse information on the anticancer activity of genistein. The in vivo animal studies have adopted the specific animal models according to a developmental stage of cancer to prove the anticancer efficacies of genistein against diverse types of cancer. The numerous previous studies insist that genistein effectively inhibits carcinogenesis in the DMBA-induced animal cancer models by reducing the incidence of adenocarcinoma and cancer progression in the transgenic and xenograft animal models by suppressing the tumor growth and metastatic transition. Although the protective effect of genistein against cancer has been controversial, genistein may be a candidate for chemoprevention of carcinogenesis and cancer progression and may deserve to be the central compound supporting the epidemiological evidence. PMID:25628724

  6. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination

    PubMed Central

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45) genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm2 UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage. PMID:21785564

  7. Synergic Effect of Genistein and Daidzein on UVB-Induced DNA Damage: An Effective Photoprotective Combination.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Gasparri, Franco; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activities of individual isoflavones are well established although little is known about the photoprotective effect of their combination. The aim of this study was to investigate the photoprotective effects of different concentrations of genistein and daidzein individually or combined. We measured the expression levels of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible (Gadd45) genes, which are involved in inflammation and DNA repair, respectively, in BJ-5ta human skin fibroblasts irradiated with 60 mJ/cm(2) UVB. We also determined the cellular response to UVB-induced DNA damage by Comet assay. We report that genistein and daidzein when administered combined, and at a specific concentration and ratio, exerted a synergistic photoprotective effect that was greater than the effect obtained with each isoflavone alone. The results reported herein suggest that low concentrations of genistein and daidzein combined may be good candidate ingredients for protective agents against UV-induced photodamage.

  8. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M

    2014-09-01

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whether phytoestrogens promote similar effects. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocyte cultures, the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, glycitein, and R- and S-equol reduced rates of protein synthesis and genistein, the phytoestrogen of greatest abundance in soy, also increased rates of protein degradation. Increased expression of the ubiquitin ligase fbxo32 and autophagy-related genes was observed with high concentrations of genistein (100 μM), and R- and S-equol (100 μM) also up-regulated autophagy-related genes. In contrast, low genistein concentrations in vitro (0.01-0.10 μM) and in vivo (5 μg/g body mass) decreased fbxo32 expression, suggesting a potential metabolic benefit for low levels of genistein exposure. Phytoestrogens reduced cell proliferation, indicating that effects of phytoestrogens extend from metabolic to mitogenic processes. Co-incubation of genistein with the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182,780, ameliorated effects of genistein on protein degradation, but not protein synthesis or cell proliferation, indicating that effects of genistein are mediated through ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms. Collectively, these data warrant additional studies to determine the extent to which dietary phytoestrogens, especially genistein, affect physiological processes that impact growth and nutrient retention.

  9. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  10. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage.

  11. Genistein modulates proliferation and mitochondrial functionality in breast cancer cells depending on ERalpha/ERbeta ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Blanquer-Rossello, M Mar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of developed countries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, and 17β-estradiol (E2) could have effects on the cell cycle and mitochondrial function and dynamics. Three human breast cancer cell lines with different estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) ratio were used: MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio), T47D (low ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, mitochondrial functionality, and mitochondrial dynamics parameters were analyzed. E2 and genistein treatment induced cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition in MCF-7, but not in T47D and MDA-MB-231. Moreover, genistein treatment produced an up-regulation of ERβ and a rise in cytochrome c oxidase activity in T47D cells, decreasing the ATP synthase/cytochrome c oxidase ratio. Finally, genistein treatment produced a drop in mitochondrial dynamics only in MCF-7 cells. In summary, the beneficial effects of genistein consumption depend on the ERα/ERβ ratio in breast cells. Therefore, genistein treatment produces cell cycle arrest and an improvement of mitochondrial functionality in T47D cells with a low ERα/ERβ ratio, but not in MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) ones.

  12. Genistein as a potential inducer of the anti-atherogenic enzyme paraoxonase-1: studies in cultured hepatocytes in vitro and in rat liver in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Charlotte; Ernst, Insa M A; Sinnecker, Heike; Soukup, Sebastian T; Kulling, Sabine E; Rimbach, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    A number of cardioprotective effects, including the reduced oxidation of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, have been attributed to dietary soy isoflavones. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1), an enzyme mainly synthesized in the liver, may exhibit anti-atherogenic activity by protecting LDL from oxidation. Thus, dietary and pharmacological inducers of PON1 may decrease cardiovascular disease risk. Using a luciferase reporter gene assay we screened different flavonoids for their ability to induce PON1 in Huh7 hepatocytes in culture. Genistein was the most potent flavonoid with regard to its PON1-inducing activity, followed by daidzein, luteolin, isorhamnetin and quercetin. Other flavonoids such as naringenin, cyanidin, malvidin and catechin showed only little or no PON1-inducing activity. Genistein-mediated PON1 transactivation was partly inhibited by the oestrogen-receptor antagonist fulvestrant as well as by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist 7-ketocholesterol. In contrast to genistein, the conjugated genistein metabolites genistein-7-glucuronide, genistein-7-sulfate and genistein-7,4′-disulfate were only weak inducers of PON1 transactivation. Accordingly, dietary genistein supplementation (2 g/kg diet over three weeks) in growing rats did not increase hepatic PON1 mRNA and protein levels as well as plasma PON1 activity. Thus, genistein may be a PON1 inducer in cultured hepatocytes in vitro, but not in rats in vivo. PMID:22304296

  13. Effects of diverse dietary phytoestrogens on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takako; Horiguchi, Hyogo; Oguma, Etsuko; Kayama, Fujio

    2010-09-01

    Phytoestrogens have attracted attention as being safer alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and as chemopreventive reagents for breast cancer because dietary soy isoflavone intake has been correlated with reduction in risk. To identify safe and effective phytoestrogen candidates for HRT and breast cancer prevention, we investigated the effects of daidzein, genistein, coumestrol, resveratrol and glycitein on cell growth, cell cycle, cyclin D1 expression, apoptosis, Bcl-2/Bax expression ratio and p53-dependent or NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, except for glycitein, significantly enhanced estrogen-response-element-dependent transcriptional activity up to a level similar to that of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)). E(2) increased cell growth significantly, coumestrol increased cell growth moderately, and resveratrol and glycitein reduced cell growth. Phytoestrogens, except for glycitein, stimulated the promotion of cells to G(1)/S transition in cell cycle analysis, similar to E(2). This stimulation was accompanied by transient up-regulation of cyclin D1. While genistein, resveratrol and glycitein all increased apoptosis and reduced the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, resveratrol reduced this ratio more than either genistein or glycitein. Moreover, resveratrol significantly enhanced p53-dependent transcriptional activity, but slightly reduced NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. On knockdown analysis, genistein, resveratrol and glycitein all reduced the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in the presence of apoptosis-inducing stimuli, and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha silencing had no effect on these reductions. In contrast, in the absence of apoptosis-inducing stimuli, only resveratrol reduced the ratio, and ERalpha silencing abolished this reduction. Thus, resveratrol might be the most promising candidate for HRT and chemoprevention of breast cancer due to its estrogenic activity and high antitumor activity.

  14. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M; Elias, Peter M; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2014-07-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide's [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ERs) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as an ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated up-regulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα- rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense.

  15. The dietary ingredient, genistein, stimulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression through a novel S1P-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Kim, Young-Il; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Jong Youl; Mann, Taj; Oda, Yuko; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Elias, Peter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered that a signaling lipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), generated by sphingosine kinase 1, regulates a major epidermal antimicrobial peptide’s [cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP)] expression via an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent pathway, independent of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in epithelial cells. Activation of estrogen receptors (ER) by either estrogens or phytoestrogens also is known to stimulate S1P production, but it is unknown whether ER activation increases CAMP production. We investigated whether a phytoestrogen, genistein, simulates CAMP expression in keratinocytes, a model of epithelial cells, by either a S1P-dependent mechanism(s) or the alternate VDR-regulated pathway. Exogenous genistein, as well as a ER-β ligand, WAY-200070, increased CAMP mRNA and protein expression in cultured human keratinocytes, while ER-β antagonist, ICI182780, attenuated the expected genistein- and WAY-200070-induced increase in CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Genistein treatment increased acidic and alkaline ceramidase expression and cellular S1P levels in parallel with increased S1P lyase inhibition, accounting for increased CAMP production. In contrast, siRNA against VDR did not alter genistein-mediated upregulation of CAMP. Taken together, genistein induces CAMP production via an ER-β→S1P→NF-κB→C/EBPα-rather than a VDR-dependent mechanism, illuminating a new role for estrogens in the regulation of epithelial innate immunity and pointing to potential additional benefits of dietary genistein in enhancing cutaneous antimicrobial defense. PMID:24768661

  16. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  17. Dual effects of phytoestrogens result in u-shaped dose-response curves.

    PubMed Central

    Almstrup, Kristian; Fernández, Mariana F; Petersen, Jørgen H; Olea, Nicolas; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Leffers, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors can affect the endocrine system without directly interacting with receptors, for example, by interfering with the synthesis or metabolism of steroid hormones. The aromatase that converts testosterone to 17beta-estradiol is a possible target. In this paper we describe an assay that simultaneously detects aromatase inhibition and estrogenicity. The principle is similar to that of other MCF-7 estrogenicity assays, but with a fixed amount of testosterone added. The endogenous aromatase activity in MCF-7 cells converts some of the testosterone to 17beta-estradiol, which is assayed by quantifying differences in the expression level of the estrogen-induced pS2 mRNA. Potential aromatase inhibitors can be identified by a dose-dependent reduction in the pS2 mRNA expression level after exposure to testosterone and the test compound. Using this assay, we have investigated several compounds, including synthetic chemicals and phytoestrogens, for aromatase inhibition. The phytoestrogens, except genistein, were aromatase inhibitors at low concentrations (< 1 micro M) but estrogenic at higher concentrations (greater than or equal to 1 micro M), resulting in U-shaped dose-response curves. None of the tested synthetic chemicals were aromatase inhibitors. The low-dose aromatase inhibition distinguished phytoestrogens from other estrogenic compounds and may partly explain reports about antiestrogenic properties of phytoestrogens. Aromatase inhibition may play an important role in the protective effects of phytoestrogens against breast cancer. PMID:12153753

  18. Effect of Genistein on reproductive parameter and serum nitric oxide levels in morphine-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Cyrus; Ahmadi, Sharareh; Roshankhah, Shiva; Salahshoor, MohammadReza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The predominant phytoestrogen in soy and derived products is the isoflavone Genistein. Genistein has antioxidant properties. Morphine is a main psychoactive chemical in opium that can increase the generation of free radicals and therefore it could adversely affects the spermatogenesis. Objective: The main goal was to investigate whether the Genistein could protect morphine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone and nitric oxide in blood serum. Materials and Methods: In this study, various doses of Genistein (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) and Genistein plus morphine (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) were administered interaperitoneally to 48 male mice for 30 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=6) and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility and morphology), testis weight and histology, testosterone hormone (ELISA method), FSH and LH hormones (immunoradiometry) and serum nitric oxide (griess assay) were analyzed and compared. Results: The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased testosterone (0.03 ng/mg) LH and FSH level, histological parameters, count, viability (55.3%), morphology and motility of sperm cells (1%), testis weight (0.08 gr) and increase nitric oxide compared to saline group (p=0.00). However, administration of Genistein and Genistein plus morphine significantly boosted motility, morphology, count, viability of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, germinal thickness, testosterone, LH and FSH while decrease nitric oxide level in all groups compared to morphine group (p<0.025). Conclusion: It seems that Genistein administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and prevent morphine- induced adverse effects on sperm parameters. PMID:27200423

  19. Genistein inhibits TNF-α-induced endothelial inflammation through the protein kinase pathway A and improves vascular inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Si, Hongwei; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Misra, Hara P; Li, Yunbo; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-10-03

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function, but the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we report that genistein at physiological concentrations (0.1 μM-5 μM) significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Genistein also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of adhesion molecules and chemokines such as sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin, MCP-1 and IL-8, which play key role in the firm adhesion of monocytes to activated endothelial cells (ECs). Genistein at physiologically relevant concentrations didn't significantly induce antioxidant enzyme activities or scavenge free radicals. Further, blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) in ECs didn't alter the preventive effect of genistein on endothelial inflammation. However, inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of genistein on TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to ECs as well as the production of MCP-1 and IL-8. In animal study, dietary genistein significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increase in circulating chemokines and adhesion molecules in C57BL/6 mice. Genistein treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, genistein protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of genistein is independent of the ER-mediated signaling machinery or antioxidant activity, but mediated via the PKA signaling pathway.

  20. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B. King, Audrey A.

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 {mu}M as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  1. Intake of dietary phytoestrogens by Dutch women.

    PubMed

    Boker, Lital Keinan; Van der Schouw, Yvonne T; De Kleijn, Miriam J J; Jacques, Paul F; Grobbee, Diederick E; Peeters, Petra H M

    2002-06-01

    Higher consumption of phytoestrogens might be protective against certain chronic diseases. Accurate quantification of habitual phytoestrogen intake is important for assessing associations between phytoestrogens and risk for certain diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate dietary intake of phytoestrogens in Dutch middle-aged and elderly women and to describe their main sources. Women were recruited between 1993 and 1997 and aged 50-69 y at enrollment (Prospect-EPIC; n = 17,357). A detailed food frequency questionnaire referring to the preceding year was filled in at recruitment. A literature search was conducted to obtain data regarding content of the isoflavones daidzein, genistein, formononetin, biochanin A, the coumestan coumesterol and the lignans matairesinol and secoisolariciresinol in relevant food items. Concentrations of each phytoestrogen in each food item were subsequently grouped by seven categories; group scores were multiplied by daily intakes of food items and then summed across food items to produce for each participant a total daily intake score for each phytoestrogen. Approximately 75% of participants were postmenopausal at recruitment. The mean age was 57 y. Geometric means of daily intake of daidzein, genistein, formononetin, biochanin A, coumesterol, matairesinol and secoisolariciresinol were 0.15, 0.16, 0.08, 0.001, <0.001, 0.07 and 0.93 mg, respectively. The main sources for isoflavones were peas and beans, nuts, grain products, coffee, tea and soy products. The main sources for coumestans were peas, beans and other vegetables. The main sources of lignans were grain products, fruit and alcoholic beverages (red and white wines). We conclude that intake levels of phytoestrogen in our study population are low; however, they are comparable with intake levels previously reported for other Western cohorts. In this population, phytoestrogen intake consisted largely of lignans.

  2. Using vaginal cytology to assess the estrogenic activity of phytoestrogen-rich herb.

    PubMed

    Malaivijitnond, Suchinda; Chansri, Kullakanya; Kijkuokul, Pisamai; Urasopon, Nontakorn; Cherdshewasart, Wichai

    2006-10-11

    To assess the estrogenic activities of synthetic estrogen, synthetic phytoestrogen, Pueraria lobata and three distinct cultivars of Pueraria mirifica, a phytoestrogen-rich herb, a vaginal cytology assay in ovariectomized rats were used. Rats were ovariectomized and treated with DW, estradiol valerate (1 mg/kg BW), genistein (0.25-2.5 mg/kg BW), Pueraria lobata and Pueraria mirifica (10-1,000 mg/kg BW) for 14 days. The vaginal cytology was checked daily and the uteri were dissected and weighed at the end of treatment or post-treatment periods. The treatments of DW, genistein and Pueraria lobata did not influence the vaginal epithelium, but the injection of estradiol valerate induced a vaginal cornification from day-3 of treatment to day-14 of post-treatment period. The occurrence of vaginal cornification after treatment and the recovery after the cessation was dependent on dosages and cultivars of Pueraria mirifica. The increments of uterus weight in all rats agreed with the cornification of vaginal epithelium. Although both uterotropic and vaginal cytology assays can be used to assess the estrogenic activity of phytoestrogen-rich herb, however, using vaginal cytology assay has two advantages: (1) we do not need to kill the animals and (2) we can follow up the recovery after the cessation of treatment.

  3. Genistein induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via ATM/p53-dependent pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Du, Guang-Jian; Qi, Lian-Wen; Calway, Tyler; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-07-01

    Soybean isoflavones have been used as a potential preventive agent in anticancer research for many years. Genistein is one of the most active flavonoids in soybeans. Accumulating evidence suggests that genistein alters a variety of biological processes in estrogen-related malignancies, such as breast and prostate cancers. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein in the prevention of human colon cancer remains unclear. Here we attempted to elucidate the anticarcinogenic mechanism of genistein in human colon cancer cells. First we evaluated the growth inhibitory effect of genistein and two other isoflavones, daidzein and biochanin A, on HCT-116 and SW-480 human colon cancer cells. In addition, flow cyto-metry was performed to observe the morphological changes in HCT-116/SW-480 cells undergoing apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, which had been visualized using Annexin V-FITC and/or propidium iodide staining. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses were also employed to study the changes in expression of several important genes associated with cell cycle regulation. Our data showed that genistein, daidzein and biochanin A exhibited growth inhibitory effects on HCT-116/SW-480 colon cancer cells and promoted apoptosis. Genistein showed a significantly greater effect than the other two compounds, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, genistein caused cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, which was accompanied by activation of ATM/p53, p21waf1/cip1 and GADD45α as well as downregulation of cdc2 and cdc25A demonstrated by q-PCR and immunoblotting assay. Interestingly, genistein induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner. These findings exemplify that isoflavones, especially genistein, could promote colon cancer cell growth inhibition and facilitate apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. The ATM/p53-p21 cross-regulatory network may play a crucial role in mediating the anticarcinogenic activities of genistein in colon cancer.

  4. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  5. Genistein alleviates lead-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo: Involvement of multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Siwang; Aschner, Michael; Cao, Zipeng; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Diya; Chen, Jiangyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant. It induces neurotoxicity and cell death by disrupting the pro- and anti-oxidative balance; however, the mechanisms of its toxicity have yet to be fully understood. The soy-derived isoflavonoid, genistein (GEN), was reported to possess neuroprotective and antioxidative properties. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of Pb-induced neurotoxicity in vivo and in vitro, addressing the efficacy of GEN in protecting against Pb-induced toxicity. Pb exposure was associated with reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, concomitant with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in vitro, and pre-treatment with GEN markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced oxidative injury by increasing the expression of key antioxidant enzymes and the antioxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Next, PKC-α activation was found after Pb exposure in vitro and pretreatment with GEN attenuated Pb-induced ROS generation by PKC-α inhibition. MAPK-NF-κB activation triggered by Pb was also inhibited by GEN. In summary, our study establishes that GEN alleviates Pb-induced impairment in spatial memory, and reduces cell apoptosis caused by Pb exposure and GEN protects neurons from Pb-induced neurotoxicity by downstream activation of antioxidant and anti-apoptotic pathways via regulation of Nrf2 and MAPK-NF-κB signaling.

  6. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer.

  7. Roles of Dietary Phytoestrogens on the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Diverse Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geum-A.; Hwang, Kyung-A.; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in tumor progression. The cells undergoing EMT upregulate the expression of cell motility-related proteins and show enhanced migration and invasion. The hallmarks of EMT in cancer cells include changed cell morphology and increased metastatic capabilities in cell migration and invasion. Therefore, prevention of EMT is an important tool for the inhibition of tumor metastasis. A novel preventive therapy is needed, such as treatment of natural dietary substances that are nontoxic to normal human cells, but effective in inhibiting cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, such as genistein, resveratrol, kaempferol and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), can be raised as possible candidates. They are plant-derived dietary estrogens, which are found in tea, vegetables and fruits, and are known to have various biological efficacies, including chemopreventive activity against cancers. Specifically, these phytoestrogens may induce not only anti-proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also anti-metastasis by inhibiting the EMT process in various cancer cells. There have been several signaling pathways found to be associated with the induction of the EMT process in cancer cells. Phytoestrogens were demonstrated to have chemopreventive effects on cancer metastasis by inhibiting EMT-associated pathways, such as Notch-1 and TGF-beta signaling. As a result, phytoestrogens can inhibit or reverse the EMT process by upregulating the expression of epithelial phenotypes, including E-cadherin, and downregulating the expression of mesenchymal phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Snail, Slug, and vimentin. In this review, we focused on the important roles of phytoestrogens in inhibiting EMT in many types of cancer and suggested phytoestrogens as prominent alternative compounds to chemotherapy. PMID:27231938

  8. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  9. Differential Effects of Genistein on Prostate Cancer Cells Depend on Mutational Status of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Abeer M.; Zhu, Tian; Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Yang, Wancai; Saleem, Mohammad; Bosland, Maarten C.

    2013-01-01

    Blocking the androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent) activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A) mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L) stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy. PMID:24167630

  10. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Abeer M; Zhu, Tian; Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Yang, Wancai; Saleem, Mohammad; Bosland, Maarten C

    2013-01-01

    Blocking the androgen receptor (AR) activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent) activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A) mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L) stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  11. Genistein improves sensorimotor gating: Mechanisms related to its neuroprotective effects on the striatum.

    PubMed

    Menze, Esther T; Esmat, Ahmed; Tadros, Mariane G; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2016-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by selective atrophy in the striatum, particularly the medium spiny GABAergic efferent neurons. This results in striatal sensorimotor gating deficits. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) produces selective lesions mimicking those of HD. Males were found to be more susceptible to 3-NPA-induced neurotoxicity than females, suggesting neuroprotective effects of estrogens. Phytoestrogens, including genistein, are good estrogenic alternatives that keep their beneficial effects on non-reproductive organs and lack the potential hazardous side effects. The current study was designed to investigate the potential beneficial effects of genistein in 3-NPA-induced HD in ovariectomized rats. Results showed that 3-NPA (20 mg/kg) administration caused significant disruption of the rats' locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition. In addition, it decreased striatal ATP levels and increased oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers with striatal focal hemorrhage and gliosis. Pretreatment with 17β-estradiol (2.5 mg/kg) or genistein (20 mg/kg) led to a significant improvement of behavioral parameters, increased ATP production, decreased oxidative stress, attenuated inflammation and apoptosis. Therefore, this study suggests potential neuroprotective effects of genistein in ovariectomized rats challenged with 3-NPA.

  12. Intracoronary genistein acutely increases coronary blood flow in anesthetized pigs through beta-adrenergic mediated nitric oxide release and estrogenic receptors.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David A S G; Uberti, Francesca; Caimmi, Philippe Primo; Surico, Nicola; Vacca, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    Various studies have suggested that the phytoestrogen genistein has beneficial cardioprotective and vascular effects. However, there has been scarce information regarding the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and its mechanisms including estrogen receptors, autonomic nervous system, and nitric oxide (NO). The present study was planned to determine the primary effect of genistein on coronary blood flow and the mechanisms involved. In anesthetized pigs, changes in left anterior descending coronary artery caused by intracoronary infusion of genistein at constant heart rate and arterial pressure were assessed using ultrasound flowmeters. In 25 pigs, genistein infused at 0.075 mg/min increased coronary blood flow by about 16.3%. This response was graded in a further five pigs by increasing the infused dose of the genistein between 0.007 and 0.147 mg/min. In the 25 pigs, blockade of cholinergic receptors (iv atropine; five pigs) and alpha-adrenergic receptors (iv phentolamine; five pigs) did not abolish the coronary response to genistein, whose effects were prevented by blockade of beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (iv butoxamine; five pigs), nitric oxide synthase (intracoronary N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester; five pigs) and estrogenic receptors (ERs; ERalpha/ERbeta; intracoronary fulvestrant; five pigs). In porcine aortic endothelial cells, genistein induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NO production through ERK 1/2, Akt, and p38 MAPK pathways, which was prevented by the concomitant treatment by butoxamine and fulvestrant. In conclusion, genistein primarily caused coronary vasodilation the mechanism of which involved ERalpha/ERbeta and the release of NO through vasodilatory beta(2)-adrenoreceptor effects.

  13. Inhibitory effects of combination of lycopene and genistein on 7,12- dimethyl benz(a)anthracene-induced breast cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Akdemir, Fatih; Ozercan, Ibrahim; Bayraktar, Soley; Kucuk, Omer

    2011-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. Carotenoids and soy isoflavones have been postulated to have breast cancer preventive effects. We investigated the potential preventive effects of lycopene and genistein, alone and in combination, on breast cancer development in female Wistar rats treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), a carcinogen known to induce breast tumors. Mammary carcinogenesis was initiated by a single, oral gavage of DMBA (80 mg/kg body weight) at 55 days of animal age. Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into 5 experimental groups having 10 animals per group: Group 1 (normal control), Group 2 (DMBA control), Group 3 (DMBA + lycopene), Group 4 (DMBA + genistein), and Group 5 (DMBA + lycopene and genistein). Rats were fed either lycopene (20 mg /kg bw) or genistein (2 mg /kg bw) by oral gavage (3 times per week) starting 2 wk prior to DMBA injection. Treatment was continued for 20 wk. Rats treated with DMBA developed mammary tumors with 100% tumor incidence during the 20-wk study. Inhibition of mammary cancer incidence by lycopene (70%), genistein (60%) and their combination (40%) was observed. Tumor weight decreased by 48%, 61%, and 67%, and mean tumor volume decreased by 18%, 35%, and 65% with lycopene, genistein, and lycopene + genistein, respectively (P < 0.01 for the combination). The proportions of adenocarcinoma masses decreased with lycopene and genistein combination (P < 0.05). Administration of lycopene and genistein combination suppressed breast cancer development and was associated with a decrease in MDA, 8-isoprostane, and 8-OhdG levels and with an increase in serum lycopene and genistein levels. Animals administered DMBA developed breast cancer, which was associated with increased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased expression of Bax, caspase 3, and caspase 9 in mammary tissues. Administration of genistein and lycopene in combination was more effective in inhibiting DMBA-induced breast tumors and modulating

  14. Risk assessment of soybean-based phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Kwack, Seung Jun; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Hyung Sik; Yoon, Kyung Sil; Lee, Byung Mu

    2009-01-01

    Koreans generally consume high quantities of soybean-based foods that contain a variety of phytoestrogens, such as, daidzein, zenistein, and biochalin A. However, phytoestrogens are considered to be potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC), which interfere with the normal function of the hormonal and reproductive systems. Therefore, dietary exposure to soybean-based phytoestrogens is of concern for Koreans, and comparative dietary risk assessments are required between Japanese (high consumers) versus Americans (low consumers). In this study, a relative risk assessment was conducted based upon daily intake levels of soybean-based foods and phytoestrogens in a Korean cohort, and the risks of photoestrogens were compared with those posed by estradiol and other EDC. Koreans approximately 30-49 yr of age consume on average a total of 135.2 g/d of soy-based foods including soybean, soybean sauce, soybean paste, and soybean oil, and 0.51 mg/kg body weight (bw)/d of phytoestrogens such as daidzein and genistein. Using estimated daily intakes (EDI) and estrogenic potencies (EP), margins of safety (MOS) were calculated where 0.05 is for estradiol (MOS value <1, considered to exert a positive estrogenic effect); thus, MOS values of 1.89 for Japanese, 1.96 for Koreans, and 5.55 for Americans indicate that consumption of soybean-based foods exerted no apparent estrogenic effects, as all MOS values were all higher than 1. For other synthetic EDC used as reference values, MOS values were dieldrin 27, nonylphenol 250, butyl benzyl phthalate 321, bisphenol A 1000, biochanin A 2203, and coumesterol 2898. These results suggest that dietary exposure to phytoestrogens, such as daidzein and genistein, poses a relatively higher health risk for humans than synthetic EDC, although MOS values were all greater than 1.

  15. Acute genistein treatment mimics the effects of estradiol by enhancing place learning and impairing response learning in young adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Samantha L; Neese, Steven L; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G; Schantz, Susan L; Korol, Donna L

    2012-09-01

    Endogenous estrogens have bidirectional effects on learning and memory, enhancing or impairing cognition depending on many variables, including the task and the memory systems that are engaged. Moderate increases in estradiol enhance hippocampus-sensitive place learning, yet impair response learning that taps dorsal striatal function. This memory modulation likely occurs via activation of estrogen receptors, resulting in altered neural function. Supplements containing estrogenic compounds from plants are widely consumed despite limited information about their effects on brain function, including learning and memory. Phytoestrogens can enter the brain and signal through estrogen receptors to affect cognition. Enhancements in spatial memory and impairments in executive function have been found following treatment with soy phytoestrogens, but no tests of actions on striatum-sensitive tasks have been made to date. The present study compared the effects of acute exposure to the isoflavone genistein with the effects of estradiol on performance in place and response learning tasks. Long-Evans rats were ovariectomized, treated with 17β-estradiol benzoate, genistein-containing sucrose pellets, or vehicle (oil or plain sucrose pellets) for 2 days prior to behavioral training. Compared to vehicle controls, estradiol treatment enhanced place learning at a low (4.5 μg/kg) but not high dose (45 μg/kg), indicating an inverted pattern of spatial memory facilitation. Treatment with 4.4 mg of genistein over 2 days also significantly enhanced place learning over vehicle controls. For the response task, treatment with estradiol impaired learning at both low and high doses; likewise, genistein treatment impaired response learning compared to rats receiving vehicle. Overall, genistein was found to mimic estradiol-induced shifts in place and response learning, facilitating hippocampus-sensitive learning and slowing striatum-sensitive learning. These results suggest signaling through

  16. Lycopene and other carotenoids inhibit estrogenic activity of 17beta-estradiol and genistein in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Keren; Atzmon, Andrea; Danilenko, Michael; Levy, Joseph; Sharoni, Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that carotenoids prevent several types of cancer, including mammary and endometrial cancers. On the other hand, such studies have also shown that estrogens are the most important risk factors for these cancer types. Genistein, the phytoestrogen mainly found in soy, also shows significant estrogenic activity when tested at concentrations found in human blood. The aim of this study was to determine whether carotenoids inhibit signaling of steroidal estrogen and phytoestrogen which could explain their cancer preventive activity. Similar to the known effect of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), treatment of breast (T47D and MCF-7) and endometrial (ECC-1) cancer cells with phytoestrogens induced cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression and transactivation of the estrogen response element (ERE). However, each of the tested carotenoids (lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and beta-carotene) inhibited cancer cell proliferation induced by either E(2) or genistein. The inhibition of cell growth by lycopene was accompanied by slow down of cell-cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Moreover, the carotenoids inhibited estrogen-induced transactivation of ERE that was mediated by both estrogen receptors (ERs) ERalpha and ERbeta. The possibility that this inhibition results from competition of carotenoid-activated transcription systems on a limited pool of shared coactivators with the ERE transcription system was tested. Although cotransfection of breast and endometrial cancer cells with four different coactivators (SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, and DRIP) strongly stimulated ERE reporter gene activity, it did not oppose the inhibitory effect of carotenoids. These results suggest that dietary carotenoids inhibit estrogen signaling of both 17beta-estradiol and genistein, and attenuate their deleterious effect in hormone-dependent malignancies.

  17. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-09

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity.

  18. In Utero Exposure to Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Induces Testicular Effects in Neonatal Rats That Are Antagonized by Genistein Cotreatment1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven; Boisvert, Annie; Francois, Sade; Zhang, Liandong; Culty, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs) is believed to predispose males to reproductive abnormalities. Although males are exposed to combinations of chemicals, few studies have evaluated the effects of ED mixtures at environmentally relevant doses. Our previous work showed that fetal exposure to a mixture of the phytoestrogen genistein (GEN) and the plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induced unique alterations in adult testis. In this follow-up study, we examined Postnatal Day 3 (PND3) and PND6 male offspring exposed from Gestational Day 14 to parturition to corn oil, 10mg/kg GEN, DEHP, or their combination, to gain insight into the early molecular events driving long-term alterations. DEHP stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of the steroidogenic enzyme HSD3B, uniquely at PND3. DEHP also increased the mRNA expression of Nestin, a Leydig progenitor/Sertoli cell marker, and markers of Sertoli cell (Wt1), gonocyte (Plzf, Foxo1), and proliferation (Pcna) at PND3, while these genes were unchanged by the mixture. Redox (Nqo1, Sod2, Sod3, Trx, Gst, Cat) and xenobiotic transporter (Abcb1b, Abcg2) gene expression was also increased by DEHP at PND3, while attenuated when combined with GEN, suggesting the involvement of cellular stress in short-term DEHP effects and a protective effect of GEN. The direct effects of GEN and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, the principal bioactive metabolite of DEHP, on testis were investigated in PND3 organ cultures, showing a stimulatory effect of 10 μM mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on basal testosterone production that was normalized by GEN. These effects contrasted with previous reports of androgen suppression and decreased gene expression in perinatal rat testis by high DEHP doses, implying that neonatal effects are not predictive of adult effects. We propose that GEN, through an antioxidant action, normalizes reactive oxygen species-induced neonatal effects of DEHP. The notion that these EDs do not follow classical

  19. Involvement of a novel genistein-inducible multidrug efflux pump of Bradyrhizobium japonicum early in the interaction with Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Keisuke; Hidaka, Tatsuo; Wei, Min; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Itakura, Manabu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Saeki, Kazuhiko; Oomori, Hirofumi; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Uchiumi, Toshiki; Abe, Mikiko; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Ohwada, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    The early molecular dialogue between soybean and the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum is crucial for triggering their symbiotic interaction. Here we found a single large genomic locus that is widely separated from the symbiosis island and was conspicuously induced within minutes after the addition of genistein. This locus (named BjG30) contains genes for the multidrug efflux pump, TetR family transcriptional regulator, and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism. The induction of BjG30 by genistein was competitively inhibited by daidzein, although both genistein and daidzein are soybean-derived inducers of nodulation (nod) genes. Such a differential expression pattern is also observed in some legume-derived flavonoids, which structurally differ in the hydroxy/deoxy group at the 5-position. In addition, not only did the induction start far in advance of nodW and nodD1 after the addition of genistein, but the levels showed distinct concentration dependence, indicating that the induction pattern of BjG30 is completely different from that of nod genes. The deletion of genes encoding either the multidrug efflux pump or PHB metabolism, especially the former, resulted in defective nodulation performance and nitrogen-fixing capability. Taken together, these results indicate that BjG30, and especially its multidrug efflux pump, may play a key role in the early stage of symbiosis by balancing the dual functions of genistein as both a nod gene inducer and toxicant.

  20. Role of miR206 in genistein-induced rescue of pulmonary hypertension in monocrotaline model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Salil; Umar, Soban; Centala, Alexander; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2015-12-15

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive lung disease associated with proliferation of smooth muscle cells and constriction of lung microvasculature, leading to increased pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular failure, and death. We have previously shown that genistein rescues preexisting established PH by significantly improving lung and heart function. (Matori H, Umar S, Nadadur RD, Sharma S, Partow-Navid R, Afkhami M, Amjedi M, Eghbali M. Hypertension 60: 425-430, 2012). Here, we have examined the role of microRNAs (miRs) in the rescue action of genistein in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH in rats. Our miR microarray analysis on the lung samples from control, PH, and genistein-rescue group revealed that miR206, which was robustly upregulated to ∼11-fold by PH, was completely normalized to control levels by genistein treatment. Next, we examined whether knockdown of miR206 could reverse preexisting established PH. PH was induced in male rats by 60 mg/kg of MCT, and rats received three intratracheal doses of either miR206 antagomir (10 mg/kg body wt) or scrambled miR control at days 17, 21, and 26. Knockdown of miR206 resulted in significant improvement in the cardiopulmonary function, as right ventricular pressure was significantly reduced to 38.6 ± 3.61 mmHg from 61.2 ± 5.4 mmHg in PH, and right ventricular hypertrophy index was decreased to 0.35 ± 0.04 from 0.59 ± 0.037 in PH. Knockdown of miR206 reversed PH-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling in vivo and was associated with restoration of PH-induced loss of capillaries in the lungs and induction of vascular endothelial growth factor A expression. In conclusion, miR206 antagomir therapy improves cardiopulmonary function and structure and rescues preexisting severe PH in MCT rat model possibly by stimulating angiogenesis in the lung.

  1. Attenuation by genistein of sodium-chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Yano, H; Uehara, H; Nakaizumi, A

    1999-01-29

    The effects of prolonged administration of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, on sodium-chloride-enhanced induction of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and the labeling and apoptotic indices and vessel counts in the gastric mucosa and gastric cancers, were investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of the carcinogen treatment, rats were fed chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and were given s.c. injections of genistein at dosages of 15 mg/kg or 30 mg/kg body weight every other day. In week 52, the incidence of gastric cancers was significantly greater in rats fed sodium chloride than in untreated control rats. Prolonged administration of genistein at a dosage of 30 mg/kg, but not 15 mg/kg, body weight significantly reduced the incidence of gastric cancers, which was increased by oral treatment with sodium chloride. Genistein at the higher dose significantly decreased the labeling index and vessel counts of the antral mucosa and the gastric cancers (which were increased by treatment with sodium chloride) and significantly increased the apoptotic index of the antral mucosa and the cancers (which was lowered by the treatment with sodium chloride). These findings suggest that genistein attenuates gastric carcinogenesis promoted by sodium chloride, by inducing increased apoptosis and lower cell proliferation and angiogenesis of antral mucosa and gastric cancers.

  2. Genistein decreases cellular redox potential, partially suppresses cell growth in HL‑60 leukemia cells and sensitizes cells to γ‑radiation‑induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Jin Sik; Lee, Jae Ha; Cho, Eun Wie

    2014-12-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the cellular activity of genistein, based on biological experiments and epidemiological studies. The present study demonstrated that genistein inhibited the expression of cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)‑dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (cICDH), thus increasing levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human promyeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells. In genistein‑treated cells, the cellular redox potential (GSH/GSSG) was significantly decreased. This decrease in redox potential was caused by significant downregulation of the cICDH gene, generating the reducing equivalents (NADPH) for maintenance of cellular redox potential and cellular ROS level, which may regulate cell growth and cell death. Genistein‑induced ROS partially induced rapid transition into the G2/M phase by upregulation of p21wap1/cip1 and apoptotic cell death. Treatment of cells with N‑acetylcysteine, a well‑known antioxidant (ROS scavenger), not only partially restored cell growth and inhibited cell cycle arrest in G2/M, but also prevented apoptotic cell death. By contrast, normal lymphocytes did not significantly progress into the G2/M phase and radiation‑induced cell death was inhibited by genistein treatment. Therefore, genistein and γ‑irradiation together synergistically cause cell death in leukemia cells, however, genistein has a radioprotective effect in normal human lymphocytes. In conclusion, it was suggested that genistein selectively functions, not as an antioxidant, but as a pro‑oxidant in HL‑60 cells. This property can increase ionizing radiation‑induced cell cycle arrest and sensitivity to apoptotic cell death in human promyeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells, but does not cause significant damage to normal cells.

  3. Effect of estrogenic activity, and phytoestrogen and organochlorine pesticide contents in an experimental fish diet on reproduction and hepatic vitellogenin production in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Inudo, Makiko; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Naomi; Matsuoka, Munekazu; Mori, Taiki; Taniyama, Shigeto; Kadokami, Kiwao; Koga, Minoru; Shinohara, Ryota; Hutchinson, T H; Iguchi, Taisen; Arizono, Koji

    2004-12-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are giving rise to serious concerns for humans and wildlife. Phytoestrogens, such as daidzein and genistein in plants, and organochlorine pesticides are suspected EDCs, because their chemical structure is similar to that of natural or synthetic estrogens and they have estrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. We assessed estrogenic activity and dietary phytoestrogen and organochlorine pesticide contents of various fish diets made in the United Kingdom, and compared them with those features of diets made in Japan that were tested in a previous study. Genistein and daidzein were detected in all of the diets. Using an in vitro bioassay, many of these diets had higher activation of estrogen beta-receptors than estrogen alpha-receptors. Organochlorine pesticides such as hexachlorobenzene, beta-benzene hexachloride (BHC), and gamma-BHC were detected in all fish diets. On the basis of these data, we investigated the effect of differing dietary phytoestrogen content in Japanese fish diets on hepatic vitellogenin production and reproduction (fecundity and fertility) in medaka (Oryzias latipes). Assessment of the effects of a 28-day feeding period on reproduction of paired medaka did not indicate significant differences in the number of eggs produced and fertility among all feeding groups. However, hepatic vitellogenin values were significantly higher for male medaka fed diet C (genistein, 58.5 +/- 0.6 microg/g; daidzein, 37.3 +/- 0.2 microg/g) for 28 days compared with those fed diet A (genistein, < 0.8 microg/g; daidzein, < 0.8 microg/g) or diet B (genistein, 1.4 +/- 0.1 microg/g; daidzein, 2.0 +/- 0.1 microg/g). Our findings indicate that fish diets containing high amounts of phytoestrogens, such as diet C, have the potential to induce hepatic vitellogenin production in male medaka, even if reproductive parameters are unaffected. Therefore, some diets, by affecting vitellogenin production in males, may alter estrogenic activity of in

  4. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  5. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C.; Lee, Lai S.; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0–1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  6. Genistein modulates the expression of NF-κB and MAPK (p-38 and ERK1/2), thereby attenuating D-Galactosamine induced fulminant hepatic failure in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ganai, Ajaz A. Khan, Athar A. Malik, Zainul A. Farooqi, Humaira

    2015-03-01

    Genistein is an isoflavanoid abundantly found in soy. It has been found to play an important role in the prevention of various chronic diseases including cancer. In this study, we evaluated potential therapeutic properties of Genistein against D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced inflammation and hepatotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW). Genistein (5 mg/kgBW/day) was given as pre-treatment for 30 days via intra-gastric route followed by D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW) injection. The hepatoprotective and curative effects of Genistein were evident from a significant decrease in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels as well as prevention of histological damage by pre-treatment of Genistein. Genistein pre-treatment significantly inhibited the increased protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), thereby reducing nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE) levels, respectively. In addition Genistein significantly suppressed the production of D-GalN-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. These inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) activation, IKKα/β and Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation by Genistein in D-GalN-treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that Genistein may serve as a potential supplement in the prevention of hepatic and inflammatory diseases. Furthermore Genistein is able to maintain the redox potential and strengthens the antioxidant defense system of a cell. - Highlights: • First study to evaluate hepatoprotective effect of Genistein against D-GalN • Genistein prevents oxidative damage induced by D-GalN. • Genistein blunts iNOS, COX-2, NF-ĸB, IKKα/β and MAPK expression. • Genistein prevents D-GalN induced apoptosis and

  7. Bowman-Birk inhibitor and genistein among soy compounds that synergistically inhibit nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation has an important role in the development of chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of eight soybean bioactive compounds using lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Genistein, daidzein, mix isoflavone glucosides, saponin A group glyco...

  8. The effects of dietary phytoestrogens on aromatase activity in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Katie M; Holloway, Alison C; Crankshaw, Denis J; Agarwal, Sanjay K; Foster, Warren G

    2005-01-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens have been reported to inhibit aromatase activity in placental microsomes, but the effects in the human endometrium are unknown. Aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of androgens to estrogens, has recently been shown to be expressed in the endometrium of women with endometriosis and is thought to play a role in the pathophysiology of this disease. Therefore, the objective of this study was to screen dietary phytoestrogens for their ability to inhibit aromatase activity in human endometrial stromal cells (ESC) and identify potential novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of endometriosis. The inhibition of aromatase activity by direct interaction with the dietary phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, chrysin, and naringenin was tested in a cell free assay. Furthermore, test compound effects on aromatase activity in ESC cultures were also examined. Genistein and daidzein were inactive in the human recombinant aromatase assay whereas naringenin and chrysin inhibited aromatase activity. However, genistein (1 nM to 1 mM) stimulated aromatase activity in ESC whereas other phytoestrogens had no effect. Immunopositive aromatase cells were demonstrated in genistein-treated ESC but not in untreated control cultures. Taken together, our data suggest that genistein can increase aromatase activity in ESC likely via increased enzyme expression.

  9. Effect of quercetin and genistein on copper- and iron-induced lipid peroxidation in methyl linolenate.

    PubMed

    Boadi, William Y; Iyere, Peter A; Adunyah, Samuel E

    2003-01-01

    The single and combined effects of two abundant flavonoids, namely quercetin and genistein, were investigated according to their ability to inhibit the oxidation of methyl linolenate via Fenton's pathway. Antioxidative activity was determined by oxidizing methyl linolenate suspended in a buffer solution with either Fe2+ (50 microM) or Cu2+ (50 microM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.01 mM) without or with a flavonoid sample (10 or 20 microM). Lipid peroxidation products were measured by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay and the amounts of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were calculated from a calibration curve using 1,1,3,3-tetraethoxypropane as the standard. Both quercetin and genistein at the 10 or 20 microM level decreased lipid peroxidation significantly compared with their respective controls. Of the two flavonoids tested, quercetin had a more marked effect on inhibiting lipid peroxides. Peroxidation products for the control samples were higher for the Fe2+-treated samples compared with the Cu2+ samples. Combination of both flavonoids at the same dose levels continued to decrease lipid peroxidation, the effect being the same for both metal ions. The data suggest that the combined flavonoids offered better protection than the single treatments and this may be attributed to the better radical scavenging or increased chelating capabilities of the combined over the single treatments. The differences in peroxide levels for the single treatment of quercetin compared with the genistein-treated samples may reflect the structural differences between these compounds in combating oxidative stress.

  10. Phytoestrogens and prevention of breast cancer: The contentious debate

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Iqra; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Davidson, Juliet; Whitehead, Saffron

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have multiple actions within target cells, including the epigenome, which could be beneficial to the development and progression of breast cancer. In this brief review the action of phytoestrogens on oestrogen receptors, cell signalling pathways, regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, steroid synthesis and epigenetic events in relation to breast cancer are discussed. Phytoestrogens can bind weakly to oestrogen receptors (ERs) and some have a preferential affinity for ERβ which can inhibit the transcriptional growth-promoting activity of ERα. However only saturating doses of phytoestrogens, stimulating both ERα and β, exert growth inhibitory effects. Such effects on growth may be through phytoestrogens inhibiting cell signalling pathways. Phytoestrogens have also been shown to inhibit cyclin D1 expression but increase the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27) and the tumour suppressor gene p53. Again these effects are only observed at high (> 10) µmol/L doses of phytoestrogens. Finally the effects of phytoestrogens on breast cancer may be mediated by their ability to inhibit local oestrogen synthesis and induce epigenetic changes. There are, though, difficulties in reconciling epidemiological and experimental data due to the fact experimental doses, both in vivo and in vitro, far exceed the circulating concentrations of “free” unbound phytoestrogens measured in women on a high phytoestrogen diet or those taking phytoestrogen supplements. PMID:25302172

  11. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury with EUK-207 and Genistein: Effects in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, J.; Jelveh, S.; Zaidi, A.; Doctrow, S. R.; Hill, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of civilian populations to radiation due to accident, war or terrorist act is an increasing concern. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs that may be affected in people receiving partial-body irradiation and radiation injury in lung is thought to be associated with the development of a prolonged inflammatory response. Here we examined how effectively damage to the lung can be mitigated by administration of drugs initiated at different times after radiation exposure and examined response in adolescent animals for comparison with the young adult animals that we had studied previously. We studied the mitigation efficacy of the isoflavone genistein (50 mg/kg) and the salen-Mn superoxide dismutase-catalase mimetic EUK-207 (8 mg/kg), both of which have been reported to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reduce activity of the NFkB pathway. The drugs were given by subcutaneous injection to 6- to 7-week-old Fisher rats daily starting either immediately or 2 weeks after irradiation with 12 Gy to the whole thorax. The treatment was stopped at 28 weeks post irradiation and the animals were assessed for levels of inflammatory cytokines, activated macrophages, oxidative damage and fibrosis at 48 weeks post irradiation. We demonstrated that both genistein and EUK-207 delayed and suppressed the increased breathing rate associated with pneumonitis. These agents also reduced levels of oxidative damage (50–100%), levels of TGF-β1 expression (75–100%), activated macrophages (20–60%) and fibrosis (60–80%). The adolescent rats developed pneumonitis earlier following irradiation of the lung than did the adult rats leading to greater severe morbidity requiring euthanasia (~37% in adolescents vs. ~10% in young adults) but the extent of the mitigation of the damage was similar or slightly greater. PMID:23237541

  12. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  13. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether estradiol (E2) or the primary soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile rainbow trout (5 mon, 65.8 ± 1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, gen...

  14. Soy phytoestrogens are neuroprotective against stroke-like injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schreihofer, Derek A.; Redmond, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in soy are neuroprotective in experimental stroke. This protective effect is hypothesized to be mediated by phytoestrogens contained in soy, because some of these compounds have neuroprotective effects in in vitro models of cell death. We tested the ability of the soy phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein, and the daidzein metabolite equol to protect primary cortical neurons from ischemic-like injury in vitro at doses typical of circulating concentrations in human populations (0.1-1 μM). All three phytoestrogens inhibited LDH release from cells exposed to glutamate toxicity or the calcium-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin. In cells exposed to hypoxia or oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), pretreatement with the phytoestrogens inhibited cell death in an estrogen receptor (ER) dependent manner. Although OGD results in multiple modes of cell death, examination of α-spectrin cleavage and caspase-3 activation revealed that the phyoestrogens were able to inhibit apoptotic cell death in this model. In addition, blockade of phosphoinositide 3-kinase prevented the protective effects of genistein and daidzein, and blockade of mitogen-activated protein kinase prevented genistein-dependent neuroprotection. These results suggest that pretreatment with dietary levels of soy phytoestrogens can mimic neuroptotective effects observed with estrogen and appear to use the same ER-kinase pathways to inhibit apoptotic cell death. PMID:18976694

  15. Genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on genetically different acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting protein synthesis and cell proliferation while inducing apoptosis – molecular insights from an iTRAQ™ quantitative proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Teck Kwang; Port, Sarah Alexandra; Han, Jin-Hua; Chen, Chien-Shing; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a form of cancer that affects the hematopoietic precursor cells with lethal effects. We investigated the prospect of using genistein as an effective alternate therapy for AML. A two-cell line model, one possessing the FLT3 gene with the ITD mutation (MV4−11) and the other with the wildtype FLT3 gene (HL−60) has been employed. Our 8−plexed iTRAQ™−based quantitative proteomics analysis together with various functional studies demonstrated that genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on both the AML cell lines. Genistein treatment on the AML cells showed that the drug arrested the mTOR pathway leading to down−regulation of protein synthesis. Additionally, genistein treatment is found to induce cell death via apoptosis. Contrasting regulatory effects of genistein on the cell cycle of the two cell lines were also identified, with the induction of G2/M phase arrest in HL-60 cells but not in MV4−11 cells. Hence, our study highlights the potent anti-leukemic effect of genistein on AML cells irrespective of their genetic status. This suggests the potential use of genistein as an effective general drug therapy for AML patients. PMID:25859554

  16. In vitro effects of soy phytoestrogens on rat L6 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, K L; Harty, J; Roeder, M J; Winters, T A; Banz, W J

    2005-01-01

    Soy isoflavones display estrogenic activity in humans and animals, and thus are referred to as phytoestrogens. This study was performed to observe the effects of the soy isoflavones genistein, daidzein, and glycitein on cell cultures of rat skeletal muscles. [3H]Thymidine incorporation was used to determine cell proliferation, while protein synthesis and degradation were determined by tracking radiolabeled leucine. For the proliferation studies, insulin, estradiol, genistein, daidzein, or glycitein was supplemented at 0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.31, 0.63, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 microM, respectively, or in combinations with final concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, or 10 microM. Genistein reacted most similarly to estradiol, inhibiting proliferation at > or = 1 microM (P < .001). A combination of phytoestrogens resulted in significant inhibition of cell proliferation, but not to the extent observed with genistein alone. For the protein synthesis and degradation experiments, treatments of 0.1 microM dexamethasone or 1 microM concentrations of insulin, genistein, daidzein, or glycitein were used. Phytoestrogens did not inhibit or stimulate protein degradation or synthesis (P > .05). A one-tailed univariate analysis of variance revealed a trend (P < or = .1) in protein stimulation with genistein and glycitein treatments. These results suggest that the tyrosine kinase inhibiting activity of genistein may be affecting phosphorylation of the mitosis-promoting factor, preventing the advancement of the mitotic cell cycle. In addition, at higher total combined concentrations, daidzein and glycitein may be able to outcompete genistein for receptor sites. These results suggest that soy isoflavones in the diet may potentially modulate normal growth and development in humans and animals that ingest soy-based products.

  17. Modulation of estrogen receptor-beta isoforms by phytoestrogens in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Vera; Miodini, Patrizia; Di Fronzo, Giovanni; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2006-05-01

    High consumption of phytoestrogen-rich food correlates with reduced incidence of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogens on growth of pre-existing breast tumors presents concerns when planning the use of phytoestrogens as chemoprevention st rategy. Genistein, the active phytoestrogen in soy, displays weak estrogenic activity mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) with a preferential binding for the ER-beta species. However, no information is at present available on the interaction between phytoestrogens and the various isoforms generated by alternative splicing. In two human breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT20, which express variable levels of ER-beta, the effect of genistein and quercetin was evaluated singly and in comparison with 17beta-estradiol, on mRNA expression of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) isoforms evaluated by a triple primer RT-PCR assay. In T47D cells estradiol caused a 6-fold up-regulation of total ER-beta, and modified the relative expression pattern of the various isoforms, up-regulating the beta2 and down-regulating the beta5 isoform. Genistein up-regulated ER-beta2 and ER-beta1 in T47D cells, and after treatment the ER-beta2 isoform became prevalent, while in BT20 cells it almost doubled the percent contribution of ER-beta1 and ER-beta2 to total ER-beta. Quercetin did not alter the total levels nor the percent distribution of ER-beta isoforms in either cell line. Genistein, through the modulation of ER-beta isoform RNA expression inhibited estrogen-promoted cell growth, without interfering on estrogen-regulated transcription. ER-beta and its ER-beta mRNA isoforms may be involved in a self-limiting mechanism of estrogenic stimulation promoted either by the natural hormone or by weaker estrogen agonists like genistein.

  18. Genistein Exposure Inhibits Growth and Alters Steroidogenesis in Adult Mouse Antral Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) for 18 – 96 hours (h). Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36 μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36 μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96 h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18 h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  19. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  20. Using the pER8:GUS reporter system to screen for phytoestrogens from Caesalpinia sappan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wan-Chun; Wang, Hui-Chun; Chen, Guan-Yu; Yang, Juan-Cheng; Korinek, Michal; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Wu, Chih-Chung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2011-08-26

    Arabidopsis thaliana pER8:GUS, a low-cost, highly efficient, and convenient transgenic plant system, was used to assay the estrogen-like activity of 30 traditional Chinese medicines. The MeOH extract of Caesalpinia sappan exhibited significant bioactivity in this assay, and subsequent bioactivity-guided fractionation of the extract led to the isolation of one new compound, (S)-3,7-dihydroxychroman-4-one (1), and 10 known compounds. Both the plant pER8:GUS and in vitro estrogen response element reporter assays were used to evaluate the estrogenic activity of the isolated compounds, and these two systems produced comparable results. Compounds 6, 8, and 11 showed significant estrogenic activity comparable to genistein. These active compounds were determined to be nontoxic new sources of phytoestrogens. In addition, compounds 2 and 3 inhibited ERE transcription induced by 17β-estradiol. A docking model revealed that compounds 6, 8, and 11 showed high affinity to the estrogen receptor. The pER8:GUS reporter system was demonstrated to be a useful and effective technique in phytoestrogen discovery.

  1. The soy isoflavone genistein inhibits the reduction in Achilles tendon collagen content induced by ovariectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J E; Al-Nakkash, L; Peterson, A; Gump, B S; Janjulia, T; Moore, M S; Broderick, T L; Carroll, C C

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of genistein and moderate intensity exercise on Achilles tendon collagen and cross-linking in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were separated into eight groups (n = 9/group): intact or OVX, treadmill exercised or sedentary, genistein-treated (300 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. After 6 weeks, tendons were assayed for the collagen-specific amino acid hydroxyproline and hydroxylyslpyridinoline (HP). Collagen content was not influenced by exercise (P = 0.40) but was lower (P < 0.001) in OVX-vehicle rats compared with intact vehicle rats (OVX: 894 ± 35 μg collagen/mg dry weight; intact: 1185 ± 72 μg collagen/mg dry weight). In contrast, collagen content in OVX rats treated with genistein was greater (P = 0.010, 1198 ± 121 μg collagen/mg dry weight) when compared with untreated rats and was not different from intact rats (P = 0.89). HP content was lower in OVX genistein-treated rats when compared with intact genistein-treated rats, but only within the sedentary animals (P = 0.05, intact-treated: 232 ± 39 mmol/mol collagen; OVX-treated: 144 ± 21 mmol/mol collagen). Our findings suggest that ovariectomy leads to a reduction in tendon collagen, which is prevented by genistein. HP content, however, may not have increased in proportion to the addition of collagen. Genistein may be useful for improving tendon collagen content in conditions of estrogen deficiency.

  2. Phytoestrogens and the menopause.

    PubMed

    Mackey, R; Eden, J

    1998-12-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as naturally occurring plant compounds that are structurally and functionally similar to 17 beta-estradiol or that produce estrogenic effects. The commonest sources are cereals, legumes and grasses. Isoflavones are the most highly investigated subgroup of phytoestrogens. They are attenuated estrogens and behave both in vivo and in vitro as agonists and antagonists. The highest concentrations are found in soy beans and legumes. The relative potencies of isoflavones as compared to estradiol are small but they can exhibit bioactivity when tested in high concentrations. A high dietary intake of phytoestrogens was first noted to be associated with a decreased incidence of certain diseases. This epidemiological information was obtained primarily from studying Asian populations. Soy consumption is highest in Japan, where urinary levels of phytoestrogen metabolites are extremely high, and where there are lower rates of so-called 'Western' diseases, namely breast, endometrial, colon and prostatic cancers as well as atherosclerotic disease. These observations have prompted extensive research, which has demonstrated the varying degrees of estrogenicity of these phytoestrogen compounds. This article provides an epidemiological background to phytoestrogens, a brief description of their composition and biochemistry, and an overview of the literature to date on phytoestrogens with an emphasis on relief of menopausal symptoms.

