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Sample records for phytohemagglutinin

  1. Phytohemagglutinin-induced diarrheal disease.

    PubMed

    Banwell, J G; Abramowsky, C R; Weber, F; Howard, R; Boldt, D H

    1984-10-01

    A purified plant lectin, phytohemagglutinin (PHA), or crude red kidney bean (RKB) from which it was derived, when incorporated as 1% of dietary protein into a purified casein protein diet caused weanling rats to fail to grow or lose weight in comparison to control animals pair fed an isonitrogenous, isocaloric diet. Feeding PHA was observed to cause diarrhea: fecal wet and dry weights were increased within 2 days after starting the diet. Increased fecal weight was caused by increased dry weight as well as by an increased fecal water content. On reversion to a normal casein diet, rapid amelioration of the antinutritional effects of PHA occurred with resumption of normal growth rate. Specific binding of PHA to the microvillus region of the small intestinal epithelium was demonstrated using rabbit anti-PHA and fluorescein-labeled goat anti-rabbit immunoglobin. PHA binding was observed after chronic intake in the diet or when applied to normal tissue in vitro. Loss of PHA binding to the intestine was observed to occur within 48 hr on reversion to a control casein diet. No significant morphological damage to the microvilli or the mucosal villus architecture was observed to accompany PHA adherence under these experimental conditions. Antinutritional and antiabsorptive effects of dietary PHA were associated with diarrhea. PHA adhered to the microvillus membrane of the small intestinal villus surface during the diarrheal state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6383746

  2. [Partial group-specific phytohemagglutinins anti-B1 and anti-B2].

    PubMed

    Potapov, M I

    2004-01-01

    Saline phytohemagglutinins (PHA) were detected in the aril of seeds Evonymus alata and E. sacrosancta (anti-B1) and in seeds Sophora japonica (anti-B2). They are highly sensitive to samples used in the detection of incomplete antibodies. Sophora contains also an incomplete partial PHA anti-B2 of the blocking type. As for extracts, they obviously do not contain PHA to erythrocytes of animals. PMID:15008090

  3. Phytohemagglutinin derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a cause for intestinal malabsorption associated with bacterial overgrowth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Banwell, J G; Boldt, D H; Meyers, J; Weber, F L

    1983-03-01

    Plant lectins or carbohydrate binding proteins interact with membrane receptors on cellular surfaces but their antinutritional effects are poorly defined. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of phytohemagglutinin, a lectin derived from raw red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), on small intestinal absorptive function and morphology, and on the intestinal microflora. Phytohemagglutinin was isolated in purified form by thyroglobulin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Red kidney bean and phytohemagglutinin (6% and 0.5%, respectively, of dietary protein) were fed in a purified casein diet to weanling rats for up to 21 days. Weight loss, associated with malabsorption of lipid, nitrogen, and vitamin B12, developed in comparison with animals pair-fed isonitrogenous casein diets. Antinutritional effects of red kidney bean were reversible on reinstitution of a purified casein diet. An increase in bacterial colonization of the jejunum and ileum occurred in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutin-fed animals. When antibiotics were included in the diet, malabsorption of [3H]triolein and 57Co-vitamin B12 in red kidney bean-fed animals was partially reversed and, in germ-free animals, purified phytohemagglutinin had no demonstrable antinutritional effect. Mucosal disaccharidase activity was reduced in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutinin-fed animals, but intestinal mucosal morphology was unchanged. Dietary administration of phytohemagglutinin, alone or as a component of red kidney bean, caused intestinal dysfunction, which was associated with, and dependent upon, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Adherence of enteric bacteria to the mucosal surface was enhanced by phytohemagglutinin which may have facilitated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. PMID:6822324

  4. High mannose oligosaccharide of phytohemagglutinin is attached to asparagine 12 and the modified oligosaccharide to asparagine 60. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Phytohemagglutinin, the lectin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris, has a high mannose and a modified (fucosylated) oligosaccharide on each polypeptide. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography of tryptic digests of (/sup 3/H)fucose or (/sup 3/H)glucosamine labeled phytohemagglutinin, followed by amino acid sequencing of the isolated glycopeptides, shows that the high mannose oligosaccharide is attached to Asn/sup 12/ and the modified oligosaccharide to Asn /sup 60/ of the protein. In animal glycoproteins, high mannose chains are rarely found at the N-terminal side of complex chains.

  5. Phytohemagglutinin skin test for the immunological assessment of the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Meijer, S; Bom-van Noorloos, A A; Visser, J J

    1984-01-01

    The use of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) as skin test agent was investigated. The test was performed in 42 healthy individuals and in 32 patients with malignant disease undergoing surgery. To establish immunosuppression in the direct postoperative period 15 patients undergoing cholecystectomy were tested sequentially. All healthy adults had a positive delayed response. No systemic or permanent local reactions were encountered. In healthy adults the PHA skin test had no influence on the in vitro PHA blastogenesis, the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes and E-rosette-forming cells. A reversion of the immunosuppressed state to normal in some cancer patients upon surgery was substantiated as well. The PHA skin test is an easy and a reliable method to give an impression of the immune response of surgical patients. It has many advantages above the commonly employed primary and secondary antigens. PMID:6335092

  6. Production of mouse lymphotoxin by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated spleen cells requires two cell fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Aksamit, R R; Leonard, E J

    1982-01-01

    The appearance of lymphotoxin in the culture fluid of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mouse spleen cells required two cell fractions that were separated by adherence to plastic. Upon stimulation with PHA, neither cell fraction alone produced significant amounts of lymphotoxin; however, when the cell fractions were combined and then stimulated with PHA, full activity was produced. Cytotoxic activity was not fully restored by combining PHA-stimulated cultured fluids from adherent and nonadherent cell fractions. This indicated that the cytotoxic activity was not the result of two factors, one produced by each cell fraction, that acted on the target cells, but rather, two cells interacted to produce lymphotoxin. Treatment of the unfractionated spleen cells with monoclonal anti-Thy1.2 and complement before PHA stimulation greatly reduced the production of lymphotoxin and indicated that at least one of the cells was a T cell. Lymphotoxin production was partially restored by the addition of nonadherent cells to the anti-Thy1.2-treated cells, suggesting that the T cell was nonadherent. Treatment of unfractionated cells with either silica or carrageenan had no effect on the subsequent production of lymphotoxin by PHA, suggesting that the adherent cell was not actively phagocytic. PMID:6980190

  7. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  8. Phytohemagglutinin improves the development and ultrastructure of in vitro-cultured goat (Capra hircus) preantral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, E.V.; Costa, J.J.N.; Rossi, R.O.D.S.; Silva, A.W.B.; Passos, J.R.S.; Portela, A.M.L.R.; Pereira, D.C.S.T.; Donato, M.A.M.; Campello, C.C.; Saraiva, M.V.A.; Peixoto, C.A.; Silva, J.R.V.; Santos, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective this study was to determine the effect of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) on survival, growth and gene expression in caprine secondary follicles cultured in vitro. Secondary follicles (∼0.2 mm) were isolated from the cortex of caprine ovaries and cultured individually for 6 days in α-MEM+ supplemented with PHA (0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL). After 6 days of culture, follicle diameter and survival, antrum formation, ultrastructure and expression of mRNA for FSH receptors (FSH-R), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase were determined. All treatments maintained follicular survival [α-MEM+ (94.59%); 1 µg/mL PHA (96.43%); 10 µg/mL PHA (84.85%); 50 µg/mL PHA (85.29%); 100 µg/mL PHA (88.57%), and 200 µg/mL PHA (87.50)], but the presence of 10 µg/mL PHA in the culture medium increased the antrum formation rate (21.21%) when compared with control (5.41%, P < 0.05) and ensured the maintenance of oocyte and granulosa cell ultrastructures after 6 days of culture. The expression of mRNA for FSH-R (2.7 ± 0.1) and PCNA (4.4 ± 0.2) was also significantly increased in follicles cultured with 10 µg/mL PHA in relation to those cultured in α-MEM+ (1.0 ± 0.1). In conclusion, supplementation of culture medium with 10 µg/mL PHA maintains the follicular viability and ultrastructure, and promotes the formation of antral cavity after 6 days of culture in vitro. PMID:23558855

  9. Intestinal microbial flora after feeding phytohemagglutinin lectins (Phaseolus vulgaris) to rats.

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, J G; Howard, R; Cooper, D; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation of purified phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lectins derived from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the diet of weanling rats will cause growth failure, malabsorption of nutrients, and bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. These effects are not caused by feeding a similar quantity of PHA to germfree rats. To define the morphological and bacterial changes on the mucosal surfaces of the jejunum, ileum, and cecum in greater detail, we pair fed two groups of weanling rats isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with or without 0.5% PHA protein. On the jejunal surfaces of control rats, the mucous layer was a confluent covering with sparsely scattered bacteria and protozoa. In PHA-treated rats, the mucous layer was thin and discontinuous, and the microvillous surface of the tissue was extensively populated by bacterial cells of two distinct morphotypes--a gram-negative rod and a gram-positive coccobacillus. In all PHA-treated animals, these bacteria formed adherent monospecific or mixed adherent microcolonies on the tissue surface. Tissue damage was observed in PHA-exposed jejunal tissue as evidenced by vesiculation of the microvillous plasma membrane and by damage to the brush border membrane. On the ileal surfaces of control rats, there was a thick mucous layer within which small numbers of bacteria and protozoa were seen. Segmented filamentous bacteria were anchored in the tissue surface. In PHA-treated rats, the ileal surface was only incompletely covered by a mucous layer, and the overlying mucosal surface was extensively covered by large numbers of protozoan cells (predominantly Hexamita muris). Most of the ileal surfaces not covered by the mucous layer were occupied and virtually occluded by an overgrowth of these protozoan cells with occasional cells of Giardia muris and the tissue-associated segmented bacillus. In the ceca of control rats, the mucosa was incompletely covered by a discontinuous mucous layer and colonized by an unnamed Spirillum sp

  10. Defective cellular immunity in renal failure: depression of reactivity of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin by renal failure serum

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, W. Marcus; Sanford, Jay P.

    1971-01-01

    In defining host resistance factors in uremia, experiments were designed to assess the effect of renal failure serum upon the reactivity of normal human lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin in vitro. Normal buffy coat cells were resuspended in sera obtained from normal subjects and from 14 patients with renal failure, then stimulated with phytohemagglutinin M and the cellular response measured by the increase in thymidine or uridine uptake. The mean thymidine uptake by stimulated cells in normal sera was 14,389 ±1695 (SEM) cpm per 2 × 106 lymphocytes. Uridine uptake under the same conditions was 12,540 ±1887 cpm. Compared to these are a mean thymidine uptake of 2740 ±457 cpm and uridine uptake of 3928 ±667 cpm in renal failure sera. Both differences are significant at P<0.01 level. For controls representing “chronic illnesses,” sera from patients with pneumococcal meningitis, cirrhosis of the liver without jaundice, rheumatoid arthritis, and paraplegia with urinary tract infection did not cause suppression. No single drug had been taken by all the renal failure patients; three patients were taking no drugs. The serum from one patient with acute renal failure suppressed thymidine uptake while her serum obtained after recovery from her illness supported a normal lymphocyte response. Improvement of lymphocyte response was also noted in 9 of 10 sera obtained from patients immediately after hemodialysis. These observations plus the inhibition of stimulated cells by normal serum mixed with renal failure serum indicate the presence of a dialyzable inhibitory factor rather than the absence of a supporting factor in the renal failure sera. Lymphocytes preincubated for 24 hr in renal failure serum responded normally when transferred to normal serum and stimulated. Cells stimulated in normal serum and transferred to renal failure serum within the initial 24 hr of incubation demonstrated depressed thymidine uptake. Also, cell survival for 72 hr incubation as judged by

  11. Phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-E) displays a novel glycan recognition mode using a common legume lectin fold.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Masamichi; Soga, Keisuke; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Ikeda, Akemi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2014-04-01

    Phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-E), a legume lectin, has an unusual specificity toward biantennary galactosylated N-glycan with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). To investigate the interaction in detail, we have solved the crystal structures of PHA-E without ligand and in complex with biantennary N-glycan derivatives. PHA-E interacts with the trisaccharide unit (Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-2Man) in a manner completely different from that of mannose/glucose-specific legume lectins. The inner mannose residue binds to a novel site on the protein, and its rotation is opposite to that occurring in the monosaccharide-binding site of other lectins around the sugar O3 axis. Saturation-transfer difference NMR using biantennary di-galactosylated and bisected glycans reveals that PHA-E interacts with both antennas almost equally. The unique carbohydrate interaction explains the glycan-binding specificity and high affinity.

  12. The cell agglutination agent, phytohemagglutinin-L, improves the efficiency of somatic nuclear transfer cloning in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Du, Fuliang; Shen, Perng-Chih; Xu, Jie; Sung, Li-Ying; Jeong, B-Seon; Lucky Nedambale, Tshimangadzo; Riesen, John; Cindy Tian, X; Cheng, Winston T K; Lee, Shan-Nan; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2006-02-01

    One of the several factors that contribute to the low efficiency of mammalian somatic cloning is poor fusion between the small somatic donor cell and the large recipient oocyte. This study was designed to test phytohemagglutinin (PHA) agglutination activity on fusion rate, and subsequent developmental potential of cloned bovine embryos. The toxicity of PHA was established by examining its effects on the development of parthenogenetic bovine oocytes treated with different doses (Experiment 1), and for different durations (Experiment 2). The effective dose and duration of PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min incubation) was selected and used to compare membrane fusion efficiency and embryo development following somatic cell nuclear transfer (Experiment 3). Cloning with somatic donor fibroblasts versus cumulus cells was also compared, both with and without PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min). Fusion rate of nuclear donor fibroblasts, after phytohemagglutinin treatment, was increased from 33 to 61% (P < 0.05), and from 59 to 88% (P < 0.05) with cumulus cell nuclear donors. The nuclear transfer (NT) efficiency per oocyte used was improved following PHA treatment, for both fibroblast (13% versus 22%) as well as cumulus cells (17% versus 34%; P < 0.05). The cloned embryos, both with and without PHA treatment, were subjected to vitrification and embryo transfer testing, and resulted in similar survival (approximately 90% hatching) and pregnancy rates (17-25%). Three calves were born following vitrification and embryo transfer of these embryos; two from the PHA-treated group, and one from non-PHA control group. We concluded that PHA treatment significantly improved the fusion efficiency of somatic NT in cattle, and therefore, increased the development of cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, within a determined range of dose and duration, PHA had no detrimental effect on embryo survival post-vitrification, nor on pregnancy or calving rates following embryo transfer.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response. PMID:26561877

  15. Potentiation of the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) induces phytohemagglutinin-activated Jurkat T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Djillani, Alaeddine; Doignon, Isabelle; Luyten, Tomas; Lamkhioued, Bouchaib; Gangloff, Sophie C; Parys, Jan B; Nüße, Oliver; Chomienne, Christine; Dellis, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the main Ca(2+) entry pathway of non-excitable cells. In the past decade, the activation of this entry has been unveiled, with STIM1, a protein of the endoplasmic reticulum able to sense the intraluminal Ca(2+) content, and Orai1, the pore-forming unit of the Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. When Ca(2+) ions are released from the endoplasmic reticulum, STIM1 proteins oligomerize and directly interact with Orai1 proteins, allowing the opening of the CRAC channels and a massive Ca(2+) ion influx known as SOCE. As Ca(2+) is involved in various cellular processes, the discovery of new drugs acting on the SOCE should be of interest to control the cell activity. By testing analogs of 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB), a well known, though not so selective effector of the SOCE, we identified methoxy diethylborinate (MDEB), a molecule able to potentiate the SOCE in three leukocyte and two breast cancer cell lines by increasing the Ca(2+) influx amplitude. Unlike 2-APB, MDEB does not affect the Ca(2+) pumps or the Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. MDEB could therefore represent the first member of a new group of molecules, specifically able to potentiate SOCE. Although not toxic for non-activated Jurkat T cells, it could induce the apoptosis of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cells.

  16. Study of agglutination of mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cell induced by egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana. II. Phytohemagglutinin P and protamine.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Kubota, K; Endo, Y; Matsuzawa, T

    1981-01-01

    When mouse mammary carcinoma (FM3A) cells were treated with egg agglutinin of Rana catesbiana for 15 min at 25 degrees C, percent total particle number of both cell aggregates and single cells was in direct proportion to the cell electrophoretic mobility. Phytohemagglutinin P mediated agglutination proceeded with biphasic kinetics: the higher the concentration of phytohemagglutinin P the shorter was the lag period between the first and second stages of agglutination. In protamine-mediated agglutination, the percent total particle number was reduced at low concentrations, while the electrophoretic mobility reduced only at high concentrations. Agglutinating and cytotoxic activities of these three reagents were in an intimate relation: the higher the agglutinating activity, the greater was their cytotoxic activity. PMID:6969671

  17. Relative importance of phytohemagglutinin (lectin) and trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L) protein absorption and utilization by the rat.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M R; Sgarbieri, V C

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this work was to perform a comparative study of the antinutritional and/or toxic properties of phytohemagglutinin and trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor extracted from the seed of a commercial cultivar of edible bean used in Brazil. Bean proteins were extracted in acidic salt solution and fractionated by dialysis and centrifugation, then freeze-dried. The total freeze-dried bean extract and the globulin or albumin protein fraction were resuspended in distilled water and heated (100 degrees C, 30 min) for inactivation of hemagglutinin. Diets were prepared with unheated bean protein fractions and heated ones (100% trypsin inhibitor activity, but 0% phytohemagglutinin activity). As a result, the inhibition of growth and poor dietary protein utilization were observed in rats fed diets containing unheated bean protein fractions, but not in rats fed diets containing heated fractions. It was thus assumed that phytohemagglutinin is the main antinutritional and toxic factor that in dry bean (Phaseolus) protein and that trypsin inhibitor (Bowman-Birk type) did not interfere with rat growth. PMID:9919488

  18. Inhibition of mitogenesis induced by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin in adherent-cell supernatants treated with protein extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, C; Montaño, L F; Huesca, M; Rayón, I; Willms, K; Goodsaid, F

    1986-01-01

    Specific stimulation of T cells by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin was inhibited by a soluble factor(s) secreted by normal adherent cells stimulated with culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) derived from bacterial cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (avirulent) and H37Rv (virulent). The induction of the inhibitory factor was blocked by the presence of hyperimmune antisera to H37Rv or H37Ra CFPE. The inhibitory factor did not seem to be a CFPE reprocessed by the adherent cells. Inhibitory activity was maximal in supernatants of adherent-cell cultures incubated for 48 h; the inhibitory factor was heat labile, and its production was dependent on the concentration of M. tuberculosis CFPE. A mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, ATCC J774A.1, produced an identical inhibitory factor, thus excluding a non-macrophage-contaminating adherent cell as the source of the factor. This inhibitory factor also interfered with the recognition of phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin by T cells. PMID:3082760

  19. Immune response of mallard ducks treated with immunosuppressive agents: antibody response to erythrocytes and in vivo response to phytohemagglutinin-P.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrank, C.S.; Cook, M.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of two in vivo tests to assay immune competence of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) treated with various immunomodulatory agents was examined. Skin responses to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) injected intradermally and serum antibody levels produced in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were measured. As measured by the skin response to PHA-P, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide or cyclosporine did not respond differently from control-injected ducks. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly significantly suppressed the skin response to PHA-P. As measured by antibody levels in response to SRBC, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide responded with antibody titers similar to controls. Cyclosporine injected intramuscularly reduced the level of immunoglobulin (Ig) G significantly in one of two experiments. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly reduced peak total and IgG titers. These experiments provide information on the viability of these two in vivo tests to reflect immune competence of mallard ducks.

  20. Suppressive effect of a chronic helminth infection, schistosomiasis mansoni, on the in vitro responses of spleen and lymph node cells to the T cell mitogens phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A.

    PubMed Central

    Pelley, R P; Ruffier, J J; Warren, K S

    1976-01-01

    Chronic murine schistosomiasis mansoni is associated with depressed cell-mediated immune responses to Schistosoma mansoni egg antigens. The present study has examined the possibility that factors develop during infection that are capable of altering the response of lymphocytes to stimuli other than specific schistosomal antigens. Egg production begins at 5 weeks, and 1 to 3 weeks later there is a moderate degree of unresponsiveness of lymph node and spleen cells to the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin. This was associated with an altered dose response curve to the mitogens similar to that observed in antigenic systems. Seven weeks after the initiation of antigenic stimulation (egg prodiction lymph node and spleen cells from chronically infected animals were profoundly unresponsive to all concentrations of concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin tested. These investigations suggest that, in addition to possible blockade by serum antibody, other suppressive factors may be involved in the spontaneous modulation of immunopathology in chronic schistosomiasis. These are detectable 1 to 3 weeks after the onset of egg production and are prominent at 12 weeks. Such findings are consistent with, but do not prove, the existence of suppressor T cells in chronic schistosomiasis. PMID:1084329

  1. Phytohemagglutinin facilitates the aggregation of blastomere pairs from Day 5 donor embryos with Day 4 host embryos for chimeric bovine embryo multiplication.

    PubMed

    Simmet, Kilian; Reichenbach, Myriam; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-12-01

    Multiplication of bovine embryos by the production of aggregation chimeras is based on the concept that few blastomeres of a donor embryo form the inner cell mass (ICM) and thus the embryo proper, whereas cells of a host embryo preferentially contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), the progenitor cells of the embryonic part of the placenta. We aggregated two fluorescent blastomeres from enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic Day 5 morulae with two Day 4 embryos that did not complete their first cleavage until 27 hours after IVF and tested the effect of phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA) on chimeric embryo formation. The resulting blastocysts were characterized by differential staining of cell lineages using the TE-specific factor CDX2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy to facilitate the precise localization of eGFP-positive cells. The proportions of blastocyst development of sandwich aggregates with (n = 99) and without PHA (n = 46) were 85.9% and 54.3% (P < 0.05), respectively. Epifluorescence microscopy showed that the proportion of blastocysts with eGFP-positive cells in the ICM was higher in the PHA group than in the no-PHA group (40% vs. 16%; P < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the total cell numbers of blastocysts from the PHA group of aggregation chimeras (n = 17; 207.8 ± 67.3 [mean ± standard deviation]) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of embryos without ZP and exposed to PHA (n = 30; 159.6 ± 42.2) and of handling control embryos (n = 19; 176.9 ± 53.3). The same was true for ICM cell counts (56.5 ± 22.0 vs. 37.7 ± 14.2 and 38.7 ± 12.4) and TE cell counts (151.2 ± 58.0 vs. 121.9 ± 37.4 and 138.3 ± 53.0), whereas the ICM/total cell number ratio was not different between the groups. Of the 17 chimeric blastocysts analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, nine had eGFP-positive cells (three of them in the ICM, three in the TE, and three in both lineages). When integration in

  2. Phytohemagglutinin induces major short-term protease-sensitive lymphocyte traffic involving high endothelium venule-like blood vessels in acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in skin and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Binns, R M; Licence, S T; Wooding, F B

    1990-05-01

    Injection of phytohemagglutinin induces dose-dependent acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in young pig skin which attract large numbers of labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts but not red cells. Similar reactions are induced in the gut wall, joints, and draining lymph nodes, and also in the skin of sheep and cattle, and by concanavalin A. Labeled peripheral blood lymphocyte entry starts within 2 h, is maximal at 6-18 h and is effectively over by 48 h and, both early and late, is markedly inhibited in a selective way by trypsinization, like high endothelium venule-mediated entry to lymphoid tissues. Electron microscopy showed development of high endothelium venule-like blood vessels with intramural lymphoid cells in mononuclear infiltrates. Inductive processes in this model short-term peripheral defense mechanism are being investigated.

  3. Functional phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) expressed in Pichia pastoris correct N-terminal processing and secretion of heterologous proteins expressed using the PHA-E signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Raemaekers, R J; de Muro, L; Gatehouse, J A; Fordham-Skelton, A P

    1999-10-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin; PHA; E- and L-forms) and snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) were expressed in Pichia pastoris using native signal peptides, or the Saccharomyces alpha-factor preprosequence, to direct proteins into the secretory pathway. PHA and GNA were present as soluble, functional proteins in culture supernatants when expressed from constructs containing the alpha-factor preprosequence. The recombinant lectins, purified by affinity chromatography, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes at concentrations similar to the respective native lectins. However, incomplete processing of the signal sequence resulted in PHA-E, PHA-L and GNA with heterogenous N-termini, with the majority of the protein containing N-terminal extensions derived from the alpha-factor prosequence. Polypeptides in which most of the alpha-factor prosequence was present were also glycosylated. Inclusion of Glu-Ala repeats at the C-terminal end of the alpha-factor preprosequence led to efficient processing N-terminal to the Glu-Ala sequence, but inefficient removal of the repeats themselves, resulting in polypeptides with heterogenous N-termini still containing N-terminal extensions. In contrast, PHA expressed with the native signal peptide was secreted, correctly processed, and also fully functional. No expression of GNA from a construct containing the native GNA signal peptide was observed. The PHA-E signal peptide directed correct processing and secretion of both GNA and green fluorescent protein (GFP) when used in expression constructs, and is suggested to have general utility for synthesis of correctly processed proteins in Pichia.

  4. [Antinutritional effect of phytohemagglutinins of Phaseolus vulgaris L].

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M O; Mancini Filho, J; Lajolo, F M

    1984-09-01

    The antinutritional effect caused by the ingestion of lectins from two Brazilian varieties of beans: Rico 23 and Jalo, was studied in rats. The two varieties were selected in a previous screening of toxicity in rats: one of them (Jalo) was lethal, and the other (Rico 23) was not, when injected intra-peritoneally. Different amounts of each one of the lectins were added to casein experimental diets and fed to rats. The amount of protein (casein) also varied from 5% to 20%. The addition to the diet of 1% lectins from the Jalo variety caused a growth depression, as well as a decrease in food efficiency ratio and serum glucose; also, it reduced the maltase and invertase activity of the intestinal mucosa. All these effects appeared when the protein contents in the rations were 5% or 10%. At the 20% level only a depression of the maltase activity was observed. Similar effects were shown by the lectins of the Rico 23 variety, but only when added in a higher (5%) percentage to the diet. The phosphatase and protease activity were not changed by any of the lectins. The inhibitor activity that occurred in vivo was not detected in vitro. PMID:6399838

  5. Trifluoperazine reduces the expression of CD69 in phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pires, V; Harab, R C; Rumjanek, V M

    1996-04-01

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) is a phenothiazine capable of inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation as well as natural killer cells (NK) and lymphokine-activated killer cells (LAK) cytotoxic activity. CD69 is a surface molecule induced by various mechanisms of cellular activation. In the present work the modulation of CD69 expression by TFP was investigated on PHA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and compared to that of CD25 (IL-2 receptor) expression. Determination of surface molecules was performed in an indirect immunofluorescence assay using anti-CD69 or anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies, and analyzed by flow cytometry. The time course of the expression of these two molecules differed: CD69 expression was already declining at 48 h, whereas CD25 was still increasing at 72 h after stimulation. TFP (10 microM) reduced CD69 expression by 71.8% at 24 h, 68.4% at 48 h and 24% at 72 h following activation. In contrast, the same dose of TFP did not significantly affect CD25 expression at 24 h but showed an inhibitory effect at later times. These results suggest that different activation pathways are involved in the expression of CD25 and CD69.

  6. Mitogen immunotherapy for HIV infections exemplified by phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen.

    PubMed

    Wimer, B M; Mann, P L

    2000-12-01

    The ideal treatment for HIV infections would supplement highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) started at the time of initial diagnosis with an agent that can facilitate cure in the briefest time possible to avoid adverse effects of extended HAART such as drug toxicity, noncompliance, and shortened telomere-induced replicative senescence of CD8 cells. As a crucial part of the regimen, the agent must be able to initiate killer reactions against the HIV, replenish CD4 cells, rejuvenate CD8 cells, block HIV invasion of CD4 cells, activate latent HIV-sequestering host cells, stimulate effective immune reactions against malignancies, generate effective immune responses against conventional and opportunistic infections, circumvent the treatment- and immune response-evading capacities of HIV mutations, and reconstitute immune and hematopoietic competences. Over the past decade, the L4 isolectin of PHA has been presented as a mitogen capable of meeting these goals as they have become defined, but its potential has not been recognized sufficiently to expedite its evaluation. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) offers the major advantage of being up to 500 times more potent than PHA and has much smaller molecular weight (22,500 to 38,000 daltons versus approximately 125,000 daltons). Given by injection, it has demonstrated curative effects for metastatic malignancies in dogs and cats unassisted by ancillary therapy. Unlike PHA, PWM does not block the attachment of HIV gp 120 to CD4 membrane receptors, but it can obstruct CD4 cell invasion by binding with the CD4 receptors themselves. An expeditious manner of applying PWM would be to give minute doses of an ultra potent root extract capable of inducing a benign plasmacytoid lymphoblastic leukemoid reaction that reverses spontaneously after about 10 weeks. This might prove curative given in conjunction with HAART or possibly even without it. The preferred route of administration for the mitogens in humans would be intravenous although oral administration might prove more advantageous, particularly with PWM. These mitogens might be used singly or, if necessary, in combination after the toxicities have been carefully delineated in humans. Economic forces might restrict treatment availability solely to orally administered PWM therapy in poverty-stricken undeveloped countries if this were shown to be curative. These proposals originating from the authors long concerned with mitogen management of various disorders including HIV infections but only peripherally involved with their clinical applications, are offered for consideration by investigators perceptive enough to see the wisdom of exploring the curative possibilities. PMID:11190495

  7. Mitogen immunotherapy for HIV infections exemplified by phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen.

    PubMed

    Wimer, B M; Mann, P L

    2000-12-01

    The ideal treatment for HIV infections would supplement highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) started at the time of initial diagnosis with an agent that can facilitate cure in the briefest time possible to avoid adverse effects of extended HAART such as drug toxicity, noncompliance, and shortened telomere-induced replicative senescence of CD8 cells. As a crucial part of the regimen, the agent must be able to initiate killer reactions against the HIV, replenish CD4 cells, rejuvenate CD8 cells, block HIV invasion of CD4 cells, activate latent HIV-sequestering host cells, stimulate effective immune reactions against malignancies, generate effective immune responses against conventional and opportunistic infections, circumvent the treatment- and immune response-evading capacities of HIV mutations, and reconstitute immune and hematopoietic competences. Over the past decade, the L4 isolectin of PHA has been presented as a mitogen capable of meeting these goals as they have become defined, but its potential has not been recognized sufficiently to expedite its evaluation. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) offers the major advantage of being up to 500 times more potent than PHA and has much smaller molecular weight (22,500 to 38,000 daltons versus approximately 125,000 daltons). Given by injection, it has demonstrated curative effects for metastatic malignancies in dogs and cats unassisted by ancillary therapy. Unlike PHA, PWM does not block the attachment of HIV gp 120 to CD4 membrane receptors, but it can obstruct CD4 cell invasion by binding with the CD4 receptors themselves. An expeditious manner of applying PWM would be to give minute doses of an ultra potent root extract capable of inducing a benign plasmacytoid lymphoblastic leukemoid reaction that reverses spontaneously after about 10 weeks. This might prove curative given in conjunction with HAART or possibly even without it. The preferred route of administration for the mitogens in humans would be intravenous although oral administration might prove more advantageous, particularly with PWM. These mitogens might be used singly or, if necessary, in combination after the toxicities have been carefully delineated in humans. Economic forces might restrict treatment availability solely to orally administered PWM therapy in poverty-stricken undeveloped countries if this were shown to be curative. These proposals originating from the authors long concerned with mitogen management of various disorders including HIV infections but only peripherally involved with their clinical applications, are offered for consideration by investigators perceptive enough to see the wisdom of exploring the curative possibilities.

  8. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure treatments on haemagglutination activity and structural conformations of phytohemagglutinin from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2013-02-15

    Red kidney beans were subjected to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (50, 150, 250, 350, 450 MPa) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was then extracted by affinity chromatography. It appeared that HHP treatment could increase crude extract yield and decrease its haemagglutination activity. For purified samples, PHA yield was not affected at pressures <450 MPa while the haemagglutination activity was noticeably reduced at 450 MPa. The structural changes were investigated using electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differencial scanning calorimetry (DSC). Electrophoresis and SEC profiles revealed a new high molecular weight polymer after 450 MPa treatment. At pressures <450 MPa, FTIR showed an increase in β-sheet structure and a decrease in α-helix. At 450 MPa, the bands at 1688 cm(-1), representing aggregate strands and random coils, increased. The conclusions are that pressures <450 MPa can cause PHA unfolding and induce PHA aggregation at 450 MPa.

  9. Structure and Activity Changes of Phytohemagglutinin from Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Affected by Ultrahigh-Pressure Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjun; Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2015-11-01

    Phytohemagglutin (PHA), purified from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) by Affi-Gel blue affinity chromatography, was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) treatment (150, 250, 350, and 450 MPa). The purified PHA lost its hemagglutination activity after 450 MPa treatment and showed less pressure tolerance than crude PHA. However, the saccharide specificity and α-glucosidase inhibition activity of the purified PHA did not change much after UHP treatment. Electrophoresis staining by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) manifested that the glycone structure of purified PHA remained stable even after 450 MPa pressure treatment. However, electrophoresis staining by Coomassie Blue as well as circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) assay proved that the protein unit structure of purified PHA unfolded when treated at 0-250 MPa but reaggregates at 250-450 MPa. Therefore, the hemagglutination activity tends to be affected by the protein unit structure, while the stability of the glycone structure contributed to the remaining α-glucosidase inhibition activity.

  10. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure treatments on haemagglutination activity and structural conformations of phytohemagglutinin from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2013-02-15

    Red kidney beans were subjected to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (50, 150, 250, 350, 450 MPa) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was then extracted by affinity chromatography. It appeared that HHP treatment could increase crude extract yield and decrease its haemagglutination activity. For purified samples, PHA yield was not affected at pressures <450 MPa while the haemagglutination activity was noticeably reduced at 450 MPa. The structural changes were investigated using electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differencial scanning calorimetry (DSC). Electrophoresis and SEC profiles revealed a new high molecular weight polymer after 450 MPa treatment. At pressures <450 MPa, FTIR showed an increase in β-sheet structure and a decrease in α-helix. At 450 MPa, the bands at 1688 cm(-1), representing aggregate strands and random coils, increased. The conclusions are that pressures <450 MPa can cause PHA unfolding and induce PHA aggregation at 450 MPa. PMID:23194535

  11. Structure and Activity Changes of Phytohemagglutinin from Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Affected by Ultrahigh-Pressure Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjun; Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2015-11-01

    Phytohemagglutin (PHA), purified from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) by Affi-Gel blue affinity chromatography, was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) treatment (150, 250, 350, and 450 MPa). The purified PHA lost its hemagglutination activity after 450 MPa treatment and showed less pressure tolerance than crude PHA. However, the saccharide specificity and α-glucosidase inhibition activity of the purified PHA did not change much after UHP treatment. Electrophoresis staining by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) manifested that the glycone structure of purified PHA remained stable even after 450 MPa pressure treatment. However, electrophoresis staining by Coomassie Blue as well as circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) assay proved that the protein unit structure of purified PHA unfolded when treated at 0-250 MPa but reaggregates at 250-450 MPa. Therefore, the hemagglutination activity tends to be affected by the protein unit structure, while the stability of the glycone structure contributed to the remaining α-glucosidase inhibition activity. PMID:26416299

  12. Evaluation of adhesion force and binding affinity of phytohemagglutinin erythroagglutinating to EGF receptor on human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, W-T; Dong, G-C; Yao, C-H; Huang, J-Y; Lin, F-H

    2013-01-01

    PHA-E is a natural product extracted from red kidney beans, and it has been reported to induce cell apoptosis by blocking EGFR in lung cancer cells. Because EGF is the major in vivo competitor to PHA-E in clinical application, PHA-E must be proved that has better affinity to EGFR than EGF. This study would focus on how PHA-E tightly bind to EGFR and the results would compare with EGF. The adhesion force, measured by AFM, between EGFR and PHA-E was 207.14±74.42 pN that was higher than EGF (183.65±86.93 pN). The equilibrium dissociation constant of PHA-E and EGF to EGFR was 2.4 10(-9)±1.4 10(-9) and 7.3 10(-8)±2.7 10(-8), respectively, that could evaluate binding affinity. The result showed that binding affinity of PHA-E to EGFR was one order higher than EGF to EGFR. In the results of flow cytometer and confocal microscope, we found binding efficiency of EGF to EGFR was decrease as the concentration of PHA-E increased. In the analysis of Western blot, treatment of A-549 cells with PHA-E resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in EGFR phosphorylation. In conclusion, we found that PHA-E had better adhesion force and binding affinity to EGFR than that of the EGF. The interaction between PHA-E and EGFR could block EGF binding and then inhibit EGFR phosphorylation. PHA-E could be developed into a new target molecule for lung cancer treatment that could be immobilized on the drug carrier to guide therapeutic particles to the tumor site. PMID:23394551

  13. Sensitivity of cultured lymphocytes from patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome to ultraviolet light and phytohemagglutinin stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.; Celotti, L.; Furlan, D.; Pattarello, I.; Peserico, A. )

    1990-01-01

    DNA repair and replication after in vitro UV irradiation were determined in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from 6 patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and from a group of control donors. DNA repair synthesis (UDS) was measured in unstimulated lymphocytes by incubation with 3H-TdR in the presence of hydroxyurea for 3 and 6 h after UV irradiation (6-48 J/m2). DNA replication was measured in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, UV-irradiated or mock-irradiated, by incubation with 3H-TdR for 24 h. The effect of the mitogen was followed during 5 days after stimulation by determining the incorporation of 3H-TdR, the increase of cell number, and the mitotic index. NBCCS and control lymphocytes showed equal sensitivity to UV light in terms of UDS and reduced response to PHA. On the contrary, the mitotic index and the number of cells in stimulated cultures were significantly lower in the affected subjects. These data suggest an altered progression along the cell cycle, which could be characteristic of stimulated NBCCS lymphocytes.

  14. Exodus of 42K+ and 86Rb+ from rat thymic and human blood lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Segel, G B; Gordon, B R; Lichtman, M A; Hollander, M M; Klemperer, M R

    1976-03-01

    We have found that PHA produces an alteration in the lymphocyte membrane which allows 86Rb+ or 42K+ in prelabeled lymphocytes to exchange for cations present in washing solutions. These observations suggested that PHA might induce an increase in the exodus of intracellular potassium during incubation in physiologic media. We, therefore, examined 86Rb+ and 42K+ efflux from rat and human lymphocytes during incubation in tissue culture medium. The rate constant for efflux, Ke, was significantly increased by PHA. 86Rb+ efflux was increased by 27% in rat thymic lymphocytes and by 78% in human blood lymphocytes following PHA treatment.

  15. [Study of the HLA-DQ system by the complement fixation test on lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin. Existence of HLA-DQX allele(s)].

    PubMed

    Chidiac, A; Colombani, M; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Sansonetti, N; Colombani, J

    1986-04-01

    The complement fixation microtechnique against PHA blasts has been used to study HLA-DQw1, 2, 3 specificities with sera from multiple transfused patients and/or from multiparous women. Several sera (6 or 7) have been used to define each DQ specificity. The sera have been chosen because of their reactivity with cells from HLA-DR 1, 2 or w6 donors (for DQw1), DR3 or 7 donors (for DQw2,) DR4 or 5 donors (for DQw3). Correlation coefficients between DQ and DR specificities were from 0.56 to 0.91. Correlation coefficients between sera were from 0.51 to 0.92 in each cluster of sera. The segregation of DQw1, 2, 3 specificities has been studied in 46 families with 234 children. This study showed haplotypes lacking DQw1, 2, 3 specificities. The segregation of such 11 DQX haplotypes has been observed in 38 children from 8 families; 5 children were DQX/DQX homozygotes. Up to now, no serological reagent defining the specificity (or specificities) corresponding to DQX has been found. No preferential association was observed between DQX and DR specificities. The gene frequencies observed in 170 haplotypes in these 46 families were as follows: DQw1: 0.400; DQw2: 0.252; DQw3: 0.282; DQX: 0.065. Detecting DQ specificities seems easier by CF on PHA blasts than by lymphocytotoxicity microtechnique against B lymphocytes and monocytes from pheripheral blood. This suggests that PHA blasts express larger quantities of DQ molecules than B lymphocytes and monocytes. The results confirm that complement fixation microtechnique against PHA blasts is efficient for HLA-DQw typing. PMID:3092321

  16. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  17. Cutaneous response to PHA-M and hematological changes in corticosteroid treated cows.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R M; Horney, B; Beiner, L

    1981-10-01

    The effect of corticosteroids on the reaction to the intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin was examined in normal cattle. The associated hematological changes were also examined. Normal, untreated cattle responded to an injection of 1 mg phytohemagglutinin in 0.1 mL saline by a 40 to 80% increase in double skin thickness while corticosteroid treated animals had responses approximately one half of the controls. Neutrophils predominated early in the reaction but were replaced by increasing proportions of lymphoid cells towards 72 hours. These results indicate that an intact and functional inflammatory mechanism is required for a cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin. Normal animals had a physiological leukocytosis characterized by an increase in mature neutrophils and lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treated animals had a mature neutrophilia, lymphopenia, eosinopenia and monocytosis. These hematological changes were qualitatively similar to those seen in other species.