  3. Genistein induces breast cancer-associated aromatase and stimulates estrogen-dependent tumor cell growth in in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, M B M; Nijmeijer, S M; de Morree, E S; de Jong, P Chr; van den Berg, M

    2011-11-18

    In breast cancer, the interaction between estrogen-producing breast adipose fibroblasts (BAFs) and estrogen-dependent epithelial tumor cells is pivotal. Local estrogen production is catalyzed by aromatase, which is differentially regulated in disease-free and tumorigenic breast tissue. The use of aromatase inhibitors to block local estrogen production has proven effective in treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. However, a major problem during breast cancer treatment is the sudden onset of menopause and many women seek for alternative medicines, such as the soy isoflavone genistein. In this study, we show that genistein can induce estrogen-dependent MCF-7 tumor cell growth and increase breast cancer-associated aromatase expression and activity in vitro. We have previously developed an in vitro breast cancer model where the positive feedback loop between primary BAFs and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 tumor cells is operational, thereby representing a more natural in vitro model for breast cancer. In this model, genistein could negate the growth inhibitory action of the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole at physiologically relevant concentrations. These data suggest that soy-based supplements might affect the efficacy of breast cancer treatment with aromatase inhibitors. Considering the high number of breast cancer patients using soy supplements to treat menopausal symptoms, the increasing risk for adverse interactions with breast cancer treatment is of major concern and should be considered with care.

  4. A pilot study of phytoestrogen content of soy foods and traditional Chinese medicines for women's health in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Li, Martin; Poon, Peter; Woo, Jean

    2004-05-01

    In view of the possible health benefits of phytoestrogens, a pilot study was carried out to quantitate the phytoestrogen content of soy foods and tea commonly consumed in Hong Kong, and also of traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) products that are prescribed for menopausal symptoms and diseases relating to the menopause. Assays of daidzein and genistein were carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography, after extraction procedures. The TCM products were found to contain phytoestrogen in quantities comparable with soy products. Moreover, certain types of Chinese tea contained large quantities of phytoestrogens in the leaves, but also yielded comparable quantities in the infusion for drinking. The phytoestrogen content of these TCM may provide a scientific basis for their actions. However, clinical efficacy can only be determined by clinical trials.

  5. Genistein affects proliferation and migration of bovine oviductal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    García, Daniela C; Valdecantos, Pablo A; Miceli, Dora C; Roldán-Olarte, Mariela

    2017-03-08

    Genistein is one of the most abundant isoflavones in soybean. This molecule induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different normal and cancer cells. Genistein has been of considerable interest due to its adverse effects on bovine reproduction, altering estrous cycle, implantation and fetal development and producing subfertility or infertility. The objective of this work was to study the effects of genistein on the expression of selected genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Primary cultures of bovine oviductal epithelial cells (BOEC) were treated with different genistein concentrations (0.2, 2 and 10μM) to analyze CYCLIN B1, BCL-2 and BAX gene expression by Real-time RT-PCR. Results showed that genistein down-regulated CYCLIN B1 expression, affecting cell cycle progression, and caused a decrease in the BCL-2/BAX ratio starting at 2μM of genistein. In addition, in order to determine if genistein affects BOEC migration, in vitro wound healing assays were performed. A significant reduction in cell migration after 12h of culture was observed at both 0.2 and 10μM genistein concentrations. Also, in the presence of genistein the percentage of mitotic cells decreased, although apoptotic cells percentages were not affected. These findings indicate that genistein has an inhibitory effect on BOEC proliferation and migration, suggesting that it could influence the normal physiology of the oviductal epithelium.

  6. Soy Isoflavone Genistein-Mediated Downregulation of miR-155 Contributes to the Anticancer Effects of Genistein

    PubMed Central

    de la Parra, Columba; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Cruz-Collazo, Ailed; Cubano, Luis; Redis, Roxana; Calin, George A.; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that dietary genistein inhibits mammary tumor growth and metastasis of the highly metastatic MDA-MB-435 cancer cells in immunocompromised mice. The purpose herein was to characterize the role of the novel oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) miR-155 in the anticancer effects of genistein in metastatic breast cancer. The effect of genistein was determined on breast cancer cell viability, apoptosis, and expression of miR-155 and its targets. At low physiologically relevant concentrations, genistein inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis in metastatic MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t breast cancer cells, without affecting the viability of nonmetastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In parallel with reduced cell viability, miR-155 is downregulated, whereas proapoptotic and anticell proliferative miR-155 targets FOXO3, PTEN, casein kinase, and p27 are upregulated in MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t cells in response to genistein treatment. However, miR-155 levels remain unchanged in response to genistein in the MCF-7 cells. Ectopic expression of miR-155 in MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t cells decreases the effects of genistein on cell viability and abrogates the effects of genistein on apoptosis and expression of proapoptotic genes. Therefore, genistein-mediated downregulation of miR-155 contributes to the anticancer effects of genistein in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26771440

  7. Developing phytoestrogens for breast cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mandy M; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women, and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Chemoprevention using phytoestrogens (PEs) for breast cancer may be a valid strategy. PEs are phytochemicals with estrogen-like structures and can be classified into four types: isoflavones, lignans, stilbenes and coumestans. They are widely distributed in diet and herbs and have shown anti-cancer activity via mechanisms including estrogen receptor modulation, aromatase inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Genistein, daidzein and resveratrol are some of the most studied PE examples. Quality control in product manufacturing and clinical study design is a critical issue in developing them as clinically effective chemopreventive agents for breast cancer.

  8. The hop phytoestrogen, 8-prenylnaringenin, reverses the ovariectomy-induced rise in skin temperature in an animal model of menopausal hot flushes.

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, James; Li, Xiao Feng; Kinsey-Jones, James; Heyerick, Arne; Brain, Susan; Milligan, Stuart; O'Byrne, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying menopausal hot flushes are poorly understood, although it is generally assumed they result from disturbances of thermoregulatory centres in the hypothalamus. 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) has been identified as a potent phytoestrogen in hops (Humulus lupulus) and there are claims that hop-containing preparations can reduce hot flushes. We have investigated the site of action of 8-PN in a rat model of menopausal hot flushes, in which the tail skin temperature (TST) is increased after oestrogen withdrawal induced by ovariectomy. Daily subcutaneous administration of either 17β-oestradiol (E2; 4 μg/kg) or 8-PN (400 μg/kg) significantly reduced the elevated TST after 2 days of treatment. Subcutaneous co-administration of either E2 or 8-PN with the oestrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182,780 (200 μg/kg), which is thought not to cross the blood-brain-barrier, completely blocked the effect of E2 and 8-PN on TST. The ERα and ERβ specific agonists, PPT (100 μg/kg) and DPN (60 μg/kg) respectively, both significantly reversed the raised TST in ovariectomised rats. These observations suggest that the regulation of the vasomotor response by oestrogens and phytoestrogens is mediated, at least in part, by peripheral mechanisms involving both ERα and ERβ. PMID:17088409

  9. Reproductive consequences of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Brown, Alexandria C; Montgomery, Tracy M; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2011-04-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that can act as endocrine disruptors in vertebrates. Biologically active levels of phytoestrogens have been found in aquatic habitats near wood pulp and paper mills, biofuel manufacturing plants, sewage-treatment plants, and agricultural fields. Phytoestrogens are known to cause hormonal and gonadal changes in male fish, but few studies have connected these effects to outcomes relevant to reproductive success. In one experiment, we exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant (1 μg L(-1)) and pharmacological concentrations (1000 μg L(-1)) of the phytoestrogen genistein as well as to a positive control of waterborne 17β-estradiol (E2; 1 μg L(-1)), and a negative control of untreated water. In a second experiment, we exposed male B. splendens to environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg L(-1)) of genistein and β-sitosterol singly and in combination as well as to the positive and negative controls. All exposures were 21 days in duration. We measured sex-steroid hormone levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm concentration and motility, and fertilization success in these fish. We found that exposure to genistein did not affect circulating levels of the androgen 11-ketotestosterone or the estrogen E2 relative to negative-control fish. We also found that neither of the compounds nor their mixture affected GSI, sperm concentration or motility, or fertilization success in exposed fish relative to negative-control fish. However, fish exposed to phytoestrogens showed some evidence of fewer but more motile sperm than fish exposed to the positive control E2. We conclude that sexually mature male B. splendens are relatively immune to reproductive impairments from short-term exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens.

  10. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  11. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric fragmentation study of phytoestrogens as their trimethylsilyl derivatives: Identification in soy milk and wastewater samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barber, L.B.; Thurman, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical method for the identification of eight plant phytoestrogens (biochanin A, coumestrol, daidzein, equol, formononetin, glycitein, genistein and prunetin) in soy products and wastewater samples was developed using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS). The phytoestrogens were derivatized as their trimethylsilyl ethers with trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). The phytoestrogens were isolated from all samples with liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Daidzein-d4 and genistein-d4 labeled standards were used as internal standards before extraction and derivatization. The fragmentation patterns of the phytoestrogens were investigated by isolating and fragmenting the precursor ions in the ion-trap and a typical fragmentation involved the loss of a methyl and a carbonyl group. Two characteristic fragment ions for each analyte were chosen for identification and confirmation. The developed methodology was applied to the identification and confirmation of phytoestrogens in soy milk, in wastewater effluent from a soy-milk processing plant, and in wastewater (influent and effluent) from a treatment plant. Detected concentrations of genistein ranged from 50,000 ??g/L and 2000 ??g/L in soy milk and in wastewater from a soy-plant, respectively, to 20 ??g/L and <1 ??g/L for influent and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, respectively. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Tissue responsiveness to estradiol and genistein in the sea bass liver and scale.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Andrade, André; Santos, Soraia; Power, Deborah M

    2016-04-01

    As in mammals, estrogens in fish are essential for reproduction but also important regulators of mineral homeostasis. Fish scales are a non-conventional target tissue responsive to estradiol and constitute a good model to study mineralized tissues effects and mechanisms of action of estrogenic compounds, including phytoestrogens. The responsiveness to estradiol and the phytoestrogen genistein, was compared between the scales and the liver, a classical estrogenic target, in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Injection with estradiol and genistein significantly increased circulating vitellogenin (for both compounds) and mineral levels (estradiol only) and genistein also significantly increased scale enzymatic activities suggesting it increased mineral turnover. The repertoire, abundance and estrogenic regulation of nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR1, 2a and 2b) and membrane G-protein receptors (GPER and GPER-like) were different between liver and scales, which presumably explains the tissue-specific changes detected in estrogen-responsive gene expression. In scales changes in gene expression mainly consisted of small rapid increases, while in liver strong, sustained increases/decreases in gene expression occurred. Similar but not overlapping gene expression changes were observed in response to both estradiol and genistein. This study demonstrates for the first time the expression of membrane estrogen receptors in scales and that estrogens and phytoestrogens, to which fish may be exposed in the wild or in aquaculture, both affect liver and mineralized tissues in a tissue-specific manner.

  13. Dietary phytoestrogens accelerate the time of vaginal opening in immature CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thigpen, Julius E; Haseman, Joseph K; Saunders, Hannah E; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Grant, Mary G; Forsythe, Diane B

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to determine the effects of dietary phytoestrogens on the time of vaginal opening (VO) in immature CD-1 mice, and to correlate it with phytoestrogen and total metabolizable energy (ME) contents of the diet in an effort to determine the most appropriate diets(s) for comparing or evaluating the estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity of endocrine disruptor compounds (EDC). Mice were weaned at postnatal day (PND) 15 and fed the test diets from PND 15 to 30. Vaginal opening was recorded from PND 20 to 30. The phytoestrogen content of the diet was highly predictive (P < 0.0001) of the proportion of mice with VO at PND 24. Total ME content also was significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with time of VO, although this variable was somewhat less predictive than was phytoestrogen content. Time of VO in mice was significantly (P < 0.05) accelerated in mice fed diets high in phytoestrogens, compared with those containing low phytoestrogen content. It was concluded that: dietary daidzein and genistein can significantly (P < 0.01) accelerate the time of VO in CD-1 mice; the advancement in time of VO is more highly correlated with daidzein and genistein contents of the diets than with total ME content; advancement in the time of VO is a sensitive end point for evaluating the estrogenic activity of EDCs, and should be part of the standard protocol for evaluating EDCs. Phytoestrogen-free diet(s) containing the same amount of ME should be used in bioassays that compare the time of VO, or increases in uterine weight as end points for evaluating the estrogenic activity of an EDC.

  14. Genistein regulates the IL-1 beta induced activation of MAPKs in human periodontal ligament cells through G protein-coupled receptor 30.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Jun; Liu, Feng; Lin, Zhi-Kai; Xie, Yu-Feng; Xu, Jia-Li; Tong, Qing-Chun; Shu, Rong

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) cells are fibroblasts that play key roles in tissue integrity, periodontal inflammation and tissue regeneration in the periodontium. The periodontal tissue destruction in periodontitis is mediated by host tissue-produced inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Here, we report the expression of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30, also known as G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 GPER) in human PDL cells and its regulation by IL-1β. IL-1β-induced GPR30 expression in human PDL cells leads to the activation of multiple signaling pathways, including MAPK, NF-κB and PI3K. In contrast, genistein, an estrogen receptor ligand, postpones the activation of MAPKs induced by IL-1β. Moreover, the inhibition of GPR30 by G15, a GPR30-specific antagonist, eliminates this delay. Thus, genistein plays a role in the regulation of MAPK activation via GPR30, and GPR30 represents a novel target regulated by steroid hormones in PDL cells.

  15. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  16. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm.

  17. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual.

  18. Effect of genistein on steroid hormone production in the pregnant rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R M; Phillippi, P P; Swan, K F; Henson, M C

    1999-10-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have been reported to cause reproductive problems in sheep and rats. This research was conducted to determine the effects of genistein fed to rhesus monkeys during pregnancy, with specific interest on fetal growth and steroidogenesis in the maternal-fetoplacental unit. Two groups of five monkeys each were selected in early stages of pregnancy. One group was administered genistein in a fruit treat each weekday until Cesarean section 10 days prior to term. The second, control group, received fruit treats without genistein. Maternal blood samples were collected on Tuesday and Friday of each week. At delivery, samples were collected from the maternal peripheral circulation, uterine veins, uterine-ovarian veins, and the fetal heart. Comparisons between control and genistein-treated monkeys revealed no differences in the maternal weight gained during pregnancy, or in fetal weights or placental weights at delivery. Serum was assayed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) for estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and estrone. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were noted in progesterone or DHEA-S levels at delivery or during the pregnancy; however, estradiol levels were higher (P < 0.05) in the four areas studied at delivery and in the maternal blood with advancing gestation. Additionally, estrone levels tended to increase more rapidly (P = 0. 057) in the maternal blood of monkeys receiving genistein than in untreated controls, suggesting that genistein may stimulate the deconjugation of estrone in the gut, thus allowing its reabsorption into the peripheral circulation and conversion to estradiol.

  19. Phytoestrogens levels determination in the cord blood from Malaysia rural and urban populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, A.M. . E-mail: mustafa@ummc.edu.my; Malintan, N.T.; Seelan, S.; Zhan, Z.; Mohamed, Z.; Hassan, J.; Pendek, R.; Hussain, R.; Ito, N.

    2007-07-01

    This study is a result of an analysis of free and conjugated phytoestrogens daidzein, genistein, daidzin, genistin and coumesterol in human cord blood plasma using LCMS. Cord blood was collected from urban and rural populations of Malaysia (n = 300) to establish a simple preliminary database on the levels of the analyzed compounds in the collected samples. The study also aimed to look at the levels of phytoestrogens in babies during birth as this may have a profound effect on the developmental process. The sample clean up was carried out by solid-phase extraction using C18 column and passed through DEAE sephadex gel before analysis by LCMS. The mean concentrations of total phytoestrogens were daidzein (1.4 {+-} 2.9 ng/ml), genistein (3.7 {+-} 2.8 ng/ml), daidzin (3.5 {+-} 3.1 ng/ml), genistin (19.5 {+-} 4.2 ng/ml) and coumesterol (3.3 {+-} 3.3 ng/ml). Distribution of phytoestrogen was found to be higher in samples collected from rural areas compared to that of urban areas.

  20. Phytoestrogens alter the reproductive organ development in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoekkynen, Ari . E-mail: ryokkyne@cc.joensuu.fi; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykoenen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Haenninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Kukkonen, Jussi V.K.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reproductive effects of two perorally applied phytoestrogens, genistein (8 mg/kg/day) and {beta}-sitosterol (50 mg/kg/day), on the mink (Mustela vison) at human dietary exposure levels. Parental generations were exposed over 9 months to these phytoestrogens and their offspring were exposed via gestation and lactation. Parents and their offspring were sampled 21 days after the birth of the kits. Sex hormone levels, sperm quality, organ weights, and development of the kits were examined. The exposed females were heavier than the control females at the 1st postnatal day (PND). The control kits were heavier than the exposed kits from the 1st to the 21st PND. Phytoestrogens did not affect the organ weights of the adult minks, but the relative testicular weight of the exposed kits was higher than in the control kits. The relative prostate weight was higher and the relative uterine weight lower in the {beta}-sitosterol-exposed kits than in the control kits. Moreover, the plasma dihydrotestosterone levels were lower in the genistein-exposed male kits compared to the control male kits. This study could not explain the mechanisms behind these alterations. The results indicate that perinatal phytoestrogen exposures cause alterations in the weight of the reproductive organs of the mink kits.

  1. Role of estrogen receptors and aromatase on brain protein synthesis rates in ovariectomized female rats fed genistein.

    PubMed

    Lyou, Sunok; Kawano, Susumu; Yamada, Takashi; Okuyama, Satoshi; Terashima, Takehiko; Hayase, Kazutoshi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-08-01

    We have reported that the dietary addition of genistein, a phytoestrogen found abundantly in soy products, stimulates brain protein synthesis rates of ovariectomized female rats. In the present study, we determine whether stimulation of brain protein synthesis rates in ovariectomized female rats by the dietary addition of genistein was conducted via estrogen receptors and aromatase-mediating actions. After ovariectomy, Wistar female rats were treated with genistein, the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780, and/or fadrozole a systemic aromatase inhibitor. In the cerebral cortex, the cerebellum and the hypothalamus, the fractional (Ks) rates of protein synthesis were increased by the dietary addition of genistein. These effects of genistein were inhibited by the administration of ICI 182,780 and fadrozole. However, the degrees to which ICI 182,780 and fadrozole inhibited the effects of genistein differed depending on the brain region. This result suggests that dietary genistein elevates the rate of protein synthesis in the brain of ovariectomized female rats. In addition, the estrogen receptors of the brain and the aromatase of the peripheral tissue and brain are, at least partly, related to the rate of brain protein synthesis caused by genistein.

  2. Genistein mediated histone acetylation and demethylation activates tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Urakami, Shinji; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Majid, Shahana; Igawa, Mikio; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2008-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen that has been reported to suppress the AKT signaling pathway in several malignancies. However, the molecular mechanism of genistein action is not known. We tested the hypothesis that genistein activates expression of several aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) that have unmethylated promoters such as PTEN, CYLD, p53 and FOXO3a. We report here that genistein activates TSGs through remodeling of the heterochromatic domains at promoters in prostate cancer cells by modulating histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation and deacetylation. Genistein activation involved demethylation and acetylation of H3-K9 at the PTEN and the CYLD promoter, while acetylation of H3-K9 at the p53 and the FOXO3a promoter occurred through reduction of endogenous SIRT1 activity. There was a decrease of SIRT1 expression and accumulation of SIRT1 in the cytoplasm from the nucleus. Increased expression of these TSGs was also reciprocally related to attenuation of phosphorylated-AKT and NF-kappaB binding activity in prostate cancer cells. This is the first report describing a novel epigenetic pathway that activates TSGs by modulating either histone H3-Lysine 9 (H3-K9) methylation or deacetylation at gene promoters leading to inhibition of the AKT signaling pathway. These findings strengthen the understanding of how genistein may be chemoprotective in prostate cancer.

  3. Genistein alters growth but is not toxic to the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Wayne A; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2002-10-01

    The mortality of clinical prostate cancer is lower in Asian populations than in American or European men. Asian men typically consume more soy than their Western counterparts, leading to the investigation of individual components, particularly phytoestrogens, as protective factors against prostate cancer. Genistein, the predominant isoflavone in soy, has been reported to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer in animal models, but the underlying biological action remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the effects of the phytoestrogen, genistein and the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), as a control, on development and function of the rat dorsolateral prostate (DLP) when given in the diet. The effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) injections were also tested. Analysis of individual lobes of the DLP revealed that 1000 mg/kg, but not 250 mg/kg, of a genistein AIN-76A diet slightly reduced lateral prostate type 1 (LP1) bud perimeter. However, expression of the secretory dorsal protein 1 (DP1) and 5alpha-reductase type II activity were not altered in the prostate. This suggested that prostate differentiation, and not toxicity, had occurred. DES in the diet reduced and testosterone injections elevated relative prostate weights and perimeters of the dorsal, LP1, lateral prostate type 2 and DP1 expression. DHT increased relative prostate weights but did not significantly increase individual lobe perimeter. Unlike DES, maximally tolerated doses of genistein in the diet were not toxic to the rat prostate.

  4. Aquatic photochemistry of isoflavone phytoestrogens: degradation kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Felcyn, Jacob R; Davis, Jasmine C C; Tran, Loan H; Berude, John C; Latch, Douglas E

    2012-06-19

    Isoflavones are plant-derived chemicals that are potential endocrine disruptors. Although some recent studies have detected isoflavones in natural waters, little is known about their aquatic fates. The photochemical behaviors of the isoflavones daidzein, formononetin, biochanin A, genistein, and equol were studied under simulated solar light and natural sunlight. All of these phytoestrogens were found to be photolabile under certain conditions. Daidzein and formononetin degraded primarily by direct photolysis. Their expected near-surface summer half-lives in pH 7 water at 47° latitude are expected to be 10 and 4.6 h, respectively. Biochanin A, genistein, and equol degraded relatively slowly by direct photolysis at environmentally realistic pH values, though they showed significant degradation rate enhancements in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). The indirect photolysis rates for these compounds scaled with NOM concentration, and NOM from microbial origin was found to be a more potent photosensitizer than NOM from terrestrial sources. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the indirect photolysis pathways responsible for the rate enhancements. Results of these studies implicate reaction with both singlet oxygen and excited state triplet NOM. Environmental half-lives for biochanin A, genistein, and equol are expected to vary on the basis of pH as well as NOM source and concentration.

  5. Modulation of Aromatase by Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lephart, Edwin D.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatase enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many human tissues. Estrogens are known to stimulate cellular proliferation associated with certain cancers and protect against adverse symptoms during the peri- and postmenopausal intervals. Phytoestrogens are a group of plant derived naturally occurring compounds that have chemical structures similar to estrogen. Since phytoestrogens are known to be constituents of animal/human food sources, these compounds have received increased research attention. Phytoestrogens may contribute to decreased cancer risk by the inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity and CYP19 gene expression in human tissues. This review covers (a) the aromatase enzyme (historical descriptions on function, activity, and gene characteristics), (b) phytoestrogens in their classifications and applications to human health, and (c) a chronological coverage of aromatase activity modulated by phytoestrogens from the early 1980s to 2015. In general, phytoestrogens act as aromatase inhibitors by (a) decreasing aromatase gene expression, (b) inhibiting the aromatase enzyme itself, or (c) in some cases acting at both levels of regulation. The findings presented herein are consistent with estrogen's impact on health and phytoestrogen's potential as anticancer treatments, but well-controlled, large-scale studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of phytoestrogens on breast cancer and age-related diseases. PMID:26798508

  6. Chronic Dietary Exposure to a Low-Dose Mixture of Genistein and Vinclozolin Modifies the Reproductive Axis, Testis Transcriptome, and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Florence; Mondon, Françoise; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal; Lesaffre, Corinne; Fulla, Yvonne; Berges, Raymond; Cravedi, Jean Pierre; Vaiman, Daniel; Auger, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background The reproductive consequences and mechanisms of action of chronic exposure to low-dose endocrine disruptors are poorly understood. Objective We assessed the effects of a continuous, low-dose exposure to a phytoestrogen (genistein) and/or an antiandrogenic food contaminant (vinclozolin) on the male reproductive tract and fertility. Methods Male rats were exposed by gavage to genistein and vinclozolin from conception to adulthood, alone or in combination, at low doses (1 mg/kg/day) or higher doses (10 and 30 mg/kg/day). We studied a number of standard reproductive toxicology end points and also assessed testicular mRNA expression profiles using long-oligonucleotide microarrays. Results The low-dose mixture and high-dose vinclozolin produced the most significant alterations in adults: decreased sperm counts, reduced sperm motion parameters, decreased litter sizes, and increased post implantation loss. Testicular mRNA expression profiles for these exposure conditions were strongly correlated. Functional clustering indicated that many of the genes induced belong to the “neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions” family encompassing several hormonally related actors (e.g., follicle-stimulating hormone and its receptor). All exposure conditions decreased the levels of mRNAs involved in ribosome function, indicating probable decreased protein production. Conclusions Our study shows that chronic exposure to a mixture of a dose of a phytoestrogen equivalent to that in the human diet and a low dose—albeit not environmental—of a common anti-androgenic food contaminant may seriously affect the male reproductive tract and fertility. PMID:19672408

  7. Genistein: A Boon for Mitigating Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Daglia, Maria; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Sobarzo-Sanchez, Eduardo; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In last decades, diet and dietary components have been regarded as important strategies to prevent the development or mitigate numerous chronic diseases, including inflammation, cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, etc. One of the most common dietary components of Asian population is soy. A plethora of research shows the promising effect of soy soy-based foodstuffs and genistein, which is one of the predominant isoflavone compounds, in the prevention and mitigation of stroke. Growing evidence shows that genistein, which is a selective estrogen receptor modulator, mitigates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the modification of oxidative stress and molecular pathways. The promising pharmacological role of genistein is attributed to its ability to suppress nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and Akt signaling pathway, direct antioxidant action, and targeting estrogen and androgen-mediated molecular pathways which help to mitigate stroke damages and prolong cell survival. In this work, we systematically review the current reports on the therapeutic role of genistein against ischemic stroke and its molecular mechanism of actions.

  8. Estrogen agonist genistein differentially influences the cognitive and motor disorders in an ovariectomized animal model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Arbabi, Elaheh; Hamidi, Gholamali; Talaei, Sayyed Alireza; Salami, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder associated with motor disabilities and cognitive dysfunction as well. Evidence indicates that PD occurs less frequently in women than men, confirming a role for steroid hormones in protection of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. It is reported that soy genistein, an estrogen agonist phytoestrogen, display neuroprotective effects against neuronal death. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein in animal models of Parkinsonism (P) and Parkinsonism + ovariectomized (OP). Materials and Methods: The experiments were carried out on the control, P and OP animals. Learning and memory abilities were evaluated using Morris water maze. The latency and speed of locating the platform were measured as cognitive indices. Motor behaviors were assessed by testing the animals in rota rod and the latency to fall from the rod was scored. Results: We found that Parkinsonism leads to the cognitive and motor disabilities; ovariectomy intensified these disorders. Whereas genistein treatment improved the maze performances in both P and OP animals it failed to influence the kinetic problems. Genistein displayed a neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons. Conclusion: Positive impact of genistein on the spatial learning and memory may reflect its effects on the nigrostriatal pathway and striatum. Nevertheless, ineffectiveness of genistein on the motor disorders, despite its neuroprotective impacts, led us to conclude that the cognitive improvement by genistein may also contribute to its effects in other areas of brain. PMID:28096960

  9. Phytoestrogens regulate vitamin D metabolism in the mouse colon: relevance for colon tumor prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Kállay, Enikö; Adlercreutz, Herman; Farhan, Hesso; Lechner, Daniel; Bajna, Erika; Gerdenitsch, Waltraud; Campbell, Moray; Cross, Heide S

    2002-11-01

    Soybean products are highly represented in the traditional Asian diet. Major components of soy proteins are phytoestrogens, such as isoflavones. They may be responsible for the extremely low incidence of prostate and mammary tumors and possibly also of colon cancer in countries such as China and Japan. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 level is inversely related to incidence of some cancers. Levels are determined by skin exposure to ultraviolet light or, to a minor extent, nutritional uptake and by subsequent conversion of the precursor vitamin D to the active hormone by the cytochrome P450 hydroxylases CYP27A1, CYP27B1 (responsible for synthesis) and CYP24 (responsible for catabolism) in liver and kidney. However, vitamin D synthesis is also found in colonocytes and is enhanced during incipient malignancy. This may indicate an autocrine/paracrine role for this differentiation-inducing hormone in defense against progression. We were able to demonstrate that either a single large oral dose of genistein or feeding soy protein for 4 mo elevated CYP27B1 and decreased CYP24 expression in the mouse colon. Our data therefore suggest that an inverse correlation of soy product consumption with colon tumor incidence may be consequent to enhanced colonic synthesis of the antimitotic hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

  10. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-κB and TNF-α expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results suggest that genistein supplementation reduces oxidative stress by increasing antioxidant capacity and modulating proinflammatory cytokine expression during the early stage of wound healing.

  11. Kaempferol, a phytoestrogen, suppressed triclosan-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastatic-related behaviors of MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geum-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Hwang, Kyung-A

    2017-01-01

    As a phytoestrogen, kaempferol is known to play a chemopreventive role inhibiting carcinogenesis and cancer progression. In this study, the influences of triclosan, an anti-bacterial agent recently known for an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC), and kaempferol on breast cancer progression were examined by measuring their effects on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastatic-related behaviors of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Morphological changes of MCF-7 cells were observed, and a wound-healing assay was performed after the treatment of triclosan and kaempferol. The effects of triclosan and kaempferol on protein expression of EMT-related markers such as E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Slug and metastasis-related markers such as cathepsin B, D, MMP-2 and -9 were investigated by Western blot assay. In microscopic observations, triclosan (10(-6)M) or E2 (10(-9)M) induced transition to mesenchymal phenotype of MCF-7 cells compared with the control. Co-treatment of ICI 182,780 (10(-8)M), an ER antagonist, or kaempferol (25μM) with E2 or triclosan restored the cellular morphology to an epithelial phenotype. In a wound-healing scratch and a transwell migration assay, triclosan enhanced migration and invasion of MCF-7 cells, but co-treatment of kaempferol or ICI 182,780 reduced the migration and invasion ability of MCF-7 cells to the control level. In addition, kaempferol effectively suppressed E2 or triclosan-induced protein expressions of EMT and metastasis promoting markers. Taken together, triclosan may be a distinct xenoestrogenic EDC to promote EMT, migration, and invasion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through ER. On the other hand, kaempferol can be an alternative chemopreventive agent to effectively suppress the metastatic behavior of breast cancer induced by an endogenous estrogen as well as exogenous xenoestrogenic compounds including triclosan.

  12. Genistein directly induces cardiac CFTR chloride current by a tyrosine kinase-independent and protein kinase A-independent pathway in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C E; Chen, S A; Chang, M S; Lin, C I; Luk, H N

    1997-06-09

    With one-suction electrode voltage-clamp technique, we demonstrated that genistein, a tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor, could directly activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) chloride current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. The activation showed concentration-dependent effect with the estimated IC50 of 39.7 microM. Tyrphostin 51, another TK inhibitor, had no effect, suggesting that genistein's effect might be unrelated to TK inhibition. After the chloride current had been activated by the maximally elevated intracellular cAMP content by saturating concentration of isoproterenol, forskolin and IBMX, genistein could further enhance the current. Pre-treatment with saturating concentration of a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, or other protein kinase inhibitors H-8 and H-9 in the perfusate or intracellularly could not prevent the activation of the current by genistein, suggesting a PKA-independent activity. Furthermore, saturating concentration of calyculin A, a specific inhibitor of phosphotase 1 and 2A, in the perfusate or intracellularly could not block genistein's action. It is possible that genistein opens the channels directly or inhibits the dephosphorylation process of CFTR, which is not sensitive calyculin A.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of genistein and folic acid on apoptosis of rat cultured cortical neurons induced by beta-amyloid 31-35.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huan-Ling; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Jin-Fang; Xiao, Rong

    2009-09-01

    Genistein and folic acid have been reported respectively to protect against the development of cognitive dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanism(s) for this protection remain unknown. In this report, the mechanism(s) contributing to the neuroprotective effects of genistein and folic acid were explored using rat cortical neuron cultures. We found that genistein and folic acid, both separately and collaboratively, increased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in beta-amyloid (Abeta) 31-35-treated neurons. Furthermore, reduced percentage of comet cells and shortened tail length were observed in the neurons treated with genistein or folic acid. A more significant reduction in tail length of the comet neurons was observed in the co-administered neurons. RT-PCR analysis of the cultured cortical neurons showed down-regulated expression of p53, bax and caspase-3, but up-regulated expression of bcl-2 in the three neuroprotective treatment groups compared with neurons from the Abeta31-35 solo-treated group. In a nuclear dyeing experiment using Hoechst 33342, we found that both genistein and folic acid prevent neuronal apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest that the mechanism underlying the neuroprotection of genistein and folic acid singly or in combination observed in cultured cortical neuron studies might be related to their anti-apoptotic properties.

  14. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  15. All-trans retinoic acid and genistein induce cell apoptosis in OVCAR-3 cells by increasing the P14 tumor suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Zamani, Saeed; Mardani, Mohammad; Beni, Batool Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) alone or in combination with genistein (GEN) in p14 tumor suppressor gene and subsequent apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR-3). The cells were treated with ATRA or GEN at concentrations of 50 and 25 μM respectively, either alone or in combination for 24 and 48 h. The cell viability was evaluated using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of cell apoptosis was determined using flow cytometry and p14 gene expression was measured using real time PCR. The MTT results showed that in both ATRA and GEN treated groups, the cell viabilityviability in group treated for 48 h was significantly lower than group treated for 24 h. The flow cytometry results showed that the percentage of apoptotic cells in groups that treated with ATRA and GEN in combination for 24 h and 48 h was significantly more than all other tested groups. The real time results showed that the mRNA level of p14 in cells treated with both drugs for 48 h was significantly higher than all other groups. In conclusion, we confirm that GEN in combination with ATRA is an effective strategy to up regulate the p14 tumor suppressor gene and induce cell apoptosis in OVCAR-3 cell line. PMID:28003845

  16. Effects of genistein in combination with conjugated estrogens on endometrial hyperplasia and metabolic dysfunction in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), which combines a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) with one or more estrogens, is a novel approach to menopausal therapy. It has been demonstrated that the phytoestrogen genistein (GEN) exhibits mixed estrogen receptor agonist and antagonist activity, suggesting that GEN may have potential for use as a natural SERM. We evaluated, for the first time, the effects of GEN, conjugated estrogens (CE), and their pairing effects as a TSEC treatment on estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia and metabolic dysfunction in ovariectomized (OVX) mice fed a high-fat diet. CE replacement prevented fat accumulation in the adipose tissue and liver, improved glucose homeostasis, and induced endometrial hyperplasia in OVX mice. GEN at 100 mg/kg showed CE mimetic effects in preventing ovariectomy-induced metabolic dysfunctions without endometrial stimulation. Combination treatments with CE and GEN prevented metabolic dysfunctions more strongly than CE alone, but at both low and high doses, GEN did not reverse CE-induced endometrial hyperplasia. In addition, we found that in a TSEC regimen, a typical SERM raloxifene maintains the metabolic benefits of CE while simultaneously protecting the endometrium in OVX mice. These findings indicate that GEN acts as an estrogen agonist in metabolic regulation, but has no SERM function in the uteri of OVX mice.

  17. SPECT/CT analysis of splenic function in genistein-treated malaria-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Ran; Kang, Sung-A; Ryu, Jeongeun; Yeom, Eunseop; Kim, Mun Ki; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Spleen traps malaria-infected red blood cells, thereby leading to splenomegaly. Splenomegaly induces impairment in splenic function, i.e., rupture. Therefore, splenomegaly inhibition is required to protect the spleen. In our previous study, genistein was found to have an influence on malaria-induced splenomegaly. However, the effect of genistein in malaria-induced splenomegaly, especially on the function of spleen, has not been fully investigated. In this study, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining images show that genistein partially prevents malaria-induced architectural disruption of spleen. In addition, genistein decreases transgenic Plasmodium parasites accumulation in the spleen. Genistein treatment can protect splenic function from impairment caused by malaria infection. To examine the functions of malaria-infected spleen, we employed single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) technology. Red blood cells are specifically radiolabeled with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4(-)) and trapped inside the spleen. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the spleen of infected mice are higher than those of naive and genistein-treated mice. However, genistein reduces the malaria-induced trapping capacity of spleen for heat-damaged radiolabeled RBCs, while exhibiting a protective effect against malaria. Considering these results, we suggested that genistein could be effectively used in combination therapy for malaria-induced splenic impairment.

  18. Effects of feeding dairy cows different legume-grass silages on milk phytoestrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Höjer, A; Adler, S; Purup, S; Hansen-Møller, J; Martinsson, K; Steinshamn, H; Gustavsson, A-M

    2012-08-01

    Phytoestrogens are hormone-like substances in plants that can substantially influence human health (positively or negatively), and when fed to dairy cows are partly transferred to their milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of varying the botanical composition and regrowth interval of legume-grass silage on phytoestrogen intake and milk phytoestrogen concentrations. In one experiment, 15 Swedish Red dairy cows were fed 2- or 3-cut red clover-grass silage, or 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage. In a second experiment, 16 Norwegian Red dairy cows were fed short-term ley silage with red clover or long-term ley silage with white clover, and the effects of supplementation with α-tocopherol were also tested. High concentrations of formononetin and biochanin A were found in all silage mixtures with red clover. The milk concentration of equol was highest for cows on the 2-cut red clover-grass silage diet (1,494 μg/kg of milk). Because of the metabolism of biochanin A, genistein, and prunetin, their concentrations in milk and the apparent recovery were low. Coumestrol was detected in only short-term and long-term ley silage mixtures, and its milk concentration was low. Concentrations of secoisolariciresinol and matairesinol were higher in 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass and long-term ley silage mixtures, those with legume species other than red clover, and the highest grass proportions. The 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet also resulted in higher enterolactone concentration than the other diets (226 μg/kg of milk). Lengthening the regrowth interval increased the intake of secoisolariciresinol and decreased the recovery of lignans. Feeding long-term ley silage resulted in higher milk lignan concentrations but lower milk isoflavone concentrations than feeding short-term ley silage. The apparent recovery of all phytoestrogens except prunetin was highest on the 2-cut birdsfoot trefoil-grass silage diet. No effect of α-tocopherol supplementation

  19. Diverse Effects of Phytoestrogens on the Reproductive Performance: Cow as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Wocławek-Potocka, Izabela; Mannelli, Chiara; Boruszewska, Dorota; Kowalczyk-Zieba, Ilona; Waśniewski, Tomasz; Skarżyński, Dariusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens, polyphenolic compounds derived from plants, are more and more common constituents of human and animal diets. In most of the cases, these chemicals are much less potent than endogenous estrogens but exert their biological effects via similar mechanisms of action. The most common source of phytoestrogen exposure to humans as well as ruminants is soybean-derived foods that are rich in the isoflavones genistein and daidzein being metabolized in the digestive tract to even more potent metabolites—para-ethyl-phenol and equol. Phytoestrogens have recently come into considerable interest due to the increasing information on their adverse effects in human and animal reproduction, increasing the number of people substituting animal proteins with plant-derived proteins. Finally, the soybean becomes the main source of protein in animal fodder because of an absolute prohibition of bone meal use for animal feeding in 1995 in Europe. The review describes how exposure of soybean-derived phytoestrogens can have adverse effects on reproductive performance in female adults. PMID:23710176

  20. The Stimulatory Effect of Strontium Ions on Phytoestrogens Content in Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Tomasz; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szymczak, Grażyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Kocjan, Ryszard; Świeboda, Ryszard

    2016-01-14

    The amount of secondary metabolites in plants can be enhanced or reduced by various external factors. In this study, the effect of strontium ions on the production of phytoestrogens in soybeans was investigated. The plants were treated with Hoagland's solution, modified with Sr(2+) with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mM, and were grown for 14 days in hydroponic cultivation. After harvest, soybean plants were separated into roots and shoots, dried, and pulverized. The plant material was extracted with methanol and hydrolyzed. Phytoestrogens were quantified by HPLC. The significant increase in the concentration of the compounds of interest was observed for all tested concentrations of strontium ions when compared to control. Sr(2+) at a concentration of 2 mM was the strongest elicitor, and the amount of phytoestrogens in plant increased ca. 2.70, 1.92, 3.77 and 2.88-fold, for daidzein, coumestrol, genistein and formononetin, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 liver cell models after treatment with extracts from 2 mM Sr(2+)-stressed soybean plants when compared to extracts from non-stressed plants. Our results indicate that the addition of strontium ions to the culture media may be used to functionalize soybean plants with enhanced phytoestrogen content.

  1. Understanding the selectivity of genistein for human estrogen receptor-beta using X-ray crystallography and computational methods.

    PubMed

    Manas, Eric S; Xu, Zhang B; Unwalla, Rayomand J; Somers, William S

    2004-12-01

    We present X-ray crystallographic and molecular modeling studies of estrogen receptors-alpha and -beta complexed with the estrogen receptor-beta-selective phytoestrogen genistein, and coactivator-derived NR box peptides containing an LXXLL motif. We demonstrate that the ligand binding mode is essentially identical when genistein is bound to both isoforms, despite the considerably weaker affinity of this ligand for estrogen receptor-alpha. In addition, we examine subtle differences between binding site residues, providing an explanation for why genistein is modestly selective for the beta isoform. To this end, we also present the results of quantum chemical studies and thermodynamic arguments that yield insight to the nature of the interactions leading to estrogen receptor-beta selectivity. The importance of our analysis to structure-based drug design is discussed.

  2. Variations in plasma phytoestrogen concentrations in European adults.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Petra H M; Slimani, Nadia; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grace, Philip B; Navarro, Carmen; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Touillaud, Marina; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Jenab, Mazda; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Dilis, Vardis; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Overvad, Kim; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Gils, Carla H; Skeie, Guri; Jakszyn, Paula; Hallmans, Goran; Berglund, Goran; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Riboli, Elio; Bingham, Sheila A

    2007-05-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may play a role in chronic disease occurrence. The aim of our study was to assess the variability of plasma concentrations in European populations. We included 15 geographical regions in 9 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and UK) and a 16th region, Oxford, UK, where participants were recruited from among vegans and vegetarians. All subjects were participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Plasma concentrations of 3 isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein), 2 metabolites of daidzein [O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) and equol] and 2 mammalian lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone) were measured in 1414 participants. We computed geometric means for each region and used multivariate regression analysis to assess the influence of region, adjusted for gender, age, BMI, alcohol intake, smoking status, and laboratory batch. Many subjects had concentrations below the detection limit [0.1 microg/L (0.4 nmol/L)] for glycitein (80%), O-DMA (73%) and equol (62%). Excluding subjects from Oxford, UK, the highest concentrations of isoflavones were in subjects from the Netherlands and Cambridge, UK [2-6 microg/L (7-24 nmol/L); P < 0.05], whereas concentrations for lignans were highest in Denmark [8 microg/L (27 nmol/L); P < 0.05]. Isoflavones varied 8- to 13-fold, whereas lignans varied 4-fold. In the vegetarian/vegan cohort of Oxford, concentrations of isoflavones were 5-50 times higher than in nonvegetarian regions. Region was the most important determinant of plasma concentrations for all 7 phytoestrogens. Despite the fact that plasma concentrations of phytoestrogens in Europe were low compared with Asian populations, they varied substantially among subjects from the 16 different regions.

  3. A Commentary on Phytoestrogens and Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Alison; Edelstein, Sari

    2015-01-01

    On the most basic level, phytoestrogens can be defined as compounds found in plants that exhibit estrogen-like activity in the human body. Phytoestrogens are considered functional foods because of their diverse physiological effects beyond basic nutritional functions. The 2 primary categories of phytoestrogens found in food are lignans and…

  4. The adverse effect of phytoestrogens on the synthesis and secretion of ovarian oxytocin in cattle.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczuk, J; Wrobel, M H; Kotwica, J

    2011-02-01

    The current investigations were undertaken to study the mechanism of the adverse effect of phytoestrogens on the function of bovine granulosa (follicles >1< cm in diameter) and luteal cells from day 1-5, 6-10, 11-15, 16-19 of the oestrous cycle. The cells were incubated with genistein, daidzein or coumestrol (each at the dose of 1 × 10(-6) m). The viability and secretion of estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4) and oxytocin (OT) were measured after 72 h of incubation. Moreover, the expression of mRNA for neurophysin-I/OT (NP-I/OT; precursor of OT) and peptidyl-glycine-α-amidating monooxygenase (PGA, an enzyme responsible for post-translational OT synthesis) was determined after 8 h of treatment. None of the phytoestrogens used affected the viability of cells except for coumestrol. The increased secretion of E2 and P4 was only obtained by coumestrol (p<0.05) from granulosa cells from follicles <1cm in diameter and decreased from luteal cells on days 11-15 of the oestrous cycle, respectively. All three phytoestrogens stimulated (p<0.05) OT secretion from granulosa and luteal cells in all stages of the oestrous cycle and the expression of NP-I/OT mRNA in the both types of cells. The expression of mRNA for PGA was stimulated (p<0.05) by daidzein and coumestrol in granulosa cells, and by genistein and coumestrol in luteal cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that these phytoestrogens can impair the ovary function in cattle by adversely affecting the synthesis of OT in follicles and in corpus luteum. However, their influence on the ovarian steroids secretion was less evident.

  5. Membrane estrogen receptor-α-mediated nongenomic actions of phytoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Yow-Jiun; Kochukov, Mikhail Y; Watson, Cheryl S

    2009-01-01

    Background Estradiol (E2) mediates various intracellular signaling cascades from the plasma membrane via several estrogen receptors (ERs). The pituitary is an estrogen-responsive tissue, and we have previously reported that E2 can activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 in the membrane ERα (mERα)-enriched GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary tumor cell line. Phytoestrogens are compounds found in plants and foods such as soybeans, alfalfa sprouts, and red grapes. They are structurally similar to E2 and share a similar mechanism of action through their binding to ERs. Phytoestrogens bind to nuclear ERs with a much lower affinity and therefore are less potent in mediating genomic responses. However, little is known about their ability to act via mERs to mediate nongenomic effects. Methods To investigate the activation of different nongenomic pathways, and determine the involvement of mERα, we measured prolactin (PRL) release by radio-immunoassay, MAPK activations (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) via a quantitative plate immunoassay, and intracellular [Ca2+] by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging in cells treated with E2 or four different phytoestrogens (coumestrol, daidzein, genistein, and trans-resveratrol). Results Coumesterol and daidzein increased PRL release similar to E2 in GH3/B6/F10 cells, while genistein and trans-resveratrol had no effect. All of these compounds except genistein activated ERK1/2 signaling at 1–10 picomolar concentrations; JNK 1/2/3 was activated by all compounds at a 100 nanomolar concentration. All compounds also caused rapid Ca2+ uptake, though in unique dose-dependent Ca2+ response patterns for several aspects of this response. A subclone of GH3 cells expressing low levels of mERα (GH3/B6/D9) did not respond to any phytoestrogen treatments for any of these responses, suggesting that these nongenomic effects were mediated via mERα. Conclusion Phytoestrogens were much more potent in mediating these nongenomic responses

  6. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  7. In Utero exposure to genistein enhanced intranasal house dust mite allergen-induced respiratory sensitization in young adult B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai L; Meng, Andrew H

    2016-06-24

    Despite many hypothesized benefits of dietary isoflavone genistein (GEN) deriving from soy-based products, questions surrounding GEN's developmental immunotoxic effects are increasing. To understand how in utero GEN exposure may modulate postnatal respiratory sensitization, we conducted a time course study using a common household allergen (house dust mites: HDM; 10μg/mouse) following intranasal instillation, a physiological route of allergen exposure. GEN was administered to dams by gavage from gestational day 14 to parturition at a physiologically relevant dose (20mg/kg bw). Female and male offspring were sensitized with HDM allergens beginning about one month prior to sacrifice followed by challenges with three weekly doses of HDM extracts, and they were euthanized at day 3 following the final HDM exposure at four different time points (postnatal day (PND) 80, 120, 160, and 200). In utero GEN combined with postnatal HDM exposures (GEN+HDM) increased total IgE production in both young female and male B6C3F1 offspring (e.g., PND 80 in females and PND 120 in males). Increased antigen-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b levels were also observed at various time points in both female and male offspring. In addition, increases in macrophage number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both female and male GEN+HDM offspring at PND 80 and PND 120, respectively, were observed when compared to the vehicle group. For T cells, an increase over the vehicle in female GEN+HDM offspring was observed at PND 80. Due to similar patterns of increases, it seems likely that GEN+HDM-induced increases in total IgE and macrophages are related. Overall, in utero GEN plus later-life HDM exposures exert increases in total IgE and HDM-specific IgG production as well as macrophage recruitments to the lung in young adult mice.

  8. Structural basis for inhibition of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases by phytoestrogens: The case of fungal 17β-HSDcl.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Alberto; Stojan, Jure; Krastanova, Ivet; Kristan, Katja; Brunskole Švegelj, Mojca; Lamba, Doriano; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea

    2017-03-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that functionally and structurally mimic mammalian estrogens. Phytoestrogens have broad inhibitory activities toward several steroidogenic enzymes, such as the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17β-HSDs), which modulate the biological potency of androgens and estrogens in mammals. However, to date, no crystallographic data are available to explain phytoestrogens binding to mammalian 17β-HSDs. NADP(H)-dependent 17β-HSD from the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) has been the subject of extensive biochemical, kinetic and quantitative structure-activity relationship studies that have shown that the flavonols are the most potent inhibitors. In the present study, we investigated the structure-activity relationships of the ternary complexes between the holo form of 17β-HSDcl and the flavonols kaempferol and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, in comparison with the isoflavones genistein and biochanin A. Crystallographic data are accompanied by kinetic analysis of the inhibition mechanisms for six flavonols (3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, kaempferol, quercetin, fisetin, myricetin), one flavanone (naringenin), one flavone (luteolin), and two isoflavones (genistein, biochanin A). The kinetics analysis shows that the degree of hydroxylation of ring B significantly influences the overall inhibitory efficacy of the flavonols. A distinct binding mode defines the interactions between 17β-HSDcl and the flavones and isoflavones. Moreover, the complex with biochanin A reveals an unusual binding mode that appears to account for its greater inhibition of 17β-HSDcl with respect to genistein. Overall, these data provide a blueprint for identification of the distinct molecular determinants that underpin 17β-HSD inhibition by phytoestrogens.

  9. Genistein nanoparticles protect mouse hematopoietic system and prevent proinflammatory factors after gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Cam T; Li, Xiang-Hong; Fu, Dadin; Xiao, Mang; Landauer, Michael R

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that genistein protects mice from radiation-induced bone marrow failure. To overcome genistein's extremely low water solubility, a nanoparticle suspension of genistein has been formulated for more rapid dissolution. In the current study, we evaluated the radioprotective effects of a nanoparticle formulation of genistein on survival and hematopoietic recovery in mice exposed to total-body gamma irradiation. A single intramuscular injection of a saline-based genistein nanosuspension (150 mg/kg) administered to CD2F1 mice 24 h before 9.25 Gy (60)Co radiation exposure resulted in a 30-day survival rate of 95% compared to 25% in vehicle-treated animals. In mice irradiated at 7 Gy, the genistein nanosuspension increased mouse bone marrow cellularity from approximately 2.9% (vehicle treated) to 28.3% on day 7 postirradiation. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated decreased radiation-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC, Lineage(-)/cKit(+)) death from 77.0% (vehicle) to 43.9% (genistein nanosuspension) with a significant recovery of clonogenicity 7 days after irradiation. The genistein nanosuspension also attenuated the radiation-induced elevation of proinflammatory factors interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in mouse bone marrow and spleen, which may contribute to protecting HSPCs.

  10. Phytoestrogens modulate prostaglandin production in bovine endometrium: cell type specificity and intracellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela; Acosta, Tomas J; Korzekwa, Anna; Bah, Mamadou M; Shibaya, Masami; Okuda, Kiyoshi; Skarzynski, Dariusz J

    2005-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are known to modulate the proper cyclicity of bovine reproductive organs. The main luteolytic agent in ruminants is PGF2alpha, whereas PGE2 has luteotropic actions. Estradiol 17beta (E2) regulates uterus function by influencing PG synthesis. Phytoestrogens structurally resemble E2 and possess estrogenic activity; therefore, they may mimic the effects of E2 on PG synthesis and influence the reproductive system. Using a cell-culture system of bovine epithelial and stromal cells, we determined cell-specific effects of phytoestrogens (i.e., daidzein, genistein), their metabolites (i.e., equol and para-ethyl-phenol, respectively), and E2 on PGF2alpha and PGE2 synthesis and examined the intracellular mechanisms of their actions. Both PGs produced by stromal and epithelial cells were significantly stimulated by phytoestrogens and their metabolites. However, PGF2alpha synthesis by both kinds of cells was greater stimulated than PGE2 synthesis. Moreover, epithelial cells treated with phytoestrogens synthesized more PGF2alpha than stromal cells, increasing the PGF2alpha to PGE2 ratio. The epithelial and stromal cells were preincubated with an estrogen-receptor (ER) antagonist (i.e., ICI), a translation inhibitor (i.e., actinomycin D), a protein kinase A inhibitor (i.e., staurosporin), and a phospholipase C inhibitor (i.e., U73122) for 0.5 hrs and then stimulated with equol, para-ethyl-phenol, or E2. Although the action of E2 on PGF2alpha synthesis was blocked by all reagents, the stimulatory effect of phytoestrogens was blocked only by ICI and actinomycin D in both cell types. Moreover, in contrast to E2 action, phytoestrogens did not cause intracellular calcium mobilization in either epithelial or stromal cells. Phytoestrogens stimulate both PGF2alpha and PGE2 in both cell types of bovine endometrium via an ER-dependent genomic pathway. However, because phytoestrogens preferentially stimulated PGF2alpha synthesis in epithelial cells of bovine

  11. Enhanced hematopoietic protection from radiation by the combination of genistein and captopril.

    PubMed

    Day, R M; Davis, T A; Barshishat-Kupper, M; McCart, E A; Tipton, A J; Landauer, M R

    2013-02-01

    The hematopoietic system is sensitive to radiation injury, and mortality can occur due to blood cell deficiency and stem cell loss. Genistein and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril are two agents shown to protect the hematopoietic system from radiation injury. In this study we examined the combination of genistein with captopril for reduction of radiation-induced mortality from hematopoietic damage and the mechanisms of radiation protection. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 8.25Gy (60)Co total body irradiation (TBI) to evaluate the effects of genistein and captopril alone and in combination on survival, blood cell recovery, hematopoietic progenitor cell recovery, DNA damage, and erythropoietin production. 8.25Gy TBI resulted in 0% survival after 30days in untreated mice. A single subcutaneous injection of genistein administered 24h before TBI resulted in 72% survival. Administration of captopril in the drinking water, from 1h through 30days postirradiation, increased survival to 55%. Genistein plus captopril increased survival to 95%. Enhanced survival was reflected in a reduction of radiation-induced anemia, improved recovery of nucleated bone marrow cells, splenocytes and circulating red blood cells. The drug combination enhanced early recovery of marrow progenitors: erythroid (CFU-E and BFU-E), and myeloid (CFU-GEMM, CFU-GM and CFU-M). Genistein alone and genistein plus captopril protected hematopoietic progenitor cells from radiation-induced micronuclei, while captopril had no effect. Captopril alone and genistein plus captopril, but not genistein alone, suppressed radiation-induced erythropoietin production. These data suggest that genistein and captopril protect the hematopoietic system from radiation injury via independent mechanisms.

  12. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2.

  13. Phytoestrogens oestrogen synthesis and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rice, Suman; Whitehead, Saffron A

    2008-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are used as 'natural' alternatives to HRT and, although epidemiological evidence implies that diets rich in phytoestrogens reduce the incidence of breast cancer, their weak oestrogenicity is also known to stimulate growth in experimental models of breast cancer. This review addresses the question as to how phytoestrogens may protect against breast cancer through their ability to bind preferentially to oestrogen receptor beta, inhibit enzymes that convert circulating steroid precursors into oestradiol and inhibit cell signalling pathways of growth factors.

  14. Urinary Phytoestrogens Are Associated with Subtle Indicators of Semen Quality among Male Partners of Couples Desiring Pregnancy123

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Sunni L; Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Zhen; Barr, Dana Boyd; Louis, Germaine M Buck

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phytoestrogens have been associated with subtle hormonal changes, although effects on male fecundity are largely unknown. Objective: We evaluated associations between male urinary phytoestrogen (isoflavone and lignan) concentrations and semen quality. Methods: This study was a prospective cohort study of 501 male partners of couples desiring pregnancy and discontinuing contraception. Each participant provided up to 2 semen samples that were analyzed for 35 semen quality endpoints the following day. Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate associations between baseline urinary phytoestrogen concentrations and semen quality parameters, adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), research site, and serum lipid and cotinine concentrations. Results: Most associations between urinary phytoestrogens and semen quality parameters were null. However, select individual phytoestrogens were associated with semen quality parameters, with associations dependent on the class of phytoestrogens and modified by BMI. Specifically, genistein and daidzein were associated with a lower percentage of normal sperm and increased abnormalities in semen morphology, with reduced associations observed as BMI increased (P < 0.05) [percentages (95% CIs) of normal morphology by WHO traditional criteria: genistein, main effect: −5.61% (−9.42%, −1.79%); interaction: 0.19% (0.06%, 0.31%) per log unit increase; daidzein, main effect: −5.35% (−9.36%, −1.34%); interaction: 0.18% (0.05%, 0.32%) per log unit increase]. Enterolactone was associated with fewer abnormalities in semen morphometry and morphology and decreased DNA fragmentation, with reduced associations observed as BMI increased (P < 0.05) [percentages (95% CIs) of abnormalities in the neck and midpiece: enterolactone, main effect: −3.35% (−6.51%, −0.19%); interaction: 0.11% (0.01%, 0.21%) per log unit increase]. Conclusions: These results suggest that male urinary phytoestrogen concentrations characteristic

  15. Characterization of estrogenicity of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived experimental model.

    PubMed Central

    Hopert, A C; Beyer, A; Frank, K; Strunck, E; Wünsche, W; Vollmer, G

    1998-01-01

    Severe developmental and reproductive disorders in wild animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with hormonal activity. These adverse effects of environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern and have received increasing attention. Although numerous chemicals with the capacity to interfere with the estrogen receptor (ER) have been identified, information on their molecular mechanism of action and their relative potency is rather limited. For the endometrium, the lack of information is due to the lack of a suitable experimental model. We investigated the functions of phytoestrogens in an endometrial-derived model, RUCA-I rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane to preserve their functional differentiation and estrogen responsiveness. We assessed the relative binding affinity to the estrogen receptor of the selected phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein, daidzein, and the putative phytoestrogen mangostin compared to estradiol by a competitive Scatchard analysis. The following affinity ranking was measured: 17beta-estradiol >>> coumestrol > genistein > daidzein >>> mangostin. In addition, we investigated the capacity of these compounds to promote the increased production of complement C3, a well-known estradiol-regulated protein of the rat endometrium. All substances tested increased the production of complement C3, although different concentrations were necessary to achieve equivalent levels of induction compared to estradiol. Mechanistically we were able to demonstrate that the increase of complement C3 production was mediated by primarily increasing its steady-state mRNA level. These findings indicate that RUCA-I cells represent a sensitive model system to elucidate relative potencies and functions of environmental estrogens in an endometrium-derived model. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721258

  16. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  17. Comprehensive Assessment of Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  18. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-07

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system.

  19. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-03

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  20. Soy-derived phytoestrogens as preventive and acute neuroprotectors in experimental ischemic stroke: influence of rat strain.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Ruiz, M; Torregrosa, G; Burguete, M C; Salom, J B; Gil, J V; Miranda, F J; Jover-Mengual, T; Marrachelli, V G; Alborch, E

    2011-04-15

    The ability of a soy-based high-phytoestrogen diet (nutritional intervention) or genistein (pharmacological intervention), to limit ischemic brain damage in Wistar, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats, has been assessed. As to the nutritional intervention, two groups from each strain received either a phytoestrogen-free (PE-0) or a high-phytoestrogen (PE-600) diet from weaning to adulthood. As to the pharmacological intervention, all animals were fed the standard soy-free AIN-93G diet and subsequently separated into two groups from each strain to receive either pure genistein (aglycone form, 1mg/kg/day intraperitoneal) or vehicle at 30 min reperfusion. After an episode of 90 min ischemia (intraluminal thread procedure) followed by 3 days reperfusion, cerebral infarct volume was measured. Arterial blood pressure (ABP) was significantly higher at the basal stage (just before ischemia) in SHR (140 ± 7 mmHg, n=17, p<0.05) than in Wistar (113 ± 4mmHg, n=23) and WKY (111 ± 6mmHg, n=14) rats. No significant differences were shown among the three stages (basal, ischemia, reperfusion) within each rat strain for both PE-0 and PE-600 diets. Wistar, but not WKY or SHR, rats fed the PE-600 diet showed significantly lower infarct volumes than their counterparts fed the PE-0 diet (30 ± 3% vs. 17 ± 3%, p<0.01). Genistein-treated Wistar, but not WKY or SHR, rats showed significantly lower infarct volumes than their vehicle-treated controls (27 ± 2% vs. 15 ± 2%, p<0.01). Our results demonstrate that: (1) the neuroprotective action of either chronic or acute exposure to soy isoflavones is strain-dependent, since it was shown in Wistar but not WKY or SHR rats; and (2) the soy-based diet does not prevent development of hypertension in SHR rats.

  1. Genistein ameliorated endothelial nitric oxidase synthase uncoupling by stimulating sirtuin-1 pathway in ox-LDL-injured HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ping; Zhao, Jia-hui; Yu, Hai-xia; Guo, Dong-xing

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxidase synthase (eNOS) uncoupling plays a causal role in endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. Genistein consumption has been associated with the prevention of atherosclerosis. However, the effect of genistein on eNOS uncoupling has not been reported. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced injury on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was established to evaluate the effect of genistein on eNOS uncoupling. We investigated the effect of genistein on NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production, NOX4 expression, BH4 synthesis and oxidation, the expression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The results showed that genistein decreased superoxide production and NOX4 expression, enhanced the ratio of BH4/BH2, augmented the expressions of GCH1 and DHFR. Accompanied with genistein ameliorating eNOS uncoupling, genistein elevated the expression of sirtuin-1; furthermore, the effects of genistein on eNOS uncoupling were blunted with sirtuin-1 siRNA. The present study indicated that genistein ameliorated eNOS uncoupling was concerned with sirtuin-1 pathway in ox-LDL-injured HUVECs.

  2. Exposure to phytoestrogens in the perinatal period affects androgen secretion by testicular Leydig cells in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Akingbemi, Benson T; Braden, Tim D; Kemppainen, Barbara W; Hancock, Karen D; Sherrill, Jessica D; Cook, Sarah J; He, Xiaoying; Supko, Jeffrey G

    2007-09-01

    The use of soy-based products in the diet of infants has raised concerns regarding the reproductive toxicity of genistein and daidzein, the predominant isoflavones in soybeans with estrogenic activity. Time-bred Long-Evans dams were fed diets containing 0, 5, 50, 500, or 1000 ppm of soy isoflavones from gestational d 12 until weaning at d 21 postpartum. Male rats in all groups were fed soy-free diets from postnatal d 21 until 90 d of age. The mean +/- SD concentration of unconjugated (i.e. biologically active) genistein and daidzein in serum from the group of dams maintained on the diet containing the highest amount of isoflavones (1000 ppm) were 17 +/- 27 and 56 +/- 30 nM, respectively, at d 21 postpartum. The concentrations were considerably greater in male offspring (genistein: 73 +/- 46 nM; daidzein: 106 +/- 53 nM). Although steroidogenesis was decreased in individual Leydig cells, male rats from the highest exposure group (1000 ppm diet) exhibited elevated serum levels of the sex steroid hormones androsterone at 21 d (control: 15 +/- 1.5 vs.28 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P < 0.05) and testosterone at 90 d of age (control: 7.5 +/- 1 vs.17 +/- 2 ng/ml; P < 0.05). Testosterone secretion by immature Leydig cells, isolated from 35-d-old male rats, decreased on exposure to 0.1 nm genistein in vitro (control: 175 +/- 5 vs. 117 +/- 3 ng/10(6) cells per 24 h; P < 0.05), indicative of direct phytoestrogen action. Thus, phytoestrogens have the ability to regulate Leydig cells, and additional studies to assess potential adverse effects of dietary soy-based products on reproductive tract development in neonates are warranted.

  3. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Hoerger, C.C.; Meyer, M.T.; Wettstein, F.E.; Hubbard, L.E.; Bucheli, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2. Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-ofreference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). Th e nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  4. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Hoerger, Corinne C.; Meyer, Michael T.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2 Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-of-reference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). The nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  5. Genistein Modified Polymer Blends for Hemodialysis Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Teng; Kyu, Thein; Define, Linda; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A soybean-derived phytochemical called genistein was used as a modifying agent to polyether sulfone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PES/PVP) blends to produce multi-functional hemodialysis membranes. With the aid of phase diagrams of PES/PVP/genistein blends, asymmetric porous membranes were fabricated by coagulating in non-solvent. Both unmodified and genistein modified PES/PVP membranes were shown to be non-cytotoxic to the blood cells. Unmodified PES/PVP membranes were found to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, whereas the genistein modified membranes exhibited suppression for ˜60% of the ROS levels. Also, the genistein modified membranes revealed significant suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, addition of PVP to PES showed the reduced trend of platelet adhesion and then leveled off. However, the modified membranes exhibited suppression of platelet adhesion at low genistein loading, but beyond 15 wt%, the platelet adhesion level rised up.

  6. Genistein modulates prostate epithelial cell proliferation via estrogen- and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingya; Clubbs, Elizabeth A; Bomser, Joshua A

    2006-03-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that consumption of soy is associated with a decreased risk for prostate cancer. Genistein, the most abundant isoflavone present in soy, is thought to be responsible, in part, for these anticancer effects. The present study examined the effects of genistein on cellular proliferation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activity and apoptosis in a nontumorigenic human prostate epithelial cell line (RWPE-1). Low concentrations of genistein (0-12.5 micromol/L) significantly increased cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activity (P<.01) in RWPE-1 cells, while higher concentrations (50 and 100 micromol/L) of genistein significantly inhibited cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activity (P<.001). A similar biphasic effect of genistein on MEK1 activity, an ERK1/2 kinase, was also observed. Pretreatment of cells with a MEK1 inhibitor (PD 098059) significantly blocked genistein-induced proliferation and ERK1/2 activity (P<.01). In addition, treatment of cells with ICI 182,780, a pure antiestrogen, inhibited genistein-induced RWPE-1 proliferation and ERK1/2 signaling. Taken together, these results suggest that genistein modulates RWPE-1 cell proliferation and signal transduction via an estrogen-dependent pathway involving ERK1/2 activation.

  7. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  8. Genistein affects histone modifications on Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1) gene in SW480 human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Li, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a plant-derived isoflavone and can block uncontrolled cell growth in colon cancer by inhibiting the WNT signaling pathway. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the enhanced gene expression of the WNT signaling pathway antagonist, DKK1 by genistein treatment is associated with epigenetic modifications of the gene in colon cancer cells. Genistein treatment induced a concentration-dependent G2 phase arrest in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 and reduced cell proliferation. Results from several other human colon cancer cell lines confirmed the growth inhibitory effects of genistein. Overexpression of DKK1 confirmed its involvement in growth inhibition. Knockdown of DKK1 expression by siRNA slightly induced cell growth. DKK1 gene expression was increased by genistein in SW480 and HCT15 cells. DNA methylation at the DKK1 promoter was not affected by genistein treatment in all the cell lines tested. On the other hand, genistein induced histone H3 acetylation of the DKK1 promoter region in SW480 and HCT15 cells. This indicates that increased histone acetylation is associated with the genistein-induced DKK1 expression. The association between histone acetylation and DKK1 gene expression is confirmed by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) treatment. In conclusion, genistein treatment decreases cell growth and proliferation in colon cancer cell lines. The effect is associated with the increased DKK1 expression through the induction of histone acetylation at the DKK1 promoter region.

  9. Effects of phytoestrogens and synthetic combinatorial libraries on aromatase, estrogen biosynthesis, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brueggemeier, R W; Gu, X; Mobley, J A; Joomprabutra, S; Bhat, A S; Whetstone, J L

    2001-12-01

    Approximately 60% of breast cancer patients have hormone-dependent breast cancer containing estrogen receptors and requiring estrogen for tumor growth. The extent of estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism in the breast cancer tissue microenvironment influences breast-tumor development and growth, and endogenous and exogenous agents may alter the levels of hormonally active estrogens and their metabolites. Isoflavonoid phytoestrogens such as genistein exhibit numerous biochemical activities; however, their effects on estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism in breast cancer cells have not been fully examined. MCF-7 cells (hormone-dependent) and MBA-MB-231 cells (hormone-independent) were treated with genistein (100 nM) for five days and then incubated with radiolabeled estradiol (100 nM, 2.5 microCi) for 0 to 48 h. Media were extracted with ethyl acetate, and the organic residues analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC with a radioactivity flow detector. The major metabolite formed in all cases is estrone, although differences were observed between the cell lines and the various drug treatments. The formation of estrone in untreated MCF-7 cells (approximately 9.3% of radioactivity at 24 h) is relatively limited, in contrast to untreated MDA-MB-231 cells (approximately 32.0% of radioactivity at 24 h). Treatment of MCF-7 cells with 100 nM genistein increased the conversion of estradiol to estrone up to 19.5% in 24 h. The effect of genistein on estrone formation in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in 37.7% of the radioactivity being estrone. Thus, genistein treatment of breast cancer cells resulted in increased 17-betahydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and elevated formation of estrone. Increased levels of oxidative 17-betahydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity (Type II) were confirmed by Western blots. Therefore, exposure of breast cancer cells to genistein results in elevated conversion of estradiol to estrogenically weaker or inactive metabolites. The regulation of breast

  10. Genistein Alleviates Neuroinflammation and Restores Cognitive Function in Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad; Husain, Mohammad

    2017-02-21

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from acute liver failure. Previously, we demonstrated hepatoprotective effects of genistein in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). In this study, we evaluated behavioural and neuroprotective effects of genistein in rat model of HE. HE was induced by intraperitonial administration of D-GalN (250 mg/kg BW) twice a week for 30 days Genistein was given as co-treatment through oral gavage daily at dose of 5 mg/kg BW. D-GalN administration significantly resulted in acute liver failure which was further associated with hyperammonemia, neurological dysfunction, as evident from behavioural and functional impairment and reduced learning ability in Morris water maze. Genistein significantly alleviated behavioural and functional impairment and restored learning ability in Morris water maze. Considerable histopathological changes, including portal inflammation, sinusoidal dilation, necrotic lesions and swelled astrocytes with pale nuclei, were seen in the liver and brain sections of D-GalN-challenged rats while genistein co-treated rats revealed normal cellular and morphological architecture as no pathological features were seen. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory markers (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-1β and TNF-α) and membrane expression of subunits α1 of GABAA receptor and GluR2 of AMPA marked significant increase, while subunits GluR1 of AMPA receptors showed reduced expression in D-GalN-challenged rats leading to neuroinflammation and dysregulated neurotransmission. Genistein significantly normalized altered expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and membrane receptor of GABA and GluR. Our study suggests strong therapeutic potential of genistein in animal model of HE. Genistein can be used a strong anti-oxidant to attenuate neurotoxic effects of xenobiotics.

  11. Environmental epigenetics and phytoestrogen/phytochemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos M; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important environmental factors to promote epigenetic alterations in an individual is nutrition and exposure to plant compounds. Phytoestrogens and other phytochemicals have dramatic effects on cellular signaling events, so have the capacity to dramatically alter developmental and physiological events. Epigenetics provides one of the more critical molecular mechanisms for environmental factors such as phytoestrogens/phytochemicals to influence biology. In the event these epigenetic mechanisms become heritable through epigenetic transgenerational mechanisms the impacts on the health of future generations and areas such as evolutionary biology need to be considered. The current review focuses on available information on the environmental epigenetics of phytoestrogen/phytochemical exposures, with impacts on health, disease and evolutionary biology considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'.

  12. Effects of environmental endocrine disruptors and phytoestrogens on the kisspeptin system.

    PubMed

    Patisaul, Heather B

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones, most notably estradiol, play a pivotal role in the sex-specific organization and function of the kisspeptin system. Endocrine--disrupting compounds are anthropogenic or naturally occurring compounds that interact with steroid hormone signaling. Thus, these compounds have the potential to disrupt the sexually dimorphic ontogeny and function of kisspeptin signaling pathways, resulting in adverse effects on neuroendocrine physiology. This chapter reviews the small but growing body of evidence for endocrine disruption of the kisspeptin system by the exogenous estrogenic compounds bisphenol A, polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures, and the phytoestrogen genistein. Disruption is region, sex, and compound specific, and associated with shifts in the timing of pubertal onset, irregular estrous cycles, and altered sociosexual behavior. These effects highlight that disruption of kisspeptin signaling pathways could have wide ranging effects across multiple organ systems, and potentially underlies a suite of adverse human health trends including precocious female puberty, idiopathic infertility, and metabolic syndrome.

  13. The pros and cons of phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Patisaul, Heather B.; Jefferson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant derived compounds found in a wide variety of foods, most notably soy. A litany of health benefits including a lowered risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, and menopausal symptoms, are frequently attributed to phytoestrogens but many are also considered endocrine disruptors, indicating that they have the potential to cause adverse health effects as well. Consequently, the question of whether or not phytoestrogens are beneficial or harmful to human health remains unresolved. The answer is likely complex and may depend on age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut microflora. Clarity on this issue is needed because global consumption is rapidly increasing. Phytoestrogens are present in numerous dietary supplements and widely marketed as a natural alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Soy infant formula now constitutes up to a third of the US market, and soy protein is now added to many processed foods. As weak estrogen agonists/antagonists with molecular and cellular properties similar to synthetic endocrine disruptors such as Bisphenol A (BPA), the phytoestrogens provide a useful model to comprehensively investigate the biological impact of endocrine disruptors in general. This review weighs the evidence for and against the purported health benefits and adverse effects of phytoestrogens. PMID:20347861

  14. Soy, phytoestrogens and metabolism: A review.

    PubMed

    Cederroth, Christopher R; Nef, Serge

    2009-05-25

    Of any plant, soy contains the largest concentration of isoflavones, a class of phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are structurally similar to estradiol and mimic its effects. Soy and phytoestrogens receive increasing attention due to the health benefits associated with their consumption. Here we review the data collected on the effects of soy and phytoestrogens on glucose and lipid metabolism and their possible mechanisms of action. Overall, there is a suggestive body of evidence that soy and dietary phytoestrogens favorably alter glycemic control, improve weight and fat loss, lower triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and total cholesterol. However, these results must be interpreted with care, and additional evidence is needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn. In particular, since not all activities related to soy can be assigned to the estrogenic-like activity, further studies are needed to identify firstly which soy constituent(s) improve metabolic parameters when ingested and secondly, which are the mechanisms whereby dietary soy improves metabolic-related conditions like obesity and diabetes. Finally, the potential detrimental effects of soy and phytoestrogens are briefly discussed.

  15. Sex-Dependent Effects of Dietary Genistein on Echocardiographic Profile and Cardiac GLUT4 Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lana; Martin, Joshua B.; Lawmaster, Todd; Arthur, Kathryn; Broderick, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether genistein diet resulted in changes in cardiac function, using echocardiography, and expression of key proteins involved in glucose uptake by the myocardium. Intact male and female C57BL/6J mice (aged 4–6 weeks) were fed either 600 mg genistein/kg diet (600 G) or 0 mg genistein/kg diet (0 G) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography data revealed sex-dependent differences in the absence of genistein: compared to females, hearts from males exhibited increased systolic left ventricle internal dimension (LVIDs), producing a decrease in function, expressed as fractional shortening (FS). Genistein diet also induced echocardiographic changes in function: in female hearts, 600G induced a 1.5-fold (P < 0.05) increase in LVIDs, resulting in a significant decrease in FS and whole heart surface area when compared to controls (fed 0 G). Genistein diet increased cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males (1.51-fold, P < 0.05) and females (1.76-fold, P < 0.05). However, no effects on the expression of notable intracellular signaling glucose uptake-regulated proteins were observed. Our data indicate that consumption of genistein diet for 4 weeks induces echocardiographic changes in indices of systolic function in females and has beneficial effects on cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males and females. PMID:27471542

  16. Combined effects of terazosin and genistein on a metastatic, hormone-independent human prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kee-Lung; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chih, Tsai-Tung; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Su, Shu-Jem

    2009-04-08

    Metastatic prostate cancer progresses from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent. Terazosin, a long-acting selective alpha1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, induces apoptosis of prostate cancer cells in an alpha1-adrenoreceptor-independent manner, while genistein, a major soy isoflavone, inhibits the growth of several types of cancer cells. The present study was designed to test the therapeutic potential of a combination of terazosin and genistein using a metastatic, hormone-independent prostatic cancer cell line, DU-145. Terazosin or genistein treatment inhibited the growth of DU-145 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas had no effect on normal prostate epithelial cells. Addition of 1 microg/ml of terazosin, which was inactive alone, augmented the growth inhibitory effect of 5 microg/ml of genistein. Co-treatment with terazosin resulted in the genistein-induced arrest of DU-145 cells in G2/M phase being overridden and an increase in apoptotic cells, as evidenced by procaspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. The combination also caused a greater decrease in the levels of the apoptosis-regulating protein, Bcl-XL, and of VEGF165 and VEGF121 than genistein alone. In conclusion, the terazosin/genistein combination was more effective in inhibiting cell growth and VEGF expression as well as inducing apoptosis of the metastatic, androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line, DU-145, than either alone. The doses used in this study are in lower and nontoxic anticancer dosage range, suggesting this combination has potential for therapeutic use.

  17. Resveratrol and genistein inhibition of rat isolated gastrointestinal contractions and related mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Xue; Li, Hong-Fang; Wang, Long-De; Jin, Shan; Dou, Xing-Cheng; Tian, Zhi-Feng; Ma, Qin

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of resveratrol and genistein on contractile responses of rat gastrointestinal smooth muscle. METHODS: Isolated strips of gastrointestinal smooth muscle from Spraque-Dawley rats were suspended in organ baths containing Kreb’s solution, and the contractility of smooth muscles was measured before and after incubation with resveratrol and genistein, and the related mechanisms were studied by co-incubation with various inhibitors. RESULTS: Resveratrol and genistein dose-dependently decreased the resting tension, and also reduced the mean contractile amplitude of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Estrogen receptor blockades (ICI 182780 and tamoxifen) failed to alter the inhibitory effects induced by resveratrol and genistein. However, their effects were attenuated by inhibitions of α-adrenergic receptor (phentolamine), nitric oxide synthase (levorotatory-NG-nitroarginine), ATP-sensitive potassium channels (glibenclamide), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (SQ22536). In high K+/Ca2+-free Kreb’s solution containing 0.01 mmol/L egtazic acid, resveratrol and genistein reduced the contractile responses of CaCl2, and shifted its cumulative concentration-response curves rightward. CONCLUSION: Resveratrol and genistein relax gastrointestinal smooth muscle via α-adrenergic receptors, nitric oxide and cyclic adenosine monophosphate pathways, ATP-sensitive potassium channels, and inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:25386082

  18. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-11-08

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD.

  19. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD. PMID:27834809

  20. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  1. Sensitization of the apoptotic effect of gamma-irradiation in genistein-pretreated CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jang-In; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hong; Choi, Hee-Sook; Kim, Jae-Wha; Lee, Hee-Gu; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Park, Sue-Nie; Park, Ok-Jin; Yoon, Do-Young

    2008-03-01

    Radiotherapy is currently applied in the treatment of human cancers. We studied whether genistein would enhance the radiosensitivity and explored its precise molecular mechanism in cervical cancer cells. After co-treatment with genistein and irradiation, the viability, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis signaling cascades were elucidated in CaSki cells. The viability was decreased by co-treatment with genistein and irradiation compared with irradiation treatment alone. Treatment with only gamma-irradiation led to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. On the other hand, co-treatment with genistein and gamma-irradiation caused a decrease in the G1 phase and a concomitant increase up to 56% in the number of G2 phase. In addition, cotreatment increased the expression of p53 and p21, and Cdc2- tyr-15-p, supporting the occurrence of G2/M arrest. In general, apoptosis signaling cascades were activated by the following events: release of cytochrome c, upregulation of Bax, downregulation of Bcl-2, and activation of caspase-3 and -8 in the treatment of genistein and irradiation. Apparently, co-treatment downregulated the transcripts of E6*I, E6*II, and E7. Genistein also stimulated irradiation-induced intracellular reactive oxygene, species (ROS) production, and co-treatment-induced apoptosis was inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting that apoptosis has occurred through the increase in ROS by genistein and gamma-irradiation in cervical cancer cells. Gamma-irradiation increased cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-2) expression, whereas the combination with genistein and gamma-irradiation almost completely prevented irradiation-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. Co-treatment with genistein and gamma-irradiation inhibited proliferation through G2/M arrest and induced apoptosis via ROS modulation in the CaSki cancer cells.

  2. Vegetables, fruit and phytoestrogens as preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Potter, J D; Steinmetz, K

    1996-01-01

    likelihood of carcinogenesis-occasionally in a way that enhances risk but usually in a favourable direction. For example, glucosinolates and indoles, thiocyanates and isothiocyanates, phenols, and coumarins can induce a multiplicity of phase II (solubilizing and usually inactivating) enzymes; ascorbate and phenols block the formation of carcinogens such as nitrosamines; flavonoids and carotenoids act as antioxidants, essentially disabling the carcinogenic potential of specific compounds; lipid-soluble compounds such as carotenoids and sterols may alter membrane structure or integrity; some sulphur-containing compounds suppress DNA and protein synthesis; carotenoids can suppress DNA synthesis and enhance differentiation; and phytoestrogens compete with estradiol for estrogen receptors in a way that is generally antiproliferative. Consumption of diets low in plant foods results in a reduced intake of a wide variety of those substances that can plausibly lower cancer risk. In the presence of a diet and lifestyle high in potential carcinogens (whether derived from fungal contamination, cooking or tobacco) or high in promoters (such as salt and alcohol), overall risk of cancer at many epithelial sites is elevated. Plant foods appear to exert a general risk-lowering effect; the patterns of exposure to cancer initiators and promoters and of genetic susceptibility may determine the variations in the site-specific risks of cancer seen across populations.

  3. Assessment of the estrogenic activity of phytoestrogens isolated from bourbon and beer.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, E R; Stauber, R E; Van Thiel, D H; Campbell, I M; Gavaler, J S

    1993-12-01

    Phytoestrogenic substances have previously been isolated and identified in two alcoholic beverages: bourbon and beer. To delineate the relative potencies of the estrogenic substances of plant origin thus far identified in these commonly consumed alcoholic beverages, we evaluated the ability of biochanin A, beta-sitosterol, genistein, and daidzein to bind to cytosolic estrogen receptor binding sites. The in vitro studies demonstrated that each of the contained substances was capable of effectively competing for cytosolic estrogen receptor binding sites of rat liver and uterus. Further, the two phytoestrogenic constituents of bourbon, beta-sitosterol and biochanin A, were less potent than those present in beer. Given the high concentration of beta-sitosterol in bourbon, we chose to evaluate the estrogenicity of beta-sitosterol in vivo using ovariectomized rats. beta-sitosterol was administered either daily or intermittently at 3 doses, based on amounts previously determined to be present in bourbon. The in vivo studies demonstrated that beta-sitosterol is capable of producing a weak estrogenic effect only at the lowest dose (6.2 micrograms/dl) administered intermittently. These responses suggest that beta-sitosterol may be weakly estrogenic at low doses, but is unable to maintain such an effect at higher doses.

  4. Inhibitory effect of genistein on mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells involved TGF-{beta}1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: zengliy@yahoo.com.cn; Tang Yunan; Hu Dongsheng; Li Juan

    2005-08-05

    TGF-{beta}1/signaling has been shown to be associated with proapoptotic and antimitotic activities in epithelial tissues. Genistein, a major component of soybean isoflavone, has multiple functions resulting in anticancer proliferation. We herein showed that genistein dose-dependently increased TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression in mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells. A mouse monoclonal anti-TGF-{beta}1 neutralizing antibody partially, but not completely, blocked the growth inhibition by genistein. By using adenoviral vector, we demonstrated that Smad7 overexpression attenuated genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis as determined by MTT and apoptosis ELISA. Smad7 overexpression also inhibited upregulation of p21 and caspase-3 activity by geinistein. To further confirm inhibitory effect of genistein in MC-26 cells require TGF-{beta}1/Smad signaling, we employed Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to detect formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, respectively. Data revealed that genistein induced an evident formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, indicating increased TGF-{beta}1 signaling. Taken together, these findings first provided insights into possible molecular mechanisms of growth inhibition by genistein that required Smad signaling, which could aid in its evaluation for colon tumor prevention.

  5. Genistein modulates the effects of parathyroid hormone in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Fang; Wong, Man-Sau

    2006-06-01

    Genistein and parathyroid hormone (PTH) are anabolic agents that stimulate bone formation through their direct actions in osteoblastic cells. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether genistein modulates the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition. The present results showed that genistein (10(-8) to 10(-6) m) induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteoprotegrin (OPG) expression in SaOS-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These effects could be completely abolished by co-treatment with oestrogen antagonist ICI 182780 (7alpha-[9-[(4,4,5,5,5-pentafluoropentyl)sulfonyl]nonyl]-estra-1,3,5(10)-triene-3,17beta-diol). Genistein (at 1 microM) could stimulate the mRNA expression of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). As OPG and RANKL are known to modulate osteoclastogenesis, the ability of genistein to modulate OPG and RANKL expression in SaOS-2 cells suggested that it might modulate osteoclastogenesis through its direct actions on osteoblastic cells. PTH (at 10 nM) stimulated ALP activity, induced RANKL mRNA expression and suppressed OPG mRNA expression in SaOS-2 cells, confirming its bi-directional effects on osteoblastic cells. Pre-treatment of SaOS-2 cells with genistein and oestrogen not only enhanced PTH-induced ALP activity, but also attenuated PTH up regulation of RANKL mRNA expression and PTH down regulation of OPG mRNA expression. Taken together, the present study provides the first evidence that genistein could modulate the actions of PTH in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells in an oestrogen-depleted condition.

  6. Genistein effect on xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Sumbayev, V V

    2001-01-01

    Genistein was defined to be an allosteric xanthine oxidase inhibitor in the concentrations 0.1-4.0 microM and xanthine oxidase activator with superoxide scavenging activity in the concentrations 5.0 microM and higher. But the most effective allosteric binding with the highest affinity was observed in the genistein concentrations 0.1-1.0 microM. Intraperitoneum injections of genistein (500 micrograms/kg) during three days with the interval 24 hours decrease xanthine oxidase activity in the liver, lung and brain of the Vistar rats.

  7. Phytoestrogens and sterols in waters with cyanobacterial blooms - Analytical methods and estrogenic potencies.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Tereza; Sychrová, Eliška; Javůrková, Barbora; Večerková, Jaroslava; Kohoutek, Jiří; Lepšová-Skácelová, Olga; Bláha, Luděk; Hilscherová, Klára

    2017-03-01

    Compounds with estrogenic potencies and their adverse effects in surface waters have received much attention. Both anthropogenic and natural compounds contribute to overall estrogenic activity in freshwaters. Recently, estrogenic potencies were also found to be associated with cyanobacteria and their blooms in surface waters. The present study developed and compared the solid phase extraction and LC-MS/MS analytical approaches for determination of phytoestrogens (8 flavonoids - biochanin A, coumestrol, daidzein, equol, formononetin, genistein, naringenin, apigenin - and 5 sterols - ergosterol, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, brassicasterol) and cholesterol in water. The method was used for analyses of samples collected in stagnant water bodies dominated by different cyanobacterial species. Concentrations of individual flavonoids ranged from below the limit of detection to 3.58 ng/L. Sterols were present in higher amounts up to 2.25 μg/L. Biological potencies of these phytoestrogens in vitro were characterized using the hERα-HeLa-9903 cell line. The relative estrogenic potencies (compared to model estrogen - 17β-estradiol) of flavonoids ranged from 2.25E-05 to 1.26E-03 with coumestrol being the most potent. None of the sterols elicited estrogenic response in the used bioassay. Estrogenic activity was detected in collected field water samples (maximum effect corresponding to 2.07 ng/L of 17β-estradiol equivalents, transcriptional assay). At maximum phytoestrogens accounted for only 1.56 pg/L of 17β-estradiol equivalents, contributing maximally 8.5% of the total estrogenicity of the water samples. Other compounds therefore, most likely of anthropogenic origin such as steroid estrogens, are probably the major drivers of total estrogenic effects in these surface waters.

  8. Reports: plasma and dietary phytoestrogens and risk of premalignant lesions of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; McDuffie, Katharine; Franke, Adrian A; Killeen, Jeffrey; Goodman, Marc T

    2004-01-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have observed an inverse association between phytoestrogens and risk of certain hormonally dependent cancers. We undertook an exploratory analysis of the relationship between specific phytoestrogens and premalignant cervical lesions. A case-control study of 122 women with histologically confirmed cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) of the cervix and 183 cytologically normal controls was conducted from 1992 to 1996 in Honolulu, Hawaii. A cervical cell sample was obtained for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. Dietary information was collected using a structured survey, and a fasting blood sample was taken for measurement of five isoflavonoids (genistein, glycitein, daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, and equol), two flavonoids (hesperetin and naringenin), and two lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone). Plasma levels of equol and enterodiol were positively associated with cervical SIL risk: odds ratio, OR = 6.5; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.4-29.2; P for trend = 0.02 and OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.1-6.3; P for trend = 0.01, respectively, for the highest relative to the lowest quartile level after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, HPV infection, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and lifetime number of sexual partners. A nonsignificant positive association with cervical SIL risk was observed for plasma enterolactone. Consistent with the relationships observed for the plasma lignans, dietary sources of lignans, including garlic and taro leaves/ong choy/marunggay, were positively associated with cervical SIL risk. A positive association was also suggested for other lignan sources such as seaweed, onions, grapefruit, and seeds. This is the first study to observe a positive association between specific phytoestrogens and premalignancies of the cervix. The results of this investigation should be considered preliminary and need to be verified in larger, prospective studies.

  9. Anticancer effect of genistein on BG-1 ovarian cancer growth induced by 17 β-estradiol or bisphenol A via the suppression of the crosstalk between estrogen receptor alpha and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Min-Ah; Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between estrogen receptor (ER) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway plays an important role in proliferation of and resistance to endocrine therapy to estrogen dependent cancers. Estrogen (E2) upregulates the expression of components of IGF-1 system and induces the downstream of mitogenic signaling cascades via phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). In the present study, we evaluated the xenoestrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA) and antiproliferative activity of genistein (GEN) in accordance with the influence on this crosstalk. BPA was determined to affect this crosstalk by upregulating mRNA expressions of ERα and IGF-1R and inducing phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt in protein level in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells as E2 did. In the mouse model xenografted with BG-1 cells, BPA significantly increased a tumor burden of mice and expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and cyclin D1 in tumor mass compared to vehicle, indicating that BPA induces ovarian cancer growth by promoting the crosstalk between ER and IGF-1R signals. On the other hand, GEN effectively reversed estrogenicity of BPA by reversing mRNA and protein expressions of ERα, IGF-1R, pIRS-1, and pAkt induced by BPA in cellular model and also significantly decreased tumor growth and in vivo expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and pAkt in xenografted mouse model. Also, GEN was confirmed to have an antiproliferative effect by inducing apoptotic signaling cascades. Taken together, these results suggest that GEN effectively reversed the increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer by suppressing the crosstalk between ERα and IGF-1R signaling pathways upregulated by BPA or E2.

  10. Phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in surface waters--Their sources, occurrence, and potential contribution to estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Jarošová, Barbora; Javůrek, Jakub; Adamovský, Ondřej; Hilscherová, Klára

    2015-08-01

    This review discusses the potential contribution of phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens to in vitro estrogenic activities occurring in surface waters and in vivo estrogenic effects in fish. Main types, sources, and pathways of entry into aquatic environment of these detected compounds were summarized. Reviewed concentrations of phyto/mycoestrogens in surface waters were mostly undetectable or in low ng/L ranges, but exceeded tens of μg/L for the flavonoids biochanin A, daidzein and genistein at some sites. While a few phytosterols were reported to occur at relatively high concentrations in surface waters, information about their potencies in in vitro systems is very limited, and contradictory in some cases. The relative estrogenic activities of compounds (compared to standard estrogen 17β-estradiol) by various in vitro assays were included, and found to differ by orders of magnitude. These potencies were used to estimate total potential estrogenic activities based on chemical analyses of phyto/mycoestrogens. In vivo effective concentrations of waterborne phyto/mycoestrogens were available only for biochanin A, daidzein, formononetin, genistein, equol, sitosterol, and zearalenone. The lowest observable effect concentrations in vivo were reported for the mycoestrogen zearalenone. This compound and especially its metabolites also elicited the highest in vitro estrogenic potencies. Despite the limited information available, the review documents low contribution of phyto/mycoestrogens to estrogenic activity in vast majority of surface waters, but significant contribution to in vitro responses and potentially also to in vivo effects in areas with high concentrations.

  11. Phytoestrogens: hormonal action and brain plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lephart, Edwin D; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Lund, Trent D

    2005-04-15

    Because of their protective effects in age-related diseases and hormone-dependent cancers, the use of phytoestrogens (isoflavones) as 'natural' remedies has gained prominence. Isoflavones are estrogen mimics that bind estrogen receptors and act like natural selective estrogen receptors modulators. However, limited data exists regarding the influence of soy-derived dietary isoflavones in brain. This brief review will address these topics and examine the influence of dietary isoflavones on sexually dimorphic hypothalamic nuclei. We have observed that altering the isoflavone content within diet significantly affects both the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (a structure that is larger in males than in females) and the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (a structure that is larger in females than in males). Specifically, when animals were switched from phytoestrogen-rich to a phytoestrogen-free diet the volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area was decreased in males (no alterations were detected in females). Conversely, when the anteroventral periventricular nucleus was examined, volume changes were recorded in males and females opposite to the patterns observed for the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area. Given the practical limitations of examining the effects of dietary phytoestrogens in the human brain, it is important to establish comparative data sets to elucidate phytoestrogen's hormone action and potentially its beneficial brain health effects.

  12. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate.

    PubMed

    Lamartiniere, Coral A; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Fritz, Wayne A; Wang, Jun; Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn; Elgavish, Ada

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the potential of genistein, the primary isoflavone of soy, to protect against breast and prostate cancers in animal models. For mammary cancer studies, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-76A diet plus minus 250 mg genistein/kg diet. Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was administered by gavage at d 50 postpartum to induce mammary tumors. Mammary cancer chemoprevention was demonstrated after prepubertal and combined prepubertal and adult genistein treatments but not after prenatal- or adult-only treatments, demonstrating that the timing of exposure to genistein is important for mammary cancer chemoprevention. The cellular mechanism of action was found to be mammary gland and cell differentiation, as shown by whole-mount analysis and beta-casein expression. An imprinting effect was shown for epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary terminal end buds. For prostate cancer studies, we used two models. The first was a chemically (N-methylnitrosourea) induced prostate cancer rat model. Genistein in the diet inhibited the development of invasive adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner. The second model was a transgenic mouse model that resulted in spontaneously developing adenocarcinoma tumor of the prostate. Genistein in the diet reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 but not estrogen receptor-beta and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expressions. We conclude that dietary genistein protects against mammary and prostate cancers by regulating specific sex steroid receptors and growth factor signaling pathways.

  13. Potential adverse effects of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Lewis, C; Russell, E; Naftolin, F

    1995-03-01

    Evaluation of the potential benefits and risks offered by naturally occurring plant estrogens requires investigation of their potency and sites of action when consumed at natural dietary concentrations. Our investigations have examined the effects of a range of natural dietary concentrations of the most potent plant isoflavonoid, coumestrol, using a rat model and a variety of estrogen-dependent tissues and endpoints. Treatments of immature females demonstrated agonistic action in the reproductive tract, brain, and pituitary at natural dietary concentrations. Experiments designed to test for estrogen antagonism demonstrated that coumestrol did not conform to the picture of a classic antiestrogen. However, coumestrol did suppress estrous cycles in adult females. Developmental actions were examined by neonatal exposure of pups through milk of rat dams fed a coumestrol, control, or commercial soy-based diet during the critical period of the first 10 postnatal days or throughout the 21 days of lactation. The 10-day treatment did not significantly alter adult estrous cyclicity, but the 21-day treatment produced in a persistent estrus state in coumestrol-treated females by 132 days of age. In contrast, the 10-day coumestrol treatments produced significant deficits in the sexual behavior of male offspring. These findings illustrate the broad range of actions of these natural estrogens and the variability in potency across endpoints. This variability argues for the importance of fully characterizing each phytoestrogen in terms of its sites of action, balance of agonistic and antagonistic properties, natural potency, and short-term and long-term effects.

  14. Association between Dietary Share of Ultra-Processed Foods and Urinary Concentrations of Phytoestrogens in the US

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Steele, Eurídice; Monteiro, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dietary contribution of ultra-processed foods and urinary phytoestrogen concentrations in the US. Participants from cross-sectional 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey aged 6+ years, selected to measure urinary phytoestrogens and with one 24-h dietary recall were evaluated (2692 participants). Food items were classified according to NOVA (a name, not an acronym), a four-group food classification based on the extent and purpose of industrial food processing. Ultra-processed foods are formulations manufactured using several ingredients and a series of processes (hence “ultra-processed”). Most of their ingredients are lower-cost industrial sources of dietary energy and nutrients, with additives used for the purpose of imitating sensorial qualities of minimally processed foods or of culinary preparations of these foods. Studied phytoestrogens included lignans (enterolactone and enterodiol) and isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin and equol). Gaussian regression was used to compare average urinary phytoestrogen concentrations (normalized by creatinine) across quintiles of energy share of ultra-processed foods. Models incorporated survey sample weights and were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family income, and education, among other factors. Adjusted enterodiol geometric means decreased monotonically from 60.6 in the lowest quintile to 35.1 µg/g creatinine in the highest, while adjusted enterolactone geometric means dropped from 281.1 to 200.1 across the same quintiles, respectively. No significant linear trend was observed in the association between these quintiles and isoflavone concentrations. This finding reinforces the existing evidence regarding the negative impact of ultra-processed food consumption on the overall quality of the diet and expands it to include non-nutrients such as lignans. PMID:28264475

  15. Association between Dietary Share of Ultra-Processed Foods and Urinary Concentrations of Phytoestrogens in the US.

    PubMed

    Martínez Steele, Eurídice; Monteiro, Carlos A

    2017-02-28

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between dietary contribution of ultra-processed foods and urinary phytoestrogen concentrations in the US. Participants from cross-sectional 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey aged 6+ years, selected to measure urinary phytoestrogens and with one 24-h dietary recall were evaluated (2692 participants). Food items were classified according to NOVA (a name, not an acronym), a four-group food classification based on the extent and purpose of industrial food processing. Ultra-processed foods are formulations manufactured using several ingredients and a series of processes (hence "ultra-processed"). Most of their ingredients are lower-cost industrial sources of dietary energy and nutrients, with additives used for the purpose of imitating sensorial qualities of minimally processed foods or of culinary preparations of these foods. Studied phytoestrogens included lignans (enterolactone and enterodiol) and isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin and equol). Gaussian regression was used to compare average urinary phytoestrogen concentrations (normalized by creatinine) across quintiles of energy share of ultra-processed foods. Models incorporated survey sample weights and were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family income, and education, among other factors. Adjusted enterodiol geometric means decreased monotonically from 60.6 in the lowest quintile to 35.1 µg/g creatinine in the highest, while adjusted enterolactone geometric means dropped from 281.1 to 200.1 across the same quintiles, respectively. No significant linear trend was observed in the association between these quintiles and isoflavone concentrations. This finding reinforces the existing evidence regarding the negative impact of ultra-processed food consumption on the overall quality of the diet and expands it to include non-nutrients such as lignans.

  16. Genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation via miR-27a and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zang, Aimin; Jia, Youchao; Shang, Yanhong; Zhang, Zhuoqi; Ge, Kun; Zhang, Jinchao; Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soybean isoflavone; in its aglycone it has various biological activities. Animal experiments, clinical studies and epidemiological investigations suggest that genistein has preventative and curative functions for a number of diseases, particularly in cancer. The present study explored the potential anti-cancer effect of genistein by observing its role in inhibiting A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation and investigating the possible mechanism. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of genistein (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM; dissolved in physiological saline) for 1, 2 and 3 days. Subsequently, the viability of A549 cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell apoptosis was examined using a flow cytometer, caspase 3/9 activity was measured using commercial kits, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the miR-27a expression and western blotting was used to investigate MET protein expression. The results suggested a significant inhibition of A549 cell growth following treatment with genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The current study also indicated that treatment with genistein significantly induces cell apoptosis and promotes caspase-3/9 activation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further functional assays revealed that the anti-cancer effect of genistein activated microRNA-27a (miR-27a) expression levels and reduced MET protein expression in A549 cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, this study reports, for the first time, a correlation between the anti-cancer effect of genistein and miR-27a-mediated MET signaling. PMID:27602162

  17. Variations in Phytoestrogen Content between Different Mill Dates of the Same Diet Produces Significant Differences in the Time of Vaginal Opening in CD-1 Mice and F344 Rats but Not in CD Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thigpen, Julius E.; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Haseman, Joseph K.; Saunders, Hannah E.; Caviness, Gordon F.; Kissling, Grace E.; Grant, Mary G.; Forsythe, Diane B.

    2007-01-01

    Background The optimum test diet and rodent species/strain for evaluating endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) are critical. Objectives We conducted studies to evaluate rodent species sensitivity and the effects of diets varying in phytoestrogen content on the time of vaginal opening (VO) in CD-1 mice, Fischer 344 (F344) rats, and CD Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Methods Mice were weaned on postnatal day (PND) 15 and rats on PND19 and randomly assigned to control or test diets. Body weights, food consumption, and time of VO were recorded. Results The time of VO was significantly advanced in F344 rats fed diets containing daidzein and genistein, whereas these same diets did not advance VO in S-D rats. When animals were fed the AIN-76A diet spiked with genistein, time of VO was significantly advanced at all doses in CD-1 mice, at the two highest doses in F344 rats, and at the highest dose in S-D rats. The time of VO in F344 rats was more highly correlated with the phytoestrogen content than with the total metabolizable energy (ME) of 12 diets. Conclusions The S-D rat is less sensitive to dietary phytoestrogens compared with the F344 rat or the CD-1 mouse, suggesting that the S-D rat is not the ideal model for evaluating estrogenic activity of EDCs. The profound effects of dietary phytoestrogens on the time of VO, an estrogen-sensitive marker, indicate that a standardized open-formula phytoestrogen-free diet containing a low ME level should be used to optimize the sensitivity of estrogenic bioassays. PMID:18087589

  18. Effects of aglycone genistein in a rat experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Altavilla, Domenica; Bonaiuto, Antonio; Polito, Francesca; Minutoli, Letteria; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Giuliani, Daniela; Guarini, Salvatore; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco

    2009-03-01

    Genistein aglycone, a soy derived isoflavone, has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. We therefore investigated its effects in an experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome. Female spontaneously hypertensive obese rats (SHROB, n=40), a genetic model of syndrome X, and age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY, n=40) rats were used. A group of SHROB (n=20) and WKY (n=20) animals were ovariectomized (OVX). Four weeks after surgery all animals were randomized to receive either genistein (54 mg/human equivalent dose/day for 4 weeks), or vehicle. Body weight, food intake, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate, plasma glucose, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), total plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, and uterine weights were studied. Furthermore, we investigated acetylcholine- and sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of aortic rings as well as NG-L-arginine (L-NMA: 10-100 mM) induced vasoconstriction in phenylephrine-precontracted aortic segments. Liver expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA and gamma (PPARG was also assessed. OVX animals had a slight increase in SBP, body weight, insulin resistance, and plasma cholesterol. OVX-SHROB rats showed also impaired endothelial responses, blunted L-NMA induced contraction (L-NMA 100 mM, WKY=2.2+/-0.3 g/mg tissue; OVX-SHROB=1.1+/-0.4 g/mg tissue). Genistein treatment decreased SBP and plasma lipids, ameliorated endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance, increased HDL cholesterol, and enhanced liver expression of PPARA and PPARG. Our data suggest that genistein is effective in ameliorating cardiovascular profiles in an experimental model of postmenopausal metabolic syndrome, attenuating the features of this disease. The effects of genistein are likely mediated by PPARA and PPARG receptors. This evidence would support the rationale for some pilot clinical trials using genistein in postmenopausal women affected by metabolic

  19. Genistein attenuates retinal inflammation associated with diabetes by targeting of microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Peña, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is associated with microglial activation and increased levels of inflammatory cytokines. Genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory potential that so far untested in animal models of diabetes. The aims of this study are to evaluate the efficacy of genistein for alleviation of diabetes-induced retinal inflammation and also to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms involved therein by analyzing the effect of genistein on concomitant microglia activation in the diabetic retina and in isolated cells. Methods Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats were used. After diabetes was established for two weeks a single intravitreal injection of genistein or vehicle was performed. Forty-eight hours later, rats were killed, their retinal and vitreal samples were processed for Quantitative Real Time-PCR (qRT–PCR) and Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses, respectively. For the in vitro study, isolated microglial cells from retinas of newborn rats were used. Results mRNA as well as protein levels for tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), a robust marker of inflammation, were increased in the retina early in the course of diabetes. Moreover, diabetes resulted in elevation of ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1) mRNA, known to be upregulated in activated microglia. These effects of diabetes in retina were all reduced by intervention treatment with genistein. Using an in vitro bioassay, we demonstrated the release of TNF-α from microglia activated by glycated albumin, a risk factor for diabetic disorders. This inflammatory signal involves the activation of tyrosine kinase and its subsequent events, ERK and P38 MAPKs. Genistein represses the release of TNF-α and significantly inhibits ERK and P38 phosphorylation in activated microglial cells by acting as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Conclusions These findings show genistein to be effective in dampening diabetes-induced

  20. Arctigenin, a dietary phytoestrogen, induces apoptosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the anticancer effect of arctigenin (ATG), a natural lignan product of Arctium lappa L., in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Results indicate that ATG inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. ATG triggers the mitochondrial caspase-independent pathways, as indicated by changes in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, resulting in AIF and EndoG nuclear translocation. ATG increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by increasing p22(phox)/NADPH oxidase 1 interaction and decreasing glutathione level. ATG clearly increases the activation of p38 MAPK, but not JNK and ERK1/2. Antioxidant EUK-8, a synthetic catalytic superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavenger, significantly decreases ATG-mediated p38 activation and apoptosis. Blocking p38 with a specific inhibitor suppresses ATG-mediated Bcl-2 downregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, ATG activates ATF-2, a transcription factor activated by p38, and then upregulates histone H3K9 trimethylation in the Bcl-2 gene promoter region, resulting in Bcl-2 downregulation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG induces apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation of Bcl-2 by upregulation of histone H3K9 trimethylation.

  1. Physico-chemical characterization of asolectin-genistein liposomal system: An approach to analyze its in vitro antioxidant potential and effect in glioma cells viability.

    PubMed

    Lopes de Azambuja, Carla Roberta; dos Santos, Lurdiane Gomes; Rodrigues, Marisa Raquel; Rodrigues, Renan Ferreira Meneses; da Silveira, Elita Ferreira; Azambuja, Juliana Hofstatter; Flores, Alex F C; Horn, Ana Paula; Dora, Cristiana Lima; Muccillo-Baisch, Ana Luisa; Braganhol, Elizandra; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Parize, Alexandre Luís; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the interaction between soy isoflavone genistein and asolectin liposomes was investigated by monitoring the effects of isoflavone on lipidic hydration, mobility, location and order. These properties were analyzed by the following techniques: horizontal attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (HATR-FTIR), low-field (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-field (31)P NMR, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The antioxidant and antitumoral activities of the genistein liposomal system were also studied. The genistein saturation concentration in ASO liposomes corresponded to 484 μM. HATR-FTIR results indicated that genistein influences the dynamics of the lipidic phosphate, choline, carbonyl and acyl chain methylenes groups. At the lipid polar head, HATR-FTIR and (31)P NMR results showed that the isoflavone reduces the hydration degree of the phosphate group, as well as its mobility. Genistein ordered the lipid interfacial carbonyl group, as evidenced by the HATR-FTIR bandwidth analysis. This ordering effect was also observed in the lipidic hydrophobic region, by HATR-FTIR, NMR, DSC and turbidity responses. At the saturation concentration, liposome-loaded genistein inhibits the lipid peroxidation induced by hydroxyl radical in 90.9%. ASO liposome-loaded genistein at 100 μM decreased C6 glioma cell viability by 57% after 72 h of treatment. Results showed an increase of the genistein in vitro activities after its incorporation in liposomes. The data described in this work will contribute to a better understanding of the interaction between genistein and a natural-source membrane and of its influence on isoflavone biological activities. Furthermore, the antitumoral results showed that genistein-based liposomes, which contain natural-sourced lipids, may be promising as a drug delivery system to be used in the glioma therapy.

  2. Genistein enhances the effect of trichostatin A on inhibition of A549 cell growth by increasing expression of TNF receptor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Yang, Ying-Chihi; Huang, Pei-Ru; Wen, Yu-Der; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study has shown that genistein enhances apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells induced by trichostatin A (TSA). The precise molecular mechanism underlying the effect of genistein, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein enhances the anti-cancer effect of TSA through up-regulation of TNF receptor-1 (TNFR-1) death receptor signaling. We incubated A549 cells with TSA (50 ng/mL) alone or in combination with genistein and then determined the mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 as well as the activation of downstream caspases. Genistein at 5 and 10 μM significantly enhanced the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The combined treatment significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 at 6 and 12 h, respectively, compared with that of the control group; while TSA alone had no effect. TSA in combination with 10 μM of genistein increased TNFR-1 mRNA and protein expression by about 70% and 40%, respectively. The underlying mechanism for this effect of genistein may be partly associated with the estrogen receptor pathway. The combined treatment also increased the activation of caspase-3 and ‐10 as well as p53 protein expression in A549 cells. The enhancing effects of genistein on the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and on the expression of caspase-3 in A549 cells were suppressed by silencing TNFR-1 expression. These data demonstrated that the upregulation of TNFR-1 death receptor signaling plays an important role, at least in part, in the enhancing effect of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. -- Highlights: ► TSA combined with genistein rather than TSA alone increases the expression of TNFR-1. ► Genistein may exert such an effect partly through estrogen receptor pathway. ► The combined treatment increases the activation of caspase-10 and caspase-3. ► The combined treatment also increases the expression of p53 protein. ► TNFR-1 si

  3. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens.

  4. Genistein stimulates fatty acid oxidation in a leptin receptor-independent manner through the JAK2-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Palacios-González, Berenice; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Flores-Galicia, Isabel; Noriega, Lilia G; Alemán-Escondrillas, Gabriela; Zariñan, Teresa; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that contributes to the development of insulin resistance, which is associated with an excessive accumulation of lipids in skeletal muscle tissue. There is evidence that soy protein can decrease the ectopic accumulation of lipids and improves insulin sensitivity; however, it is unknown whether soy isoflavones, particularly genistein, can stimulate fatty acid oxidation in the skeletal muscle. Thus, we studied the mechanism by which genistein stimulates fatty acid oxidation in the skeletal muscle. We showed that genistein induced the expression of genes of fatty acid oxidation in the skeletal muscle of Zucker fa/fa rats and in leptin receptor (ObR)-silenced C2C12 myotubes through AMPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, the genistein-mediated AMPK phosphorylation occurred via JAK2, which was possibly activated through a mechanism that involved cAMP. Additionally, the genistein-mediated induction of fatty acid oxidation genes involved PGC1α and PPARδ. As a result, we observed that genistein increased fatty acid oxidation in both the control and silenced C2C12 myotubes, as well as a decrease in the RER in mice, suggesting that genistein can be used in strategies to decrease lipid accumulation in the skeletal muscle.

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  6. Inhibition of IGF-1 signaling by genistein: modulation of E-cadherin expression and downregulation of β-catenin signaling in hormone refractory PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joomin; Ju, Jihyeung; Park, Seyeon; Hong, Sung Joon; Yoon, Sun

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are associated with an increased risk of several different cancers, including prostate cancer. Inhibition of IGF-1 and the downstream signaling pathways mediated by the activation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) may be involved in inhibiting prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated whether genistein downregulated the IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling pathway and inhibited cell growth in hormone refractory PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Genistein treatment caused a significant inhibition of IGF-1-stimulated cell growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that genistein significantly decreased the number of IGF-1-stimulated cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. In IGF-1-treated cells, genistein effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of IGF-1R and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets, such as Src, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSk-3β). IGF-1 treatment decreased the levels of E-cadherin but increased the levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. However, genistein treatment greatly attenuated IGF-1-induced β-catenin signaling that correlated with increasing the levels of E-cadherin and decreasing cyclin D1 levels in PC-3 cells. In addition, genistein inhibited T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF)-dependent transcriptional activity. These results showed that genistein effectively inhibited cell growth in IGF-1-stimulated PC-3 cells, possibly by inhibiting downstream of IGF-1R activation.