  18. Cutaneous response to PHA-M and hematological changes in corticosteroid treated cows.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, R M; Horney, B; Beiner, L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of corticosteroids on the reaction to the intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin was examined in normal cattle. The associated hematological changes were also examined. Normal, untreated cattle responded to an injection of 1 mg phytohemagglutinin in 0.1 mL saline by a 40 to 80% increase in double skin thickness while corticosteroid treated animals had responses approximately one half of the controls. Neutrophils predominated early in the reaction but were replaced by increasing proportions of lymphoid cells towards 72 hours. These results indicate that an intact and functional inflammatory mechanism is required for a cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin. Normal animals had a physiological leukocytosis characterized by an increase in mature neutrophils and lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treated animals had a mature neutrophilia, lymphopenia, eosinopenia and monocytosis. These hematological changes were qualitatively similar to those seen in other species. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7337870

  19. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  20. Sensitivity of lymphocytes to prostaglandin E2 increases in subjects over age 70.

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J S; Messner, R P

    1979-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of lymphocytes from different age groups to inhibition by prostaglandin E2. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 12 healthy subjects over the age of 70 were much more sensitive to inhibition by exogenously added prostaglandin E2 than were cells from 17 young controls (ID50 congruent to 10 nM for the subjects over 70 vs. greater than 3 micronM for the young controls). The more senstivie lymphocytes from a subject over 70 were to prostaglandin E2, the lower was his or her response to phytohemagglutinin (r = 0.75, P less than 0.01). The mean responses to phytohemagglutinin of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the subjects over 70 were significantly depressed compared to the young controls. Addition of indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, to the cultures resulted in an increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation of 140 +/- 16% in the cells of the subjects over 70 vs. a 36 +/- 3% increase in the young controls (mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.001). The mean phytohemagglutinin response of the subjects over 70 was 40% of the control response without indomethacin. With addition of indomethacin the response of subjects over 70 rose to 72% of control. Thus, increased sinsitivity to prostaglandin E2 appears to be responsible in part for the depressed mitogen response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects over 70. PMID:457862

  1. 40 CFR 798.5375 - In vitro mammalian cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mitogen, e.g., phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and incubated at 37 °C. White cells sedimented by gravity (buffy... specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported: (i) Cells... detection of chromosomal aberrations in cultured mammalian cells. Chromosomal aberrations may be...

  2. 40 CFR 798.5375 - In vitro mammalian cytogenetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mitogen, e.g., phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and incubated at 37 °C. White cells sedimented by gravity (buffy... specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported: (i) Cells... detection of chromosomal aberrations in cultured mammalian cells. Chromosomal aberrations may be...

  3. Studying the proliferation of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Tabakov, V U; Litvina, M M; Schepkina, J V; Jarilin, A A; Chestkov, V V

    2009-01-01

    We compared the cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in serum-free medium Hybris-2 and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum in the presence of phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The optimal concentration of phytohemagglutinin significantly differed in serum-free and serum-containing media (0.5 and 5 microg/ml, [corrected] respectively). Both mitogens were more potent in stimulating the proliferation of lymphocytes in serum-free medium than in serum-containing medium. Strong proliferation of CD3(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was observed in both media. The dynamics of other markers was similar in serum-free and serum-containing media. However, significant differences were revealed between individual donors. Our results indicate that the developed serum-free medium may be used in lymphocyte cultivation for scientific, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes.

  4. Effect of triacontanol on numbers and functions of cells involved in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Warren, R P; Burger, R A; Sidwell, R W; Clark, L L

    1992-07-01

    A preparation of a triacontanol-containing compound was studied for its effect on cells involved in the inflammatory response. C57BL/6 mice were injected intraperitoneally with various concentrations of this compound and investigated for total body weight, wet weight of thymus tissue, number of thymus cells and splenocytes, interleukin 1 production of spleen monocytes, and response of splenocytes to the T cell mitogen, phytohemagglutinin. Mice treated with the triacontanol preparation exhibited decreased total body weight, 24% reduction in thymus weights, 39% decrease in the number of thymus cells, and 21% depression in total splenocytes. Splenic monocytes of these animals produced a significantly reduced amount of interleukin 1 and splenocytes had a significantly depressed response to phytohemagglutinin. It is concluded that triacontanol has an inhibitory effect on at least some of the cells responsible for inflammation.

  5. A comparison of irradiation and mitomycin as blocking agents in the mixed lymphocyte reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Pogue, L.; Troup, G.M.; Standefer, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    In comparison with administration of mitomycin, lethal irradiation (2,000 rad) of the stimulator cells in a one-way mixed leukocyte culture results in a reduced response due at least in part to the release of inhibitory materials by the irradiated cells. These inhibitory molecules may be partially removed by washing and possess differential reactivity with respect to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and pokeweed mitogen.

  6. Proliferative responses of lymphocytes to mitogens in the gray, short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Brozek, C M; Kaleta, E W; Kusewitt, D F; Ley, R D

    1992-02-15

    A South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) is a model animal for studies on the health effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). As part of a broad evaluation of immune function in this animal, we have tested in vitro mitogenic responses using whole blood cultures. Lymphocytes proliferated in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM), but were unresponsive to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  7. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  8. 4-Quinolone drugs affect cell cycle progression and function of human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, A; Schlossman, S F; Tedder, T F

    1987-01-01

    Most antibacterial agents do not affect human lymphocyte function, but a few are inhibitory. In contrast, a pronounced increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in the presence of 4-quinolones was observed in these studies. The uptake of [3H]thymidine into DNA (trichloroacetic acid precipitable) was significantly increased in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes when they were exposed to eight new 4-quinolone derivatives, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, A-56619, A-56620, amifloxacin, enoxacin, and pefloxacin, at 1.6 to 6.25 micrograms/ml for 5 days. Four less antibacterially active 4-quinolones (nalidixic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, and pipemidic acid) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation only at higher concentrations or not at all. Kinetic studies showed that incorporation of [3H]thymidine was not affected or slightly inhibited by ciprofloxacin 2 days after phytohemagglutinin stimulation but was increased on days 3 to 6. The total incorporation of [3H]thymidine from day 1 to day 6 after phytohemagglutinin stimulation was increased by 42 to 45% at 5 to 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. Increased [3H]thymidine incorporation was also seen when human lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens other than phytohemagglutinin. Ciprofloxacin added at the start of the culture had a more pronounced effect on [3H]thymidine incorporation than when added later. In spite of the apparent increase in DNA synthesis, lymphocyte growth was inhibited by 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and cell cycle analysis showed that ciprofloxacin inhibited progression through the cell cycle. In addition, immunoglobulin secretion by human lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen for Epstein-Barr virus was inhibited by approximately 50% at 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. These results suggest that the 4-quinolone drugs may also affect eucaryotic cell function in vitro, but additional studies are needed to establish an in vivo relevance. PMID:3606076

  9. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Eyng, C.; Murakami, A. E.; Santos, T. C.; Silveira, T. G. V.; Pedroso, R. B.; Lourenço, D. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control – macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and

  10. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets.

    PubMed

    Eyng, C; Murakami, A E; Santos, T C; Silveira, T G V; Pedroso, R B; Lourenço, D A L

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control - macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and

  11. Effects of dietary lectins on ion transport in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, Karl; Sun, J; Schreiber, R; König, Jens

    2004-08-01

    Phytohemagglutinins are widely distributed in common food items. They constitute a heterogeneous group of proteins, which are often resistant to proteolysis in the gastrointestinal tract. Upon binding to the luminal membrane of intestinal cells, they can interfere with digestive, protective or secretory functions of the intestine. Phytohemagglutinins present in red kidney beans and jackbeans have been shown to induce diarrhea and hypersecretion in human airways, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We examined how agglutinins from wheat germ (WGA), soy bean (SBA), red kidney beans (Pha-E, Pha-L), and jackbeans (Con-A) affect ion transport in mouse airways and large intestine using Ussing chamber techniques. We found that Pha-E, Pha-L, and Con-A but not WGA and SBA inhibit electrogenic Na(+) absorption dose dependently in both colon and trachea. The inhibitory effects of Con-A on Na(+) absorption were suppressed by the sugar mannose, by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC). Thus, nutritional phytohemagglutinins block salt absorption in a PLC- and PKC-dependent manner, probably by inhibition of the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC). This effect may be therapeutically useful in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. PMID:15237102

  12. Binding of isolectins from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to purified rat brush-border membranes.

    PubMed

    Boldt, D H; Banwell, J G

    1985-12-13

    Ingestion of red kidney bean phytohemagglutinin causes impaired growth and intestinal malabsorption, and facilitates bacterial colonization in the small intestine of weanling rats. We have studied interactions of the highly purified phytohemagglutinin erythroagglutinating (E4) and mitogenic (L4) isolectins with microvillous membrane vesicles prepared from rat small intestines. E4 and L4 were radioiodinated with 125I by the chloramine-T technique. E4 and L4 isolectins both bound to microvillous membrane vesicles. Binding was saturable and reversible. Each mg of membrane protein bound 744 +/- 86 micrograms E4 and 213 +/- 21 micrograms L4. The apparent Ka for E4 and L4 binding was 2.5 x 10(-6) and 13.0 x 10(-6) M-1, respectively. Binding of each 125I-labelled isolectin was abolished by 100-fold excess of unlabelled isolectin. In each case binding also was inhibited by appropriate oligosaccharide inhibitors, indicating that isolectin-microvillous membrane interactions were mediated by carbohydrate recognition. Patterns of saccharide inhibition of isolectin binding were different for E4 and L4. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated mutual noncompetitive inhibition of E4 and L4 binding consistent with steric hindrance. Therefore, E4 and L4 each bound to its own set of receptors. Based on the known saccharide specificities of E4 and L4, these data indicate that there are differences in expression of complex asparagine-linked biantennary and tri- or tetraantennary oligosaccharides at the microvillous surface. The data also provide the possibility that direct interactions of one or more phytohemagglutinin isolectins with intestinal mucosa in vivo may contribute to the antinutritional effects associated with ingestion of crude red kidney beans. PMID:4063394

  13. Responses of bovine lymphocytes to heat shock as modified by breed and antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Kamwanja, L A; Chase, C C; Gutierrez, J A; Guerriero, V; Olson, T A; Hammond, A C; Hansen, P J

    1994-02-01

    We tested whether resistance of lymphocytes to heat stress is modified by breed, intracellular glutathione content, and extracellular antioxidants. In the first experiment, lymphocytes from Angus (Bos taurus, non-heat-tolerant), Brahman (B. indicus, heat-tolerant), and Senepol (B. taurus, heat-tolerant) heifers (12 heifers per breed) were cultured at 45 degrees C for 3 h to evaluate thermal killing, at 42 degrees C for 12 h in a 60-h phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation test, and at 42 degrees C for 1 h to measure induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Killing at 45 degrees C was affected by breed x temperature (P < .01); the decrease in viability caused by a temperature of 45 degrees C was greater for Angus than for Brahman or Senepol. For phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes, heating to 42 degrees C reduced [3H]thymidine incorporation equally for all breeds. Viability at the end of culture was affected (P < .001) by a breed x temperature interaction because the decrease in viability caused by culture at 42 degrees C was greatest for lymphocytes from Angus heifers. Heat shock for 1 h at 42 degrees C caused a two- to threefold increase in intracellular concentrations of HSP70, but there was no interaction of temperature with breed. In another experiment (with lymphocytes harvested from three Holstein cows), buthionine sulfoximine, a glutathione synthesis inhibitor, inhibited (P < .01) proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes at 38.5 and 42 degrees C. Addition of the antioxidants glutathione or thioredoxin to culture did not reduce the effects of heating to 42 degrees C on proliferation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8157528

  14. Human cellular immune responsiveness following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Dardano, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral circulating lymphocytes were separated from astronaut blood samples three times before and two times after the first four US Space Shuttle flights. The ability of the in vitro T lymphocytes to respond to Phytohemagglutinin by blastogenesis was found to be reduced for each crewmember following spaceflight. In addition, the astronauts experienced a postflight increase in neutrophils and a decrease in eosinophils. These postflight changes in leukocytes are shown to increase with subjectively-evaluated increases in the incidence of inflight stress, indicating that stress, and not hypogravity, is likely to be the major effector of these changes.

  15. Separation of human lymphocytes on Ficoll-Paque gradients: stimulation of cells and depletion of a concanavalin-A responsive radioresistant subpopulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kol, R.; Friedlaender, M.; Riklis, E.; Raveh, D.

    1983-07-01

    A subpopulation of human lymphocytes separated on Ficoll-Paque gradients showed an ultrastructural phenotype characteristic of stimulated cells. Thymidine incorporation was increased fivefold compared with unseparated (Buffy coat) controls. The Ficoll-Paque separated lymphocytes were more sensitive to gamma radiation than unseparated lymphocytes and showed a decreased capability to undergo transformation in response to concanavalin A. Transformation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen was the same as for unseparated control lymphocytes. These results are interpreted as the selective depletion of a Con A-responsive T-cell fraction by Ficoll-Paque separation.

  16. Separation of human lymphocytes on Ficoll-Paque gradients: stimulation of cells and depletion of a concanavalin-A responsive radioresistant subpopulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kol, R.; Friedlaender, M.; Riklis, E.; Raveh, D.

    1983-07-01

    A subpopulation of human lymphocytes separated on Ficoll-Paque gradients showed an ultrastructural phenotype characteristic of stimulated cells. Thymidine incorporation was increased fivefold compared with unseparated (Buffy coat) controls. The Ficoll-Paque separated lymphocytes were more sensitive to ..gamma.. radiation than unseparated lymphocytes and showed a decreased capability to undergo transformation in response to concanavalin A. Transformation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen was the same as for unseparated control lymphocytes. These results are interpreted as the selective depletion of a Con A-responsive T-cell fraction by Ficoll-Paque separation.

  17. Suppression of lymphocyte proliferative responses by sera from patients with American visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Barral, A; Carvalho, E M; Badaró, R; Barral-Netto, M

    1986-07-01

    We examined the effect of sera from 11 patients with American visceral leishmaniasis on mitogen-driven lymphocyte proliferative capacity. All sera inhibited lymphocyte proliferation of patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) when stimulated by either phytohemagglutinin, Concanavalin A or pokeweed mitogen. Serum was also strongly inhibitory for Concanavalin A-pulsed normal volunteers' PMBC. The effect of the serum was not due to cytotoxicity, inadequate nutritional support or altered kinetics of DNA synthesis. High levels of IgM or IgG (both total and antiparasite) and high levels of triglycerides were found in patients' sera.

  18. [Supression of the lymphocyte blast transformation reaction evoked in human subjects by a fat load].

    PubMed

    Dil'man, V M; Fedorov, S N; Vishnevskiĭ, A S; Poroshina, T E

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that "Intralipid"--triglycerides emulsion, used for parenteral feeding, administered intravenously in the amount of 200 ml would induce within 2 hours in human subjects a metabolic immunosuppression, estimated by a drop in the labelled thymidine and uridine incorporation into phytohemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes. The dosage blood loss (25 ml of blood) would prevent the inhibition of lymphocytic blasttransformation reaction, that seems to prove the functional nature of metabolic immunosuppression, induced by the increased concentration of fatty acids in blood due to hydrolysis of administered triglycerides. The relationship between metabolic immunosuppression and the standard methods of treatment used in oncology is briefly discussed.

  19. Suppressor cell hyperactivity relative to allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation as a manifestation of defective T-T-cell interactions in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Stenina, M.A.; Potapova, A.A.; Biryukov, A.V.; Skripnik, A.Yu.; Cheredeev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the state of immunoregulatory process in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at the T-T-cell interaction level and seek to test the possibility of the pharmacological modulation of this process. The proliferative activity of mononuclear lymphocytes, extracted from the blood of ten lupus patients, was assessed by measuring the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into cultures stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and theophylline. The comparative effects of each of these agents on the immunoregulatory and proliferative activity of the lymphocytes are reported.

  20. Lymphocyte function in patients with recurrent aphthous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sun, A; Wu, Y C; Kwan, H W

    1987-08-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation (LP) responses to mitogens: phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA) and pokeweed mitogens (PWM) were studied in 17 patients with recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU) of minor type (MiAU) and 20 age/sex-matched healthy subjects. RAU patients elicited normal T-cell and B-cell responses to mitogens in comparison with healthy subjects. Proliferative responses were neither enhanced during active episodes of oral ulceration nor suppressed during periods of remission. It seems unlikely that non-specific lymphocyte dysfunction plays a major role in the pathogenesis of RAU.

  1. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  2. CELLS INVOLVED IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Daguillard, Fritz; Richter, Maxwell

    1970-01-01

    There exists in the rabbit a population of lymphocytes carrying immunoglobulin-like receptors on their surface. These receptors interact with antigen and with anti-immunoglobulin antibodies and appear to mediate the recognition process leading to the humoral immune response. There exists in the rabbit a second population of lymphocytes capable of reacting with phytohemagglutinin. This population of lymphocytes is different from the one capable of reacting with soluble protein antigens or anti-immunoglobulin antiserum and is probably involved in the mediation of cellular immunity. PMID:5308064

  3. Use of whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls.

    PubMed

    Redig, P T; Dunnette, J L; Sivanandan, V

    1984-11-01

    Mitogen-induced whole blood lymphocyte stimulation tests for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were developed. Combinations of incubation times, blood dilutions, concentrations of [3H]thymidine and [125I]2-deoxyuridine, antibiotics, phytohemagglutinin-P, and concanavalin A were tested for their effects on the stimulation index (SI). An antibiotic combination of gentamicin plus amphotericin B yielded low SI with lymphocytes from bald eagles, but not with lymphocytes from great horned owls or red-tailed hawks. Penicillin plus streptomycin caused no such depression of SI. Lymphocytes from all 3 species yielded maximum responses with a 48-hour prelabel and 12- to- 16 hour postlabel incubation period at 41 C and 1:20 blood dilution. Optimal mitogen concentrations for lymphocytes from bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls were 25 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of phytohemagglutinin-P/well, respectively, and 2.5 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of concanavalin A/well, respectively. Differences in SI were not seen between the 2 radioactive labels. The optimal concentration of the [3H]thymidine label ranged from 0.06 to 0.125 microCi/well. PMID:6524727

  4. Interaction of lectins with human IgE: IgE-binding property and histamine-releasing activity of twelve plant lectins.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, M; Sumazaki, R; Isoyama, S; Takita, H

    1992-01-01

    We examined the IgE-binding reaction and the histamine-releasing response of basophils to a panel of 12 lectins: concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris hemagglutinin (LcH), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA-I), Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin (Lotus A), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), phytohemagglutinin E (PHA-E) and phytohemagglutinin L (PHA-L), IgE from allergic patients bound with high affinity to Con A, LcH, PSA, RCA-I and PHA-E, and with lower affinity to WGA, BPA, Lotus A and UEA-I, but they did not bind to SBA, PNA or PHA-L. There was no apparent individual difference in the reactivity of IgE to these lectins between 10 IgE preparations from allergic patients. The binding to these lectins, except Lotus A and UEA-I, were competitively inhibited by the lectin-specific sugars or glycopeptide. Upon stimulation by Con A, LcH, PSA, WGA, RCA-1 and PHA-E, leukocytes from allergic patients showed a significant release of histamine, but cells from IgE-deficient subjects did not respond to these lectins. The histamine-releasing responses by these lectins were also inhibited by specific sugars or glycopeptides.

  5. FINE STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF INTERPHASE NUCLEI OF LYMPHOCYTES STIMULATED TO GROWTH ACTIVITY IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyasu, K.; Madden, S. C.; Zeldis, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes fine structural changes of interphase nuclei of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated to growth by short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin. Chromatin is found highly labile, its changes accompanying the sequential increases of RNA and DNA synthesis which are known to occur in lymphocyte cultures. In "resting" lymphocytes, abundant condensed chromatin appears as a network of large and small aggregates. Early in the response to phytohemagglutinin, small aggregates disappear during increase of diffuse chromatin regions. Small aggregates soon reappear, probably resulting from disaggregation of large masses of condensed chromatin. Loosened and highly dispersed forms then appear prior to the formation of prophase chromosomes. The loosened state is found by radioautography to be most active in DNA synthesis. Small nucleoli of resting lymphocytes have concentric agranular, fibrillar, and granular zones with small amounts of intranucleolar chromatin. Enlarging interphase nucleoli change chiefly (1) by increase in amount of intranucleolar chromatin and alteration of its state of aggregation and (2) by increase in granular components in close association with fibrillar components. PMID:5699935

  6. A novel insight into the immunologic basis of chronic granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rae, William; Doffinger, Rainer; Shelton, Fenella; Sproson, Eleanor; Ismail-Koch, Hasnaa; Lund, Valerie J.; Harries, Philip G.; Eren, Efrem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (CGIFRS) is a rare disease. The underlying immune responses that drive the development of CGIFRS, as opposed to successful pathogen clearance and controlled inflammation, are not currently known. Objective: To characterize the immune responses associated with CGIFRS. Methods: In addition to a battery of basic investigations, more in-depth immunologic testing involves ex vivo whole-blood stimulation with the polyclonal T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin and fungal antigens with interleukin (IL) 12, was undertaken to investigate cell-mediated immune responses associated with CGIFRS. Results: Ex vivo whole-blood stimulation with the polyclonal T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin and fungal antigens with IL-12 identified reduced interferon gamma and increased IL-17A levels within the supernatant, which indicated increased in vivo T-helper (Th)17 responses and impaired Th1 responses compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the development of CGIFRS may be associated with an abnormally exaggerated host Th17 response, which caused failure to clear the fungal pathogen with refractory fungal infection of mucosal membranes, resulting in chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:27658186

  7. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides counteract inhibition on CD71 and FasL expression by culture supernatant of B16F10 cells upon lymphocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LI-XIN; LIN, ZHI-BIN; DUAN, XIN-SUO; LU, JIE; GE, ZHI-HUA; LI, MIN; XING, EN-HONG; LAN, TIAN-FEI; JIANG, MIAO-MIAO; YANG, NING; LI, WEI-DONG

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses to tumor-associated antigens are often detectable in tumor-bearing hosts, but they fail to eliminate malignant cells or prevent development of metastases. Tumor cells produce factors such as interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that suppress the function of immune cells or induce apoptosis of immune cells. Culture supernatant of tumor cells may contain these immunosuppressive factors which suppress lymphocyte activation. CD71 and FasL are two important molecules that are expressed upon lymphocyte activation. Counteraction against suppression CD71 and FasL expression upon lymphocyte activation may benefit tumor control. A potential component with this effect is Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS). In this study, Gl-PS was used on lymphocytes incubating with culture supernatant of B16F10 melanoma cells (B16F10-CS) in the presence of phytohemagglutinin. Following induction with phytohemagglutinin, B16F10-CS suppressed CD71 expression in lymphocytes (as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry), proliferation in lymphocytes (as detected by MTT assay), and FasL expression in lymphocytes (as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis), while Gl-PS fully or partially counteracted these suppressions. Gl-PS showed counteractive effects against suppression induced by B16F10-CS on CD71 and FasL expression upon lymphocyte activation, suggesting the potential of Gl-PS to facilitate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23596479

  8. Induction of tibial dyschondroplasia and suppression of cell-mediated immunity in chickens by Fusarium oxysporum grown on sterile corn.

    PubMed

    Chu, Q; Wu, W; Cook, M E; Smalley, E B

    1995-01-01

    An isolate of Fusarium oxysporum from corn associated with Kaschin-Beck disease in humans was tested for its ability to induce tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) and toxicity in chicks. Both leghorn and broiler chicks were fed diets in which corn was replaced with varied amounts (0% to 50%) of the F. oxysporum culture grown on sterile corn, or with known TD-inducing agents. F. oxysporum did not affect body weight in either type of chicks. In leghorn chicks, neither F. oxysporum nor the known TD-inducing agents (F. equiseti, 4%; tetramethylthiuram disulfide [Thiram], 35 ppm) caused TD. However, F. oxysporum at high levels (50%) and the two known TD-inducing agents reduced interdigital cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin-P challenge. In addition, Thiram also reduced body-weight gain by more than 17%. In female broiler chicks (Cornish Rock), F. oxysporum not only decreased cell-mediated cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin-P but also increased TD incidence; these same effects were observed with F. equiseti and Thiram. Histological examinations revealed similar pathological changes among dyschondroplastic lesions induced by F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, and Thiram. Results of this experiment indicate that the isolate of F. oxysporum from the region in which Kaschin-Beck disease is endemic can induce TD in broiler chicks and that it is immunosuppressive.

  9. Thermal stability of Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin: a differential scanning calorimetry study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2002-09-30

    Phaseolus vulgaris phytohemagglutinin L is a homotetrameric-leucoagglutinating seed lectin. Its three-dimensional structure shows similarity with other members of the legume lectin family. The tetrameric form of this lectin is pH dependent. Gel filtration results showed that the protein exists in its dimeric state at pH 2.5 and as a tetramer at pH 7.2. Contrary to earlier reports on legume lectins that possess canonical dimers, thermal denaturation studies show that the refolding of phytohemagglutinin L at neutral pH is irreversible. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the denaturation of this lectin as a function of pH that ranged from 2.0 to 3.0. The lectin was found to be extremely thermostable with a transition temperature around 82 degrees C and above 100 degrees C at pH 2.5 and 7.2, respectively. The ratio of calorimetric to vant Hoff enthalpy could not be calculated because of its irreversible-folding behavior. However, from the DSC data, it was discovered that the protein remains in its compact-folded state, even at pH 2.3, with the onset of denaturation occurring at 60 degrees C. PMID:12359088

  10. Feed intake, body weight, body condition score, musculation, and immunocompetence in aged mares given equine somatotropin.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K; Christensen, R A; Konopka, A; Scanes, C G; Hafs, H D

    1997-03-01

    Sixteen 20- to 26-yr-old mares were given 0, 6.25, or 12.5 mg/d equine somatotropin (eST) to determine whether aged mares respond to ST with changes in feed intake, body weight, body condition score (based mostly on fat cover), or immunocompetence. Neither dry matter intake, body weight, nor body condition scores were altered during the 6 wk of eST injection. However, based on photographs taken to evaluate musculation before and after treatment (scores 0 to 4), mares given eST developed greater (P < .07) muscle definition (1.8 +/- .6 and 2.5 +/- .6 for 6.25 and 12.5 mg eST/d, respectively) than control mares (.7 +/- .4). Total circulating leukocytes increased (P < .05) in both of the eST-treated groups during the 6-wk injection period, caused by an increase (P < .05) in granulocytes. Lymphocyte numbers were not altered. Granulocyte oxidative burst activity was not altered by eST treatment. Although lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, or lipopolysaccharide were not altered during the treatment period, lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen increased twofold in eST-treated horses at 2 wk after eST treatment. In overview, the increased musculation and the increase in granulocyte numbers in mares given eST suggest that eST supplementation may improve the health and well-being of aged mares. PMID:9078493

  11. Disparate actions of hydroxyurea in potentiation of purine and pyrimidine 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside activities against replication of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, W Y; Johns, D G; Chokekuchai, S; Mitsuya, H

    1995-01-01

    We and other groups have recently reported the potentiation by ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors such as hydroxyurea of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity of purine and pyrimidine 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides in both resting and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Little agreement prevails, however, as to the mechanism of the synergistic effects described. We report here that in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, two mechanisms exist for the potentiation of the anti-HIV-1 activity by low-dose hydroxyurea of the purine-based dideoxynucleoside 2',3'-dideoxyinosine and the pyrimidine-based dideoxynucleosides 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine. For 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, the enhancement arises from a specific depletion of dATP by hydroxyurea, resulting in a favorable shift of the 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate/dATP ratio. For the pyrimidine dideoxynucleosides 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, the more modest anti-HIV enhancement results from hydroxyurea-induced increases of pyrimidine kinase activities in the salvage pathway and, hence, increased 5'-phosphorylation of these drugs, while depletion of the corresponding deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates (dTTP and dCTP) plays no significant role. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7667290

  12. Effect of azacytidine in the release of leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin m, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-11 by mononuclear cells of patients with refractory anemia.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Barrales-Benítez, Olga; Flores, Martín; Piedras, Josefa

    2002-11-24

    5-azacytidine (AZA) yields hematologic improvement in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Ineffective hemopoiesis in MDS produce the paradox of high intramedullary cellularity with peripheral cytopenias. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-11 regulate hemopoiesis and LIF, OSM, and IL-6 also inhibit the proliferation of myeloid leukemic cell lines through the signal-transducing subunit gp130. These IL-6-type cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in cell culture supernatants (SN) obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) and monocyte-depleted MNC of patients with refractory anemia (RA; n=12) and healthy individuals (n=10). AZA down-regulated OSM, IL-6, and IL-11 release by MNC of patients but not by MNC from healthy individuals. Patient's SN had significantly lower concentrations of LIF, OSM, and IL-11 than SN of normal subjects. When monocyte-depleted MNC of patients were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin a significant increment in OSM levels was observed. In contrast, monocyte depletion in healthy subjects did not cause any significant change in OSM values. We conclude that: (a) AZA inhibits the release of OSM, IL-6, and IL-11 exclusively in RA-diseased MNC, (b) Patient's MNC release subnormal amounts of LIF, OSM, and IL-11, and (c) RA-derived monocytes probably down-regulate OSM release by phytohemagglutinin-activated MNC.

  13. Conditioned medium from stimulated mononuclear leukocytes augments human neutrophil-mediated killing of a virulent Acanthamoeba sp.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A; Abell, T J

    1986-01-01

    Human neutrophils in the presence of serum containing anti-amoeba antibody either lacked amoebicidal activity or were poorly amoebicidal for Acanthamoeba culbertsoni. In contrast, neutrophils preexposed for 1 h to supernatants from human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (MNLs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin demonstrated significant amoeba killing in the presence of serum containing anti-acanthamoeba antibodies. Supernatant from MNL cultured in the absence of phytohemagglutinin were not effective in stimulating significant activity in the neutrophils. Serum containing antibody promoted the adherence of many neutrophils to one amoeba. There was no significant difference between the ability of neutrophils treated with supernatants from stimulated MNLs (stimulated conditioned medium [sCM]) and supernatants from nonstimulated MNLs (nonstimulated conditioned medium [nsCM]) in their binding to acanthamoeba. The effects of sCM on neutrophils was a general phenomenon. For example, the sCM but not the nsCM enhanced the antibody-dependent neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity against three tumor targets (K562 erythroid myeloid leukemia cell line, B16 melanoma, and P815 (DBA/2 mastocytoma). Furthermore, the sCM but not the nsCM increased the bactericidal (against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae) and fungicidal (against Torulopsis glabrata) activity of the neutrophil. The sCM but not the nsCM contained activities which inhibited neutrophil migration and stimulated a respiratory burst in these leukocytes. These results suggest that the neutrophil antimicrobial power can be increased by exposing the leukocytes to MNL mediators. Images PMID:3943902

  14. Infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vydelingum, S; Ilonen, J; Salonen, R; Marusyk, R; Salmi, A

    1989-01-01

    A stable temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus (MV ts38) was used to study the mechanism of virus-mediated immune suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures released infectious virus at 32 degrees C, whereas no virus was released at 37 degrees C, although both viral RNA and viral proteins were synthesized. However, the response of the lymphoid cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and herpes simplex virus antigen was decreased in the presence of MV ts38 at 37 degrees C. The viability of infected cells was not diminished, therefore excluding cell death as a reason for immunosuppression. Interleukin 2 did not play a role in the inhibitory effect of MV ts38. Antibodies to alpha interferon partially reversed the inhibitory effect of the virus infection on lymphocyte mitogenesis, thus implying that alpha interferon plays a role in the immunosuppression. Depletion experiments indicated that adherent cells play a greater role in the measles virus-induced immunosuppression than nonadherent cells. However, monocyte maturation to macrophages had no effect on the degree of immunosuppression. Images PMID:2911119

  15. Chemical constituents, in vitro protein digestibility, and presence of antinutritional substances in amaranth grains.

    PubMed

    Correa, A D; Jokl, L; Carlsson, R

    1986-06-01

    The chemical composition, content of antinutritional factors, and the in vitro protein digestibility of grains of the pseudo-cereal Amaranthus were analyzed. The plants were grown in Brazil (without fertilizer), Puerto Rico (100 kg N/ha), and California (200 kg N/ha). The seed analysis gave the following values (%DM): 14.4 - 16.9 protein (N X 6.25), 4.8 - 6.8 fat, 2.5 - 3.9 ash, and 2.3 - 2.9 crude fiber. The trypsin inhibitors, phenolics and saponine contents were low, and the phytohemagglutinin activity, fairly low. The in vitro protein digestibility was 61 - 76%. Digestibility was not correlated to the analyzed proximal composition nor to the antinutritional factors. The grain composition indicates a food value equivalent to that of conventional food grains. PMID:3632210

  16. Immunological aspects of the common food colorants, amaranth and tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Koutsogeorgopoulou, L; Maravelias, C; Methenitou, G; Koutselinis, A

    1998-02-01

    We describe a sensitive and reproducible microassay model using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for discrimination between the cytotoxic and immunosuppressive effects of food colorants such as amaranth and tartrazine. The cytotoxic effects of a wide range of concentrations of these substances were studied on human PBL by the colorimetric in vitro cytotoxicity assays, neutral red uptake (NR) and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The immunotoxic properties of these 2 substances were determined by a [3H]-thymidine DNA incorporation assay on phytohemagglutinin stimulated or non-stimulated lymphocytes, as well as by a Cr51 release Natural Killer assays. The results showed clear immunosuppressive effects from the 2 substances tested, although the concentrations chosen for this study proved to be non-cytotoxic by NR and MTT cytotoxic endpoints.

  17. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type. PMID:303689

  18. Estrogenic xenobiotics affect the intracellular activation signal in mitogen-induced human peripheral blood lymphocytes: immunotoxicological impact.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Okuma, M; Kazuno, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, T; Furuya, H; Kayama, F; Suwa, Y; Fujii, W; Fresa, K L

    1998-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to elucidate the effect of estrogenic xenobiotics on the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL). Our findings follow: (a) the proliferation of PBL in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was mediated by protein kinase C activity, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on protein kinase C activity of PHA-stimulated PBL; (b) cytoplasmic extracts from PHA-stimulated PBL greatly activated DNA replication, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on these activities. The results suggest that the cytoplasmic signal-generating system in mitogen-treated PBL is inhibited by estrogenic xenobiotics, and that the defect occurs at all stages in the sequence of events leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. PMID:9730256

  19. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  20. Lymphocyte transformation in presumed ocular histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, J.P.; Nemo, G.J.; Comstock, G.W.; Brody, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with inactive macular disciform lesions of presumed ocular histoplasmosis challenged with three histoplasmin antigens incorporated tritiated thymidine at a significantly higher rate than histoplasmin-stimulated lymphocytes of matched control and peripheral scar groups. This finding is consistent with the etiologic association of the disciform ocular syndrome and previous systemic infection with Histoplasma capsulatum. The disciform group had a higher mean response than the other two groups to pokeweed mitogen but not to phytohemagglutinin and had higher mean counts per minute to the specific antigens Toxoplasma gondii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M battery, and M gaus, but not to Candida albicans. These data would suggest that individuals with the disciform lesion of presumed ocular histoplasmosis have a hyperreactive cellular immune response; this response may play an important role in the development of the disciform.

  1. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term followup of patients treated with 750 rads or 2,000 rads

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, M.; Hassan, J.; Scott, D.L.; Hanly, J.G.; Moriarty, M.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1989-05-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were randomized to receive 750 or 2,000 rads of lymphoid irradiation (LI) in a double-blind comparative study, and were followed for a maximum of 48 months (mean 40 months) after treatment. During followup, sustained immunomodulation (including lymphopenia, particularly of the T helper cell subset; reduced ratio of helper cells to suppressor cells; and impaired in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) was observed. Significant improvements in early morning stiffness, Ritchie articular index, pain score, grip strength, and 15-meter walk time were observed in both treatment groups, but these were not sustained through the followup period. Progressive joint damage was observed radiologically in both groups during followup. Thus, LI induced sustained immunosuppression, but resulted in only short-lived clinical improvement and was associated with progressive joint erosion in these patients.

  2. Immune and hormonal changes in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Everaus, H; Lehtmaa, J; Luik, E; Kŏdar, H

    1992-11-01

    Fifty-six previously untreated stage-I (according to Rai) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients were examined for their clinical data, immunological characteristics, and hormonal values. Dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes was demonstrated by changed lymphocyte blastogenic response to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), pisum sativatum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2), and dextran sulfate (DxS); also by decreased immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA, IgE) and increased beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) values. Simultaneously, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system integration, imbalance of sex hormones, and changes in thyroid hormones were observed in the same group of patients. Disturbed immunohormonal interactions in early-stage CLL may be responsible for the pathogenetic mechanisms in this lymphoproliferative malignancy.

  3. AntiTumor and Immunoregulatory Effects of Fermented Papaya Preparation (FPP: SAIDOPS501).

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinki; Eikawa, Shingo; Kaya, Savas; Imao, Mitsuko; Aji, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Various beneficial effects have been described for fermented papaya preparation (FPP: SAIDOPS501) based on its antioxidative and antiinflammatory functions. The present study was designed to determine the effects of FPP on carcinogenesis in vivo, and immunomodulatory function in vitro. Mice were injected with RL male 1 cells subcutaneously or 3methylcholantherene (MCA) intravenously to induce cancer and orally or intraperitoneally treated with FPP solution. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from healthy volunteers and patients with atopic dermatitis, treated with FPP, and subjected to measurement of cytokine production and changes in Foxp3expressing regulatory T cell (Treg) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Administration of FPP suppressed tumor size and the incidence of malignancy. In vitro, treatment of PBMC with FPP induced IL1?, TNFα and IFNγ production. Moreover, FPP suppressed proliferation of PHAstimulated Foxp3expressing Treg. These results suggest that FPP has chemotherapeutic properties. PMID:27509932

  4. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  5. Signals involved in T cell activation. II. Distinct roles of intact accessory cells, phorbol esters, and interleukin 1 in activation and cell cycle progression of resting T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1986-05-15

    The signals involved in the initiation of mitogen-induced activation of resting guinea pig T cells were examined. The combination of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated DNA synthesis by accessory cell (AC)-depleted T cells cultured at high density, but the use of low density cultures indicated that intact AC were absolutely necessary for PHA-stimulated T cell DNA synthesis even in the presence of PMA, interleukin 1 (IL 1), or interleukin 2 (IL 2). In contrast, AC-depleted T cells were able to respond to the combination of the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, and PMA regardless of the cell density at which they were cultured. Results of cell cycle analysis support the conclusion that intact AC, IL 1, and a PMA-like signal play distinct roles in the progression of mitogen stimulated T cells through the first round of the cell cycle.

  6. Obscurumines H-P, new Lycopodium alkaloids from the club moss Lycopodium obscurum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Wei; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Liu, Yan-Chun; He, Juan; Su, Jia; Cheng, Xiao; Peng, Li-Yan; Shao, Li-Dong; Wu, Xing-De; Yang, Jia-Hui; Zhao, Qin-Shi

    2016-03-01

    Seven new fawcettimine-type (1-7) and two new lycopodine-type (8 and 9) Lycopodium alkaloids, as well as 10 known compounds, were isolated from the club moss, Lycopodium obscurum L. The structures of obscurumines H-P (1-9) were determined based on high-resolution MS and 1D and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1 and 2 include a new skeleton that is formed via the linkage of C-9-N-2', which is rarely present in Lycopodium alkaloids. The in vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity assay showed that 5 exhibited weak anti-AChE activity with an IC50 value of 81.0 μM. Compound 8 exhibited inhibition of the secretion of IL-2 in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated Jurkat cells, and the IC50 value was 17.2 μM.

  7. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus)

    PubMed Central

    PAUDEL, Sarad; VILLANUEVA, Marvin A.; MIKOTA, Susan K.; NAKAJIMA, Chie; GAIRHE, Kamal P.; SUBEDI, Suraj; RAYAMAJHI, Nabin; SASHIKA, Mariko; SHIMOZURU, Michito; MATSUBA, Takashi; SUZUKI, Yasuhiko; TSUBOTA, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants. PMID:26983683

  8. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  9. Suppressed peripheral blood lymphocyte blastogenesis in pre- and postpartal sheep by chronic heat-stress, and suppressive property of heat-stressed sheep serum on lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Niwano, Y; Becker, B A; Mitra, R; Caldwell, C W; Abdalla, E B; Johnson, H D

    1990-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A)-induced blastogenesis of peripheral blood lymphocytes was examined in heat-stressed pre- and postpartal sheep. The peak responses of lymphocytes to PHA and Con A in heat-stressed sheep revealed significant reduction before and after parturition compared with those in the corresponding control animals kept under thermoneutral conditions. Furthermore, the effect of serum from control or heat-stressed sheep on PHA-induced lymphocyte blastogenesis was examined. Supplementation of serum from heat-stressed sheep significantly suppressed the blastogenesis of lymphocytes obtained from healthy sheep, bovine, and human donors. Unlike dexamethasone, heat-stressed sheep serum did not inhibit IL-2 production by PHA-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results indicate that the immunosuppression of heat-stressed sheep is in part mediated by serum factor(s) that can modulate T-cell function in a species nonspecific manner.

  10. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Villanueva, Marvin A; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Subedi, Suraj; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Matsuba, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants.