  7. Synergistic Action of Genistein and Calcitriol in Immature Osteosarcoma MG-63 Cells by SGPL1 Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Nadja; Adamus, Anna; Schauer, Nicolas; Kühn, Juliane; Nebe, Barbara; Seitz, Guido; Kraft, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Background Phytoestrogens such as genistein, the most prominent isoflavone from soy, show concentration-dependent anti-estrogenic or estrogenic effects. High genistein concentrations (>10 μM) also promote proliferation of bone cancer cells in vitro. On the other hand, the most active component of the vitamin D family, calcitriol, has been shown to be tumor protective in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to examine a putative synergism of genistein and calcitriol in two osteosarcoma cell lines MG-63 (early osteoblast), Saos-2 (mature osteoblast) and primary osteoblasts. Methods Thus, an initial screening based on cell cycle phase alterations, estrogen (ER) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, live cell metabolic monitoring, and metabolomics were performed. Results Exposure to the combination of 100 μM genistein and 10 nM calcitriol reduced the number of proliferative cells to control levels, increased ERß and VDR expression, and reduced extracellular acidification (40%) as well as respiratory activity (70%), primarily in MG-63 cells. In order to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms in the MG-63 cell line, metabolic profiling via GC/MS technology was conducted. Combined treatment significantly influenced lipids and amino acids preferably, whereas metabolites of the energy metabolism were not altered. The comparative analysis of the log2-ratios revealed that after combined treatment only the metabolite ethanolamine was highly up-regulated. This is the result: a strong overexpression (350%) of the enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1), which irreversibly degrades sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), thereby, generating ethanolamine. S1P production and secretion is associated with an increased capability of migration and invasion of cancer cells. Conclusion From these results can be concluded that the tumor promoting effect of high concentrations of genistein in immature osteosarcoma cells is reduced by the co-administration of calcitriol

  8. Genistein, the dietary-derived angiogenesis inhibitor, prevents LDL oxidation and protects endothelial cells from damage by atherogenic LDL.

    PubMed

    Kapiotis, S; Hermann, M; Held, I; Seelos, C; Ehringer, H; Gmeiner, B M

    1997-11-01

    There is now growing evidence that the oxidative modification of LDL plays a potential role in atherosclerosis. In this study, genistein, a compound derived from a soy diet with a flavonoid chemical structure (4',5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), which was found to inhibit angiogenesis, has been evaluated for its ability to act as an LDL antioxidant and a vascular cell protective agent against oxidized LDL. The results showed that genistein was able to inhibit the oxidation of LDL in the presence of copper ions or superoxide/nitric oxide radicals as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance formation, alteration in electrophoretic mobility, and lipid hydroperoxides. Bovine aortic endothelial cell- and human endothelial cell-mediated LDL oxidation was also inhibited in the presence of genistein. The 7-O-glucoside of genistein, genistin, was much less effective in inhibiting LDL oxidation in the cell-free and cell-mediated lipoprotein-oxidating systems. Incubating human endothelial cells in the absence or presence of genistein and challenging the cells with already oxidized lipoprotein revealed that in addition to its antioxidative potential during LDL oxidating processes, genistein effectively protected the vascular cells from damage by oxidized lipoproteins. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein was found to block upregulation of two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of 132 and 69 kDa in endothelial cells induced by oxidized LDL. Parallel experiments with the inactive analogue daidzein, however, showed that the cytoprotective effect of the isoflavones seems not to be dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings will support the suggested and documented beneficial action of a soy diet in preventing chronic vascular diseases and early atherogenic events.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Genistein and Daidzein with Dexamethasone and Soy Protein on Rheumatoid Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Shahi, Majid; Haidari, Fatemeh; Rashidi, Bahman; Saei, Amir Ata; Mahboob, Soltanali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have already shown the protective effects of soy protein on rheumatoid arthritis in rats. In this study, the effects of genistein and daidzein, two isoflavones from soy on rheumatoid arthritis prognosis and prevention in rats have been investigated. Methods Rheumatoid arthritis was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats using collagen type II plus adjuvant. Rats were then treated with soy protein (7 g/kg), dexamethasone (1 mg/kg), genistein (20 mg/kg genistein), daidzein (20 mg/kg genistein) and casein (in control groups) by daily gavage feedings for 50 days. Scores of arthritis were recorded every day for each paw of animal. Serum concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, adiponectin and leptin were characterized. Tibiotarsal tissue was used for histopathologic analyses. Results Treatment with genistein and daidzein resulted in not only a reduction in disease symptoms but also a delay in the onset of symptoms. Results from delayed-type hypersensitivity test demonstrated that the ear thickness in treated rats was significantly lower than that in the control group (p<0.05). There was a reduction in TNF-α, IL-6, adiponectin and leptin serum concentrations after treatment with genistein and daidzein. Dexamethasone reduced the serum concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6 and adiponectin but increased leptin serum level. Prevention of the tissue damage and joint inflammation was also observed following treatment with two soy isoflavones. Conclusion soy isoflavones, daidzein and especially genistein, could significantly improve rheumatoid arthritis symptoms in rats. The structural similarity of isoflavones to estrogen could be the possible underlying mechanism involved in the function. PMID:23678422

  10. Effect of genistein with carnitine administration on lipid parameters and obesity in C57Bl/6J mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Jun; Park, Hyun-Woo; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2006-01-01

    Soy products are mainly composed of proteins, phytochemicals such as isoflavones, soy lipids, and carbohydrates. It is unclear whether an individual component alone or a combined effect of multiple bioactive compounds contributes to the beneficial properties of soy. We investigated the effect of dietary genistein (the principal soy isoflavone) alone and combined with L-carnitine to evaluate possible synergistic effects on the intentionally induced prediabetic state characterized by insulin resistance and obesity in C57Bl/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HD). In the HD-alone group, abdominal and back fat relative to total body weight were significantly higher compared with other groups including those fed normal diet (ND). Among the HD groups, final weight gains of the HD plus genistein (HD+G) and HD plus genistein plus L-carnitine (HD+G+C) groups were lower compared with that of the control (HD-alone). Especially in liver, the results showed that genistein with carnitine transcriptionally up-regulated expressions of acyl-coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) by approximately 50% and 40%, respectively, compared with genistein alone. However, the up-regulation of CPT-I did not directly reflect the enzyme activity of CPT-I. On the other hand, the effects of genistein and genistein with carnitine on the expressions of ACS and CPT-I in muscle were not significant. Our study suggests that genistein with carnitine exerts anti-obesity effects, probably by modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-associated genes. However, further work is needed to elucidate the possible mechanisms by which genistein and carnitine intervene.

  11. Phytoestrogens and Their Metabolites in Bulk-Tank Milk: Effects of Farm Management and Season

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Steffen A.; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  12. Comparison of the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts with phytoestrogens on the reproductive physiology and sexual behavior in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Juárez-Rojas, L; Hernández, A; Romero, C; López, G; Miranda, L; Guerrero-Aguilera, A; Solano, F; Hernández, E; Chemineau, P; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2016-10-01

    Mesquite (Prosopis sp.) and Leucaena leucocephala are widespread legumes, widely used to feed several livestock species and as food source for human populations in several countries. Both mesquite and Leucaena contain several phytoestrogens which might have potential estrogenic effects. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts on several aspects of behavior and reproductive physiology of the male rat. The effects of the extracts were compared with those of estradiol (E2) and of two isoflavones: daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN). The following treatments were given to groups of intact male rats: vehicle; mesquite pod extract; Leucaena extract; E2; DAI; GEN. The results indicate that mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts disrupt male sexual behavior in a similar way to DAI and GEN, but less than E2. The main disruptor of sexual behavior was E2, however after 40 and 50days of administration, both extracts and phytoestrogens disrupted sexual behavior in a similar way to E2. The extracts also increased testicular germ cell apoptosis, decreased sperm quality, testicular weight, and testosterone levels, as phytoestrogens did, although these effects were less than those caused by estradiol. The number of seminiferous tubules with TUNEL-positive germ cells increased in extracts treated groups in a similar way to phytoestrogens groups, and E2 caused the greatest effect. The number of TUNEL-positive cells per tubule increased only in Leucaena extract and E2 groups, but not in mesquite- and phytoestrogens-treated groups. Spermatocytes and round spermatids were the TUNEL-positive cells observed in all experimental groups. This effect was associated with smaller testicular weights without atrophy in experimental groups compared with control. Testicular atrophy was only observed in estradiol-treated males. Testosterone decreased in males of all experimental groups, compared with control, this androgen was undetectable in E2

  13. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  14. Diarylheptanoids, new phytoestrogens from the rhizomes of Curcuma comosa: Isolation, chemical modification and estrogenic activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Suksamrarn, Apichart; Ponglikitmongkol, Mathurose; Wongkrajang, Kanjana; Chindaduang, Anon; Kittidanairak, Suthadta; Jankam, Aroon; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Kittipanumat, Narin; Chokchaisiri, Ratchanaporn; Khetkam, Pichit; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2008-07-15

    Three new diarylheptanoids, a 1:2 mixture of (3S)- and (3R)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-7-phenyl-(6E)-6-hepten-3-ol (13a and 13b) and 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-phenyl-(6E)-6-hepten-3-one (15), together with two synthetically known diarylheptanoids 1,7-diphenyl-(1E,3E,5E)-1,3,5-triene (9) and 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-phenyl-(4E,6E)-4,6-heptadien-3-one (16), and nine known diarylheptanoids, 2, 8, 10-12, 14, a 3:1 mixture of 17a and 17b, and 18, were isolated from the rhizomes of Curcuma comosa Roxb. The absolute stereochemistry of the isolated compounds has also been determined using the modified Mosher's method. The isolated compounds and the chemically modified analogues were evaluated for their estrogenic-like transcriptional activity using RT-PCR in HeLa cell line. Some of the isolated diarylheptanoids and their modified analogues exhibited estrogenic activity comparable to or higher than that of the phytoestrogen genistein. Based on the transcriptional activation of both estrogenic targets, Bcl-xL and ERbeta gene expression, the structural features for a diarylheptanoid to exhibit high estrogenic activity are the presence of an olefinic function conjugated with the aromatic ring at the 7-position, a keto group at the 3-position, and a phenolic hydroxyl group at the p-position of the aromatic ring attached to the 1-position of the heptyl chain.

  15. Urinary phytoestrogen levels related to idiopathic male infertility in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yankai; Chen, Minjian; Zhu, Pengfei; Lu, Chuncheng; Fu, Guangbo; Zhou, Xiaojin; Chen, Daozhen; Wang, Honghua; Hang, Bo; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao; Wang, Xinru

    2013-09-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are naturally occurring chemical constituents of certain plants. The internal PE exposures, mainly from diet, vary among different populations and in different regions due to various eating habits. To investigate the potential relationship between urinary PE levels and idiopathic male infertility and semen quality in Chinese adult males, 608 idiopathic infertile men and 469 fertile controls were recruited by eligibility screening procedures. Individual exposure to PEs was measured using UPLC-MS/MS as spot urinary concentrations of 6 PEs (daidzein, DAI; equol, EQU; genistein, GEN; naringenin, NAR; coumestrol, COU; and secoisolariciresinol, SEC), which were adjusted with urinary creatinine (CR). Semen quality was assessed by sperm concentration, number per ejaculum and motility. We found that exposures to DAI, GEN and SEC were significantly associated with idiopathic male infertility (P-value for trend=0.036; 0.002; and 0.0001, respectively), while these exposures had stronger association with infertile subjects with at least one abnormal semen parameter than those with all normal semen parameters. Exposures to DAI, GEN and SEC were also related to idiopathic male infertility with abnormal sperm concentration, number per ejaculum and motility (P-value for trend<0.05), while these exposures had stronger association with the infertile men with abnormal sperm number per ejaculum. These findings provide the evidence that PE exposures are related to male reproductive function and raise a public health concern because that exposure to PEs is ubiquitous in China.

  16. Phytoestrogens and Breast Cancer Prevention: Possible Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Hei, Tom K.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Phytoestrogens display an array of pharmacologic properties, and in recent years investigation of their potential as anticancer agents has increased dramatically. In this article we review the published literature related to phytoestrogens and breast cancer as well as suggest the possible mechanisms that may underlie the relationship between phytoestrogens and breast cancer. Data sources Electronic searches on phytoestrogens and breast cancer were performed on MEDLINE and EMBASE in June 2007. No date restriction was placed on the electronic search. Data extraction We focused on experimental data from published studies that examined the characteristics of phytoestrogens using in vivo or in vitro models. We also include human intervention studies in this review. Data synthesis We evaluated evidence regarding the possible mechanisms of phytoestrogen action. Discussions of these mechanisms were organized into those activities related to the estrogen receptor, cell growth and proliferation, tumor development, signaling pathways, and estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Conclusions We suggest that despite numerous investigations, the mechanisms of phytoestrogen action in breast cancer have yet to be elucidated. It remains uncertain whether these plant compounds are chemoprotective or whether they may produce adverse outcomes related to breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18414622

  17. Biodegradation of the phytoestrogen luteolin by the endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Su, Chun-Lun; Zhu, Hong; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived hormonally-active compounds known to cause varied reproductive, immunosuppressive and behavioral effects in vertebrates. In this study, biodegradation of luteolin, a common phytoestrogen, was investigated during incubation with endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari. The optimum concentration of luteolin as sole carbon source supplied in culture was 200 mg L(-1), which allowed 97 and 99 % degradation of luteolin by P. liquidambari in liquid culture and soil conditions, respectively. The investigation of the fungal metabolic pathway showed that luteolin was first decomposed to caffeic acid and phloroglucinol. These intermediate products were degraded to protocatechuic acid and hydroxyquinol, respectively, and then rings were opened by ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Two novel genes encoding the protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase and hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase were successfully cloned. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that expression levels of mRNA of these two genes increased significantly after P. liquidambari was induced by the intermediate products caffeic acid and phloroglucinol, respectively. These results revealed that P. liquidambari can biodegrade luteolin efficiently and could potentially be used to bioremediate phytoestrogen contamination.

  18. Xenopus laevis is a potential alternative model animal species to study reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Qin, Zhan-Fen; Jing, Xiang-Ning; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Jing-Ming; Xu, Xiao-Bai

    2006-05-10

    This study investigated effects of phytoestrogen quercetin on the gonadal development in Xenopus laevis. X. laevis at Nieuwkoop and Faber stage 46/47 were exposed to 50, 100 and 200 microg/L quercetin till 1 month postmetamorphosis. Gonads from frogs at 1 and 3 months postmetamorphosis were examined in gross morphology and histology. The highest dose of quercetin as well as estradiol (E2) significantly increased the percentages of phenotypic females. Exposure to quercetin at all doses induced abnormal testes with certain ovarian characteristics to some degree in gross morphology, including ovotestes. The abnormality rate exceeded 10% in each quercetin treatment. Histologic examination revealed that some abnormal testes exhibited intersexuality with testicular structure and ovarian structure or oocytes interspersed in testicular structure at 1 month postmetamorphosis. At 3 months postmetamorphosis, testicular abnormalities were more obvious, such as necrosis or apoptosis of spermatogonia, occurrence of developed or undeveloped oocytes, delay of the development of seminiferous tubes without or less late stage spermatocytes. The results have shown that quercetin cannot only feminize but also impair testicular development of X. laevis, i.e. X. laevis is sensitive to phytoestrogen. It is suggested that X. laevis might be an alternative model species to study reproductive toxicity of phytoestrogens.

  19. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells through suppression of nuclear factor-κB and upregulation of microRNA-29b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zhu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor and is the most common primary tumor of the bone marrow in the USA. Genistein is predominantly found in Leguminosae and various lines of evidence have indicated that it suppresses cell growth, induces programmed cell death and inhibits angiogenesis. As a result of these capabilities, genistein presents as a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. However, the effect of genistein on MM remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells through the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and microRNA-29b (miR-29b). In the present study, cell proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, apoptosis was detected using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis assay and caspase-3 activation assay. The expression of NF-κB and miR-29b was analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-29b and anti-miR-29b plasmids were transfected into U266 cells to determine the effect of genistein on MM. In the present study, the results demonstrated that genistein could significantly reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and increase the activity of caspase-3 in U266 cells. Furthermore, it was found that genistein could suppress the protein level of NF-κB and promote the expression of miR-29b in U266 cells. The results also indicated that miR-29b could alter the expression of NF-κB in U266 cells. These findings suggest that genistein inhibits the proliferation of human MM cells by upregulating miR-29b resulting in suppression of NF-κB.

  20. Development of topical hydrogels containing genistein-loaded nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    de Vargas, Bethânia Andrade; Bidone, Juliana; Oliveira, Laura Karsburg; Koester, Leticia Scherer; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the development of topical hydrogels containing genistein-loaded nanoemulsions, obtained by means of spontaneous emulsification. This procedure yielded monodisperse nanoemulsions in a sub 250 nm range exhibiting negative zeta-potential and low viscosity. The formulations were incorporated into acrylic-acid hydrogels in order to have their viscosity adjusted for topical application. The semisolid formulations exhibit non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior. The skin permeation/retention of genistein from formulations was carried out using porcine ear skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells under sink conditions. The results showed a slow flow of genistein through the skin. Higher amount of genistein was detected into the skin from the formulation composed by medium chain triglycerides as oily core when compared to the octyldodecanol one. The overall results show that hydrogels containing genistein-loaded nanoemulsions could be considered as a promising formulation to delivery isoflavones into the skin.

  1. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  2. Comparison of an array of in vitro assays for the assessment of the estrogenic potential of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Gutendorf, B; Westendorf, J

    2001-09-14

    Many chemicals in surface waters and sediments have recently been discovered to have estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity. Among these compounds, known as 'endocrine disrupters', are natural and synthetic hormones, phytoestrogenes and a variety of industrial chemicals, such as certain detergents and pesticides. These substances are supposed to affect the development and reproduction in wildlife and humans and may also be involved in the induction of cancer. In order to assess the estrogenic/antiestrogenic potential of pure compounds and complex environmental samples we compared an array of in vitro test systems, (i) two luciferase reporter gene assays using transgenic human MVLN cells (derived from MCF-7 cells) and HGELN cells (derived from HeLa cells); (ii) a competitive binding assay with recombinant human estrogen receptors (ER) alpha and beta; and (iii) a proliferation assay with MCF7-cells (E-Screen). The sensitivity of the assays for 17-beta-estradiol decreased in the order: MVLN-cells=E-Screen>HGELN-cells>binding to ER-alpha>binding to ER-beta. A good correlation was obtained between the estrogenic potencies of 11 compounds (17-beta-estradiol (E(2)), estrone (E(1)), estriol (E(3)), ethinylestradiol (EE(2)), diethylstilbestrol (DES), coumestrol, beta-sitosterol, genistein, 4-nonylphenol, 4-octylphenol, bisphenol A) in the three tissue culture assays. The relative potencies of the compounds obtained by the cell free binding assays were one to two orders of magnitude higher compared with the cell culture assays. The phytoestrogens showed a preference to bind to ER-beta, but only genistein showed a much lower activity in the E-Screen (growth induction in breast cancer cells) compared with the luciferase induction in MVLN and HGELN-cells.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of the natural isoflavone genistein in two xenograft mouse models monitored by [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT, and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab small animal PET

    PubMed Central

    Honndorf, Valerie S.; Wiehr, Stefan; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schmitt, Julia; Kreft, Luisa; Quintanilla-Martinez, Letitia; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Reischl, Gerald; Maurer, Andreas; Boldt, Karsten; Schwarz, Michael; Schmidt, Holger; Pichler, Bernd J.

    2016-01-01

    The natural phytoestrogen genistein is known as protein kinase inhibitor and tumor suppressor in various types of cancers. We studied its antitumor effect in two different xenograft models using positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo combined with ex vivo histology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic fingerprinting. Procedures A431 and Colo205 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle or genistein (500 mg/kg/d) over a period of 12 days. Imaging was performed with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) and 3′-deoxy-3′-[18F]fluorothymidine ([18F] FLT). In a second study A431 tumor-bearing mice were treated with vehicle, genistein (500 mg/kg/d), cetuximab (1mg/3d) or a combination of the compounds and imaged using [18F]FDG, [18F]FLT and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab. Data were compared to histology and principal components analysis (PCA) of NMR fingerprinting data. Results Genistein reduced tumor growth significantly in both xenografts. [18F] FLT uptake was consistent in both models and corresponded to histological findings and also PCA whereas [18F]FDG and [64Cu]NODAGA-cetuximab were not suitable for therapy monitoring. Conclusions As mono-therapy the natural isoflavone genistein has a powerful therapeutic effect in vivo on A431 and Colo205 tumors. [18F]FLT has superior consistency compared to the other tested tracers in therapy monitoring, while the treatment effect could be shown on the molecular level by histology and metabolic fingerprinting. PMID:27070087

  4. Biochanin A reduces drug-induced p75NTR expression and enhances cell survival: a new in vitro assay for screening inhibitors of p75NTR expression.

    PubMed

    El Touny, Lara H; Henderson, Fraser; Djakiew, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) or peripheral neuropathy, increased levels of the p75(NTR) death receptor initiate the signal transduction cascade leading to cell death. Investigations of compounds that may ameliorate neuronal cell death have largely used rodent models, which are time consuming, expensive, and cumbersome to perform. Previous studies had demonstrated that steroids, particularly dexamethasone and its analog methylprednisolone sodium succinate, exhibit limited neuroprotective effects against neuronal injury. Significantly, many naturally occurring nonsteroidal plant compounds exhibit structural overlap with steroids. In this report, we present an in vitro cellular screen model to practically examine the efficacy of various phytoestrogens in modulating the ibuprofen-induced expression of p75(NTR) and reduced cell survival of CCFSTTG1 and U87MG cells in a rescue (postinjury) or prevention (preinjury) regimen. We show that the phytoestrogen, biochanin A, and, to a lesser extent, genistein are more effective than dexamethasone at reducing p75(NTR) expression and improving the viability of U87MG and CCFSTTG1 before and after p75(NTR) induction. Furthermore, these studies implicate biochanin A's inactivation of p38-MAPK as a possible contributor to reducing p75(NTR) with associated increased cell survival. This new in vitro assay facilitates a more time-efficient screening of compounds to suppress p75(NTR) expression and increase neuronal cell viability prior to their evaluation in animal models of neurological diseases.

  5. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-02-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones.

  6. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9435150

  7. Synthesis of genistein 2,3-anhydroglycoconjugates -- potential antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Goj, Katarzyna; Rusin, Aleksandra; Szeja, Wiesław; Kitel, Radosław; Komor, Roman; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    The title compounds, variously protected 2.3-anhydrosugars linked with genistein through an alkyl chain, were synthesized in a sequence of reactions. First step involved Ferrier rearragement of 3,4-di-O-acetyl-L-rhamnal with 3-bromopropanol to obtain 2,3-unsaturated bromoalkylglycosides. The next step was epoxidation with m-CPBA and finally these compounds were connected with genistein in reaction of 7-O-genistein tetra-butylamonium salt with 2,3-anhydro bromoalkylglycosides. Obtained glycoconjugates differ in orientation of an oxirane ring and the protecting group in a sugar moiety. All compounds were tested in vitro for antiproliferative potential in cancer cells.

  8. Effects of phytoestrogens on expression of genes regulating growth-related processes in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived isoflavones that activate estrogen receptors. Phytoestrogen content of aquafeeds is increasing due to higher inclusion levels of soy and other legumes rich in these compounds. It is unknown whether phytoestrogens affect growth-related processes in a manner similar...

  9. Occurrence of phytoestrogens in municipal wastewater and surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E

    2009-08-01

    Phytoestrogens (isoflavones, enterolignans and coumestrol) in wastewater samples and surface water samples have been analysed by LC-ESI-MS(n). In wastewater samples, high levels of enterolactone (581-2111 ng/L), daidzein (341-1688 ng/L) and enterodiol (60-834 ng/L) were detected in raw sewage, but the vast majority of the analysed phytoestrogens were removed effectively in the treatment process. The removal rates of the analysed phytoestrogens in the two advanced tertiary treatment plants were >99%; a case study in one of the treatment plants showed that most of the residual phytoestrogens were removed by biological treatment using activated sludge. In surface water samples, daidzein was found at concentrations ranging from 2 ng/L to 33 ng/L in samples from two creeks, and up to 120 ng/L in surface water (pond) on a dairy farm. The analytical results suggest that direct excretions of livestock discharged from farmyards can be another potential source of phytoestrogen contamination in the aquatic environment.

  10. Effects of genistein and estrogen receptor subtype-specific agonists in ArKO mice following different administration routes.

    PubMed

    Bliedtner, Anja; Zierau, Oliver; Albrecht, Steffen; Liebhaber, Steffi; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-01-15

    We have scrutinized the effects of the phytoestrogen genistein and three synthetic estrogen receptor agonists, 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE), propylpyrazole-triol (PPT) and diarylpropionitrile (DPN) in the completely estrogen-free background of aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice by means of two routes of substance administration: oral via diet (per os; po) or subcutaneous injection (sc) with the intention to evaluate the ArKO mice as sensitive model organism for uterotrophic assays. Additionally, we were aiming to qualitatively analyze effects resulting from oral administration path, in particular for PPT and DPN. Therefore, we analyzed the resulting uterine wet weights (UWW) and epithelial heights as physiological endpoints of function as well as the gonadotropin levels. Moreover, the gene expression profiles of estrogen receptors as well as important uterine and ovarian estrogen-response genes were investigated by real-time PCR. The uterus of ArKO mice responded very sensitive upon the substitution with EE (sc 5 microg/kg BW; po 50 microg/kg BW) in a proliferative manner. This was evaluated inter alia by increased UWW and by up-regulation of the expression of proliferation-associated and estrogen-response genes. It is important to note, that ER alpha and ER beta-agonist, PPT and DPN respectively (po 5mg/kg BW and sc 0.5mg/kg BW), have only been used for sc applications so far. Here, effects resulting from oral application were qualitatively described and evaluated for their applicability. The UWW and expression of proliferation-associated genes were increased following both po and sc treatment with PPT. In contrast, DPN did not exert an increase of the UWW, but a significant decrease of proliferation-associated gene and protein expression. Additionally, a substantial hypoplasia was detectable in the uterine cross-sections of DPN-treated mice. On the other hand, the phytoestrogen genistein (sc 10mg/kg BW; po 70 mg/kg BW) did not cause detectable uterotrophic

  11. E-Screen evaluation of sugar beet feedstuffs in a case of reduced embryo transfer efficiencies in cattle: the role of phytoestrogens and zearalenone.

    PubMed

    Shappell, N W; Mostrom, M S; Lenneman, E M

    2012-04-01

    The E-Screen assay was used to evaluate the estrogenicity of sugar beet by-products obtained from a dairy farm experiencing low success rates of embryo transfer. The beet tailings had ~3-fold the estradiol equivalents of the pelleted beet pulp (3.9 and 1.2 μg estradiol equivalents or E(2)Eq/kg dry matter, respectively). Whole sugar beets, sugar beet pellets, and shreds from several Midwest US locations were also evaluated by E-Screen. All pellets examined were found to have some estrogenic activity (range ~0.1-2.0 μg E(2)Eq/kg DM) with a mean of 0.46 μg/kg dry matter and median of 0.28 μg/kg dry matter. Relative E(2)Eq ranked as follows: pellets > shreds > most unprocessed roots. Using recommended feeding levels and conservative absorption estimates (10%), the estrogenic activity in the original samples could result in blood estradiol equivalents ≥ those found at estrus (10 pg/mL, cows). Chemical analyses revealed no known phytoestrogens, but the estrogenic mycotoxin, zearalenone, was found in 15 of 21 samples. Of significance to those using the E-Screen are our findings that contradict previous reports: ß-sitosterol has no proliferative effect and genistein's glucuronidated form-genistin-is equal to genistein in proliferative effect. The latter is the result of deconjugation of genistin to genistein in the presence of fetal bovine serum (determined by LC MSMS). These data show the usefulness and caveats of the E-Screen in evaluation of feedstuffs, and indicate a potential for sugar beet by-products to contain zearalenone at concentrations that may impact reproduction.

  12. Genistein inhibits advanced glycation end product formation by trapping methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lishuang; Shao, Xi; Chen, Huadong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2011-04-18

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive endogenous metabolite derived from several nonenzymatic and enzymatic reactions, and identified as a well-known precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). In the present study, genistein, a naturally occurring isoflavone derived from soy products, demonstrated significant trapping effects of MGO and consequently formed mono- and di-MGO adducts under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C). More than 80.0% of MGO was trapped within 4 h, and the trapping efficiency could be up to 97.7% at 24 h. The reaction adducts formed from genistein and MGO under different ratios were analyzed using LC/MS. We also successfully purified and identified the major mono- and di-MGO conjugated adducts of genistein. The NMR data showed that positions 6 and 8 of the A ring of genistein were the major active sites for trapping MGO. We further demonstrated that genistein could effectively inhibit the formation of AGEs in the human serum albumin (HSA)-MGO assay. Two mono-MGO adducts and one di-MGO adduct of genistein were detected in this assay using LC/MS. The di-MGO adduct of genistein became the dominant reaction product during prolonged incubation. Results from this study, as well as our previous findings on (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG), phloridzin and phloretin, indicate that dietary flavonoids that have the same A ring structure as genistein, EGCG, phloridzin, and phloretin may have the potential to inhibit the formation of AGEs by trapping reactive dicarbonyl species.

  13. Metabolic programming of a beige adipocyte phenotype by genistein

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Sadat A.; Wakeling, Luisa A.; Miwa, Satomi; Alberdi, Goiuri; Hesketh, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Scope Promoting the development of brown or beige adipose tissue may protect against obesity and related metabolic features, and potentially underlies protective effects of genistein in mice. Methods and results We observed that application of genistein to 3T3‐L1 adipocytes changed the lipid distribution from large droplets to a multilocular distribution, reduced mRNAs indicative of white adipocytes (ACC, Fasn, Fabp4, HSL, chemerin, and resistin) and increased mRNAs that are a characteristic feature of brown/beige adipocytes (CD‐137 and UCP1). Transcripts with a role in adipocyte differentiation (Cebpβ, Pgc1α, Sirt1) peaked at different times after application of genistein. These responses were not affected by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist fulvestrant, revealing that this action of genistein is not through the classical ER pathway. The Sirt1 inhibitor Ex‐527 curtailed the genistein‐mediated increase in UCP1 and Cebpβ mRNA, revealing a role for Sirt1 in mediating the effect. Baseline oxygen consumption and the proportional contribution of proton leak to maximal respiratory capacity was greater for cells exposed to genistein, demonstrating greater mitochondrial uncoupling. Conclusions We conclude that genistein acts directly on adipocytes or on adipocyte progenitor cells to programme the cells metabolically to adopt features of beige adipocytes. Thus, this natural dietary agent may protect against obesity and related metabolic disease. PMID:27670404

  14. [Soy and phytoestrogens consumption and health policy hesitation or certitude].

    PubMed

    Nitzan-Kaluski, Dorit; Stern, Felicia; Kachel, Josefa; Leventhal, Alex

    2002-01-01

    Soy and phytoestrogens are controversial as to their beneficial effects on health and the prevention of disease. To date, dietary recommendations in Israel do not specify a diet rich in soy and phytoestrogens. In order to establish a policy on this issue, we carried out a comprehensive, updated review of the relevant scientific literature. Data on the role of these substances in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer are limited. As yet, there is no conclusive evidence on the efficacy of phytoestrogens and soy in the prevention of osteoporosis. Their effect on fertility in animals and humans is still unclear. There are no data on the long-term risks or benefits of using soy-based formulae in infancy. Therefore, for those who cannot be breast-fed, cow-milk based formulae are recommended. Currently, the most supportive evidence for health benefits of soy can be found in studies on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Utility of cyclodextrins in the formulation of genistein part 1. Preparation and physicochemical properties of genistein complexes with native cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Daruházi, Agnes Emma; Szente, Lajos; Balogh, Balázs; Mátyus, Péter; Béni, Szabolcs; Takács, Mária; Gergely, András; Horváth, Péter; Szoke, Eva; Lemberkovics, Eva

    2008-11-04

    Isoflavones are suitable guest molecules for inclusion complex formation with cyclodextrins (CDs). The molecular encapsulation with CDs results in a solid, molecularly dispersed form and in a significantly improved aqueous solubility of isoflavones. Genistein, a key isoflavone constituent of Ononidis spinosae radix was found to form a supramolecular, non-covalent inclusion complex with both beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD), while it did not form a stable complex with alpha-CD. The guest genistein was found to spatially located in the less polar cavity of cyclodextrin. The isolated binary genistein/CD complexes appeared novel crystalline lattices. The in vitro dissolution of genistein entrapped into both beta- and gamma-CD, significantly surpassed that of the plain isoflavone.

  16. Cross-species and interassay comparisons of phytoestrogen action.

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, P L; Patisaul, H B

    2001-01-01

    This paper compiles animal and human data on the biologic effects and exposure levels of phytoestrogens in order to identify areas of research in which direct species comparisons can be made. In vitro and in vivo assays of phytoestrogen action and potency are reviewed and compared to actions, dose-response relationships, and estimates of exposure in human subjects. Binding studies show that the isoflavonoid phytoestrogens are high-affinity ligands for estrogen receptors (ERs), especially ER beta, but have lower potency in whole-cell assays, perhaps because of interactions with binding proteins. Many other enzymatic actions require concentrations higher than those normally seen in plasma. In vivo data show that phytoestrogens have a wide range of biologic effects at doses and plasma concentrations seen with normal human diets. Significant in vivoresponses have been observed in animal and human tests for bone, breast, ovary, pituitary, vasculature, prostate, and serum lipids. The doses reported to be biologically active in humans (0.4--10 mg/kg body weight/day) are lower than the doses generally reported to be active in rodents (10--100 mg/kg body weight/day), although some studies have reported rodent responses at lower doses. However, available estimates of bioavailability and peak plasma levels in rodents and humans are more similar. Steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appear to be important loci of phytoestrogen actions, but these inferences must be tentative because good dose-response data are not available for many end points. The similarity of reported proliferative and antiproliferative doses illustrates the need for fuller examination of dose-response relationships and multiple end points in assessing phytoestrogen actions. PMID:11250801

  17. Antiresorptive Effects of Phytoestrogen Supplements Compared with Estradiol or Risedronate in Postmenopausal Women Using 41Ca Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, C. M.; Martin, B. R.; Jackson, G. S.; McCabe, G. P.; Nolan, J. R.; McCabe, L. D.; Barnes, S.; Reinwald, S.; Boris, M. E.; Peacock, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Reduction of ovarian estrogen secretion at menopause increases net bone resorption and leads to bone loss. Isoflavones have been reported to protect bone from estrogen deficiency, but their modest effects on bone resorption have been difficult to measure with traditional analytical methods. Methods: In this randomized-order, crossover, blinded trial in 11 healthy postmenopausal women, we compared four commercial sources of isoflavones from soy cotyledon, soy germ, kudzu, and red clover and a positive control of oral 1 mg estradiol combined with 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone or 5 mg/d oral risedronate (Actonel®) for their antiresorptive effects on bone using novel 41Ca methodology. Results: Risedronate and estrogen plus progesterone decreased net bone resorption measured by urinary 41Ca by 22 and 24%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Despite serum isoflavone profiles indicating bioavailability of the phytoestrogens, only soy isoflavones from the cotyledon and germ significantly decreased net bone resorption by 9% (P = 0.0002) and 5% (P = 0.03), respectively. Calcium absorption and biochemical markers of bone turnover were not influenced by interventions. Conclusions: Dietary supplements containing genistein-like isoflavones demonstrated a significant but modest ability to suppress net bone resorption in postmenopausal women at the doses supplied in this study over a 50-d intervention period. PMID:19584189

  18. Interaction of bisphenol A (BPA) and soy phytoestrogens on sexually dimorphic sociosexual behaviors in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Kimani D; Sullivan, Alana W; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Rebuli, Meghan; Patisaul, Heather B

    2016-08-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the potential for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) to alter brain development and behavior. Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous EDC, has been linked to altered sociosexual and mood-related behaviors in various animal models and children but effects are inconsistent across laboratories and animal models creating confusion about potential risk in humans. Exposure to endocrine active diets, such as soy, which is rich in phytoestrogens, may contribute to this variability. Here, we tested the individual and combined effects of low dose oral BPA and soy diet or the individual isoflavone genistein (GEN; administered as the aglycone genistin (GIN)) on rat sociosexual behaviors with the hypothesis that soy would obfuscate any BPA-related effects. Social and activity levels were unchanged by developmental exposure to BPA but soy diet had sex specific effects including suppressed novelty preference, and open field exploration in females. The data presented here reinforce that environmental factors, including anthropogenic chemical exposure and hormone active diets, can shape complex behaviors and even reverse expected sex differences.

  19. Genistein Up-Regulates Tumor Suppressor MicroRNA-574-3p in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Hidaka, Hideo; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Arora, Sumit; Deng, Guoren; Shahryari, Varahram; Chang, Inik; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Enokida, Hideki; Seki, Naohiko; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2013-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to inhibit cancers both in vitro and in vivo, by altering the expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs). In this study, we focused on tumor suppressor miRNAs regulated by genistein and investigated their function in prostate cancer (PCa) and target pathways. Using miRNA microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR we observed that miR-574-3p was significantly up-regulated in PCa cells treated with genistein compared with vehicle control. The expression of miR-574-3p was significantly lower in PCa cell lines and clinical PCa tissues compared with normal prostate cells (RWPE-1) and adjacent normal tissues. Low expression level of miR-574-3p was correlated with advanced tumor stage and higher Gleason score in PCa specimens. Re-expression of miR-574-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. miR-574-3p restoration induced apoptosis through reducing Bcl-xL and activating caspase-9 and caspase-3. Using GeneCodis software analysis, several pathways affected by miR-574-3p were identified, such as ‘Pathways in cancer’, ‘Jak-STAT signaling pathway’, and ‘Wnt signaling pathway’. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-574-3p directly binds to the 3′ UTR of several target genes (such as RAC1, EGFR and EP300) that are components of ‘Pathways in cancer’. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the three target genes in PCa cells were markedly down-regulated with miR-574-3p. Loss-of-function studies demonstrated that the three target genes significantly affect cell proliferation, migration and invasion in PCa cell lines. Our results show that genistein up-regulates tumor suppressor miR-574-3p expression targeting several cell signaling pathways. These findings enhance understanding of how genistein regulates with miRNA in PCa. PMID:23554959

  20. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bayele, Henry K; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K S

    2015-12-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis.

  1. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Rizner, Tea Lanisnik

    2005-09-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100 microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100 microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1 microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5 microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  2. Phytoestrogens as inhibitors of fungal 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kristan, Katja; Krajnc, Katja; Konc, Janez; Gobec, Stanislav; Stojan, Jure; Lanisnik Rizner, Tea

    2005-08-01

    Different phytoestrogens were tested as inhibitors of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17beta-HSDcl), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Phytoestrogens inhibited the oxidation of 100microM 17beta-hydroxyestra-4-en-3-one and the reduction of 100microM estra-4-en-3,17-dione, the best substrate pair known. The best inhibitors of oxidation, with IC(50) below 1microM, were flavones hydroxylated at positions 3, 5 and 7: 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,7-dihydroxyflavone, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) and 5-hydroxyflavone, together with 5-methoxyflavone. The best inhibitors of reduction were less potent; 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-methoxyflavone, coumestrol, 3,5,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone (kaempferol) and 5-hydroxyflavone, all had IC(50) values between 1 and 5microM. Docking the representative inhibitors chrysin and kaempferol into the active site of 17beta-HSDcl revealed the possible binding mode, in which they are sandwiched between the nicotinamide moiety and Tyr212. The structural features of phytoestrogens, inhibitors of both oxidation and reduction catalyzed by the fungal 17beta-HSD, are similar to the reported structural features of phytoestrogen inhibitors of human 17beta-HSD types 1 and 2.

  3. Phytoestrogens in botanical dietary supplements: implications for cancer.

    PubMed

    Piersen, Colleen E

    2003-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant constituents that possess either estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity. Although their activities are weak as compared with human endogenous estrogens, the consumption of phytoestrogens may have clinically significant consequences. A number of botanicals, or the compounds contained therein, have been identified as putative estrogenic agents, but consensus in the biomedical community has been hampered by conflicting data from various in vitro and in vivo models of estrogenic activity. Phytoestrogens may serve as chemopreventive agents while at the same time being capable of promoting growth in estrogen receptor positive cancer cell lines. Furthermore, they may exert their estrogenic influence through receptor-dependent and/or receptor-independent mechanisms. These findings have led to speculation that phytoestrogen intake might be ill advised for patients at an increased risk for hormone-dependent cancers, cancer patients, or cancer survivors. This article will attempt to sort out discrepancies between various experimental models and establish whether certain herbs possess estrogenic activity. The review will focus on 5 popular botanical dietary supplements: Trifolium pratense (red clover), Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh), Humulus lupulus (hops), Angelica sinensis (dong quai), and Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice). It will address their mechanisms of action, clinical evidence bases, and implications for use in cancer.

  4. Determination of Phytoestrogen Content in Fresh-Cut Legume Forage

    PubMed Central

    Hloucalová, Pavlína; Skládanka, Jiří; Horký, Pavel; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pelikán, Jan; Knotová, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Phytoestrogens comprise a group of substances negatively influencing the development and function of animal reproductive organs. Their appearance in forage crops can reduce feeding values, cause dietary disorders, and lead to animal health damage. This study evaluated the occurrence of individual phytoestrogens in various species of annual and perennial legumes and their levels in dry forage. It appeared that feeding large amounts of red clover presents a potential risk, but red clover can be replaced with the annual Persian clover, in which markedly lower phytoestrogen levels were detected. Abstract The aim of the study was to determine phytoestrogen content in fresh-cut legume forage. This issue has been much discussed in recent years in connection with the health and safety of feedstuffs and thus livestock health. The experiments were carried out on two experimental plots at Troubsko and Vatín, Czech Republic during June and July in 2015. Samples were collected of the four forage legume species perennial red clover (variety “Amos”), alfalfa (variety “Holyně”), and annuals Persian clover and Alexandrian clover. Forage was sampled twice at regular three to four day intervals leading up to harvest and a third time on the day of harvest. Fresh and wilted material was analyzed using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Higher levels (p < 0.05) of isoflavones biochanin A (3.697 mg·g−1 of dry weight) and formononetin (4.315 mg·g−1 of dry weight) were found in red clover than in other species. The highest isoflavone content was detected in red clover, reaching 1.001% of dry matter (p < 0.05), representing a risk for occurrence of reproduction problems and inhibited secretion of animal estrogen. The phytoestrogen content was particularly increased in wilted forage. Significant isoflavone reduction was observed over three to four day intervals leading up to harvest. PMID:27429009

  5. Isoflavones made simple - genistein's agonist activity for the beta-type estrogen receptor mediates their health benefits.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Soy isoflavones, the focus of much research and controversy, are often referred to as "weak estrogens". In fact, genistein is a relatively potent agonist for the recently characterized beta isoform of the estrogen receptor (ERbeta). The low nanomolar serum concentrations of unconjugated free genistein achieved with high-nutritional intakes of soy isoflavones are near the binding affinity of genistein for this receptor, but are about an order of magnitude lower than genistein's affinity for the "classical" alpha isoform of the estrogen receptor (ERalpha). Moreover, these concentrations are far too low to inhibit tyrosine kinases or topoisomerase II, in vitro activities of genistein often cited as potential mediators of its physiological effects. The thesis that these physiological effects are in fact mediated by ERbeta activation provides a satisfying rationale for genistein's clinical activities. Hepatocytes do not express ERbeta; this explains why soy isoflavones, unlike oral estrogen, neither modify serum lipids nor provoke the prothrombotic effects associated with increased risk for thromboembolic disorders. The lack of uterotrophic activity of soy isoflavones reflects the fact that ERalpha is the exclusive mediator of estrogen's impact in this regard. Vascular endothelium expresses both ERalpha and ERbeta, each of which has the potential to induce and activate nitric oxide synthase; this may account for the favorable influence of soy isoflavones on endothelial function in postmenopausal women and ovariectomized rats. The ERbeta expressed in osteoblasts may mediate the reported beneficial impact of soy isoflavones on bone metabolism. Suggestive evidence that soy-rich diets decrease prostate cancer risk, accords well with the observation that ERbeta appears to play an antiproliferative role in healthy prostate. In the breast, ERalpha promotes epithelial proliferation, whereas ERbeta has a restraining influence in this regard - consistent with the emerging view

  6. Metabolism of daidzein and genistein by intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Nair, M G

    1995-12-01

    The isoflavones daidzein [1] and genistein [2] were fermented with human fecal bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Dihydrodaidzein [3], benzopyran-4,7-diol,3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) [4], and equol [5] were isolated from the fermentation broth of 1. Only one metabolite, dihydrogenistein [6], was isolated and characterized from the fermentation broth of 2. Metabolites 3-6 were identified by spectral methods.

  7. Impact of Phytoestrogens on Serum Lipids in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Terzic, M.; Micic, J.; Dotlic, J.; Maricic, S.; Mihailovic, T.; Knezevic, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the impact of soy- and red clover-derived isoflavones on serum lipid levels in postmenopausal women and to compare the effects to the lipid levels of healthy postmenopausal women without phytoestrogen supplementation. Materials and Methods: Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and cholesterol fractions were assessed. Measurements were performed before treatment and at 6-month intervals over a period of 18 months. The investigation included 74 healthy postmenopausal women randomized into three groups according to treatment. The first group of 23 patients received soy-derived isoflavones, the second group (26 patients) was given red clover-derived phytoestrogens, while the third control group (25 patients) received no supplements. Results: Mean triglyceride, cholesterol and LDL levels of patients in the control group were significantly higher than in both the soy and the red clover groups (p < 0.001) at all three time points, while mean values did not differ significantly between the soy and the red clover groups. The mean HDL levels of patients in the control group was significantly lower than in both the soy and the red clover groups (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Phytoestrogen supplementation had a positive metabolic effect on serum lipid levels in postmenopausal women. The impact on serum lipids levels was similar for soy and red clover. PMID:25284841

  8. Analysis of phytoestrogens and polyphenols in plasma, tissue, and urine using HPLC with coulometric array detection.

    PubMed

    Gamache, P H; Acworth, I N

    1998-03-01

    The study of phytoestrogens in food sources and their metabolism, effects, and mechanism of action in animals requires very selective and often sensitive analytical techniques. We have applied coulometric array detection, which uses a series of flow-through electrochemical sensors each providing 100% electrolytic efficiency, for measurement of a variety of phytochemicals in complex matrices. Recent work has involved the resolution of coumestrol (COM), daidzein (DE), daidzin (DI), diethylstilbestrol (DES), enterodiol (ED), enterolactone (EL), equol (EQ), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), estrone (E), genistein (GE), and quercetin (QE). Binary gradient reversed-phase (C18) chromatography was used with a sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.8)-methanol-acetonitrile solvent system. Eight coulometric sensors were set at 260, 320, 380, 440, 500, 560, 620, and 680 mV (vs Pd reference). Compounds were resolved in 30 min via both their oxidation/reduction characteristics and chromatographic behavior. Respective maximal oxidation potentials (mV) were: COM = 380; DE = 500; DI = 620; DES = 440; ED = 620; EL = 620; EQ = 560; E2 = 560; E3 = 560; E1 = 560; GE = 500; and QE = 260 with limits of detection of 5-50 pg. Uterine tissue homogenates (30 mg/ml in Tris-EDTA) and plasma from Sprague-Dawley rats sacrificed 1 hr after sc injection with either vehicle, dimethylsulfoxide, 10 microg DES, or 1.0 mg EQ were analyzed before and after enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase/sulfatase. Urine samples from humans receiving a Boston-area diet with or without soy protein isolate supplements were also analyzed. Ethanol extracts were evaporated and reconstituted in 20% methanol before HPLC analysis. DE, ED, EL, EQ, and GE were determined in urine with less than 5% (R.S.D.) intraassay imprecision and 85%-102% recovery. Levels (ng/ml) of GE (1.8), QE (11.2), and EQ (1.7) were found in control plasma before hydrolysis and GE (293), QE (183), and EQ (22) after hydrolysis. Higher concentrations

  9. Genistein and cancer: current status, challenges, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    Primary prevention through lifestyle interventions is a cost-effective alternative for preventing a large burden of chronic and degenerative diseases, including cancer, which is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the past decade, epidemiologic and preclinical evidence suggested that polyphenolic phytochemicals present in many plant foods possess chemopreventive properties against several cancer forms. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the potential cancer chemopreventive agents obtained from natural sources, such as polyphenols, that may represent a new, affordable approach to curb the increasing burden of cancer throughout the world. Several epidemiologic studies showed a relation between a soy-rich diet and cancer prevention, which was attributed to the presence of a phenolic compound, genistein, present in soy-based foods. Genistein acts as a chemotherapeutic agent against different types of cancer, mainly by altering apoptosis, the cell cycle, and angiogenesis and inhibiting metastasis. Targeting caspases, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2, kinesin-like protein 20A (KIF20A), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), Wingless and integration 1 β-catenin (Wnt/β-catenin), and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathways may act as the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer, therapeutic effects of genistein. Genistein also shows synergistic behavior with well-known anticancer drugs, such as adriamycin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen, suggesting a potential role in combination therapy. This review critically analyzes the available literature on the therapeutic role of genistein on different types of cancer, focusing on its chemical features, plant food sources, bioavailability, and safety.

  10. Genistein and Cancer: Current Status, Challenges, and Future Directions12

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Primary prevention through lifestyle interventions is a cost-effective alternative for preventing a large burden of chronic and degenerative diseases, including cancer, which is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the past decade, epidemiologic and preclinical evidence suggested that polyphenolic phytochemicals present in many plant foods possess chemopreventive properties against several cancer forms. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the potential cancer chemopreventive agents obtained from natural sources, such as polyphenols, that may represent a new, affordable approach to curb the increasing burden of cancer throughout the world. Several epidemiologic studies showed a relation between a soy-rich diet and cancer prevention, which was attributed to the presence of a phenolic compound, genistein, present in soy-based foods. Genistein acts as a chemotherapeutic agent against different types of cancer, mainly by altering apoptosis, the cell cycle, and angiogenesis and inhibiting metastasis. Targeting caspases, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)–associated X protein (Bax), Bcl-2, kinesin-like protein 20A (KIF20A), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB), Wingless and integration 1 β-catenin (Wnt/β-catenin), and phosphoinositide 3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathways may act as the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer, therapeutic effects of genistein. Genistein also shows synergistic behavior with well-known anticancer drugs, such as adriamycin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen, suggesting a potential role in combination therapy. This review critically analyzes the available literature on the therapeutic role of genistein on different types of cancer, focusing on its chemical features, plant food sources, bioavailability, and safety. PMID:26178025

  11. A new class of phytoestrogens; evaluation of the estrogenic activity of deoxybenzoins.

    PubMed

    Fokialakis, Nikolas; Lambrinidis, George; Mitsiou, Dimitra J; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Mitakou, Sofia; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Pratsinis, Harris; Mikros, Emmanuel; Alexis, Michael N

    2004-03-01

    Although deoxybenzoins are intermediates in the synthesis of isoflavones, their estrogenic activity has not been investigated. Eleven deoxybenzoins were synthesized and their estrogenicity was evaluated. While their affinities for estrogen receptors (ER) ERalpha and ERbeta were found grossly comparable to those of daidzein, some exhibited considerable selectivity and transcriptional bias toward ERbeta, which appeared to allow for enhancement of ER-mediated transcription via deoxybenzoin binding of ERbeta. Their activity to stimulate the proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells and regulate the expression of endogenous and stably transfected reporter genes differed considerably, with some inhibiting cell proliferation while effectively inducing gene expression at the same time. Molecular modeling confirmed that deoxybenzoins fit well in the ligand binding pocket of ERbeta, albeit with different orientations. Our data support the view that deoxybenzoins constitute a promising new class of ERbeta-biased phytoestrogens.

  12. Genistein prevents calcium mobilization evoked by platelet-derived growth factor without affecting calcium release by cadmium or bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Ming Lyu; Barnes, S.; Smith, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Cadmium (Cd) strikingly increases ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate and evokes a spike in cytosolic free Ca (Ca{sub i}) in human dermal fibroblasts as described previously. Cd apparently activates a membrane receptor by binding to a zinc site in its external domain. Two classes of receptors are known to induce inositol phosphate formation and release stored Ca: those that are coupled to phospholipase C via GTP-binding proteins, e.g., the bradykinin (BK) receptor; and those that are tyrosine kinases, e.g. the receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Cd, 100 nM BK, and 10 ng/ml PDGF increased Ca{sub i} from 142 {plus minus} 24 nM to 809 {plus minus} 36, 964 {plus minus} 74, and 401 {plus minus} 52 nM (n = 5), respectively. Cd and BK immediately increased Ca{sub i}, however, there was a lag between the addition of PDGF compared to 15 {plus minus} 1 sec for Cd and 9 {plus minus} 1 sec for BK (all n = 10). Genistein (40 {mu}M, 40 min), which selectively inhibits tyrosine kinases, had no significant effect on the Ca{sub i} spike evoked by Cd or BK. In the presence of genistein Cd and BK increased Ca{sub i} from 165 {plus minus} 14 nM to 726 {plus minus} 23 and 876 {plus minus} 31 nM (n = 4), respectively. In contrast to Cd and BK, PDGF only slightly increased Ca{sub i} in the presence of 40 {mu}M genistein. The concentration of genistein that inhibited the Ca{sub i} response to PDGF by 50% was 8 {mu}M. These findings suggest that the Cd triggers a G protein-coupled receptor rather than a tyrosine kinase.

  13. Genistein upregulates LDLR levels via JNK-mediated activation of SREBP-2

    PubMed Central

    Kartawijaya, Medicia; Han, Hye Won; Kim, Yunhye; Lee, Seung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Genistein has been proved in vitro and in vivo to lower LDLR level. It is also widely consumed and implicated for its anti-atherogenic effects. However, the molecular mechanism by which genistein lowers the LDL level is still unknown. Objective To understand the anti-atherogenic molecular mechanism of action, genistein was investigated for its impact on the expression of LDLR, the receptor for LDL cholesterol, and related signaling pathways in a human hepatoma cell line. Design HepG2 cell was used for the experiments. Genistein with different concentrations was diluted in media and was incubated for 24 h or more as indicated. Protein levels were measured by western blotting, and mRNA expression was detected by RT-qPCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (CHIP) assay was used to determine protein binding levels, and luciferase assay was used to measure promoter activity. Result Genistein increased the mRNA and protein levels of LDLR in a time-dependent manner. Genistein increased the transcriptional activity of the LDLR promoter containing the reporter gene (pLDLR-luc, −805 to +50). But the sterol regulatory element deletion mutant construct failed to be activated by genistein. Genistein increased the nuclear fraction of SREBP-2 and the DNA-binding activity of SREBP-2 to LDLR promoter, as assessed by CHIP. The genistein-phosphorylated JNK inhibitor (SP600126) abolished the genistein-stimulated levels of LDLR and the nuclear SREBP-2. The addition of cholesterol up to 5 µg/mL for 24 h did not affect the effect of genistein on LDLR protein expression. Even the addition of 40 µM genistein increased the cholesterol uptake by more than 10% in the human hepatoma cell line. Conclusion Our data support the idea that genistein may have anti-atherogenic effects by activating JNK signals and SREBP-2 processing, which is followed by the upregulation of LDLR. PMID:27211318

  14. Glyphosate induces human breast cancer cells growth via estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Thongprakaisang, Siriporn; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Suriyo, Tawit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2013-09-01

    Glyphosate is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide and it is believed to be less toxic than other pesticides. However, several recent studies showed its potential adverse health effects to humans as it may be an endocrine disruptor. This study focuses on the effects of pure glyphosate on estrogen receptors (ERs) mediated transcriptional activity and their expressions. Glyphosate exerted proliferative effects only in human hormone-dependent breast cancer, T47D cells, but not in hormone-independent breast cancer, MDA-MB231 cells, at 10⁻¹² to 10⁻⁶M in estrogen withdrawal condition. The proliferative concentrations of glyphosate that induced the activation of estrogen response element (ERE) transcription activity were 5-13 fold of control in T47D-KBluc cells and this activation was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist, ICI 182780, indicating that the estrogenic activity of glyphosate was mediated via ERs. Furthermore, glyphosate also altered both ERα and β expression. These results indicated that low and environmentally relevant concentrations of glyphosate possessed estrogenic activity. Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used for soybean cultivation, and our results also found that there was an additive estrogenic effect between glyphosate and genistein, a phytoestrogen in soybeans. However, these additive effects of glyphosate contamination in soybeans need further animal study.

  15. Chemoprevention Against Breast Cancer with Genistein and Resveratrol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    signaling pathway, the PI3K/Akt pathway, as well as changes in sex steroid receptor co- activators . We have demonstrated that the estrogen receptors play...each estrogen or phytoestrogen individually. Estradiol benzoate. As seen in Table 1, a single s.c. dose of estradiol benzoate was able to...α and β along with an increase in progesterone receptor (PR) levels. We and others have shown that activation of the estrogen receptors by estradiol

  16. IMPACT OF GENISTEIN AND PHYTIC ACID ON THE VIABILITY AND PROLIFERATION ACTIVITY OF NASAL POLYPS' CELLS IN AN IN VITRO MODEL.

    PubMed

    Frączek, Marcin; Kuśmierz, Dariusz; Rostkowska-Nadolska, Beata; Kręcicki, Tomasz; Latocha, Małgorzata T

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is one of the diseases that diminish patients' quality of life most significantly. Treatment of that often incurable disease is based on the steroids and surgery in patients who had failed thorough conservative management. It appears that the introduction of new treatment agents suppressing inflammation process and inhibiting cells' proliferation would be a valuable therapeutic option. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of genistein and phytic acid on the viability and growth rate of fibroblasts derived from nasal polyps. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of genistein (5-500 μM) and phytic acid (100-20,000 μM). After 72 h incubation, cells survivability and cells' growth rate were estimated by combination of WST-1 and LDH methods. QRT-PCR technique was used to determine the expression of histone H3, BCL-2, BAX and P53 genes. Caspase-8 and -9 expressions were evaluated by ELISA assay. Genistein and phytic acid significantly and in dose-specific manner decreased nasal polyps fibroblasts survivability and growth rate. Both agents in similar way decreased cell proliferation as measured by the expression of histone H3. They induce apoptotic machinery by modulating the expression of BCL-2, BAX and caspase-8 activity. Genistein and phytic acid have significant potential for a therapeutic role in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis.

  17. Synthetic conjugates of genistein affecting proliferation and mitosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rusin, Aleksandra; Zawisza-Puchałka, Jadwiga; Kujawa, Katarzyna; Gogler-Pigłowska, Agnieszka; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Switalska, Marta; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Gruca, Aleksandra; Szeja, Wiesław; Krawczyk, Zdzisław; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and antiproliferative activity of conjugates of genistein (1) and unsaturated pyranosides. Constructs linking genistein with a sugar moiety through an alkyl chain were obtained in a two-step synthesis: in a first step genistein was converted into an intermediate bearing an ω-hydroxyalkyl substituent, containing two, three or five carbon atoms, at position 7, while the second step involved Ferrier glycosylation reaction, employing glycals. Antiproliferative activity of several genistein derivatives was tested in cancer cell lines in vitro. The most potent derivative, Ram-3 inhibited the cell cycle, interacted with mitotic spindles and caused apoptotic cell death. Neither genistein nor the sugar alone were able to influence the mitotic spindle organization. Our results indicate, that conjugation of genistein with certain sugars may render the interaction of derivatives with new molecular targets.

  18. Dietary phytoestrogens improve stroke outcome after transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Burguete, María C; Torregrosa, Germán; Pérez-Asensio, Fernando J; Castelló-Ruiz, María; Salom, Juan B; Gil, José V; Alborch, Enrique

    2006-02-01

    As phytoestrogens are postulated as being neuroprotectants, we assessed the hypothesis that dietary isoflavone-type phytoestrogens are neuroprotective against ischemic stroke. Transient focal cerebral ischemia (90 min) was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) following the intraluminal thread technique, both in rats fed with soy-based diet and in rats fed with isoflavone-free diet. Cerebro-cortical laser-Doppler flow (cortical perfusion, CP), arterial blood pressure, core temperature, PaO2, PaCO2, pH and glycemia were measured before, during and after MCAO. Neurological examination and infarct volume measurements were carried out 3 days after the ischemic insult. Dietary isoflavones (both glycosides and aglycones) were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither pre-ischemic, intra-ischemic nor post-ischemic CP values were significantly different between the soy-based diet and the isoflavone-free diet groups. Animals fed with the soy-based diet showed an infarct volume of 122 +/- 20.2 mm3 (19 +/- 3.3% of the whole ipsilateral hemisphere volume). In animals fed with the isoflavone-free diet the mean infarct volume was significantly higher, 191 +/- 26.7 mm3 (28 +/- 4.1%, P < 0.05). Neurological examination revealed significantly higher impairment in the isoflavone-free diet group compared with the soy-based diet group (3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.5, P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that dietary isoflavones improve stroke outcome after transient focal cerebral ischemia in such a way that a higher dietary isoflavone content results in a lower infarct volume and a better neurological status.

  19. Solubilization of genistein in poly(oxyethylene) through eutectic crystal melting.

    PubMed

    Buddhiranon, Sasiwimon; Kyu, Thein

    2012-07-12

    Solid-liquid phase diagrams of binary crystalline blends of genistein with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were established experimentally and theoretically based on the combined Flory-Huggins free energy of liquid-liquid phase separation and the phase field free energy pertaining to crystal solidification. The liquidus lines obtained self-consistently were found to agree well with trends of depressed crystal melting transitions in genistein/PEO and genistein/PEG blends, exhibiting eutectic phase behavior. Of particular importance is the lowering of the eutectic temperature of the genistein/PEO blend by about 60 °C upon switching to the genistein/PEG system. The occurrence of interspecies hydrogen bonding between genistein molecules and both PEO and PEG chains, albeit weak, was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The improved solubility of genistein in PEG can be attributed not only to lowering of the molecular weight of PEG utilized, but also to its terminal hydroxyl groups. This eutectic melting approach by PEG solvent is sufficiently effective in solubilizing genistein crystals that development of genistein-containing drugs might be feasible for injection and/or oral administration.

  20. Genistein inhibits activities of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and lactate dehydrogenase, enzymes which use NADH as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2015-09-25

    Genistein (5, 7-dihydroxy-3- (4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) is a natural isoflavone revealing many biological activities. Thus, it is considered as a therapeutic compound in as various disorders as cancer, infections and genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits activities of bacterial methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both enzymes use NADH as a substrate, and results of biochemical as well as molecular modeling studies with MetF suggest that genistein may interfere with binding of this dinucleotide to the enzyme. These results have implications for our understanding of biological functions of genistein and its effects on cellular metabolism.

  1. Analysis of Acid-Base Properties of Flavonoid Genistein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, C.; Pająk, W.

    2013-11-01

    The first two dissociation constants of genistein, pK1 = 7.30 ± 0.07 and pK2 = 9.93 ± 0.05, were determined spectrophotometrically. Simultaneously the second constant, pK2 = 10.18 ± 0.07, was confirmed potentiometrically, and, additionally, the third dissociation constant, pK3 = 11.68 ± 0.15, was determined. The values of the last two dissociation constants were confirmed with the graphical method of Schwarzenbach. The values of constants obtained are pK2 = 10.36 and pK3 = 11.47, respectively. In order to establish the deprotonation site in the genistein molecule, a number of its physicochemical parameters were calculated. Computations were performed with HyperChem v. 7.0 software. A procedure for geometrical optimization (AM1 method, RHF function, Polak-Ribiere algorithm) of different molecular forms was applied. It was found that deprotonation of the neutral molecule of genistein takes place in the following order: 7-OH, 4'-OH and 5-OH.

  2. Interactions of ATP, oestradiol, genistein and the anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) and tamoxifen, with the human erythrocyte glucose transporter, GLUT1.

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Naftalin, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    17 beta-Oestradiol (ED when subscript to K) and the phytoestrogen isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibit glucose transport in human erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts. The selective oestrogen receptor modulators or anti-oestrogens, faslodex (ICI 182780) (FAS) and tamoxifen (TAM), competitively antagonize oestradiol inhibition of glucose exit from erythrocytes (K(i(ED/FAS))=2.84+/-0.16 microM and K(i(ED/TAM))=100+/-2 nM). Faslodex has no significant inhibitory effect on glucose exit, but tamoxifen alone inhibits glucose exit (K(i(TAM))=300+/-100 nM). In ghosts, ATP (1-4 mM) competitively antagonizes oestradiol, genistein and cytochalasin B (CB)-dependent inhibitions of glucose exit, (K(i(ATP/ED))=2.5+/-0.23 mM, K(i(ATP/GEN))=0.99+/-0.17 mM and K(i(ATP/CB))=0.76+/-0.08 mM). Tamoxifen and faslodex reverse oestradiol-dependent inhibition of glucose exit with ATP>1 mM (K(i(ED/TAM))=130+/-5 nM and K(i(ED/FAS))=2.7+/-0.9 microM). The cytoplasmic surface of the glucose transporter (GLUT)1 contains four sequences with close homologies to sequences in the ligand-binding domain of human oestrogen receptor beta (hesr-2). One homology is adjacent to the Walker ATP-binding motif II (GLUT1, residues 225-229) in the large cytoplasmic segment linking transmembrane helices 6 and 7; another GLUT (residues 421-423) contains the Walker ATP-binding motif III. Mapping of these regions on to a three-dimensional template of GLUT indicates that a possible oestrogen-binding site lies between His(337), Arg(349) and Glu(249) at the cytoplasmic entrance to the hydrophilic pore spanning GLUT, which have a similar topology to His(475), Glu(305) and Arg(346) in hesr-2 that anchor the head and tail hydroxy groups of oestradiol and genistein, and thus are suitably placed to provide an ATP-sensitive oestrogen binding site that could modulate glucose export. PMID:12133004

  3. Effect of Genistein and L-Carnitine and Their Combination on Gene Expression of Hepatocyte HMG-COA Reductase and LDL Receptor in Experimental Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFINEJAD, Abbas; SIASSI, Fereydoon; MIRSHAFIEY, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad-Reza; KOOHDANI, Fariba; JAVANBAKHT, Mohammad Hassan; SEDAGHAT, Reza; RAMEZANI, Atena; ZAREI, Mahnaz; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome is a disorder that leads to hyperlipidemia. L-carnitine and genistein can effect on lipid metabolism and the syndrome. In the present study, we have delved into the separate and the twin-effects of L-carnitine and genistein on the gene expressions of HMG-COA reductase and LDL receptor in experimental nephrotic syndrome. Methods: In this controlled experimental study, 50 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: NC (normal-control), PC (patient-control), LC (L-carnitine), G (genistein), LCG (L-carnitine-genistein). Adriamycin was used for inducing nephrotic syndrome and the spot urine samples and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio were measured. Hepatocytic RNA was extracted and real-time PCR was used for HMG-COA Reductase and LDL receptor gene Expression measurement. Results: The final weight of the patients groups were lower than the NC group (P=0.001), and weight gain of the NC group was higher than the other groups (P<0.001). The proteinuria and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio showed significant differences between PC group and LC, G and LCG groups at week 7 (P<0.001). The expression of HMGCOA Reductase mRNA down regulated in LC, G and LCG groups in comparison with PC group (P<0.001). ΔCT of LDLr mRNA showed significant differences between the PC group and the other patient groups (P<0.001). Conclusion: This study shows a significant decreasing (P<0.001) and non-significant increasing trend in HMG-COA Reductase and LDLr gene expression, respectively, and synergistic effect of L-carnitine and genistein on these genes in experimental nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26576346

  4. Responsiveness to phytoestrogens in primary human osteoblasts is modulated differentially by a "less-calcemic" analog of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3): JK 1624F(2)-2 (JKF).

    PubMed

    Somjen, Dalia; Katzburg, Sara; Kohen, Fortune; Gayer, Batya; Sharon, Orly; Hendel, David; Posner, Gary H; Kaye, Alvin M

    2006-02-01

    We have reported previously, that female-derived bone cells responded to 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and raloxifene (Ral), and male-derived cells responded only to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) when the stimulation of creatine kinase specific activity (CK), which is a marker for hormone responsiveness, was measured. We also found that pre-treatment with the less-calcemic analog of Vitamin D, JK 1624 F(2)-2 (JKF), upregulated the response of CK to E(2) and Ral. In this study, we analyzed the response of human bone cells from pre- and post-menopausal females and males, to phytoestrogens. Bone cells derived from pre-menopausal women showed greater stimulation of CK than cells from post-menopausal women, after treatment with E(2) (30 nM), daidzein (D, 3000 nM), genistein (G, 3000 nM) and Ral (3000 nM); whereas the responses to biochainin A (BA 3000 nM), quecertin (Qu 3000 nM) or the carboxy derivative of G (cG 300 nM) were not age-dependent. Male-derived cells did not respond to phytoestrogens. When cells derived from female bones at both age groups were pre-treated with JKF, by daily addition of 1nM, for 3 days, there was an upregulation of the response to E(2), Ral, G and D but not to BA or Qu. Nuclear binding of (3)[H] E(2) was characteristic of the different phytoestrogens, with increase of the specific binding after pre-treatment with JKF. In contrast, the membranal binding of E(2)-Ov-Eu, which was specific for the estrogenic compounds except Ral, was inhibited by pre-treatment with JKF except for ICI 161480 (ICI). Male bone cells did not bind E(2)-Ov-Eu but bound T-BSA-Eu; this binding was abolished by pre-treatment with JKF. Pre-treatment with JKF increased mRNA for ERalpha and decreased mRNA for ERbeta in bone cells from both age groups of females and from males, all of which expressed both ERs, with a ratio of ERalpha to ERbeta of 121:1 in pre- and 78:1 in post-menopausal and 105:1 in male bone cells. This study raises the possibility of combined Vitamin D analog and

  5. Medical applications of phytoestrogens from the Thai herb Pueraria mirifica.

    PubMed

    Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2012-03-01

    Pueraria mirifica Airy Shaw et Suvatabandhu is a medicinal plant endemic to Thailand. It has been used in Thai folklore medicine for its rejuvenating qualities in aged women and men for nearly one hundred years. Indeed, it has been claimed that P. mirifica contains active phytoestrogens (plant substances with estrogen-like activity). Using high performance liquid chromatography, at least 17 phytoestrogens, mainly isoflavones, have been isolated. Thus, fairly considerable scientific researches, both in vitro in cell lines and in vivo in various species of animals including humans, have been conducted to date to address its estrogenic activity on the reproductive organs, bones, cardiovascular diseases and other climacteric related symptoms. The antioxidative capacity and antiproliferative effect on tumor cell lines have also been assessed. In general, P. mirifica could be applicable for preventing, or as a therapeutic for, the symptoms related to estrogen deficiency in menopausal women as well as in andropausal men. However, the optimal doses for each desirable effect and the balance to avoid undesired side effects need to be calculated before use.

  6. Dose- and Time-Dependent Transcriptional Response of Ishikawa Cells Exposed to Genistein.

    PubMed

    Naciff, Jorge M; Khambatta, Zubin S; Carr, Gregory J; Tiesman, Jay P; Singleton, David W; Khan, Sohaib A; Daston, George P

    2016-05-01

    To further define the utility of the Ishikawa cells as a reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest, transcriptional changes induced by genistein (GES) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (10 pM, 1 nM, 100 nM, and 10 μM) and time points (8, 24, and 48 h) were identified using a comprehensive microarray approach. Trend analysis indicated that the expression of 5342 unique genes was modified by GES in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest dose of GES evaluated (10 μM). The GES' estrogenic activity was identified by comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to GES versus 17 α-ethynyl estradiol (EE, at equipotent doses, ie, 10 μM vs 1 μM, respectively) and was defined by changes in the expression of 284 unique genes elicited by GES and EE in the same direction, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, comparing the response of the Ishikawa cells exposed to high doses of GES and EE versus the response of the juvenile rat uterus exposed to EE, we identified 66 unique genes which were up- or down regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro Genistein elicits changes in multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action.

  7. Genistein suppresses the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in hippocampal neurons in rats with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Cai, Biao; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ting-ting; Cai, Run-ze; Ma, Chang-ju; Han, Tao; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is effective against amyloid-β toxicity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that genistein may protect neurons by inhibiting the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and thereby play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. A rat model of Alzheimer’s disease was established by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactose and intracerebral injection of amyloid-β peptide (25–35). In the genistein treatment groups, a 7-day pretreatment with genistein (10, 30, 90 mg/kg) was given prior to establishing Alzheimer’s disease model, for 49 consecutive days. Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated a reduction in apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats treated with genistein. Western blot analysis showed that expression levels of capase-3, Bax and cytochrome c were decreased compared with the model group. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed reductions in cytochrome c and Bax immunoreactivity in these rats. Morris water maze revealed a substantial shortening of escape latency by genistein in Alzheimer’s disease rats. These findings suggest that genistein decreases neuronal loss in the hippocampus, and improves learning and memory ability. The neuroprotective effects of genistein are associated with the inhibition of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as shown by its ability to reduce levels of caspase-3, Bax and cytochrome c. PMID:27630702

  8. Mechanism of phytoestrogen puerarin-mediated cytoprotection following oxidative injury: Estrogen receptor-dependent up-regulation of PI3K/Akt and HO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-12-15

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. The phytoestrogen puerarin, the main isoflavone glycoside found in the root of Pueraria lobata, has been used for various medicinal purposes in traditional Chinese medicines for thousands of years. Recent studies have indicated that the estrogen receptor (ER), through interaction with p85, regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, revealing a physiologic, non-nuclear function of ER that may be relevant in cytoprotection. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen puerarin inhibits tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of Hepa1c1c7 and HepG2 cells with puerarin significantly reduced t-BHP-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Also, puerarin up-regulated HO-1 expression and this expression conferred cytoprotection against oxidative injury induced by t-BHP. Moreover, puerarin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of puerarin-induced HO-1 expression, and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Puerarin-induced up-regulation of HO-1 and cytoprotection against t-BHP were abolished by silencing Nrf2 expression with specific siRNA. Also, puerarin-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that puerarin augments cellular antioxidant defense capacity through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the G{beta}1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress.

  9. Effects of nutrition relevant mixtures of phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis, aromatase, estrogen, and androgen activity.

    PubMed

    Taxvig, Camilla; Elleby, Anders; Sonne-Hansen, Katrine; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Nellemann, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are naturally occurring plant components produced in a large range of plants. They can induce biologic responses in vertebrates by mimicking or modulating the action or production of endogenous hormones. This study examined mixtures of 12 food relevant PEs for effects on steroid hormone production, aromatase activity, estrogenic activity, and for interaction with the androgen receptor. The results show that a mixture of all tested PEs increased estradiol production and decreased testosterone production in H295R human adrenal corticocarcinoma cells, indicating an induced aromatase activity. Furthermore, exposure of the H295R cells to isoflavonoids caused a decrease in testosterone production, and various mixtures of PEs significantly stimulated MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cell growth and induced aromatase activity in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. The estrogenic effect in the MCF7 cells of the isoflavonoid mixture and coumestrol was supported by an observed increase in progesterone receptor protein expression as well as a decreased ERalpha expression. Overall, the results support that nutrition-relevant concentrations of PEs both alone and in mixtures possess various endocrine disrupting effects, all of which need to be considered when assessing the effects on human health.

  10. Structural modeling for DNA binding to antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Bekale, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-10-01

    Several models are presented here for the bindings of the antioxidant polyphenols resveratrol, genistein and curcumin with DNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to locate the binding sites of these polyphenols with DNA duplex. Structural models showed that intercalation is more stable for resveratrol and genistein than groove bindings, while curcumin interaction is via DNA grooves. Docking showed more stable complexes formed with resveratrol and genistein than curcumin with the free binding energies of -4.62 for resveratrol-DNA (intercalation), -4.28 for resveratrol-DNA (groove binding), -4.54 for genistein-DNA (intercalation), -4.38 for genistein-DNA (groove binding) and -3.84 kcal/mol for curcumin-DNA (groove binding). The free binding energies show polyphenol-DNA complexation is spontaneous at room temperature. At high polyphenol concentration a major DNA aggregation occurred, while biopolymer remained in B-family structure.

  11. ADULT EXPOSURE TO PHYTOESTROGEN APIGENIN RESULTS IN CHANGES IN ENDOCRINE PARAMETERS BUT FAILS TO ALTER FECUNDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant-derived estrogens offer the opportunity to investigate the potential for weakly estrogenic compounds to influence endocrine function and reproduction. The presence of these phytoestrogens in foods, and agricultural and industrial runoff has the potential to increase the tot...

  12. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Genistein Analogues as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Pahoua; Wang, Rubing; Zhang, Xiaojie; Torre, Eduardo DeLa; Leon, Francisco; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi; Chen, Qiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a bioactive isoflavone derived from soybeans. The tie-in between the intake of genistein and the decreased incidence of some solid tumors (including prostate cancer) has been demonstrated by epidemiological studies. The potential of genistein in treating prostate cancer has also been displayed by in vitro cell-based and in vivo animal experiments. Genistein has entered clinical trials for both chemoprevention and potential treatment of prostate cancer. Even though the low oral bioavailability has presented the major challenges to genistein’s further clinical development, chemical modulation of genistein holds the promise to generate potential anti-prostate cancer agents with enhanced potency and/or better pharmacokinetic profiles than genistein. As part of our ongoing project to develop natural products-based anti-prostate cancer agents, the current study was undertaken to synthesize eight genistein analogues for cytotoxic evaluation in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP; both androgen-sensitive and androgen-refractory cell lines), as well as one aggressive cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Eight genistein analogues have been successfully synthesized with Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction as a key step. Their in vitro anti-cancer potential was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay and WST-1 cell proliferation assay against a panel of four human cancer cell lines. The acquired data suggest i) that the C-5 and C-7 hydroxyl groups in genistein are very important for the cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative activity; and ii) that 1-alkyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl and pyridine-3-yl might act as good bioisosteres for the 4'-hydroxyphenyl moiety in genistein. PMID:25991428

  13. New concepts, experimental approaches, and dereplication strategies for the discovery of novel phytoestrogens from natural sources.

    PubMed

    Michel, Thomas; Halabalaki, Maria; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2013-05-01

    Phytoestrogens constitute an attractive research topic due to their estrogenic profile and their biological involvement in woman's health. Therefore, numerous studies are currently performed in natural products chemistry area aiming at the discovery of novel phytoestrogens. The main classes of phytoestrogens are flavonoids (flavonols, flavanones), isoflavonoids (isoflavones, coumestans), lignans, stilbenoids as well as miscellaneous chemical groups abundant in several edible and/or medicinal plants, belonging mostly to the Leguminosae family. As for other bioactives, the detection of new structures and more potent plant-derived phytoestrogens typically follows the general approaches currently available in the natural product discovery process. Plant-based approaches selected from traditional medicine knowledge and bioguided concepts are routinely employed. However, these approaches are associated with serious disadvantages such as time-consuming, repeated, and labor intensive processes as well as lack of specificity and reproducibility. In recent years, the natural products chemistry became more technology-driven, and several different strategies have been developed. Structure-oriented procedures and miniaturized approaches employing advanced hyphenated analytical platforms have recently emerged. They facilitate significantly not only the discovery of novel phytoestrogens but also the dereplication procedure leading to the anticipation of major drawbacks in natural products discovery. In this review, apart from the traditional concepts followed in phytochemistry for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds, recent applications in the field of extraction, analysis, fractionation, and identification of phytoestrogens will be discussed. Moreover, specific methodologies combining identification of actives and biological evaluation in parallel, such as liquid chromatography-biochemical detection, frontal affinity chromatography-mass spectrometry and pulsed

  14. Both soybean and kudzu phytoestrogens modify favorably the blood lipoprotein profile in ovariectomized and castrated hamsters.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lei; Yeung, Sai Ying Venus; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2006-06-28

    The present study compared the hypolipidemic activity of kudzu phytoestrogens with that of soybean phytoestrogen in estrogen- and androgen-deficient hamsters. In the first experiment, ovariectomized hamsters (n = 37) were randomly divided into four groups (n = 9-10 each group). The first group was the control group, whereas the second group had the time-releasing estradiol-17beta subcutaneous (pellet) implants as a positive control. The third and fourth groups were orally administered soybean or kudzu phytoestrogen extracts (30 mg/kg of body weight) per day. In the second experiments, the first group of male hamsters (n = 9) received a sham operation, whereas the other three groups of male hamsters (n = 9 each) were castrated. The castrated control group received orally distilled water, whereas the second and third castrated groups were orally given 30 mg/kg soybean or kudzu phytoestrogen extracts. The results for the first experiment showed that the ovariectomized hamsters orally given soybean and kudzu phytoestrogen extracts had significantly decreased serum total cholesterol (TC) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) with HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) being unaffected. The data from the second experiment demonstrated that administration of soybean but not kudzu phytoestrogen extracts decreased significantly serum TC. However, administration of kudzu phytoestrogens caused redistribution of cholesterol among lipoproteins, leading to a significant decrease in the ratio of non-HDL-C to HDL-C. It was concluded that both soybean and kudzu phytoestrogens could modify favorably lipoprotein profiles in ovariectomized and castrated hamsters.

  15. Dietary Phytoestrogen Intake Is Associated with Reduced Colorectal Cancer Risk1

    PubMed Central

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Boucher, Beatrice A.; Manno, Michael; Gallinger, Steven; Okey, Allan; Harper, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests dietary phytoestrogens may reduce the risk of certain hormonal cancers (e.g. breast and prostate). There is a paucity of data regarding phytoestrogens and colorectal cancer risk. Phytoestrogens are plant compounds with estrogen-like activities. Main classes include isoflavones (found in legumes such as soy) and lignans (found in grains, seeds, nuts, fruits, and vegetables). Although isoflavones have dominated phytoestrogen cancer research, lignans may be more relevant to North American diets. Food questionnaires and analytic databases have recently been modified to incorporate some lignan information. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate the association between phytoestrogen intake and colorectal cancer risk. Colorectal cancer cases were diagnosed in 1997–2000, aged 20–74 y, identified through the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry, and recruited by the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. Controls were a sex and age-group matched random sample of the population of Ontario. Epidemiologic and food frequency questionnaires were completed by 1095 cases and 1890 control subjects. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to obtain adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates. Dietary lignan intake was associated with a significant reduction in colorectal cancer risk [OR (T3 vs. T1) = 0.73; 95% CI: 0.56, 0.94], as was isoflavone intake [OR (T3 vs. T1) = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.86]. We evaluated interactions between polymorphic genes that encode enzymes possibly involved in metabolism of phytoestrogens (CYPs, catechol O-methyl transferase, GSTs, and UGTs) and found no significant effect modification with respect to phytoestrogen intake. This finding that phytoestrogen intake may reduce colorectal cancer risk is important, because dietary intake is potentially modifiable. PMID:17116718

  16. Dietary withdrawal of phytoestrogens resulted in higher gene expression of 3-beta-HSD and ARO but lower 5-alpha-R-1 in male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María F; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phytoestrogens causes obesity and diabetes in adult male rats. Based on the facts that hypothalamic food intake control is disrupted in phytoestrogen-deprived animals and that several steroids affect food intake, we hypothesized that phytoestrogen withdrawal alters the expression of hypothalamic steroidogenic enzymes. Male Wistar rats fed with a high-phytoestrogen diet from conception to adulthood were subjected to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding them a low-phytoestrogen diet or a high-phytoestrogen, high-fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and P450 aromatase gene expression and decreased those of 5α-reductase-1. This is a direct effect of the lack of dietary phytoestrogens and not a consequence of obesity, as it was not observed in high-fat-fed rats. Phytoestrogen withdrawal and high-fat diet intake reduced hypothalamic expression of estrogen receptor (ER)α correlated with low levels of ERα-O, ERα-OS, and ERα-OT transcripts. Variations in gene expression of steroidogenic enzymes may affect the content of neurosteroids. As neurosteroids are related to food intake control, the changes observed may be a novel mechanism in the regulation of energy balance in obese phytoestrogen-deprived animals. In rats, steroidogenesis and ER signaling appear to be altered by phytoestrogen withdrawal in the rat. The ubiquity of phytoestrogens in the diet and changing intakes or withdrawal suggest that aspects of human health could be affected based on the rat and warrant further research.

  17. [Response surface method optimize of nano-silica solid dispersion technology assistant enzymatic hydrolysis preparation genistein].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Zhu, Jing; Sun, E; Yu, Dan-Hong; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Qi-Yuan; Ning, Qing; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2012-04-01

    This article reports that nano-silica solid dispersion technology was used to raise genistein efficiency through increasing the enzymatic hydrolysis rate. Firstly, genistin-nano-silica solid dispersion was prepared by solvent method. And differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to verify the formation of solid dispersion, then enzymatic hydrolysis of solid dispersion was done by snailase to get genistein. With the conversion of genistein as criteria, single factor experiments were used to study the different factors affecting enzymatic hydrolysis of genistin and its solid dispersion. And then, response surface method was used to optimize of nano-silica solid dispersion technology assistant enzymatic hydrolysis. The optimum condition to get genistein through enzymatic hydrolysis of genistin-nano-silica solid dispersion was pH 7.1, temperature 52.2 degrees C, enzyme concentration 5.0 mg x mL(-1) and reaction time 7 h. Under this condition, the conversion of genistein was (93.47 +/- 2.40)%. Comparing with that without forming the genistin-nano-silica solid dispersion, the conversion increased 2.62 fold. At the same time, the product of hydrolysis was purified to get pure genistein. The method of enzymatic hydrolysis of genistin-nano-silica solid dispersion by snailase to obtain genistein is simple, efficiency and suitable for the modern scale production.

  18. Effects of dietary genistein on GH/IGF-I axis of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2016-09-01

    There is considerable concern that isoflavones, such as genistein in fish feed composed of soybean protein, aff ects somatic growth in fish. Our previous works demonstrated that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant eff ect on growth performance in Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus), but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed growth. This study was conducted to further examine the eff ects of dietary genistein on the endocrine disruption on growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis in Nile tilapia ( O. niloticus). Juvenile fish were fed by hand twice daily to satiation with one of four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets, each containing either 0, 30, 300 or 3 000 μg/g genistein. Following an 8-week feeding period, plasma GH and IGF-I levels were investigated by radioimmunoassay and gene expression levels of gh, ghrelin, gnrhs, ghr, npy, npyrs, pacap, ghrs, i gf-I, igf-Ir, and igfbp3 were examined by real-time PCR. The results show that no significant change in plasma GH and IGF-I levels in fish fed with diets containing 30 μg/g and 300 μg/g genistein. mRNA expression of genes along the GH/IGF-I axis remained unaff ected, except for igf-Ir, which was stimulated by the 300 μg/g genistein diet. While in fish fed the 3 000 μg/g genistein diet, the plasma GH and IGF-I levels decreased, and mRNA expression of gh, ghr2, npyr1, igf-I, and igf-Ir were also significantly depressed. In contrast, npy and igfbp3 mRNA expression were enhanced. This study provides convincing evidence for growth impediment by genistein by disturbing the GH/IGF-I axis in Nile tilapia O. niloticus.

  19. Synthesis and cytotoxicity of 2,3-enopyranosyl C-linked conjugates of genistein.

    PubMed

    Szeja, Wieslaw; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Bieg, Tadeusz; Swierk, Piotr; Byczek, Anna; Papaj, Katarzyna; Kitel, Radosław; Rusin, Aleksandra

    2014-05-30

    A series of glycoconjugates, derivatives of genistein containing a C-glycosylated carbohydrate moiety, were synthesized and their anticancer activity was tested in vitro in the human cell lines HCT 116 and DU 145. The target compounds 15-17 were synthesized by treating ω-bromoalkyl C-glycosides derived from L-rhamnal (1) with a tetrabutylammonium salt of genistein. The new, metabolically stable analogs of previously studied O-glycosidic genistein derivatives inhibited proliferation of cancer cell lines through inhibition of the cell cycle.

  20. Efficacy of phytoestrogens for menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M-N.; Lin, C-C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To perform a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of phytoestrogens for the relief of menopausal symptoms. Methods Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until September 30, 2013 using the following key words: vasomotor symptoms, menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens, isoflavones, coumestrol, soy, red clover. Inclusion criteria were (1) randomized controlled trial (RCT), (2) perimenopausal or postmenopausal women experiencing menopausal symptoms, (3) intervention with an oral phytoestrogen. Outcome measures included Kupperman index (KI) changes, daily hot flush frequency, and the likelihood of side-effects. Results Of 543 potentially relevant studies identified, 15 RCTs meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The mean age of the subjects ranged from 49 to 58.3 and 48 to 60.1 years, respectively, in the placebo and phytoestrogen groups. The number of participants ranged from 30 to 252, and the intervention periods ranged from 3 to 12 months. Meta-analysis of the seven studies that reported KI data indicated no significant treatment effect of phytoestrogen as compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 6.44, p = 0.110). Meta-analysis of the ten studies that reported hot flush data indicated that phytoestrogens result in a significantly greater reduction in hot flush frequency compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 0.89, p < 0.005). Meta-analysis of the five studies that reported side-effect data showed no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.175). Conclusion Phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women, without serious side-effects. PMID:25263312

  1. Binding characteristics of aromatase inhibitors and phytoestrogens to human aromatase.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Kao, Y C; Laughton, C A

    1997-04-01

    We have evaluated the binding characteristics of three steroidal inhibitors [4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), 7alpha-(4'-amino)phenylthio-1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (7alpha-APTADD), and bridge (2,19-methyleneoxy) androstene-3,17-dione (MDL 101,003)], four nonsteroidal inhibitors [aminoglutethimide (AG), CGS 20267, ICI D1033, and vorozole (R83842)], and two flavone phytoestrogens (chrysin, and 7,8-dihydroxyflavone) to aromatase through a combination of computer modeling and inhibitory profile studies on the wild-type and six aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y). We have generated two aromatase models based on the x-ray structures of cytochrome P450-cam and cytochrome P450bm3, respectively. A major difference between the cytochrome P450cam-based and cytochrome P450bm3-based models is in the predicted lengths of helices F and G. In the cytochrome P450cam-based model, helices F and G lie antiparallel and extend across the active-site face of the molecule from one edge to the center, so that the carboxyl-terminal residues of helix F and the N-terminal residues of helix G make a major contribution to the structure of the active site. In the cytochrome P450bm3-based model, both helices are longer and so extend almost all the way across the active-site face of the molecule. Considering the size of the androgen substrate, we evaluated our results mainly based on the cytochrome P450cam model. The mutations involved in this study are thought to be at or near the proposed active site pocket. The inhibitory profile analysis has produced very interesting results and provided a molecular basis as to how seven aromatase inhibitors with different structures bind to the active site of aromatase. Furthermore, the investigation reveals that phytoestrogens bind to the active site of aromatase in a different orientation from that in the estrogen receptor.

  2. Effects of genistein and daidzein on erythrocyte membrane fluidity: an electron paramagnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Ajdzanović, Vladimir; Spasojević, Ivan; Filipović, Branko; Sosić-Jurjević, Branka; Sekulić, Milka; Milosević, Verica

    2010-04-01

    The maintenance of erythrocyte membrane fluidity at the physiological level is an important factor affecting the ability of erythrocytes to pass through blood vessels of small luminal diameter. Genistein and daidzein, which are used as alternative therapeutics in cardiovascular conditions, can be incorporated into the cell membrane and change its fluidity. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genistein and daidzein on erythrocyte membrane fluidity at graded depths. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and fatty acid spin probes (5-DS and 12-DS) where EPR spectra were dependent on fluidity. The results showed that genistein significantly (p < 0.05) decreased erythrocyte membrane fluidity near the hydrophilic surface, while daidzein significantly (p < 0.05) increased the same parameter in deeper regions of the membrane. These data suggest that the deep fluidizing effects of daidzein on erythrocyte membranes make it a better therapeutic choice than genistein in some cardiovascular conditions.

  3. Role of the phytoestrogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties of silymarin in inhibiting experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Atawia, Reem T; Tadros, Mariane G; Khalifa, Amani E; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2013-05-23

    Androgen and estrogen play an important role in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Estrogen exerts its action through two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs) either ER-α or ER-β. The phytoestrogenic property of silymarin (SIL) has been previously characterized. Thus, this study examined the protective effect of SIL against testosterone-induced BPH in rats. In an initial dose-response study, SIL in a dose of 50mg/kg was the most effective in preventing the rise in prostate weight, prostate weight/body weight ratio and histopathologic changes induced by testosterone. Testosterone significantly decreased ER-β and increased ER-α and AR expressions as compared to the control group and these effects were significantly ameliorated by SIL. Furthermore, SIL significantly protected against testosterone-provoked decline in mRNA expression of P21(WAF1/Cip1) and Bax/Bcl-xl ratio as well as caspase-3 activity. SIL minimized the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells as compared to testosterone-treated group. Moreover, SIL significantly blunted the inducible NF-κB expression and restored the oxidative status to within normal values in the prostatic tissues. Collectively these findings elucidate the effectiveness of SIL in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. This could be attributed, at least partly, to its phytoestrogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties.

  4. Role of phytoestrogens in prevention and management of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Talaei, Mohammad; Pan, An

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a major public health threat across the globe. It has been widely acknowledged that diet plays an important role in the development and management of T2D. Phytoestrogens are polyphenols that are structurally similar to endogenous estrogen and have weak estrogenic properties. Emerging evidence from pre-clinical models has suggested that phytoestrogens may have anti-diabetic function via both estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent pathways. In the current review, we have summarized the evidence linking two major types of phytoestrogens, isoflavones and lignans, and T2D from epidemiological studies and clinical trials. The cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies have reported inconsistent results, which may due to the large variations in different populations and measurement errors in dietary intakes. Long-term intervention studies using isoflavone supplements have reported potential beneficial effects on glycemic parameters in postmenopausal women, while results from short-term small-size clinical trials are conflicting. Taken together, the current evidence from different study designs is complex and inconsistent. Although the widespread use of phytoestrogens could not be recommended yet, habitual consumption of phytoestrogens, particularly their intact food sources like soy and whole flaxseed, could be considered as a component of overall healthy dietary pattern for prevention and management of T2D. PMID:25789108

  5. Phytoestrogens in Postmenopause: The State of the Art from a Chemical, Pharmacological and Regulatory Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; Ponti, Fabrizio De

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user’s initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements. PMID:24164197

  6. Phytoestrogens in postmenopause: the state of the art from a chemical, pharmacological and regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Poluzzi, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Carlo; Raschi, Emanuel; Rampa, Angela; Recanatini, Maurizio; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens represent a diverse group of non-steroidal natural products, which seem to have some oestrogenic effects and are often marketed as food supplements. Population exposed to phytoestrogens is potentially increasing, in part because an unfavourable risk-benefit profile of Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) for prolonged treatments (e.g., osteoporosis prevention) highlighted by the publication of the Women Health Initiative (WHI) trial in 2002, but also because many post-menopausal women often perceived phytoestrogens in food supplements as a safer alternative than HRT. Despite of increasing preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade, appealing evidence is still lacking to support the overall positive risk-benefit profile of phytoestrogens. Their status as food supplements seems to discourage studies to obtain new evidence, and the chance to buy them by user's initiative make it difficult to survey their prevalence and pattern of use. The aim of the present review is to: (a) outline the clinical scenario underlying the increased interest on phytoestrogens, by overviewing the evolution of the evidence on HRT and its main therapeutic goals (e.g., menopausal symptoms relief, chemoprevention, osteoporosis prevention); (b) address the chemical and pharmacological features (e.g. chemical structure, botanical sources, mechanism of action) of the main compounds (e.g., isoflavones, lignans, coumestans); (c) describe the clinical evidence on potential therapeutic applications; (d) put available evidence on their riskbenefit profile in a regulatory perspective, in light of the recent regulation on health claims of food supplements.

  7. Phytoestrogen consumption and risk for cognitive decline and dementia: With consideration of thyroid status and other possible mediators.

    PubMed

    Soni, M; White, L R; Kridawati, A; Bandelow, S; Hogervorst, E

    2016-06-01

    It is predicted that around 20% of the worlds population will be age 60 or above by 2050. Prevalence of cognitive decline and dementia is high in older adults and modifiable dietary factors may be able to reduce risk for these conditions. Phytoestrogens are bioactive plant chemicals found in soy, which have a similarity in structure to natural estradiol (the most abundant circulating estrogen). This structural likeness enables phytoestrogens to interact with estrogen receptors in the brain, potentially affecting cognition. However, findings in this domain are largely inconsistent, with approximately 50% of studies showing positive effects of phytoestrogens on cognition and the other half resulting in null/negative findings. This paper provides an updated review of the relationship between consumption of phytoestrogens and risk for cognitive decline and/or dementia. In particular, possible mediators were identified to explain discrepant findings and for consideration in future research. A case can be made for a link between phytoestrogen consumption, thyroid status and cognition in older age, although current findings in this area are very limited. Evidence suggests that inter-individual variants that can affect phytoestrogen bioavailability (and thus cognitive outcome) include age and ability to breakdown ingested phytoestrogens into their bioactive metabolites. Factors of the study design that must be taken into account are type of soy product, dosage, frequency of dietary intake and type of cognitive test used. Guidelines regarding optimal phytoestrogen dosage and frequency of intake are yet to be determined.

  8. In vitro effect of genistein on DNA damage in leukocytes from mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients.

    PubMed

    Negretto, G W; Deon, M; Burin, M; Biancini, G B; Ribas, G; Garcia, S C; Goethel, G; Fracasso, R; Giugliani, L; Giugliani, R; Vargas, C R

    2014-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to an increase in glycosaminoglycans storage. Genistein is an isoflavone capable to inhibit glycosaminoglycans production. The objective of this study was to analyze the in vitro effect of different concentrations of genistein on DNA injury in mucopolysaccharidosis IVA patients. The lower concentration tested (10 μM) showed a significant increase on DNA injury in vitro, although higher concentrations (30 μM and 50 μM) showed higher DNA damage.

  9. Adsorption properties of polyvinyl-alcohol-grafted particles toward genistein driven by hydrogen-bond interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; Xu, Zeqing

    2013-05-09

    The adsorption properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-grafted silica gel particles PVA/SiO2 toward genistein are researched in this paper. The effects of the main factors on the adsorption properties are investigated, the adsorption mechanism is explored in depth, and the adsorption thermodynamics is researched. The experimental results show that the conventional hydrogen bond is formed between the hydroxyl groups with high density on the surfaces of PVA/SiO2 and the phenolic hydroxyl groups in genistein, while π-type hydrogen bond is formed between the hydroxyl groups of PVA/SiO2 and the conjugated aromatic rings. It is the two types of hydrogen bond that make the functional composite particles PVA/SiO2 produce very strong physical adsorption toward genistein. The competitive adsorption of the solvent can have severe negative impact on the adsorption capacity of genistein. Increasing temperature will weaken the hydrogen-bond interaction between PVA/SiO2 particles and genistein. The existence of electrolytes in the protic solvent will affect the adsorption negatively. The adsorption process of PVA/SiO2 particles toward genistein is exothermic and driven by enthalpy. The adsorption isotherm data matches the Langmuir model.

  10. Genistein ameliorates hyperglycemia in a mouse model of nongenetic type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhuo; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Pfeiffer, Liliane; Zhang, Yanling; Fu, Yu; Liu, Dongmin

    2012-06-01

    While peripheral insulin resistance is common during obesity and aging in mice and people, the progression to type 2 diabetes (T2D) is largely due to loss of β-cell mass and function through apoptosis. We recently reported that genistein, a soy derived isoflavone, can improve glycemic control and β-cell function in insulin-deficient diabetic mice. However, whether it can prevent β-cell loss and diabetes in T2D mice is unknown. Our current study aimed to investigate the effect of dietary supplemented genistein in a nongenetic T2D mouse model. Nongenetic, middle-aged obese diabetic mice were generated by high fat diet and a low dose of streptozotocin injection. The effect of dietary supplementation of genistein on glycemic control and β-cell mass and function was determined. Dietary intake of genistein (250 mg·kg(-1) diet) improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin level in obese diabetic mice, whereas it did not affect body weight gain, food intake, fat deposit, plasma lipid profile, and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Genistein increased the number of insulin-positive β-cell in islets, promoted islet β-cell survival, and preserved islet mass. In conclusion, dietary intake of genistein could prevent T2D via a direct protective action on β-cells without alteration of periphery insulin sensitivity.

  11. Factorial design applied to the optimization of lipid composition of topical antiherpetic nanoemulsions containing isoflavone genistein

    PubMed Central

    Argenta, Débora Fretes; de Mattos, Cristiane Bastos; Misturini, Fabíola Dallarosa; Koester, Leticia Scherer; Bassani, Valquiria Linck; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize topical nanoemulsions containing genistein, by means of a 23 full factorial design based on physicochemical properties and skin retention. The experimental arrangement was constructed using oil type (isopropyl myristate or castor oil), phospholipid type (distearoylphosphatidylcholine [DSPC] or dioleylphosphaditylcholine [DOPC]), and ionic cosurfactant type (oleic acid or oleylamine) as independent variables. The analysis of variance showed effect of third order for particle size, polydispersity index, and skin retention of genistein. Nanoemulsions composed of isopropyl myristate/DOPC/oleylamine showed the smallest diameter and highest genistein amount in porcine ear skin whereas the formulation composed of isopropyl myristate/DSPC/oleylamine exhibited the lowest polydispersity index. Thus, these two formulations were selected for further studies. The formulations presented positive ζ potential values (>25 mV) and genistein content close to 100% (at 1 mg/mL). The incorporation of genistein in nanoemulsions significantly increased the retention of this isoflavone in epidermis and dermis, especially when the formulation composed by isopropyl myristate/DOPC/oleylamine was used. These results were supported by confocal images. Such formulations exhibited antiherpetic activity in vitro against herpes simplex virus 1 (strain KOS) and herpes simplex virus 22 (strain 333). Taken together, the results show that the genistein-loaded nanoemulsions developed in this study are promising options in herpes treatment. PMID:25336951

  12. Blocking effects of genistein on cell proliferation and possible mechanism in human gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hong-Bin; Na, Xiao-Lin; Song, Dan-Feng; Liu, Ying

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the blocking effects of genistein on cell proliferation cycle in human gastric carcinoma cells (SGC-7901) and the possible mechanism. METHODS: MTT assay was applied in the detection of the inhibitory effects of genistein on cell proliferation. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the cell cycle distribution. Immunocytochemical technique and Western blotting were performed to detect the protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and p21waf1/cip1. RESULTS: Genistein significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells (SGC-7901). Seven days after treatment with different concentrations of genistein (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 μg /mL), the growth inhibitory rates were 11.2%, 28.8%, 55.3%, 84.7% respectively and cell cycles were arrested at the G(2)/ M phase. Genistein decreased cyclin D1 protein expression and enhanced cyclin B1 and p21waf/cip1 protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: The growth and proliferation of SGC-7901 cells can be inhibited by genistein via blocking the cell cycle, with reduced expression of cyclin D1 and enhanced expression of cyclin B1 and p21waf/cip1 protein in the concentration range of 0-20 μg /mL. PMID:15609399

  13. In vitro bioassays of non-steroidal phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, L; Garey, J; Adlercreutz, H; Gurpide, E

    1993-05-01

    Some of the isoflavonoids present in human diet as well as in urine are expected to exert biologic effects as they have been reported to bind to estrogen receptors and to be estrogenic in other species. This report describes the in vitro assessment of estrogenic effects of isoflavonoids using human endometrial cells and tissue. The relative estrogenic potencies (EC50 values) of estradiol, 3 dietary isoflavonoids (coumestrol, genistein and daidzein) and one of their metabolites (equol), were estimated by using a recently developed multiwell plate in vitro bioassay based on the estrogen-specific enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (AlkP) activity in human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells of the Ishikawa-Var I line. The maximal AlkP activity elicited by the isoflavonoids tested was as high as that achieved with estradiol and their effects were suppressed by the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384. These results indicate that estradiol and the isoflavonoids exert their effects on AlkP by similar interactions with the estrogen receptor, with potencies depending on binding affinities. The estrogenic effect of equol was confirmed by another in vitro bioassay, based on the estrogen-stimulated enhancement of prostaglandin F2 alpha output by fragments of human secretory endometrium.

  14. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of genistein-modified hemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Neelakandan, Chandrasekaran; Chang, Teng; Alexander, Thomas; Define, Linda; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle; Kyu, Thein

    2011-07-11

    Genistein-modified poly(amide):poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PA:PVP/G) hemodialysis membranes have been fabricated by coagulation via solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO)/nonsolvent (water) exchange. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the unmodified PA:PVP membranes were evaluated in vitro using human blood. It was found that these unmodified PA:PVP membranes were noncytotoxic to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but raised intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Pure genistein (in DMSO solution) was not only nontoxic to PBMC, but also suppressed the ROS levels in a manner dependent on genistein dosage. A similar dose-dependent suppression of ROS was found in genistein-modified PA (i.e., PA/G) membranes. However, the PVP addition had little or no effect in the suppression of ROS levels for the ternary PA:PVP/G system; the membrane ROS suppression was largely controlled by the genistein dosage. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin (IL-6) in whole blood were measured by ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The unmodified PA:PVP membranes drastically increased the level of TNF-α; however, the concentration of IL-1β and IL-6 remained almost the same. The PA/G membranes reduced the concentration of IL-1β and TNF-α even at very low genistein loadings, but it required a higher genistein loading to realize a similar effect in the case of IL-6. Of particular importance is that the genistein-modified blend membranes (PA:PVP/G) showed greater suppression of the concentrations of all three cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in comparison with those of the PA/G membranes, signifying the role of PVP in the enhanced anti-inflammatory properties of these genistein-modified membranes. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy was employed to quantify any genistein leaching during the in vitro testing.

  15. A combination of genistein and magnesium enhances the vasodilatory effect via an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Hou, Yunlong; Zhao, Tingting; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaoran; Zhang, Liming; Yu, Guichun

    2015-04-01

    The phytoestrogen genistein (GST) and magnesium have been independently shown to regulate vascular tone; however, their individual vasodilatory effects are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the combined effects of GST plus magnesium on vascular tone in mesenteric arteries. The effects of pretreatment with GST (0-200 μmol/L), MgCl2 (0-4.8 mmol/L) and GST plus MgCl2 on 10 μmol/L phenylephrine (PE) precontracted mesenteric arteries in rats were assessed by measuring isometric force. BK(Ca) currents were detected by the patch clamp method. GST caused concentration- and partial endothelium-dependent relaxation. Magnesium resulted in dual adjustment of vascular tone. Magnesium-free solution eliminated the vasodilatation of GST in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. GST (50 μmol/L) plus magnesium (4.8 mmol/L) caused stronger relaxation in both endothelium-intact and denuded rings. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-N-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μmol/L) significantly inhibited the effects of GST, high magnesium, and the combination of GST and magnesium. BK(Ca) currents were amplified to a greater extent when GST (50 μmol/L) was combined with 4.8 versus 1.2 mmol/L Mg(2+). Our data suggest that GST plus magnesium provides enhanced vasodilatory effects in rat mesenteric arteries compared with that observed when either is used separately, which was related to an eNOS pathway and BK(Ca) current amplification.

  16. Early postnatal genistein administration permanently affects nitrergic and vasopressinergic systems in a sex-specific way.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Rodriguez-Gomez, A; Farinetti, A; Marraudino, M; Filice, F; Foglio, B; Sciacca, G; Panzica, G C; Gotti, S

    2017-03-27

    Genistein (GEN) is a natural xenoestrogen (isoflavonoid) that may interfere with the development of estrogen-sensitive neural circuits. Due to the large and increasing use of soy-based formulas for babies (characterized by a high content of GEN), there are some concerns that this could result in an impairment of some estrogen-sensitive neural circuits and behaviors. In a previous study, we demonstrated that its oral administration to female mice during late pregnancy and early lactation induced a significant decrease of nitric oxide synthase-positive cells in the amygdala of their male offspring. In the present study, we have used a different experimental protocol mimicking, in mice, the direct precocious exposure to GEN. Mice pups of both sexes were fed either with oil, estradiol or GEN from birth to postnatal day 8. Nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin neural systems were analyzed in adult mice. Interestingly, we observed that GEN effect was time specific (when compared to our previous study), sex specific, and not always comparable to the effects of estradiol. This last observation suggests that GEN may act through different intracellular pathways. Present results indicate that the effect of natural xenoestrogens on the development of the brain may be highly variable: a plethora of neuronal circuits may be affected depending on sex, time of exposure, intracellular pathway involved, and target cells. This raises concern on the possible long-term effects of the use of soy-based formulas for babies, which may be currently underestimated.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of genistein conjugated with gold nanoparticles and the study of their cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, Elżbieta U; Stolarczyk, Krzysztof; Łaszcz, Marta; Kubiszewski, Marek; Maruszak, Wioleta; Olejarz, Wioletta; Bryk, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles conjugated with drug substances are used in diagnostics and therapies. Apart from the combinations involving gold nanoparticles conjugated with drug substances through linkers, a direct bonding is also known. In our paper the example of such a direct bonding between gold nanoparticles and genistein (AuNPs-GE) is presented. This conjugate was obtained in a one-pot synthesis and the formation of AuNPs-GE was monitored in terms of color change and UV-Vis spectroscopy. It has been shown that genistein reduces Au(3+) ions to spherical Au(0) nanocrystallites and acts as a stabilizing agent. The efficiency of the purification of the conjugate from free genistein was controlled by the capillary electrophoresis. Gold nanoparticles are homogeneously shaped and have a narrow range of size from 14 to 33nm and the size of the nanoparticles modified with genistein is around 64.64±0.41nm, as measured by the TEM and DSL techniques, respectively. The zeta potential of the gold nanoparticles modified with genistein is -19.32±0.82mV and suggests a high stability of the nanoparticles and lower toxicity for the normal cells. The identity of genistein on the gold nanoparticles was proved by the electrochemistry, NMR and Raman spectroscopy. The mechanism of the conjugate forming has been proposed. The coverage of gold nanoparticles with genistein 5.09% (m/m) has been calculated from the TGA analysis. Moreover, it has been proved that the obtained conjugate is characterized by a high cytotoxic activity towards cancer cells, as observed in the cell line test.

  18. Supplementation with Fish Oil and Genistein, Individually or in Combination, Protects Bone against the Adverse Effects of Methotrexate Chemotherapy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raghu Nadhanan, Rethi; Skinner, Jayne; Chung, Rosa; Su, Yu-Wen; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy has been shown to induce long-term skeletal side effects such as osteoporosis and fractures; however, there are no preventative treatments. This study investigated the damaging effects of anti-metabolite methotrexate (MTX) subcutaneous injections (0.75 mg/kg BW) for five days and the potential protective benefits of daily oral gavage of fish oil at 0.5 mL/100 g BW (containing 375 mg of n-3 PUFA/100 g BW), genistein (2 mg/100 g BW), or their combination in young adult rats. MTX treatment alone significantly reduced primary spongiosa height and secondary spongiosa trabecular bone volume. Bone marrow stromal cells from the treated rats showed a significant reduction in osteogenic differentiation but an increase in adipogenesis ex vivo. Consistently, stromal cells had significantly higher mRNA levels of adipogenesis-related proliferator activator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and fatty acid binding protein (FABP4). MTX significantly increased the numbers of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and marrow osteoclast precursor cell pool while significantly enhancing the mRNA expression of receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), the RANKL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the bone. Supplementary treatment with fish oil and/or genistein significantly preserved trabecular bone volume and osteogenesis but suppressed MTX-induced adipogenesis and increases in osteoclast numbers and pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine expression. Thus, Fish oil and/or genistein supplementation during MTX treatment enabled not only preservation of osteogenic differentiation, osteoblast number and bone volume, but also prevention of MTX treatment-induced increases in bone marrow adiposity, osteoclastogenic cytokine expression and osteoclast formation, and thus bone loss. PMID:23951199

  19. The preventive and therapeutic roles of phytoestrogen α-Zearalanol on osteoporetic rats due to ovariectomization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Duan, Fei; Liu, Weihua; Sun, Xiaofang; Pan, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to observe the influence of phytoestrogen α-Zearalanol on ovariectomy-induced postmenopausal osteoporosis in rats. Materials and Methods: 40 SD female rats were randomly divided into four groups: Sham group, OVX group (ovariectomized and fed estrogen), α-Zearalanol group (ovariectomized and fed α-Zearalanol) and untreated group (ovariectomized). Three weeks later after surgery, α-Zearalanol and estradiol valerate were administered by oral gavage for 12 weeks to the α-Zearalanol group and the OVX group, respectively. In contrast, the sham and untreated controls were treated with distilled water in a daily basis. After the treatments, uterus histomorphometry, bone mechanical strength, bone histomorphometry, bone mineral density (BMD) of femur, and serum biochemical indicators, such as serum E2, CT and PTH, as well as the levels of TNF and IL-1 were examined. Results: The BMD was overall declined rigorously in the OVX rats, and that could be mitigated through feeding on either estrogen or α-Zearalanol. Estrogen or α-Zearalanol was found to decrease the levels of serum ALP and BGP in OVX rats, while, α-Zearalanol was found to increase the levels of serum E2 and CT, the thickness of the endometrium, and decrease the levels of PTH, TNF and IL-1 in serum in OVX rats. Feeding the OVX rats on α-Zearalanol improved the bone histomorphometric parameters impaired due to estrogen deficiency and enhanced the bone mechanical properties in the ovariectomized rats. Conclusion: α-Zearalanol treated rats reduced the resorption of bone, and showed a preventive and therapeutic effect of α-Zearalanol on postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:27917278

  20. Genistein synergizes centchroman action in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Shweta; Shyam, Hari; Sharma, Ramesh; Balapure, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the progress in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, it remains a major health problem in women. Natural flavones along with chemotherapeutic agents enhance therapeutic response and minimize toxicity of chemical agents. Centchroman (CC) colloquially called as ormeloxifene, is a nonsteroidal oral contraceptive categorized as selective estrogen receptor modulator with anti-breast cancer activity. Genistein (GN), an isoflavone found mainly in soy products possesses anti-cancerous potential against a number of cancers including breast. The present study aims at investigating the combination of CC and GN in human breast cancer cell lines (HBCCs). Materials and Methods: Cytotoxic effect of CC and GN separately and in combination were assessed by sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay in MDA MB-231, MDA MB-468, MCF-7, T-47D HBCCs, and nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) MCF-10A. The drug interaction was analyzed using CompuSyn software through which combination index and dose reduction index were generated. Results: Combination of CC plus GN exerts significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to each drug per se in HBCCs, whereas HMEC-MCF-10A remains unaffected. Conclusion: On an overall basis, the drugs in combination enhanced cell killing in malignant cells. Therefore, the combination of CC with GN may offer a novel approach for the breast cancer. PMID:28066099

  1. Improved performance and immunological responses as the result of dietary genistein supplementation of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, E; Jahanian, R

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of supplemental genistein (an isoflavonoid) on performance, lymphoid organs' development, and cellular and humoral immune responses in broiler chicks. A total of 675-day-old male broiler chicks (Ross 308) were randomly assigned to the five replicate pens (15 chicks each) of nine experimental diets. Dietary treatments included a negative (not-supplemented) control diet, two positive control groups (virginiamycin or zinc-bacitracin, 20 mg/kg), and diets containing 10, 20, 40, 80, 160 and 320 mg/kg of genistein. The cutaneous basophil hypersensivity (CBH) test was measured at day 10 of age after toe web injection with phytohemagglutinin-P. In addition, sera samples were collected after different antigen inoculations to investigate antibody responses. At day 28 of age, three randomly selected birds from each pen were euthanized to evaluate the relative weights of lymphoid organs. Results showed that dietary supplementation of both antibiotics increased (P<0.01) feed intake during 1 to 42 days of age. Furthermore, daily weight gain was influenced (P<0.01) by dietary treatments throughout the trial, so that the birds fed on antibiotics and 20 to 80 mg/kg genistein diets revealed the greater weight gains compared with other experimental groups. The best (P<0.05) feed conversion ratio assigned to the birds fed on diets containing antibiotics and moderate levels (40 to 80 mg/kg) of genistein. Although the relative weights of thymus (P<0.05) and bursa of Fabricius (P<0.01) were greater in birds fed on genistein-supplemented diets compared with antibiotics-supplemented birds, the spleen weight was not affected by experimental diets. Similarly, CBH response and antibody titers against Newcastle and infectious bronchitis disease viruses were markedly (P<0.05) greater in chicks fed on diets supplemented with 20 to 80 mg/kg of genistein. Interestingly, the higher dosages of genistein suppressed CBH and antibody responses to the

  2. Exogenous Hormonal Regulation in Breast Cancer Cells by Phytoestrogens and Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Albini, A.; Rosano, C.; Angelini, G.; Amaro, A.; Esposito, A.I.; Maramotti, S.; Noonan, D.M.; Pfeffer, U.