  11. Graft Versus Leukemia Response Without Graft-versus-host Disease Elicited By Adoptively Transferred Multivirus-specific T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Melenhorst, Jan J; Castillo, Paul; Hanley, Patrick J; Keller, Michael D; Krance, Robert A; Margolin, Judith; Leen, Ann M; Heslop, Helen E; Barrett, A John; Rooney, Cliona M; Bollard, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia received a haploidentical transplant from his mother. As prophylaxis for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and adenovirus, he received ex vivo expanded virus-specific donor T cells 3.5 months after transplant. Four weeks later leukemic blasts bearing the E2A deletion, identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), appeared transiently in the blood followed by a FISH-negative hematological remission, which was sustained until a testicular relapse 3.5 months later. Clearance of the circulating leukemic cells coincided with a marked increase in circulating virus-specific T cells. The virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) line showed strong polyfunctional reactivity with the patient's leukemic cells but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts, suggesting that virus-specific CTL lines may have clinically significant antileukemia activity. PMID:25266309

  12. Identification of CD3+ T lymphocytes in the green turtle Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz, F.A.; Estrada-Parra, S.; Romero-Rojas, A.; Work, T.M.; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, E.; Estrada-Garcia, I.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role of the immune system with respect to disease in reptiles, there is the need to develop tools to assess the host's immune response. An important tool is the development of molecular markers to identify immune cells, and these are limited for reptiles. We developed a technique for the cryopreservation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and showed that a commercially available anti-CD3 epsilon chain antibody detects a subpopulation of CD3 positive peripheral blood lymphocytes in the marine turtle Chelonia mydas. In the thymus and in skin inoculated with phytohemagglutinin, the same antibody showed the classical staining pattern observed in mammals and birds. For Western blot, the anti-CD3 antibodies identified a 17.6 kDa band in membrane proteins of peripheral blood mononuclear cell compatible in weight to previously described CD3 molecules. This is the first demostration of CD3+ cells in reptiles using specific antibodies. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Immune and hormonal changes in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Everaus, H; Lehtmaa, J; Luik, E; Kŏdar, H

    1992-11-01

    Fifty-six previously untreated stage-I (according to Rai) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients were examined for their clinical data, immunological characteristics, and hormonal values. Dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes was demonstrated by changed lymphocyte blastogenic response to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), pisum sativatum agglutinin (PSA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2), and dextran sulfate (DxS); also by decreased immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgA, IgE) and increased beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) values. Simultaneously, dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system integration, imbalance of sex hormones, and changes in thyroid hormones were observed in the same group of patients. Disturbed immunohormonal interactions in early-stage CLL may be responsible for the pathogenetic mechanisms in this lymphoproliferative malignancy. PMID:1457579

  14. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Villanueva, Marvin A; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Subedi, Suraj; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Matsuba, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants. PMID:26983683

  15. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean. PMID:18588315

  16. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  17. Superantigenicity of streptococcal M protein

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    M proteins that define the serotypes of group A streptococci are powerful blastogens for human T lymphocytes. The mechanism by which they activate T cells was investigated and compared with the conventional T cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin, and the known superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Although major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are required for presentation, there is no MHC restriction, since allogeneic class II molecules presented the bacterial protein to human T cells. Type 5 M protein appears to bind class II molecules on the antigen-presenting cells and stimulate T cells bearing V beta 8 sequences. Our results indicate that this streptococcal M protein is a superantigen and suggest a possible mechanism of its role in the pathogenesis of the postinfectious autoimmune sequelae. PMID:2358781

  18. Acute Effects of Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge on Vaccine-Induced Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses to Gag in Rhesus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Krista K.; Waterman, Paul M.; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in macaques provides a convenient model for testing vaccine efficacy and for understanding viral pathogenesis in AIDS. We immunized macaques with recombinant, Salmonella typhimurium (expressing Gag) or soluble Gag in adjuvant to generate T-cell-dependent lymphoproliferative or serum antibody responses. Immunized animals were challenged by intrarectal inoculation with SHIV89.6PD. Virus infection was accompanied by rapid losses of lymphoproliferative responses to Gag or phytohemagglutinin. By 8 weeks, mitogen responses recovered to near normal levels but antigen-specific immunity remained at low or undetectable levels. Serum antibody levels were elevated initially by virus exposure but soon dropped well below levels achieved by immunization. Our studies show a rapid depletion of preexisting Gag-specific CD4+ T cells that prevent or limit subsequent antiviral cellular and humoral immune responses during acute SHIV infection. PMID:9971763

  19. Expression of Early Activation Marker CD69 on Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from Pregnant Women after First Trimester Alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Krechetova, L V; Vtorushina, V V; Nikolaeva, M A; Golubeva, E L; Van'ko, L V; Saribegova, V A; Tetruashvili, N K

    2016-08-01

    We studied the expression of an early activation marker CD69 in peripheral blood lymphocytes of pregnant women with a history of recurrent pregnancy loss after immunization with paternal lymphocytes. Spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated expression of CD69 on the surface of T cells and NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood was analyzed. On gestation week 5-6, the number of T cells expressing CD69 spontaneously and after stimulation was significantly higher in women with miscarriage than in woman with prolonged pregnancy. However, the number of cells with CD56(+) phenotype expressing CD69 did not differ in these groups. No differences were found in the number of cells of all subpopulations expressing CD69 after stimulation on gestation week 12 in woman with full-term current pregnancy and in woman with physiological pregnancy. PMID:27591871

  20. Assignment of the DPP4 gene encoding adenosine deaminase binding protein (CD26/dipeptidylpeptidase IV) to 2q23

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Morrison, M.E.; Murty, V.V.V.S.

    1994-07-01

    FISH was performed on chromosome preparations obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human blood lymphocytes. cDNA encoding ADAbp was isolated from the SK-RC-28 human renal cell carcinomas cell line using PCR technique and was cloned in pSVK3 plasmid for use as a probe. The PCR primers were constructed from the known nucleotide sequence of CD26, and the cDNA product was extracted from nucleotides 1 to 2344. The vector containing the probe was labeled by nick-translation with biotin-11-dUTP. Hybridization to chromosome spreads, washings, detection with FITC-conjugated avidin, selection and photography of metaphases, analysis of signals, and banding were performed according to the described method.

  1. The genes for the {alpha}-type HC3 (PMSA2) and {beta}-type HC5 (PMSB1) subunits of human proteasomes map to chromosomes 6q27 and 7p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Katsuzumi; Nogami, Masahiro; Taguchi, Hiroshi

    1995-05-20

    The authors have determined the locations of the genes for the two subunits, HC3 and HC5, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosome spreads were obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of a healthy donor after thymidine synchronization and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by the method of Takahashi et al. Genomic DNA fragments of HC3 (4.3 kb, including exons 3, 4, and 5) and HC5 (7.5 kb including exons 1 and 2) (11) were labeled with biotin-16-dUTP by nick-translation. In situ hybridization was performed according to Lichter et al. in the presence of COT-1 DNA as a competitor. Hybridized probe was detected with FITC-conjugated avidin without further signal amplification. Comparison of the fluorescence signals and the banding patterns of the chromosomes indicated that the HC3 and HC5 genes were located on chromosome band 6q27 and 7p12-p13, respectively.

  2. The effects of glucocorticosteroids on the chemiluminescence response of bovine phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T R; Yang, W C; Schultz, R D

    1987-03-01

    The effects of corticosteroids on the chemiluminescence response of bovine phagocytic cells were determined both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro addition of hydrocortisone or dexamethasone had no significant effect on the chemiluminescence response of leukocytes in a whole blood or purified polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) population. Cattle that received a single 20 mg dose of dexamethasone or three 20 mg doses of dexamethasone (given 24 hours apart) demonstrated the expected effects on the bovine leukogram (leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, eosinopenia, and monocytosis) and also demonstrated the expected suppressive effect on lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). However, neither a single nor multiple dexamethasone treatment(s) had an effect on the chemiluminescence response of phagocytes in whole blood, but significantly enhanced the chemiluminescence response of the purified PMN leukocyte population. There was no significant difference between the two dexamethasone treatment groups in either the degree or duration of the effects observed in the chemiluminescence or lymphocyte response assays.

  3. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  4. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  5. Immunoregulatory T cells in man. Histamine-induced suppressor T cells are derived from a Leu 2+ (T8+) subpopulation distinct from that which gives rise to cytotoxic T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sansoni, P.; Silverman, E.D.; Khan, M.M.; Melmon, K.L.; Engleman, E.G.

    1985-02-01

    One mechanism of histamine-mediated inhibition of the immune response in man is to activate T suppressor cells that bear the Leu 2 (OKT8) marker. The current study was undertaken to characterize the histamine-induced suppressor cell using a monoclonal antibody (9.3) shown previously to distinguish cytotoxic T cells from antigen-specific suppressor T cells. Leu 2+ cells isolated from peripheral blood were further separated with antibody 9.3 into Leu 2+, 9.3+, and Leu 2+, 9.3- subsets and each subset was incubated with different concentrations of histamine before determining their ability to suppress immune responses in vitro. The results indicate that the Leu 2+, 9.3- subpopulation includes all histamine-induced suppressor cells, that 10(-4) M histamine is the optimal concentration for suppressor cell induction, and that exposure of Leu 2+, 9.3- cells to histamine for 30 s is sufficient to initiate the induction process. After treatment with histamine these cells inhibit both phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation and pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell differentiation. The suppression of phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation was resistant to x-irradiation with 1,200 rad, either before or after histamine exposure, suggesting that Leu 2+, 9.3- cells need not proliferate to become suppressor cells or exert suppression. Moreover, suppression by these cells was not due to altered kinetics of the response. Finally, a histamine type 2 receptor antagonist (cimetidine) but not a type 1 receptor antagonist (mepyramine) blocked the induction of suppressor cells. On the basis of these results and our previous studies of antigen specific suppressor cells, we conclude that Leu 2+ suppressor cells in man are derived from a precursor pool that is phenotypically distinct from cells that can differentiate into cytotoxic T cells.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects of clarithromycin in patients with cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pukhalsky, Alexander L; Shmarina, Galina V; Kapranov, Nikolai I; Kokarovtseva, Svetlana N; Pukhalskaya, Daria; Kashirskaja, Natalia J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Macrolide antibiotics are widely used in the treatment of suppurative lung diseases including cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common inherited fatal disease in the Caucasian population. This condition is characterized by secondary Pseudomonas infection resulting in neutrophil infiltration within the airways. The aim of the study was to investigate the evolution of inflammatory process in CF patients receiving long-term clarithromycin therapy. METHODS: Twenty-seven CF patients (mean age, 12 years) were enrolled into the study. Beside the basic therapy the patients were treated with clarithromycin at a dose of 250 mg every other day orally. All patients were routinely examined every 3 months. Blood and sputum were collected before clarithromycin treatment and then again 3, 6 and 12 months after the drug prescription. Cytokine concentrations (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-8, interleukin-4, interferon-gamma) in the sputum and plasma were assayed. Peripheral blood lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin was also evaluated. RESULTS: Clarithromycin treatment resulted in a marked reduction of the cytokine levels both in the sputum and plasma specimens. At the same time, the interferon-gamma/interleukin-4 ratio has been significantly elevated. In addition, a sustained increase of peripheral blood lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin was demonstrated. These changes were associated with a significant improvement of the lung function. CONCLUSIONS: The beneficial effect of the prolonged treatment of CF patients with a 14-membered ring macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin seems to be associated not only with down-regulation of the inflammatory response, but also with immunological changes including the switch from Th2 to Th1 type response. PMID:15203552

  7. Induction and down-regulation of PLK, a human serine/threonine kinase expressed in proliferating cells and tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Holtrich, U; Wolf, G; Bräuninger, A; Karn, T; Böhme, B; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H; Strebhardt, K

    1994-01-01

    We have identified the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA encoding the human counterpart of the mouse gene Plk (polo-like kinase). The sequence of the human gene, PLK, predicts a serine/threonine kinase of 603 aa. Expression of PLK mRNA appeared to be strongly correlated with the mitotic activity of cells. Resting peripheral lymphocytes did not express the gene at all. When primary T cells were activated by phytohemagglutinin, a high level of PLK transcripts resulted within 2-3 days. In some cases, addition of interleukin 2 to these cells increased the expression of PLK mRNA further. In contrast, primary cultures of human peripheral macrophages, which were not dividing under the culture conditions applied, showed very little or no PLK mRNA. Stimulation of these cells by bacterial lipopolysaccharide, an inducer of several cytokines in macrophages, totally abrogated the expression of PLK mRNA. In line with a function of PLK mRNA expression in mitotically active cells is our finding that six immortalized cell lines examined expressed the gene. In A-431 epidermoid carcinoma cells this expression was down-regulated by serum starvation and enhanced after serum was added again. Tumors of various origin (lung, colon, stomach, smooth muscle, and esophagus as well as non-Hodgkin lymphomas) expressed high levels of PLK transcripts in about 80% of the samples studied, whereas PLK mRNA was absent in surrounding tissue, except for colon. The only normal tissues where PLK mRNA expression was observed were colon and placenta, both known to be mitotically active. No PLK transcripts were found in normal adult lung, brain, heart, liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. In Northern blot experiments with RNA from lymphocytes which were treated with phytohemagglutinin and cycloheximide, PLK transcripts were not detectable, suggesting that PLK is not an early growth-response gene. Images PMID:8127874

  8. Reduced immune responsiveness and lymphoid depletion in mice infected with Ehrlichia risticii.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Johnson, G C; Burger, C J

    1987-01-01

    The histopathology of the thymus and spleen and the response of spleen cells to mitogenic stimuli were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley CF-1 mice infected with Ehrlichia risticii. Intraperitoneal injection of 10(4) or 10(6) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells into mice resulted in 100% morbidity and partial mortality. Thymic atrophy became significant between 1 and 2 weeks postinfection and remained for the duration of the study. The atrophy appeared associated with antecedent destruction and rarefaction of lymphocytes, resulting in the loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Splenomegaly was prominent; significantly increased weights were detected 7 days postinfection. Histopathologic examination revealed rarefaction of lymphocytes around central arteries, the presence of necrotic debris in histiocytes, and replacement of erythropoiesis by granulopoiesis in the red pulp. Marked and acute reduction of in vitro proliferative responses of spleen cells to concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohemagglutinin were observed in mice infected with 10(4) or 10(6) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells. Interleukin-2 activity in the supernatant of ConA-stimulated spleen cells was also severely reduced. Both changes were time- and dose-dependent and were not associated with decreased spleen cell viability. Neither morbidity nor mortality occurred in mice infected with 10(2) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells. Although there was temporal reduction in phytohemagglutinin-driven lymphocyte proliferation, reduction in neither ConA-driven lymphocyte proliferation nor interleukin-2 activity was observed with this dosage. All E. risticii-inoculated mice seroconverted between days 18 and 25, as detected by the indirect fluorescent-antibody procedure. The findings indicate for the first time the hypoimmune responsiveness and histopathologic changes in lymphoid organs associated with E. risticii infection. Images PMID:3497879

  9. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans.

    PubMed Central

    von Schaewen, A; Sturm, A; O'Neill, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1993-01-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of beta 1-->2 xylose and alpha 1-->3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose9(N-acetylglucosamine)2 (Man9GlcNAc2) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man5GlcNAc1 glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man9GlcNAc2 and Man8GlcNAc2 glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, we obtained a unique strain that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. PMID:8278542

  10. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-aetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaewen, A. von; O'Neill, J.; Chrispeels, M.J. ); Sturm, A. )

    1993-08-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of [beta]1[yields]2 xylose and [alpha]1[yields]3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose[sub 9](N-acetylglucosamine)[sub 2] (Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2]) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arbidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man[sub 5]GlcNAc[sub 1] glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2] and Man[sub 8]GlcNAc[sub 2] glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, a unique strain was obtained that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Standardization of sensitive human immunodeficiency virus coculture procedures and establishment of a multicenter quality assurance program for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group. The NIH/NIAID/DAIDS/ACTG Virology Laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Hollinger, F B; Bremer, J W; Myers, L E; Gold, J W; McQuay, L

    1992-01-01

    An independent quality assurance program has been established by the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for monitoring virologic assays performed by nearly 40 laboratories participating in multicenter clinical trials in the United States. Since virologic endpoints are important in evaluating the timing and efficacy of therapeutic interventions, it is imperative that virologic measurements be accurate and uniform. When the quality assurance program was initially created, fewer than 40% of the laboratories could consistently recover human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-infected patients. By comparing coculture procedures in the more competent laboratories with those in laboratories who were struggling to isolate virus, optimal conditions were established and nonessential reagents and practices were eliminated. Changes were rapidly introduced into a laboratory when experience dictated that such modifications would result in a favorable outcome. Isolation of HIV was enhanced by optimizing the numbers and ratios of patient and donor cells used in cultures, by standardizing PBMC separation procedures, by using fresh rather than frozen donor PBMCs, by processing whole blood within 24 h, and by using natural delectinated interleukin 2 instead of recombinant interleukin 2 products in existence at that time. Delays of more than 8 h in the addition of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor cells to freshly separated patient PBMCs reduced recovery. Phytohemagglutinin in cocultures and the addition of Polybrene and anti-human alpha interferon to media were not important in HIV isolation. The introduction of a consensus protocol based on this information brought most laboratories quickly into compliance. In addition, monthly monitoring has successfully maintained proficiency among the laboratories, a process that is critical for the scientific integrity of collaborative multicenter trials

  12. Ovine lentivirus is macrophagetropic and does not replicate productively in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gorrell, M D; Brandon, M R; Sheffer, D; Adams, R J; Narayan, O

    1992-01-01

    The lentiviruses of sheep, goats, and horses cause chronic multiorgan disease in which macrophages are highly permissive for viral replication. Monocytes, which mature into macrophages, are thought to be latently infected with lentivirus, but the extent to which other leukocytes are infected is unknown. Dendritic cells have not been studied separately from monocytes and T-cell subsets have not been examined in previous attempts to identify infected cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found no evidence of T-cell tropism using an animal-passaged, pathogenic ovine lentivirus. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated infectious PBMC produced 20-fold less virus than differentiated macrophages, and cocultivation of infectious PBMC with fresh, uninfected phytohemagglutinin blasts did not facilitate virus replication. Furthermore, central lymph cells, the best in vivo source of purified lymphocytes, lacked virus and did not yield virus upon in vitro cultivation. In contrast, cultivated blood-derived macrophages were highly permissive for viral replication. To identify the latently infected PBMC, PBMC from infected sheep were selectively depleted of monocytes and B cells by passage over nylon wool and then of nonadherent cells bearing CD4, CD8, T19, gamma delta T-cell receptor, CD45RA, or major histocompatibility complex class II antigens by panning. Removal of adherent monocytes and B cells or of adherent cells and the three major T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD8+, T19+) did not decrease the infectivity of PBMC. The richest sources of infected cells in fresh PBMC were CD45RA+ and major histocompatibility complex class II+ nonadherent cells, which are three characteristics of dendritic cells. Thus, the dendritic cell, and not the monocyte or the CD4+ cell, is probably the predominant infected cell type in blood. Images PMID:1348546

  13. In vitro screening of plant lectins and tropical plant extracts for anthelmintic properties.

    PubMed

    Ríos-de Álvarez, L; Jackson, F; Greer, A; Bartley, Y; Bartley, D J; Grant, G; Huntley, J F

    2012-05-25

    Lectins are plant secondary metabolites (PSM) found in many forages and which may confer anthelmintic properties to gastrointestinal parasites through disrupting the development of parasitic larvae throughout its life cycle. In experiment 1, the ability of the plant lectins jacalin (JAC), concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin E2L2 (PHA-E2L2), phytohemagglutinin L4 (PHA-L4), phytohemagglutinin E3L (PHA-E3L), kidney bean albumin (KBA), Robinia pseudoacacia agglutinin (RPA), Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA), Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MAA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to disrupt the feeding of the first stage larvae (L(1)) of the sheep gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) Teladorsagia circumcincta, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis was investigated using a larval feeding inhibition test (LFIT). Only PHA-E3L, WGA and Con A had a potent effect on disrupting larval feeding of all of the three species of GIN investigated. The lectin concentration required to inhibit feeding in 50% of L(1) (IC50) was 7.3±1.2, 8.3±1.4 and 4.3±1.7 μg/ml for PHA-E3L; 59.1±32.4, 58.7±11.9 and 8.1±7.0 μg/ml for Con A and 78.9±11.2, 69.4±8.1 and 28.0±14.1 μg/ml for WGA for T. circumcincta, H. contortus and T. colubriformis larvae, respectively (P=0.006). The addition of the lectin inhibitors fetuin, glucose/mannose or N-acetylglucosamine for PHA-E3L, Con A and WGA, respectively, caused an increase in the proportion of larvae that had fed at all concentrations for PHA-E3L only. In experiment 2, the effect of extracts from the tropical plants Azadiractha indica, Trichanthera gigantea, Morus alba, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala on the feeding behaviour of H. contortus L(1,) was examined. A. indica, T. gigantea and M. alba failed to inhibit 50% of larvae from feeding at concentrations up to 10mg plant extract per ml. In contrast, both G. sepium and L. leucocephala demonstrated

  14. Didanosine and zidovudine resistance patterns in clinical isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 as determined by a replication endpoint concentration assay.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, G X; McGrath, J M; Ladd, E A; Hammer, S M

    1992-01-01

    Reports of in vitro resistance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to zidovudine (AZT) have raised concerns about the development of resistance to other dideoxynucleosides in clinical use. To address this, we have developed a screening assay which supports the growth of clinical isolates and have applied this to a series of paired isolates from patients entered into a phase I trial of didanosine (DDI). Thirteen patients (10 with AIDS, 3 with AIDS-related complex) who had been exposed to AZT for a mean of 6.5 months (range, 1 to 13 months) were treated with DDI at 750 mg/day. Paired isolates were obtained pretherapy and after a mean of 58 weeks (range, 21 to 90) of DDI therapy by coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBLs) with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor PBLs. Isolates were passaged only one additional time in PBLs and then tested in parallel in a microtiter assay with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor PBLs as targets. PBLs were infected with 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses per 10(7) cells and exposed to DDI (1 to 50 microM) or AZT (0.01 to 100 microM), and supernatants were assayed for the HIV p24 antigen at 7 days postinfection. Control AZT-susceptible and resistant isolates were included. The median pre- and posttherapy DDI susceptibilities of the 13 pairs of isolates were 10.0 microM (range, 1 to 25 microM) and 17.5 microM (range, 2.5 to 50 microM), respectively (P = 0.036; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). These studies thus indicated that (i) the susceptibility to DDI tends to mildly decrease with drug exposure; (ii) the susceptibility to AZT improves with time off AZT; (iii) baseline susceptibilities to DDI have a wide range, and the CD4 response may correlate with the initial susceptibility; and (iv) a PBL-based microtiter assay is useful for screening clinical isolated for dideoxynucleoside susceptibility profiles. PMID:1510414

  15. Human CD8+ herpes simplex virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones recognize diverse virion protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, M A; Koelle, D; Hartog, K; Sekulovich, R E; Corey, L; Burke, R L

    1992-01-01

    The role of the HLA class I-restricted, CD8+, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in the control of human HSV infections is controversial because previous reports suggest that a substantial portion of the antigen-specific lytic response is mediated by CD4+ cells. To address this question directly, we isolated HSV-specific CD8+ CTL clones from a patient with recurrent genital herpes. These CTL were cloned by coculturing responder peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBMC that had been infected with live HSV-2 and then irradiated prior to the addition of responder cells. After 1 week, CTL were cloned by limiting dilution using phytohemagglutinin stimulation and allogeneic feeder PBMC. Seven clones were isolated; all seven clones were CD8+ CD4- CD3+ DRbright, six lysed only HSV-2-infected targets, and one lysed both HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected targets. Antigen presentation was restricted by two to three different HLA class I loci. To determine the antigens recognized by these HSV-specific CTL, target cells were infected with HSV in the presence of acyclovir, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, or cycloheximide in a series of drug block/release protocols to limit the repertoire of viral gene expression to select transcriptional classes. Five of the clones exhibited a different pattern of cytotoxicity, suggesting that each recognized a distinct HSV antigen. One of the clones appears to be directed against an immediate-early antigen; six of the clones recognize virion proteins. Five of these clones recognized internal virion proteins that could be introduced into target cells by HSV infection in the absence of virus gene expression. Antigen specificity was further tested by using vaccinia virus vectors that express glycoproteins gD2 and gB2 or the tegument protein VP16. One clone lysed vaccinia virus/gD2-infected target cells; the remaining clones did not recognize any of these gene

  16. Effects of diets containing grape seed, linseed, or both on milk production traits, liver and kidney activities, and immunity of lactating dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Nudda, A; Correddu, F; Marzano, A; Battacone, G; Nicolussi, P; Bonelli, P; Pulina, G

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the dietary inclusion of grape seed, alone or in combination with linseed, on milk production traits, immune response, and liver and kidney metabolic activity of lactating ewes. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments consisting of a control diet (CON), a diet containing 300 g/d per head of grape seed (GS), a diet containing 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (LIN), and a diet containing a mix of 300 g/d per head of grape seed and 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (MIX). The study lasted 10 wk, with 2 wk of adaptation period and 8 wk of experimental period. Milk yield was measured and samples were collected weekly and analyzed for fat, protein, casein, lactose, pH, milk urea nitrogen, and somatic cell count. Blood samples were collected every 2 wk by jugular vein puncture and analyzed for hematological parameters, for albumin, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, creatinine, gamma glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, protein, blood urea nitrogen, and for anti-albumin IgG, IL-6, and lymphocyte T-helper (CD4(+)) and lymphocyte T-cytotoxic (CD8(+)) cells. On d 0, 45, and 60 of the trial, lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin was determined in vivo on each animal by measuring skin-fold thickness (SFT) at the site of phytohemagglutinin injection. Humoral response to chicken egg albumin was stimulated by a subcutaneous injection with albumin. Dietary treatments did not affect milk yield and composition. Milk urea nitrogen and lactose were affected by diet × period. Diets did not influence hematological, kidney, and liver parameters, except for blood urea nitrogen, which decreased in LIN and increased in MIX compared with CON and GS. Dietary treatments did not alter CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD4(+)-to-CD8(+) ratio. The SFT was reduced in GS and MIX and increased in LIN compared with CON. The IgG and IL-6 were affected by diet × period. The reduction in Ig

  17. Leishmania donovani: assessment of leishmanicidal effects of herbal extracts obtained from plants in the visceral leishmaniasis endemic area of Bihar, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shubhankar K; Bimal, Sanjiva; Narayan, Shyam; Jee, Chandrawati; Bimal, Devla; Das, P; Bimal, Raageeva

    2011-02-01

    One obstacle faced in the effective control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the limited number of available treatment options. Furthermore, control efforts have been hindered further by the emergence of Leishmania resistance to many of the available drugs. In this study, we investigated the anti-leishmanial properties of 30 medicinally important plants from the VL endemic area of Bihar, India and compared them to two available anti-leishmanial drugs (sodium antimony gluconate and amphotericin B) and two plant lectins (phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A) on Leishmania donovani promastigotes in vitro at 24 and 48 h after initiation of culture. We identified eight plant extracts in addition to phytohemagglutinin and amphotericin B that significantly inhibited the growth of promastigotes (p < 0.03). We further studied the minimum effective concentrations as well as the effect on axenic amastigotes viability and the cell cytotoxicity on human peripheral blood of four (Agave americana, Azadirachta indica, Eclipta alba and Piper longum) of the eight plant extracts that induced significant promastigotes killing (p = 0.00098). Effect-based dose finding analysis revealed that the threshold concentration of A. americana required to eliminate L. donovani after 24h was 0.05 mg/ml. A. indica and P. longum plant extracts eliminated L. donovani promastigotes after 48 h at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5mg/ml, respectively. E. alba eliminated the promastigotes at a concentration of 0.5mg/ml within 24h. The axenic amastigote killing response was 1.90-, 2.52- and 1.3-fold higher than the promastigote killing response with A. indica, A. americana and E. alba plant extracts, respectively. A. americana and A. indica, respectively, led to approximate 2.5- and 1.3-fold declines in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity compared with control. E. alba stimulation resulted in an up-regulation of dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.00329). The CSA from P. longum was found to be least cytotoxic

  18. Characterization of. alpha. -amylase-inhibitor, a lectin-like protein in the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect {alpha}-amylases but not of plant {alpha}-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it. The primary translation product of {alpha}Al is a polypeptide of M{sub r} 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of M{sub r} 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (M{sub r} 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that {alpha}Al is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles.

  19. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    SciTech Connect

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  20. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has the same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.

  1. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  2. A new lectin in red kidney beans called PvFRIL stimulates proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the Flt3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, J G; Fuchs, C A; Hata, Y S; Hicklin, D J; Colucci, G; Chrispeels, M J; Feldman, M

    2000-07-26

    A new legume lectin has been identified by its ability to specifically stimulate proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor. The lectin was isolated from conditioned medium harvested from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated to secrete cytokines by a crude red kidney bean extract containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Untransfected 3T3 cells and 3T3 cells transfected with the related Fms tyrosine kinase receptor do not respond to this lectin, which we called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin). When tested on cord blood mononuclear cells enriched for Flt3-expressing progenitors, purified PvFRIL fractions maintained a small population of cells that continued to express CD34 after 2 weeks in suspension cultures containing IL3. These cultures did not show the effects of IL3's strong induction of proliferation and differentiation (high cell number and exhausted medium); instead, low cell number at the end of the culture period resulted in persistence of cells in the context of cell death. These observations led to the hypothesis that PvFRIL acts in a dominant manner to preserve progenitor viability and prevent proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Pharmacological inhibition of interleukin-1 activity on T cells by hydrocortisone, cyclosporine, prostaglandins, and cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tracey, D E; Hardee, M M; Richard, K A; Paslay, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a panel of hormones and pharmacological agents on the activation of T cells by a combination of interleukin-1 and phytohemagglutinin (IL-1/PHA) was studied. Pharmacological effects on various stages of IL-1/PHA-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by the cloned murine thymoma cell line LBRM-33-1A5.7 were dissected using a multi-step assay procedure. A 4-h lag phase in the kinetics of IL-2 production allowed the operational definition of an early, IL-1-dependent programming stage, followed by an IL-2-production stage of the assay. A cell-washing procedure between these stages was introduced in order to distinguish IL-1 receptor antagonists from functional IL-1/PHA antagonists. Hydrocortisone and cyclosporine were potent inhibitors (active in the nM range) of both stages of IL-2 production, suggesting that neither is an IL-1 receptor antagonist. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-elevating agents prostaglandin E2, dibutyryl cAMP, and theophylline inhibited IL-2 production during the early, IL-1-dependent programming stage. By contrast, prostaglandin F2 alpha and dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate did not appreciably inhibit IL-1/PHA activity. These results are discussed in relationship to the effects of these test agents in thymocyte IL-1 assays or mitogenesis assays and the implications toward understanding the mechanisms underlying IL-1/PHA activation of T cells.

  4. Alterations of mitogenic responses of mononuclear cells by arsenic in arsenical skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, H S; Chang, K L; Wang, C M; Yu, C L

    1992-11-01

    We have studied the endemic occurrence of chronic arsenism in a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan. The effects of arsenic on the mitogenic responses of mononuclear cells (MNC) derived from patients with arsenical skin cancers in that area were evaluated. The subjects enrolled in this study included patients with 1) Bowen's disease, 2) arsenical skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), 3) non-arsenical skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), 4) nasopharyngeal cancer and 5) healthy controls from endemic and non-endemic areas. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation in MNC in all groups except the arsenical skin cancer group. However, when a low concentration of As2O3 (2.5 x 10(-7) M) was added to PHA-stimulated MNC, a tremendous amplification of the uptake of [3H]thymidine was noticed in patients with arsenical skin cancer. In this study, this phenomenon did not occur in cancers not related to arsenic. This result shows that arsenical carcinomas are hyperreactive to its specific etiology--arsenic. Arsenic seems to play a role as a co-stimulant of PHA similar to interleukin-1.

  5. Effective delivery of immunosuppressive drug molecules by silica coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jangsun; Lee, Eunwon; Kim, Jieun; Seo, Youngmin; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Gilad, Assaf A; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, molecular imaging, and cellular imaging. Various surface modifications have been applied to the particles to stabilize their surface and to give them a moiety for anchoring tags and/or drug molecules. Conventional methods of delivering immunosuppressant drugs often require a high dose of drugs to ensure therapeutic effects, but this can lead to toxic side effects. In this study, we used silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IOSs) for a drug delivery application in which the nanoparticles carry the minimum amount of drug required to be effective to the target cells. IOSs could be loaded with water-insoluble immunosuppressive drug molecules (MPA: mycophenolic acid) and be used as a contrast agent for MRI. We characterized the IOSs for their physicochemical properties and found their average hydrodynamic diameter and core size to be 40.5nm and 5nm, respectively. Following the introduction of MPA-loaded IOSs (IOS/M), we evaluated the secretion dynamics of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The results showed that IOS/M effectively inhibited the secretion of the cytokines interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α, with a minimal concentration of MPA. In conclusion, IOS/M may have potential applications in both efficient drug delivery and MRI. PMID:26966999

  6. Impaired IL-2 expression in latent HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Lim, Hoyong; Park, Jihwan; Roh, Tae-Young; Kang, Chun; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2015-08-01

    Regarding the T cell function in HIV-1 infection, activation of T cells is enhanced in acutely HIV-1-infected T cells upon stimuli. However, T cell immune responses underlying the activation of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling molecules and interleukin (IL)-2 production in latently HIV-1-infected cells are poorly understood. The expression and activation of TCR components and its downstream molecules in acutely and latently HIV-1-infected T cells were compared using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for mRNA expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for levels of IL-2 in phytohemagglutinin M (PHA-M). The levels of T cell surface molecules and TCR signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were greatly decreased without changes in their mRNA levels. In addition, downstream TCR-signaling molecules in latently HIV-1-infected cells were not activated even in the presence of PHA-M. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the presence of PHA-M was weakly induced in latently HIV-1-infected cells but was greater in acutely HIVNL4-3-infected cells. Finally, the production of IL-2 was significantly decreased in latently HIV-1-infected cells compared with uninfected parent cells. Thus, IL-2-related immunological functions in latently HIV-1-infected T cells were markedly impaired even in the presence of stimuli.

  7. Membrane receptors for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) inhibitor of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, P.I.; Beck, G.; Zucker, S.

    1981-06-01

    Physiologic concentrations of human plasma very low density lipoproteins inhibit the DNA synthesis of lymphocytes stimulated by allogeneic cells or lectins. In this report reachers have compared the effects of isolated lipoproteins (very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL)) and lipoprotein-depleted plasma (LDP) on DNA synthesis by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. The relative potency for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation was VLDL greater than LDL greater than HDL greater than LDP. Fifty percent inhibition of DNA synthesis was observed at a VLDL protein concentration of 1.5--2.0 microgram/ml. Researchers have further demonstrated the presence of specific receptors for VLDL on human lymphocytes. Native VLDL was more effective than LDL in competing for 125I-VLDL binding sites. Subsequent to binding to lymphocytes, 125I-VLDL was internalized and degraded to acid-soluble products. Based on a Scatchard analysis of VLDL binding at 4 degrees C, the number of VLDL receptors per lymphocyte was estimated at 28,000 +/- 1300. Based on an estimated mean binding affinity for the VLDL receptor complex at half saturation of approximately 8.8 X 10(7) liter/mole, it is estimated that 91% of lymphocyte VLDL receptors are occupied at physiologic VLDL concentrations in blood. Although the immune regulatory role of plasma lipoproteins is uncertain, researchers suggest tha VLDL and LDL-In may maintain circulating blood lymphocytes in a nonproliferative state via their respective cell receptor mechanisms.

  8. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage study in primary amenorrhea by comet assay and karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Sarah; Chand, Parkash; Chaturvedula, Latha; Rao, K. Ramachandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: This study aims at evaluating the chromosomal abnormalities and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cases with primary amenorrhea by karyotyping and comet assay. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 30 cases of primary amenorrhea were recruited. Secondary sexual characters were assessed by Tanner staging. Chromosomal analysis was performed by conventional phytohemagglutinin stimulated lymphocyte cell culture technique. Alkaline version of comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage. RESULTS: The chromosomal pattern of 20 subjects (66.7%) was found to be normal (46,XX). Two subjects had 46,XY pattern and eight subjects had Turner syndrome (45,X or 45,X/46,XX). The comet parameters were found to be increased among subjects with 45,X monosomy, when compared to the rest of the study group and also in subjects with Tanner stage 1 when compared to stage 2. CONCLUSION: Comet assay revealed increased DNA damage in cases with 45,X monosomy, compared with subjects with 46,XX and 46,XY karyotype, which correlated with clinical features. PMID:24497702

  9. Immunomodulatory and cytotoxic effects of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone on rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Three different concentrations of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) ethanolic extract, thymoquinone (TQ), dexamethasone, and saline were examined to see whether they had any effects on cell viability, proliferation, and interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion in non-stimulated, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concavaline A (Con A)-stimulated splenocytes. In PHA and Con A-stimulated splenocytes, cell viability and proliferation were increased and Con A shifted cytokine profile towards Th2 balance. Dexamethasone treatment showed a suppression in viability, IFNγ and IL-4 secretion in non-stimulated and stimulated splenocytes. Extract and TQ reduced the viability and inhibited the proliferation of stimulated and non-stimulated splenocytes concentration-dependently. Higher concentrations of N. sativa (1000 mg/ml) and TQ (5 and 10 mg/ml) reduced the secretion of IL-4 in stimulated cells. Two higher concentrations of N. sativa had decreased IFNγ secretion in both stimulated and non-stimulated cells. In non-stimulated cells, only the highest and in Con A-stimulated cells, all TQ concentrations had inhibited IFNγ secretion. The highest concentration of N. sativa increased IFNγ/IL-4 ratio in both stimulated and non-stimulated cells while higher concentrations of TQ only had the same effect on stimulated cells. N. sativa and TQ showed cytotoxic inhibitory effect on rat splenocytes and on Th1/Th2 cytokines concentration-dependently. Higher concentrations of extract and TQ increased cytokines balance in Th1/Th2.

  10. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  11. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men Referred to Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubi, Frouzandeh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Mantegy, Sanaz

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of somatic chromosomal abnormalities in infertile male individuals has been reported to vary in different literatures. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations among infertile men referred to the Cytogenetic Laboratory of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Centre (IBTO). Materials and Methods Chromosomal analysis was performed on phytohemag-glutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocyte cultures of 1052 infertile men using standard cytogenetic methods. The study took place during 1997 to 2007. Results Total chromosome alterations were revealed in 161 (15.30%) infertile men. The most prevalent chromosomal abnormality in the infertile men was 47, XXY, that was seen in 94 (58.38%) men while one of them had a mosaic karyotype: mos 47, XX[54]/47,XXY[18]/46,XY[9]. In 37 (22.98%) cases, structural aberrations were detected. There were 30 (18.63%) cases of sex reversal. Conclusion Cytogenetic studies of these patients showed increased chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men in comparison with that of the normal population, justifying the need for cytogenetic analysis of men with idiopathic infertility. PMID:23926486

  12. State-dependent physiological maintenance in a long-lived ectotherm, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa; Warner, Daniel A; McGaugh, Suzanne; Di Terlizzi, Roberta; Bronikowski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Energy allocation among somatic maintenance, reproduction and growth varies not only among species, but among individuals according to states such as age, sex and season. Little research has been conducted on the somatic (physiological) maintenance of long-lived organisms, particularly ectotherms such as reptiles. In this study, we examined sex differences and age- and season-related variation in immune function and DNA repair efficiency in a long-lived reptile, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta). Immune components tended to be depressed during hibernation, in winter, compared with autumn or spring. Increased heterophil count during hibernation provided the only support for winter immunoenhancement. In juvenile and adult turtles, we found little evidence for senescence in physiological maintenance, consistent with predictions for long-lived organisms. Among immune components, swelling in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and control injection increased with age, whereas basophil count decreased with age. Hatchling turtles had reduced basophil counts and natural antibodies, indicative of an immature immune system, but demonstrated higher DNA repair efficiency than older turtles. Reproductively mature turtles had reduced lymphocytes compared with juvenile turtles in the spring, presumably driven by a trade-off between maintenance and reproduction. Sex had little influence on physiological maintenance. These results suggest that components of physiological maintenance are modulated differentially according to individual state and highlight the need for more research on the multiple components of physiological maintenance in animals of variable states.

  13. Adipocytes, like their progenitors, contribute to inflammation of adipose tissues through promotion of Th-17 cells and activation of monocytes, in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Chehimi, Marwa; Robert, Maud; Bechwaty, Michel El; Vial, Guillaume; Rieusset, Jennifer; Vidal, Hubert; Pirola, Luciano; Eljaafari, Assia

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) harvested from obese donors induce a pro-inflammatory environment when co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC), with a polarization of T cells toward the Th17 cell lineage, increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines, and down-regulation of Th1 cytokines, such as IFNγ and TNFα. However, whether differentiated adipocytes, like the aforementioned ASC, are pro-inflammatory in obese subject AT remained to be investigated. Herein, we isolated ASC from AT of obese donors and differentiated them into adipocytes, for either 8 or 14 d. We analyzed their capacity to activate blood MNC after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA), or not, in co-culture assays. Our results showed that co-cultures of MNC with adipocytes, like with ASC, increased IL-17A, IL-1β, and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Moreover, like ASC, adipocytes down-regulated TNFα secretion by Th1 cells. As adipocytes differentiated from ASC of lean donors also promoted IL-17A secretion by MNC, an experimental model of high-fat versus chow diet mice was used and supported that adipocytes from obese, but not lean AT, are able to mediate IL-17A secretion by PHA-activated MNCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that, as ASC, adipocytes in obese AT might contribute to the establishment of a low-grade chronic inflammation state. PMID:27617173

  14. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-01-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response. Images PMID:689736

  15. Immunomodulating properties of dimethylglycine in humans.

    PubMed

    Graber, C D; Goust, J M; Glassman, A D; Kendall, R; Loadholt, C B

    1981-01-01

    Dimethylglycine (DMG), a tertiary amino acid, has had wide acceptance as a nonfuel nutrient; presumably it enhances oxygen utilization by tissue and complexes free radicals. Its potential as an immunoadjuvant has also been suggested by a study of an analog of DMG, calcium pangamate. A double-blind study in 20 human volunteers showed a fourfold increase in antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in those receiving DMG orally as compared with controls (P less than 0.01). Production of leukocyte inhibitory factor in response to concanavalin A was similar in the two groups, but those taking DMG tablets had a significantly highr mean response of leukocyte inhibition factor to streptokinase-streptodornase (P less than 0.001). The in vitro responses of lymphocytes from patients with diabetes and those with sickle cell disease to phytohemagglutinin, convanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen were increased almost threefold after addition of DMA. These results suggest that DMG enhances both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in humans. PMID:6163829

  16. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-08-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response. PMID:689736

  17. Stimulators and inhibitors of lymphocyte DNA synthesis in supernatants from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vesole, D H; Goust, J M; Fett, J W; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-09-01

    Some T and B lymphoid cell lines (LCL) were found to secrete into their supernatants a substance able to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. This substance produced an increase in [3H]thymidine uptake by mononuclear cells when added to unstimulated cultures (mitogenic effect) or when added to cultures stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM) (potentiating effect). When complete supernatants were used, the potentiating effect was sometimes masked by an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. Fractionation on Sephadex G-100 separated these two activities. The stimulatory substance eluted at a m.w. range of 15,000 to 30,000, and the inhibitor eluted with the albumin peak. B cells with or without monocytes were the most sensitive to the mitogenic effect, whereas T cells were unaffected. Responses to PHA and PWM were potentiated when T cells were present, but the maximum effect was observed when the proportion of T cells was less than 50%. The stimulatory material may be similar to lymphocyte mitogenic factor and may function as a T cell-replacing factor in B cell stimulation. PMID:313950

  18. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of lymphocyte activation in serum from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Binderup, L; Bramm, E; Arrigoni-Martelli, E

    1978-01-01

    Serum from adjuvant arthritic rats inhibits the concanavalin A- (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide-induced stimulation of lymph node cells, leaving the basal and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation unaffected. Con A-stimulated 3H-thymidine uptake is also inhibited in rat spleen and peripheral blood lymphocytes and in dog peripheral blood lymphocytes. The intensity of the inhibitory activity in serum is positively correlated with the intensity of the secondary lesions of adjuvant arthritis. Inhibitory activity was not found in serum from rats bearing nystatin-induced inflammation. Serum fractionation studies indicated that the inhibitory activity cannot be attributed to low molecular weight alpha2-glycoproteins or to gamma-globulins and alpha2-macroglobulins, but it is present in a fraction migrating with beta-globulins. The inhibitory activity in arthritic rat serum is reduced by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but is unaltered by D-penicillamine. It is suggested that this inhibitory activity is part of the systemic response to an immunologically mediated inflammation. PMID:151867

  19. Polysaccharide Isolated from Zizyphus jujuba (紅棗 Hóng Zǎo) Inhibits Interleukin-2 Production in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bo-Yang; Kuo, Yuh-Chi; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Zizyphus jujuba (紅棗 Hóng Zǎo), a traditional Chinese herb widely used in many Asian countries, has been shown to possess vital biological activities such as anti-cancer activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of deproteinated polysaccharide (DP) isolated from Z. jujuba. The DP isolated from Z. jujuba consisted of two polysaccharide fractions and their molecular weights (MWs) were found to be 143,108 and 67,633 Da, respectively. The DP could significantly decrease interleukin (IL)-2 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated Jurkat T cells in a dose-dependent manner after 48 h of incubation, with the inhibition being 47.5%, 61.2%, and 81.7% for DP concentrations of 0.75, 1.75, and 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. Thus, our study showed that DP isolated from Z. jujuba may possess anti-inflammatory activity as it could significantly reduce IL-2 production in activated Jurkat T cells. PMID:24860737

  20. Lack of genotoxic effects (micronucleus induction) in human lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zeni, O; Chiavoni, A S; Sannino, A; Antolini, A; Forigo, D; Bersani, F; Scarfì, M R

    2003-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated the induction of genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to electromagnetic fields used in mobile communication systems (frequency 900 MHz). For this purpose, the incidence of micronuclei was evaluated by applying the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Cytotoxicity was also investigated using the cytokinesis-block proliferation index. The experiments were performed on peripheral blood from 20 healthy donors, and several conditions were tested by varying the duration of exposure, the specific absorption rate (SAR), and the signal [continuous-wave (CW) or GSM (Global System of Mobile Communication) modulated signal]. The following exposures were carried out: (1) CW intermittent exposure (SAR = 1.6 W/kg) for 6 min followed by a 3-h pause (14 on/off cycles); (2) GSM signal, intermittent exposure as described in (1); (3) GSM signal, intermittent exposure as described in (1) 24 h before stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (8 on/off cycles); (4) GSM signal, intermittent exposure (SAR = 0.2 W/kg) 1 h per day for 3 days. The SARs were estimated numerically. No statistically significant differences were detected in any case in terms of either micronucleus frequency or cell cycle kinetics.

  1. Delayed effects of low-dose radiation on cellular immunity in atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, E T; Akiyama, M; Kusunoki, Y; Makinodan, T

    1987-05-01

    Several parameters of cellular immune function were assessed among persons who survived the 1945 atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki but who now reside in the United States. The subjects in this study were exposed to various low doses (T65D) of radiation at the time of the bomb. More than half received an estimated 0 Gy (S0 group). Of those exposed to more radiation (S+ group), nearly 90% received less than 0.50 Gy (50 rad). Lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of these individuals and were assessed for the following parameters of cellular immunity: mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin, mitogenic response to allogeneic lymphocytes, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), and interferon production. In every case, the response of the S+ group was greater than that of the S0 group, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. Results of studies presently being performed on A-bomb survivors residing in Hiroshima do not confirm this difference. Therefore, it is difficult to say whether the increase in natural cytotoxicity observed among the American and not the Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to very low doses of radiation is a hormetic effect which was modulated by post-radiation environmental conditions or a result of selective migration.

  2. Quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes do not contain a sizable amount of preexistent DNA single-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.; Mullaart, E.; van der Schans, G.P.; Vijg, J.

    1989-02-01

    Sedimentation of nucleoids through neutral sucrose density gradients has shown that nucleoids isolated from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) sediment faster than nucleoids derived from quiescent lymphocytes, which was attributed to rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) present in the resting cells. We isolated PBL from donors and determined the amount of SSB in nonradiolabeled, untreated resting and PHA-stimulated cells by applying the alkaline filter elution technique. Calibration was based on dose-dependent induction of SSB by /sup 60/Co-gamma-radiation. Quiescent cells did not contain a sizable amount of SSB. Mitogen-stimulated cells showed equally low amounts of SSB per cell. The present study indicates that the interpretation of the results obtained with the nucleoid sedimentation technique concerning the supposed rejoining of SSB in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes is incorrect. Other, equally sensitive, techniques such as alkaline filter elution appear to be preferable for studies on DNA damage and repair.

  3. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  4. Body mass and immune function, but not bill coloration, predict dominance in female mallards.

    PubMed

    Ligon, Russell A; Butler, Michael W

    2016-10-01

    Competition over indivisible resources is common and often costly. Therefore, selection should favor strategies, including efficient communication, that minimize unnecessary costs associated with such competition. For example, signaling enables competitors to avoid engaging in costly asymmetrical contests. Recently, bill coloration has been identified as an information-rich signal used by some birds to mediate aggressive interactions and we evaluated this possibility in female mallards Anas platyrhynchos. Specifically, we conducted two rounds of competitive interactions among groups of unfamiliar adult female ducks. By recording all aggressive behaviors exhibited by each individual, as well as the identity of attack recipients, we were able to assign dominance scores and evaluate links between numerous physiological, morphological, and experimental variables that we predicted would influence contest outcome and dominance. Contrary to our predictions, dominance was not linked to any aspect of bill coloration, access to dietary carotenoids during development, two of three measures of immune function, or ovarian follicle maturation. Instead, heavier birds were more dominant, as were those with reduced immune system responses to an experimentally administered external immunostimulant, phytohemagglutinin. These results suggest that visual signals are less useful during the establishment of dominance hierarchies within multi-individual scramble competitions, and that immune function is correlated with contest strategies in competitions for access to limited resources. PMID:27561967

  5. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  6. DEPRESSED CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY INTRACRANIAL TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, William H.; Netsky, Martin G.; Normansell, David E.; Horwitz, David A.

    1972-01-01

    Tumor immunity in patients with primary intracranial tumors was assessed in relation to the general status of host immunocompetence. Lymphocyte sensitization to tumor-specific membrane antigens was demonstrated by the proliferative response of lymphocytes in the presence of autochthonous tumor cells. Paradoxically, one-half of the patients could not be sensitized to a primary antigen, dinitrochlorobenzene; existing delayed hypersensitivity was also depressed, as measured by skin tests and lymphocyte transformation in response to common antigens. A heat-stable factor in patients' sera blocked cell-mediated tumor immunity. In addition, these "enhancing" sera consistently suppressed the blastogenic response of autologous and homologous lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and to membrane antigens on allogeneic cells in the one-way mixed lymphocyte culture. When patients' leukocytes were washed and autologous plasma replaced with normal plasma, reactivity in the mixed lymphocyte culture increased to normal values. In vitro immunosuppressive activity in patients' plasma or sera correlated with depressed delayed hypersensitivity. After removal of the tumor, suppressor activity disappeared. IgG fractions of patient sera contained strong immunosuppressive activity. These data suggest that the suppressor factor may be an isoantibody elicited by the tumor that also binds to receptors on the lymphocyte membrane. In addition to specifically blocking cell-mediated tumor immunity, enhancing sera may broadly depress host immunocompetence. PMID:4345108

  7. Effect of renutrition on the proliferation kinetics of PHA stimulated lymphocytes from malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R; Campos, C; Gómez, J L; Espinoza, M; Ramos-Motilla, M; Betancourt, M

    1995-04-01

    The fraction of lymphocytes that responded to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation and initiated cellular proliferation (stimulation index or SI) was determined in groups of healthy and severely malnourished children. SI was determined again in the latter group after a period of nutritional recovery. The proportion of interphasic cells showing PHA response was assessed adding bromodeoxyuridine to the culture, so proliferative nuclei appear big and stain light blue, with dispersed granular chromatin and apparent nucleoli, while non-proliferative nuclei look small, stain red, and have compact and homogeneous chromatin. In mitotic nuclei, differential staining of sister chromatids made it possible to distinguish cells that had gone through one, two and three or more proliferation cycles. Based on the data obtained from interphase nuclei and mitosis, the SI was estimated at 48 and 72 h of culture. SI were higher in lymphocytes from healthy children than in those from children with severe malnutrition, even after the period of nutritional recovery. However, the SI was significantly higher in lymphocytes from malnourished children after nutritional recovery. Although in these children more cells are stimulated, there seems to be still damage that causes a cycling delay. PMID:7885377

  8. An Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Domain Receptor Expressed Widely in the Brain Functions as a Coreceptor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Sharron, Matthew; Lee, Benhur; Yi, Yanji; Choe, Wonkyu; Kolson, Dennis L.; Mitrovic, Branka; Zhou, Yiqing; Faulds, Daryl; Collman, Ronald G.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Horuk, Richard; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Both CD4 and an appropriate coreceptor are necessary for infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and most strains of HIV-2. The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major HIV-1 coreceptors, although some virus strains can also utilize alternative coreceptors such as CCR3 to infect cells. In contrast, most if not all simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains use CCR5 as a coreceptor, and many SIV strains can use CCR5 independently of CD4. In addition, several orphan seven-transmembrane receptors which can serve as HIV-1 and SIV coreceptors have been identified. Here we report that APJ, an orphan seven-transmembrane domain receptor with homology to the angiotensin receptor family, functions as a coreceptor for a number of HIV-1 and SIV strains. APJ was expressed widely in the human brain and in NT2N neurons. APJ transcripts were also detected by reverse transcription-PCR in the CD4-positive T-cell line C8166, but not in peripheral blood leukocytes, microglia, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- or PHA/interleukin-2-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes, or monocyte-derived macrophages. The widespread distribution of APJ in the central nervous system coupled with its use as a coreceptor by some HIV-1 strains indicates that it may play a role in neuropathogenesis. PMID:9733831

  9. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents. PMID:8642690

  10. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 Cytokine Production in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells after Treatment with Cypermethrin and Mancozeb In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45–30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings. PMID:25328518

  11. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings. PMID:25328518

  12. The in vitro effects of artificial and natural sweeteners on the immune system using whole blood culture assays.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, F; Pool, E J

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of commercially available artificial (aspartame, saccharin, sucralose) and natural sweeteners (brown sugar, white sugar, molasses) on the immune system. Human whole blood cultures were incubated with various sweeteners and stimulated in vitro with either phytohemagglutinin or endotoxin. Harvested supernatants were screened for cytotoxicity and cytokine release. Results showed that none of the artificial or natural sweeteners proved to be cytotoxic, indicating that no cell death was induced in vitro. The natural sweetener, sugar cane molasses (10 ug/mL), enhanced levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 while all artificial sweeteners (10 ug/mL) revealed a suppressive effect on IL-6 secretion (P < 0.001). Exposure of blood cells to sucralose-containing sweeteners under stimulatory conditions reduced levels of the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). The cumulative suppression of Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-10 levels induced by sucralose may contribute to the inability in mounting an effective humoral response when posed with an exogenous threat. PMID:24063614

  13. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945.

  14. Carrier detection in xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Kraemer, K.H.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    We were able to detect clinically normal carriers of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) genes with coded samples of either peripheral blood lymphocytes or skin fibroblasts, using a cytogenetic assay shown previously to detect individuals with cancer-prone genetic disorders. Metaphase cells of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes from eight individuals who are obligate heterozygotes for XP were compared with those from nine normal controls at 1.3, 2.3, and 3.3 h after x-irradiation (58 R) during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Lymphocytes from the XP heterozygotes had twofold higher frequencies of chromatid breaks or chromatid gaps than normal (P less than 10(-5)) when fixed at 2.3 or 3.3 h after irradiation. Lymphocytes from six XP homozygotes had frequencies of breaks and gaps threefold higher than normal. Skin fibroblasts from an additional obligate XP heterozygote, when fixed approximately 2 h after x-irradiation (68 R), had a twofold higher frequency of chromatid breaks and a fourfold higher frequency of gaps than fibroblasts from a normal control. This frequency of aberrations in cells from the XP heterozygote was approximately half that observed in the XP homozygote. The elevated frequencies of chromatid breaks and gaps after G2 phase x-irradiation may provide the basis of a test for identifying carriers of the XP gene(s) within known XP families.

  15. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Corbin, S.A.; Saunders, J.; Tandy, N.P.

    1989-06-01

    Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.

  16. Evaluation of proliferation and cytokines production by mitogen-stimulated bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Norian, Reza; Delirezh, Nowruz; Azadmehr, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate lymphocyte blastogenic and cytokine production by bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogens, by using tetrazolium salt and ELISA tests, respectively. The results presented that Interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ production in response to PWM mitogens was the highest and Con A the lowest amount and the median values of three mitogens were in the following order: PWM > PHA > Con A > cell control. In the case of IL-6, the production of this cytokine was the same amount for PWM and Con A and a lower amount for PHA stimulation. The results of this study not only showed a normal range for the production of these cytokines from PBMCs that were affected by mitogens, but it demonstrated that the bovine immune system at 2.5 to 3 months was post-natally matured enough to mount an effective immune response to mitogens as well as specific antigens. PMID:26973760

  17. Effects of cyclophosphamide on in vitro human lymphocyte culture and mitogenic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.S.

    1983-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) has been reported to be inactive in vitro under certain conditions. In the present study, CY was tested for its ability to inhibit human lymphocyte proliferation and to modulate lymphocyte response to mitogens in vitro. The inhibition of or the increase in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in mitogen-stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes by CY was used as a measure of CY activity in vitro. The results demonstrate that lymphocytes from 10 different persons had a mean decrease of 74% in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of CY (P less than 0.005). The effect was maximal at a concentration of 160 micrograms/ml. A mean inhibition of 35 and 55% was caused by 10 and 40 micrograms/ml concentrations of CY, respectively. CY also was able to reduce the number of viable cells during 5 days in culture and had a profound effect on mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes. In all cases, CY modulated the stimulation of lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) either by augmenting or suppressing the responses. At low concentrations (10 micrograms/ml) it augmented mitogenic stimulation by 46 to 281%. At higher concentrations (20 to 160 micrograms/ml), CY had a suppressive effect with a maximum suppression of 99%. The CY-induced immunomodulation is perhaps caused by its action on the regulatory T cells. When tested in vitro, CY had inhibitory activity on T cells.

  18. Cellular kinetics in a patient with Sezary syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Chikkappa, G.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    Cellular kinetics and proliferation of Sezary cells (SC) were studied in a 48-year-old woman with Sezary syndrome (SS). In vitro flash labeling indices of peripheral blood (PB) SC were studied by labeling with tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/HTdR) and tritiated cytidine (/sup 3/HCdR). Intradermal SC were labeled in vivo by local injection of /sup 3/HTdR followed by skin biopsies of the injected sites. Traffic patterns of DNA labeled PB SC were studied by intravenous /sup 3/HTdR followed by sampling of PB, skin, lymph node (LN), and bone marrow (BM). Fluxes of PB SC in various tissues were investigated by autotransfusion of /sup 3/HCdR labeled PB SC followed by serial sampling of PB, LN, BM, and skin. In vitro response of PB SC to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed (PWM) were also investigated. The results from these studies in this patient indicate that 1) proliferation of SC was primarily in the skin, 2) there was a negligible flux of SC from blood into skin, LN, and BM, and 3) the mitogenic response of PB mononuclear cells (mostly SC) to PHA, PWM, and Con A was poor.

  19. Immunotoxicological evaluation of toluene exposure via drinking water in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.C.; Sharma, R.P.; Parker, R.D.R. )

    1989-06-01

    Toluene is a known contaminant found in trace amounts in groundwater. Male CD-1 mice were exposed to 0, 17, 80, and 405 mg/liter toluene in drinking water for 4 weeks. Immune function assays were selected to evaluate specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, interleukin-2 (IL-2) activity, hematology, along with general toxicity. Toluene produced an increase in liver weight and decrease in thymus mass at the highest dose. No effects on body weights and hematological parameters, including erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials were noticed. Mitogenesis by lipopolysaccharide, pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A, and phytohemagglutinin were suppressed in splenocytes from treated mice. Splenocyte lymphoproliferation to alloantigens decreased at the 405 mg/liter concentration only. Numbers of sheep red blood cell (SRBC)-specific plaque-forming cells decreased in the highest dosed animals; however, no significant change was observed in the serum {alpha}-SRBC antibody level. Toluene also adversely affected IL-2 synthesis at the 405 mg/liter concentration. Findings suggest that alteration of immune functions of mice ingesting toluene was generally evident at relatively high doses, except for splenic lymphocyte responses to selected mitogens.

  20. Peripheral blood lymphocytes are able to maintain their viability and basic function in normal urine

    PubMed Central

    Aghamajidi, Azin; Babaie, Hesam; Amirjamshidi, Narges; Abedian, Zeinab; Khorasani, Hamidreza; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Similar to inflammatory cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can also infiltrate in to kidney and urinary tracts and subsequently excreted by urine. In this study we determined the viability rate and response to phytohemagglutinin-A (PHA) of human PBMCs in normal urine. Methods: A number of 1×106 ficoll-hypaque isolated PBMCs were dispensed in 1 ml normal urine and 6 molar urea and RPMI-1640+FBS10 % were considered as negative and positive control, respectively. After 20, 60 and 120 minutes the viability of these cells was measured by trypan blue dye exclusion assay. 1×105 of PBMCs were isolated from urine and cultured as triplicate in RPMI-1640`supplemented with FBS 10% and PHA for 96hr. MTT assay was performed to determine the PBMCs response to PHA. These experiments were repeated three times independently. Results: There was no significant difference between the viability rates of the PBMCs incubated in urine and positive control after 20, 60 and 120 minutes. Overall, there was a significant difference in trends of viability rate across the three groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that not only PBMCs remained remarkably alive in urine after 120 minutes, but can also respond to PHA up to 60 minutes after incubation in urine. These data open a new avenue in the designation for cell culture-based techniques in urine cell analysis. PMID:26958332

  1. Effects of macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins on the murine immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The macrocyclic trichothecenes are a unique group of toxins which have some antileukemic properties. In the first study, verrucarin A and roridin A were examined. Both mycotoxins were administered intraperitoneally at an equitoxic dose of 0.35 mg/kg to CD-1 mice. Lymphocyte proliferation was studied after animals were dosed with verrucarin A. After day 2, no differences in {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation were observed using concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On day 4, DNA synthesis induced by Con A, PHA, and PWM increased significantly. On day 7, PHA stimulation increased above controls while Con A, PWM, and LPS responses were not significantly different. In contrast, roridin A decreased PHA stimulation only on day 7. In the second study the mycotoxins roritoxin B, myrotoxin B, roridin A, verrucarin A, 16-hydroxyverrucarin A, verrucarin J, baccharinoid B12, roridin D, roridin E, baccharinoid B4, and baccharinoid B5 were investigated. In the third study lymphocytes were cultured with each of the mycotoxins for 48 hr to assess their lethality.

  2. Effects of irradiation upon the response of murine spleen cells to mitogens

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Troup, G.M.

    1982-11-01

    The mitogenic response of murine spleen cells exposed to graded doses of radiation was evaluated. Low-dose exposures were associated with an augmented response to concanavalin A (Con A) that was most marked with 100 rads. Low-dose augmentation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was equivocal and most pronounced in cells exposed to 10-20 rads. Augmentation was only demonstrable when the cells were irradiated immediately prior to mitogenic stimulation. Timed exposures after stimulation with Con A or PHA showed no evidence that mitogen activation increased radioresistance, although the possibility could not be excluded that activation protects against interphase cell death. Reduced isotope incorporation was associated with all doses of radiation evaluated in cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). On this basis it is concluded that 1) each of the mitogens tested differs in its capacity to stimulate irradiated spleen cells; 2) radiation-induced augmentation is noted with those mitogens (Con A and possibly PHA) known to activate only T cells; 3) radiation-induced augmentation may be due to the release of mitogenically active molecules by injured lymphocytes.

  3. Cell mediated immunity in American cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E M; Johnson, W D; Barreto, E; Marsden, P D; Costa, J L; Reed, S; Rocha, H

    1985-12-01

    Cellular immune responses were studied in 35 Brazilian patients with either active cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), active mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), or healed cutaneous leishmaniasis. The mean age and duration of illness in the two groups were as follows: 14 CL patients, age 28 +/- 13 yr, disease 5 +/- mo; and 16 ML patients, age 34 +/- 15 yr, disease 86 +/- 117 mo. Patients with CL and ML responded well to leishmania antigen in blastogenesis assays. However, the response of ML patients was over three times greater than the response of CL patients. There was a significant correlation between the magnitude of the lymphoproliferative response and the duration of disease activity. There were no significant differences between CL and ML patients in terms of the following parameters: lymphoproliferative responsiveness to mitogens (phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen) and peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations (T and B cells, oKT8+ and OKT4+ cells, OKT4:OKT8 ratio). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ML patients also generated interferon-gamma containing lymphokine in response to stimulation with leishmania antigen. This lymphokine was capable of inducing macrophages from ML patients to inhibit the intracellular multiplication of leishmania in vitro. These studies have determined that the parameters of lymphocyte and macrophage functions evaluated in ML and CL patients are comparable, except for an enhanced lymphoproliferative response, with leishmania antigen in ML patients. This later finding may be a function of the long duration of active disease in this population and unrelated to the pathogenesis of their mucosal lesions.

  4. In vitro activation of T lymphocytes from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive blood donors. I. Soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL2R) production parallels cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Prince, H E; Kleinman, S H; Maino, V C; Jackson, A L

    1988-03-01

    We investigated the relationship of soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL2R) production to cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis by mitogen-stimulated mononuclear cells from blood donors seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). SIL2R was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which employed 2 anti-IL2R monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct IL2R epitopes. Decreased phytohemagglutinin-induced DNA synthesis and cellular IL2R expression were accompanied by decreased levels of sIL2R in cell culture supernatants. Similar findings were observed for pokeweed mitogen-induced responses. There was no detectable spontaneous secretion of sIL2R into culture supernatants by unstimulated mononuclear cells from either HIV-seropositive or control seronegative donors. These findings indicate that the in vitro T-cell activation defects which characterize HIV infection include decreased sIL2R production, as well as decreased cellular IL2R expression and DNA synthesis. Further, they show that assessment of supernatant sIL2R levels can be used as a valid, reliable assay for T-cell activation.

  5. Lymphocyte reactivity to mitogens in American visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E M; Bacellar, O A

    1983-04-01

    In vitro lymphocyte reactivity to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) was evaluated in 11 patients with American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL) and 11 control subjects. The diagnosis of AVL was established by the demonstration of leishmania in bone marrow aspirates. Thymidine incorporation (cpm +/- SEM) of PHA-stimulated cultures was 27, 520 +/- 4,488 in the AVL patients and 56,531 +/- 8,787 in the controls (P less than 0.01). No significant difference was observed in the response to Con A and PWM between AVL and control patients. The restoration of the PHA response to levels similar to normal was observed when cells from five AVL patients were cultured in medium supplemented with standard AB serum rather than autologous serum. In this group of experiments the average suppressor activity of the PHA response present in sera from AVL patients was 46%. Lymphocyte reactivity of normal subjects to PHA was also suppressed by the AVL serum: PHA-stimulated lymphocytes cultured in standard AB serum were 49,122 +/- 9,345 vs 23,115 +/- 4,935 cpm in cultures supplemented with AVL serum. The demonstration that AVL serum suppressed the PHA response indicates that some of the cellular immunological abnormalities in AVL patients may be dependent on inhibitor factory present in AVl serum.

  6. Myotonic dystrophy: HLA antigens and mitogen stimulated lymphocyte responses of a black American family.

    PubMed

    Hsia, S; Ho, C K; Aliffi, V B; Doran, D M; Hamilton, D

    1982-01-01

    A Black American family of four generations with 29 members was studied. Six family members spanning two generations were affected with myotonic dystrophy. HLA A, B, C and DR antigen specificities were determined for each family member using local typing trays. Twelve HLA haplotypes were identified in the family. No significant association was found between the disease and any HLA antigenic type or haplotype. This finding suggests that the involvement of the major histocompatibility complex in the etiology of myotonic dystrophy is unlikely. The cellular responses to twenty-eight family members and 20 unrelated Black Americans to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), Concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM), each in three concentrations, were tested with mononuclear cells prepared from peripheral blood. There was a significant difference in responses of the affected family members as compared to the unaffected family members and the unrelated Black Americans. The PHA and PWM responses of the unaffected family members are not significantly different from those of the unrelated Black American controls; however, the Con A responses of the unaffected family members are significantly higher than those of the control group at the lowest Con A dosage. The possible systemic defects of cytoskeletal structures of the affected family members are discussed.

  7. Modulatory effects of plasma and serum on T lymphocyte activation: distinctive patterns for different mitogens.

    PubMed

    Prince, H E; Jensen, E R

    1993-03-01

    Published reports have shown that fresh plasma, but not cryoprecipitate-depleted plasma or fresh serum, inhibits T cell activation by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We sought to determine if this pattern of inhibition also characterized T cell responses to mitogens differing from PHA with regard to the cell surface molecules utilized for signal transduction. The activation system included colchicine, which limits the cells to one round of division, masking stimulatory factors that enhance proliferation by boosting the number of divisions per culture period. A distinctive modulatory pattern characterized T cell responses to each of 4 mitogens tested (PHA, anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, desialyzed oxidized erythrocytes (DOE), pokeweed mitogen). Enhanced proliferative responses to anti-CD3 and DOE were observed in the presence of serum, and reflected an increased percentage of T cells expressing CD25. These findings suggest that concerns regarding a negative impact of plasma components on T cell responsiveness, when based on results from PHA-induced activations systems, may be unwarranted.

  8. Constitutive heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and Duffy blood group alleles in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kosower, N.S.; Gerad, L.; Goldstein, M.; Parasol, N.

    1995-04-24

    Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in unrelated schizophrenic patients, unrelated controls and patients and family members in multiplex families. The size-distribution of chromosome 1 heterochromatic region (1qH, C-band variants) among 21 unrelated schizophrenic patients was different from that found in a group of 46 controls. The patient group had 1qH variants of smaller size than the control group (P < 0.01). Incubation of phytohemagglutinin-treated blood lymphocytes with 5-azacytidine (which causes decondensation and extension of the heterochromatin) led to a lesser degree of heterochromatin decondensation in a group of patients than in the controls (7 schizophrenic, 9 controls, P < 0.01). The distribution of phenotypes of Duffy blood group system (whose locus is linked to the 1qH region) among 28 schizophrenic patients was also different from that in the general population. Cosegregation of schizophrenia with a 1qH (C-band) variant and Duffy blood group allele was observed in one of six multiplex families. The overall results suggest that alterations within the Duffy/1qH region are involved in schizophrenia in some cases. This region contains the locus of D5 dopamine receptor pseudogene 2 (1q21.1), which is transcribed in normal lymphocytes. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. A comparative study of physicochemical characteristics and functionalities of pinto bean protein isolate (PBPI) against the soybean protein isolate (SPI) after the extraction optimisation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ee-San; Ying-Yuan, Ngoh; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Optimisation of protein extraction yield from pinto bean was investigated using response surface methodology. The maximum protein yield of 54.8 mg/g was obtained with the optimal conditions of: temperature=25 °C, time=1 h and buffer-to-sample ratio=20 ml/g. PBPI was found to obtain high amount of essential amino acids such as leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine compared to SPI. The predominant proteins of PBPI were vicilin and phytohemagglutinins whereas the predominant proteins of SPI were glycinin and conglycinins. Significantly higher emulsifying capacity was found in PBPI (84.8%) compared to SPI (61.9%). Different isoelectric points were found in both PBPI (4.0-5.5) and SPI (4.0-5.0). Also, it was found that PBPI obtained a much higher denaturation temperature of 110.2 °C compared to SPI (92.5 °C). Other properties such as structural information, gelling capacity, water- and oil-holding capacities, emulsion stability as well as digestibility were also reported.

  10. Role of HDL in cholesteryl ester metabolism of lipopolysaccharide-activated P388D1 macrophages[S

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Sabrina; Spolitu, Stefano; Angius, Fabrizio; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Banni, Sebastiano; Murru, Elisabetta; Sanna, Francesca; Batetta, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Infections share with atherosclerosis similar lipid alterations, with accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) in activated macrophages and concomitant decrease of cholesterol-HDL (C-HDL). Yet the precise role of HDL during microbial infection has not been fully elucidated. Activation of P388D1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered an increase of CEs and neutral lipid contents, along with a remarkable enhancement in 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-HDL uptake. Similar results were found in human monocyte-derived macrophages and monocytes cocultured with phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. Inhibition of cholesterol esterification with Sandoz-58035 resulted in 80% suppression of CE biosynthesis in P388D1. However, only a 35% decrease of CE content, together with increased scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-B1) protein expression, was found after 72 h and thereafter up to 16 passages of continuous ACAT suppression. Chronic inhibition blunted the effect of LPS treatment on cholesterol metabolism, increased the ratio of free cholesterol/CE content and enhanced interleukin 6 secretion.These results imply that, besides de novo biosynthesis and acquisition by LDL, HDL contributes probably through SR-B1 to the increased CE content in macrophages, partly explaining the low levels of C-HDL during their activation. Our data suggest that in those conditions where more CEs are required, HDL rather than removing, may supply CEs to the cells. PMID:23956443

  11. The effects of malnutrition on variables of host defense in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Wunder, J A; Stinnett, J D; Alexander, J W

    1978-10-01

    Studies were conducted in young guinea pigs to determine the effects of malnutrition on selected variables of host resistance. Malnutrition was produced differently in two experiments. In the first the quantity of a standard, normal diet was reduced progressively so that test groups were fed 25% less each week over a 4 week period. Control groups were fed ad libitum. In the subsequent experiment, animals were fed defined guinea pig diets containing 5%, 30%, and 60% casein, respectively, which were similar in caloric content, vitamins, and minerals. Measurements of phagocytic bactericidal activity, serum opsonization, serum IgG and C3 levels, and mitogenic response of lymphocytes were made at weekly intervals. Results obtained from both experiments were comparable. There was a significant decline in phagocyte function by the third week in malnourished animals while the numbers of phagocytes per milliliter of peritoneal washings were similar to controls at all time periods. A depression of serum opsonization was observed when animals became moribund even though serum IgG levels remained unchanged. Serum C3 levels in malnourished animals were significantly lower than controls. Mitogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin was 85% lower in the 5% casein group after the third week. These results indicated that a marasmus-like condition and protein malnutrition depress critical functions of resistance.

  12. Carotenoid-based coloration, condition, and immune responsiveness in the nestlings of a sexually dimorphic bird of prey.

    PubMed

    Sternalski, Audrey; Mougeot, François; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In many birds, nestlings exhibit brightly colored traits that are pigmented by carotenoids. Carotenoids are diet limited and also serve important health-related physiological functions. The proximate mechanisms behind the expression of these carotenoid-pigmented traits are still poorly known, especially in nestlings with sexual size dimorphism. In these nestlings, intrabrood competition levels and growth strategies likely differ between sexes, and this may in turn influence carotenoid allocation rules. We used dietary carotenoid supplementation to test whether wild marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus) nestlings were carotenoid limited and whether carotenoid allocation strategies varied between sexes, which differ in their size and growth strategies. When supplemented, nestlings used the supplemental carotenoids to increase their coloration independently of their sex. We showed that the condition dependence of the carotenoid level and the response to an immune challenge (phytohemagglutinin test) differed between sexes, possibly because sexual size dimorphism influences growth strategies and/or intrabrood competition levels and access to different types of food. In this species, which often feeds on mammals, a trade-off likely exists between food quantity (energy) and quality (carotenoid content). Finally, carotenoid-based coloration expressed in marsh harrier nestlings appeared to be indicative of immune responsiveness rather than condition, therefore potentially advertising to parents nestling quality or value rather than nutritional need.

  13. Application of a live varicella vaccine in children with acute leukemia or other malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Izawa, T; Ihara, T; Hattori, A; Iwasa, T; Kamiya, H; Sakurai, M; Takahashi, M

    1977-12-01

    A live varicella vaccine was used in 11 susceptible children in remission from acute leukemia, ten of whom had been in remission for six months or less, and in 6 children with neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma. In the immunological checkup before vaccination, most of them showed a positive reaction in the skin tests with dinitrochlorobenzene, phytohemagglutinin, purified protein derivative, and viral antigens. Leukopenia (three cases, less than 3,000/cu mm) and decreased IgG level (two cases, 380 mg/dl and 445 mg/dl) were observed in the children with leukemia. Anticancer medication was suspended from one week before vaccination to one week after vaccination. The only clinical reaction was a minute rash that appeared three weeks after vaccination in two children with leukemia and that disappeared within three days. Serological responses by complement fixing and neutralizing (NT) tests were detected in all the vaccinated children four weeks after vaccination, and NT antibody was still detected 28 months after vaccination in the two patients tested. Three of the vaccines were exposed to natural varicella at home and in the classroom 2 to 18 months after vaccination, but they were free from any varicella symptoms.

  14. Immunomodulating and Antiprotozoal Effects of Different Extracts of the Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Against Coccidiosis in Broiler.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Irfan; Akhtar, Masood; Iqbal, Zafar; Shahid, Muhammad; Awais, Mian Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The culinary-medicinal oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, procured from local sources, was processed for hot water and methanolic extraction. Extracts obtained were subjected to proximate analysis to determine the amount of crude protein, crude fiber, ash, ether, and nitrogen-free extracts. These extracts were evaluated for immunomodulating and antiprotozoal effects against coccidiosis in a broiler. Cellular immune investigation revealed significantly higher (P < 0.05) lymphoproliferative response to phytohemagglutinin-P in groups administered P. ostreatus extracts compared with controls. Humoral immune investigation revealed higher immunoglobulin (total Ig, IgG, and IgM) titers against sheep red blood cells in treated groups compared with controls. However, nonsignificant (P > 0.05) findings were observed in investigations of lymphoid organs. Antiprotozoal studies revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) percentage of protection against coccidiosis in groups administered P. ostreatus extracts when compared with controls. Moreover, lesion scoring and oocysts per gram of droppings observed in the control group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with those in groups administered hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus. Results concluded that hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus had strong immune-enhancing activities. Further, these extracts also had excellent antiprotozoal activities against coccidiosis in a broiler. PMID:25954914

  15. Cytogenetic characterization of circulating malignant cells in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, M.; Yelavarthi, K.K.; Finn, W.G.

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes from 20 patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) were analyzed for clonal chromosomal abnormalities using phytohemagglutinin or a combination of IL-2 and IL-7 as mitogens. Clonal abnormalities were observed in 10 of 16 patients with circulating Sezary cells but in none of the 4 patients without circulating Sezary cells, suggesting a correlation between the presence of clonal abnormalities and circulating Sezary cells. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to correlate with poor prognosis (1 of 6 cases with a single abnormal clone and all 4 cases with complex abnormalities). Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 1 and 8 were observed in 6 cases. In 5 cases involving chromosome 1, loss of material involved the region between 1p33 and 1p36. In an additional case, a reciprocal translocation involving the short arm of chromosome 1 and 1p33 was observed. In 2 cases an apparently identical, balanced translocation involving chromosomes 8 and 17, t(8;17)(p21;q21), was observed. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 10 and 17 (5 cases) and chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9, 13, and 20 (3 cases) were also observed. Future studies of these chromosomes at the molecular level, particularly of the region between 1p33 and 1p36, may help in the identification of the genetic defects associated with malignant transformation in CTCL.

  16. Monitoring of chimerism using fluorescence in situ hybridization in a child with severe combined immune deficiency following bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Chen, X.O.; Katz, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    A boy with severe combined immunodeficiency received a bone marrow transplant from his sister when he was approximately 3 years of age. His peripheral blood karyotype at age 3 and 4 years was 46,XX (20 cells analyzed). Because of a decline in antibody production at 19 years of age, the patient`s peripheral blood was analyzed again for suspected chimerism. His karyotype in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated culture was 46,XX in 49 cells and 46,XY in one cell. Both metaphase and interphase cells were examined for sex chromosome constitution using X and Y dual-color alpha-satellite probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results for metaphase cells showed 1/50 XY cells, but 38% of interphase cells showed the presence of both X and Y centromere. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures grew poorly and were therefore analyzed using FISH only: 81% of interphase cells were 46,XX. The discrepancy between metaphase and interphase in the PHA-stimulated cultures most likely represents a failure of this boy`s own XY T-cells to be stimulated.

  17. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of spironolactone on human blood mononuclear cells: mineralocorticoid receptor independent effects on gene expression and late apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik Salling; Mikkelsen, Marianne; Rieneck, Klaus; Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2006-05-01

    1 Spironolactone (SPIR) binds to cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and functions as an aldosterone antagonist. Recently, the drug was shown to have an early suppressive effect on several immunoactive and proinflammatory cytokines. 2 To elucidate the mechanism behind this, the four MR-binding steroids SPIR, canrenone, 7alpha-thiomethyl-spironolactone and aldosterone (ALDO) were investigated for effects on lipopolysaccharide- and phytohemagglutinin-A-activated human blood mononuclear cells. Gene expression was examined after 4 h using microarrays, and SPIR affected 1018 transcripts of the (=) 22,000 probed. In contrast, the SPIR-related steroids affected 17 or fewer transcripts. Combining SPIR and ALDO resulted in 940 affected transcripts, indicating that SPIR has an early gene-regulatory effect independent of MR. 3 The affected genes encode a large number of signalling proteins and receptors, including immunoinflammatory response genes and apoptosis and antiapoptosis genes. Apoptosis was evident in CD3-, CD14- and CD19-positive cells, but only after 18 h of exposure to SPIR. 4 The transcriptional network involving the differentially regulated genes was examined and the results indicate that SPIR affects genes controlled by the transcription factors NF-kappaB, CEBPbeta and MYC. 5 These observations provide new insight into the non-MR-mediated effects of SPIR. PMID:16520746

  19. Immune response, not immune maintenance, is energetically costly in wild white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Derting, Terry L; Compton, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the cost of immune function is essential for more accurate characterization of energy budgets of animals and better understanding of the role of immunity in the evolution of life-history strategies. We examined the energetic cost of maintaining a normally functioning immune system and mounting a mild immune response in wild male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). To evaluate the cost of maintaining immunocompetence, we compared resting and daily metabolic rates (RMR; DMR) and masses of body organs of mice whose immune systems were suppressed by cyclophosphamide with those of control mice. To evaluate the cost of mounting an immune response, we measured RMR, DMR, and organ masses in mice whose humoral and cell-mediated immune responses had been stimulated by injections of sheep red blood cells and phytohemagglutinin, respectively. Immunosuppression resulted in a significant reduction in circulating leukocytes, by 225%, but no significant effect on metabolic rates or organ masses. Immunochallenged animals showed no significant differences in metabolic rates compared with control animals but did exhibit significantly smaller dry masses of the small intestine and testes, by 74% and 22%, respectively. We concluded that the cost of maintaining the immune system was minimal. In contrast, there was a significant energetic cost of mounting an immune response that, depending on its magnitude, can be met through reductions in energy allocation to other physiological systems.