    2014-01-01

    Observations on the role of ovarian hormones in breast cancer growth, as well as interest in contraception, stimulated research into the biology of estrogens. The identification of the classical receptors ERα and ERβ and the transmembrane receptor GPER and the resolution of the structure of the ligand bound to its receptor established the principal molecular mechanisms of estrogen action. The presence of estrogen-like compounds in many plants used in traditional medicine or ingested as food ingredients, phytoestrogens, as well as the estrogenic activities of many industrial pollutants and pesticides, xenoestrogens, have prompted investigations into their role in human health. Phyto- and xenoestrogens bind to the estrogen receptors with a lower affinity than the endogenous estrogens and can compete or substitute the hormone. Xenoestrogens, which accumulate in the body throughout life, are believed to increase breast cancer risk, especially in cases of prenatal and prepuberal exposure whereas the role of phytoestrogens is still a matter of debate. At present, the application of phytoestrogens appears to be limited to the treatment of post-menopausal symptoms in women where the production of endogenous estrogens has ceased. In this review we discuss chemistry, structure and classification, estrogen signaling and the consequences of the interactions of estrogens, phytoestrogens and xenoestrogens with their receptors, the complex interactions of endogenous and exogenous ligands, the evaluation of the health risks related to xenoestrogens, and the perspectives toward the synthesis of potent third generation selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). PMID:24304271

  3. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-01-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought. PMID:15121509

  4. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  5. Effects of phytoestrogens on indices of protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as alternative ingredients in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens that act as endocrine disruptors, capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors, although at a much lower level of estrogenicity compared to estradiol. Estradiol has catabolic effects on...

  6. Phytoestrogen signaling and symbiotic gene activation are disrupted by endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jennifer E; Starcevic, Marta; Jones, Phillip E; Burow, Matthew E; McLachlan, John A

    2004-05-01

    Some organochlorine pesticides and other synthetic chemicals mimic hormones in representatives of each vertebrate class, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and fish. These compounds are called endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Similarly, hormonelike signaling has also been observed when vertebrates are exposed to plant chemicals called phytoestrogens. Previous research has shown the mechanism of action for EDCs and phytoestrogens is as unintended ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER). Although pesticides have been synthesized to deter insects and weeds, plants produce phytoestrogens to deter herbivores, as attractant cues for insects, and as recruitment signals for symbiotic soil bacteria. Our data present the first evidence that some of the same organochlorine pesticides and EDCs known to disrupt endocrine signaling through ERs in exposed wildlife and humans also disrupt the phytoestrogen signaling that leguminous plants use to recruit Sinorhizobium meliloti soil bacteria for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Here we report that a variety of EDCs and pesticides commonly found in agricultural soils interfere with the symbiotic signaling necessary for nitrogen fixation, suggesting that the principles underlying endocrine disruption may have more widespread biological and ecological importance than had once been thought.

  7. Effect of genistein supplementation of thawing medium on characteristics of frozen human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Soto, Juan Carlos; de DiosHourcade, Juan; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Landeras, José Lorenzo; Gadea, Joaquín

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of genistein supplementation of the thawing extender on frozen-thawed human semen parameters. We analyzed the effect of supplementation on sperm motility, capacitation (membrane lipid disorder), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, chromatin condensation and DNA damage. Using this preliminary information, it maybe possible to improve the cryopreservation process and reduce the cellular damage. We have confirmed that the isoflavone genistein (10 micromol L(-1)) has antioxidant properties on the frozen-thawed spermatozoa. This results in a decreased ROS production that shows a slight improvement in the sperm motility, and decreases the membrane lipid disorder and DNA damage caused by cryopreservation. These results suggest an effect of genistein on sperm functionality that could be of interest for assisted reproduction treatments using frozen-thawed human spermatozoa, but further studies will be necessary to confirm our findings and to evaluate the possible clinical applications.

  8. Genistein potentiates the effect of 17-beta estradiol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Fraidoon; Dastjerdi, Mehdi Nikbakht; Valiani, Ali; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sanaei, Masumeh; Hakemi, Mazdak Ganjalikhani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors. This cancer may be due to a multistep process with an accumulation of epigenetic alterations in tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), leading to hypermethylation of the genes. Hypermethylation of TSGs is associated with silencing and inactivation of them. It is well-known that DNA hypomethylation is the initial epigenetic abnormality recognized in human tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is one of the TSGs which modulates gene transcription and its hypermethylation is because of overactivity of DNA methyltransferases. Fortunately, epigenetic changes especially hypermethylation can be reversed by pharmacological compounds such as genistein (GE) and 17-beta estradiol (E2) which involve in preventing the development of certain cancers by maintaining a protective DNA methylation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of GE on ERα and DNMT1 genes expression and also apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of GE and E2 on HCC. Materials and Methods: Cells were treated with various concentrations of GE and E2 and the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. Furthermore, cells were treated with single dose of GE and E2 (25 μM) and flow cytometry assay was performed. The expression level of the genes was determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: GE increased ERα and decreased DNMT1 genes expression, GE and E2 inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis significantly. Conclusion: GE can epigenetically increase ERα expression by inhibition of DNMT1 expression which in turn increases apoptotic effect of E2. Furthermore, a combination of GE and E2 can induce apoptosis more significantly. PMID:27656602

  9. A high isoflavone soy protein diet and intravenous genistein delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy P; Liesen, Daniel A; Mann, Paul C; Rolando, Lori; Banz, William J

    2002-08-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has in vitro immunosuppressive properties. We investigated whether genistein or dietary soy protein containing isoflavones could influence the outcome of rat cardiac allografts. Lewis rats were fed a diet with protein from high isoflavone soy protein fraction (HIS), casein (CAS) or casein with isoflavones added (CI) starting 1 wk before heart transplants from Wistar Furth donors, and continuing throughout the study. HIS-fed rats had significantly prolonged time to rejection compared with CAS- and CI-fed recipients (10.8 +/- 2.62 vs. 7.18 +/- 0.75 and 7.22 +/- 0.44 d, P < 0.001). Intravenous genistein [20mg/(kg. d) for 14 d] significantly prolonged heart survival compared with controls and dissolvent-treated recipients (23.2 +/- 7.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 1.3 and 11.4+/3.6 d, P < 0.0005), and had an additive effect when given to heart recipients also receiving low dose cyclosporine for 7 d (30.8 +/- 2.3 vs. 23.4 +/- 2.4 d, P < 0.005). Concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, isolated from Lewis rats given intraperitoneal genistein for 7 d, had decreased production of interferon gamma compared with controls or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated groups (22.6 +/- 9.9 vs 149 +/- 105 and 154 +/- 103 micro g/L, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high isoflavone soy diet and intravenous genistein, but not isoflavone extract alone, delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts, with an additive effect in cyclosporine-treated rats. In addition, intraperitoneal genistein has immunosuppressive properties in vivo.

  10. Genistein suppresses prostate cancer growth through inhibition of oncogenic microRNA-151.

    PubMed

    Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Majid, Shahana; Deng, Guoren; Shahryari, Varahram; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Chang, Inik; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to suppress the growth of several cancers through modulation of various pathways. However, the effects of genistein on the regulation of oncogenic microRNA-151 (miR-151) have not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could alter the expression of oncogenic miR-151 and its target genes that are involved in the progression and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa). Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of miR-151 was higher in PC3 and DU145 cells compared with RWPE-1 cells. Treatment of PC3 and DU145 cells with 25 µM genistein down-regulated the expression of miR-151 compared with vehicle control. Inhibition of miR-151 in PCa cells by genistein significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion. In-silico analysis showed that several genes (CASZ1, IL1RAPL1, SOX17, N4BP1 and ARHGDIA) suggested to have tumor suppressive functions were target genes of miR-151. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-151 directly binds to specific sites on the 3'UTR of target genes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of the five target genes in PC3 and DU145 were markedly changed with miR-151 mimics and inhibitor. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests revealed that high expression levels of miR-151 had an adverse effect on survival rate. This study suggests that genistein mediated suppression of oncogenic miRNAs can be an important dietary therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCa.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of genistein 4'-O-glucoside specific glycosyltransferase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Ruby; Santosh Kumar, R J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Singh, Somesh; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-07-01

    Health related benefits of isoflavones such as genistein are well known. Glycosylation of genistein yields different glycosides like genistein 7-O-glycoside (genistin) and genistein 4'-O-glycoside (sophoricoside). This is the first report on isolation, cloning and functional characterization of a glycosyltransferase specific for genistein 4'-O-glucoside from Bacopa monniera, an important Indian medicinal herb. The glycosyltransferase from B. monniera (UGT74W1) showed 49% identity at amino acid level with the glycosyltransferases from Lycium barbarum. The UGT74W1 sequence contained all the conserved motifs present in plant glycosyltransferases. UGT74W1 was cloned in pET-30b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli. The molecular mass of over expressed protein was found to be around 52 kDa. Functional characterization of the enzyme was performed using different substrates. Product analysis was done using LC-MS and HPLC, which confirmed its specificity for genistein 4'-O-glucoside. Immuno-localization studies of the UGT74W1 showed its localization in the vascular bundle. Spatio-temporal expression studies under normal and stressed conditions were also performed. The control B. monniera plant showed maximum expression of UGT74W1 in leaves followed by roots and stem. Salicylic acid treatment causes almost tenfold increase in UGT74W1 expression in roots, while leaves and stem showed decrease in expression. Since salicylic acid is generated at the time of injury or wound caused by pathogens, this increase in UGT74W1 expression under salicylic acid stress might point towards its role in defense mechanism.

  12. Soy extract is more potent than genistein on tumor growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Jeong, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    Soybean and soy products have received much attention for their potential heath benefits. Recently it has been reported that the bioactivity of soy products is influenced by the degree of soy processing. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the influence of diets containing genistein and soy extract on the growth of the estrogen-independent human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, implanted into female Balb/c mice. Four-week-old female athymic nude mice (Balb/c) were acclimatized to an AIN-93G control diet for one week prior to initiating the experimental diets. The animals were placed into three treatment groups, each of which was provided with containing DMSO, genistein (750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) or 0.6% soy extract (containing genistein at 750 microg/g AIN-93G diet) for three weeks from one week prior to the injection of MDA-MB-231 cells (1 x 10(6)/site) and subsequently fed on the AIN-93G control diet until sacrifice. The tumor volumes increased steeply in the control group and the genistein-treated group. However, tumor growth was significantly reduced in the soy extract-treated group compared to the control and genistein-treated groups. Immunohistochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) also revealed that the soy extract treatment effectively reduced cell proliferation of the implanted tumors. In conclusion, soy extract is more potent than genistein in the inhibition of tumor growth, presumably resulting from the synergistic effect of the various bioactive components in the soy extract.

  13. Genistein Suppresses Prostate Cancer Growth through Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNA-151

    PubMed Central

    Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Majid, Shahana; Deng, Guoren; Shahryari, Varahram; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Chang, Inik; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to suppress the growth of several cancers through modulation of various pathways. However, the effects of genistein on the regulation of oncogenic microRNA-151 (miR-151) have not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could alter the expression of oncogenic miR-151 and its target genes that are involved in the progression and metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa). Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of miR-151 was higher in PC3 and DU145 cells compared with RWPE-1 cells. Treatment of PC3 and DU145 cells with 25 µM genistein down-regulated the expression of miR-151 compared with vehicle control. Inhibition of miR-151 in PCa cells by genistein significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion. In-silico analysis showed that several genes (CASZ1, IL1RAPL1, SOX17, N4BP1 and ARHGDIA) suggested to have tumor suppressive functions were target genes of miR-151. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that miR-151 directly binds to specific sites on the 3′UTR of target genes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of the five target genes in PC3 and DU145 were markedly changed with miR-151 mimics and inhibitor. Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests revealed that high expression levels of miR-151 had an adverse effect on survival rate. This study suggests that genistein mediated suppression of oncogenic miRNAs can be an important dietary therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22928040

  14. In vitro and in vivo effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) white muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans and other legumes investigated as fishmeal replacements in aquafeeds contain phytoestrogens capable of binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Estradiol has catabolic effects in salmonid white muscle, partially through increases in protein turnover. The current study determines whet...

  15. Do dietary phytoestrogens influence susceptibility to hormone-dependent cancer by disrupting the metabolism of endogenous oestrogens?

    PubMed

    Kirk, C J; Harris, R M; Wood, D M; Waring, R H; Hughes, P J

    2001-05-01

    Phytoestrogens are natural constituents of our diets that have been suggested to protect against hormone-dependent breast cancer. Some of the diverse effects of these compounds may be attributed to ligand-dependent differences in their interaction with oestrogen receptor sub-classes. However, phytoestrogens can also inhibit enzymes that are involved in the generation and removal of endogenous steroid hormones. Among the most potent effects of dietary phytoestrogens is their ability to inhibit the sulphotransferases that sulphate both oestrogenic steroids and a variety of environmental chemicals, including dietary pro-carcinogens. Circulating steroid sulphates are thought to be the major source of oestradiol in post-menopausal breast tumours and sulphation is a key step in the activation of some dietary pro-carcinogens. Hence the inhibition of sulphotransferases by dietary phytoestrogens may have complex effects upon human susceptibility to breast cancer.

  16. Soy Isoflavones Genistein and Daidzein Exert Anti-Apoptotic Actions via a Selective ER-mediated Mechanism in Neurons following HIV-1 Tat1–86 Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sheila M.; Aksenova, Marina V.; Aksenov, Michael Y.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-1 viral protein Tat partially mediates the neural dysfunction and neuronal cell death associated with HIV-1 induced neurodegeneration and neurocognitive disorders. Soy isoflavones provide protection against various neurotoxic insults to maintain neuronal function and thus help preserve neurocognitive capacity. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate in primary cortical cell cultures that 17β-estradiol or isoflavones (genistein or daidzein) attenuate Tat1–86-induced expression of apoptotic proteins and subsequent cell death. Exposure of cultured neurons to the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 abolished the anti-apoptotic actions of isoflavones. Use of ERα or ERβ specific antagonists determined the involvement of both ER isoforms in genistein and daidzein inhibition of caspase activity; ERβ selectively mediated downregulation of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic protein Bax. The findings suggest soy isoflavones effectively diminished HIV-1 Tat-induced apoptotic signaling. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our results suggest that soy isoflavones represent an adjunctive therapeutic option with combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to preserve neuronal functioning and sustain neurocognitive abilities of HIV-1 infected persons. PMID:22629415

  17. Exopolysaccharide Production by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Is Repressed by Genistein in a NodD1-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Crespo-Rivas, Juan-Carlos; Jie, Shi; Cuesta-Berrio, Lidia; Ruiz-Sainz, José-Enrique; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel-Ángel; Vinardell, José-María

    2016-01-01

    In the rhizobia-legume symbiotic interaction, bacterial surface polysaccharides, such as exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K-antigen polysaccharide (KPS) or cyclic glucans (CG), appear to play crucial roles either acting as signals required for the progression of the interaction and/or preventing host defence mechanisms. The symbiotic significance of each of these polysaccharides varies depending on the specific rhizobia-legume couple. In this work we show that the production of exopolysaccharide by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, but not by other S. fredii strains such as USDA257 or NGR234, is repressed by nod gene inducing flavonoids such as genistein and that this repression is dependent on the presence of a functional NodD1 protein. In agreement with the importance of EPS for bacterial biofilms, this reduced EPS production upon treatment with flavonoids correlates with decreased biofilm formation ability. By using quantitative RT-PCR analysis we show that expression of the exoY2 and exoK genes is repressed in late stationary cultures of S. fredii HH103 upon treatment with genistein. Results presented in this work show that in S. fredii HH103 EPS production is regulated just in the opposite way than other bacterial signals such as Nod factors and type 3 secreted effectors: it is repressed by flavonoids and NodD1 and enhanced by the nod repressor NolR. These results are in agreement with our previous observations showing that lack of EPS production by S. fredii HH103 is not only non-detrimental but even beneficial for symbiosis with soybean.

  18. Exopolysaccharide Production by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Is Repressed by Genistein in a NodD1-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Crespo-Rivas, Juan-Carlos; Jie, Shi; Cuesta-Berrio, Lidia; Ruiz-Sainz, José-Enrique; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the rhizobia-legume symbiotic interaction, bacterial surface polysaccharides, such as exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K-antigen polysaccharide (KPS) or cyclic glucans (CG), appear to play crucial roles either acting as signals required for the progression of the interaction and/or preventing host defence mechanisms. The symbiotic significance of each of these polysaccharides varies depending on the specific rhizobia-legume couple. In this work we show that the production of exopolysaccharide by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, but not by other S. fredii strains such as USDA257 or NGR234, is repressed by nod gene inducing flavonoids such as genistein and that this repression is dependent on the presence of a functional NodD1 protein. In agreement with the importance of EPS for bacterial biofilms, this reduced EPS production upon treatment with flavonoids correlates with decreased biofilm formation ability. By using quantitative RT-PCR analysis we show that expression of the exoY2 and exoK genes is repressed in late stationary cultures of S. fredii HH103 upon treatment with genistein. Results presented in this work show that in S. fredii HH103 EPS production is regulated just in the opposite way than other bacterial signals such as Nod factors and type 3 secreted effectors: it is repressed by flavonoids and NodD1 and enhanced by the nod repressor NolR. These results are in agreement with our previous observations showing that lack of EPS production by S. fredii HH103 is not only non-detrimental but even beneficial for symbiosis with soybean. PMID:27486751

  19. Trapping Methylglyoxal by Genistein and Its Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Chen, Huadong; Sang, Shengmin

    2016-03-21

    Increasing evidence supports dicarbonyl stress such as methylglyoxal (MGO) as one of the major pathogenic links between hyperglycemia and diabetic complications. In vitro studies have shown that dietary flavonoids can inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by trapping MGO. However, whether flavonoids can trap MGO in vivo and whether biotransformation limits the trapping capacity of flavonoids remain virtually unknown. In this study, we investigated whether genistein (GEN), the major soy isoflavone, could trap MGO in mice by promoting the formation of MGO adducts of GEN and its metabolites. Two different mouse studies were conducted. In the acute study, a single dose of MGO and GEN were administered to mice via oral gavage. In the chronic study, MGO was given to mice in drinking water for 1 month and then GEN was given to mice for 4 consecutive days via oral gavage. Two mono-MGO adducts of GEN and six mono-MGO adducts of GEN phase I and microbial metabolites were identified in mouse urine samples from these studies using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structures of these MGO adducts were confirmed by analyzing their MS(n) (n = 1-4) spectra as well as by comparing them with the tandem mass spectra of authentic standards. All of the MGO adducts presented in their phase II conjugated forms in mouse urine samples in the acute and chronic studies. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo evidence to demonstrate the trapping efficacy of GEN in mice and to show that the metabolites of GEN remain bioactive.

  20. Preparation of a 1:1 cocrystal of genistein with 4,4‧-bipyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yin, He-Mei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Da-Jun; Su, Xin; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2017-01-01

    Based on analysing the relationship between the possible number of intermolecular O-H···N hydrogen bonds and the stoichiometric ratio, a 1:1 C15H10O5·C10H8N2 (genistein-4,4‧-bipyridine) cocrystal has been prepared by solution evaporation and characterized. This work successfully demonstrates that the stoichiometric ratio could be inferred by analysing the possible number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between flavonoids and amines. The strategy provides a facile route for rational designing cocrystal of flavonoids with amines. Additionally, the title cocrystal shows advantages in terms of solubility and antibacterial properties in comparison to pure genistein.

  1. Estrogen and the Dietary Phytoestrogen Tesveratrol as Regulators of the Rho GTPase Rac in Breast Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0330 TITLE: Estrogen and the Dietary Phytoestrogen ...COVERED 7 May 2007 – 6 May 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Estrogen and the Dietary Phytoestrogen Tesveratrol as Regulators of the... estrogen (E2), or resveratrol (Res). PAK-PBD-GST beads were used to pull-down active GTP- bound Rac from the cell lysates. Active and total Rac levels

  2. Effects of genistein on oestrogen and progesterone receptor, proliferative marker Ki-67 and carbonic anhydrase localisation in the uterus and cervix of gilts after insemination.

    PubMed

    Norrby, Mattias; Madej, Andrzej; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Holm, Lena

    2013-04-01

    Soya products are routinely fed to domestic animals as an important source of protein. The aim of this work was to study how the phytooestrogen genistein, supplemented at a feed relevant level, affects the morphology and distribution of reproductive hormone receptors, proliferative activities and carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the uterus and cervix of gilts. Eleven gilts were fed a soya-free diet. Six were given genistein (1 mg/kg bw) twice daily for eight days starting three days before expected oestrus. Five gilts were used as controls. All gilts were inseminated (AI) one day after signs of standing oestrus and euthanized three days after AI. Samples from the uterus and cervix were processed for morphometric evaluation, immunohistochemical localisation of oestrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), proliferative marker Ki-67 and histochemical localisation of CA. Nuclear staining for ERβ was detected in surface epithelial, glandular and some stromal cells in the uterus and in the cervix surface epithelial cells. ERα and PR were observed in surface epithelium, subepithelial stromal cells and smooth muscle cells of uterus and cervix, and glandular cells of the uterus. Ki-67 positive cells were recorded in uterine and cervical surface epithelium and subepithelial stromal layer. CA was mainly confined to glandular cells of the uterus. Immunohistochemical results were evaluated using semi-quantitative image analysis. Statistic comparison between groups revealed no differences. However, intra-treatment evaluation and correlations indicate that the supplementation of genistein modulates the expression pattern of all receptors and Ki-67, which may induce cellular activities in both the uterus and cervix of early pregnant gilts.

  3. Oestradiol, but not genistein, inhibits the rise in food intake following gonadectomy in cats, but genistein is associated with an increase in lean body mass.

    PubMed

    Cave, N J; Backus, R C; Marks, S L; Klasing, K C

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity in domestic cats is increasing worldwide, and is strongly associated with gonadectomy. We have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of oestradiol in reducing food intake in both male and female neutered cats. This experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that oestradiol or genistein would prevent the increase in food intake following gonadectomy of male and female cats, and would prevent an increase in body fat mass. Three groups of eight cats each were surgically neutered then treated daily with either 0.5 mug oestradiol subcutaneously, 100 mg/kg genistein orally, or vehicle only. Effect of treatment on food intake, vaginal cytology and body weight were recorded, and body composition was assayed using the D(2)O isotopic dilution method. Neutering was followed by an increase in food intake, bodyweight and body fat mass in the control group, which were almost completely prevented by treatment with oestradiol (p < 0.001). Treatment with genistein had no effect on food intake or bodyweight increase, but was associated with a significant increase in lean body mass (p = 0.018), and significantly less body fat accumulation than the control group (p = 0.01). There were no significant differences in responses to treatment between sexes. These findings demonstrate the importance of gonadal oestrogen for the control of food intake in male and female cats, and suggest the provision of an oestrogenic compound could help prevent obesity following neutering. In addition, the findings of this study are consistent with observations in rodents of the efficacy of genistein in inhibiting adipogenesis and promoting lean body tissue development.

  4. Deciphering the inhibitory mechanism of genistein on xanthine oxidase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suyun; Zhang, Guowen; Pan, Junhui; Gong, Deming

    2015-12-01

    Genistein (Gen), widely distributed in soybean, is proved to be important in homeostasis in the human body. Herein, the inhibitory mechanism of Gen against xanthine oxidase (XO) was studied through multispectroscopic methods and molecular simulation. The inhibition kinetics showed that Gen competitively inhibited XO with an inhibition constant of (1.39 ± 0.11) μM by competing with xanthine for binding to the active site of XO. Fluorescence titration study suggested that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of XO was static, resulting from the formation of a Gen-XO complex at one fold site. The calculated thermodynamic parameters revealed that the interaction process was driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds with affinity of (5.24 ± 0.02) × 10(4) Lmol(-1). Conformational analyses demonstrated that the microenvironment and the secondary structure of XO were changed upon binding of Gen. The molecular docking displayed that Gen bound to the active cavity of XO by interacting with the surrounding amino acid residues (Leu648, Phe649, Glu802, Ser876, Glu879, Arg880, Phe914, Phe1009, Thr1010 and Phe1013). Thus, the inhibition may be attributed to the insertion of Gen into the active site of XO occupying the catalytic center of the enzyme to avoid entry of the substrate and inducing conformational changes of XO (more compact), which was further unfavorable for forming the active cavity and further reduced the landing and oxidation of substrate. This study may offer novel insights into the inhibition mechanism of Gen on XO.

  5. Age decreased steady-state concentrations of genistein in plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Yen; Bakhiet, Raga M

    2006-04-01

    Soy isoflavones are associated with low incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and hormone-dependent cancers, but no solid information is available on the relative deposition of isoflavones in the body as a function of age. One-year-old (adult) male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed control diet or one of three high-genistein isoflavone (HGI) diets at a dose of 62, 154, or 308 genistein mg/kg (ppm) diet for 5 weeks; 2-year-old (old) were fed a dose of 154 or 308 ppm. Steady-state genistein concentrations in plasma, liver, and gastrocnemius muscle of the adult rats after 12 h fast revealed a linear dose-dependent manner (P < or = 0.0001). However, there was no such relationship in the old rats. Nevertheless, old rats fed the 308 ppm genistein diet had significantly lower steady-state genistein concentrations in plasma and liver than the adult rats did (P < or = 0.05); but similar genistein concentration in muscle. The results of this study indicate that steady-state genistein concentrations in tissues of adult rats after 12 h fast exhibited a dose-dependent fashion and were diminished in specific tissues by age.

  6. The influence of common metal ions on the interactions of the isoflavone genistein with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Chatterjee, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of genistein with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been characterized via UV-vis, fluorescence spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements under physiological conditions. In this study, we have investigated the effect of some common metal ions on the binding of genistein with BSA using fluorescence studies. The fluorescence data reveal that the binding affinity of genistein to BSA increases in presence of certain metal ions. The possibility of non-radiative energy transition from the donor tryptophan to the acceptor genistein has been observed in absence and presence of metal ions. The observed similarities in the values of efficiency of energy transfer (E) and the separation between the donor and acceptor (r) in both the cases may be correlated with the complexation between the genistein and metal ions, which is also observed from the UV-vis studies. The changes in enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) of the interaction were found to be -14.64 kJ mol-1 and +42.75 J mol-1 K-1 respectively. These values indicate the involvement of electrostatic interactions along with a hydrophobic association that results in a positive entropy change. CD analysis shows that there is a slight increase in the% α-helical content of BSA on binding with genistein at lower molar ratios. Warfarin and ibuprofen displacement studies in accordance with the molecular docking show that genistein binds to site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA.

  7. Visfatin correlates with hot flashes in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome: effects of genistein.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Alibrandi, Angela; D'Anna, Rosario; Corrado, Francesco; Atteritano, Marco; Minutoli, Letteria; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    During menopause, an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and central obesity seems to increase hot flashes (HFs). Visfatin is an inflammatory adipokine secreted by visceral fat. We investigated visfatin levels and its relationship with hot flash number and BMI, in postmenopausal women with MetS. We also evaluated the effect of genistein, an isoflavone effective in reducing HFs, on visfatin levels and HFs after 1 year of treatment. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Postmenopausal women with MetS were randomly assigned to receive placebo (n = 60) or 54 mg genistein (n = 60), daily for 1 year. As main outcome measures, hot flashes number and circulating visfatin levels were evaluated. Visfatin significantly correlated with BMI and HFs number in women with MetS at basal. After 6 and 12 months, our results indicate a strong correlation and a significant effect of genistein in reducing both HFs and visfatin in women with MetS. The present study suggests that visfatin plays a role in the vasomotor symptoms, at least in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. Genistein may reduce HFs decreasing the circulating levels of this inflammatory adipokine.

  8. Genistein inhibits vitamin D hydroxylases CYP24 and CYP27B1 expression in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Hesso; Wähälä, Kristiina; Cross, Heide S

    2003-03-01

    In human prostate cancer cells, the availability of the steroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) for antimitotic action is determined through the activity of the two enzymes CYP24 and CYP27B1, viz. 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1alpha-hydroxylase. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of [(3)H]25(OH)D(3) metabolism in human prostate cancer DU-145 cells revealed that genistein and other isoflavonoids, such as dihydrogenistein and daidzein, as well as the antiestrogenic compound ICI 182,780, inhibited Vitamin D-metabolizing enzyme activities. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that only in case of genistein this was due to transcriptional inhibition of CYP24 and CYP27B1 gene expressions. In case of CYP27B1, reduction of gene activity involves histone deacetylation because genistein was inactive in the presence of the histone deactylase inhibitor trichostatin A. In contrast, under the same condition, CYP24 gene activity was largely suppressed. In summary, our results suggest that a combined effect of genistein and trichostatin A could increase the responsiveness of human prostate cancer cells to the antiproliferative action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3).

  9. [Role of genistein in enzymatic albumin hydrolysis in the presence of nitrates (III) and (V)].

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Andrzej; Pokorska-Lis, Grazyna; Popiel, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    Polyphenols and nitrates are essential ingredients of human diet. Harm caused by nitrates is well know and studied. Positive role of polyphenols is investigated. The aim of the study was to analyze interactions between nitrates (III) and (V) and genistein in systems of enzymatic protein (albumin) hydrolysis. In vitro model of enzymatic acidic-alkaline albumine hydrolysis in the presence of nitrates, polyphenols and vitamin C in different concentrations was used. Content of nitrates was measured in dialysation fluid spectrophotometrically according to Griess' method. The study revealed inhibiting influence of genistein on nitrares(III) concentration in external compartment. The influence depended on polyphenol dose (for nitrates (III) between 11.21% and 7.27%, for nitrates (V) between 95.64% and 79.64% of dialysis). When genistein was introduced in too high concentrations--over 2,4 mg/system--it did not improve the effect, but inhibited it. The influence of genistein was synergic with resveratrol and vitamin C.

  10. The steady-state serum concentration of genistein aglycone is affected by formulation: a bioequivalence study of bone products.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Burnett, Bruce P; Polito, Francesca; Russo, Silvia; D'Anna, Rosario; Pillai, Lakshmi; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Levy, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    An FDA-regulated, prescription medical food (Fosteum; 27 mg natural genistein, 200 IU cholecalciferol, 20 mg citrated zinc bisglycinate (4 mg elemental zinc) per capsule) and an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement (Citracal Plus Bone Density Builder; 27 mg synthetic genistein, 600 mg elemental calcium (calcium citrate), 400 IU vitamin D3, 50 mg magnesium, 7.5 mg zinc, 1 mg copper, 75 μ g molybdenum, 250 μ g boron per two tablets) were compared to a clinically proven bone formulation (27 mg natural genistein, 400 IU cholecalciferol, 500 mg elemental calcium (calcium carbonate) per tablet; the Squadrito formulation) in an 8-day steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) study of healthy postmenopausal women (n = 30) randomized to receive 54 mg of genistein per day. Trough serum samples were obtained before the final dose on the morning of the ninth day followed by sampling at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hrs. Total serum genistein, after β -glucuronidase/sulfatase digestion, was measured by time-resolved fluorometric assay. Maximal time (Tmax), concentration (Cmax), half-life (T1/2), and area under the curve (AUC) were determined for genistein in each formulation. Fosteum and the Squadrito study formulation were equivalent for genistein Tmax (2 hrs), Cmax (0.7 μM), T1/2 (18 ± 6.9 versus 21 ± 4.9 hrs), and AUC (9221 ± 413 versus 9818 ± 1370 ng·hr/mL). The OTC supplement's synthetically derived genistein, however, showed altered Tmax (6 hrs), Cmax (0.57 μ M), T1/2 (8.3 ± 1.9 hrs), and AUC (6474 ± 287 ng·hr/mL). Differences in uptake may be due to multiple ingredients in the OTC supplement which interfere with genistein absorption.

  11. Identification of a potent phytoestrogen in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and beer.

    PubMed

    Milligan, S R; Kalita, J C; Heyerick, A; Rong, H; De Cooman, L; De Keukeleire, D

    1999-06-01

    The female flowers of the hop plant are used as a preservative and as a flavoring agent in beer. However, a recurring suggestion has been that hops have a powerful estrogenic activity and that beer may also be estrogenic. In this study, sensitive and specific in vitro bioassays for estrogens were used for an activity-guided fractionation of hops via selective solvent extraction and appropriate HPLC separation. We have identified a potent phytoestrogen in hops, 8-prenylnaringenin, which has an activity greater than other established plant estrogens. The estrogenic activity of this compound was reflected in its relative binding affinity to estrogen receptors from rat uteri. The presence of 8-prenylnaringenin in hops may provide an explanation for the accounts of menstrual disturbances in female hop workers. This phytoestrogen can also be detected in beer, but the levels are low and should not pose any cause for concern.

  12. Urinary excretion of phytoestrogens and risk of breast cancer among Chinese women in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Franke, Adrian A; Jin, Fan; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Hebert, James R; Custer, Laurie J; Cheng, Jiarong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2002-09-01

    Although the majority of ecological and experimental studies have suggested a potential role of phytoestrogens in breast cancer prevention, findings from epidemiological studies have been inconsistent. Part of the inconsistencies may be attributable to the difficulty in measuring intake levels of phytoestrogens. Overnight urine samples from 250 incident breast cancer cases and their individually matched controls were analyzed for urinary excretion rates of isoflavonoids, mammalian lignans, and citrus flavonoids. The study subjects were a subset of the participants in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study, a large population-based case-control study conducted in Shanghai from 1996-1998. To minimize potential influence of treatment on the exposure of interest, urine samples from breast cancer cases were collected before cancer therapy. Urinary excretion of total isoflavonoids and mammalian lignans was substantially lower in breast cancer cases than in controls. The median excretion rate of total isoflavonoids was 13.97 nmol/mg creatinine in cases and 23.09 in controls (P = 0.01), and the median excretion rate of total lignans was 1.77 in cases and 4.16 in controls (P < 0.01). The risk of breast cancer was reduced with increasing excretion of total isoflavonoids (P for trend, 0.04) and total lignans (P for trend, <0.01), with adjusted odds ratios of 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.99) and 0.40 (95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.64) observed for the highest versus the lowest tertile of total isoflavonoid and lignan excretion, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio was 0.28 (95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.50) for women who had a high excretion rate of both total lignans and isoflavonoids compared with those with a low excretion of both groups of phytoestrogens. No association was observed with citrus flavonoids. The results from this study suggest that high intake of certain phytoestrogens may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  13. Dietary phytoestrogens and photoperiodic response in a male songbird, the Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Corbitt, Cynthia; Satre, Danielle; Adamson, Larry A; Cobbs, Gary A; Bentley, George E

    2007-01-01

    Many commercial bird diets are made with soy products that contain phytoestrogens (i.e., plant compounds that have weak agonist activity at estrogen receptors), but the effects of these compounds on bird physiology and behavior are largely unknown. The primary phytoestrogens present in soy are the isoflavones genistin and diadzin, which have been shown to affect reproductive measures in many taxa. Two groups of wild-caught male Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) were fed a diet either made with water-washed soy protein (soy(+)) or made with soy protein that had been alcohol-washed to extract isoflavones (soy(-)). Both groups exhibited a photoperiodic response to long days. Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations increased within the first week of long day (LD) exposure for both groups, and over the course of the experiment LH was higher in the soy(+) group, although concentrations for both groups were lower than have been reported in free-living juncos. The rate of cloacal protuberance (CP) growth was significantly affected by diet, with the soy(-) birds beginning to increase their CPs about a week faster than soy(+) birds after exposure to LD. There was no group difference in food intake, fat score, body mass, or behavioral measures during the study or in testis weight at the end of the study. Although effects of dietary phytoestrogens detected were subtle (i.e., rate of CP growth), those investigating subtle effects of hormonally active substances (e.g., endocrine disruptors) or environmental cues affecting the reproductive axis in songbirds may want to consider eliminating phytoestrogens from their experimental diets.

  14. Effects of genistein on vertebral trabecular bone microstructure, bone mineral density, microcracks, osteocyte density, and bone strength in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruchun; Ma, Yulin; Sheng, Zhifeng; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Yuhai; Fang, Lingna; Fan, Huijie; Liao, Eryuan

    2008-01-01

    Until now, the effects of phytoestrogen on bone in both women and ovarian hormone-deficient animal models of osteoporosis have remained uncertain. We have aimed here to investigate the effect of genistein (GEN) on trabecular bone quality in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty 7-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following four groups: OVX, sham-operated (SHAM), treated with 17beta-estradiol (EST, 10 microg x kg(-1) x day(-1)), and GEN (5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)). At 15 weeks postoperation, the compressive test was performed on the L5 vertebral body; additionally, microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) assessment was performed to estimate the bone mineral density (BMD) and microstructure parameters of the L6 vertebral body. After fatigue damage testing, the L6 vertebral body was bulk-stained in 1% basic fuchsin and embedded in methylmethacrylate. The L4 vertebral body was embedded in methylmethacrylate for dynamic histomorphometry analysis without staining. Mounted bone slices were used to measure microcrack parameters, empty osteocyte lacuna density (e.Lc.Dn), and osteocyte density (Ot.N/T.Ar). Maximum loading (ML) and Ot.N/T.Ar were significantly lower in the OVX group than in the other groups. E.Lc.Dn was significantly decreased in GEN and EST groups compared to the OVX group. ML was significantly decreased in the GEN group compared to the SHAM group. Microcrack density, microcrack surface density, and microcrack length were significantly increased in the OVX group compared to the other groups. Mineral apposition rate was significantly decreased in the OVX group compared to the SHAM and GEN groups. Bone formation rate was significantly decreased in the OVX group compared to other groups. There were no significant differences with regard to mineralizing surface among the four groups. Volumetric BMD at organ was significantly lower in OVX, EST, and GEN groups than in the SHAM group. Bone mineral content was significantly lower in the OVX

  15. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: an in vitro/in vivo comparison.

    PubMed

    Charles, Grantley D; Gennings, Chris; Tornesi, Belen; Kan, H Lynn; Zacharewski, Timothy R; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B; Carney, Edward W

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the mixture

  16. Analysis of the interaction of phytoestrogens and synthetic chemicals: An in vitro/in vivo comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, Grantley D. . E-mail: charles_grantley@allergan.com; Gennings, Chris; Tornesi, Belen; Kan, H. Lynn; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Bhaskar Gollapudi, B.; Carney, Edward W.

    2007-02-01

    In the evaluation of chemical mixture toxicity, it is desirable to develop an evaluation paradigm which incorporates some critical attributes of real world exposures, particularly low dose levels, larger numbers of chemicals, and chemicals from synthetic and natural sources. This study evaluated the impact of low level exposure to a mixture of six synthetic chemicals (SC) under conditions of co-exposure to various levels of plant-derived phytoestrogen (PE) compounds. Estrogenic activity was evaluated using an in vitro human estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation assay and an in vivo immature rat uterotrophic assay. Initially, dose-response curves were characterized for each of the six SCs (methoxyclor, o,p-DDT, octylphenol, bisphenol A, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile) in each of the assays. The six SCs were then combined at equipotent ratios and tested at 5-6 dose levels spanning from very low, sub-threshold levels, to a dose in which every chemical in the mixture was at its individual estrogenic response threshold. The SC mixtures also were tested in the absence or presence of 5-6 different levels of PEs, for a total of 36 (in vitro) or 25 (in vivo) treatment groups. Both in vitro and in vivo, low concentrations of the SC mixture failed to increase estrogenic responses relative to those induced by PEs alone. However, significant increases in response occurred when each chemical in the SC mixture was near or above its individual response threshold. In vitro, interactions between high-doses of SCs and PEs were greater than additive, whereas mixtures of SCs in the absence of PEs interacted in a less than additive fashion. In vivo, the SC and PE mixture responses were consistent with additivity. These data illustrate a novel approach for incorporating key attributes of real world exposures in chemical mixture toxicity assessments, and suggest that chemical mixture toxicity is likely to be of concern only when the

  17. In vitro effects of diethylstilbestrol, genistein, 4-tert-butylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol on steroidogenic activity of isolated immature rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Myllymaeki, Sari . E-mail: saanmy@utu.fi; Haavisto, Tapio; Vainio, Minna; Toppari, Jorma; Paranko, Jorma

    2005-04-01

    Isolated rat ovarian follicles grow and produce steroid hormones in vitro and so provide a good model for studying the effects of hormonally active compounds on follicular steroidogenesis. We have evaluated the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES), genistein (GEN) and two alkylphenols, 4-tert-butylphenol (BP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) on the growth, survival, and steroid hormone and cAMP production by isolated 14-day-old rat (Sprague-Dawley) ovarian follicles. During a 5-day culture, FSH was obligatory for follicle growth and increased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner. DES (10{sup -6} M) caused the strongest decline in estradiol and testosterone levels but did not have detectable effects on either cAMP production or aromatase enzyme activity. GEN caused a prominent decrease in cAMP and testosterone levels without significant changes in secreted estradiol. The latter, apparently, was due to a dose-dependent stimulation of aromatase enzyme activity in the presence of genistein. Both BP and OP decreased estradiol and testosterone secretion in a dose-dependent manner while no effect on aromatase activity was observed. OP, unlike BP, decreased forskolin-induced cAMP levels. Xenoestrogens at the used concentrations did not interfere with the growth and survival of the follicles. The results indicate that isolated ovarian follicles representing intact morphological and functional units offer a sensitive model system for elucidating the female-specific reproductive effects of environmental chemicals.

  18. A comparative survey of leguminous plants as sources of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein: implications for human nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, P B; Duke, J A; Brielmann, H; Boik, J; Hoyt, J E

    1997-01-01

    Over 80 taxa of mostly agriculturally important legumes were surveyed as sources of the metabolites, genistein and daidzein. Remarkably high concentrations (over 2 g.kg-1 dry weight) of the anticancer metabolite, genistein, were found in the leaves of Psoralea corylifolia (Indian bread root). All other legumes, with the exception of fermented soybean miso, had genistein levels < 400 mg.kg-1 dry weight. Concentrations of over 1 g.kg-1 dry weight and 0.95 g.kg-1 dry weight of the anticancer metabolite, daidzein, were found in the stems of the fava bean (Vicia faba) and roots of kudzu vine (Pueraria lobata), respectively. From this survey, our results indicate that the legumes, lupine (Lupinus spp.), fava bean, (Vicia faba), soybeans (Glycine max), kudzu (Pueraria lobata), and psoralea (Psoralea corylifolia), are excellent food sources for both genistein and daidzein. Miso, a fermented soybean product, is also a rich source of both isoflavones.

  19. Direct vasorelaxation by a novel phytoestrogen tanshinone IIA is mediated by nongenomic action of estrogen receptor through endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation and calcium mobilization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Guo, Hao; Wang, Xiaoying; Wang, Hong; Gao, Xiumei

    2011-03-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen) has been widely used in China and other Asian countries for treating various cardiovascular diseases resulting from its ability to improve coronary microcirculation and increase coronary blood flow. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA), the major active lipophilic ingredient responsible for the beneficial actions of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to induce vasodilation in coronary arteries. Because our recent study identified Tan IIA as a new member of the phytoestrogens, we hypothesized that its action might be mediated by estrogen receptor (ER) in vascular endothelial cells. The aim of the present study was to assess whether cardiovascular protection exerted by Tan IIA is mediated by the ER signal pathway and whether the genomic or nongenomic action of ER is involved within arteries and vascular endothelial cells. The effect of Tan IIA on blood vessels was investigated by vascular ring assay using endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortas. Similar to estrogen, Tan IIA caused an nitric oxide- and endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was blocked by ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells were used as a model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Tan IIA-induced vasorelaxation. We demonstrate that Tan IIA is capable of activating the estrogen receptor signal pathway, leading to increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene expression, nitric oxide production, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and Ca mobilization. Collectively, these effects contribute to Tan IIA's vasodilative activity effects of y ER antagonist Cnt of cardiovascular diseases. Our findings support a continued effort in discovering and developing novel phytoestrogens as an alternative hormone replacement therapy for safer and more effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Isoflavonic phytoestrogens--new prebiotics for farm animals: a review on research in China.

    PubMed

    Zhengkang, Han; Wang, Guojie; Yao, Wen; Zhu, Wei-yun

    2006-09-01

    Isoflavones are recognized to be estrogenic compounds that are often associated with a reduced risk of cancers. The estrogenic activity can be enhanced after metabolization to more active compounds such as genistein and daidzein by gut microorganisms. The direct use of these metabolites has been investigated in laboratory rats and farm animals over the last decade. This paper reviews the research progress on the effect of isoflavonic compounds including metabolites on the physiology, gut microbiology and performance of farm animals in China.

  1. Genistein downregulates onco-miR-1260b and inhibits Wnt-signalling in renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, H; Ueno, K; Nakajima, K; Tabatabai, Z L; Hinoda, Y; Ishii, N; Dahiya, R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wnt-signalling has an important role in renal cancer and it is modulated by genistein in other cancers. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as new regulators of gene expression. Thus, we focused on miRNAs to examine the regulatory mechanism of genistein on the Wnt-signalling pathway in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Initially, we investigated the effect of genistein on Wnt-signalling (TOPflash reporter assay (TCF reporter assays)) in renal cancer cells, and using microarray identified candidate miRNAs whose expression was decreased by genistein. We performed functional analyses and investigated the relationship between miRNA expression and renal cancer patient outcomes. We also did 3′UTR luciferase assays to look at direct miRNA regulation of Wnt-signalling-related genes. Results: Genistein promoted apoptosis while inhibiting RCC cell proliferation and invasion. Genistein also decreased TCF reporter activity in RCC cells. We found that miR-1260b was highly expressed and significantly downregulated by genistein in RCC cells. The expression of miR-1260b was significantly higher in renal cancer tissues compared with normal, and significantly related to overall shorter survival. In addition, miR-1260b promoted renal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in RCC cells. The 3′UTR luciferase activity of target genes (sFRP1, Dkk2, Smad4) was significantly decreased and their protein expression significantly upregulated in miR-1260b inhibitor-transfected renal cancer cells. Conclusion: Our data suggest that genistein inhibited Wnt-signalling by regulating miR-1260b expression in renal cancer cells. PMID:23591200

  2. Biophysical characterization of genistein-membrane interaction and its correlation with biological effect on cells - The case of EYPC liposomes and human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Pawlęga, Bożena; Misiak, Lucjan E; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Zarzyka, Barbara; Paduch, Roman; Gawron, Antoni; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2014-08-01

    With application of EPR and (1)H NMR techniques genistein interaction with liposomes formed with egg yolk lecithin and with erythrocyte membranes was assessed. The present study addressed the problem of genistein localization and its effects on lipid membrane fluidity and protein conformation. The range of microscopic techniques was employed to study genistein effects on HeLa cells and human erythrocytes. Moreover, DPPH bioassay, superoxide anion radical test and enzymatic measurements were performed in HeLa cells subjected to genistein. The gathered results from both EPR and NMR techniques indicated strong ordering effect of genistein on the motional freedom of lipids in the head group region and the adjacent hydrophobic zone in liposomal as well as in red blood cell membranes. EPR study of human ghost showed also the changes in the erythrocyte membrane protein conformation. The membrane effects of genistein were correlated with the changes in internal membranes arrangement of HeLa cells as it was noticed using transmission electron microscopic and fluorescent techniques. Scanning electron and light microscopy methods showed that one of the aftermaths of genistein incorporation into membranes was creation of echinocytic form of the red blood cells with reduced diameter. Genistein improved redox status of HeLa cells treated with H2O2 by lowering radicals' level. In conclusion, the capacity of genistein to incorporate, to affect membrane organization and to change its biophysical properties is correlated with the changes inside the cells.

  3. Solid-state characterization and solubility of a genistein-caffeine cocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Michał; Ślepokura, Katarzyna; Matczak-Jon, Ewa

    2014-11-01

    Combination of genistein and caffeine leads to a 1:1 cocrystalline phase, which was identified by means of a solvent-drop grinding experiment and isolated afterwards in a solution-evaporation approach. Obtained cocrystal was characterized by X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction as well as investigated in terms of thermal stability and Hirshfeld surfaces. A scale-up procedure was provided by slurry technique, enabling solubility determination. Neutral forms of both compounds cocrystallize in a common P21/c space group of the monoclinic crystal system. Analysis of packing and interactions in the crystal lattice reveals formation of molecular layers, formed by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O-type contacts between genistein and caffeine molecules, whereas stabilization of the three-dimensional crystal lattice is provided by π⋯π interactions. Dissolution studies in a 50:50 v/v ethanol-water medium revealed that the maximum solubility of the cocrystalline phase reached 0.861 mg/mL after 8 h, revealing some degree of enhancement as compared to parent genistein, maximum solubility of which was also reached after 8 h and equalled 0.588 mg/mL.

  4. Inhibitory effects of daidzein and genistein on trypsin: Insights from spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Jin; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yang, Ran; You, Jing; Qu, Ling-Bo

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the inhibitory effect of two isoflavonoids including daidzein and genistein on trypsin and their binding mechanism were determined by spectroscopic and molecular docking approaches. The results indicated that both daidzein and genistein reversibly inhibited trypsin in a competitive manner with IC50 values of 68.01×10(-6)molL(-1) and 64.70×10(-6)molL(-1) and Ki values of 62.12×10(-6)molL(-1) and 59.83×10(-6)molL(-1), respectively. They could spontaneously bind with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic force and electrostatic interactions with a single binding site. Analysis of circular dichrosim spectra and molecular docking revealed that both isoflavonoids bound directly into the catalytic cavity and the microenvironment and secondary structure of trypsin were changed in this process, which caused the inhibition of trypsin activity. All these experimental results and theoretical data in this work would be help in understanding the mechanism of inhibitory effects of daidzein and genistein against trypsin and the potential of isoflavonoid to relieve symptoms of pancreatitis.

  5. Chemopreventive activity of GEN-27, a genistein derivative, in colitis-associated cancer is mediated by p65-CDX2-β-catenin axis.

    PubMed

    Du, Qianming; Wang, Yajing; Liu, Chao; Wang, Hong; Fan, Huimin; Li, Yan; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Jinrong; Ji, Hui; Hu, Rong

    2016-04-05

    Nonresolving inflammation in the intestine predisposes individuals to colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), which leads to high morbidity and mortality. Here we show that genistein-27 (GEN-27), a derivative of genistein, inhibited proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells through inhibiting β-catenin activity. Our results showed that GEN-27 increased expressions of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2), and reduced β-catenin nuclear localization, which resulted from the inhibition of NF-κB/p65 nuclear localization and up-regulation of caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2). Furthermore, GEN-27 decreased binding of p65 to the silencer region of CDX2 and increased binding of CDX2 to the promoter regions of APC and AXIN2, thus inhibiting the activation of β-catenin induced by TNF-α. Importantly, GEN-27 protected mice from azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon carcinogenesis, with reduced mortality, tumor number and tumor volume. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry revealed that dietary GEN-27 significantly decreased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration. Moreover, GEN-27 inhibited AOM/DSS-induced p65 and β-catenin nuclear translocation, while promoted the expression of CDX2, APC, and AXIN2. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the anti-proliferation effect of GEN-27 in vitro and the prevention of CAC in vivo is mediated by p65-CDX2-β-catenin axis via inhibiting β-catenin target genes. Our results imply that GEN-27 could be a promising candidate for the chemoprevention of CAC.

  6. Phytochemical mimicry of reproductive hormones and modulation of herbivore fertility by phytoestrogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, C L

    1988-01-01

    Plants have physical and chemical mechanisms for defense from attack by animals. Phytochemical defenses that protect plants from attack by insects include antifeedants, insecticides, and insect growth regulators. Phytochemical options exist by which plants can modulate the fertility of the other major group of plant predators, vertebrate herbivores, and thereby reduce cumulative attacks by those herbivores. The success of such a defense depends upon phytochemical mimicry of vertebrate reproductive hormones. Phytoestrogens do mimic reproductive hormones and are proposed to be defensive substances produced by plants to modulate the fertility of herbivores. PMID:3203635

  7. Effect of dietary phytoestrogens on human growth regulation: imprinting in health & disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, K.; Wilson, D.W.; Singh, R.B.; De Meester, F.

    2014-01-01

    This group has advocated a return to the notional Palæolithic diet with fruits, vegetables, roots, leaves, seeds, phytochemical antioxidants and proteins, etc. Phytoestrogens, viz. lignans, isoflavonoids and flavonoids are weak oestrogenic constituents of such a diet and may have a considerable impact on human health and disease. The aim of this paper was to conduct a preliminary overview of about 2000 research-led studies from the 1930s to the present time reported in the literature on flavonoids/isoflavonoids/lignans and to assemble evidence for a future strictly formal literature review on the health benefits and risks of flavonoids in a variety of diseases. PMID:25673549

  8. Effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and body composition of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Wei; Ru, Shaoguo

    2015-01-01

    An 8-week feeding experiment was performed to evaluate the effect of dietary genistein on growth performance, body composition, and digestive enzymes activity of juvenile Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus). Four isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated containing four graded supplements of genistein: 0, 30, 300, and 3 000 μg/g. Each diet was randomly assigned in triplicate to tanks stocked with 15 juvenile tilapia (10.47±1.24 g). The results show that 30 and 300 μg/g dietary genistein had no significant effect on growth performance of Nile tilapia, but the higher level of genistein (3 000 μg/g) significantly depressed the final body weight and specific growth rate. There was no significant difference in survival rate, feed intake, feed efficiency ratio or whole body composition among all dietary treatments. An assay of digestive enzymes showed that the diet containing 3 000 μg/ggenistein decreased stomach and hepatopancreas protease activity, and amylase activity in the liver and intestine, while a dietary level of 300 μg/g genistein depressed stomach protease and intestine amylase activities. However, no significant difference in stomach amylase activity was found among dietary treatments. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that a high level of dietary genistein (3 000 μg/g, or above) would significantly reduce the growth of Nile tilapia, partly because of its inhibitory effect on the activity of major digestive enzymes. Accordingly, the detrimental effects of genistein, as found in soybean products, should not be ignored when applied as an alternative ingredient source in aquaculture.

  9. Mixed Inhibition of cPEPCK by Genistein, Using an Extended Binding Site Located Adjacent to Its Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cPEPCK) is a critical enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis. cPEPCK converts oxaloacetic acid (OAA) into phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) in the presence of GTP. cPEPCK is known to be associated with type 2 diabetes. Genistein is an isoflavone compound that shows anti-diabetic and anti-obesitic properties. Experimental studies have shown a decrease in the blood glucose level in the presence of genistein by lowering the functional activity of cPEPCK, an enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Using computational techniques such as molecular modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations, we identified cPEPCK as a direct target of genistein. We studied the molecular interactions of genistein with three possible conformations of cPEPCK—unbound cPEPCK (u_cPEPCK), GTP bound cPEPCK (GTP_cPEPCK) and GDP bound cPEPCK (GDP_cPEPCK). Binding of genistein was also compared with an already known cPEPCK inhibitor. We analyzed the interactions of genistein with cPEPCK enzyme and compared them with its natural substrate (OAA), product (PEP) and known inhibitor (3-MPA). Our results demonstrate that genistein uses the mechanism of mixed inhibition to block the functional activity of cPEPCK and thus can serve as a potential anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drug candidate. We also identified an extended binding site in the catalytic cleft of cPEPCK which is used by 3-MPA to inhibit cPEPCK non-competitively. We demonstrate that extended binding site of cPEPCK can further be exploited for designing new drugs against cPEPCK. PMID:26528723

  10. Binding sites of resveratrol, genistein, and curcumin with milk α- and β-caseins.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, P; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2013-02-07

    The binding sites of antioxidant polyphenols resveratrol, genistein, and curcumin are located with milk α- and β-caseins in aqueous solution. FTIR, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze polyphenol binding sites, the binding constant, and the effects of complexation on casein stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that polyphenols bind casein via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with the number of bound polyphenol molecules (n) 1.20 for resveratrol, 1.42 for genistein, and 1.43 for curcumin with α-casein and 1.14 for resveratrol, 1.27 for genistein, and 1.27 for curcumin with β-casein. The overall binding constants of the complexes formed are K(res-α-casein) = 1.9 (±0.6) × 10(4) M(-1), K(gen-α-casein) = 1.8 (±0.4) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(cur-α-casein) = 2.8 (±0.8) × 10(4) M(-1) with α-casein and K(res-β-casein) = 2.3 (±0.3) × 10(4) M(-1), K(gen-β-casein) = 3.0 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(cur-β-casein) = 3.1 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1) for β-casein. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in polyphenol-protein complexes, which were stabilized by the hydrogen bonding network with the free binding energy of -11.56 (resveratrol-α-casein), -12.35 (resveratrol-β-casein), -9.68 (genistein-α-casein), -9.97 (genistein-β-casein), -8.89 (curcumin-α-casein), and -10.70 kcal/mol (curcumin-β-casein). The binding sites of polyphenols are different with α- and β-caseins. Polyphenol binding altered casein conformation with reduction of α-helix, indicating a partial protein destabilization. Caseins might act as carriers to transport polyphenol in vitro.