  20. Body mass and immune function, but not bill coloration, predict dominance in female mallards.

    PubMed

    Ligon, Russell A; Butler, Michael W

    2016-10-01

    Competition over indivisible resources is common and often costly. Therefore, selection should favor strategies, including efficient communication, that minimize unnecessary costs associated with such competition. For example, signaling enables competitors to avoid engaging in costly asymmetrical contests. Recently, bill coloration has been identified as an information-rich signal used by some birds to mediate aggressive interactions and we evaluated this possibility in female mallards Anas platyrhynchos. Specifically, we conducted two rounds of competitive interactions among groups of unfamiliar adult female ducks. By recording all aggressive behaviors exhibited by each individual, as well as the identity of attack recipients, we were able to assign dominance scores and evaluate links between numerous physiological, morphological, and experimental variables that we predicted would influence contest outcome and dominance. Contrary to our predictions, dominance was not linked to any aspect of bill coloration, access to dietary carotenoids during development, two of three measures of immune function, or ovarian follicle maturation. Instead, heavier birds were more dominant, as were those with reduced immune system responses to an experimentally administered external immunostimulant, phytohemagglutinin. These results suggest that visual signals are less useful during the establishment of dominance hierarchies within multi-individual scramble competitions, and that immune function is correlated with contest strategies in competitions for access to limited resources.

  1. 3-Bromoacetylamino benzoylurea (3-BAABU), a new antimicrotubule cancericidal agent applied in cytogenetic analysis in hematology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J D; Wang, Y; Janish, C A; Holland, J F; Bekesi, J G

    1998-01-01

    3-Bromoacetylamino benzoylurea (3-BAABU) is a newly synthesized antimicrotubule cancericidal compound. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of using 3-BAABU as a mitotic blocking agent for hematologic karyotyping. Treatment with 3-BAABU caused scattering of metaphase chromosomes throughout the cytoplasm both in phytohemagglutinine (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocytes and in human leukemic cells. Kinetic showed a rapid uptake of 3-BAABU by treated cells and irreversibility of its effect. Using 3-BAABU in routine procedure, a karyotype of lymphocytes from a normal male was 46, XY, with normal structure and CEM leukemic line was 85, XX, in a representative spread with abnormalities similar to reports using other blocking agents. Using 3-BAABU in spectral karyotyping, details of translocations in CEM leukemic cells were readily detected in several chromosomes, such as 7 [t(7;11)], 8 [t(8;9)], 9 [t(8;9) & t(9;19)], 11 [t(7;11)], 16 [t(16;18;20)] and 20 [t(1;20)]. 3-BAABU displayed two important characters in cytogenetics, 1) it caused dispersion of chromosomes, avoiding chance of overlap; 2) compared to the conventional mitotic blocking agent, vinblastine sulfate, 3-BAABU exhibited much gentle effect on chromosomes, thus providing more flexibility in time to perform karyotyping.

  2. [Biological effects of mineral fibers on lymphocytes in vitro. Comparative studies of asbestos and glass fibers].

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Y

    1983-09-01

    The biological effects of asbestos and glass fibers on lymphocytes in vitro were investigated. Blastoid transformation and beta 2 microglobulin production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) induced by phytohemagglutinin were inhibited by Canadian chrysotile B (Standard sample of the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer; UICC standard sample) but it was not the case for crocidolite (UICC standard sample) and small and large glass fibers (John Manville, Canada). Cytotoxic activities of natural killer and killer cells of PBL were investigated using K562 cells and Chang liver cells as target cells respectively. Chrysotile inhibited the both activities but crocidolite and two kind of glass fibers not. In regard to release of lactic dehydrogenase and beta-glucuronidase from mouse peritoneal macrophages exposed to mineral fibers, chrysotile showed more effective reaction compared to crocidolite and amosite (UICC standard sample), on the other hand large glass fiber showed the similar reaction to chrysotile but small glass fiber and milled amosite did not induce any more enzymatic release than the control. In addition to chemical compositions of mineral fibers, the morphological characteristics were also discussed in relation to their biological effects.

  3. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  4. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  5. Specific immune responses in changed gaseous environments.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, I V; Lebedev, K A; Zemskov, V M; Zazhirey, V D; Ganina, V I

    1971-01-01

    The capacity of lymphoid cells to participate in immunity reactions was evaluated by blast transformation of lymphocytes under the influence of phytohemagglutinin. Blast transformation was measured by cytologic analysis and autoradiographic investigation of the rate of RNA synthesis in cells (tritiated uridin used as label). An analysis of the material taken from the three test subjects during the year-long experiment showed that various situations affected significantly the blast transformation level of lymphocytes. The reaction was substantially reduced 10 days after a simulated emergency situation which involved a change in the atmosphere, increase of physical load, etc. The level of blast transformation increased 1.5 to 2 months after the simulation, exceeding the average value, then to be normalized. Atmospheric variations appear to be one of the factors that may change the activity of lymphoid cells. A parallel experiment was performed in which three subjects lived 10 days in a hyperoxic enclosed environment (53% O2). They showed a considerable intensification of blast transformation (by 2.2-2.6 times) and pronounced activation of the RNA synthesis. Investigations give evidence that a long-term enclosure exerts an effect on the reactivity of the systems involved in the development of basic immune reactions.

  6. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death.

  7. Immunomodulation and disease resistance in postyearling rainbow trout infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Ottinger, C.A.; Blazer, V.S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Smith, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the myxosporean parasite that causes whirling disease, has a number of deleterious effects on its salmonid host. Although it is well established that juvenile salmonids in the active stages of whirling disease mount an immune response to the pathogen, the occurrence and longevity of any related immunomodulatory effects are unknown. In this study, postyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with M. cerebralis were examined for leukocyte functions and for resistance to Yersinia ruckeri, a bacterial pathogen of salmonids. Compared with uninfected controls, M. cerebralis-infected fish showed lower proliferative lymphocyte responses to four mitogens (concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide). Conversely, M. cerebralis-infected fish displayed greater bactericidal activity of anterior kidney macrophages than did uninfected fish. After bath challenges with K. ruckeri, M. cerebralis-infected fish had slightly lower survival and a more rapid onset of mortality than did the control fish. Renal tissue and fecal samples from M. cerebralis-infected and uninfected survivors were cultured for the presence of K. ruckeri, and no difference in prevalence was noted between the two groups. Because immunomodulatory changes in the M. cerebralis-infected fish involved functional enhancement and suppression of different leukocyte populations, disease resistance among M. cerebralis-infected fish in the later stages of whirling disease will probably vary with the secondary pathogen and the nature of immune response the pathogen evokes.

  8. In-vitro immunomodulatory and anti-cancerous activities of biotransformed products of Dianabol through Azadirachta indica and its molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant Biotransformation is one of the tools for structural modifications of the organic substrate of low, moderate or high biological value utilizing plant cultured cells, these modifications of organic structures may lead to biologically augmented products and which may be ultimately substantial in cure or improvement of various morbidities and diseases. Results Azadirachta indica A. Juss. suspension culture was employed for the biotransformation of dianabol (1) for the first time, and two metabolites, 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androst-1-en-3-one (2), and 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3-one (3) were obtained. Conclusions Most important aspect of this work was the evaluation of metabolite 2, which strongly and differentially suppressed [not affecting whole blood and human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN)] the phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T-cell proliferation (IC50: <10.33 μM), and also found to inhibit IL-2 production (IC50: 16.89 ± 1.32) unlike metabolite 3 and compound 1. Compound 2 also exhibited anticancer activity against lung cancer cell line; NCI-H460, it moderately inhibited the growth of cancer cells (22.5 ± 4.15 μM). Furthermore, a good correlation between the predicted binding energies of the compounds acquired by the FlexX program and the experimental affinities were speculated upon interacting with IL-2 protein during molecular docking studies. PMID:24764465

  9. Antigen-Mediated Fusion of Specifically Sensitized Rabbit Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, B.

    1972-01-01

    Rabbits sensitized intravenously with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (strain H37Ra) suspended in mineral oil developed a strong pulmonary granulomatous response which reached its peak about 3 to 4 weeks after injection. Alveolar cells (4 × 106 cells/ml of tissue culture medium 199) procured 6 weeks after sensitization showed extensive development of multinucleated giant cells after 12 hr of incubation in tissue culture flasks containing heat-killed H37Ra (5 μg/ml). Giant cells measured 80 μm to 2.5 mm in length and contained between 30 and 700 nuclei. In contrast, no giant cells were observed when similar samples of the same cell populations were incubated in flasks containing: (i) no mycobacteria; (ii) heat-killed Escherichia coli; (iii) heat-killed Bacillus subtilis; (iv) latex particles; (v) ovalbumin; or (vi) phytohemagglutinin. The addition of immune (anti-H37Ra) sera potentiated the phenomenon of giant cell formation. In addition, supernatant fluids obtained from sensitive alveolar cells incubated with H37Ra were capable of inducing giant cell formation when incubated with nonsensitized alveolar cells. The results suggest that fusion of alveolar macrophages is mediated by an immunological mechanism. Images PMID:4629127

  10. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis alters the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Barrera, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that in vitro infection of human monocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis affected monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Despite the low bacterial load used, M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes had fewer granules, displayed a reduced number of cytoplasmic projections and decreased HLA class II, CD68, CD86 and CD36 expression compared to cells differentiated in the absence of mycobacteria. Infected cells produced less IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-6 and high IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide and purified protein M. tuberculosis-derived. Reduced T-cell proliferative response and IFN-γ secretion in response to phytohemagglutinin and culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis was also observed in infected cells when compared to non-infected ones. The ability of monocytes differentiated in the presence of M. tuberculosis to control mycobacterial growth in response to IFN-γ stimulation was attenuated, as determined by bacterial plate count; however, they had a similar ability to uptake fluorescent M. tuberculosis and latex beads compared to non-infected cells. Recombinant IL-1β partially altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages; however, treating M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes with IL-1RA did not reverse the effects of infection during differentiation. The results indicated that M. tuberculosis infection altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages and affected their ability to respond to innate stimuli and activate T-cells.

  12. Correlation between the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 and the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ji; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Bin; Wu, Song

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ratio of the transcription factors T-bet/GATA-3 in patients with allergic asthma. Forty-seven individuals with allergic asthma and 47 healthy control individuals provided 5 ml of anticoagulated peripheral venous blood. Lymphocytes in peripheral blood were isolated by Ficoll and treated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at a final concentration of 100 mg/l for 48 h. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the mRNA levels of both T-bet and GATA-3 were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IFN-γ levels in the lymphocytes of asthmatic patients were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05) and were positively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. By contrast, IL-4 levels were significantly higher in asthmatic patients than in the control group (P<0.01) and were negatively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. In conclusion, the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 can be used as an objective indicator of immune imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

  13. Organochlorine-induced immunosuppression in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Grasman, K.A.; Scanlon, P.F.; Fox, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation studied the effects of environmental contaminants on immune function in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes and evaluated the use of immunological tests as biomarkers for contaminant exposure in wild birds. During 1991--1994, specific immune functions and general hematological parameters were measured in herring gull (Larus argentatus) and Caspian tern (Stema caspia) chicks. Study sites were chosen across a wide range of organochlorine contamination caused primarily by PCBs. In herring gull adults, the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio decreased as liver EROD, an index of contaminant exposure, increased, In herring gull chicks, thymus mass decreased as EROD increased. At highly contaminated sites, gull and tern chicks showed a marked reduction in T cell-mediated immunity as measured by the phytohemagglutinin skin test. The thymic atrophy and T cell suppression were consistent with documented effects of PCBs in laboratory animals during development and growth. In both species, chicks exhibited biologically significant differences in antibody production among sites, but any relationships to contaminants or other factors remain unclear. In laboratory animals, PCBs exhibit variable effects on antibody production. Structural and functional parameters related to the immune system are useful biomarkers for assessing the effects of contaminants on wild birds.

  14. [Agonists of µ- and δ-Opioid Receptors in the Regulation of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ Production by Peripheral Blood Cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Tendryakova, S P

    2015-01-01

    It was found that β-endorphin stimulates the PHA (phytohemagglutinin)-induced production of interleukin-4 and has no affect on the production of interferon-gamma in unfractionated leukocytic suspension. In the culture of purified CD4+ T cells, β-endorphin does not affect the concentration of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ, but stimulates the production of IL-4 and inhibits the production of IFN-γ when adding monocytes to the culture. Selective δ-agonist DADLE enhances the PHA-induced production of IL-4 in unfractionated leukocytic suspension and in CD4+ lymphocytes+monocytes system. The synthesis of IFN-γ by purified CD4+ lymphocytes is not afected by the presence of DADLE, DAGO ad Deltorphin II; but when adding monocytes to the culture, the synthesis rate decreases. β-endorphin and selective μ-agonist DAGO enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulated neutrophils. The production of IFN-γ in CD8+ lymphocytes is not affected by β-endorphin. Thus, opioid peptides have a predominantly Th2 polarizing effect, which is monocyte-mediated, hindering the development of cell response by inhibiting IFN-γ, and stimulating the production of I L-4 by activating δ-receptor. On the other hand, neutrophils can enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulating μ-receptor. PMID:26237955

  15. Cytogenetic studies in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Abarbanel, J; Shabtai, F; Kyzer, S; Chaimof, C

    1991-01-01

    Banded cytogenetic studies of gastric carcinoma are still relatively scarce, comprised of only a small number of patients. This study was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes and malignant cells of 16 patients with gastric carcinoma. The lymphocytes were analyzed by standard techniques. All patients had a normal constitutional karyotype; 90% of the patients presented an increased breakage rate and nonrandom chromosomal instability mainly in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. Decreased response to phytohemagglutinin was observed in 6 (38%) patients. The tissue specimens were analyzed using direct techniques. Normal ploidy was observed in only one patient, 3 tumors were near-diploid, 4 hyperdiploid, 4 near-triploid, and 4 near-tetraploid. Those with the near-triploid or near-tetraploid constitution were in a more advanced pathological stage, most of them with a more complex cytogenetic profile. Particular involvement was found for chromosomes 1 to 4, 7 to 9, 17, and 20, but the more specific nonrandom changes seemed to involve chromosomes 7, 8, 9, and 17. PMID:1767545

  16. Role of HDL in cholesteryl ester metabolism of lipopolysaccharide-activated P388D1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uda, Sabrina; Spolitu, Stefano; Angius, Fabrizio; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Banni, Sebastiano; Murru, Elisabetta; Sanna, Francesca; Batetta, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    Infections share with atherosclerosis similar lipid alterations, with accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) in activated macrophages and concomitant decrease of cholesterol-HDL (C-HDL). Yet the precise role of HDL during microbial infection has not been fully elucidated. Activation of P388D1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered an increase of CEs and neutral lipid contents, along with a remarkable enhancement in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-HDL uptake. Similar results were found in human monocyte-derived macrophages and monocytes cocultured with phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. Inhibition of cholesterol esterification with Sandoz-58035 resulted in 80% suppression of CE biosynthesis in P388D1. However, only a 35% decrease of CE content, together with increased scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-B1) protein expression, was found after 72 h and thereafter up to 16 passages of continuous ACAT suppression. Chronic inhibition blunted the effect of LPS treatment on cholesterol metabolism, increased the ratio of free cholesterol/CE content and enhanced interleukin 6 secretion. These results imply that, besides de novo biosynthesis and acquisition by LDL, HDL contributes probably through SR-B1 to the increased CE content in macrophages, partly explaining the low levels of C-HDL during their activation. Our data suggest that in those conditions where more CEs are required, HDL rather than removing, may supply CEs to the cells. PMID:23956443

  17. Clonal T-cell colony formation in agar culture: an attractive assay to test the T-cell depletion from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Beaujean, F; Cordonnier, C; Pico, J; Gourdin, M F; Divine, M; Bracq, C; Bouguet, J; Laurent, G; Bernard, A

    1986-12-01

    Current studies suggest that the depletion of T-lymphocytes from donor marrow is an effective method for preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man. To deplete the T-lymphocytes from bone marrow cells we use either monoclonal anti-T-cell antibodies and complement or T101 ricin A-chain immunotoxin. Residual T-lymphocytes are analyzed by their capacity to form clonal T-cell colonies in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), accessory cells, and recombinant interleukin 2. The method is compared to immediate indirect immunofluorescence (iF) and thymidine incorporation by marrow cells stimulated by PHA. IF is not suitable for evaluating the depletion by immunotoxin, and the interpretation of thymidine incorporation is generally questionable. The results of the colony formation show that the sensitivity of the colony assay is close to that of iF when T cells are depleted by complement lysis, and the sensitivity of the colony assay is not dependent upon the depletion procedure. Therefore, the T-cell colony assay is a simple functional control for the quality of bone marrow T-cell depletion, especially for T-cell depletion by immunotoxin. PMID:3536543

  18. Phenotype study of fresh and cultured hairy cells with the use of immunologic markers and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Divine, M; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Tabilio, A; Vasconcelos, A; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Bouguet, J; Reyes, F

    1984-08-01

    The phenotype of fresh and cultured leukemic cells from patients with hairy cell leukemia was studied using a panel of monoclonal antibodies in addition to the detection of peroxidase activity under electron microscopy. In fresh samples, the leukemic cells from 11 patients displayed predominantly a B phenotype, as judged by their reactivity with the B1 monoclonal antibody and surface immunoglobulin expression. Ultrastructural peroxidase activity, characteristic of hairy cells, was observed in all cases studied. When hairy cells were cultured in the presence of phytohemagglutinin and irradiated T cells, their phenotype converted from surface Ig+, B1+, OKT3-, OKT11- to surface Ig-, B1+, OKT3-, OKT11+. In contrast, the peroxidase activity remained unchanged. Some hairy cells were also OKM1+, but no conclusion could be made about the MO2 antigen, a more specific marker of monocytes. The variability of the phenotype in vivo and in vitro indicates that reliable markers are required for identifying hairy cells. When studied together, the staining by B1 monoclonal antibody and the ultrastructural detection of peroxidase, enable the identification of hairy cells with certainty. PMID:6378279

  19. Functional analysis of CD8 lymphocytes in long-term surviving patients after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Divine, M; Lecouedic, J P; Gourdin, M F; Oudhriri, N; Zohair, M; Henni, T; Beaujan, F; Vernant, J P; Reyes, F; Farcet, J P

    1988-03-01

    The recovery of T-cell populations after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is characterized by a persistent expansion of CD8 lymphocytes. Previously, we have shown that beyond 1 year posttransplantation the CD8 lymphocytes consist, to a large extent, of CD8+ HNK1+ cells that suppress, like normal CD8 lymphocytes, immunoglobulin production in vitro. We have further investigated the functional capabilities of CD8 lymphocytes, mostly HNK1+ (from 50 to 77%), in seven long-term BMT patients. As normal, patient CD8 lymphocytes do not suppress (1) phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced interleukin 2 (IL2) receptor expression and IL2 responsiveness by normal T cells or (2) the mixed lymphocyte reaction of donor cells. Also as normal, patient CD8 lymphocytes can be activated into potent cytotoxic effectors. Therefore, under the present experimental conditions, the increase in the absolute number of CD8 lymphocytes in the long-term BMT patients is characterized by an expansion of the CD8+ HNK1+-cell subpopulation and a normal suppressor/cytotoxic potential on a per-CD8+ cell basis. PMID:2967308

  20. PHA-induced inflammation is not energetically costly in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (tuco-tucos).

    PubMed

    Merlo, Julieta L; Cutrera, Ana P; Luna, Facundo; Zenuto, Roxana R

    2014-09-01

    Immune activity has been proposed to be associated with substantial costs, due to trade-offs with other functions or activities that share common resources and contribute to an animal's fitness. However, direct estimates of the cost of mounting an immune response are few and have been performed mainly in birds. Thus, further work is needed to clarify the relative costs of different components of the immune system and the role of environmental and life-history traits in modulating the costs of resistance. Within the components of immunity, inflammation is considered to be associated with a larger energetic expenditure. Here, we evaluated the energetic cost of the inflammatory response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in a wild population of a subterranean rodent, Ctenomys talarum, and the trade-offs between immune activity and reproduction. C. talarum develops an inflammatory response to PHA, but contrary to our predictions, this response was not associated with an increase in oxygen consumption regardless of reproductive status or sex. Our study shows that an immune challenge may not always result in a detectable energetic cost. We discuss the possibility that other currencies could be underlying the cost, such as micro-or macronutrients requirements, autoimmunity or oxidative stress.

  1. Parasite infection negatively affects PHA-triggered inflammation in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Julieta L; Cutrera, Ana P; Zenuto, Roxana R

    2016-02-01

    Magnitude and effectiveness of immune responses vary greatly between and within species. Among factors reported to determine this variation, parasitism is a critical one, although controversial effects of parasites over immunological indices have been reported. Information regarding immune strategies in species with different life histories is crucial to better understand the role of immune defenses in an ecological and evolutionary context. Here, we examine the influence of the parasite community on immune responsiveness of a solitary subterranean rodent, Ctenomys talarum. To do this, we assessed the impact of the natural parasite community and the experimental infection with Eimeria sp. on the phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-response, as well as other immune, condition, nutrition, and stress parameters. PHA-triggered inflammation was similarly impaired by Eimeria sp. infection alone or co-occurring with a number of gastrointestinal nematodes. None of the other physiological parameters studied were affected by parasitism. This indicates that parasitism is a general key factor modulating immune responsiveness of the host, and in particular for C. talarum, it could explain the great inter-individual variation previously observed in the PHA-response. Thus, our results highlight the importance of taking the parasite community into account in ecoimmunological studies, particularly when using immunological indices.

  2. Effects of spironolactone on human blood mononuclear cells: mineralocorticoid receptor independent effects on gene expression and late apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Sønder, Søren Ulrik Salling; Mikkelsen, Marianne; Rieneck, Klaus; Hedegaard, Chris Juul; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Spironolactone (SPIR) binds to cytoplasmic mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and functions as an aldosterone antagonist. Recently, the drug was shown to have an early suppressive effect on several immunoactive and proinflammatory cytokines. To elucidate the mechanism behind this, the four MR-binding steroids SPIR, canrenone, 7α-thiomethyl-spironolactone and aldosterone (ALDO) were investigated for effects on lipopolysaccharide- and phytohemagglutinin-A-activated human blood mononuclear cells. Gene expression was examined after 4 h using microarrays, and SPIR affected 1018 transcripts of the (=) 22,000 probed. In contrast, the SPIR-related steroids affected 17 or fewer transcripts. Combining SPIR and ALDO resulted in 940 affected transcripts, indicating that SPIR has an early gene-regulatory effect independent of MR. The affected genes encode a large number of signalling proteins and receptors, including immunoinflammatory response genes and apoptosis and antiapoptosis genes. Apoptosis was evident in CD3-, CD14- and CD19-positive cells, but only after 18 h of exposure to SPIR. The transcriptional network involving the differentially regulated genes was examined and the results indicate that SPIR affects genes controlled by the transcription factors NF-κB, CEBPβ and MYC. These observations provide new insight into the non-MR-mediated effects of SPIR. PMID:16520746

  3. A multiplex lectin-channel monitoring method for human serum glycoproteins by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong Heon; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-02-01

    A mass profiling method and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based quantitative approach were used to analyze multiple lectin-captured fractions of human serum using different lectins such as aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), phytohemagglutinin-L(4) (L-PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) to quantitatively monitor protein glycosylation diversity. Each fraction, prepared by multiple lectin-fractionation and tryptic digestion, was analyzed by 1-D LC-MS/MS. Semi-quantitative profiling showed that the list of glycoproteins identified from each lectin-captured fraction is significantly different according to the used lectin. Thus, it was confirmed that the multiplex lectin-channel monitoring (LCM) using multiple lectins is useful for investigating protein glycosylation diversity in a proteome sample. Based on the semi-quantitative mass profiling, target proteins showing lectin-specificity among each lectin-captured fraction were selected and analyzed by the MRM-based method in triplicate using each lectin-captured fraction (average CV 7.9%). The MRM-based analysis for each lectin-captured fraction was similar to those obtained by the profiling experiments. The abundance of each target protein measured varied dramatically, based on the lectin-specificity. The multiplex LCM approach using MRM-based analyses is useful for quantitatively monitoring target protein glycoforms selectively fractionated by multiple lectins. Thus through multiplex LCM rather than single, we could inquire minutely into protein glycosylation states. PMID:22158852

  4. Genetic, kinetic, and mechanistic studies on the inhibition of interferon production by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Golemboski, K.A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) production is inhibited by treatment with chemical carcinogens. The significance of this inhibition is not clear. The interaction of IFN with cytochrome P-450 and associated enzymes, which are responsible for the metabolism and/or activation of many carcinogens, and with the immune system suggests that the developement of a cancer could be influenced by this inhibition. The effect of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) on IFN-..gamma.. production in murine spleen cell cultures was inhibited when DMBA was given 24 hours before or 4-5 hours after IFN-..gamma.. was induced with phytohemagglutinin-p (PHA-P). The influence of genetic controls of IFN inhibition was examined using DBA/2, C57B1/6, ICR, and SENCAR mouse strains. Kinetic studies examined parameters of IFN inhibition by benzo(a)pyrene (BP). IFN production in treated cells equaled that of untreated cells, but was delayed by six to twelve hours, suggesting a reversible inhibition. The approximate decrease in cell number which would be required to decrease IFN significantly was determined to be 50%. These results indicated that production of all types of IFN is inhibited by carcinogen treatment and that the inhibition may be genetically controlled. The inhibition of IFN production is actually a rapidly reversible delay. Exposure to the carcinogen is required only for uptake, and extended exposure, or another carcinogen, can interfere with the inhibition of IFN production by subsequent doses.

  5. Immunostimulatory Effects of the Anionic Alkali Mineral Complex BARODON on Equine Lymphocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Koo, HyeCheong; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Woo Kyung; Park, Young Kyung; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, So Hyun; Kim, Jun Man; Yoo, Byung Woo; Choi, Soo Il; Davis, William C.; Park, Yong Ho

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the anionic alkali mineral complex BARODON has an immunoenhancing effect on pigs as an adjuvant and as a nonspecific immunostimulant. Likewise, the equine immune system has been defined with various monoclonal antibodies specific to equine leukocyte differentiation antigens to determine the possibility of enhancing equine resistance to respiratory diseases and promoting other immunostimulatory effects with the application of BARODON. Compared with the control group, after 3 weeks of treatment, BARODON-treated groups showed higher proportions of cells (P < 0.05) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II and CD2, CD4+, CD4+ CD25+, CD8+, and CD8+ CD25+ T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and surface immunoglobulin M+ B lymphocytes in peripheral blood, as well as enhanced cell proliferative responses with phytohemagglutinin and increased phagocytic activity against Streptococcus equi and Staphylococcus aureus strains with high antibiotic resistance, the bacteria frequently identified as etiologic agents of equine respiratory diseases at the Seoul Race Park in Seoul, Korea. This study shows that BARODON may act as an immunostimulator and can be an effective alternative to antimicrobial feed additives for nonspecific improvements in equine immune responses, particularly against respiratory diseases. PMID:16943344

  6. Crystal structure of the arcelin-1 dimer from Phaseolus vulgaris at 1.9-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Mourey, L; Pédelacq, J D; Birck, C; Fabre, C; Rougé, P; Samama, J P

    1998-05-22

    Arcelin-1 is a glycoprotein from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) which displays insecticidal properties and protects the seeds from predation by larvae of various bruchids. This lectin-like protein is devoid of monosaccharide binding properties and belongs to the phytohemagglutinin protein family. The x-ray structure determination at 1.9-A resolution of native arcelin-1 dimers, which correspond to the functional state of the protein in solution, was solved using multiple isomorphous replacement and refined to a crystallographic R factor of 0.208. The three glycosylation sites on each monomer are all covalently modified. One of these oligosaccharide chains provides interactions with protein atoms at the dimer interface, and another one may act by preventing the formation of higher oligomeric species in the arcelin variants. The dimeric structure and the severe alteration of the monosaccharide binding site in arcelin-1 correlate with the hemagglutinating properties of the protein, which are unaffected by simple sugars and sugar derivatives. Sequence analysis and structure comparisons of arcelin-1 with the other insecticidal proteins from kidney beans, arcelin-5, and alpha-amylase inhibitor and with legume lectins, yield insights into the molecular basis of the different biological functions of these proteins. PMID:9582323

  7. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity. PMID:20976304

  8. A new lectin in red kidney beans called PvFRIL stimulates proliferation of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the Flt3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Moore, J G; Fuchs, C A; Hata, Y S; Hicklin, D J; Colucci, G; Chrispeels, M J; Feldman, M

    2000-07-26

    A new legume lectin has been identified by its ability to specifically stimulate proliferation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts expressing the Flt3 tyrosine kinase receptor. The lectin was isolated from conditioned medium harvested from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated to secrete cytokines by a crude red kidney bean extract containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Untransfected 3T3 cells and 3T3 cells transfected with the related Fms tyrosine kinase receptor do not respond to this lectin, which we called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris Flt3 receptor-interacting lectin). When tested on cord blood mononuclear cells enriched for Flt3-expressing progenitors, purified PvFRIL fractions maintained a small population of cells that continued to express CD34 after 2 weeks in suspension cultures containing IL3. These cultures did not show the effects of IL3's strong induction of proliferation and differentiation (high cell number and exhausted medium); instead, low cell number at the end of the culture period resulted in persistence of cells in the context of cell death. These observations led to the hypothesis that PvFRIL acts in a dominant manner to preserve progenitor viability and prevent proliferation and differentiation. PMID:10913819

  9. Evolutionary analysis of the APA genes in the Phaseolus genus: wild and cultivated bean species as sources of lectin-related resistance factors?

    PubMed

    Lioi, L; Galasso, I; Lanave, C; Daminati, M G; Bollini, R; Sparvoli, F

    2007-11-01

    The APA (Arcelin/Phytohemagglutinin/alpha-Amylase inhibitor) gene family is composed of various members, present in Phaseolus species and coding for lectin and lectin-related seed proteins having the double role of storage and defense proteins. Here members of the APA family have been identified by immunological, functional, and molecular analyses and representative genes were sequenced in nine wild species of Phaseolus. All taxa possessed at least one member of the true lectin gene. No arcelin type sequences have been isolated from the species examined. Among the wild species studied, only P. costaricensis contained an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha-AI). In addition P. augusti, P. maculatus, P. microcarpus, and P. oligospermus showed the presence of the lectin-related alpha-amylase inhibitor-like (AIL) genes and alpha-AI activity. Data from Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of only one lectin gene in P. parvulus and P. filiformis, while an extensive gene duplication of the APA locus was found in the other Phaseolus species. Phylogenetic analysis carried out on the nucleotide sequences showed the existence of two main clusters and clearly indicated that lectin-related genes originated from a paralogous duplication event preceding the development of the ancestor to the Phaseolus genus. The finding of detectable alpha-AI activity in species containing AIL genes suggests that exploiting APA genes variability in the Phaseolus genus may represent a valuable tool to find new members that may have acquired insecticidal activities.

  10. Differential sensitivity of T lymphocytes and hematopoietic precursor cells to photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light.

    PubMed

    Mabed, Mohamed; Coffe, Christian; Racadot, Evelyne; Angonin, Regis; Pavey, Jean-Jaques; Tiberghien, Pierre; Herve, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combination of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) has immunomodulatory effects and might abolish both graft-vs-host and host-vs-graft reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we have confirmed the sensitivity of T lymphocytes to 8-MOP treatment plus UV-A exposure as evidenced by the abrogation of the alloreactivity in mixed lymphocyte cultures as well as the inhibition of the response to phytohemagglutinin A. However, the clonogenic capacity of the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors was inhibited with UV-A doses lower than the doses needed to inhibit T-lymphocytes alloreactivity. Moreover, long-term bone marrow cultures showed that 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment had detrimental effects on the more immature bone marrow stem cells. These data were confirmed when murine bone marrow graft was treated with 8-MOP, exposed to UV-A, then transplanted into semiallogeneic recipient mice. The treated cells could not maintain their clonogenic capacity in vivo resulting in death of all animals. Taken together, these data show that ex vivo 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment of the marrow graft cannot be used to prevent post-bone marrow transplantation alloreactivity. PMID:16208471

  11. Detection of sister chromatid exchanges induced by volatile genotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Xu, J.; Stewart, J.; Baciu, P.C.; Ong, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    To test the recently developed method of exposing cells to volatile compounds, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral lymphocyte cultures were exposed to gaseous methyl bromide, ethylene oxide, and propylene oxide, as well as diesel exhaust. The cultures were placed in sterile dialysis tubing and inserted into enclosed flasks containing additional culture medium. The test compounds (in gaseous state) were diluted with air and bubbled through the flasks for various lengths of time. The cells were then washed and incubated for a total of 75 h. The harvest was performed according to established procedures, and second-division cells were scored for induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). The SCE frequency was more than doubled in the cultures treated with ethylene oxide and propylene oxide; methyl bromide also induced SCEs. Cultures treated with diesel exhaust showed an increase in the SCE frequency in cells from two of four donors tested. These results further substantiate the use of this method for detecting the induction of SCEs by airborne genotoxins.

  12. Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce T Lymphocyte Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest by Expression of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuying; Xu, Zhuo; Bai, Jinping; Yang, Shuyuan; Zhao, Shuli; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that human mesenchymal stem cells are able to inhibit T lymphocyte activation; however, the discrepancy among different sources of MSCs is not well documented. In this study, we have compared the MSCs from bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), placenta (PL), and umbilical cord (UC) to determine which one displayed the most efficient immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation. Among them we found that hUC-MSC has the strongest effects on inhibiting T cell proliferation and is chosen to do the further study. We observed that T lymphocyte spontaneously released abundant IFN-γ. And IFN-γ secreted by T lymphocyte could induce the expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in hUC-MSCs. IDO was previously reported to induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in S phase. When cocultured with hUC-MSCs, T lymphocyte expression of caspase 3 was significantly increased, while Bcl2 and CDK4 mRNA expression decreased dramatically. Addition of 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT), an IDO inhibitor, restored T lymphocyte proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and induced resumption of the cell cycle. In addition, the changes in caspase 3, CDK4, and Bcl2 expression were reversed by 1-MT. These findings demonstrate that hUC-MSCs induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by expressing abundant IDO and provide an explanation for some of the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs. PMID:27418932

  13. Cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Hadinedoushan; Mahroo, Mirahmadian; Abbas, Aflatounian; Firouzeh, Akbari; Nadia, Hatmi

    2004-10-21

    It has been postulated that a proportion of recurrent miscarriage (RM) might be due to immune causes. The objective was to determine whether cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cell is altered in patients with a history of RM. We compared the levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, TGFbeta1 and IFNgamma in the supernatant of Phytohemagglutinin stimulated mononuclear cells in 21 women with RM at the time of 3rd or higher abortion (group I), 32 women who were at least 3 months past their 3rd or higher abortion (group II) and 32 pregnant women with no history of abortion (group III). Gestational age was matched between groups I and III. Group I had higher level of IL-2 than group III (P=0.001). Group II showed higher level of IL-2 (P=0.001) and IFNgamma (P=0.015) than group III. The production of IL-10 by mononuclear cells of group III was higher than both group I (P=0.002) and group II (P=0.001). There was no difference in the levels of IL-2, IL-10 and IFNgamma between groups I and II. Also, the levels of IL-4, IL-13, and TGFbeta1 were similar among the groups. The data indicate an elevation of Th1 cytokines in women with RM as compared to normal pregnant women, and IL-10 is an important cytokine in the maintenance of pregnancy.

  14. Abnormal immune responses of Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T H; Litwin, S D; German, J

    1975-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome is a rare autosmal recessive disorder, first characterized by growth retardation and asum-sensitive facial telangiectasia and more recently demonstarted to have increased chromosome instability, a predisposition to malignancy, and increased susecptibitily to infection. The present report ocncern the immune function of Bloom's syndrom lymphoctes in vitro. Four affected homozgotes and five heterozygotes were studied. An abnormal serum concentartion of at least one class of immunoglobin was present in three out of four homozgotes. Affected homozgotes were shown capable of both a humoral and cellular response after antigenic challenge, the responses in general being weak but detectable. Blood lymphocytes from Bloom's syndrome individuals were cultured in impaired proliferavite response and synthesized less immunoglobulin at the end of 5 days than did normal controls. In contrast, they had a normal proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin except at highest concentrations of the mitogen. In the mixed lymphocte culture, Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes proved to be poor responder cells but normal stimulator cells. Lmyphoctes from the heterozgotes produced normal responses in these three systems. Distrubed immunity appears to be on of several major consequences of homozygosity for the Bloom's syndrome gene. Although the explanation for this pleiotropism is at present obscure, the idea was advanced that the aberrant immune function is, along with the major clincial feature-small body size, amanifestation of defect in cellular proliferation. PMID:124745

  15. Effects of Ajoene on lymphocyte and macrophage membrane-dependent functions.

    PubMed

    Romano, E L; Montaño, R F; Brito, B; Apitz, R; Alonso, J; Romano, M; Gebrán, S; Soyano, A

    1997-02-01

    Ajoene, (E, Z) -4, 5, 9-trithiadeca-1, 6, 11-triene 9 oxide, is a compound originally isolated from ethanolic extracts of garlic that impairs platelet aggregation by inhibiting the functional exposure of platelet integrins GPIIb/IIIa. In vitro, Ajoene is toxic for several tumoral cell lines, and exert an antiproliferative effect on T. cruzi and murine malaria parasites. Here we show that Ajoene strongly inhibited the proliferation induced in human lymphocytes by the mitogens phytohemagglutinin (PHA), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and anti-CD3, and the capping formation induced in B lymphocytes by anti-IgM antibodies. On macrophages, Ajoene was also found to partially inhibit the lypopolysaccharide-induced production of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF), and to decrease the phagocytic activity of thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages for IgG-opsonized, human erythrocytes. Ajoene also partially prevented the lytic effect of human and rabbit TNF on Actinomycin D-treated WEHI 164 cells. These results strongly suggest that Ajoene is a potent modulator of membrane-dependent functions of immune cells.

  16. beta1,4-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase III potentiates beta1 integrin-mediated neuritogenesis induced by serum deprivation in Neuro2a cells.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Masaki; Shibukawa, Yukinao; Ihara, Hideyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Gu, Jianguo

    2006-06-01

    Aspects of the biological significance of the bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) structure on N-glycans introduced by beta1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) in Neuro2a cell differentiation are demonstrated. The overexpression of GnT-III in the cells led to the induction of axon-like processes with numerous neurites and swellings, in which beta1 integrin was localized, under conditions of serum starvation. This enhancement in neuritogenesis was suppressed by either the addition of a bisecting GlcNAc-containing N-glycan or erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (E(4)-PHA), which preferentially recognizes the bisecting GlcNAc. GnT-III-promoted neuritogenesis was also significantly perturbed by treatment with a functional blocking anti-beta1 integrin antibody. In fact, beta1 integrin was found to be one of the target proteins of GnT-III, as confirmed by a pull-down assay with E(4)-PHA. These data suggest that N-glycans with a bisecting GlcNAc on target molecules, such as beta1 integrin, play important roles in the regulation of neuritogenesis. PMID:16531477

  17. In vitro immune functions in thiamine-replete and -depleted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the impacts of in vivo thiamine deficiency on lake trout leukocyte function measured in vitro. When compared outside the context of individual-specific thiamine concentrations no significant differences were observed in leukocyte bactericidal activity or in concanavalin A (Con A), and phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) stimulated leukocyte proliferation. Placing immune functions into context with the ratio of in vivo liver thiamine monophosphate (TMP – biologically inactive form) to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP – biologically active form) proved to be the best indicator of thiamine depletion impacts as determined using regression modeling. These observed relationships indicated differential effects on the immune measures with bactericidal activity exhibiting an inverse relationship with TMP to TPP ratios, Con A stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting a positive relationship with TMP to TPP ratios and PHA-P stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting no significant relationships. In addition, these relationships showed considerable complexity which included the consistent observation of a thiamine-replete subgroup with characteristics similar to those seen in the leukocytes from thiamine-depleted fish. When considered together, our observations indicate that lake trout leukocytes experience cell-type specific impacts as well as an altered physiologic environment when confronted with a thiamine-limited state.

  18. Augmentation of the neutrophil response to Naegleria fowleri by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, A

    1989-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes, previously shown to activate neutrophils for amoeba killing, was found to contain high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effects of human recombinant TNF-alpha on the response of human neutrophils to the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri was studied in vitro. The data showed that recombinant human TNF-alpha augmented the neutrophil respiratory burst (assessed by the cytochrome c reduction assay and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay) in response to amoebae opsonized with human serum. The priming effects of TNF-alpha were transient; marked enhancement was found with short 5- to 30-min preincubations of neutrophils with the cytokine. The enhancement of oxygen radical production was evident with 20 U of TNF-alpha per 10(6) neutrophils and continued to increase with up to 100 U. TNF-alpha also augmented the neutrophil lysosomal enzyme release in response to N. fowleri. The results support previous reports suggesting an important role of neutrophil cytokine activation for effective immunity against free-living amoebae. PMID:2777375

  19. Synthesis of cobalamin coenzymes by human lymphocytes in vitro and the effect of folates and metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Quadros, E V; Matthews, D M; Hoffbrand, A V; Linnell, J C

    1976-10-01

    The uptake of 57Co-cyanocobalamin (CN-Cbl) and its conversion to 5-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl), methylcobalamin (Me-Cbl), and hydroxocobalamin (OH-Cbl) has been studied in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-transformed lymphocytes from normal subjects and patients with patients with pernicious anemia. Uptake and conversion were much greater by PHA-stimulated lymphocytes than by mature non-transformed lymphocytes. In normal cells, uptake of 57Co-CN-Cbl and synthesis of the cobalamin coenzymes were approximately linear between 3 and 48 hr incubation. Ado-Cbl was the major cobalamin formed, and after 72 hr the cells contained about twice as much Ado-Cbl as Me-Cbl. Uptake by lymphocytes from patients with untreated pernicious anemia (PA) was greater than that by normal lymphocytes, but the proportions of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl synthesized by each were similar. Folic acid and methyltetrahydrofolate enhanced synthesis of Me-Cbl both in normal and in PA cells, while methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil depressed it. This depression was overcome by 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, suggesting that an uninterrupted folate cycle may play an important role in Me-Cbl synthesis. PMID:963297

  20. Alternative pathway of complement activation by stimulated T lymphocytes. II. Elevation of cytotoxic potential against complement receptor-carrying cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ramos, O F; Sármay, G; Eggertsen, G; Nilsson, B; Klein, E; Gergely, J

    1987-07-01

    Exposure of lectin-stimulated (concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) blood lymphocytes to human serum or to purified C3 increased their cytotoxic capacity towards complement receptor positive targets such as Raji and Daudi cells. The lysis of complement receptor-negative lymphoblastoid cell lines was not influenced. The lytic capacity of lymphocytes exposed to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate was not elevated by human serum. Lectin-stimulated lymphocytes were previously shown to activate and bind C3. The results using lymphocytes activated in different ways and targets with or without complement receptor expression suggest that the C3b deposited on lymphocytes binds to the complement receptor on the targets. This contact elevates the avidity between the two cells as indicated also by the increased frequency of the lymphocyte-target conjugates. On the basis of immune adherence the C3 fragment bound on the lymphocytes was identified as C3b. The increase of the conjugate formation and cytotoxicity was abrogated when the target cells, Raji, were pre-exposed to purified C3d which occupy the CR2 receptor. The majority of lymphocytes responsible for the cytotoxicity were CD8+. PMID:3111863

  1. Prostaglandin E2 production by the cattle tick (Boophilus microplus) into feeding sites and its effect on the response of bovine mononuclear cells to mitogen.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, H; Kemp, D H; Willadsen, P

    1994-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion by the cattle tick Boophilus microplus into feeding sites was quantified. It was detected by the in vitro tube feeding experiment and it was determined that a semi-engorged female tick could produce and transmit 1.8 ng PGE2 into the feeding site. Using the in vitro membrane feeding system, newly molted adult ticks were also shown to secrete 0.04-0.15 ng PGE2 into the feeding site; however, female ticks produced more PGE2 than male ticks. The immune suppressive effect of PGE2 in the saliva of B. microplus on the bovine mononuclear cells (MNC) was also examined. PGE2 in the saliva was suspected of being a major component that inhibited the blastogenic response of MNC to a T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin. As bovine MNC are sensitive to low level concentration of PGE2, the PGE2 transmitted into feeding sites was suspected to be sufficient to produce physiological effects on the bovine host. PMID:7975125

  2. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  3. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  4. Different calcium influx characteristics upon Kv1.3 and IKCa1 potassium channel inhibition in T helper subsets.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Csaba; Bajnok, Anna; Vásárhelyi, Barna; Tulassay, Tivadar; Toldi, Gergely

    2014-07-01

    Functional imbalance between T helper subsets plays important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Transient increase of cytoplasmic calcium level, and sustention of negative membrane potential by voltage sensitive Kv1.3 and calcium-dependent IKCa1 potassium channels are essential for short-term lymphocyte activation, thus present possible target for selective immunomodulation. We aimed to investigate calcium influx sensitivity to the inhibition of potassium channels in the main T helper subsets. Peripheral blood from 11 healthy individuals was drawn and calcium influx kinetics following activation with phytohemagglutinin in Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cells were evaluated. Alteration of calcium influx induced by specific inhibitors of Kv1.3 and IKCa1 potassium channels, and the expression of Kv1.3 channels were also assessed. Highest cytoplasmic calcium concentration was observed in stimulated Th1 cells, while the lowest level was measured in Treg cells. In Th1 and Th17 cells, inhibition of both investigated potassium channels decreased calcium influx. In Th2 cells only the inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels, while in Treg cells none of the inhibitors had significant effect. Upon the inhibition of IKCa1 channels, short-term activation of proinflammatory cells was specifically decreased without affecting anti-inflammatory subsets, indicating that selective immunomodulation is possible in healthy individuals.

  5. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death. PMID:20306689

  6. Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Imbalance Modifies NK Cytotoxicity, Lymphocytes B and Lymphoprolipheration in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Úbeda, Natalia; Montero, Ana; Achón, María; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Different vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations could exacerbate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate different dietary folic acid and vitamin B12 levels on the immune response in aged rats. Male Sprague Dawley aged rats were assigned to three folic acid groups (deficient, control, supplemented) each in absence of vitamin B12 for 30 days. Several parameters of innate and acquired immune responses were measured. Serum and hepatic folate levels increased according to folic acid dietary level, while vitamin B12 levels decreased. There was a significant decrease in natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen for the vitamin B12 deficient diet and folic acid control diet groups. Significant changes in CD45 lymphocyte subsets were also observed according to dietary imbalance. Lymphoproliferative response to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin did not differ significantly between groups. The spleen response to lipopolysaccharide increased significantly, but was unmodified for the other organs. An imbalance between dietary vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations alters some immunological parameters in aged rats. Therefore, the ratio between folate and vitamin B12 could be as important as their absolute dietary concentrations. PMID:24288024

  7. Successful treatment for West syndrome with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Inaba, Yuji; Fukuyama, Tetsuhiro; Kurata, Takashi; Niimi, Taemi; Saito, Shoji; Shiba, Naoko; Nishimura, Takafumi; Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Sakashita, Kazuo; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Ichikawa, Motoki; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Several immune mechanisms are suspected in the unknown etiology of West syndrome (WS). We report a male infant who suffered from WS and X-linked T-B+NK- severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) with a missense mutation of the IL2RG gene (c.202G>A, p.Glu68Lys). He promptly began vitamin B6 and valproic acid treatment, but infantile spasms (IS) and hypsarrhythmia persisted. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and the change to topiramate (TPM) at 7 months of age resulted in the rapid resolution of IS. The CD4/8 ratio in his peripheral blood increased from 0.04-0.09 to 0.20-1.95 following unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT). In vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A and the ability of B lymphocytes to produce antibodies improved as well. Electroencephalogram findings became normal 1 month after UCBT. Thus, we consider that T-cell dysfunction and/or impairments in T-B cell interactions due to X-SCID may have played important roles in the onset of WS. Immune-modulating therapies along with the administration of TPM effectively treated this severe epileptic syndrome in our patient.

  8. Age-related alterations to immune parameters in Labrador retriever dogs.

    PubMed

    Blount, Daniel G; Pritchard, David I; Heaton, Paul R

    2005-12-15

    In order to assess age-related changes in the immune status of Labrador retriever dogs, leukocyte phenotypes, lymphocyte proliferative capacity, and serum antibody levels were measured in four cohorts of dogs, ranging from 2 to 10 years of age. Absolute numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD21+ lymphocytes significantly decreased with increasing age. Relative percentages of lymphocytes and CD4 cells were significantly decreased, and relative percentages of granulocytes and CD8 cells significantly increased, with age. The CD4:CD8 ratio showed a significant age-related decrease. Proliferative responses of T-cells to mitogens in whole-blood cultures either increased (Concanavalin A) or remained the same (phytohemagglutinin) with age when data was normalised to allow for differences in responding cell number. Similarly, normalised data of proliferative response to anti-CD3 stimulation together with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate showed an age-related increase. Serum levels of total IgA significantly increased with age whereas total IgG levels remained unchanged. These observations illustrate a significant change to a number of immune parameters with age. However, further work is required to determine whether the differences reported here are sufficient to cause overt or functional immune senescence in Labrador retriever dogs. PMID:16105688

  9. Sitagliptin treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes does not affect CD4+ T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    White, Perrin C; Chamberlain-Shea, Heidi; de la Morena, Maria-Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP4) inhibitors have recently become widely used for treating type 2 diabetes, but in meta-analyses are associated with a mildly increased risk of all-cause infections. CD26 is a cell-surface form of DPP4 which can costimulate T-cell proliferation, raising the possibility that DPP4 inhibitors might adversely affect immune function. To address this issue in an observational study, two groups of 20 subjects each were recruited from a private endocrinology practice; one group consisted of type 2 diabetes patients treated for at least 6 months with the DPP4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, whereas patients in the other group had never been treated with this agent. The groups were similar with regard to sex and racial composition, body mass index, hemoglobin A(1c), and use of other medications for diabetes, but the sitagliptin group was slightly older. A blood sample from each patient was analyzed for CD4+ T-cell activation in response to phytohemagglutinin using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-stimulated bioluminescence. There was not a significant difference in T-cell activation between the treatment groups (median, 419 and 481 ng/ml ATP in the groups that were and were not treated with sitagliptin, respectively). Thus the observed increased rate of infection in diabetic patients treated with sitagliptin cannot be explained by a major effect on T-cell activation. Randomized studies, preferably using several assays of immune function, should be performed to confirm and extend these findings.

  10. Dietary antioxidants enhance immunocompetence in larval amphibians.

    PubMed

    Szuroczki, Dorina; Koprivnikar, Janet; Baker, Robert L

    2016-11-01

    Dietary antioxidants have been shown to confer a variety of benefits through their ability to counter oxidative stress, including increased immunocompetence and reduced susceptibility to both infectious and non-infectious diseases. However, little is known about the effects of dietary antioxidants on immune function in larval amphibians, a group experiencing worldwide declines driven by factors that likely involve altered immunocompetence. We investigated the effects of dietary antioxidants (quercetin, vitamin E, and β-carotene) on two components of the immune system, as well as development and growth. Lithobates pipiens tadpoles fed diets with supplemental β-carotene or vitamin E exhibited an enhanced swelling response as measured with a phytohemagglutinin assay (PHA), but there was no induced antibody response. Effects were often dose-dependent, with higher antioxidant levels generally conferring stronger swelling that possibly corresponds to the innate immune response. Our results indicate that the antioxidant content of the larval amphibian diets not only had a detectable effect on their immune response capability, but also promoted tadpole growth (mass gain), although developmental stage was not affected. Given that many environmental perturbations may cause oxidative stress or reduce immunocompetence, it is critical to understand how nutrition may counter these effects. PMID:27475300

  11. Limited effect of selected organic pollutants on cytokine production by peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Devos, Sabrina; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Hooghe, Robert; Hooghe-Peters, Elisabeth L

    2004-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that some persistent organic pollutants contribute to the increased prevalence of allergic disease, the effects of selected compounds on cytokine production by PBMC from control and allergic donors were evaluated. Cells were cultured for six days in the presence of a xenobiotic (PCB 153, hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorobenzene, pentachlorophenol, lindane, atrazine or DMSO vehicle) with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extract, then for one day in the presence of PHA + phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. PCB 153 reduced the levels of IL-10, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Hexachlorobenzene reduced the levels of IL-5, IL-10 and IFN-gamma. Pentachlorobenzene reduced IL-6 levels. Pentachlorophenol reduced IL-5 levels. Lindane and atrazine reduced both IL-5 and IFN-gamma. In addition, lindane reduced TNF-alpha levels. As these compounds had similar effects on cells from allergic and non-allergic donors, and as these effects were, in all cases, very limited indeed, the potential deleterious impact of the xenobiotics tested on the allergic response seems unlikely.

  12. SHP2-interacting Transmembrane Adaptor Protein (SIT), A Novel Disulfide-linked Dimer Regulating Human T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Marie-Cardine, Anne; Kirchgessner, Henning; Bruyns, Eddy; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Autschbach, Frank; Ratnofsky, Sheldon; Meuer, Stefan; Schraven, Burkhart

    1999-01-01

    T lymphocytes express several low molecular weight transmembrane adaptor proteins that recruit src homology (SH)2 domain–containing intracellular molecules to the cell membrane via tyrosine-based signaling motifs. We describe here a novel molecule of this group termed SIT (SHP2 interacting transmembrane adaptor protein). SIT is a disulfide-linked homodimeric glycoprotein that is expressed in lymphocytes. After tyrosine phosphorylation by src and possibly syk protein tyrosine kinases SIT recruits the SH2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif. Overexpression of SIT in Jurkat cells downmodulates T cell receptor– and phytohemagglutinin-mediated activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT) by interfering with signaling processes that are probably located upstream of activation of phospholipase C. However, binding of SHP2 to SIT is not required for inhibition of NF-AT induction, suggesting that SIT not only regulates NF-AT activity but also controls NF-AT unrelated pathways of T cell activation involving SHP2. PMID:10209036

  13. Mutation in the primer binding site of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus genome affects virus production and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Nagashunmugam, T; Velpandi, A; Goldsmith, C S; Zaki, S R; Kalyanaraman, V S; Srinivasan, A

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to understand the contribution of the primer-binding site (PBS) region to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, we have constructed a mutant HIV proviral DNA with an alteration in the 5' end of the PBS. The PBS mutant proviral DNA was characterized by transfection of the viral DNA into CD4+ and non-CD4+ target cells. The results indicate that mutation in the PBS reduced the level of viral particles released into the medium of transfected cells in comparison to wild-type proviral DNA. The viral particles were noninfectious upon transmission to established CD4+ cell lines and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Electron microscopic analysis of the transfected cells revealed no abnormalities in the structure of the virion directed by the mutant proviral DNA. Also, the protein and RNA contents of the mutant virions were similar to the wild type. The quantitation of intracellular viral structural protein in the transfected cells, however, indicated that the PBS mutation may have an effect on the assembly of viral particles in addition to completely abolishing reverse transcription of viral RNA into DNA. These results provide evidence that the PBS region of the viral genome has multiple functions in HIV-1 replication. Images PMID:1373895

  14. [Resting metabolic rate, stress, testosterone, and induced immune response in "spring" and "fall" males of Campbell dwarf hamsters. Rearing under the long day conditions].

    PubMed

    Rogovin, K A; Bushuev, A V; Khrushchova, A M; Vasil'eva, N Iu

    2013-01-01

    We have studied morphological and physiological traits of even-young males of Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905) born at the end of summer ("fall males") and at the end of winter ("spring males") in a vivarium with constant 14-hour day length (14D:10N). After removal from parental cages at the age of one month, males were kept in isolation under the same light conditions. The results obained signify the statistical difference between "fall" and "spring" males in resting metabolic rate, morphological traits associated with sexual activity, some endocrine and immunologic characteristics. Spring males had higher resting metabolic rate, higher body mass in the middle of experiment, bigger testes, seminal vesicles, higher concentration of testosterone in blood and more intensive T-cell immune response to the intracutaneous injection of phytohemagglutinin. They did not differ significantly in basal level of blood cortisole and antibodies production in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antigen challenge, but possessed lower adrenocortical response to the social stressor and adrenocorticotropic hormone. GLM analysis showed that cortisol level in blood after 10 min encounter of males in the open arena, and resting metabolic rate were the only factors significantly influenced humoral immune response to SRBC. When intensity of T-cell immune response was considered as dependent variable, season turned out to be the only factor in the final model that caused a significant effect.

  15. Clonal analysis of T lymphocytes in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Evidence for an abnormality affecting individual helper and suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Margolick, J B; Volkman, D J; Lane, H C; Fauci, A S

    1985-01-01

    Purified helper-inducer (T4+) and suppressor-cytotoxic (T8+) lymphocytes from eight patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and eight healthy heterosexual donors were examined by limiting dilution analysis for their ability to be clonally expanded. It was demonstrated that viable T4+ and T8+ lymphocytes from patients with AIDS had markedly reduced proportions of clonable cells compared to the healthy donors (T4 = 1:255 vs. 1:34, P = 0.06; T8 = 1:355 vs. 1:55, P = 0.01). However, the cloned T cells that were obtained from the patients with AIDS demonstrated normal proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and alloantigen, and normal ability to help or suppress pokeweed mitogen-driven IgG synthesis. These results strongly suggest that, in addition to a quantitative diminution of T4+ lymphocytes in AIDS, there is an intrinsic functional defect in the surviving T4+ and T8+ lymphocytes, which is reflected by a severe decrease in their potential for clonal expansion. PMID:3161909

  16. Immunosuppressive properties of the Mycoplasma arthritidis T-cell mitogen in vivo: inhibition of proliferative responses to T-cell mitogens.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Wells, D J

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that Mycoplasma arthritidis produces a soluble T-cell mitogen (MAM) which is active for most mouse strains that express the alpha chain of the I-E molecule (E alpha) encoded within the murine major histocompatibility complex. The lymphocytes from mice injected intravenously with the MAM exhibited a marked decrease in their ability to respond in vitro to MAM, to phytohemagglutinin, or to concanavalin A T-cell mitogens. Suppression could only be induced in MAM-responsive mouse strains and was most marked 1 to 4 days postinjection. Splenic and node cells and, to a lesser extent, thymic cells from MAM-injected mice could inhibit the ability of lymphocytes from normal mice to respond to MAM and lectin mitogens. A minimum of 2.5 x 10(4) viable cells was required for significant transfer of suppression, and no major histocompatibility complex restrictions were seen. Unlike concanavalin A-induced suppressor cells, which consist of a CD4-, CD8+ T-cell subset, suppressor cells induced by MAM were due to a CD4+ CD8- subset. We hypothesize that MAM may play a role in M. arthritidis-mediated disease by both its inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. PMID:1967168

  17. Enhancement of cellular and humoral immunity following embryonic exposure to melatonin in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Moore, C B; Siopes, T D

    2005-09-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine the effect of in ovo melatonin supplementation on the ontogeny of immunity in the Large White turkey poult. Different levels of melatonin were injected into the air cell of the egg 4 days prior to hatch. In Experiment 1, turkey embryos received 3 ml of solution containing 200, 100, 50, 25, 10, or 1 microg/ml of melatonin. The hatchability at each dose was determined and compared to vehicle-injected controls. In Experiment 2, only poults from melatonin treatments in Experiment 1 that resulted in normal hatchability (10 and 1 microg/ml) were used. Lymphoproliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA-P) and primary antibody responses to Chukar red blood cells (CRBC) were determine at five time intervals: 0, 1, 7, 14, and 21 days post-hatch. At each of these times, including 28 days post-hatch, treatment effects on body weights were determined. At 28 days post-hatch, bursal, thymic, and splenic weights were obtained. In ovo melatonin administration significantly accelerated (P0.05) the development of cell-mediated (PHA-P) and humoral (CRBC) immune responses, and these responses were significantly elevated above vehicle-injected controls through 21 days post-hatch. No effect was observed on bursal, thymic, splenic or body weights. These data suggest that embryonic exposure to melatonin enhances post-hatch immune development and responsiveness.

  18. Immune Response and Function: Exercise Conditioning Versus Bed-Rest and Spaceflight Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Lawless, D.

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses measured at rest immediately or some hours after exercise training (some with and some without increase in maximal oxygen uptake) gave variable and sometimes conflicting results; therefore, no general conclusions can be drawn. On the other hand, most immune responses were either unchanged (immunoglobulin, T cells, CD4+, and natural killer activity) or decreased (blood properdin, neutrophil phagocytic activity, salivary lysozymes, brain immunoglobulin A and G, and liver B lymphocytes and phytohemagglutinin activity) during prolonged bed rest. Some data suggested that exercise training during bed rest may partially ameliorate the decreased functioning of the immune system. Exercise and change in body position, especially during prolonged bed rest with plasma fluid shifts and diuresis, may induce a change in plasma protein concentration and content, which can influence drug metabolism as well as immune function. Leukocytosis, accompanied by lymphopenia and a depressed lymphocyte response, occurs in astronauts on return to Earth from spaceflight; recovery may depend on time of exposure to microgravity. It is clear that the effect of drugs and exercise used as countermeasures for microgravity deconditioning should be evaluated for their effect on an astronaut's immune system to assure optimal health and performance on long-duration space missions.

  19. Isolation and characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Shalini; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; George, Elizabeth; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of placenta tissue as a reliable and efficient source for generating mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). METHODS: MSC were generated from human placenta tissue by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation. The placenta MSC (PLC-MSC) were characterized for expression of cell surface markers, embryonic stem cell (ECS) gene expression and their differentiation ability into adipocytes and osteocytes. The immunosuppressive properties of PLC-MSC on resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated allogenic T cells were assessed by means of cell proliferation via incorporation of tritium thymidine (3H-TdR). RESULTS: The generated PLC-MSC appeared as spindle-shaped cells, expressed common MSC surface markers and ESC transcriptional factors. They also differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages when induced. However, continuous cultivation up to passage 15 caused changes in morphological appearance and cellular senescence, although the stem cell nature of their protein expression was unchanged. In terms of their immunosuppressive properties, PLC-MSC were unable to stimulate resting T cell proliferation; they inhibited the PHA stimulated T cells in a dose dependent manner through cell to cell contact. In our study, MSC generated from human placenta exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers; MSC-like gene expression pattern and MSC-like differentiation potential were comparable to other sources of MSC. CONCLUSION: We suggest that placenta tissues can serve as an alternative source of MSC for future experimental and clinical studies. PMID:22993662

  20. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  1. Effects of recombinant human GM-CSF on proliferation of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Young, D; Herrmann, F; Wiper, D; Wagner, K; Sabbath, K D

    1986-05-01

    Proliferation of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells in vitro is limited in most cases to a small subset of blasts that have several properties of stem cells. These leukemic colony-forming cells (AML-CFU) generally require addition of exogenous growth factors for proliferation in agar or methylcellulose. These factors can be supplied by media conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal leukocytes or by CSF-secreting tumor cell lines. However, the exact factor or factors required for stimulation of AML-CFU growth have not been defined. We compared the AML-CFU stimulatory activity of a human recombinant GM-CSF with that of GCT-CM, Mo-CM, and the PHA-leukocyte feeder system in 15 cases of AML. In each of the 12 cases that required exogenous growth factors for maximum AML-CFU growth, recombinant GM-CSF could replace either GM-CSF or Mo-CM, and could partially replace the PHA-leukocyte feeder system. These results indicate that this GM-CSF is a growth promoter of AML-CFU in these culture systems.

  2. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  3. The influence of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on function of selected peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wasik, M; Gorska, E; Modzelewska, M; Nowicki, K; Jakubczak, B; Demkow, U

    2007-11-01

    The effects of low-level laser light irradiation are debatable and the mechanisms of its action are still unclear. This study was conducted to test the effects of low-level laser irradiation on human blood cells: erythrocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Whole blood obtained by phlebotomy was irradiated at 632.8 nm by using energy fluences 0.6 J/cm2. An analysis of blood gases revealed an increase in PO2 and SaO2 (P<0.001) in irradiated blood. No shifts in PCO2 and pH were recorded. Spontaneous synthesis of DNA in T and B blood lymphocytes decreased significantly after laser irradiation (P<0.02 and P<0.04, respectively). Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation of T cells and SAC proliferation of B cells, expressed as a stimulation index, were statistically higher in the samples of irradiated than in non-irradiated blood (P<0.01). Chemiluminescence of fMLP-stimulated granulocytes from irradiated blood increased in comparison with non-irradiated samples (P<0.001). No changes of spontaneous and stimulated chemiluminescence kinetics in irradiated samples were observed. These results reveal the influence of photodynamic reactions on the ability of blood to transport oxygen and on immunomodulatory effects on leukocytes. PMID:18204188

  4. Comparison of the immunosuppressive effect of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) vs conventional immunosuppression (CI) in renal cadaveric allotransplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Vanrenterghem, Y.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Michielsen, P.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-02-01

    Beginning in November 1981, eight patients with end stage diabetic nephropathy underwent renal cadaveric transplantation after TLI. Transplantation was done between 2 to 11 days after the end of a fractionated TLI to a total dose of 20 to 30 Gy. During the same observation period, 60 nondiabetic patients with end stage renal disease of different origin also received a cadaveric kidney graft, with a conventional regimen of immunosuppression that consists of anti-lymphocyte-globulin, tapering high doses of prednisone, and azathioprine. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-, concanavalin A (con A)-, and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced blastogenesis, as well as the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) decreased progressively during the first months after conventional immunosuppression to 50% of the pretransplantation level, and remained there for the first year after transplantation. These tests were much more impaired after TLI and again no recovery occurred during the first year. In the clinic, the more profound immunosuppression in TLI patients was more frequently associated with viral infections (cytomegalovirus and herpes zoster). The incidence of rejections, however, was somewhat less frequent in the TLI-treated group and occurred significantly later. After TLI, the mean cumulative dose of steroids needed for kidney transplantation during the first year after transplantation could be substantially reduced.

  5. Effects of cytotoxic immunosuppressants on tuberculin-sensitive lymphocytes in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelstein, A

    1975-01-01

    The immunosuppressive activities of two phase-specific drugs, 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and methotrexate, and a cycle-specific agent, cyclophosphamide, were evaluated on the lymphocytic component of established tuberculin hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. In these animals, purified protein derivative (PPD)-sensitive lymphocytes are in an intermitotic phase of their proliferative cycle. Neither phase-specific drug significantly altered either the number or functional activities of these lymphocytes. By two in vitro criteria, PPD-induced lymphoproliferation and elaboration of migration inhibition factor (MIF), the responses of lymph node cells were equivalent to sensitized controls. In addition, these agents did not deplete pools of T lymphocytes, impair responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), nor inhibit cutaneous reactivity if employed before sensitization. In contrast, cyclophosphamide showed broader immunosuppressive effects including significant toxicities for intermitotic lymphocytes. This drug depleted pools of T cells and markedly impaired the in vitro proliferative responses of residual lymphocytes. The latter occurred with both PHA and PPD. Suppression of PHA reactivity was a dose-dependent phenomenon but was evident even with small quantities of this alkylating agent. The suppression of antigen-induced responses was independent of the proliferative status of target lymphocytes in vivo, after a single large dose, it persisted for more than 3 wk. In total, these results indicate that the effective use of cytotoxic drugs as immunosuppressants must include consideration of both the cycle specificities of the agent and the proliferative activities of the target lymphoid population. PMID:1081551

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit lymphocyte proliferation by mitogens and alloantigens by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmusson, Ida . E-mail: Ida.Rasmusson@labmed.ki.se; Ringden, Olle; Sundberg, Berit; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2005-04-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immuno-modulatory properties. They inhibit T-cell proliferation to mitogens and alloantigens in vitro and prolong skin graft survival in vivo. We found that MSCs inhibited the proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that MSCs exert an inhibitory effect downstream of the receptor level. We analyzed cytokine profiles of PBLs co-cultured with MSCs. MSCs increased interleukin (IL)-2 and soluble IL-2 receptor in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLCs), while IL-2 and IL-2R decreased in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBL cultures. MSCs inhibited IL-2 induced proliferation, without absorbing IL-2. IL-10 levels increased in MLCs co-cultured with 10% MSCs, while the levels were not affected in PHA cultures. In MLCs inhibited by MSCs, antibodies against IL-10 further suppressed proliferation but had no effect in PHA cultures. Addition of indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin-synthesis, restored part of the inhibition by MSCs in PHA cultures. However, indomethacin did not affect MSC-induced inhibition in MLCs. To conclude, our data indicate that MSC-induced suppression is a complex mechanism affecting IL-2 and IL-10 signaling and may function differently, depending on T-cell stimuli. Prostaglandins are important in the inhibition by MSCs when the T cells were activated by PHA, but not alloantigens.

  7. Immune function in an avian brood parasite and its nonparasitic relative.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Loren; O'Loghlen, Adrian L; Wingfield, John C; Rothstein, Stephen I

    2013-01-01

    Organisms that breed multiple times must trade off resources between current and future reproduction. In many species, sexual selection can lead to reduced levels of immune function in males because they invest heavily in current reproduction at the expense of self-maintenance. Much less is known about whether the same trend is seen in species such as the brood-parasitic brown-headed cowbird Molothrus ater (hereafter "cowbird"), in which females invest heavily in current reproduction. We examined two measures of immune function (bactericidal capacity of the plasma and the phytohemagglutinin swelling response) and baseline levels of corticosterone in both sexes of the cowbird and its nonparasitic relative the red-winged blackbird Agelaius phoeniceus (hereafter "redwing") during the breeding and subsequent nonbreeding seasons. We found that female cowbirds exhibited significantly lower levels of both measures of immune function than did male cowbirds and female redwings during the breeding season but had comparable levels during the nonbreeding season. Female redwings, in contrast, exhibited higher or comparable levels of immune function when compared with male redwings during the breeding season. In conjunction with published accounts documenting significantly higher rates of mortality for female cowbirds compared with male cowbirds and the fact that female cowbirds produce very high numbers of eggs (25-65) in a single breeding season, our results suggest that female cowbirds invest heavily in current reproduction at the expense of self-maintenance. PMID:23303321

  8. Influence of phthalates on in vitro innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Brorson, Marianne Møller; Frederiksen, Hanne; Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Bendtzen, Klaus; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals, suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of phthalates on cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide and phytohemagglutinin-P were used for stimulation of monocytes/macrophages and T cells, respectively. Cells were exposed for 20 to 22 hours to either di-ethyl, di-n-butyl or mono-n-butyl phthalate at two different concentrations. Both diesters were metabolised to their respective monoester and influenced cytokine secretion from both monocytes/macrophages and T cells in a similar pattern: the secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and the chemokine CXCL8 by monocytes/macrophages was enhanced, while tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by monocytes/macrophages was impaired, as was the secretion of IL-2 and IL-4, TNF-α and interferon-γ by T cells. The investigated phthalate monoester also influenced cytokine secretion from monocytes/macrophages similar to that of the diesters. In T cells, however, the effect of the monoester was different compared to the diesters. The influence of the phthalates on the cytokine secretion did not seem to be a result of cell death. Thus, results indicate that both human innate and adaptive immunity is influenced in vitro by phthalates, and that phthalates therefore may affect cell differentiation and regenerative and inflammatory processes in vivo.

  9. Central stimulation of hormone release and the proliferative response of lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1995-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may communicate with the immune system by direct innervation of lymphoid organs and/or by neurotransmitters and changes in neuroendocrine functioning and hormone release. The consequences of selective transient changes in circulating hormones on immune functioning in humans have not yet been studied. To address this problem, the authors evaluated the lymphoproliferative responses to optimal and suboptimal concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) under selective enhancement of circulating growth hormone, prolactin, or norepinephrine. The authors failed to demonstrate any effect of elevated growth hormone levels after clonidine challenge on the lymphoproliferative response to mitogens. Similarly, the results did not show any effect of elevated prolactin concentrations induced by domperidone administration on the immune test. Exposure of volunteers to cold resulted in elevation of plasma norepinephrine levels without changes in growth hormone, epinephrine, or cortisol secretion. Cold exposure induced elevation of plasma norepinephrine and reduction of the lymphoproliferative response to the suboptimal dosage of PHA. The reduction was significant 180 and 240 min after exposure. These results are indicative of a relationship between norepinephrine and immunity. PMID:8534322

  10. Tobacco Plants Transformed with the Bean αai Gene Express an Inhibitor of Insect α-Amylase in Their Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Altabella, Teresa; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1990-01-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant α-amylases. We recently (J Moreno, MJ Chrispeels [1989] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:7885-7889) presented strong circumstantial evidence that this α-amylase inhibitor (αAI) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5′ and 3′ flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (Mr 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean α-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas α-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas α-amylase activity as well as the α-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called αai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667540

  11. Lymphocyte responses to stress in postpartum women: relationship to vagal tone.

    PubMed

    Redwine, L S; Altemus, M; Leong, Y M; Carter, C S

    2001-04-01

    Although women spend their lives in various phases of the reproductive cycle, including menstrual, pregnancy, postpartum, lactation and menopause, few studies have examined immune responses to stress in women as a function of events associated with reproduction. The objective of this study was to evaluate differential effects of breastfeeding (n = 16), bottlefeeding (n = 10) and non-postpartum (n = 10) status on lymphocyte responses to stressful tasks (public speaking and mental arithmetic). To measure cellular immune responses, lymphocyte proliferation to plant lectins, poke weed mitogen (PWM) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were used. The autonomic measures, heart rate, vagal tone, blood pressure and the hormones of the HPA axis, ACTH and cortisol, were measured and their possible roles in mediating lymphocyte proliferation responses were examined. Recently parturient women who were breastfeeding or bottlefeeding had attenuated stress-induced change in lymphocyte responses to PWM compared with non-postpartum women, tested in the follicular phase of their cycle (P < 0.05). Also, lymphocyte responses to PHA were higher in the breastfeeding group compared with non-postpartum controls (P < 0.05). Regression analyses revealed that an index of cardiac vagal tone, but not other autonomic or endocrine measures, was positively predictive of lymphocyte proliferation to PWM. To summarize, these findings suggest that lactation and parturition can influence lymphocyte proliferation and that activity in the vagal system may influence lymphocyte responses to stress. PMID:11166487

  12. [Molecular and immunological approach to hematological disease: detection and analysis of intracellular modified nucleosides by flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, A; Honda, I; Ishimori, A; Itoh, K; Mizugaki, M; Nose, M

    1990-07-01

    Modified nucleosides are components of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), transfer RNA (tRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA). 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine are members of those modified nucleosides. The urinary concentration of 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine of cancer patients are higher than that of healthy controls, and those compounds were reduced after effective chemotherapy. Thus those compounds might be expected to use as tumor markers. In this study cellular origin of 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine were analysed about two tumor cell lines (HUT-102, THP-1), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy adult and PBL under the phytohemagglutinin stimulation, by flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescent staining of cellular RNA using monoclonal antibodies specific for 1-methyladenosine (AMA) and pseudouridine (APU). Both 1-methyladenosine and pseudouridine were detected in more than 90% of tumor cells above the thresholds of flow cytometric detection (Spectrum III, Ortho). The PBL under the PHA stimulation also tended to take the same way of the tumor cell lines, whereas few of the PBL contained 1-methyladenosine above the thresholds. According to the DNA analysis of those cell lines, high contents of the modified nucleosides in the cell might follow DNA synthesis, this leads to one reason for high levels of the urinary excretion of the modified nucleosides in cancer patient.

  13. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP) expression on T cells and on a natural-killer-cell sub-population.

    PubMed

    Moller, M J; Kammerer, R; Grunert, F; von Kleist, S

    1996-03-15

    Human T and natural-killer (NK) cells, that are thought to be the major cytotoxic effector-cell populations in the defence against neoplastic cells, were isolated from blood and decidua in order to analyze their expression of carcinoembronic-antigen-(CEA)-family-member proteins. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP,CD66a) was the only member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family detected. While freshly isolated T-cells expressed low amounts of BGP, freshly isolated NK cells were negative. After in vitro stimulation for 3 days, T cells up-regulated their BGP expression and a sub-group of NK cells (CD16- CD56+), known to predominate in decidua revealed de novo expression of BGP. In contrast, stimulated CD16+ CD56+ NK cells, which occur exclusively in the blood, remained negative. The expression of BGP could be shown on the protein level by using a panel of 12 well-defined MAbs and on the transcription level in rt-PCR and subsequent oligonucleotide hybridization. Interestingly, rIL-2-stimulated T cells expressed 3-fold higher levels of BGP compared with those seen after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA, on the other hand, induced a higher expression of HLA-DR, an activation marker of T cells. The differential regulation implies a distinct function of BGP and HLA-DR.

  14. Chlorinated dibenzo-P-dioxins and dibenzofurans and the human immune system (2) In vitro proliferation of lymphocytes from workers with quantified moderately-increased body burdens

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, R.; Maskow, L.; Delgado, I.

    1995-11-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation responses were studied in workers with moderately increased body burdens of 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and other polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and other polyclorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), calculated as International Toxicity Equivalencies [I-TE]. Mitogens (pokeweed mitogen [PWM], phytohemagglutinine [PHA], concanavalin A [Con A], as well as anti-human monoclonal antibody against CD3 were used as proliferation stimulators in vitro. Additionally, the feasibility of using the lymphocyte response to tetanus toxoid was assessed, and the response to this recall-antigen was included in this trial. No decrease in the capacity of {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation was observed with any of the proliferation stimulators in the group of volunteers with the increased TCDD-body burden when compared with volunteers exhibiting TCDD-concentrations in blood flat within the reference range. Regression analysis revealed a slight trend towards an increase for {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation during the stimulation with PHA only. It can be concluded from our data that moderates increases in the TCDD- or I-TE-body burdens do not induce any medically significant changes in the capacity for proliferation of lymphocytes, measured as {sub 3}H=thymidine incorporation. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Effects of irradiation upon the response of murine spleen cells to mitogens.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R. E.; Troup, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    The mitogenic response of murine spleen cells exposed to graded doses of radiation was evaluated. Low-dose exposures were associated with an augmented response to concanavalin A (Con A) that was most marked with 100 rads. Low-dose augmentation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was equivocal and most pronounced in cells exposed to 10-20 rads. Augmentation was only demonstrable when the cells were irradiated immediately prior to mitogenic stimulation. Timed exposures after stimulation with Con A or PHA showed no evidence that mitogen activation increased radioresistance, although the possibility could not be excluded that activation protects against interphase cell death. Reduced isotope incorporation was associated with all doses of radiation evaluated in cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM). On this basis it is concluded that 1) each of the mitogens tested differs in its capacity to stimulate irradiated spleen cells; 2) radiation-induced augmentation is noted with those mitogens (Con A and possibly PHA) known to activate only T cells; 3) radiation-induced augmentation may be due to the release of mitogenically active molecules by injured lymphocytes. PMID:6982622

  16. Hepatitis B surface antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in human chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, K R; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody (anti-HBe), the nature of T-cell function, and specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg were determined and evaluated serially in groups of subjects with chronic HBsAg carrier states and in seronegative controls. The techniques of in vitro lymphocyte transformation, spontaneous rosette formation, radioimmunoassay, reverse passive hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination, rheophoresis, and liver function tests were employed for these studies. For the lymphocyte transformation assay, multiple concentrations of phytohemagglutinin and purified HBsAg were used as stimulants. Cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg was detectable in 50% of the chronic HBsAg carriers (responders) at one or more concentrations of HBsAg. The remaining carriers (nonresponders) and controls failed to manifest HBsAg-specific lymphocyte transformation activity. The profile of the responders was characterized by elevated serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of anti-HBe, high HBsAg titers, and the conspicuous absence of HBeAg in the serum. The nonresponders were characterized by normal serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, and lower HBsAg titers. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg in chronic HBsAg carriers who manifest biochemical evidence of liver disease. PMID:80380

  17. Expression and subcellular localization of Ewing sarcoma (EWS) protein is affected by the methylation process.

    PubMed

    Belyanskaya, Larisa L; Delattre, Olivier; Gehring, Heinz

    2003-08-15

    Ewing sarcoma (EWS) protein contains an N-terminal transcriptional activation domain (EAD) and a C-terminal RNA-binding domain (RBD). Recently, we had shown that EWS protein is not only localized in the nucleus and cytosol, but also on the surface of T cells and that its RBD is extensively asymmetrically dimethylated on arginine residues. Here we show that stimulation of T cells with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) caused a time-dependent 10-fold increase in expression of methylated EWS protein on the cell surface and a sixfold increase in the nuclei of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Mitogenic stimulation of malignant T cell lines, however, did not increase their inherently high expression of EWS protein. This expression seemed to correlate with methionine adenosyltransferase activity and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) utilization in PBMC and tumor cells and thus indicates dependence on the methylation process. Inhibition of methylation in normal and malignant cells with the methylation inhibitor adenosine dialdehyde (AdOx) resulted in a three to fivefold decreased expression of EWS protein not only in the nucleus but also on the cell surface. The inhibitory effect of AdOx was compensated and negligible in PBMC, but not in tumor cells if they were treated simultaneously with mitogenic PHA concentrations. The present findings indicate that expression of EWS protein in the various subcellular compartments is affected by the methylation process, in particular by the availability of intracellular AdoMet.

  18. The genes for nicein/kalinin 125- and 100-kDa subunits, candidates for junctional epidermiolysis bullosa, map to chromosomes 1q32 and 1q25-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Vailly, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Meneguzzi, G.; Szepetowski, P.; Pedeutour, F. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Burgeson, R. )

    1994-05-01

    Expression of nicein is specifically hampered in the severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive genodermatosis characterized by blister formation of integument believed to be due to defects in hemidesmosomes. Nicein genes are therefore the prime candidates for involvement in JEB. To map the gene encoding the 125-kDa subunit of nicein, the authors used the cDNA Kal5.5C coding for the amino-terminal domain of the protein. In situ hybridization was carried out on chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. In 100 metaphases examined, 153 silver grains were found associated with chromosomes; 45 (29%) of these were located on chromosome 1, and 33 (73%) of these 45 grains mapped to region 1q32.1-q41 with a maximum in band 1q32. To confirm the regional localization of the genes for nicein subunits of 100 and 125 kDa, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on normal lymphocytes from two unrelated normal males and fibroblast cell lines GM00257 (karyotype 46,XX, t(1;2)(1q32;2p23)) and GM004088 (46,XY,t(1;4)(q32;p16)). It was thus confirmed that the genes for nicein 125- and 100-kDa subunits are localized at 1q32 and 1q25-q31, respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Chromosomal localization of the [delta] opioid receptor gene to human 1p34. 3-36. 1 and mouse 4D bands by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Befort, K.; Kieffer, B. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. )

    1994-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the precise localization of this gene in the murine as well as human genome by in situ hybridization. Southern analysis, using the noncoding part of the cDNA as a probe (NotI-BamHI fragment, 1040 bp) under high-stringency conditions, shows the existence of a single-copy gene in the murine genome. In a similar analysis performed on human genomic DNA, the coding part of the cDNA (PstI-NotI fragment, 976 bp) clearly detected a single gene in the human genome (not shown). The authors therefore used these two probes for the chromosomal localization of the murine gene and its human counterpart, respectively. Chromosome spread preparations from concanavalin A (mouse) or phytohemagglutinin (human)-stimulated lymphocytes were hybridized with tritium-labeled cDNAs, exposed for 15 days, and developed, as described previously. For the murine assignment, a total of 100 metaphase cells were examined, and 149 silver grains were found. Forty-two grains were associated with chromosome 4, and 73.8% of them mapped to the D1-D3 region of the chromosome. In the 120 metaphase human cells analyzed, 197 silver grains were found, 25.8% of which were located on chromosome 1. The distribution of grains allowed mapping of the human [delta] opioid receptor gene to the p34.3-p36.1 region of the short arm with a maximum in the p35 band.