  11. Bimodal action of miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol, phytoestrogens from Pueraria candollei var. mirifica, on hepatic CYP2B9 and CYP1A2 expressions and antilipid peroxidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Udomsuk, Latiporn; Juengwatanatrakul, Thaweesak; Putalun, Waraporn; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2012-01-01

    Miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol are phytoestrogens isolated from Pueraria candollei var. mirifica. The influence of miroestrol and dexoymirosestrol on hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes and antioxidative activity in brain was examined in C57BL/6 mice compared with that of a synthetic female sex hormone estradiol. We hypothesized that miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol would induce CYP2B9 expression, whereas CYP1A2 expression would be suppressed compared with estradiol. Miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol treatment significantly increased uterus weight and volume. In addition, both of these phytoestrogens induced the expression of CYP2B9 and suppressed the expression of CYP1A2, as expected. Hepatic P450 activities correspondingly showed that both compounds increased benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity, whereas methoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activity was reduced. These observations suggested that miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol might affect hepatic P450 enzymes, including the CYP2B9 and CYP1A2 P450 isoforms. Assessment of lipid peroxidation demonstrated that miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol markedly decreased levels of malondialdehyde formation in the mouse brain. This is the first report suggesting miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol as potential alternative medicines to estradiol because of their distinctive ability to regulate mouse hepatic P450 expression and their beneficial antioxidative activities.

  12. Anti-Atherosclerotic Effects of a Phytoestrogen-Rich Herbal Preparation in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, Veronika A; Kirichenko, Tatyana V; Melnichenko, Alexandra A; Orekhova, Varvara A; Ravani, Alessio; Poggio, Paolo; Sobenin, Igor A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-08-11

    The risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis progression is significantly increased after menopause, probably due to the decrease of estrogen levels. The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for prevention of cardiovascular disease in older postmenopausal failed to meet expectations. Phytoestrogens may induce some improvements in climacteric symptoms, but their effect on the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. The reduction of cholesterol accumulation at the cellular level should lead to inhibition of the atherosclerotic process in the arterial wall. The inhibition of intracellular lipid deposition with isoflavonoids was suggested as the effective way for the prevention of plaque formation in the arterial wall. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was to investigate the effect of an isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation on atherosclerosis progression in postmenopausal women free of overt cardiovascular disease. One hundred fifty-seven healthy postmenopausal women (age 65 ± 6) were randomized to a 500 mg isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation containing tannins from grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cone powder, and garlic powder, or placebo. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (cIMT) were evaluated at the baseline and after 12 months of treatment. After 12-months follow-up, total cholesterol decreased by 6.3% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.011) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (p = 0.020); low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol decreased by 7.6% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.040) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (non-significant, NS); high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased by 3.4% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 4.5% in placebo recipients (p = 0.038); triglycerides decreased by 6.0% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 7.1% in

  13. Anti-Atherosclerotic Effects of a Phytoestrogen-Rich Herbal Preparation in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Myasoedova, Veronika A.; Kirichenko, Tatyana V.; Melnichenko, Alexandra A.; Orekhova, Varvara A.; Ravani, Alessio; Poggio, Paolo; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis progression is significantly increased after menopause, probably due to the decrease of estrogen levels. The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for prevention of cardiovascular disease in older postmenopausal failed to meet expectations. Phytoestrogens may induce some improvements in climacteric symptoms, but their effect on the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. The reduction of cholesterol accumulation at the cellular level should lead to inhibition of the atherosclerotic process in the arterial wall. The inhibition of intracellular lipid deposition with isoflavonoids was suggested as the effective way for the prevention of plaque formation in the arterial wall. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was to investigate the effect of an isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation on atherosclerosis progression in postmenopausal women free of overt cardiovascular disease. One hundred fifty-seven healthy postmenopausal women (age 65 ± 6) were randomized to a 500 mg isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation containing tannins from grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cone powder, and garlic powder, or placebo. Conventional cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media thickness of common carotid arteries (cIMT) were evaluated at the baseline and after 12 months of treatment. After 12-months follow-up, total cholesterol decreased by 6.3% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.011) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (p = 0.020); low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol decreased by 7.6% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (p = 0.040) and by 5.2% in placebo recipients (non-significant, NS); high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased by 3.4% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 4.5% in placebo recipients (p = 0.038); triglycerides decreased by 6.0% in isoflavonoid-rich herbal preparation recipients (NS) and by 7.1% in

  14. The Steady-State Serum Concentration of Genistein Aglycone Is Affected by Formulation: A Bioequivalence Study of Bone Products

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, Alessandra; Burnett, Bruce P.; Polito, Francesca; Russo, Silvia; D'Anna, Rosario; Pillai, Lakshmi; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Levy, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    An FDA-regulated, prescription medical food (Fosteum; 27 mg natural genistein, 200 IU cholecalciferol, 20 mg citrated zinc bisglycinate (4 mg elemental zinc) per capsule) and an over-the-counter (OTC) supplement (Citracal Plus Bone Density Builder; 27 mg synthetic genistein, 600 mg elemental calcium (calcium citrate), 400 IU vitamin D3, 50 mg magnesium, 7.5 mg zinc, 1 mg copper, 75 μg molybdenum, 250 μg boron per two tablets) were compared to a clinically proven bone formulation (27 mg natural genistein, 400 IU cholecalciferol, 500 mg elemental calcium (calcium carbonate) per tablet; the Squadrito formulation) in an 8-day steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) study of healthy postmenopausal women (n = 30) randomized to receive 54 mg of genistein per day. Trough serum samples were obtained before the final dose on the morning of the ninth day followed by sampling at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hrs. Total serum genistein, after β-glucuronidase/sulfatase digestion, was measured by time-resolved fluorometric assay. Maximal time (Tmax), concentration (Cmax), half-life (T1/2), and area under the curve (AUC) were determined for genistein in each formulation. Fosteum and the Squadrito study formulation were equivalent for genistein Tmax (2 hrs), Cmax (0.7 μM), T1/2 (18 ± 6.9 versus 21 ± 4.9 hrs), and AUC (9221 ± 413 versus 9818 ± 1370 ng·hr/mL). The OTC supplement's synthetically derived genistein, however, showed altered Tmax (6 hrs), Cmax (0.57 μM), T1/2 (8.3 ± 1.9 hrs), and AUC (6474 ± 287 ng·hr/mL). Differences in uptake may be due to multiple ingredients in the OTC supplement which interfere with genistein absorption. PMID:23484100

  15. Genistein sensitizes sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo by enhancing apoptosis and by inhibiting DSB repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, X X; Sun, C; Jin, X D; Li, P; Zheng, X G; Zhao, T; Li, Q

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the radiosensitization effects of genistein on mice sarcoma cells and the corresponding biological mechanisms in vitro and in vivo Using the non-toxic dosage of 10 μM genistein, the sensitizer enhancement ratios after exposure to X-rays at 50% cell survival (IC50) was 1.45 for S180 cells. For mice cotreated with genistein and X-rays, the excised tumor tissues had reduced blood vessels and decreased size and volume compared with the control and irradiation-only groups. Moreover, a significant increase in apoptosis was accompanied by upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 in the mitochondria, and lots of cytochrome c being transferred to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, X-rays combined with genistein inhibited the activity of DNA-PKcs, so DNA-injured sites were dominated by Ku70/80, leading to incompleteness of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repairs and the eventual occurrence of cell apoptosis. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that genistein sensitized sarcoma cells to X-rays and that this radiosensitizing effect depended on induction of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway and inhibition of the double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways.

  16. Anti-diabetic functions of soy isoflavone genistein: mechanisms underlying its effects on pancreatic β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a result of chronic insulin resistance and loss of functional pancreatic β-cell mass. Strategies to preserve β-cell mass and a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying β-cell turnover are needed to prevent and treat this devastating disease. Genistein, a naturally occurring soy isoflavone, is reported to have numerous health benefits attributed to multiple biological functions. Over the past 10 years, numerous studies have demonstrated that genistein has anti-diabetic effects, in particular, direct effects on β-cell proliferation, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protection against apoptosis, independent of its functions as an estrogen receptor agonist, antioxidant, or tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Effects are structure-specific and not common to all flavonoids. While there are limited data on the effects of genistein consumption in humans with diabetes, there are a plethora of animal and cell-culture studies that demonstrate a direct effect of genistein on β-cells at physiologically relevant concentrations (<10 μM). The effects appear to involve cAMP/PKA signaling and there are some studies that suggest an effect on epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review focuses on the anti-diabetic effects of genistein in both in vitro and in vivo models and potential mechanisms underlying its direct effects on β-cells.

  17. Enhanced cytotoxicity of optimized liposomal genistein via specific induction of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and prostate carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Phan, Vu; Walters, Jarvis; Brownlow, Bill; Elbayoumi, Tamer

    2013-12-01

    Clinical use of genistein against cancer is limited by its extremely low aqueous solubility, poor bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. Based on structural analogy with steroidal compounds, liposomal vehicle compositions were designed and optimized for maximum incorporation of genistein's flavonoid structure. Model conventional and stealth liposomes of genistein (GenLip)--incorporating unsaturated phospholipids and cholesterol--have demonstrated enhanced drug solubilization (over 350-folds > aqueous drug solution), shelf-life stability, and extended release profile. Owing to effective cellular delivery, preservation of genistein's antioxidant activity was confirmed through marked neutralization of peroxides via GenLip, in both quantitative and microscopic fluorescent-probe oxidation assays. Furthermore, significant broad-spectrum anticancer efficacy of GenLip, in murine and human cancer cell lines (p < 0.05-0.001), was achieved in a concentration and time-dependent manner--approx. 5-7 lower IC50 values versus all non-incorporated drug controls. Indicative of key pro-apoptotic activity, GenLip produced DNA laddering, with 1/3 of free drug solution content, and resulted in the highest induction level of P53-independent apoptotic pathway markers, compared to all treatments, in our assays (namely, mitochondrial polarization, and caspase-3/7 enzymes). Our proof-of-principle pharmaceutical design of genistein-loaded liposomes shows optimal loading capacity and physico-chemical properties, which improved cellular delivery and specific pro-apototic effectiveness of incorporated drug, against various cancers.

  18. Pharmacological Evaluation of Antidepressant-Like Effect of Genistein and Its Combination with Amitriptyline: An Acute and Chronic Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jia Jia, Tay; Yee Woon, Lim; Kumar Chellappan, Dinesh; Candasamy, Mayuren; Dua, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the acute and chronic antidepressant effect of genistein in combination with amitriptyline in mice. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6) for treatment with water, genistein, or amitriptyline, either alone or in combination for ten days. Animals were subjected to locomotor activity testing; tail suspension test (TST); and forced swim test (FST) and immobility time was recorded on day one and day ten. Acute treatment of all treatment groups did not significantly reduce the immobility time (p > 0.05). Chronic treatment of combination of genistein (10 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility time as compared to control group (p < 0.001) and was comparable to amitriptyline alone (10 mg/kg). However, no changes in anti-immobility activity in combination of subeffective doses of genistein (5 mg/kg) and amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) were observed. Genistein at its standard dose (10 mg/kg) rendered synergistic effects in combination with subeffective dose of amitriptyline (5 mg/kg) and additive effects in combination with therapeutic dose of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg). PMID:26681936

  19. Gastrointestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition.

    PubMed

    Njåstad, K M; Adler, S A; Hansen-Møller, J; Thuen, E; Gustavsson, A-M; Steinshamn, H

    2014-12-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens are metabolized or converted in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants, only limited knowledge exists on the extent and location of this conversion in vivo. The objective of this study was to quantify the gastro-intestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition. Four lactating rumen cannulated Norwegian Red cattle were assigned to a 4 × 4 Latin square with 1 cow per treatment period of 3 wk. The 4 treatment silages were prepared from grasslands with different botanical compositions: organically managed short-term timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) ley (2 yr old: ORG-SG); organically managed long-term grassland with a high proportion of unsown species (6 yr old; ORG-LG); conventionally managed perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) ley (CON-PR); and conventionally managed timothy ley (CON-TI). The herbages were cut, wilted, and preserved with additive in round bales, fed as a mix of the first and third cut at 90% of ad libitum intake, and contributed to 70% of the total dry matter intake. Milk, feed, omasal digesta, urine, and feces were collected at the end of each period and analyzed for the concentrations of phytoestrogens by using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique. Concentration of total isoflavones was highest in ORG-SG and lowest in CON-TI silage, whereas the content of total lignans was highest in the grass silages. The isoflavones were extensively metabolized in the rumen on all diets, and the recovery of formononetin and daidzein in omasum, mainly as equol, averaged 0.11 mg/mg. The apparent intestinal metabolism was less severe as, on average, 0.29 mg/mg of the omasal flow was recovered in feces. The plant lignans were also strongly degraded in the rumen. However, the flow of lignans to omasum and excretion in feces were, on average, 7.2- and 5.2-fold higher, respectively, than the intake of the plant lignans

  20. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  1. The synergy effect of daidzein and genistein isolated from Butea superba Roxb. on the reproductive system of male mice.

    PubMed

    Eumkeb, Griangsak; Tanphonkrang, Sudarat; Sirichaiwetchakoon, Kittipot; Hengpratom, Tanaporn; Naknarong, Wanatkamon

    2017-03-01

    Butea superba Roxb. (BS) has been used in Thai men as an aphrodisiac, and prevent erectile dysfunction. Nevertheless, the active ingredients, dosages, have not been cleared. Hence, this study was to investigate the effect of compounds from the BS on the reproductive parameters of male mice. The results revealed that BS was extracted to afford biochanin A and genistein, which were first reported on BS, and daidzein. The mice were treated by daidzein and genistein alone and in combination. The results showed that the sperm number and motility, cholesterol and testosterone level of all isoflavones-treated groups were significantly higher than controls (p < 0.01). Obviously, daidzein plus genistein exhibited a synergistic effect, which is also the first report, and resulted in significantly displayed higher levels of these parameters compared to others. So, the synergistic activity of these isoflavones may be useful in improving libido, erectile capacity and assist infertility of poor spermatozoa in men.

  2. Multi-functional sample preparation procedure for measuring phytoestrogens in milk, cereals, and baby-food by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with subsequent determination of their estrogenic activity using transcriptomic assay.

    PubMed

    Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Gaudin-Hirret, Isabelle; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Cariou, Ronan; Elliott, Christopher; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    A method dedicated to the determination of a multiple range of phytoestrogens as endocrine disruptor compounds in infant food products was developed, with as double objective the specific measurement of 13 parameters and the evaluation of the estrogenic potency associated to this quantitative profile. A combined enzymatic and acidic chemical hydrolysis followed by a double purification on two successive C(18) and SiOH Solid Phase Extraction cartridges permitted to efficiently purify milk, cereals and baby-food samples while eliminating naturally occurring estrogen hormones. A specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric measurement authorised unambiguous identification and quantification of the target compounds. The proposed methodology was fully validated and applied to a set of around 30 real samples, demonstrating the presence of phytoestrogens at levels globally ranging from several microgkg(-1) (ppb) to several tens mgkg(-1) (ppm). The prepared sample extracts were proven to be suitable and compatible with the evaluation of their induced biological transcriptional activity on MCF-7 cell lines. Because permitting to cope with difficult issues such as low-dose and mixture effects, this proposed methodology may appear of particular interest for further exposure assessment studies and hazard characterisation investigations related to this class of endocrine disruptor compounds.

  3. Chemoprevention Against Breast Cancer with Genistein and Resveratrol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for both res- veratrol and EGCG extractions. Serum concentrations of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, and prolactin Serum estradiol-17β, progesterone...was not signifi- cantly different from the controls. Animals receiving res- veratrol developed the lowest number of chemically- induced mammary...the control group (Table 2). Neither EGCG nor res- veratrol had an effect on mammary tumor incidence as almost every animal (93 out of 94) developed

  4. Study of hydrogen-bonding, vibrational dynamics and structure-activity relationship of genistein using spectroscopic techniques coupled with DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Dev, Kapil; Maurya, Rakesh

    2017-02-01

    The conformational and hydrogen bonding studies of genistein have been performed by combined spectroscopic and quantum chemical approach. The vibrational spectra (FT-IR and FT-Raman), UV-visible and 1H and 13C NMR absorption spectra of genistein have been recorded and examined. The vibrational wavenumbers of optimized geometry and total energy for isolated molecule and hydrogen-bonded dimers of genistein have been determined using the quantum chemical calculation (DFT/B3LYP) with extended 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational assignments for the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of genistein are provided by calculations on monomer and hydrogen-bonded dimer. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is used for investigating the nature and strength of hydrogen-bonds. UV-visible spectrum of the genistein was recorded in methanol solvent and the electronic properties were calculated by using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The computed HOMO and LUMO energies predicted the type of transition as π → π*. The 1H and 13C NMR signals of the genistein were computed by the Gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) approach. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis predicted the stability of molecules due to charge delocalization and hyper conjugative interactions. NBO analysis shows that there is an Osbnd H⋯O inter and intramolecular hydrogen bond, and π → π* transition in the monomer and dimer, which is consistent with the conclusion obtained by the investigation of molecular structure and assignment of UV-visible spectra.

  5. Preliminary in vitro evaluation of genistein chemopreventive capacity as a result of esterification and cyclodextrin encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Soica, Codruta; Dehelean, Cristina; Zupko, Istvan; Csanyi, Erzsebet; Pinzaru, Iulia

    2015-01-01

    The present study focuses on the synthesis and analysis of a genistein ester derivative with myristic acid followed by beta cyclodextrin encapsulation; physicochemical analysis using consecrated techniques such as FTIR, MS, DSC, and SEM revealed both a successful esterification and inclusion inside the cyclodextrin cavity. Cytotoxic effects were measured in vitro on three human cell lines: HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma), A2780 (ovary carcinoma), and A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma). The in vitro biological analysis exhibited rather poor antiproliferative results on all three tested cancer cell lines, behavior that may be due to the high stability of the complex within the in vitro environment.

  6. Inhibition of Lassa virus and Ebola virus infection in host cells treated with the kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin.

    PubMed

    Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Adhikary, Shramika; Garver, Jennifer; Johnson, Lela; Davey, Robert A; Vela, Eric M

    2012-01-01

    Arenaviruses and filoviruses are capable of causing hemorrhagic fever syndrome in humans. Limited therapeutic and/or prophylactic options are available for humans suffering from viral hemorrhagic fever. In this report, we demonstrate that pre-treatment of host cells with the kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG1478 leads to inhibition of infection or transduction in cells infected with Ebola virus, Marburg virus, and Lassa virus. In all, the results demonstrate that a kinase inhibitor cocktail consisting of genistein and tyrphostin AG1478 is a broad-spectrum antiviral that may be used as a therapeutic or prophylactic against arenavirus and filovirus hemorrhagic fever.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of Chinese medicinal formula Si-Wu-Tang on breast cancer cells reveals phytoestrogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Si-Wu-Tang (SWT), comprising the combination of four herbs, Paeoniae, Angelicae, Chuanxiong and Rehmanniae, is one of the most popular traditional oriental medicines for women’s diseases. In our previous study, the microarray gene expression profiles of SWT on breast cancer cell line MCF-7 were found similar to the effect of β-estradiol (E2) on MCF-7 cells in the Connectivity Map database. Methods Further data analysis was conducted to find the main similarities and differences between the effects of SWT and E2 on MCF-7 gene expression. The cell proliferation assay on MCF-7 (ER-positive) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) cells were used to examine such estrogenic activity. The estrogenic potency of SWT was further confirmed by estrogen-responsive element (ERE) luciferase reporter assay in MCF-7 cells. Results Many estrogen regulated genes strongly up-regulated by E2 were similarly up-regulated by SWT, e.g., GREB1, PGR and EGR3. Of interest with regard to safety of SWT, the oncogenes MYBL1 and RET were strongly induced by E2 but not by SWT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a highly concordant expression change in selected genes with data obtained by microarrays. Further supporting SWT’s estrogenic activity, in MCF-7 but not in MDA-MB-231 cells, SWT stimulated cell growth at lower concentrations (< 3.0 mg/ml), while at high concentrations, it inhibits the growth of both cell lines. The growth inhibitory potency of SWT was significantly higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7 cells. The SWT-induced cell growth of MCF-7 could be blocked by addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen. In addition, SWT was able to activate the ERE activity at lower concentrations. The herbal components Angelicae, Chuanxiong and Rehmanniae at lower concentrations (< 3.0 mg/ml) also showed growth-inducing and ERE-activating activity in MCF-7 cells. Conclusions These results revealed a new mechanism to support the clinical use of SWT for estrogen related diseases

  8. The fate of pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides during MBR treatment.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Kaushalya C; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Hao H; Nghiem, Long D

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between molecular properties and the fate of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) in the aqueous and solid phases during wastewater treatment by MBR. A set of 29 TrOCs was selected to represent pharmaceuticals, steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, UV-filters and pesticides that occur ubiquitously in municipal wastewater. Both adsorption and biodegradation/transformation were found responsible for the removal of TrOCs by MBR treatment. A connection between biodegradation and molecular structure could be observed while adsorption was the dominant removal mechanism for the hydrophobic (logD>3.2) compounds. Highly hydrophobic (logD>3.2) but readily biodegradable compounds did not accumulate in sludge. In contrast, recalcitrant compounds with a moderate hydrophobicity, such as carbamazepine, accumulated significantly in the solid phase. The results provide a framework to predict the removal and fate of TrOCs by MBR treatment.

  9. The Improvement of Hypertension by Probiotics: Effects on Cholesterol, Diabetes, Renin, and Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lye, Huey-Shi; Kuan, Chiu-Yin; Ewe, Joo-Ann; Fung, Wai-Yee; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live organisms that are primarily used to improve gastrointestinal disorders such as diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, constipation, lactose intolerance, and to inhibit the excessive proliferation of pathogenic intestinal bacteria. However, recent studies have suggested that probiotics could have beneficial effects beyond gastrointestinal health, as they were found to improve certain metabolic disorders such as hypertension. Hypertension is caused by various factors and the predominant causes include an increase in cholesterol levels, incidence of diabetes, inconsistent modulation of renin and imbalanced sexual hormones. This review discusses the antihypertensive roles of probiotics via the improvement and/or treatment of lipid profiles, modulation of insulin resistance and sensitivity, the modulation of renin levels and also the conversion of bioactive phytoestrogens as an alternative replacement of sexual hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. PMID:19865517

  10. The phytoestrogen daidzein affects the antioxidant enzyme system of rat hepatoma H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrdanz, Elke; Ohler, Sandra; Tran-Thi, Quynh-Hoa; Kahl, Regine

    2002-03-01

    Phytoestrogens such as the soy isoflavonoid daidzein have potential health benefits. The antioxidant properties of phytoestrogens are considered to be responsible in part for their protective effects. The antioxidant enzyme (AOE) system plays an important role in the defense of cells against oxidative insults. To determine whether flavonoids can exert antioxidative effects not only directly but also indirectly by modulating the AOE system, we investigated the influence of the flavonoid daidzein on the expression of different AOE. Daidzein treatment of hepatoma H4IIE cells increased catalase mRNA expression two- to threefold. Expression levels of copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) were not affected by exposure to daidzein. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA expression levels decreased slightly and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels increased slightly after daidzein exposure. Changes in AOE mRNA expression levels were significant at 300 micromol/L daidzein. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the strong increase in catalase mRNA, transfection experiments were performed. Transient transfection of hepatoma cells with reporter plasmids containing different parts of the upstream region of the catalase gene showed a significant one- to threefold increase in reporter gene activity after daidzein exposure. This indicates that daidzein can directly activate the rat catalase promoter region. Despite the increase in catalase mRNA, daidzein pretreatment of cells did not protect against oxidative stress resulting from H(2)O(2) exposure. On the contrary, daidzein itself exerted a mild oxidative stress. In conclusion, the changes in the AOE system provoked by daidzein affected the oxidant rather than the antioxidant properties of daidzein.

  11. Supplemental genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol intake in active duty army soldiers.

    PubMed

    Sepowitz, John J; Fauser, Kristina R; Meyer, Stephanie A; Jackson, Steven J

    2015-05-01

    Previous reports indicate that the majority of U.S. Army soldiers consume dietary supplements (DSs) > 1 time/wk. However, these studies did not evaluate phytonutrient supplementation. A growing literature suggests inclusion of phytonutrients in DSs may pose a risk for toxicity, which could impact the performance of soldier duties, as well as long-term health and wellness. This study was conducted to assess and understand soldiers' motivations to consume phytonutrient-containing DSs, specifically genistein, quercetin, and resveratrol. The study was a cross-sectional, descriptive mixed-methods design using a survey and semistructured interviews. There were 436 soldiers stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington who completed the survey, from which 36 soldiers completed an interview. Overall, 34% of soldiers reported taking a single or multicomponent phytonutrient DS > 1 time/wk, from which 41 soldiers took >1 supplement/wk. Soldiers' reasons for use included unsure (54%), weight loss (12%), and other, unspecified (24%). The majority of interviewees did not consume DSs based on inclusion of genistein, quercetin, or resveratrol. The majority of soldiers, in our study, appear unable to rationalize their phytonutrient DS choices. Findings from this study illuminate the need for future research to further explore DS practices within military populations and encourage informed use of DSs.

  12. Locating the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin with tRNA.

    PubMed

    N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Bourassa, P; Mandeville, J S; Bekale, L; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-09-01

    We located the binding sites of antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and curcumin on tRNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using constant tRNA concentration and various polyphenol contents. FTIR, UV-visible, CD spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine polyphenol binding sites, the binding constant and the effects of polyphenol complexation on tRNA conformation and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that polyphenols bind tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs through hydrophilic, hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of K(res-tRNA)=8.95(±0.80)×10(3) M(-1), K(gen-tRNA)=3.07(±0.5)×10(3) M(-1) and K(cur-tRNA)=1.55(±0.3)×10(4) M(-1). Molecular modeling showed the participation of several nucleobases in polyphenol-tRNA adduct formation with free binding energy of -4.43 for resveratrol, -4.26 kcal/mol for genistein and -4.84 kcal/mol for curcumin, indicating that the interaction process is spontaneous at room temperature. While tRNA remains in A-family structure, major biopolymer aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polyphenol contents.

  13. Attenuation of endothelin-1-induced calcium response by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, C Y; Sturek, M

    1996-06-01

    Although tyrosine kinases play an important role in cell growth and have been implicated in regulation of smooth muscle contraction, their role in agonist-induced myoplasmic Ca2+ responses is unclear. We examined effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and methyl 2,5-dihydroxycinnamate (MDHC) on the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced Ca2+ response and determined underlying mechanisms for the effects. Freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from porcine coronary arteries were loaded with fura 2 ester, and myoplasmic free Ca2+ (Ca2+ (m)) concentration was estimated with fura 2 microfluorometry. Both genistein and MDHC inhibited the initial transient Cam2+ response to ET by 54 and 81%, respectively (P < 0.05), in the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Genistein also significantly delayed the Cam2+ response, with the latent period from ET-1 application to the beginning of the Cam2+ response being increased from 1.08 +/- 0.17 to 2.65 +/- 0.52 min (P < 0.05). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, genistein inhibited the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response by 93% (P < 0.05). The Cam2+ responses to caffeine (5 mM) or inositol trisphosphate (IP3) applied intracellularly via a patch-clamp pipette were not affected by genistein. Both genistein and MDHC also abolished the sustained Cam2+ response to ET-1. However, the Cam2+ response to depolarization by 80 mM K+ was not inhibited by MDHC and only inhibited 22% by genistein (P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) activation of tyrosine kinases is an important regulatory mechanism for the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response in vascular smooth muscle and 2) tyrosine kinases mediate ET-1-induced Ca2+ release with no direct effect on IP3-mediated Ca2+ release. Thus ET-1-mediated signaling upstream of IP3 interaction with the Ca2+ stores is regulated by tyrosine kinases.

  14. MicroRNAs 221/222 and Genistein mediated regulation of ARHI tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Zaman, Mohd Saif; Deng, Guoren; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Shranjot; Liu, Jan; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ARHI, an imprinted tumor suppressor gene, is expressed in normal immortalized prostate epithelial cells, but is dramatically down-regulated in prostate cancer cell lines. Here we investigated the mechanisms of ARHI silencing in prostate cancer through miRNA and genistein mediated pathways. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE We evaluated ARHI mRNA and protein levels by real time PCR and immunostaining of prostate tissue array. Then, ARHI was over-expressed in prostate cancer PC-3 cells followed by functional studies. Finally, miRNA inhibitor studies and dual luciferase pMIR-REPORT assay were performed to prove the direct target of miR-221&222 to ARHI. RESULTS Both ARHI mRNA and protein levels were down regulated in prostate cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. Over-expression of ARHI can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion and induced apoptosis. Further studies on a new mechanism of ARHI down regulation showed a significant inverse relationship between ARHI and miR-221 & 222 which were up-regulated in cancer cell lines. Transfection of miR-221 & 222 inhibitors into PC-3 cells caused a significant induction of ARHI expression. A direct interaction of miR-221 or 222 with a target site on the 3’UTR of ARHI was confirmed by a dual luciferase pMIR-REPORT assay. CONCLUSIONS ARHI is a tumor suppressor gene down regulated in prostate cancer and over-expression of ARHI can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. This study demonstrates for the first time that prostate cancer cells have decreased level of ARHI which could be caused by direct targeting of 3’UTR of ARHI by miR221/222. PMID:21071579

  15. In vitro investigation of antioxidant, anti-Inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) hemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Teng; DeFine, Linda; Alexander, Thomas; Kyu, Thein

    2015-04-01

    Hemocompatibility of genistein-modified poly(ethersulfone)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PES/PVP) hemodialysis (HD) membranes has been investigated in vitro with emphasis on evaluation of cell viability, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet adhesion properties. Genistein modified PES/PVP membranes reveal significant reduction of the reactive oxygen species and also considerable suppression of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in whole blood, but to a lesser extent ininterleukin-6. The incorporation of PVP into the HD membrane reduces platelet adhesion by virtue of its hydrophilicity. Of particular importance is that platelet adhesion of the genistein modified membranes declines noticeably at low concentrations of genistein for about 5-10%, beyond which it raises the number of adhered platelets. The initial decline in the platelet adhesion is attributable to genistein's ability to inhibit intercellular and/or vascular cell adhesion, whereas the reversal of this adhesion trend with further increase of genistein loading is ascribed to the inherent hydrophobicity of the genistein modified HD membrane.

  16. The kinetic basis for age-associated changes in quercetin and genistein glucuronidation by rat liver microsomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dietary bioavailability of the isoflavone genistein is decreased in older rats compared to young adults. Since flavonoids are metabolized extensively by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), we hypothesized that UGT flavonoid conjugating activity changes with age. The effect of age on flavono...

  17. Segregated responses of mammary gland development and vaginal opening to prepubertal genistein exposure in Bscl2(-/-) female mice with lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Chen, Weiqin; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-07-01

    Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2-deficient (Bscl2(-/-)) mice recapitulate human BSCL2 disease with lipodystrophy. Bscl2-encoded seipin is detected in adipocytes and epithelium of mammary gland. Postnatal mammary gland growth spurt and vaginal opening signify pubertal onset in female mice. Bscl2(-/-) females have longer and dilated mammary gland ducts at 5-week old and delayed vaginal opening. Prepubertal exposure to 500ppm genistein diet increases mammary gland area and accelerates vaginal opening in both control and Bscl2(-/-) females. However, genistein treatment increases ductal length in control but not Bscl2(-/-) females. Neither prepubertal genistein treatment nor Bscl2-deficiency affects phospho-estrogen receptor α or progesterone receptor expression patterns in 5-week old mammary gland. Interestingly, Bscl2-deficiency specifically reduces estrogen receptor β expression in mammary gland ductal epithelium. In summary, Bscl2(-/-) females have accelerated postnatal mammary ductal development but delayed vaginal opening; they display segregated responses in mammary gland development and vaginal opening to prepubertal genistein treatment.

  18. Genistein-mediated inhibition of mammary stromal adipocyte differentiation limits expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells by paracrine signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary adiposity may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by releasing cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that promote mammary epithelial proliferation. We evaluated the effects of soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) on the adipogenic differentiation of a SV40-immortalized mou...

  19. Clearing Amyloid-β through PPARγ/ApoE Activation by Genistein is a Treatment of Experimental Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Blanco-Gandía, MariCarmen; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Inglés, Marta; Garcia-Tarraga, Patricia; Rodriguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Borras, Consuelo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Viña, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance from brain, which is decreased in Alzheimer's disease, is facilitated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE is upregulated by activation of the retinoid X receptor moiety of the RXR/PPARγ dimeric receptor. Genistein, a non-toxic, well-tested, and inexpensive drug activates the other moiety of the receptor PPARγ. Treatment of an Alzheimer's disease mouse model with genistein results in a remarkable and rapid improvement in various parameters of cognition, such as hippocampal learning, recognition memory, implicit memory, and odor discrimination. This is associated with a lowering of Aβ levels in brain, in the number and the area of amyloid plaques (confirmed in vivo by positron emission tomography) as well as in microglial reactivity. Finally, incubation of primary astrocytes with genistein results in a PPARγ-mediated increased release of ApoE. Our results strongly suggest that controlled clinical trials should be performed to test the effect of genistein as treatment of human Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Genistein downregulates onco-miR-1260b and upregulates sFRP1 and Smad4 via demethylation and histone modification in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, H; Hinoda, Y; Shahryari, V; Deng, G; Tanaka, Y; Tabatabai, Z L; Dahiya, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be regulated by genistein in cancer cells. In this study, we focused on the gene regulatory effect of genistein on microRNA and its target genes in prostate cancer (PC). Methods: Initially, we investigated the effect of genistein on prostate cancer cells and identified that the expression of miRNA-1260b was decreased by genistein. We performed functional analyses and investigated the relationship between miRNA-1260b expression and prostate cancer patient outcomes. Two target genes (sFRP1 and Smad4) of miR-1260b were identified based on computer algorithm and 3′UTR luciferase assay was carried out to determine direct miRNA regulation of the genes. Results: Genistein promoted apoptosis while inhibiting prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and TCF reporter activity in PC cells. MiR-1260b was highly expressed in prostate cancer tissues and significantly downregulated by genistein in PC cells. After knocking down miR-1260b, cell proliferation, invasion, migration and TCF reporter activity were decreased in PC cells. Western analysis and 3′UTR luciferase assay showed that the two target genes (sFRP1 and Smad4) were directly regulated by miR-1260b. The expression of sFRP1 and Smad4 was significantly decreased in prostate cancer tissues. Genistein also increased expression of these two genes via DNA demethylation and histone modifications. Conclusions: Our data suggest that genistein exerts its anti-tumour effect via downregulation of miR-1260b that targeted sRRP1 and Smad4 genes in prostate cancer cells. The expression of sFRP1 and Smad4 was also modulated by genistein via DNA methylation or histone modifications in PC cell lines. PMID:24504368

  1. Coacervation of β-conglycinin, glycinin and isoflavones induced by propylene glycol alginate in heated soymilk.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Chun-Ping; Kuo, Meng-I; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the propylene glycol alginate (PGA)-induced coacervation of β-conglycinin (7S), glycinin (11S) and isoflavones in heated soymilk. The addition of 0.9% PGA caused 7S, 11S, daidzein and genistein to coacervate following a 1h incubation period. SDS-PAGE showed that the protein bands corresponding to the 7S α', 7S α, 7S β, 11S A3, and 11S acidic subunits and the 11S basic proteins in the soymilk supernatant fraction (SSF) decreased to 37.7 ± 12.7%, 24.7 ± 3.9%, 4.9 ± 1.8%, 8.5 ± 2.7%, 18.1 ± 1.8% and 6.0 ± 1.6%, respectively. In addition, isoflavones including daidzein and genistein were also coacervated from the SSF into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) following incubation with 0.9% PGA for 1h. The amounts of daidzein and genistein in the SSF decreased to 8.6 ± 1.6% and 2.0 ± 1.0%, respectively. HPLC analysis suggested that daidzein and genistein were bound to the 7S and 11S proteins. These results suggested that daidzein and genistein were co-precipitated with the 7S and 11S proteins into the SPF by 0.9% PGA. Our results demonstrated that PGA is a potent coagulant for the coacervation of 7S, 11S, daidzein and genistein.

  2. Impact of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica and its potent phytoestrogen miroestrol on expression of bone-specific genes in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Udomsuk, Latiporn; Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Monthakantirat, Orawan; Churikhit, Yaowared; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2012-12-01

    Miroestrol (MR) is a highly active phytoestrogen isolated from tuberous root of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica (PM). Modulatory effects of PM and MR on osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) mRNAs which are bone-specific genes were investigated in ovariectomized female ICR mice. After ovariectomy, expression of OPG mRNA was suppressed but that of RANKL was induced. Estradiol benzoate (E2) recovered OPG expression to the level comparable to the sham while that of RANKL was suppressed in ovariectomized mice. PM crude extract (PME) significantly down-regulated the expression of RANKL mRNA with no change in the OPG level whereas MR elevated the expression of OPG mRNA with lowering level of RANKL mRNA, resulting in the increased OPG/RANKL ratio, and consequently lead to lowering progression of osteoporosis at molecular level. These findings revealed potential of PME and MR on bone loss prevention via increasing the ratio of OPG to RANKL (osteoformation/osteoresorption) in liver of ovariectomized mice. Therefore, using PME and MR as alternative hormone replacement therapy of E2 might be beneficial recommended due to advantageous on regulation of osteoporosis related genes.

  3. Clobetasol synergistically diminishes Ciz1 expression with genistein in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Nishimura, Yuri; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2012-02-01

    Cip-interacting zinc finger protein 1 (Ciz1) stimulates DNA replication and has been implicated in the tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. In order to investigate the possibility of using medicinal glucocorticoids against breast cancer, we studied whether certain glucocorticoids affect the expression of Ciz1. The in vitro effect of clobetasol treatment on the reduction of Ciz1 expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Western blotting also confirmed the down-regulation of the protein in a dose-dependent manner upon clobetasol treatment in U937 monocytoid cells. Furthermore, we found that Ciz1 protein expression was decreased after pre-treatment of the cells with clobetasol and genistein. An extract of Lens culinaris also had a synergistic effect on the repression of Ciz1 protein expression.

  4. Preventive effects of phytoestrogens against postmenopausal osteoporosis as compared to the available therapeutic choices: An overview.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, Abdullah Foraih; Qureshi, Viquar Fatima; Javaid, Khalida; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2011-07-01

    Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Although hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been rampantly used to recompense for the bone loss, but the procedure is coupled with severe adverse effects. Hence, there is a boost in the production of newer synthetic products to ward off the effects of menopause-related osteoporosis. As of today, there are several prescription products available for the treatment of postmenopause osteoporosis; most of these are estrogenic agents and combination products. Nevertheless, in view of the lack of effect and/or toxicity of these products, majority of the postmenopausal women are now fascinated by highly publicized natural products. This is an offshoot of the generalized consensus that these products are more effective and free from any adverse effects. Recently, certain plant-derived natural products, mostly phytoestrogens (isoflavones, lignans, coumestanes, stilbenes, flavonoids) and many more novel estrogen-like compounds in plants have been immensely used to prevent menopause-related depletion in bone mineral density (BMD). Although, a number of papers are published on menopause-related general symptoms, sexual dysfunction, cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon, and breast cancers, there is paucity of literature on the accompanying osteoporosis and its treatment. In view of the controversies on synthetic hormones and drugs and drift of a major population of patients toward natural drugs, it was found worthwhile to investigate if these drugs are suitable to be used in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Preparation of this paper is an attempt to review the (a) epidemiology of postmenopausal osteoporosis, (b) treatment modalities of postmenopausal osteoporosis by hormones and synthetic drugs and the associated drawbacks and adverse effects, and (c) prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis by phytoestrogens, their drawbacks and toxicity

  5. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Li, Xue-Dong; Yang, Na; Pan, Wei-San; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC) to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) proliferation. METHODS Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS), zeta potentials (ZP), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), genistein (Gen) and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth. PMID:27275415

  6. Pharmacokinetics of isoflavones, daidzein and genistein, after ingestion of soy beverage compared with soy extract capsules in postmenopausal Thai women

    PubMed Central

    Anupongsanugool, Ekasin; Teekachunhatean, Supanimit; Rojanasthien, Noppamas; Pongsatha, Saipin; Sangdee, Chaichan

    2005-01-01

    Background Isoflavones from soybeans may provide some beneficial impacts on postmenopausal health. The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of plasma isoflavones (daidzein and genistein) after a single dose of orally administered soy beverage and soy extract capsules in postmenopausal Thai women. Methods We conducted a randomized two-phase crossover pharmacokinetic study in 12 postmenopausal Thai women. In the first phase, each subject randomly received either 2 soy extract capsules (containing daidzin : genistin = 7.79 : 22.57 mg), or soy beverage prepared from 15 g of soy flour (containing daidzin : genistin = 9.27 : 10.51 mg). In the second phase, the subjects received an alternative preparation in the same manner after a washout period of at least 1 week. Blood samples were collected immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24 and 32 h after administration of the soy preparation in each phase. Plasma daidzein and genistein concentrations were determined by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetic parameters of daidzein and genistein, i.e. maximal plasma concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma concentration (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and half-life (t1/2), were estimated using the TopFit version 2.0 software with noncompartmental model analysis. Results There were no significant differences in the mean values of Cmax/dose, AUC0–32/dose, AUC0-∝/dose, Tmax, and t1/2 of genistein between both preparations. For pharmacokinetic parameters of daidzein, the mean values of Cmax/dose, Tmax, and t1/2 did not significantly differ between both preparations. Nonetheless, the mean AUC0–32/dose and AUC0-∝/dose after administration of soy extract capsules were slightly (but significantly, p < 0.05) higher than those of soy beverage. Conclusion The bioavailability of daidzein, which was adjusted for the administered dose (AUC/dose), following a

  7. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, F.; Jiménez-Guerrero, I.; Acosta-Jurado, S.; Navarro-Gómez, P.; Ollero, F. J.; Ruiz-Sainz, J. E.; López-Baena, F. J.; Vinardell, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  8. [Experimental Evaluation of Radioprotective Efficacy of Synthetic Genistein on Criteria of Glutathione System and Lipid Peroxidation in Erythrocytes of Peripheral Blood in Irradiated Rats].

    PubMed

    Grebenyuk, A N; Tarumov, R A; Basharin, V A; Kovtun, V U

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate experimentally the radioprotective effectiveness of synthetic genistein in terms of the glutathione system and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes of irradiated rats. The animals were exposed to single acute X-ray irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy. Genistein was administered intraperitoneally at 200 mg/kg 1 hour before radiation exposure. The irradiation caused the initiation of lipid peroxidation in the background depletion of reduced glutathione. Decrease by 25% in the number of malondialdehyde in the rats treated with genistein was registered 5 min after irradiation compared with the control. It is established thatl day after irradiation the level of reduced glutathione in the rats treated with genistein was 26% higher. However, intraperitoneal administration of genistein did not cause statistically significant changes in the activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase during the whole period of observation. The results suggest that the radioprotective effect of synthetic genistein is implemented, along with other mechanisms, by stimulating the glutathione system and reducing the severity of lipid peroxidation.

  9. Vascular Dysfunction in Aging: Potential Effects of Resveratrol, an Anti-Inflammatory Phytoestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Labinskyy, Nazar; Csiszar, Anna; Veress, Gabor; Stef, Gyorgyi; Pacher, Pal; Oroszi, Gabor; Wu, Joseph; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated that even in the absence of other risk factors (e.g. diabetes, hypertension, hyperhomocysteinemia, hypercholesterolemia), advanced age itself significantly increases cardiovascular morbidity by enhancing vascular oxidative stress and inflammation. Because the population in the Western world is rapidly aging, there is a substantial need for pharmacological interventions that delay the functional decline of the cardiovascular system. Resveratrol is an atoxic phytoestrogen found in more than 70 plants including grapevine and berries. Recent data suggest that nutritional intake of resveratrol and other polyphenol compounds may contribute to the “French paradox”, the unexpectedly low cardiovascular morbidity in the Mediterranean population. There is increasing evidence that resveratrol exerts multifaceted anti-oxidant and/or anti-inflammatory effects in various disease models. Importantly, resveratrol was reported to slow aging and increase lifespan in simple organisms and has been suggested as a potential calorie restriction mimetic. Resveratrol has also been reported to activate NAD-dependent histone deacetylases (sirtuins), which may contribute to its anti-aging effects. This review focuses on the role of oxidative stress and inflammation in cardiovascular dysfunction in aging, and on emerging anti-aging therapeutic strategies offered by resveratrol and other polyphenol compounds. PMID:16611080

  10. Metabolism of 8-prenylnaringenin, a potent phytoestrogen from hops (Humulus lupulus), by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Dejan; Li, Yongmei; Chadwick, Lucas R; Grubjesic, Simonida; Schwab, Pia; Metz, Peter; van Breemen, Richard B

    2004-02-01

    The female flowers of hops are used throughout the world as a flavoring agent for beer. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the potential estrogenic properties of hop extracts. Among the possible estrogenic compounds in hops, 8-prenylnaringenin is perhaps most significant due to its high in vitro potency exceeding that of other known phytoestrogens. Since data regarding the pharmacokinetic properties of this compound are lacking, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of 8-prenylnaringenin by human liver microsomes. A total of 12 metabolites were identified, and biotransformation occurred on the prenyl group and the flavanone skeleton. The major site of oxidation was on the terminal methyl groups, and of the two possible isomers, the transisomer was more abundant. The double bond on the prenyl group was also oxidized to an epoxide that was opened by intramolecular reaction with the neighboring hydroxyl group. On the flavanone skeleton, the major site of oxidation was at 3'position on the B ring. Other metabolites included oxidation at carbon-3 as well as desaturation of the C ring to produce 8-prenylapigenin. An unusual hydroxy quinone product formed by ipso hydroxylation of the B ring of 8-prenylnaringenin was also detected. This product was probably an intermediate for the B ring cleavage product, 8-prenylchromone.

  11. Effects of Vehicles and Enhancers on the Skin Permeation of Phytoestrogenic Diarylheptanoids from Curcuma comosa.

    PubMed

    Tuntiyasawasdikul, Sarunya; Limpongsa, Ekapol; Jaipakdee, Napaphak; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2017-04-01

    Curcuma comosa (C. comosa) is widely used in traditional medicine as a dietary supplement for health promotion in postmenopausal women in Thailand. It contains several diarylheptanoids, which are considered to be a novel class of phytoestrogens. However, the diarylheptanoids isolated from the plant rhizome are shown to have low oral bioavailability and faster elimination characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the permeation behavior of the active compounds of diarylheptanoids. The effects of binary vehicle systems and permeation enhancers on diarylheptanoids permeation and accumulation within the skin were studied using side-by-side diffusion cells through the porcine ear skin. Among the tested binary vehicle systems, the ethanol/water vehicle appeared to be the most effective system for diarylheptanoids permeation with the highest flux and shortest lag time. The presence of transcutol in the vehicle system significantly increased diarylheptanoid's permeation and accumulation within the skin in a concentration-dependent manner. Although the presence of terpenes in formulation decreased the flux of diarylheptanoids, it raised the amount of diarylheptanoids retained within the skin substantially. Based on the feasibility of diarylheptanoid permeation, C. comosa extract should be further developed into an effective transdermal product for health benefits and hormone replacement therapy.

  12. Phytoestrogens from the roots of Polygonum cuspidatum (Polygonaceae): structure-requirement of hydroxyanthraquinones for estrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Shimoda, H; Morikawa, T; Yoshikawa, M

    2001-07-23

    The methanolic extract from the roots of Polygonum (P.) cuspidatum was found to enhance cell proliferation at 30 or 100 microg/mL in MCF-7, an estrogen-sensitive cell line. By bioassay-guided separation from P. cuspidatum with the most potent activity, emodin and emodin 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside were isolated as active principles. The methanolic extracts from Polygonum, Cassia, Aloe, and Rheum species, which were known to contain anthraquinones, also showed the MCF-7 proliferation. As a result of the evaluation of various anthraquinones from plant sources and synthetic anthraquinones, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, chrysophanol 8-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone showed weak activity. On the other hand, alizalin and 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone as well as emodin having the 2- and/or 6-hydroxyl groups showed potent activity. These results show that the unchelated hydroxyl group is essential for strong activity. Emodin and 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone also inhibited 17beta-estradiol binding to human estrogen receptors (ERs) with K(i) values of 0.77 and 0.31microM for ERalpha and 1.5 and 0.69 microM for ERbeta. These findings indicate that hydroxyanthraquinones such as emodin are phytoestrogens with an affinity to human estrogen receptors.

  13. Suppression of dendritic cells' maturation and functions by daidzein, a phytoestrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Yum, Min Kyu; Jung, Mi Young; Cho, Daeho; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-12-15

    Isoflavones are ubiquitous compounds in foods and in the environment in general. Daidzein and genistein, the best known of isoflavones, are structurally similar to 17{beta}-estradiol and known to exert estrogenic effects. They also evidence a broad variety of biological properties, including antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic and anti-osteoporotic activities. Previously, daidzein was reported to increase the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages and splenocyte proliferation, and to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. However, its potential impacts on immune response in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immunity, have yet to be clearly elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of isoflavones on the maturation and activation of DCs. Isoflavones (formononetin, daidzein, equol, biochanin A, genistein) were found to differentially affect the expression of CD86, a costimulatory molecule, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. In particular, daidzein significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the expression levels of maturation-associated cell surface markers including CD40, costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86), and major histocompatibility complex class II (I-A{sup b}) molecule on LPS-stimulated DCs. Daidzein also suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production such as IL-12p40, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}, whereas it didn't affect IL-10 and IL-1{beta} expression. Furthermore, daidzein enhanced endocytosis and inhibited the allo-stimulatory ability of LPS-stimulated DCs on T cells, indicating that daidzein treatment can inhibit the functional maturation of DCs. These results demonstrate that daidzein may exhibit immunosuppressive activity by inhibiting the maturation and activation of DCs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein inhibited expression of maturation-associated cell surface markers in DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daidzein suppressed expression of

  14. Prevention of Gamma Radiation-Induced Mortality in Mice by the Isoflavone Genistein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    activity, grip strength, body weight, testes weight, or histopathology. The results demonstrate that a single subcutane- ous administration of the flavonoid ...occurring isoflavone found in soybeans, has gained increas- ing attention because of its association with beneficial effects for treatment of cardiovascular ...693-694. [Erlejman 2004] A.G. Erlejman, S.V. Verstraeten, C.G. Fraga, P.I. Oteiza, The interaction of flavonoids with membranes: potential

  15. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-07-08

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody.

  16. A novel UHPLC method for the rapid and simultaneous determination of daidzein, genistein and equol in human urine.

    PubMed

    Redruello, Begoña; Guadamuro, Lucía; Cuesta, Isabel; Álvarez-Buylla, Jorge R; Mayo, Baltasar; Delgado, Susana

    2015-11-15

    This work reports on a novel method involving reverse-phased ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) plus a spectrophotometric photodiode array/fluorescence (FLR) detection system for determining the concentration of equol and major soy isoflavones (daidzein and genistein) in human urine. The proposed method was validated in terms of its linearity, sensitivity, accuracy (recovery) and precision (intra- and inter-day repeatability). The isoflavone profiles of urine samples from a group of menopausal women following oral soy isoflavone supplementation were determined and compared. Screening for equol-producer status was accomplished with high sensitivity (detection limit of the FLR detector 2.93nM). The method involves a short chromatographic run time compared to conventional HPLC methods while allowing for the simultaneous and reliable quantification of daidzein, genistein and equol in human urine. It also allows for the rapid screening of multiple urine samples when testing for equol production status and checking patient adherence to isoflavone treatment regimens.

  17. Soy and other legumes: 'Bean' around a long time but are they the 'superfoods' of the millennium and what are the safety issues for their constituent phytoestrogens?

    PubMed

    Setchell, K D; Radd, S

    2000-09-01

    The recognition that legumes and, in particular, soybeans provide not only an excellent source of vegetable protein but also contain appreciable amounts of a number of phytoprotectants has increased general awareness of their potential nutritional and health properties. Since the discovery that soybeans are one of the richest dietary sources of bioavailable phytoestrogens, this legume has been elevated to the forefront of clinical nutritional research. These natural 'selective oestrogen receptor modulators' have been shown to be bioactive. The recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for a health claim for soy protein reducing risk for heart disease by its effects on lowering cholesterol levels has led to the increased awareness of the health benefits of soy protein. However, the presence of high levels of phytoestrogens in soybeans has also led to concerns over the potential safety of soy foods. This review will focus on the cardioprotective benefits of legumes and discuss the hypothetical concerns regarding the constituent phytoestrogens.

  18. Bioavailability of the glucuronide and sulfate conjugates of genistein and daidzein in breast cancer resistance protein 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Ana I; Vallejo, Fernando; Barrera, Borja; Merino, Gracia; Prieto, Julio G; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Espín, Juan C

    2011-11-01

    The dietary polyphenols genistein and daidzein are potent effectors of biological processes. The plasma profile of both isoflavones is governed by the presence of phase II conjugates, mainly glucuronides and sulfates. Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP) interacts with genistein and daidzein, which are among the natural substrates of the transporter and competitively inhibit ABCG2-mediated drug efflux. ABCG2/BCRP can also transport glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. In this study, we analyzed the plasma levels of aglycones and derived conjugated metabolites, glucuronides, and sulfates, after intragastric administration of these isoflavones to wild-type and Bcrp1(-/-) knockout mice. The results show that overall plasmatic profile is mainly governed by sulfate and glucuronide derivatives, the concentration of which was significantly increased (7- to 10-fold) in Bcrp1(-/-) mice. The total AUC h nM (0-180 min), as the sum of aglycones, glucuronides, and sulfates, was 901 ± 207 in wild-type mice versus 4988 ± 508 in Bcrp1(-/-) mice after genistein administration (50 mg/kg b.wt.); 584.3 ± 90 in wild-type mice versus 4012 ± 612 in Bcrp1(-/-) after daidzein administration (50 mg/kg); and 926 ± 140 in wild-type mice versus 5174 ± 696 in Bcrp1(-/-) after genistein+daidzein administration (25 + 25 mg/kg). Therefore, our results indicate a direct and conclusive Bcrp1 efflux action on phase II metabolites of these isoflavones in vivo and suggest a possible novel concept for ABCG2/BCRP as part of metabolism-driven efflux transport of these conjugates.

  19. Bacteroides uniformis is a putative bacterial species associated with the degradation of the isoflavone genistein in human feces.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2011-06-01

    Inter-individual variation in isoflavone absorption depends on gut microbial degradation and affects the efficacy of these compounds. We hypothesized that inter-individual variation in fecal isoflavone disappearance coincided with variation in bacterial species. In vitro anaerobic fecal disappearance of isoflavones was measured from 33 participants by HPLC. Fecal microbial 16S rRNA variable region PCR products were obtained from 4 participants with the greatest and least genistein or glycitein degradation and were subjected to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. DNA bands with a homology of 90-95% to Bacteroides uniformis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a genistein disappearance rate constant of 1.47 ± 0.14 h(-1) compared with those with a genistein disappearance rate constant of 0.15 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). Human fecal bacterial species with DNA sequences 90-100% homologous to Tannerella forsythensis and 4 other species were present in greater intensities in fecal samples showing a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.57 ± 0.30 h(-1) compared with fecal samples with a glycitein disappearance rate constant of 0.08 ± 0.03 h(-1) (P < 0.05). In high degraders, B. uniformis may be a candidate for genistein degradation and T. forsythensis for glycitein degradation, based on fecal isoflavone degradation in the presence of these species. Bacteroides acidifaciens increased isoflavone disappearance in anaerobic human fecal incubations under nutrient-rich and -depleted conditions, suggesting this species as one responsible for the generally high degradation of isoflavones by humans. These fecal microbes are candidate biomarkers for interindividual variation in isoflavone uptake and efficacy.

  20. Characteristics of the isomeric flavonoids apigenin and genistein binding to hemoglobin by spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiang-Lan; Liu, Hui; Kang, Xu; Lv, Zhong; Zou, Guo-Lin

    2008-11-01

    Apigenin (Ap) and genistein (Ge), a couple of isomeric flavonoids with extensive bioactivities, are the most common dietary ingredients. They have been widely investigated due to their potential therapeutic actions for some diseases. In our work, binding characteristics of Ap and Ge to hemoglobin (Hb) were analyzed with fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results indicated that Ap and Ge caused strong fluorescence quenching of Hb by static quenching mechanism, but their quenching efficiency and mechanisms were different. The binding site n suggested that there was a single binding site in Hb for Ap and Ge. The results of synchronous fluorescence showed that the microenvironment around Tyr residues of Hb had a slight trend of polarity decreasing, but the polarity around Trp residues increased by adding Ap. Results of CD indicated that the Ap and Ge did not changed the secondary structure of Hb. According to the theory of Förster resonance energy transfer, the binding distance r between Trp 37 and Ap/Ge was predicted to be 3.4 nm and 3.32 nm, respectively. The affinity of Ge toward Hb was higher than that of Ap.