  20. Iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status and immune response in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Henry-Christian, J.R.; Johnson, A.A.; Walters, C.S.; Greene, E.J.; Lindsey, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The relationships of iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status to cell-mediated immune response were investigated among 125 healthy, elderly persons (60-87 years of age). Plasma ferritin, plasma and red cell folate, and plasma vitamin B/sub 12/ levels were assayed immuno-radiometrically. Plasma and hair zinc levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Immune response was determined by transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (con A), and in mixed lymphocyte reaction. Deficiencies of iron, folacin vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc were each associated (independently) with significantly lower lymphocyte responses to PHA and con A, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (P < 0.01). These findings indicate a depression of cell-mediated immunity in elderly persons deficient in iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ or zinc. Further, they suggest that deficiencies of these nutrients may play a role in the depression of cell-mediated immunity with age, which in turn may lead to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and cancer in the elderly.

  1. Cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation in patients with Nocardia brasiliensis actinomycetoma.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tovar, Luis J; Mondragón-González, Rafael; Vega-López, Francisco; Dockrell, Hazel M; Hay, Roderick; López-Martínez, Rubén; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Padilla-Desgarennes, Carmen; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2004-11-01

    IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12 concentrations in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures and the in vitro proliferation of PBMC were studied in 25 patients with actinomycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis and in 10 healthy controls from endemic zones. Cell cultures were stimulated by a N. brasiliensis crude cytoplasmic antigen (NB) and five semi-purified protein fractions (NB2, NB4, NB6, NB8, and NB10) separated by isoelectric. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as control antigens. Skin tests were performed by injecting 0.1 ml of candidin and PPD intradermally (ID). Patients showed a poor response to tuberculin, while their response to candidin was more than two fold greater than that observed in the controls. Cell proliferation showed no statistically significant differences in either group. IFN-gamma production was higher in the healthy controls than in the patients, whereas TNF-alpha secretion was slightly higher in the patients' cultures. IL-4 was detected in the patients' cultures but not in the controls. IL-10 and IL-12 were present at low concentrations in both groups. These results suggest that patients with actinomycetoma show normal antigen recognition, but with low IFN-gamma production, and higher concentrations of IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-alpha in the patients' PBMC cultures, indicating that they probably have a Th2 type of immune response.

  2. Suppressed PHA activation of T lymphocytes in simulated microgravity is restored by direct activation of protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing clinostatic rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity, we found phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness to be almost completely diminished. Activation marker expression was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, cytokine secretion profiles suggested that monocytes are not as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness because placing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. However, activation of purified T cells with cross-linked CD2/CD28 and CD3/CD28 antibody pairs was completely suppressed in the RWV, suggesting a defect in signal transduction. Activation of purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture. Furthermore, sub-mitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  3. Metal accumulation and evaluation of effects in a freshwater turtle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuangying; Halbrook, Richard S; Sparling, Donald W; Colombo, Robert

    2011-11-01

    A variety of contaminants have been detected in aquatic and terrestrial environments around the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Kentucky. The presence of these contaminants at the PGDP may pose a risk to biota, yet little is known about the bioaccumulation of contaminants and associated effects in wildlife, especially in aquatic turtles. The current study was initiated to evaluate: (1) the accumulation of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Hg) in aquatic ecosystems associated with the PGDP using red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) as biomonitors; (2) maternal transfer of heavy metals; and (3) potential hematological and immunological effects resulting from metal accumulation. A total of 26 turtles were collected from 7 ponds located south, adjacent, and north of the PGDP. Liver Cu concentrations were significantly different among ponds and Cu concentrations in eggs were positively correlated with female Cu concentrations in kidney. The concentrations of heavy metals measured in turtle tissues and eggs were low and, based on previous studies of reptiles and established avian threshold levels of heavy metals, did not appear to have adverse effects on aquatic turtles inhabiting ponds near the PGDP. However, total white blood cell counts, heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, and phytohemagglutinin stimulation index were correlated with metal concentrations. Because other factors may affect the hematological and immunological indices, further investigation is needed to determine if these effects are associated with metal exposure, other contaminants, or disease. PMID:21688058

  4. Different responsiveness of spleen lymphocytes from two lines of psychogenetically selected rats (Roman high and low avoidance).

    PubMed

    Sandi, C; Castanon, N; Vitiello, S; Neveu, P J; Mormède, P

    1991-01-01

    Roman high- (RHA) and low-avoidance (RLA) rats have been genetically selected on the basis of their active avoidance behavior, and have been shown to differ on numerous behavioral, neurochemical and neuroendocrine parameters, especially in response to stress. We investigated the activity of splenic lymphocytes in vitro. Natural killer cell activity against YAC-1 tumoral cells and the mitotic response to plant lectins concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin were much lower for lymphocytes isolated from RHA rats, in males as well as in females. The difference between the two strains was even larger when measured in a stressed state, immediately after active avoidance learning. On the other hand, the mitotic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a B-cell-specific mitogen, was not different between the two lines, indicating that the difference in lymphocyte reactivity is limited to the T-lineage. The lower activity of T-cells in the RHA line had no consequence upon the ability of these animals to build up an antibody response against sheep red blood cells. These results indicate that Roman lines are an interesting animal model for the study of the relationships between the brain and the immune system, as well as for the analysis of the genes involved in the control of behavior. PMID:1984035

  5. Immunoregulation of autocrine prolactin: suppressing the expression of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in T lymphocytes by prolactin receptor knockdown.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongming; Lin, Ling; Lin, Xiahong; Huang, Ziyang; Lei, Zhenmin

    2010-01-01

    Ample evidence indicates that prolactin (PRL) secreted from the pituitary gland plays an important role in a variety of human immune responses. However, the immunoregulation of autocrine PRL in T lymphocytes is not fully understood. To evaluate the role of autocrine PRL in T lymphocyte activation, PRL receptor (PRLR) in Jurkat cells was silenced by lentivirus-mediated stable expression of PRLR shRNAi. Knockdown of PRLR resulted in a considerable reduction of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T cell proliferation. Moreover, the synthesis and secretion of CD137, CD154, IL-2 and IL-4 were significantly decreased, while the production of CD28, IFN-gamma and IL-10 was not affected in PHA-primed PRLR-deficient cells. These results demonstrate the importance of autocrine regulation of the PRL signaling in T lymphocyte growth and activation, and support a mechanism by which autocrine PRL participates in the immunoregulation through selectively influencing the expression of certain critical costimulatory molecules and cytokines.

  6. CELLS INVOLVED IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Daguillard, Fritz; Richter, Maxwell

    1969-01-01

    Cells of the different lymphoid organs in the normal adult rabbit were investigated for their capacity to respond in vitro to a number of stimuli, such as phytohemagglutinin (PHA), anti-rabbit immunoglobulin antiserum (GARIG) and allogeneic and xenogeneic lymphoid cells, and for their capacity to adsorb radioactively-labeled anti-immunoglobulin antiserum. The bone marrow cells responded minimally to PHA, GARIG, and the allogeneic and xenogeneic stimuli. The thymus cells were unable to respond to stimulation with GARIG although they responded to the other stimuli. The cells of the other lymphoid organs tested responded to all the mitogenic agents, to varying degrees. On the basis of the results presented and the findings of other investigators, it is concluded that: 1. The response of the cells to GARIG indicates a potential capacity to mediate humoral immunity and requires the presence of immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin-like recognition sites on the cell surface. 2. The response of the cells to PHA and allogeneic and xenogeneic cells indicates a potential capacity to mediate cellular immunity and does not necessitate the presence of immunoglobulin-recognition sites on the cell surface. 3. The thymus in the normal adult rabbit consists of cells capable of mediating cellular immunity only. 4. The other lymphoid organs appear to possess cells capable of mediating humoral and cellular immunity. PMID:5307485

  7. In vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation in a crossbred cattle population.

    PubMed

    Young, F J; Woolliams, J A; Williams, J L; Glass, E J; O'Neill, R G; Fitzpatrick, J L

    2005-07-01

    Immune function measured by Staphylococcus aureus- and phytohemagglutinin- (PHA-) induced cell proliferation was assessed in a population of 445 genetically defined, F2 and backcross Charolais-Holstein crossbred cattle when the animals were approximately 5 mo of age. Variation in Staph. aureus-induced, PHA-induced, and control proliferation [peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and media only] was observed at d 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 10 of in vitro culture. The levels of Staph. aureus-induced, PHA-induced, and control proliferation were strongly positively correlated between days of culture within-assay (e.g., between d 2 and d 3 or between d 4 and d 5). Responses were also positively correlated when the same individuals were resampled and the assay repeated within 3 mo. Analyses fitting linear mixed models using REML showed that Staph. aureus-induced and PHA-induced proliferation was significantly associated with control proliferation and the year of birth. The age of the animal at sampling influenced only Staph. aureus-induced proliferation, with Staph. aureus-induced proliferation increasing with the age of the animal. Control proliferation was influenced by a sex x cross interaction, although in this study, sex was confounded by management, as female cattle were housed and reared differently from male cattle. All 3 measures of immune function were influenced by sire, demonstrating that these traits are partially under genetic control, and indicating that it may ultimately be possible to identify quantitative trait loci for these measures of immunity.

  8. Procainamide hydroxylamine lymphocyte toxicity--I. Evidence for participation by hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S M; Adams, L E; Donovan-Brand, R; Budinsky, R; Skoulis, N P; Zimmer, H; Hess, E V

    1989-01-01

    A number of lines of evidence suggest that the lupus-like symptoms associated with procainamide therapy may be caused by products of metabolic N-oxidation. In the present study, the perfusion of the isolated rat liver with a hemoglobin-free solution containing procainamide (100 microM) resulted in the rapid appearance of the N-oxidation metabolite procainamide hydroxylamine in the perfusate. Addition of procainamide hydroxylamine in vitro to whole rat blood (1-40 microM) resulted in a concentration-dependent loss of proliferative response among mononuclear cells isolated from the treated blood and cultured with mitogens (phytohemagglutinin, PHA-P: concanavalin A, Con A; and pokeweed mitogen, PWM), as well as a loss of viability. Similar effects on lymphocyte mitogen responsiveness were observed when procainamide hydroxylamine (1-40 microM) was added to rat whole splenic cell populations. Carbon monoxide or ascorbic acid pretreatment inhibited the toxicity of procainamide hydroxylamine to lymphocytes in whole blood, but only carbon monoxide pretreatment inhibited procainamide hydroxylamine-induced methemoglobin formation. These observations are consistent with the participation of hemoglobin in a redox cycle with procainamide hydroxylamine, generating products which are primarily responsible for its cytotoxicity in blood.

  9. The in vitro effects of artificial and natural sweeteners on the immune system using whole blood culture assays.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, F; Pool, E J

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of commercially available artificial (aspartame, saccharin, sucralose) and natural sweeteners (brown sugar, white sugar, molasses) on the immune system. Human whole blood cultures were incubated with various sweeteners and stimulated in vitro with either phytohemagglutinin or endotoxin. Harvested supernatants were screened for cytotoxicity and cytokine release. Results showed that none of the artificial or natural sweeteners proved to be cytotoxic, indicating that no cell death was induced in vitro. The natural sweetener, sugar cane molasses (10 ug/mL), enhanced levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 while all artificial sweeteners (10 ug/mL) revealed a suppressive effect on IL-6 secretion (P < 0.001). Exposure of blood cells to sucralose-containing sweeteners under stimulatory conditions reduced levels of the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). The cumulative suppression of Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-10 levels induced by sucralose may contribute to the inability in mounting an effective humoral response when posed with an exogenous threat.

  10. Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8a: cloning, tissue distribution and immunobiological in splenic mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiurong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Yan, Xiaoling; Qi, Yulin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-25

    CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein, which plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity. Here, we identified Chinese goose CD8α (goCD8α) gene for the first time. The full-length cDNA of goCD8α is 1459bp in length and contains a 711bp open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the waterfowl CD8α formed a monophyletic group. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that transcripts of goCD8α mRNA were high in the immune-related organs and mucosal immune system in gosling, and high in thymus and spleen comparing to other immune-related tissues in goose. The obvious increase of CD8α expression was observed in spleen of acute new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) infected bird, while the increase of CD8α were observed in the thymus, bursa of fabricius, and cecum of chronic infected bird. The CD8α mRNA transcription level in spleen mononuclear cells was significantly up-regulated when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, but not by lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

  11. Purification of beta-glucuronidase and structural assessment of the carbohydrate chains by lectin affinity immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wójczyk, B; Hoja, D; Lityńska, A

    1991-08-01

    The purification of rat liver beta-glucuronidase from a lysosomal fraction by methods including affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing and preparative PAGE steps is described. Molecular weights of 300,000 and 150,000 were estimated by two dimensional gradient PAGE/immunoelectrophoresis of the lysosomal extract. Isoelectrofocusing in agarose gel followed by immunoelectrophoresis in the second dimension revealed the presence of at least five maxima in the range pH 4.3-7.4. The structural assessment of the carbohydrate chains of lysosomal and microsomal beta-glucuronidase was performed by lectin affinity immunoelectrophoresis. Reaction with Concanavalin A indicated the presence of bi-antennary complex, oligomannosidic and hybrid type structures, whereas the absence of tri- and tetra-antennary complex type structures was deduced from the lack of interaction with phytohemagglutinin-L. The reaction with Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin and Lotus tetragonolobus lectin revealed that part of the glycans contained a fucose alpha(1-6)-linked to the N-acetylglucosamine attached to asparagine. The presence of terminal beta(1-4)-galactose residues was detected with Ricinus communis agglutinin I. PMID:1841676

  12. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: feasibility in transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Andreu, G; Boccaccio, C; Lecrubier, C; Fretault, J; Coursaget, J; LeGuen, J P; Oleggini, M; Fournel, J J; Samama, M

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  13. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    SciTech Connect

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  14. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  15. Piperine inhibits cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Chuchawankul, S; Khorana, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2012-01-01

    Piperine, an amide isolated from Piper species (Piperaceae), has been reported to exhibit central nervous system depression, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activity. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activity of piperine has been demonstrated in mouse carcinomas. However, there is little information available concerning the effect of piperine on humans. We evaluated the immunopharmacological activity of this compound in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to piperine, and cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay. Piperine significantly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human PBMC proliferation after exposure for 72 h. This compound inhibited PBMC activity, with an IC(50) of 100.73 ± 11.16 μg/mL. Production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was measured using an ELISA assay and RT-PCR. Piperine inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production in the PBMCs. RT-PCR data indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMCs is suppressed by piperine. This compound significantly inhibited the production of these two cytokines by activated PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, piperine appears to have potential as an immunomodulatory agent for immune system suppression. PMID:22535397

  16. The in vivo and in vitro effects of caffeine on rat immune cells activities: B, T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kantamala, D; Vongsakul, M; Satayavivad, J

    1990-12-01

    The effect of caffeine (naturally occurring plant methylxanthine) on immunological cell activities in Sprague-Dawley rat both in vivo and in vitro was studied. A cytotoxic assay was done to study natural killer (NK) cells and a proliferation assay was performed for T and B cell activities. Three different doses of caffeine i.e., 2, 6 and 18 mg/kg/day were administered chronically to Sprague-Dawley rats to assess the effects in vivo. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and B cell proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) showed significant decreases (P less than 0.05) in rats treated with 6 mg/kg/day, whereas the T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) was significantly increased (P less than 0.05) in the rats treated with 18 mg/kg/day. In vitro, caffeine significantly decreases (P less than 0.05) B and T cell proliferative responses to PWM and PHA-P at added caffeine concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 micrograms/ml. However, no effect was observed on NK cells activity. Furthermore, in vitro, a broader dose range of caffeine (1, 10, 100 and 1,000 micrograms/ml) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of both B and T cell proliferative responses.

  17. Corticosteroid-sensitive lymphocytes are normal in atopic asthma.

    PubMed

    Schuyler, M R; Bondarevsky, E; Schwartz, H J; Schmitt, D

    1981-07-01

    Corticosteroids, well known to increase susceptibility to infection, are often administered to atopic patients. Atopy may be associated with lymphocyte abnormalities and increased susceptibility to infections caused by intracellular organisms. We sought to determine whether atopic and nonatopic subjects respond in a similar manner to corticosteroids administered both systemically and locally. We compared the response of peripheral blood leukocytes of 15 atopic asthmatics and 10 nonatopic control subjects to prednisone or beclomethasone dipropionate. We determined leukocyte number, total eosinophil count, T-cell number, complement receptor lymphocyte number, and concanavalin A (Con A)- and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation before and 5 hr after administration of 20 mg of prednisone orally or 336 micrograms of beclomethasone dipropionate by aerosol inhalation. Baseline values of the groups differed. The atopic asthmatic group had higher total eosinophil count, lower percent lymphocyte count, and slightly lower Con A- and PHA (high concentration)-induced lymphocyte proliferation. T-cell and complement receptor lymphocyte number were equivalent in both groups. Prednisone caused a profound eosinopenia, monocytopenia, T lymphopenia, depression of mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, and increase in leukocyte number and complement receptor lymphocyte percent. Beclomethasone dipropionate was associated with little or no change in these parameters. We conclude that atopic asthma is not associated with a defect in corticosteroid-sensitive leukocyte populations and that beclomethasone dipropionate aerosol, as opposed to prednisone, does not alter peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations.

  18. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  19. Inhibition of Local Immune Responses by the Frog-Killing Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Fites, J. Scott; Reinert, Laura K.; Chappell, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians are suffering unprecedented global declines. A leading cause is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Chytridiomycosis is a skin disease which disrupts transport of essential ions leading to death. Soluble factors produced by B. dendrobatidis impair amphibian and mammalian lymphocytes in vitro, but previous studies have not shown the effects of these inhibitory factors in vivo. To demonstrate in vivo inhibition of immunity by B. dendrobatidis, a modified delayed-type-hypersensitivity (DTH) protocol was developed to induce innate and adaptive inflammatory swelling in the feet of Xenopus laevis by injection of killed bacteria or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Compared to previous protocols for PHA injection in amphibians, this method induced up to 20-fold greater inflammatory swelling. Using this new protocol, we measured DTH responses induced by killed bacteria or PHA in the presence of B. dendrobatidis supernatants. Swelling induced by single injection of PHA or killed bacteria was not significantly affected by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. However, swelling caused by a secondary injection of PHA, was significantly reduced by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. As previously described in vitro, factors from B. dendrobatidis appear to inhibit lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory swelling but not swelling caused by an inducer of innate leukocytes. This suggests that B. dendrobatidis is capable of inhibiting lymphocytes in a localized response to prevent adaptive immune responses in the skin. The modified protocol used to induce inflammatory swelling in the present study may be more effective than previous methods to investigate amphibian immune competence, particularly in nonmodel species. PMID:25156734

  20. Chromosome aberration, cancer mortality and hormetic phenomena among inhabitants in areas of high background radiation in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Wei, L

    1991-12-01

    The respective average annual doses are about 330 and 110 mR/yr, in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang County and the control areas (CA) in Enping and Taishan Counties. Both the HBRA and CA are in Guangdong Province which borders the South China Sea. The frequencies of chromosome aberration in circulating lymphocytes were examined for persons residing in the HBRA and CA. Those in the HBRA had increased frequencies of detectable abnormalities in stable aberrations (translocations and inversions) and unstable aberrations (dicentrics and rings). Previous reports have shown that when samples of circulating lymphocytes taken from inhabitants were tested in vitro for mitotic responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and for the degree of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced by UV-irradiation, there were higher responsiveness and UDS rates for those in the HBRA than in the CA. In contrast, mortality from all cancers and those from leukemia, breast and lung cancers that are inducible by radiation was not higher in the HBRA. Although the differences in the cancer mortality rates for the HBRA and CA are not significant, the findings are compatible with the assumption that the lower mortality from cancer in the HBRA is the result of the hormetic effects of the three-fold higher dose rate of background radiation in that areas. This assumption requires further study.

  1. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Kelly; Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  2. Mechanism for macrophage activation against Corynebacterium parvum--participation of T cells and its lymphokines.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Mihara, M; Uesugi, Y; Nagai, H; Koda, A

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that Corynebacterium parvum activates macrophages to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). It is suspected that the activation of macrophages by C. parvum requires T-cell participation. The purpose of this study was to confirm that T cells participate in the activation of macrophages by C. parvum. TNF production in vitro from the spleen cells of BALB/c(-)+/+ mice was abrogated completely by the pre-treatment of spleen cells with anti-Ia antiserum and complement, indicating that Ia+ cells are the source of TNF. TNF production was not elicited at all in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. However, there was an increase in the number of Ia+ cells as well as an increase in the weight of spleen and liver. Supernatant from a culture of spleen cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (a PHA-induced lymphokine) made it possible for BALB/c-nu/nu mice to produce TNF, associated with an induction of Lyt-1+ cells and Lyt-2+ cells. However, treatment with the lymphokine did not augment the increases of Ia+ cells or liver and spleen weights. These results suggest that increasing the number of Ia+ cells is not sufficient to bring about TNF production; Ia+ cells must also be stimulated by T cells or T-cell lymphokines in order to produce TNF. These results suggest that T cells play an essential role in the activation of Ia+ cells against C. parvum. PMID:7723692

  3. Long-term cytogenetic effects of antineoplastic treatment in relation to secondary leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Genuardi, M.; Zollino, M.; Serra, A.; Leone, G.; Mancini, R.; Mango, G.; Neri, G.

    1988-07-15

    Chromosome translocations are consistently present in leukemias and lymphomas and are likely to represent primary events in the development of these neoplasias. A study of conditions that predispose to leukemia could shed some light on the origin of these translocations and therefore help in clarifying their exact role in the process of neoplastic transformation. Based on this assumption, we studied a group of individuals treated with radiochemotherapy for previous lymphoma and who were at increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia. The group comprised 14 Hodgkin's disease patients, 11 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, and 13 controls. The patients were in remission and had been off therapy for at least 6 months. Chromosomes were studied from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocytes and from bone marrow cells by the direct method and after short-term cultures (72 hours). The latter were also exposed to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Metaphases were scored for chromosome breaks, gaps, and other rearrangements. The percentage of gaps and breaks was significantly higher in patients than in controls. The difference was induced by BrdU and was apparent in bone marrow cells, but not in peripheral lymphocytes. We conclude that individuals exposed to the action of mutagenic agents (radiochemotherapy) have an increased chromosome instability that could be related to their increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia.

  4. Development and disappearance of tolerance to induction of interferon and tumor necrosis factor response in athletes treated with natural immunostimulant.

    PubMed

    Inglot, A D; Sobiech, K A; Zielińska-Jenczylik, J; Sypuła, A; Majda, J; Lorenc, M

    1999-01-01

    The effect of nonspecific immunostimulation was examined in 15 basketball players subjected to extensive physical effort. The Tołpa* Torf Preparation (TTP*), a natural immunostimulating drug, was applied orally, one 5 mg tablet daily, in two 21-day cycles, separated by 2-week hiatus. Blood samples were collected 4 times, after each of two TTP* cycles and after the first and second hiatus. Whole blood assay was used to determine the spontaneous and induced production of interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The levels of the cytokines were measured by microbioassays. TTP* stimulated synthesis of IFN and TNF in the whole blood cultures. However, after the oral administraton of TTP* for 3 weeks the leukocytes of the athletes developed hyporeactivity to IFN induction by TTP* and to a lesser extent to another "superinducer"--a mixture of phytohemagglutinin and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The hyporeactivity state disappeared spontaneously within 2 weeks. In contrast, the tolerance to TNF induction did not develop during the TTP* administration. The increase of immunoglobulins, mainly of IgM and IgG classes and an acute phase protein--alpha1-antitrypsin, was observed at the late phase of the treatment. We suggest that the cytokine levels may be early markers for immunoprophylaxis. Furthermore, high production of IFN and TNF may be associated with extensive physical effort.

  5. Systemic therapy of myeloma xenografts by an attenuated measles virus.

    PubMed

    Peng, K W; Ahmann, G J; Pham, L; Greipp, P R; Cattaneo, R; Russell, S J

    2001-10-01

    Conditionally replicating viruses are promising agents for the treatment of malignancy. Here it is shown that the live attenuated Edmonston-B vaccine strain of measles virus (MV-Edm) replicates selectively in human myeloma cells and has potent antitumor activity. In vitro, replication of MV-Edm was restricted in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) but proceeded efficiently in a panel of 6 myeloma cell lines-ARH-77, RPMI 8226, JJN-3, MM1, KAS-6/1, and KMS-11-and in primary myeloma cells isolated by CD138 sorting from the bone marrow aspirates of 6 patients. MV-Edm infection induced potent cytopathic effects in these myeloma cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleated syncytia that eventually became nonviable. In contrast, syncytial formation in PHA-stimulated PBLs was minimal after MV-Edm infection. In vivo, MV-Edm was antitumorigenic and inhibited the establishment of myeloma cells as xenografts in immunocompromised mice. When injected directly into ARH-77 myeloma xenografts in the mice, MV-Edm caused complete regression of these xenografts. MV-Edm administered intravenously into the tail veins of mice also showed significant antineoplastic activity against established RPMI 8226 and ARH-77 xenografts. In particular, the ARH-77 myeloma xenografts were exquisitely sensitive to MV-Edm therapy, and tumors in all mice regressed completely. In light of its selectivity for myeloma cells and its potent antineoplastic activity against myeloma xenografts in vivo, MV-Edm merits further development for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  6. New immunological investigations on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric ulcer in patients.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Farshad, Shohreh; Firoozi, Mehdi Saberi; Taghavi, Ali Reza; Kiany, Simin

    2013-06-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori (Hp) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer, little is known about the probable mechanisms of these types of gastrointestinal damage. To determine the precise mechanisms involved in ulcer formation, immune responses in patients with gastric ulcer (GUP) caused by Hp infection (Hp(+)) were compared with those of other gastritis patients (GP). The sensitivity and proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) obtained from patients were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay against exposure with complex Hp crude antigen (HPCA) and mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA). Production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8, in serum and supernatants of PBMNCs were then measured by ELISA. It was found that, after stimulation with PHA, both IL-8 and IL-1β concentrations in sera and supernatants as well as proliferation and sensitivity were statistically greater in GUP Hp(+) than GP Hp(-) . Furthermore, HPCA inhibited the proliferation of PBMNCs dose-dependently; however, it stimulated IL-8 and IL-1β production in supernatants of mononuclear cells. Therefore, the up-regulated concentrations of IL-8 and IL-1β may have been caused by increase in the size of mononuclear cell subpopulations or in their cytokine secretory activity, indicating the greatest cell responsiveness in GUP Hp(+) patients. These results suggest that tissue damage and ulcers occur in patients who produce more IL-8 and IL-1β than patients who do not develop ulcers; the former consequently have more activated immune cells at the site of infection. Therefore, both host responses and Hp virulence factors may be involved in the development of gastric ulcers.

  7. Long-term fungal inhibitory activity of water-soluble extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto and sourdough lactic acid bacteria during bread storage.

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo G; Nigro, Franco; De Angelis, Maria; Arnault, Philip; Gobbetti, Marco

    2008-12-01

    The antifungal activity of proteinaceous compounds from different food matrices was investigated. In initial experiments, water-soluble extracts of wheat sourdoughs, cheeses, and vegetables were screened by agar diffusion assays with Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1 as the indicator fungus. Water-soluble extracts of sourdough fermented with Lactobacillus brevis AM7 and Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto were selected for further study. The crude water-soluble extracts of L. brevis AM7 sourdough and P. vulgaris cv. Pinto had a MIC of 40 mg of peptide/ml and 30.9 mg of protein/ml, respectively. MICs were markedly lower when chemically synthesized peptides or partially purified protein fractions were used. The water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto showed inhibition toward a large number of fungal species isolated from bakeries. Phaseolin alpha-type precursor, phaseolin, and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin precursor were identified in the water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto by nano liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. When the antifungal activity was assayed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all three proteins were inhibitory. A mixture of eight peptides was identified from the water-soluble extract of sourdough L. brevis AM7, and five of these exhibited inhibitory activity. Bread was made at the pilot plant scale by sourdough fermentation with L. brevis AM7 and addition of the water-soluble extract (27%, vol/wt; 5 mg of protein/ml) of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto. Slices of bread packed in polyethylene bags did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage at room temperature, a level of protection comparable to that afforded by 0.3% (wt/wt) calcium propionate.

  8. Subchronic lead exposure, immunotoxicology and increased disease resistance in Japanese quail (Corturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Nain, S; Smits, J E G

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of lead (Pb) on immune responses in quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) and the pathological impact of exposure to an infectious agent (E. coli O2). Fifty-four, 4-week-old quail were exposed to lead acetate in drinking water at 5 or 50 ppm. All birds were vaccinated with Newcastle Vaccine (NDV) during the third week of contaminant (Pb) exposure. In the fourth week, several arms of the immune response were tested using the T cell based phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test, the B cell mediated antibody response to NVD, and the chemiluminescence assay measuring innate immunity. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to determine the expression of toll like receptor-3 (TLR-3) in the bursa of Fabricius. In the fifth week, quail were challenged with 200 μL of E. coli O2 (1×10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/mL). No clinical signs of Pb toxicity were observed. Morbidity/mortality subsequent to E. coli exposure was lowest in the high exposure group (27.8%) compared to low exposure (44.4%) and control (55.5%) groups. There was no difference in the T-cell-mediated PHA response, primary or secondary immune response or the innate response in Pb exposed groups; however, bursal TLR-3 increased (p<0.05) with higher Pb exposure. No evidence supported that subchronic Pb exposure was immunotoxic to quail at 5 or 50 ppm in drinking water. In contrast, our results provide evidence of a hormetic effect, with Pb exposed birds having lower morbidity and better survival than controls. Subchronic Pb exposure may be immunostimulatory rather than suppressive as predicted in earlier studies based on testing individual immune parameters.

  9. [Basic biological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human umbilical cord].

    PubMed

    Han, Zhen-Xia; Shi, Qing; Wang, Da-Kun; Li, Dong; Lyu, Ming

    2013-10-01

    Bone marrow (BM) and umbilical cord (UC) are the major sources of mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutics. This study was aimed to compare the basic biologic characteristics of bone marrow-derived and umbilical cord derived-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC and UC-MSC) and their immunosuppressive capability in vitro. The BM-MSC and UC-MSC were cultured and amplified under same culture condition. The growth kinetics, phenotypic characteristics and immunosuppressive effects of UC-MSC were compared with those of BM-MSC.Gene chip was used to compare the genes differentially expressed between UC-MSC and BM-MSC. The results showed that UC-MSC shared most of the characteristics of BM-MSC, including morphology and immunophenotype. UC-MSC could be ready expanded for 30 passages without visible changes. However, BM-MSC grew slowly, and the mean doubling time increased notably after passage 6. Both UC-MSC and BM-MSC could inhibit phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, in which BM-MSC mediated more inhibitory effect. Compared with UC-MSC, BM-MSC expressed more genes associated with immune response. Meanwhile, the categories of up-regulated genes in UC-MSC were concentrated in organ development and growth. It is concluded that the higher proliferation capacity, low human leukocyte antigen-ABC expression and immunosuppression make UC-MSC an excellent alternative to BM-MSC for cell therapy. The differences between BM-MSC and UC-MSC gene expressions can be explained by their ontogeny and different microenvironment in origin tissue. These differences can affect their efficacy in different therapeutic applications.

  10. Effects of natural eggshell membrane (NEM) on cytokine production in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells: increased suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α levels after in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Benson, Kathleen F; Ruff, Kevin J; Jensen, Gitte S

    2012-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in inflammatory processes. This study examined the effects of natural eggshell membrane (NEM(®)) (ESM Technologies, LLC, Carthage, MO, USA) on interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and TNF-α cytokine production by 4-day peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures exposed to serial dilutions of either an aqueous extract of natural eggshell membrane (NEM-AQ) or NEM subjected to in vitro digestion (NEM-IVD). The effects on cytokine production were also assessed in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) where exposure to NEM-AQ resulted in reduced levels of proliferation and statistically significant effects on IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α cytokine production. NEM-AQ reduced levels of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α in cultures exposed to PHA. In cultures containing PWM, NEM-AQ reduced production of IL-10 and at the highest dose tested increased IL-6 and decreased TNF-α cytokine levels. NEM-IVD, at the two lowest concentrations of product, significantly reduced TNF-α production by PBMC cultures exposed to PWM compared with the in vitro digest control or native NEM. Taken together, these results suggest that NEM-AQ can influence signaling events in response to the T cell-specific mitogen PHA as well as to the mitogen PWM that require cellular cross-talk and that these effects may be partially mediated through a reduction in level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. The suppression of TNF-α production in the presence of NEM-IVD is promising for the use of NEM as a consumable anti-inflammatory product.

  11. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  12. Effects of environmental stressors on lymphocyte proliferation in Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Cathy J; Luer, Carl A; Noyes, David R

    2005-02-10

    The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected each year by exposure to cold weather or harmful algal blooms (red tide; Karenia brevis). Exposures can be sublethal, resulting in stressed animals that are rescued and taken to authorized facilities for rehabilitation, or lethal if exposures are prolonged or unusually severe. To investigate whether sublethal environmental exposures can impair immune function in manatees, rendering animals vulnerable to disease or death, mitogen-induced proliferation was assessed in lymphocytes from manatees exposed to cold temperatures (N=20) or red tide (N=19) in the wild, and compared to lymphocyte responses from healthy free-ranging manatees (N=32). All animals sampled for this study were adults. Lymphocytes were stimulated in vitro with either concanavalin A (ConA) or phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and proliferation was assessed after 96 h using incorporation of the thymidine analog, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), into newly synthesized DNA. Proliferation of lymphocytes from manatees rescued from exposure to red tide or cold-stress was approximately one-third that of lymphocytes from healthy free-ranging manatees. To examine the direct effects of red tide toxins on lymphocyte function, mitogen-induced proliferation was assessed following co-culture of lymphocytes with K. brevis toxin extracts. Stimulation indices decreased with increasing toxin concentration, with a significant decrease in proliferation occurring in the presence of 400 ng red tide toxins/ml. When lymphocytes from cold-stressed manatees were co-cultured with red tide toxin extracts, proliferative responses were reduced even further, suggesting multiple stressors may have synergistic effects on immune function in manatees.

  13. Studies in Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Shigeru; Zalar, Gregory L.; Kappas, Attallah

    1978-01-01

    A 50% reduction in the activity of uroporphyrinogen-I (URO) synthase in liver, erythrocytes, and cultured skin fibroblasts characterizes all patients with clinically active acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The same enzyme defect has also been demonstrated in the erythrocytes and skin fibroblasts of completely latent gene carriers of this disorder and presumably exists in the liver as well. In this study, we examined whether or not the formation of URO-synthase is impaired in AIP cells using lymphocytes treated with mitogens or infected with Epstein-Barr virus. Both mitogens (phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) and Epstein-Barr virus induced the synthesis of URO-synthase in lymphocytes, but the induction of URO-synthase in AIP lymphocytes was only 50% as compared with that in normal lymphocytes. The impaired induction of URO-synthase in AIP lymphocytes reflects a specific gene defect because AIP lymphocytes showed normal [3H] thymidine uptake into DNA, [3H] uridine uptake into RNA, and normal δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase, ALA-dehydratase, catalase activities, and heme content. Utilizing the same methodology, the ferrochelatase deficiency of hereditary erythropoietic protoporphyria could also be identified. The Km of the induced URO-synthase in AIP cells was identical to that of the enzyme in normal cells. The induced URO-synthase of mitogen-treated AIP lymphocytes was not accompanied by a concurrent enhanced level of ALA-synthase. Moreover, the URO-synthase deficiency in lymphocytes from actively ill AIP patients was not different from the level of enzyme activity when they were in clinical remission, or when compared with the enzyme activity of cells from completely latent AIP gene carriers. The results of this study indicate that the URO-synthase deficiency in AIP may be the result of a gene mutation regulating the rate of synthesis of a normal enzyme rather than a mutation causing a structural abnormality of this enzyme protein. PMID:621286

  14. Syncytium induction in primary CD4+ T-cell lines from normal donors by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates with non-syncytium-inducing genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, B J; Kedar, P; Pope, J H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates classified as syncytium-inducing (SI) or non-SI (NSI) in the MT-2 T-cell line exhibit characteristic sequence differences in the V1-V2 and V3 regions of the env gene. Seven HIV-1 isolates were phenotyped as NSI or SI in the MT-2 cell line. Unexpectedly, all four NSI viruses induced large syncytia 4 to 8 days postinoculation in a panel of five primary CD4+ T-cell lines (including two clones) generated from the peripheral blood of normal donors by exposure to infectious HIV-1, inactivated HIV-1, or Epstein-Barr virus. The primary T-cell lines yielded neither HIV-1 provirus nor infectious HIV by PCR analysis or exhaustive coculture with phytohemagglutinin-treated blast cells. Three isolates (TC354, PK1, and PK2) were biologically cloned and retained their SI or NSI phenotypes in MT-2 and primary T-cell lines. The biologically cloned provirus DNA was also used to clone and sequence the relevant V2 and V3 regions of the env genes. The amino acid sequences of the V2 and V3 regions were characteristic of patterns already reported for the NSI, switch NSI, and SI phenotypes, respectively. This evidence precludes the possibility that these results were due to contamination of the NSI isolates with SI virus. The results unequivocally indicate that HIV-1 isolates with the NSI genotype and phenotype in MT-2 cells may actively induce syncytia in cloned CD4+ T cells in vitro and support the view that direct cytopathic effects may contribute to the steady decline in CD4+ T cells in asymptomatic HIV-1-seropositive patients without detectable SI virus. PMID:7474129

  15. No evidence for a trade-off between reproductive investment and immunity in a rodent.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Chao; Yang, Deng-Bao; Wang, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Life history theory assumes there are trade-offs between competing functions such as reproduction and immunity. Although well studied in birds, studies of the trade-offs between reproduction and immunity in small mammals are scarce. Here we examined whether reduced immunity is a consequence of reproductive effort in lactating Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii). Specifically, we tested the effects of lactation on immune function (Experiment I). The results showed that food intake and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were higher in lactating voles (6≤ litter size ≤8) than that in non-reproductive voles. Contrary to our expectation, lactating voles also had higher levels of serum total Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) IgG and no change in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) response and anti-KLH Immunoglobulin M (IgM) compared with non-reproductive voles, suggesting improved rather than reduced immune function. To further test the effect of differences in reproductive investment on immunity, we compared the responses between natural large (n≥8) and small litter size (n≤6) (Experiment II) and manipulated large (11-13) and small litter size (2-3) (Experiment III). During peak lactation, acquired immunity (PHA response, anti-KLH IgG and anti-KLH IgM) was not significantly different between voles raising large or small litters in both experiments, despite the measured difference in reproductive investment (greater litter size, litter mass, RMR and food intake in the voles raising larger litters). Total IgG was higher in voles with natural large litter size than those with natural small litter size, but decreased in the enlarged litter size group compared with control and reduced group. Our results showed that immune function is not suppressed to compensate the high energy demands during lactation in Brandt's voles and contrasting the situation in birds, is unlikely to be an important aspect mediating the trade-off between reproduction and

  16. Immunomodulating effects of intestinal absorbed maternal colostral leukocytes by neonatal pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P P

    1993-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled maternal colostral leukocytes (FITC-CL) was studied in 49 neonatal colostrum-deprived (CD) pigs from nine Minnesota miniature sows. Within 2 h postfeeding (pf), maternal FITC-CL were absorbed from the sibling's digestive tract and migrated into blood. The peak appearance of FITC-CL in blood occurred in samples at 5 and 7 h pf. By 24 h pf, cells were detected in liver, lung, lymph nodes, spleen and gastrointestinal tissues. To confirm intercellular migration of FITC-CL, gastrointestinal explant cultures from neonatal CD pigs were used. Maternal FITC-CL were observed to intercellularly migrate in 24 to 48 h pf between duodenal- and jejunal-epithelial cells to lamina propria cells and submucosal spaces. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled maternal colostral leukocytes were not absorbed via ileal explant cultures. Unlike FITC-CL, maternal FITC-peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (FITC-PBL) were not absorbed either in vivo or in vitro by gastrointestinal tissues. When maternal FITC-PBL were intravenously administered to siblings they were distributed in blood and organs similar to FITC-CL. Following exposure to FITC-labelled cells, treated- and mock (untreated)-pigs were compared on the basis of PBL proliferative responses to phytomitogens. Sibling CD-pigs fed maternal FITC-CL showed higher PBL T-cell responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (ConA), and a significant stimulation (p < or = 0.01) of B-cell responses to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Pigs fed FITC-PBL showed little PBL responses to PHA, ConA and PWM over PBL from mock pigs. Similarly, the influence of noncellular constituents of colostrum were also assessed by proliferative studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. PMID:8431798

  17. Multivariate heredity of melanin-based coloration, body mass and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-Y; Fargallo, J A; Vergara, P; Martínez-Padilla, J

    2013-08-01

    The genetic covariation among different traits may cause the appearance of correlated response to selection on multivariate phenotypes. Genes responsible for the expression of melanin-based color traits are also involved in other important physiological functions such as immunity and metabolism by pleiotropy, suggesting the possibility of multivariate evolution. However, little is known about the relationship between melanin coloration and these functions at the additive genetic level in wild vertebrates. From a multivariate perspective, we simultaneously explored inheritance and selection of melanin coloration, body mass and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-mediated immune response by using long-term data over an 18-year period collected in a wild population of the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus. Pedigree-based quantitative genetic analyses showed negative genetic covariance between melanin-based coloration and body mass in male adults and positive genetic covariance between body mass and PHA-mediated immune response in fledglings as predicted by pleiotropic effects of melanocortin receptor activity. Multiple selection analyses showed an increased fitness in male adults with intermediate phenotypic values for melanin color and body mass. In male fledglings, there was evidence for a disruptive selection on rump gray color, but a stabilizing selection on PHA-mediated immune response. Our results provide an insight into the evolution of multivariate traits genetically related with melanin-based coloration. The differences in multivariate inheritance and selection between male and female kestrels might have resulted in sexual dimorphism in size and color. When pleiotropic effects are present, coloration can evolve through a complex pathway involving correlated response to selection on multivariate traits.