  1. Homocysteine, heat shock proteins, genistein and vitamins in ischemic stroke--pathogenic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Sawuła, Wojciech; Kadziński, Leszek; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecki, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological conditions, with an approximate worldwide mortality of 5.5 million annually and loss of 44 million disability-adjusted life-years. The etiology of stroke is often unknown; it has been estimated that the etiology and pathophysiology remains unexplained in more than 40% of stroke cases. The conventional stroke risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and cardiac diseases, do not fully account for the risk of stroke, and stroke victims, especially young subjects, often do not have any of these factors. It is very likely that inflammation, specific genetic predispositions and traditional risk factors interact with each other and may together increase the risk of stroke. Inflammatory and immune responses play important roles in the course of ischemic stroke. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hcy) is considered a modifiable risk factor for stroke, possibly through an atherogenic and prothrombotic mechanism. Both genetic and environmental factors (e.g., dietary intake of folic acid and B vitamins) affect homocysteine level. Identification of the role of hcy as a modifiable risk factor for stroke and of HSPs as regulators of the immune response may lead to more effective prevention and treatment of stroke through dietary and pharmacological intervention. Dietary modification may also include supplementation with novel preventive compounds, such as the antioxidative isoflavones--genistein or daidzein.

  2. Antiosteoporotic Activity of Genistein Aglycone in Postmenopausal Women: Evidence from a Post-Hoc Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Atteritano, Marco; Squadrito, Francesco; D'Anna, Rosario; Marini, Herbert; Santoro, Domenico; Minutoli, Letteria; Messina, Sonia; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra

    2017-02-22

    Genistein has a preventive role against bone mass loss during menopause. However, experimental data in animal models of osteoporosis suggest an anti-osteoporotic potential for this isoflavone. We performed a post-hoc analysis of a previously published trial investigating the effects of genistein in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density. The parent study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving postmenopausal women with a femoral neck (FN) density <0.795 g/cm². A cohort of the enrolled women was, in fact, identified at the baseline as osteoporotic (n = 121) on the basis of their T-score and analyzed thereafter for the 24 months' treatment with either 1000 mg of calcium and 800 IU vitamin D3 (placebo; n = 59); or calcium, vitamin D3, and Genistein aglycone (54 mg/day; genistein; n = 62). According to the femoral neck T-scores, 31.3% of the genistein and 30.9% of the placebo recipients were osteoporotic at baseline. In the placebo and genistein groups, the 10-year hip fracture probability risk assessed by Fracture Risk Assessment tool (FRAX) was 4.1 ± 1.9 (SD) and 4.2 ± 2.1 (SD), respectively. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck increased from 0.62 g/cm² at baseline to 0.68 g/cm² at 1 year and 0.70 g/cm² at 2 years in genistein recipients, and decreased from 0.61 g/cm² at baseline to 0.60 g/cm² at 1 year and 0.57 g/cm² at 2 years in placebo recipients. At the end of the study only 18 postmenopausal women had osteoporosis in the genistein group with a prevalence of 12%, whereas in the placebo group the number of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis was unchanged, after 24 months. This post-hoc analysis is a proof-of concept study suggesting that genistein may be useful not only in postmenopausal osteopenia but also in osteoporosis. However, this proof-of concept study needs to be confirmed by a large, well designed, and appropriately focused randomized clinical trial in a population at high risk of

  3. Antiosteoporotic Activity of Genistein Aglycone in Postmenopausal Women: Evidence from a Post-Hoc Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Atteritano, Marco; Squadrito, Francesco; D’Anna, Rosario; Marini, Herbert; Santoro, Domenico; Minutoli, Letteria; Messina, Sonia; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Genistein has a preventive role against bone mass loss during menopause. However, experimental data in animal models of osteoporosis suggest an anti-osteoporotic potential for this isoflavone. We performed a post-hoc analysis of a previously published trial investigating the effects of genistein in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density. The parent study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving postmenopausal women with a femoral neck (FN) density <0.795 g/cm2. A cohort of the enrolled women was, in fact, identified at the baseline as osteoporotic (n = 121) on the basis of their T-score and analyzed thereafter for the 24 months’ treatment with either 1000 mg of calcium and 800 IU vitamin D3 (placebo; n = 59); or calcium, vitamin D3, and Genistein aglycone (54 mg/day; genistein; n = 62). According to the femoral neck T-scores, 31.3% of the genistein and 30.9% of the placebo recipients were osteoporotic at baseline. In the placebo and genistein groups, the 10-year hip fracture probability risk assessed by Fracture Risk Assessment tool (FRAX) was 4.1 ± 1.9 (SD) and 4.2 ± 2.1 (SD), respectively. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck increased from 0.62 g/cm2 at baseline to 0.68 g/cm2 at 1 year and 0.70 g/cm2 at 2 years in genistein recipients, and decreased from 0.61 g/cm2 at baseline to 0.60 g/cm2 at 1 year and 0.57 g/cm2 at 2 years in placebo recipients. At the end of the study only 18 postmenopausal women had osteoporosis in the genistein group with a prevalence of 12%, whereas in the placebo group the number of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis was unchanged, after 24 months. This post-hoc analysis is a proof-of concept study suggesting that genistein may be useful not only in postmenopausal osteopenia but also in osteoporosis. However, this proof-of concept study needs to be confirmed by a large, well designed, and appropriately focused randomized clinical trial in a population at high risk of fractures

  4. Genistein interferes with SDF-1- and HIV-mediated actin dynamics and inhibits HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Binding of HIV to the chemokine coreceptor CXCR4 mediates viral fusion and signal transduction that promotes actin dynamics critical for HIV infection of blood resting CD4 T cells. It has been suggested that this gp120-mediated actin activity resembles the chemotactic actin dynamics mediated by chemokines such as SDF-1. To determine whether inhibiting SDF-1-mediated chemotactic activity can also inhibit HIV infection, we screened several inhibitors known to reduce SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis of T cells. Results We found that a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, inhibited both SDF-1-mediated chemotaxis and HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells. Genistein was also found to interfere with SDF-1- and HIV-mediated actin dynamics in CD4 T cells. This reduction in actin activity correlates with genistein-mediated inhibition of viral DNA accumulation in resting CD4 T cells. In addition, we also tested two other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib and AG1478. Sunitinib, but not AG1478, inhibited HIV infection of resting CD4 T cells. We further tested the safety of genistein in 3 Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and each animal was given a monotherapy of genistein at 10 mg/kg orally for 12 weeks. No adverse drug effects were observed in these animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that novel therapeutic strategies can be developed based on targeting cellular proteins involved in HIV-dependent signaling. This approach can interfere with HIV-mediated actin dynamics and inhibit HIV infection. PMID:23782904

  5. The anti-metastatic effects of the phytoestrogen arctigenin on human breast cancer cell lines regardless of the status of ER expression.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Thressi; Chun, So-Young; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Kim, Soyoung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2017-02-01

    Arctigenin is a plant lignan extracted from Arctium lappa that has been shown to have estrogenic properties. In spite of the health benefits of phytoestrogens reducing the risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, and menopausal symptoms, its benefits against the risk of breast cancer have not been fully elucidated. Thus, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on metastasis of breast cancer using both estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines to see if the effects are dependent on the status of ER expression. In ER-positive MCF-7 cells, arctigenin efficiently inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell migration and invasion. The activity of crucial metastatic protease matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 in gelatin zymography was also efficiently decreased by arctigenin, as well as its mRNA expression. Notably, arctigenin exhibited similar anti-metastatic effects even in ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells, suggesting that the anti-metastatic effects of arctigenin were not exerted via the ER. The upstream signaling pathways involved in the regulation of MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) were analyzed using western blotting. The activation of Akt, NF-κB and MAPK (ERK 1/2 and JNK 1/2) was found to be inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that arctigenin confers anti-metastatic effects by inhibiting MMP-9 and uPA via the Akt, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways on breast cancer, regardless of ER expression. Therefore, we propose that the intake of arctigenin could be an effective supplement for breast cancer patients.

  6. Influence of partial replacement of soya bean meal by faba beans or peas in heavy pigs diet on meat quality, residual anti-nutritional factors and phytoestrogen content.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Domenico; Russo, Claudia; Giuliotti, Lorella; Mannari, Claudio; Picciarelli, Piero; Lombardi, Lara; Giovannini, Luca; Ceccarelli, Nello; Mariotti, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    The study evaluated the partial substitution of soybean meal by faba beans (18%) or peas (20%) as additional protein sources in diets destined for typical Italian heavy pig production. It compared animal performances, meat quality, the presence of residual anti-nutritional factors (ANF) and phytoestrogens in plasma and meat and the possible effects on pig health, by evaluating oxidative, inflammatory and pro-atherogenic markers. The results showed that the productive performances, expressed as body weight and feed conversion ratio, of pigs fed with faba bean and pea diets were similar to those of pigs fed only the soybean meal. Meat quality of pigs fed with the three diets was similar in colour, water-holding capacity, tenderness and chemical composition. Despite the higher levels of phytoestrogen in the plasma of pigs fed only the soybean meal, phytoestrogen concentration in the muscle was equivalent to that of animals fed diets with faba beans, whereas pigs fed a diet with peas showed a lower concentration. Inflammation and pro-atherogenic parameters did not show significant differences among the three diets. Overall, the partial substitution of soybean meal by faba beans appears more interesting than with peas, particularly in relation to the higher amount of polyphenols in the diet and the highest concentration of phytoestrogens found in the plasma and muscle of animals, while the pyrimidine anti-nutritional compounds present in the diet did not appear to accumulate and had no effect on the growth performance of animals.

  7. Combinatorial effect of genistein and female sex-steroids on uterine fluid volume and secretion rate and aquaporin (AQP)-1, 2, 5, and 7 expression in the uterus in rats.

    PubMed

    Chinigarzadeh, Asma; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2017-03-01

    We hypothesized that genistein can interfere with the regulation of uterine fluid volume, secretion rate and expression of aquaporin in the uterus by female sex-steroids, i.e., estrogen and progesterone. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate changes in these parameters in the presence of genistein and female sex-steroids.

  8. Phenolic compounds from Pueraria lobata protect PC12 cells against Aβ-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-hyeok; Hong, Seong Su; Shin, Yu Su; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Park, So-Young; Lee, Dongho

    2010-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the EtOAc-soluble extract of Pueraria lobata based on the inhibition of Aβ-induced toxicity in PC12 cells resulted in the isolation of four known active compounds, genistein (8), biochanin A (9), sissotrin (10), and puerol B (11). Of these, genistein (8) and biochanin A (9) exhibited potent neuroprotective effects with ED(50) values of 33.7 and 27.8 μM, respectively. In addition, a new coumestan, 2-(α,α-dimethylallyl)coumestrol (1) was isolated and characterized, but proved to be inactive, as were additional seven known compounds. The structure of new compound 1 was determined using spectroscopic techniques.

  9. Evaluation of the Isoflavone Genistein as Reversible Human Monoamine Oxidase-A and -B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zarmouh, Najla O.; Messeha, Samia S.; Elshami, Faisel M.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective therapeutic drugs for managing Parkinson's disease (PD) and depression. However, their irreversibility may lead to rare but serious side effects. As finding safer and reversible MAOIs is our target, we characterized the recombinant human (h) MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition potentials of two common natural isoflavones, genistein (GST) and daidzein (DZ) using luminescence assay. The results obtained showed that DZ exhibits partial to no inhibition of the isozymes examined while GST inhibited hMAO-B (IC50 of 6.81 μM), and its hMAO-A inhibition was more potent than the standard deprenyl. Furthermore, the reversibility, mode of inhibition kinetics, and tyramine oxidation of GST were examined. GST was a time-independent reversible and competitive hMAO-A and hMAO-B inhibitor with a lower Ki of hMAO-B (1.45 μM) than hMAO-A (4.31 μM). GST also inhibited hMAO-B tyramine oxidation and hydrogen peroxide production more than hMAO-A. Docking studies conducted indicated that the GST reversibility and hMAO-B selectivity of inhibition may relate to C5-OH effects on its orientation and its interactions with the threonine 201 residue of the active site. It was concluded from this study that the natural product GST has competitive and reversible MAOs inhibitions and may be recommended for further investigations as a useful therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27118978

  10. Neonatal exposure to daidzein, genistein, or the combination modulates bone development in female CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Ward, Wendy E

    2009-03-01

    Neonatal exposure to genistein (GEN), an isoflavone abundant in soy, favorably modulates bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength in mice at adulthood. The study objective was to determine whether early exposure to a combination of the soy isoflavones daidzein (DAI) and GEN that naturally exists in soy protein-based infant formula results in greater benefits to bone at adulthood than either treatment alone. Male and female CD-1 mice (n = 8-16 pups per group per gender) were randomized to subcutaneous injections of DAI (2 mg x kg body weight(-1) x d(-1)), GEN (5 mg x kg body weight(-1) x d(-1)), DAI+GEN (7 mg x kg body weight(-1) x d(-1)), diethylstilbesterol (DES; positive control) (2 mg x kg body weight(-1) x d(-1)), or control (CON) from postnatal d 1-5 and were studied to 4 mo of age. BMD, biomechanical bone strength, and bone microarchitecture were assessed at the femur and lumbar vertebrae (LV). Females treated with DAI, GEN, DAI+GEN, or DES had greater (P < 0.05) BMD at the LV compared with CON and vertebra in the DAI and DES group were more resistant to compression fractures. Microstructural analyses demonstrated that treatment with DAI and GEN resulted in greater (P < 0.05) trabecular connectivity and trabecular thickness, respectively, than the CON. In conclusion, neonatal exposure to DAI and/or GEN had a positive effect on the skeleton of female mice at adulthood, but, compared with individual treatments, DAI+GEN did not have a greater benefit to bone in females or males.

  11. Repression of mammary adipogenesis by genistein limits mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa E; Rahal, Omar M; Nakatani, Hajime; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-07-01

    Mammary adipose tissue may contribute to breast cancer development and progression by altering neighboring epithelial cell behavior and phenotype through paracrine signaling. Dietary exposure to soy foods is associated with lower mammary tumor risk and reduced body weight and adiposity in humans and in rodent breast cancer models. Despite the suggested linkage between obesity and breast cancer, the local influence of bioactive dietary components on mammary adiposity for antitumor effects remains unknown. Herein, we report that post-weaning dietary exposure to soy protein isolate and its bioactive isoflavone genistein (GEN) lowered mammary adiposity and increased mammary tumor suppressor PTEN and E-cadherin expression in female mice, relative to control casein diet. To ascertain GEN's role in mammary adipose deposition that may affect underlying epithelial cell phenotype, we evaluated GEN's effects on SV40-immortalized mouse mammary stromal fibroblast-like (MSF) cells during differentiation into adipocytes. MSF cells cultured in a differentiation medium with 40 nM GEN showed reductions in mature adipocyte numbers, triglyceride accumulation, and Pparγ (Pparg) and fatty acid synthase transcript levels. GEN inhibition of adipose differentiation was accompanied by increased estrogen receptor β (Erβ (Esr2)) gene expression and was modestly recapitulated by ERβ-selective agonist 2,3-bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN). Reduction of Erβ expression by siRNA targeting increased Pparγ transcript levels and stromal fibroblast differentiation into mature adipocytes; the latter was reversed by GEN but not by DPN. Conditioned medium from GEN-treated adipocytes diminished anchorage-independent mammosphere formation of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Our results suggest a mechanistic pathway to support direct regulation of mammary adiposity by GEN for breast cancer prevention.

  12. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-01-01

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody. PMID:26184156

  13. Investigation of transport of genistein, daidzein and their inclusion complexes prepared with different cyclodextrins on Caco-2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Daruházi, Agnes Emma; Kiss, Tímea; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Szente, Lajos; Szőke, Eva; Lemberkovics, Eva

    2013-10-01

    Isoflavonoids are widespread constituents in medical plants especially in legumes (Fabaceae), but occur in other different plant families as well (Rosaceae, Iridaceae, Amaranthaceae). Their antioxidant, estrogen-like, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects make them promising compounds in therapy of important disorders especially in estrogen related diseases. Poor solubility in aqueous system of genistein and daidzein needs a solubility enhancement for pharmaceutical use. These compounds are suitable guest molecules for inclusion complex formation with cyclodextrins (CDs) considering matching their size and polarity. The molecular encapsulation with beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD), gamma-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and random methyl-beta cyclodextrin (RAMEB-CD) results in a solid, molecularly dispersed form and in a significantly improved aqueous solubility of genistein and daidzein. Determining enhancement in solubility and bioavailability we investigated the transport of these inclusion complexes across Caco-2 cell line comparing that of the pure compounds and found significant improving effect of the different CD derivatives on membrane permeation of the two isoflavone aglycons.

  14. Surface molecularly imprinted silica for selective solid-phase extraction of biochanin A, daidzein and genistein from urine samples.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowska, Anna M; Poliwoda, Anna; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2015-05-01

    Selective molecularly imprinted silica polymer (SiO2MIP) for extraction of biochanin A, daidzein and genistein was synthesized using the surface molecular imprinting technique with the silica gel as a support. Biochanin A (BCA) was used as a template, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as a functional monomer, and tetraethoxysilicane (TEOS) as a cross-linker. Non-imprinted polymer with the sol-gel process (SiO2NIP) was also prepared for comparison. The synthesized polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a standard Brunauer-Emett-Teller (BET) and Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis. The obtained results indicated the structural differences between imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. Finally, the SiO2MIP and SiO2NIP were adopted as the adsorbents of solid phase extraction for isolation and preconcentration of biochanin A and its structural analogues-daidzein and genistein from aqueous and urine samples. The performance analysis revealed that SiO2MIP displayed better affinity to the three investigated isoflavones compared with SiO2NIP. The recoveries of spiked samples for studied analytes ranged from 65.7% to 102.6% for molecularly imprinted silica polymer and 8.9-16.0% for non-imprinted sorbents.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids: genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein inhibit STAT-1 and NF-kappaB activations, whereas flavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, and pelargonidin inhibit only NF-kappaB activation along with their inhibitory effect on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Mari; Nieminen, Riina; Vuorela, Pia; Heinonen, Marina; Moilanen, Eeva

    2007-01-01

    In inflammation, bacterial products and proinflammatory cytokines induce the formation of large amounts of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and compounds that inhibit NO production have anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we systematically investigated the effects of 36 naturally occurring flavonoids and related compounds on NO production in macrophages exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), and evaluated the mechanisms of action of the effective compounds. Flavone, the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, the flavonols isorhamnetin, kaempferol and quercetin, the flavanone naringenin, and the anthocyanin pelargonidin inhibited iNOS protein and mRNA expression and also NO production in a dose-dependent manner. All eight active compounds inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which is a significant transcription factor for iNOS. Genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein also inhibited the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1), another important transcription factor for iNOS. The present study characterises the effects and mechanisms of naturally occurring phenolic compounds on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages. The results partially explain the pharmacological efficacy of flavonoids as anti-inflammatory compounds.

  16. The soybean peptide lunasin promotes apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells via induction of tumor suppressor PTEN: similarities and distinct actions from soy isoflavone genistein.

    PubMed

    Pabona, John Mark P; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Su, Ying; Montales, Maria Theresa E; de Lumen, Ben O; de Mejia, Elvira G; Rahal, Omar M; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Diet and lifestyle are major contributing factors to increased breast cancer risk. While mechanisms underlying dietary protection of mammary tumor formation are increasingly elucidated, there remains a dearth of knowledge on the nature and precise actions of specific bioactive components present in foods with purported health effects. The 43-amino acid peptide lunasin (LUN) is found in soybeans, is bioavailable similar to the isoflavone genistein (GEN), and thus may mediate the beneficial effects of soy food consumption. Here, we evaluated whether LUN displays common and distinct actions from those of GEN in non-malignant (mouse HC11) and malignant (human MCF-7) mammary epithelial cells. In MCF-7 cells, LUN up-regulated tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted in chromosome ten (PTEN) promoter activity, increased PTEN transcript and protein levels and enhanced nuclear PTEN localization, similar to that shown for GEN in mammary epithelial cells. LUN-induced cellular apoptosis, akin to GEN, was mediated by PTEN, but unlike that for GEN, was p53-independent. LUN promoted E-cadherin and β-catenin non-nuclear localization similar to GEN, but unlike GEN, did not influence the proliferative effects of oncogene Wnt1 on HC11 cells. Further, LUN did not recapitulate GEN inhibitory effects on expansion of the cancer stem-like/progenitor population in MCF-7 cells. Results suggest the concerted actions of GEN and LUN on cellular apoptosis for potential mammary tumor preventive effects and highlight whole food consumption rather than intake of specific dietary supplements with limited biological effects for greater health benefits.

  17. Short-term effects of genistein on gamete quality, steroidogenesis and histological changes in gonads in gibel carp, Carassius auratus gibelio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine effects of genistein or 17ß-estradiol (E2) on reproductive physiology in gibel carp, Carassius auratus gibelio, during prespawning phase. Maturing gibel carp of both sexes received intraperitoneal injections of E2 (10 µg/g body weight), one...

  18. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  19. NORMAL MAMMARY GLAND MORPHOLOGY IN PUBERTAL FEMALE MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO GENISTEIN AT LEVELS COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of in utero and lactational exposure to genistein (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) on mammary gland morphology in female B6D2F1 mice at levels comparable to or greater than human exposures. The effect of diethylstilbest...

  20. Design, characterization, and in vitro cellular inhibition and uptake of optimized genistein-loaded NLC for the prevention of posterior capsular opacification using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenji; Li, Xuedong; Ye, Tiantian; Chen, Fen; Sun, Xiao; Kong, Jun; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan; Li, Sanming

    2013-09-15

    This study was to design an innovative nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) for drug delivery of genistein applied after cataract surgery for the prevention of posterior capsular opacification. NLC loaded with genistein (GEN-NLC) was produced with Compritol 888 ATO, Gelucire 44/14 and Miglyol 812N, stabilized by Solutol(®) HS15 by melt emulsification method. A 2(4) central composite design of 4 independent variables was performed for optimization. Effects of drug concentration, Gelucire 44/14 concentration in total solid lipid, liquid lipid concentration, and surfactant concentration on the mean particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency were investigated. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test was used to assess the optimization. The optimized GEN-NLC showed a homogeneous particle size of 90.16 nm (with PI=0.33) of negatively charged surface (-25.08 mv) and high encapsulation efficiency (91.14%). Particle morphology assessed by TEM revealed a spherical shape. DSC analyses confirmed that GEN was mostly entrapped in amorphous state. In vitro release experiments indicated a prolonged and controlled genistein release for 72 h. In vitro growth inhibition assay showed an effective growth inhibition of GEN-NLCs on human lens epithelial cells (HLECs). Preliminary cellular uptake test proved a enhanced penetration of genistein into HLECs when delivered in NLC.

  1. Genistein-loaded nanoparticles of star-shaped diblock copolymer mannitol-core PLGA-TPGS for the treatment of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binquan; Liang, Yong; Tan, Yi; Xie, Chunmei; Shen, Jin; Zhang, Mei; Liu, Xinkuang; Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Fujian; Liu, Liang; Cai, Shuyu; Huai, De; Zheng, Donghui; Zhang, Rongbo; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Ke; Tang, Xiaolong; Sui, Xuemei

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop nanoparticles (NPs) of star-shaped copolymer mannitol-functionalized PLGA-TPGS for Genistein delivery for liver cancer treatment, and evaluate their therapeutic effects in liver cancer cell line and hepatoma-tumor-bearing nude mice in comparison with the linear PLGA nanoparticles and PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles. The Genistein-loaded M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles (MPTN), prepared by a modified nanoprecipitation method, were observed by FESEM and TEM to be near-spherical shape with narrow size distribution. The nanoparticles were further characterized in terms of their size, size distribution, surface charge, drug-loading content, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release profiles. The data showed that the M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles were found to be stable, showing almost no change in particle size and surface charge during 3-month storage of their aqueous solution. In vitro Genistein release from the nanoparticles exhibited biphasic pattern with burst release at the initial 4days and sustained release afterwards. The cellular uptake efficiency of fluorescent M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles was 1.25-, 1.22-, and 1.29-fold higher than that of the PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles at the nanoparticle concentrations of 100, 250, and 500μg/mL, respectively. In the MPTN group, the ratio of apoptotic cells increased with the drug dose increased, which exhibited dose-dependent effect and a significant difference compared with Genistein solution group (p<0.05). The data also showed that the Genistein-loaded M-PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles have higher antitumor efficacy than that of linear PLGA-TPGS nanoparticles and PLGA nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the star-shaped copolymer M-PLGA-TPGS could be used as a potential and promising bioactive material for nanomedicine development for liver cancer treatment.

  2. Anti-cancer Effect and Underlying Mechanism(s) of Kaempferol, a Phytoestrogen, on the Regulation of Apoptosis in Diverse Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens exist in edible compounds commonly found in fruits or plants. For long times, phytoestrogens have been used for therapeutic treatments against human diseases, and they can be promising ingredients for future pharmacological industries. Kaempferol is a yellow compound found in grapes, broccoli and yellow fruits, which is one of flavonoid as phytoestrogens. Kaempferol has been suggested to have an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. In past decades, many studies have been performed to examine anti-toxicological role(s) of kaempferol against human cancers. It has been shown that kaempferol may be involved in the regulations of cell cycle, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. Among them, there have been a few of the studies to examine a relationship between kaempferol and apoptosis. Thus, in this review, we highlight the effect(s) of kaempferol on the regulation of apoptosis in diverse cancer cell models. This could be a forecast in regard to use of kaempferol as promising treatment against human diseases. PMID:24578792

  3. Anti-cancer Effect and Underlying Mechanism(s) of Kaempferol, a Phytoestrogen, on the Regulation of Apoptosis in Diverse Cancer Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hee; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-12-31

    Phytoestrogens exist in edible compounds commonly found in fruits or plants. For long times, phytoestrogens have been used for therapeutic treatments against human diseases, and they can be promising ingredients for future pharmacological industries. Kaempferol is a yellow compound found in grapes, broccoli and yellow fruits, which is one of flavonoid as phytoestrogens. Kaempferol has been suggested to have an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. In past decades, many studies have been performed to examine anti-toxicological role(s) of kaempferol against human cancers. It has been shown that kaempferol may be involved in the regulations of cell cycle, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis in various cancer cell types. Among them, there have been a few of the studies to examine a relationship between kaempferol and apoptosis. Thus, in this review, we highlight the effect(s) of kaempferol on the regulation of apoptosis in diverse cancer cell models. This could be a forecast in regard to use of kaempferol as promising treatment against human diseases.

  4. Combinatorial effects of genistein and sex-steroids on the level of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP in the cervix of ovariectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Naguib; Ismail, Nurain; Muniandy, Sekaran; Korla, Praveen Kumar; Giribabu, Nelli

    2015-12-01

    The combinatorial effects of genistein and estrogen (E) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) on CFTR, AC and cAMP levels in cervix were investigated. Ovariectomised adult female rats received 50 or 100mg/kg/day genistein with E or E followed by E+P [E+(E+P)] for seven consecutive days. Cervixes were harvested and analyzed for CFTR mRNA levels by Real-time PCR. Distribution of AC and CFTR proteins in endocervix were observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP were measured by enzyme-immunoassay. Molecular docking predicted interaction between genistein and AC. Our results indicate that levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of rats receiving genistein plus E were higher than E-only treatment (p<0.05) while genistein plus [E+(E+P)] were higher than E+(E+P)-only treatment (p<0.05). In conclusions, increased levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of E and E+(E+P)-treated rats by genistein could affect the cervical secretory function which could influence the female reproductive processes.

  5. Identification of the Potent Phytoestrogen Glycinol in Elicited Soybean (Glycine max)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary induced isoflavones in soybean, the glyceollins, have been shown to be potent estrogen antagonists in vitro and in vivo. The discovery of the glyceollins’ ability to inhibit cancer cell proliferation has led to the analysis of estrogenic activities of other induced isoflavones. In this s...

  6. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a haemorrhagic fever with high mortality in human. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process.

  7. Cell entry of Lassa virus induces tyrosine phosphorylation of dystroglycan

    PubMed Central

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Pythoud, Christelle; Turk, Rolf; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Pasquato, Antonella; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor dystroglycan (DG) serves as a cellular receptor for the highly pathogenic arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) that causes a hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in man. In the host cell, DG provides a molecular link between the ECM and the actin cytoskeleton via the adapter proteins utrophin or dystrophin. Here we investigated post-translational modifications of DG in the context of LASV cell entry. Using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, we found that tyrosine kinases are required for efficient internalization of virus particles, but not virus-receptor binding. Engagement of cellular DG by LASV envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP) in human epithelial cells induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of DG. LASV GP binding to DG further resulted in dissociation of the adapter protein utrophin from virus-bound DG. This virus-induced dissociation of utrophin was affected by genistein treatment, suggesting a role of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in the process. PMID:23279385

  8. Determination of the hop-derived phytoestrogen, 8-prenylnaringenin, in beer by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tekel', J; De Keukeleire, D; Rong, H; Daeseleire, E; Van Peteghem, C

    1999-12-01

    A method was developed to determine 8-prenylnaringenin, a novel hop-derived phytoestrogen, in beer. Matrix purification involved solid-phase extraction on octadecyl silica followed by liquid/liquid extraction on a ChemElut 1010 column connected to a Florisil adsorption/desorption cartridge. 8-Prenylnaringenin was eluted from the tandem columns using a 1:1 mixture of diethyl ether and ethyl acetate and subsequently determined as tris(trimethylsilyl) ether by GC/MS-SIM. The recovery of 8-prenylnaringenin in beer samples was between 61.1 +/- 6.6 and 82.2 +/- 8.8% for levels of 37 and 92.5 microg L(-1), respectively, and the detection limit was approximately 5 microg L(-1). Although most beers do not contain 8-prenylnaringenin in detectable quantities, the highest concentration found was 19.8 microg L(-1). The concentration of 8-prenylnaringenin in beers and, possibly, its absence depend on the selection of particular hop varieties, the hopping rate, or the type of hop product used in brewing. The efficiency of transfer of 8-prenylnaringenin from hops to beer is between 10 and 20%.

  9. Determination of the estrogenic activity of wild phytoestrogen-rich Pueraria mirifica by MCF-7 proliferation assay.

    PubMed

    Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Traisup, Virasinee; Picha, Porntipa

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the estrogenic activity of tuberous samples of wild, phytoestrogen-rich Pueraria mirifica collected from 28 out of 76 provinces of Thailand by MCF-7 proliferation assay. The plant extracts were administered to MCF-7, ER alpha positive human mammary adenocarcinoma cell cultures, for 3 days at dosages of 0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 microg/ml and were compared with 17 beta-estradiol at concentrations of 10(-12)-10(-6) M. The mean P. mirifica population at 1 mug/ml exhibited significant proliferation. Two plant samples exhibited levels of proliferation in MCF-7 that were similar to 17beta-estradiol. The mean P. mirifica populations at 100 and 1,000 microg/ml exhibited significant cytotoxicity in MCF-7. Analysis of the estrogenic activity of puerarin, representative of major isoflavonoids in P. mirifica tubers, revealed proliferation in MCF-7 only at the highest dose (10(-6) M) that was 10(2)-10(5) times less active than 17 beta-estradiol. Puerarin and 17 beta-estradiol at concentration of 10(-12)-10(-6) M exhibited no cytotoxicity in MCF-7.

  10. Requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation in lipopolysaccharide-induced murine B-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden-Badet, M T; Revillard, J P

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a strong B-cell proliferative response with subsequent differentiation, through a complex signal transduction pathway. This process is known to be mediated through protein kinase C (PKC) translocation without Ca2+ mobilization. Here, we show that B-cell proliferative responses induced by five different LPS preparations, as well as by F(ab')2 anti-IgM antibodies, are inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genistein and herbimycin A. In contrast, B-cell proliferation induced by the combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin was not influenced by treatment with either herbimycin A or genistein. These data indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation is required to initiate B-cell proliferation by LPS. PMID:8307617

  11. Genistein supplementation increases bone turnover but does not prevent alcohol-induced bone loss in male mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in bone loss through increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These effects can be reversed by estradiol (E2) supplementation. Soy diets are suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy prote...

  12. Genistein: A Novel Anthocyanin Synthesis Promoter that Directly Regulates Biosynthetic Genes in Red Cabbage in a Light-Dependent Way

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Hongfei; Shi, Yantong; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GNT), an isoflavone, is used in the clinical treatment of various health disorders. GNT is found in primary food source plants and some medical plants. However, studies on the functions of GNT in plants are rarely reported. In this study, we demonstrated that GNT plays an important role in promoting anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage. GNT solutions (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/L) as foliar fertilizers were applied to red cabbage. Consequently, anthocyanin accumulation in red cabbage increased in a light-dependent manner. GNT solution at 30 mg/L exhibited the optimal effect on anthocyanin accumulation, which was twice that of the control. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that GNT application upregulated the expression of all structural genes, contributing to anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions. Under dark conditions, GNT exerted no significant promotive effect on anthocyanin accumulation; only early biosynthetic genes of anthocyanin biosynthesis responded to GNT. The promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin biosynthesis is directly attributable to the regulation of structural gene expression. Transcription factors exhibited no response to GNT. The levels of anthocyanin in red cabbage positively correlated with the enzyme activities of antioxidant systems. This finding correlation suggested that the promotive effect of GNT on anthocyanin levels was correlated with improved antioxidant activity in the red cabbage. PMID:27990149

  13. Enhanced cellular uptake and anti-proliferating effect of chitosan hydrochlorides modified genistein loaded NLC on human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenji; Liu, Jinlu; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xuedong; Yu, Shihui; Yang, Xinggang; Kong, Jun; Pan, Weisan

    2014-08-25

    This study was attempted to increase the cellular uptake of developed genistein loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) into human lens epithelial (HLE) cells by chitosan hydrochlorides coatings when applied in post lens capsule (PCO) treatment, and to provide further understanding of the uptake and anti-proliferation mechanisms inside. NLCs were produced using melt-emulsification method and were subsequently coated with chitosan hydrochlorides by adsorption. The uptake of various particle sizes were evaluated and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), showing a size-dependent manner. The uptake of NLC was proved to be endocytosed in an energy dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis to HLE cells by the decrease in uptake at lower temperature, when pre-saturated by blank NLC and in the presence of NaN3 and sucrose. CH coating improved the uptake percentage of NLC irrespective of the particle size, without influencing the uptake mechanism. Cell apoptosis was tested using PI and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, followed by flow cytometer analysis. Higher anti-proliferation effect was observed for CH-NLC in inhibiting the growth of HLE cells by causing more apoptosis. Results above indicate that GEN-NLC surface modified by chitosan hydrochlorides could enhance the trans-cellular performance and anti-proliferating effect as PCO therapy.

  14. Phase IIa, randomized placebo-controlled trial of single high dose cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and daily Genistein (G-2535) versus double placebo in men with early stage prostate cancer undergoing prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jarrard, David; Konety, Badrinath; Huang, Wei; Downs, Tracy; Kolesar, Jill; Kim, Kyung Mann; Havighurst, Tom; Slaton, Joel; House, Margaret G; Parnes, Howard L; Bailey, Howard H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objectives: Prostate cancer (PCa) represents an important target for chemoprevention given its prolonged natural history and high prevalence. Epidemiologic and laboratory data suggest that vitamin D and genistein (soy isoflavone) may decrease PCa progression. The effect of vitamin D on prostate epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation is well documented and genistein may augment this affect through inhibition of the CYP24 enzyme, which is responsible for intracellular vitamin D metabolism. In addition, both genistein and vitamin D inhibit the intraprostatic synthesis of prostaglandin E2, an important mediator of inflammation. The objectives of this prospective multicenter trial were to compare prostate tissue calcitriol levels and down-stream related biomarkers in men with localized prostate cancer randomized to receive cholecalciferol and genistein versus placebo cholecalciferol and placebo genistein during the pre-prostatectomy period. Methods: Men undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: (1) cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) 200,000 IU as one dose at study entry plus genistein (G-2535), 600 mg daily or (2) placebo cholecalciferol day 1 and placebo genistein PO daily for 21-28 days prior to radical prostatectomy. Serum and tissue analyses were performed and side-effects recorded. Results: A total of 15 patients were enrolled, 8 in the placebo arm and 7 in the vitamin D3 + genistein (VD + G) arm. All patients were compliant and completed the study. No significant differences in side effect profiles were noted. Utilization of the VD + G trended toward increased calcitriol serum concentrations when compared to placebo (0.104 ± 0.2 vs. 0.0013 ± 0.08; p=0.08); however, prostate tissue levels did not increase. Calcidiol levels did not change (p=0.5). Immunohistochemistry for marker analyses using VECTRA automated quantitation revealed a increase in AR expression (p=0.04) and a trend toward increased

  15. Activation of transgenic estrogen receptor-beta by selected phytoestrogens in a stably transduced rat serotonergic cell line.

    PubMed

    Amer, Dena A M; Kretzschmar, Georg; Müller, Nicole; Stanke, Nicole; Lindemann, Dirk; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-06-01

    Many flavonoids, a major group of phenolic plant-derived secondary metabolites, are known to possess estrogen-like bioactivities. However, little is known about their estrogenic properties in the central nervous system due to the lack of suitable cellular models expressing sufficient amounts of functional estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). To overcome this deficit, we have created a cellular model, which is serotonergic in origin, to study properties of estrogenic substances by stably transducing RN46A-B14 cells derived from raphe nuclei region of the rat brain with a lentiviral vector encoding a human ERbeta. We clearly showed that the transgenic human ERbeta is a spontaneously expressed and a functional receptor. We have further assessed the estrogenicity of three different isoflavones and four different naringenin-type flavanones in this cell line utilizing a luciferase reporter gene assay. Genistein (GEN), Daidzein (DAI), Equol (EQ), Naringenin (NAR) and 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) showed strong estrogenic activity in a concentration-dependent manner as compared to 7-(O-prenyl)naringenin-4'-acetate (7-O-PN) which was only slightly estrogenic and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6-DMAN) that neither showed estrogenic nor anti-estrogenic activity in our model. All observed effects could be antagonized by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant. Moreover, co-treatment of cells with 17beta-estradiol (E2) and either GEN or DAI showed a slight additive effect as compared to EQ. On the other hand, 8-PN in addition to 7-O-PN, but not NAR and 6-DMAN, were able to slightly antagonize the responses triggered by E2. Our newly established cellular model may prove to be a useful tool in explicating basic physiological properties of ERbeta in the brain and may help unravel molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in serotonergic mood regulation by estrogen or potential plant-derived secondary metabolites.

  16. Design and baseline characteristics of the soy phytoestrogens as replacement estrogen (SPARE) study--a clinical trial of the effects of soy isoflavones in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Levis, Silvina; Strickman-Stein, Nancy; Doerge, Daniel R; Krischer, Jeffrey

    2010-07-01

    Following the results of the Women's Health Initiative, many women now decline estrogen replacement at the time of menopause and seek natural remedies that would treat menopausal symptoms and prevent bone loss and other long-term consequences of estrogen deficiency, but without adverse effects on the breast, uterus, and cardiovascular system. The results of most soy studies in this population have had limitations because of poor design, small sample size, or short duration. This report describes the study rationale, design, and procedures of the Soy Phytoestrogens As Replacement Estrogen (SPARE) study, which was designed to determine the efficacy of soy isoflavones in preventing spinal bone loss and menopausal symptoms in the initial years of menopause. Women ages 45 to 60 without osteoporosis and within 5 years from menopause were randomized to receive soy isoflavones 200mg daily or placebo for 2 years. Participants have yearly measurements of spine and hip bone density, urinary phytoestrogens, and serum lipids, thyroid stimulating hormone, and estradiol. Menopausal symptoms, mood changes, depression, and quality of life are assessed annually. The SPARE study recruited 283 women, 66.1% were Hispanic white. With a large cohort, long duration, and large isoflavone dose, this trial will provide important, relevant, and currently unavailable information on the benefits of purified soy isoflavones in the prevention of bone loss and menopausal symptoms in the first 5 years of menopause. Given the high proportion of Hispanics participating in the study, the results of this trial will also be applicable to this minority group.

  17. Phytoestrogens/insoluble fibers and colonic estrogen receptor β: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Mariabeatrice; Di Leo, Alfredo; Pricci, Maria; Scavo, Maria Principia; Guido, Raffaella; Tanzi, Sabina; Piscitelli, Domenico; Pisani, Antonio; Ierardi, Enzo; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Barone, Michele

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety and effect of the supplementation of a patented blend of dietary phytoestrogens and insoluble fibers on estrogen receptor (ER)-β and biological parameters in sporadic colonic adenomas. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was performed. Patients scheduled to undergo surveillance colonoscopy for previous sporadic colonic adenomas were identified, and 60 eligible patients were randomized to placebo or active dietary intervention (ADI) twice a day, for 60 d before surveillance colonoscopy. ADI was a mixture of 175 mg milk thistle extract, 20 mg secoisolariciresinol and 750 mg oat fiber extract. ER-β and ER-α expression, apoptosis and proliferation (Ki-67 LI) were assessed in colon samples. RESULTS: No adverse event related to ADI was recorded. ADI administration showed a significant increases in ER-β protein (0.822 ± 0.08 vs 0.768 ± 0.10, P = 0.04) and a general trend to an increase in ER-β LI (39.222 ± 2.69 vs 37.708 ± 5.31, P = 0.06), ER-β/ER-α LI ratio (6.564 ± 10.04 vs 2.437 ± 1.53, P = 0.06), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (35.592 ± 14.97 vs 31.541 ± 11.54, P = 0.07) and Ki-67 (53.923 ± 20.91 vs 44.833 ± 10.38, P = 0.07) approximating statistical significance. A significant increase of ER-β protein (0.805 ± 0.13 vs 0.773 ± 0.13, P = 0.04), mRNA (2.278 ± 1.19 vs 1.105 ± 1.07, P < 0.02) and LI (47.533 ± 15.47 vs 34.875 ± 16.67, P < 0.05) and a decrease of ER-α protein (0.423 ± 0.06 vs 0.532 ± 0.11, P < 0.02) as well as a trend to increase of ER-β/ER-α protein in ADI vs placebo group were observed in patients without polyps (1.734 ± 0.20 vs 1.571 ± 0.42, P = 0.07). CONCLUSION: The role of ER-β on the control of apoptosis, and its amenability to dietary intervention, are supported in our study. PMID:23885143

  18. Effect of chronic treatments with GH, melatonin, estrogens, and phytoestrogens on oxidative stress parameters in liver from aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Kireev, R A; Tresguerres, A F; Vara, E; Ariznavarreta, C; Tresguerres, J A F

    2007-10-01

    The aging theory postulates that this process may be due to the accumulation of oxidative damage in cells and molecules. The present study has investigated the effect of castration in old female rats on various parameters related to the antioxidant properties of several cellular fractions obtained from the liver, and the influence of several chronic treatments on it, both in intact and castrated animals. Sixty-one 22-month-old Wistar female rats, were used. About 21 intact animals were divided into three groups and treated for 10 weeks with GH, melatonin or saline, and 40 ovariectomized (at 12 months of age) animals were divided into five groups and treated for the same time with GH, melatonin, estrogens (Eos), phytoestrogens (Phyt) or saline. All animals were sacrificed at 24 months of age by decapitation. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in cytosolic fraction, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in cytosol and microsomal fractions, and the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and cytochrome C in mitochondrial and cytosol fractions of liver were determined. A decrease in GST activity was detected in cytosol and in the microsomal fraction in ovariectomized animals as compared to intact rats. The activity of GPx was also decreased in ovariectomized as compared with the intact group. NO level was increased and cytochrome C decreased in the mitochondrial fraction of the liver in ovariectomized females as compared with the intact group, respectively. No significant changes after melatonin or GH treatments were found in GPx, GST activity and NO level in mitochondrial fraction in the intact group. Administration of GH, melatonin, Eos and Phyt in the ovariectomized groups significantly increased the GPx, and GST activity in the cytosol and microsomal fraction and decreased the level of NO in the mitochondrial fraction as compared with the untreated rats. A significant increase in the level of cytochrome C in the mitochondrial fraction and a decrease in the cytosol fraction

  19. Lesser in vitro anaerobic cecal isoflavone disappearance was associated with greater apparent absorption of daidzein and genistein in Golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2011-05-01

    Our hypothesis in this study was that in vitro disappearance of isoflavones from fecal or cecal contents of Golden Syrian hamsters paralleled the apparent absorption of these compounds, comparable with previous findings from in vitro human fecal incubations. Two studies were conducted to test this idea: one on in vitro fecal (study 1, n = 20/sex) and the other on in vitro cecal contents (study 2, n = 10/sex) ability to degrade isoflavones. According to HPLC analysis, urinary isoflavone excretion was significantly less by 2-4 fold in males compared with females in both studies. Fecal isoflavone excretion was not significantly different between sexes or isoflavones (study 1) and was <0.5% of ingested dose. In vitro anaerobic fecal isoflavone degradation rate constants from study 1 were minimal with no significant correlation between urinary and fecal isoflavone excretion. However, in vitro anaerobic cecal isoflavone degradation rate constants (study 2) were greater and significantly correlated with urinary excretion of daidzein (R = 0.90; p = 0.01) and genistein (R = 0.93; p = 0.004), but not glycitein (R = 0.50; p = 0.3). Both male and female hamsters showed a pattern of urinary isoflavone excretion similar to that found in humans (daidzein > genistein). Hamster in vitro cecal isoflavone degradation rate constants seemed to be analogous to human in vitro fecal isoflavone degradation rate constants for genistein and daidzein. The sex difference in isoflavone excretion in hamsters and the instability in glycitein excretion across studies coupled with the paucity of human data on this isoflavone deserve further investigation.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of dietary soy phytoestrogens on canine health, steroidogenesis, thyroid function, behavior and skin and coat quality in a prospective controlled randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Cerundolo, Rosario; Michel, Kathy E.; Reisner, Ilana R.; Phillips, Lucy; Goldschmidt, Michael; Court, Michael H.; Shrestha, Binu; Hao, Qin; Refsal, Kent; Oliver, Jack W.; Biourge, Vincent; Shofer, Frances S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Phytoestrogens are non-steroidal compounds possessing estrogenic activity present in significant amounts in soy-based pet foods. There is speculation that long-term consumption of phytoestrogen-rich diets could have biological effects but this has never been evaluated in dogs. Hypothesis Soy-based diets may affect general health, adrenocortical function, thyroid function, behavior and skin/coat quality in adult dogs. Animals Fifteen normal dogs were divided into two groups and fed either high-isoflavone (HID) or a low-isoflavone (LID) soy-based diet. Methods In this prospective controlled randomized trial end points of general health were assessed at baseline and up to one-year by evaluating body and dermatological condition, hematology, biochemistry profiles, urine-analysis (UA), serum concentrations of adrenal and thyroid hormones, and behavior. Student’s t-test (2 time points) analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 time points) was used to analyze differences in these parameters from baseline between diets. Results No differences were found in measures of skin/coat, body condition, or behavior, in either group. Results of hematology, biochemical profiles and urinalysis showed no differences between the two groups. Analysis of variance in repeated measures was used to analyze differences in hair follicles from baseline between diets when there were 2 time points. No differences were found in the evaluation of the skin, hair follicle and hair diameter size. Most adrenal and thyroid hormones did not change over time nor were they different by diet (P>.1). However, total T4 differences were higher in HI than LI group (15.3 vs −1.4 p=.07) and post-ACTH estradiol concentration differences were also increased in HI compared to LI groups (19 vs −5.6 pg/ml at 1 year, p=.0006). Conclusions and Clinical Importance These data suggest long-term ingestion of soy phytoestrogens may influence endocrine function in dogs and this could potentially impact

  1. A New Therapeutic Paradigm for Breast Cancer Exploiting Low Dose Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    nM E2 + 10 µM AG1024 decreased DNA content significantly more than either treat- ment alone (Fig. 7C), suggesting an integral role of IGF-1Rβ in MCF...conformation, estrogen-induced apoptosis, high throughput RNA interference (include area code) 1859 Table of Contents Introduction Body...growth was assessed as DNA content in each well. (B) Inhibition of cell growth in MCF7:5C cells by genistein, equol and coumestrol was assessed in

  2. Methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum inhibits ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirke, Sarika S; Jadhav, Sanket R; Jagtap, Aarti G

    2008-11-01

    Several animal and clinical studies have shown that phytoestrogens, plant-derived estrogenic compounds, can be useful in treating postmenopausal osteoporosis. Phytoestrogens and phytoestrogen-containing plants are currently under active investigation for their role in estrogen-related disorders. The present study deals with anti-osteoporotic evaluation of phytoestrogen-rich plant Cuminum cyminum, commonly known as cumin. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were bilaterally ovariectomized (OVX) and randomly assigned to 3 groups (10 rats/group). Additional 10 animals were sham operated. OVX and sham control groups were orally administered with vehicle while the other two OVX groups were administered 0.15 mg/kg estradiol and 1 g/kg of methanolic extract of Cuminum cyminum fruits (MCC) in two divided doses for 10 weeks. At the end of the study blood, bones and uteri of the animals were collected. Serum was evaluated for calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and tartarate resistant acid phosphatase. Bone density, ash density, mineral content and mechanical strength of bones were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of bones (tibia) was performed. Results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukeys multiple comparison test. MCC (1 g/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced urinary calcium excretion and significantly increased calcium content and mechanical strength of bones in comparison to OVX control. It showed greater bone and ash densities and improved microarchitecture of bones in SEM analysis. Unlike estradiol it did not affect body weight gain and weight of atrophic uterus in OVX animals. MCC prevented ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats with no anabolic effect on atrophic uterus. The osteoprotective effect was comparable with estradiol.

  3. The use of elevated doses of genistein-rich soy extract in the gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy for Sanfilippo disease patients.

    PubMed

    Malinová, Věra; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Narajczyk, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are severe, inherited metabolic disorders caused by storage of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Sanfilippo disease (mucopolysaccharidosis type III, MPS III) is described as severe neurological type of MPS, characterized by rapid deterioration of brain functions. No therapy for Sanfilippo disease is approved to date, however, a specific substrate reduction therapy (SRT), called gene expression-targeted isoflavone therapy (GET IT), has been used as an experimental therapy. In this report, we describe effects of treatment of six Sanfilippo disease patients with GET IT, in which the dose of genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one), an active compound of GET IT present in the soy isoflavone extract, has been increased to 10, and then to 15 mg/kg/day, contrary to the previously reported dose of 5 mg/kg/day. By measuring levels of urinary GAGs and assessing hair dysmorphology as biomarkers, and by considering clinical symptoms of patients, we obtained results suggesting that elevated doses of genistein may improve efficacy of GET IT for Sanfilippo disease.

  4. Isoflavone metabolism in domestic cats (Felis catus): comparison of plasma metabolites detected after ingestion of two different dietary forms of genistein and daidzein.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse-Tedd, K M; Cave, N J; Ugarte, C E; Waldron, L A; Prasain, J K; Arabshahi, A; Barnes, S; Hendriks, W H; Thomas, D G

    2013-03-01

    Some felid diets contain isoflavones but the metabolic capacity of cats toward isoflavones is relatively unknown, despite the understanding that isoflavones have divergent biological potential according to their metabolite end products. The objective of this study was to determine the plasma metabolites detectable in domestic cats after exposure to 2 different dietary forms of isoflavones, either as a soy extract tablet (n = 6) or as part of a dietary matrix (n = 4). Serial blood samples were collected after isoflavone exposure to identify the plasma metabolites of each cat. Genistein was detected in its unconjugated form or as a monosulfate. Daidzein was detected as both a mono- and disulfate as well as in its unconjugated form. Other daidzein metabolites detected included equol mono- and disulfate, dihydrodaidzein, and O-desmethylangolensin. No β-glucuronide metabolites of either isoflavone were detected. Equol was produced in markedly fewer cats after ingestion of a soy extract tablet as a single oral bolus compared with cats consuming an isoflavone-containing diet. The detectable metabolites of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, in domestic cat plasma after dietary ingestion has been described in the present study for the first time. The metabolic capacity for isoflavones by domestic cats appears to be efficient, with only minimal proportions of the ingested amount detected in their unconjugated forms. This has implications for the potential of isoflavones to exert physiological activity in the domestic cat when consumed at concentrations representative of typical dietary intake.

  5. Molecular analysis of the genus Asparagus based on matK sequences and its application to identify A. racemosus, a medicinally phytoestrogenic species.

    PubMed

    Boonsom, Teerawat; Waranuch, Neti; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Sukrong, Suchada

    2012-07-01

    The plant Asparagus racemosus is one of the most widely used sources of phytoestrogens because of its high content of the steroidal saponins, shatavarins I-IV, in roots. The dry root of A. racemosus, known as "Rak-Sam-Sip" in Thai, is one of the most popular herbal medicines, used as an anti-inflammatory, an aphrodisiac and a galactagogue. Recently, the interest in plant-derived estrogens has increased tremendously, making A. racemosus particularly important and a possible target for fraudulent labeling. However, the identification of A. racemosus is generally difficult due to its similar morphology to other Asparagus spp. Thus, accurate authentication of A. racemosus is essential. In this study, 1557-bp nucleotide sequences of the maturase K (matK) gene of eight Asparagus taxa were analyzed. A phylogenetic relationship based on the matK gene was also constructed. Ten polymorphic sites of nucleotide substitutions were found within the matK sequences. A. racemosus showed different nucleotide substitutions to the other species. A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the matK gene was developed to discriminate A. racemosus from others. Only the 650-bp PCR product from A. racemosus could be digested with BssKI into two fragments of 397 and 253-bp while the products of other species remained undigested. Ten commercially crude drugs were analyzed and revealed that eight samples were derived from A. racemosus while two samples of that were not. Thus, the PCR-RFLP analysis of matK gene was shown to be an effective method for authentication of the medicinally phytoestrogenic species, A. racemosus.

  6. Eubacterium limosum activates isoxanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) into the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin in vitro and in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Possemiers, Sam; Rabot, Sylvie; Espín, Juan Carlos; Bruneau, Aurélia; Philippe, Catherine; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Heyerick, Arne; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; De Keukeleire, Denis; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-07-01

    Recently, it was shown that the exposure to the potent hop phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) depends on intestinal bacterial activation of isoxanthohumol (IX), but this occurs in only one-third of tested individuals. As the butyrate-producing Eubacterium limosum can produce 8-PN from IX, a probiotic strategy was applied to investigate whether 8-PN production could be increased in low 8-PN producers, thus balancing phytoestrogen exposure. Using fecal samples from high (Hop +) and low (Hop -) 8-PN-producing individuals, a Hop + and Hop - dynamic intestinal model was developed. In parallel, Hop + and Hop - human microbiota-associated rats were developed, germ-free (GF) rats acting as negative controls. IX and then IX + E. limosum were administered in the intestinal model and to the rats, and changes in 8-PN production and exposure were assessed. After dosing IX, 80% was converted into 8-PN in the Hop + model and highest 8-PN production, plasma concentrations, and urinary and fecal excretion occurred in the Hop + rats. Administration of the bacterium triggered 8-PN production in the GF rats and increased 8-PN production in the Hop - model and Hop - rats. 8-PN excretion was similar in the feces (294.1 +/- 132.2 nmol/d) and urine (8.5 +/- 1.1 nmol/d ) of all rats (n = 18). In addition, butyrate production increased in all rats. In conclusion, intestinal microbiota determined 8-PN production and exposure after IX intake. Moreover, E. limosum administration increased 8-PN production in low producers, resulting in similar 8-PN production in all rats.

  7. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  8. Signal transduction pathway regulating prostaglandin EP3 receptor-induced neurite retraction: requirement for two different tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, J; Katoh, H; Yasui, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Nakamura, K; Hasegawa, H; Ichikawa, A; Negishi, M

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that activation of the prostaglandin E receptor EP3 subtype triggered neurite retraction through the small GTPase Rho-, and its target, RhoA-binding kinase alpha (ROKalpha)-, dependent pathway in EP3 receptor-expressing PC12 cells. Here we examined the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this pathway in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells. Tyrphostin A25, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by activation of the EP3 receptor, however, it failed to block neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by microinjection of constitutively active RhoA, RhoAV14, indicating that a tyrphostin-sensitive tyrosine kinase was involved in the pathway from the EP3 receptor to Rho activation. On the other hand, genistein, another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by both activation of the EP3 receptor and microinjection of RhoAV14. However, genistein did not block neuronal morphological changes induced by microinjection of a constitutively active mutant of ROKalpha. These results indicate that two different tyrosine kinases, tyrphostin A25-sensitive and genistein-sensitive kinases, are involved in the EP3 receptor-mediated neurite retraction acting upstream and downstream of Rho, respectively. PMID:10333476

  9. Phytoestrogens from Aspalathus linearis.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Naomi; Miyase, Toshio; Umehara, Kaoru; Warashina, Tsutomu; Fujii, Satoshi

    2006-06-01

    From the leaves of Aspalathus linearis, 24 known compounds and a new one, aspalalinin (25), were isolated. The structures of the compounds were determined mainly based on spectral evidence. The absolute configuration of aspalalinin was presented on the basis of X-ray analysis. Each isolate was assessed for its estrogenic activity by an estrogen ELISA assay. Compounds 12, 15, and 24 showed the estrogenic activity.