  18. Defective immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hoffman, P M; Pryjma, J; Hogan, E L; Fudenberg, H H

    1980-11-01

    Imbalances in T cell subpopulations have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS). In the present study of 31 MS patients, the percentage of T cells with Fc receptors for IgG (Tg) was found to be increased in patients with chronic progressive disease, and another T cell subset binding to the Raji B lymphoid cell line was decreased. An inverse correlation (r = -0.675; < 95% confidence limit) was found between these two subsets, suggesting that they vary inversely in MS. The mitogenic responses of MS mononuclear cells, isolated T cells, and recombinet T and non-T cells to the lectins phytohemagglutinin and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) did not differ from those of normal cells. However, more immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells were generated in a PWM-driven system with cells from MS patients than with cells from age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Autologous recombination of separated T and non-T cells did not significantly modify these results. T cells from MS patients added to B cells from normal controls exerted an effect that was related to their percentage of Tg cells; that is, values above 15% were associated with a suppression of Ig production, whereas for Tg values below 12%, a helper effect or no modification was observed. These results suggest that changes in T cell subsets in MS are related to changes in functional ability to modulate Ig production by normal B cells. However, MS B cells partly escape regulation by their own T cells, suggesting an associated B cell hyperactivity. PMID:7436394

  19. Synthesis, crystal structure and biological activities of a novel amidrazone derivative and its copper(II) complex--a potential antitumor drug.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Liliana; Modzelewska-Banachiewicz, Bożena; Paprocka, Renata; Zimecki, Michał; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E; Kutkowska, Jolanta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna

    2012-09-01

    A new linear amidrazone derivative, 6-acetyl-cyclohex-3-enecarboxylic acid [1-pyridin-2-yl-1-(pyridyn-2-yloamin)meth-(Z)-ylidene] hydrazide, H(2)L (2) and its Cu(II) complex, [Cu(2)L(2)]·4H(2)O (3) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Compound 2 was synthesized in the equimolar reaction of N(3)-substituted amidrazone with cis-1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalic anhydride. The Cu complex of 2 was obtained in the reaction with copper(II) acetate. The molecular structures of 2 and 3 were determined by X-ray crystallography. The parent ligand exists in its amide-hydrazone form in the solid state. The central amidrazone moiety has a Z configuration with respect to the double C=N bond. Coordination to the metal center promotes Z/E isomerization of the hydrazone group of the ligand. Compound 3 is a dinuclear four-coordinated Cu(II) complex with the amidrazone ligand behaving as a tetradentate double deprotonated chelating one. Several biological activities of 2 and 3 were examined in vitro; they were: antimicrobial properties against selected bacterial and fungal strains, suppression of phytohemagglutinin A (PHA)-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and their effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production. The cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) complex was determined with respect to the four carcinoma cell lines (SW 984, CX-1, L-1210, A-431). The studied complex exhibited significant cytotoxic effects (particularly against CX-1 colon carcinoma), comparable to those reported for cisplatin. Both compounds have shown a relatively low antibacterial activity and were devoid of antifungal properties.

  20. beta. -endorphin modulation of mitogen-stimulated calcium uptake by rat thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.; Bidlack, J.M.

    1987-10-19

    Lymphocytes stimulated by mitogens or antigens exhibit an enhanced calcium uptake early in the proliferation or activation response. Modulation of this calcium uptake results in alterations of proliferation and immunocompetence. ..beta..-endorphin and other opioids affect several parameters of lymphocyte competence. Limited data are available concerning the mechanism(s) of these effects. This study examines whether a possible opioid mechanism is the modification of the early calcium influx into stimulated lymphocytes. The time course of both concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into thymocytes was characterized to determine the optimal time for testing the effects of opioids. BETA-Endorphin 1-31 significantly enhanced Con A-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into rat thymocytes. This peptide had no significant effect on PHA-simulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake or on basal thymocyte /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ flux. The ..beta../sub h/-endorphin stimulatory effect was titratable in the range of 0.1 nM to 10 ..mu..M. Naloxone did not reverse the enhancement. Met-enkephalinamide and other opioid agonists did not duplicate the stimulatory effect. Thus, the ..beta../sub h/-endorphin 1-31 enhancement of Con A-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake by rat thymocytes does not operate via classical opioid receptor mechanisms. ..beta../sub h/-endorphin 1-31 appears to be acting on a subset of T cells that are responsive to Con A but not to PHA. 30 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Modulatory effects of dietary beta-carotene on blood and mammary leukocyte function in periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Michal, J J; Heirman, L R; Wong, T S; Chew, B P; Frigg, M; Volker, L

    1994-05-01

    Beginning 4 wk prior to predicted calving, 14 Holstein cows per treatment were fed diets 1) unsupplemented (control) or supplemented daily with 2) 300 mg of beta-carotene, 3) 600 mg of beta-carotene, or 4) 120,000 IU of vitamin A. Blood was collected around calving on wk -4, -2, -1, 0 (within 24 h postcalving), 1, 2, and 4 for isolation of lymphocytes and neutrophils and for the analysis of plasma vitamins. Lacteal secretions were collected on wk 0, 1, 2, and 4 for the isolation of phagocytes. Cows supplemented with 600 mg of beta-carotene had higher concentrations of plasma beta-carotene and retinol than did unsupplemented cows. Supplemental vitamin A increased plasma retinol on wk 4 and decreased plasma beta-carotene on wk -1 and 0. Treatment did not affect concentrations of plasma alpha-tocopherol. Blood lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen during the peripartum period was higher in cows supplemented with beta-carotene than in unsupplemented controls. Phagocytic activity of blood neutrophils was enhanced on wk 1 in cows fed 300 mg of beta-carotene. Intracellular killing by blood neutrophils was enhanced in cows supplemented with beta-carotene (wk 0) and vitamin A (wk 0 and 1). Iodine uptake and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by blood neutrophils was stimulated in cows supplemented with beta-carotene. Phagocytic activity, iodine uptake, and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by mammary phagocytes from all cows generally were lower postpartum than on the day of calving. The incidence of retained placenta and metritis was higher for unsupplemented cows than for cows supplemented with beta-carotene. Therefore, dietary beta-carotene can elevate peripartum concentrations of blood beta-carotene, enhance host defense mechanisms by potentiating lymphocyte and phagocyte function, and decrease the incidence of certain reproductive disorders.

  2. T-cell abnormalities after mediastinal irradiation for lung cancer. The in vitro influence of synthetic thymosin alpha-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schulof, R.S.; Chorba, T.L.; Cleary, P.A.; Palaszynski, S.R.; Alabaster, O.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1985-03-01

    The effects of mediastinal irradiation (RT) on the numbers and functions of purified peripheral blood T-lymphocytes from patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were evaluated. The patients were candidates for a randomized trial to evaluate the immunorestorative properties of synthetic thymosin alpha-1. Twenty-one patients studied before RT did not exhibit any significant difference in T-cell numbers or function compared to age-matched healthy subjects. However, 41 patients studied within 1 week after completing RT exhibited significant depressions of E-rosette-forming cells at 4 degrees C (E4 degrees-RFC)/mm3, E-rosette-forming cells at 29 degrees C (E29 degrees-RFC)/mm3, OKT3/mm3, OKT4/mm3, and OKT8/mm3 (P . 0.0001); total T-cell percentages (%OKT3, P . 0.01); and T-cell proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLR) (P . 0.01) and to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin under suboptimal conditions (P less than or equal to 0.03). Nine patients studied before and after RT showed a significant increase in OKT4/OKT8 (P . 0.01) following RT. A short-term in vitro incubation with thymosin alpha-1 could enhance MLR of T-cells in 12 of 27 patients with post-RT abnormalities. In 13 patients who were treated with placebo, the RT-induced depression of T-cell numbers and function persisted for at least 3 to 4 months. In addition, in 12 patients progressive decreases developed in %E4 degrees-RFC, %OKT3, %OKT4, and OKT4/OKT8, which always preceded clinical relapse.

  3. Zinc repletion with organic or inorganic forms of zinc and protein turnover in marginally zinc-deficient calves.

    PubMed

    Engle, T E; Nockels, C F; Kimberling, C V; Weaber, D L; Johnson, A B

    1997-11-01

    We conducted two experiments using marginally Zn-deficient (-Zn) calves to determine which supplemental chemical form of Zn would most rapidly reverse certain Zn deficiency signs and to determine whether a change in protein turnover had occurred in Zn deficiency. In Exp. 1, 40 crossbred beef heifers were allocated by BW to four groups. The control group received 23 mg Zn/kg diet DM from ZnSO4 supplemented to the -Zn diet (17 mg Zn/kg diet DM). The three other groups received the -Zn diet. After 21 d, based on a decreased (P < .05) feed efficiency, they were deemed -Zn. Cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was reduced (P < .05) but plasma and liver Zn were unaffected in the -Zn calves. Zinc was repleted by feeding iso-Zn amounts (23 mg Zn/kg diet DM) from Zn lysine, Zn methionine, or ZnSO4. At 8 h after injection of PHA, control CMI response values were similar to Zn Methionine, and Zn lysine was lower (P < .05). In Exp. 2, 10 Holstein steers were allocated by BW to two groups. One group received the -Zn diet, and the other received the +Zn diet. Urine collections were obtained from both groups of calves when the -Zn calves showed a decrease (P < .05) in feed efficiency relative to the controls and when they were repleted with 23 mg Zn/kg diet DM from ZnSO4 and their feed efficiency had returned to that of the controls. Urinary 3-methylhistidine indicated that -Zn calves had less (P < .05) daily protein degradation than the controls. Refeeding Zn to the -Zn group did not change BW or daily protein degradation. Results indicated that a marginal Zn deficiency decreased fractional accretion rate, increased (P < .05) urine excretion, and tended to increase (P < .19) Na and decrease (P < .12) K concentrations in the urine.

  4. Behavioral/Lifestyle and Immunologic Factors Associated with HPV Infection among Women Older Than 45 Years

    PubMed Central

    González, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Porras, Carolina; Wacholder, Sholom; Piñeres, Alfonso García; Pinto, Ligia A.; Burk, Robert D.; Herrero, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) detection increases after menopause, but its determinants need clarification. Methods In a case–control study nested within a 10,049 women cohort, we evaluated women 45 to 75 years old who acquired HPV infection and were HPV positive 5 to 6 years after enrollment (N = 252), and HPV-negative women as matched controls (N = 265). Detailed sexual behavior and cellular immune response were investigated. Odds ratios (OR) and attributable fractions were estimated. Results Women with 2+ lifetime partners had 1.7-fold (95% CI = 1.1–2.7) higher risk than monogamous women, with similar findings if their partners had other partners. Women with 2+ partners after last HPV-negative result had the highest risk (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2–12.4 compared with 0–1 partners). Weaker immune response to HPV-16 virus-like particles increased risk (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.1–2.7 comparing lowest to highest tertile). Among women with no sexual activity in the period before HPV appearance, reduced immune response to phytohemagglutinin was the only determinant (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 0.94–8.8). Twenty-one percent of infections were explained by recent sexual behavior, 21% by past sexual behavior, and 12% by reduced immune response. Conclusions New infections among older women may result from sexual activity of women and/or their partners or reappearance of past (latent) infections possibly related to weakened immune response. Impact HPV infections among older women are associated with current and past sexual exposures and possibly with immune senescence. The risk of cancer from these infections is likely to be low but could not be fully evaluated in the context of this study. PMID:20952561

  5. Immunologic effects of nickel. 1. Suppression of cellular and humoral immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Rogers, R.R.; Riddle, M.M.; Stott, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    The effects of nickel chloride on the cellular and humoral immune responses of mice were studied. A single intramuscular injection of nickel chloride (18.3 mg/kg) caused a significant involution of the thymus within 2 days following treatment. Significant reductions in the in vitro mitogen-stimulated response of lymphocytes from nickel chloride-treated mice (24 hr following a single injection of 18.3 or 36.6 mg/kg) were observed for the T-cell mitogens phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), and the B- and T-cell mitogen pokeweed mitogen (PWM) but not the B-cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Theta-positive but not Ig-positive spleen cells were significantly reduced in nickel-treated mice compared with controls. Significant suppression of the primary antibody response to the T-cell dependent antigen sheep red blood cells was observed following a single injection of 18.3 mg/kg NiCl/sub 2/. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly suppressed following a single injection of 18.3 mg/kg NiCl/sub 2/. The administration of NiCl/sub 2/ (18.3 mg/kg) also decreased the amount of endotoxin required to kill 50% of treated mice, although this was not statistically significant. In all cases the immunosuppressive effects of NiCl/sub 2/ were found to be transient with responses returning to normal within a few days. No alteration in the response of mice immunized with the T-cell independent antigen polyvinylpyrrolidone was observed following treatment with nickel. Furthermore, the phagocytic capacity of resident peritoneal macrophages from nickel-treated mice was not significantly different from saline-injected mice. The results indicate that NiCl/sub 2/ predominantly affects T-cell mediated immune responses and natural killer cells.

  6. A lectin gene encodes the alpha-amylase inhibitor of the common bean.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-01-01

    An alpha-amylase inhibitor that inhibits insect and mammalian alpha-amylases but not plant alpha-amylases, is present in seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). We have purified the alpha-amylase inhibitor by using a selective heat treatment in acidic medium and affinity chromatography with porcine pancreas alpha-amylase coupled to agarose. Under sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, the purified inhibitor gave rise to five bands with mobilities corresponding to molecular masses ranging from 14 to 19 kDa. N-terminal sequencing (up to 15 amino acids) of the polypeptides obtained from these bands resulted in only two different sequences matching two stretches of the amino acid sequence deduced from an already described lectin gene [Hoffman, L. M. (1984) J. Mol. Appl. Gen. 2,447-453]. This gene is different from but closely related to the genes that code for phytohemagglutinin, the major lectin of bean. Further evidence based on amino acid composition, identification of a precursor, and recognition of the product of the gene (expressed in Escherichia coli) by an anti-alpha-amylase inhibitor serum confirms that the inhibitor is encoded by this or a closely related lectin gene. This finding assigns a biological function, which has been described at the molecular level, to a plant lectin gene product and supports the defense role postulated for seed lectins. The lack of homology with other families of enzyme inhibitors suggests that this may be the first member of a new family of plant enzyme inhibitors. Images PMID:2682631

  7. Suppression of adult T cell leukemia-derived factor/human thioredoxin induction by FK506 and cyclosporin A: a new mechanism of immune modulation via redox control.

    PubMed

    Furuke, K; Nakamura, H; Hori, T; Iwata, S; Maekawa, N; Inamoto, T; Yamaoka, Y; Yodoi, J

    1995-06-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-derived factor (ADF), which is identical to a disulfide reducing enzyme human thioredoxin (TRX), is produced and released by activated or virus-infected lymphocytes. Here we report that, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), ADF/TRX mRNA was induced within 8 h after stimulation as detected by in situ hybridization study. To analyze the mechanism of ADF/TRX induction during T cell activation, the effects of immunosuppressants including FK506, rapamycin (Rap) and cyclosporin A (CsA) on ADF/TRX expression were investigated by immunoblot analysis. ADF/TRX induction in PBMC by PHA, Con A or OKT3 mAb was almost completely suppressed by FK506. Whereas CsA also inhibited ADF/TRX expression in OKT3 mAb-stimulated PBMC, Rap failed to affect it in spite of exhibiting growth inhibition. In addition, exogenous IL-2 could not increase ADF/TRX production in FK506-treated PBMC or in PHA blasts. These results indicate that ADF/TRX induction in T cell activation depends on calcineurin-dependent events in the early phase and that IL-2 production is not directly involved in ADF/TRX induction. Furthermore, when recombinant ADF (rADF) was added to a culture of PBMC 1 h before the addition of PHA and FK506, the action of FK506 was partially reversed as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation and viable cell counts. These results suggest that ADF/TRX produced and released from PBMC may be a crucial event in lymphocyte activation, and that FK506 and CsA may exert the immune suppression partly through inhibiting the induction of the endogenous reducing factor ADF/TRX. PMID:7577807

  8. Interleukin 2 secretion by lectin-activated human blood lymphocytes is markedly augmented by vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guinan, E.C.; Pober, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Since the initial interaction (and possible activation) of a blood borne T lymphocyte involves contact with the endothelial lining of the vasculature at the site of an immune response, the authors have examined the effect of cultured human endothelial cells (HEC) upon polyclonal T cell activation. Addition of 10/sup 4/ HEC to 10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/ peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA, 0.3-10 ..mu..g/ml) leads to marked augmentation of interleukin 2 (IL-2) production. The relative increase in IL-2 (mean of 3 expts. +/- SEM) is present at 24 h (5.8 fold +/- 1.5) and become more marked at 48 h (12.6 fold +/- 3.5) and 72 h (18.5 fold +/- 3.7). This relative enhancement is greater for HEC added to 10/sup 4/ than 10/sup 5/ PBL and is also greater when 10/sup 4/ rather than 2 x 10/sup 3/ HEC are added to a given number of PBL. This increased IL-2 concentration has two biological consequences. First, at suboptimal PHA doses or at low PBL number, PBL proliferation as measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation is increased up to two fold. Second, the phenotype of the proliferating cells appears altered, including a decrease in mean density of IL-2 receptor. The authors hypothesize that such modulation of the concentration of locally produced IL-2 may play a key role in the nature of an immune response, influencing both its magnitude and the functional profile of the activated and amplified effector cells.

  9. Enhanced DNA repair, immune function and reduced toxicity of C-MED-100, a novel aqueous extract from Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Y; Bryngelsson, C; Pero, R W

    2000-02-01

    Female W/Fu rats were gavaged daily with a water-soluble extract (C-MED-100) of Uncaria tomentosa supplied commercially by CampaMed at the doses of 0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg for 8 consecutive weeks. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated lymphocyte proliferation was significantly increased in splenocytes of rats treated at the doses of 40 and 80 mg/kg. White blood cells (WBC) from the C-MED-100 treatment groups of 40 and 80 mg/kg for 8 weeks or 160 mg/kg for 4 weeks were significantly elevated compared with controls (P < 0.05). In a human volunteer study, C-MED-100 was given daily at 5 mg/kg for 6 consecutive weeks to four healthy adult males. No toxicity was observed and again, WBC were significantly elevated (P < 0.05) after supplement. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) 3 h after 12 Gy whole body irradiation of rats were also significantly improved in C-MED-100 treated animals (P < 0.05). The LD50 and MTD of a single oral dose of C-MED-100 in the rat were observed to be greater than 8 g/kg. Although the rats were treated daily with U. tomentosa extracts at the doses of 10-80 mg/kg for 8 weeks or 160 mg/kg for 4 weeks, no acute or chronic toxicity signs were observed symptomatically. In addition, no body weight, food consumption, organ weight and kidney, liver, spleen, and heart pathological changes were found to be associated with C-MED-100 treatment.

  10. Application of cytogenetic endpoints and Comet assay on human lymphocytes treated with vincristine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopjar, N; Garaj-Vrhovac, V

    2000-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of vincristine is assessed on human peripheral blood lymphocytes following administration of the drug at a dose 0.0875 microg/ml by use of single cell gel electrophoresis - Comet assay (SCGE), analysis of structural chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus assay (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. In vitro treatment of human lymphocytes with vincristine was performed on cells in G0 phase, as well on lymphocyte cultures 24 hours after stimulation with mitogen phytohemagglutinine. For the Comet assay at 24, 48 and 72 h the treated cells were embedded in agarose on slides, lysed with alkaline lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. DNA migrated within the agarose and formed comets whose length depends on the amount of DNA damage. For the analysis of structural CA cells were grown on F-10 medium for 48 hours, and for MN and SCE analysis for 72 hours. The results on SCGE showed an increase in tail length compared to control both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. The amount of DNA damage was higher in cells treated with vincristine 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Administered concentration of drug caused total inhibition of lymphocytes growth in 72-h cultures for MN and SCE analysis indicating strong microtubule distruptive effects of vincristine. Analysis of structural CA reveals chromatid breaks and acentric fragments as the main aberration types both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Number of these aberrations was higher in cells treated in G0 phase. Results obtained in this study by use of different cytogenetic endpoints confirmed that vincristine exhibits both aneugenic and clastogenic effects on human lymphocytes. PMID:11043839

  11. In Vitro Effects of Sodium Benzoate on Th1/Th2 Deviation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, N; Amirghofran, Z; Nikseresht, A; Ashjazade, N; Zoghi, S; Tahvili, S; Kamali-Sarvestani, E

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can improve the clinical manifestations in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sodium benzoate (NaB) deviates the cytokine profile to Th2 (or IL-4 producing) cells in EAE and thus might be effective in the treatment of MS. Therefore, in this study the effect of different concentrations of NaB on the percentage and mRNA levels of IL-4 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-producing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 20 Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients and eight healthy controls was evaluated in the presence of mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) or specific antigen (myelin basic protein, MBP). Our results showed that in the patient's group the percentage of CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells was significantly increased in the presence of all concentrations of NaB when PBMCs were stimulated by MBP (p = 0.001) or PHA (p < 0.03). The same results were obtained for normal donors in the highest concentration of NaB, 1000 µg/ml (p = 0.02). Moreover, in the patient's group the percentage of CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) cells was decreased significantly when the PBMCs were stimulated by PHA and NaB (p < 0.004) or by MBP and 1000 µg/ml of NaB (p < 0.03). The effect of NaB on IL-4 and IFN-γ production was also documented at the mRNA levels. In conclusion, our data suggest that NaB is able to induce IL-4 production by human PBMCs and therefore might be a useful candidate for conjunctive therapy in RR-MS.

  12. Expression of toll-like receptors on human rectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tchórzewski, Marcin; Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Dziki, Adam; Tchórzewski, Henryk

    2014-06-01

    The innate immune system uses Toll-like receptors (TLR) to detect the presence of pathogen patterns thus allowing for rapid host defense responses. Stimulation of TLR results in inflammatory response and regulatory cytokine production affecting acquired immunity. The aim of the study was an evaluation of TLR2 and TLR4 expression on the surface of human colon cancer cells in primary culture with or without autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Surgical specimens of colon cancer were processed to obtain cancer cells. Cancer cells separation was conducted first by mechanical tissue disintegration and than by gradient centrifugation to obtain 95 % cell confluence. By staining the isolated cells the pathologist determined them as adenocarcinoma. Colon cancer cells were then co-cultured in 24 h culture alone or together with autologous lymphocytes. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed for detection of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA in colon cancer and normal colon epithelial cells using commercially available primers. Resting as well as phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated cells were tested. Receptor proteins on cancer cells were examined by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 mRNA was detected in cancer cells. Autologous lymphocytes do not exert any effect on these receptors expression. TLR4 mRNA expression was not observed in normal colon epithelial cells. TLR2 mRNA was present on LPS stimulated cancer cells as well as on resting and stimulated lymphocytes. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor proteins on colon cancer cells were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. TLR4 may be responsible for uncontrolled tumor growth under LPS stimulation in human colon environment.

  13. Effects of globularifolin on cell survival, nuclear factor-κB activity, neopterin production, tryptophan breakdown and free radicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Hande; Becker, Kathrin; Gostner, Johanna M; Charehsaz, Mohammad; Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Schennach, Harald; Aydin, Ahmet; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of globularifolin, an acylated iridoid glucoside, on cell survival, inflammation markers and free radicals scavenging were investigated. Viability assay on human myelomomonocytic cell line THP-1 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using the Cell-Titer Blue assay proved that globularifolin had no toxic effect at the tested concentrations. Conversely, it is proportional to the dose globularifolin increased growth of THP-1 cells (p <0.01). On human PBMC, globularifolin at 6.25 and 12.5 μM concentrations showed a stimulatory effect, while at 12.5-200 μM it suppressed response of PBMC to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Globularifolin (50-200 μM) enhanced neopterin formation dose-dependently, whereas tryptophan breakdown was not influenced. At 50-200 μM in unstimulated PBMC in THP-1 cells, globularifolin induced a significant expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) as was quantified by Quanti-Blue assay. By contrast, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells, the higher concentrations of globularifolin suppressed NF-κB expression dose-dependently and a significant decrease was observed at 200 μM concentration. A positive correlation was found between increased neopterin and NF-κB activity (p <0.01). Similarly, a positive correlation was observed between neopterin levels in mitogen-induced cells and NF-κB activity in LPS-stimulated cells after treatment with globularifolin (p=0.001). The free radical scavenging capacity of globularifolin evaluated by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay showed relative ORAC values of 0.36±0.05 μmol Trolox equivalent/μmol. All together, results show that natural antioxidant globularifolin might represent a potential immunomodulatory as well as proliferative agent, which deserves further in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:24185011

  14. Experimental exposure of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) to seeds coated with imidacloprid, thiram and difenoconazole.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Antia, Ana; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Mougeot, François; Mateo, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide coated seeds are commonly used in agriculture, and may be an important source of food for some birds in times of scarcity, as well as a route of pesticide ingestion. We tested the lethal and sub-lethal effects of treated seed ingestion by the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa), a game bird of high socio-economic value in Spain. One year-old partridges (n = 42 pairs) were fed for 10 days in spring (prior to breeding) with wheat treated with difenoconazole (fungicide), thiram (fungicide) or imidacloprid (insecticide), using two doses for each pesticide (the one recommended, and its double to represent potential cases of abuse of pesticides). We investigated the direct and indirect effects on the body condition, physiology, immunology, coloration and subsequent reproduction of exposed partridges. For the latter, eggs were collected, measured and incubated and the growth and survival of chicks were monitored. Thiram and imidacloprid at high exposure doses produced mortalities of 41.6 and 58.3 %, respectively. The first death was observed at day 3 for imidacloprid and at day 7 for thiram. Both doses of the three pesticides caused sublethal effects, such as altered biochemical parameters, oxidative stress and reduced carotenoid-based coloration. The high exposure doses of imidacloprid and thiram also produced a decrease in cellular immune response measured by the phytohemagglutinin test in males. Bearing in mind the limitation of the small number of surviving pairs in some treatments, we found that the three pesticides reduced the size of eggs and imidacloprid and difenoconazole also reduced the fertilization rate. In addition, both thiram and imidacloprid reduced chick survival. These experiments highlight that the toxicity of pesticide-treated seeds is a factor to consider in the decline of birds in agricultural environments.

  15. The PHA Test Reflects Acquired T-Cell Mediated Immunocompetence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Lemus, Jesús A.; Carrete, Martina; Blanco, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Background cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. Methodology Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD5+ and CD8+) and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. Principal Findings Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. Conclusions/Significance These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host-parasite interactions. PMID:18820730

  16. Decreased lymphocyte responses in free-ranging bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are associated with increased concentrations of PCBs and DDT in peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Lahvis, G P; Wells, R S; Kuehl, D W; Stewart, J L; Rhinehart, H L; Via, C S

    1995-01-01

    Since 1987, large-scale mortalities of dolphins have been reported along the Atlantic coast of North America, in the Gulf of Mexico, and in the Mediterranean Sea. Autopsied bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, which were collected from the large-scale mortality along the Atlantic coast in 1987 to 1988, exhibited opportunistic infections indicative of immune dysfunction. Further, these animals had high levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as PCBs and DDT, that can suppress immune functions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between chemical contaminant exposure and immune response in free-ranging dolphins. In June of 1991, peripheral blood was obtained from members of a bottlenose dolphin population that resides along the west coast of Florida. Peripheral blood lymphocyte responses to Concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were determined in vitro and compared by regression analysis with contaminant concentrations in whole blood from a small subset of these animals (n = 5). These data indicate that a reduced immune response in these bottlenose dolphins was correlated with increasing whole blood concentrations of several contaminants. Specifically, inverse correlations were found between Con A-induced lymphocyte proliferation and tetrachlorinated to octachlorinated biphenyls (r2 values ranged from 0.70 to 0.87). Con A-induced lymphocyte responses also correlated inversely with p,p'DDT (r2 values of 0.73 and 0.79); o.p'-DDE (r2 values of 0.93 and 0.96); and p,p'-DDE (r2 values of 0.73 and 0.81). PMID:7556026

  17. A study of zearalenone cytotoxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vlata, Zaxarenia; Porichis, Filippos; Tzanakakis, George; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Krambovitis, Elias

    2006-09-10

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is a common contaminant of all major cereal grains worldwide with estrogenic and anabolic activity. We investigated the in vitro cytopathic effects of ZEA on freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in relation to proliferation and cell death patterns of untreated and mitogen-activated cells. The higher concentration of 30microg/ml ZEA was found to totally inhibit T and B lymphocyte proliferation from the stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen. The inhibitory effects of ZEA were further related to cell necrosis/apoptosis. Flow cytometry analysis showed a distinct necrotic effect on PBMC, irrespective of mitogen stimulation, whereas apoptotic activity was less evident. Necrosis was observed in both the lymphocyte and monocyte/granulocyte gates. Measurements of ZEA-induced intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) mobilization showed an increase of both Ca(2+) levels and the number of cells with high Ca(2+) only in the monocyte/granulocyte gated cells. Using phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, and ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl), a lysosomal inhibitor, both associated with cell necrosis inhibition, we showed that PMSF at 0.05mM and NH(4)Cl at 1 and 10mM reduced the cytopathic effects induced by 30microg/ml ZEA, whereas apoptosis was less affected. Expose of PBMC to 1microg/ml ZEA did not alter the viability of the cells. Our results suggest that high ZEA concentrations in the blood may well exert cytotoxic effects that merit further investigation.

  18. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  19. In vitro ozone exposure inhibits mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Jordan, R.L.; Orlando, G.S.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells were exposed to ozone in vitro and thereafter analyzed for competence in mitogen-induced proliferation as well as IL-1 and IL-2 production. Proliferative responses induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were all depressed in lymphocytes exposed to an ozone concentration of 1 ppm for 4-6 h. The response to PWM was most sensitive to the ozone effect (38% suppression); responses to Con A and PHA were suppressed to a lesser extent, 23% and 18%, respectively, and were not significantly different from each other. PWM responses were affected at an ozone concentration as low as 0.1 ppm; however, no suppression of Con A-induced proliferation was seen below 0.18 ppm or of PHA-induced proliferation below 0.5 ppm. When lymphocytes and monocytes were exposed separately to ozone and then mixed back with control air-exposed monocytes or lymphocytes, both cell types appeared to be affected and the functional defects caused by the pollutant were additive. Monocyte IL-1 production induced by endotoxin was not affected by ozone exposure, while surface expression of HLA-DR on exposed monocytes was reduced by 40% 24 h after exposure. Moreover, lymphocytes exposed to ozone produced 46% less IL-2 while expressing similar surface density of IL-2 receptors. Taken together, these results show that exposure to ozone has distinct adverse effects on lymphocytes and monocytes, both of which are important in local immune defenses in the lung.

  20. Immune status of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Neelam; Alter, Blanche P; Penrose, Keri; Falk, Roni T; Pan, Yuanji; Savage, Sharon A; Williams, Marcus; Kemp, Troy J; Pinto, Ligia A

    2015-01-01

    Immune function abnormalities have been reported in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and, rarely, in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), but large systematic studies are lacking. We assessed immunological parameters in 118 patients with these syndromes and 202 unaffected relatives. We compared results in patients with reference values, and with values in relatives after adjusting for age, sex, corticosteroid-treatment and severe bone marrow failure (BMF). Adult patients (≥18 years) with FA had significantly lower immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM), total lymphocytes and CD4 T-cells than reference values or adult relatives (p<0.001); children with FA had normal values. Both children and adults with FA had lower B- and NK-cells (p<0.01) than relatives or reference values. Patients with DC had essentially normal immunoglobulins but lower total lymphocytes than reference values or relatives, and lower T-, B- and NK-cells; these changes were more marked in children than adults (p<0.01). Most patients with DBA and SDS had normal immunoglobulins and lymphocytes. Lymphoproliferative responses, serum cytokine levels, including TNF-α and IFN-γ, and cytokine levels in supernatants from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures were similar across patient groups and relatives. Only patients with severe BMF, particularly those with FA and DC, had higher serum G-CSF and Flt3-ligand and lower RANTES levels compared with all other groups or relatives (p<0.05). Overall, immune function abnormalities were seen mainly in adult patients with FA, which likely reflects their disease-related progression, and in children with DC, which may be a feature of early-onset severe disease phenotype. PMID:25963299

  1. Impact of lithium alone and in combination with antidepressants on cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petersein, Charlotte; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Schmidt, Frank M; Lichtblau, Nicole; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important psychopharmacological agent for the treatment of unipolar as well as bipolar affective disorders. Lithium has a number of side effects such as hypothyroidism and aggravation of psoriasis. On the other hand, lithium has pro-inflammatory effects, which appear beneficial in some disorders associated with immunological deficits, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, immunological characteristics of lithium may be an important consideration in individualized therapeutic decisions. We measured the levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-22, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the stimulated blood of thirty healthy subjects supplemented with lithium alone, the antidepressants citalopram, escitalopram or mirtazapine alone, the combination of each antidepressant with lithium, and a no drug control. These drugs were tested under three blood stimulant conditions: murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 and the 5C3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3/5C3), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and unstimulated blood. Lithium, alone and in combination with any of the tested antidepressants, led to a consistent increase of IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the unstimulated as well as the stimulated blood. In the OKT3/5C3- and PHA-stimulated blood, IL-17 production was significantly enhanced by lithium. Lithium additionally increased IL-2 concentrations significantly in PHA-stimulated blood. The data support the view that lithium has pro-inflammatory properties. These immunological characteristics may contribute to side effects of lithium, but may also explain its beneficial effects in patients suffering from HIV infection or SLE. PMID:25377522

  2. Secretion of an articular cartilage proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity by murine T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, G M; Sapolsky, A I; Malemud, C J

    1985-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is the hallmark of inflammatory arthritides. Enzymes elaborated by mononuclear cells infiltrating the synovium mediate, in part, the degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Since mononuclear cells are the dominant cell type found in chronic inflammatory synovitis, we investigated whether interaction of immune mononuclear cells with antigen initiated the synthesis and secretion of a proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. Proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity was monitored by the capacity of murine spleen cell conditioned medium to release [3H]serine/35SO4 incorporated into rabbit cartilage proteoglycan monomer fraction (A1D1), and by the relative change in specific viscosity of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer. The results demonstrated that both virgin and immune mononuclear cells spontaneously generated proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity and that cellular activation and proliferation induced by the antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin or the mitogen phytohemagglutinin was not required. Kinetic studies demonstrated stable release of the enzyme activity over 72 h. Cell separation studies showed that T lymphocytes, a thymoma line, and macrophages separately produced proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. The enzyme activity has been partially characterized and appears to belong to a class of neutral pH metal-dependent proteinases. These observations, the first to demonstrate that T lymphocytes secrete an enzyme capable of degrading cartilage proteoglycan, raise the possibility that this enzyme activity contributes to cartilage extracellular matrix destruction in vivo. Moreover, these data support the conclusion that production of this enzyme by T lymphocytes is independent of an antigen-specific stimulus. PMID:3897284

  3. A countermeasure to ameliorate immune dysfunction in in vitro simulated microgravity environment: role of cellularnucleotide nutrition.

    PubMed

    Hales, N W; Yamauchi, K; Alicea, A; Sundaresan, A; Pellis, N R; Kulkarni, A D

    2002-04-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that space travelers are immunosuppressed, presumably by microgravity environmental stresses, putting them at risk for adverse effects, such as opportunistic infections, poor wound healing, and cancer. The purpose of this study was to examine the role and mechanisms of nucleotide (NT) supplementation as a countermeasure to obviate immunosuppression during space travel. The in vitro rotary cell culture system, a bioreactor (BIO), was used to simulate the effect of microgravity and to isolate the neuroendocrine effects inherent to in vitro models. The splenocytes from normal mice were cultured in BIO and control tissue culture (TC) flasks with and without phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for mitogen assays. The culture medium was then supplemented with various concentrations of a nucleosides-nucleotides mixture (NS + NT), inosine, and uridine. Cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-3, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon (IFN)-gamma were measured from the supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the PHA-stimulated cultures the cellular proliferation in the BIO was significantly decreased as compared with the TC flask cells. BIO-cultured cells in the presence of NS + NT maintained mitogen responses similar to the control TC flask cells. The maintenance of the mitogen response in BIO was observed by the supplementation of uridine and not of inosine. These results are in agreement with our earlier results from unit gravity experiments that showed that pyrimidines are more effective in pleiogenic immunoprotection to hosts. Cytokines IL-1beta, IL-2, and IFN-gamma in the BIO supernatants of cells cultured in the presence of NS + NT had a significantly higher response than the control vessel. Thus, supplemental NT, especially pyrimidines, can confer immune protection and enhance cytokine responses during space travel.

  4. Lymphocyte-suppressing action of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in coronary artery disease patients with normal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders partially results from its anti-inflammatory action. No previous study has investigated the effect of any ACE inhibitor on lymphocyte cytokine release. In this study, we compared the effects of serum- and tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on systemic inflammation and lymphocyte secretory function in normotensive patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study included 134 patients with coronary artery disease who were randomized into one of three groups and treated with enalapril (20 mg/d, n = 47), perindopril (4 mg/d, n = 45) or placebo (n = 42), respectively. The control group included 40 age-, sex- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The plasma lipid profile, glucose metabolism markers, hsCRP and lymphocyte cytokine release were examined at the beginning of the study and after 30 and 90 days of treatment. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T cells released significantly more interleukin-2, interferon-γ and TNFα than the lymphocytes of control subjects. Neither enalapril nor perindopril treatment was associated with any significant changes in blood pressure. Perindopril treatment inhibited lymphocyte cytokine release and systemic inflammation, while the effect of enalapril was insignificant. Perindopril, and, to a lesser extent, enalapril, strongly reduced lymphocyte cytokine release in insulin-resistant but not insulin-sensitive subjects. Our results indicate that perindopril is superior to enalapril in producing lymphocyte-suppressing and systemic anti-inflammatory effects in normotensive coronary artery disease patients. These effects may contribute to a reduction in the vascular risk of this group of patients, particularly in those subjects who are resistant to insulin, when these patients are treated with tissue-type angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:22180357

  5. DNA-AP sites generation by Etoposide in whole blood cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Etoposide is currently one of the most commonly used antitumor drugs. The mechanisms of action proposed for its antitumor activity are based mainly on its interaction with topoisomerase II. Etoposide effects in transformed cells have been described previously. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of this drug in non-transformed whole blood cells, such as occurs as collateral damage induced by some chemotherapies. Methods To determine etoposide genotoxicity, we employed Comet assay in two alkaline versions. To evaluate single strand breaks and delay repair sites we use pH 12.3 conditions and pH >13 to evidence alkali labile sites. With the purpose to quantified apurinic or apyrimidine (AP) sites we employed a specific restriction enzyme. Etoposide effects were determined on whole blood cells cultured in absence or presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) treated during 2 and 24 hours of cultured. Results Alkaline (pH > 13) single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay experiments revealed etoposide-induced increases in DNA damage in phytohemaglutinine (PHA)-stimulated blood and non-stimulated blood cells. When the assay was performed at a less alkaline pH, 12.3, we observed DNA damage in PHA-stimulated blood cells consistent with the existence of alkali labile sites (ALSs). In an effort to elucidate the molecular events underlying this result, we applied exonuclease III (Exo III) in conjunction with a SCGE assay, enabling detection of DNA-AP sites along the genome. More DNA AP-sites were revealed by Exo III and ALSs were recognized by the SCGE assay only in the non-stimulated blood cells treated with etoposide. Conclusion Our results indicate that etoposide induces DNA damage specifically at DNA-AP sites in quiescent blood cells. This effect could be involved in the development of secondary malignancies associated with etoposide chemotherapy. PMID:19917085

  6. Growth and differentiation of circulating hemopoietic stem cells with atomic bomb irradiation-induced chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, T.; Honda, T.; Otake, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of atomic bomb irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells were studied cytogenetically using single colonies derived from hemopoietic progenitor cells. The subjects studied were 21 healthy atomic bomb survivors (10 males and 11 females) in the high dose exposure group (100+ rad) with a known high incidence (10% or more) of radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in their peripheral blood lymphocytes (stimulated with phytohemagglutinin), and 11 nonexposed healthy controls (5 males and 6 females). Colony formation by circulating granulocyte-macrophage (GM-CFC) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells was made by the methylcellulose method using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Chromosome specimens were prepared from single colonies by our micromethod. The total number of colonies analyzed in the exposed group was 131 for GM-CFC and 75 for BFU-E. Chromosome abnormalities were observed in 15 (11.5%) and 9 (12.0%) colonies, respectively. In the control group, the total number of colonies analyzed was 61 for GM-CFC and 41 for BFU-E. None of these colonies showed chromosome abnormalities. The difference in incidence of chromosome abnormalities was highly significant by an exact test; p = 0.003 for GM-CFC and 0.017 for BFU-E. The karyotypes of chromosome abnormalities obtained from the colonies in the exposed group were mostly translocations, but deletion and marker chromosomes were also observed. In two individuals, such karyotypic abnormalities as observed in the peripheral lymphocytes were also seen in the myeloid progenitor cells. This finding suggests that atomic bomb irradiation produced a chromosome aberration on multipotent hemopoietic stem cells common to myeloid and lymphoid lineages.

  7. The Immunosuppressive Activity of Amniotic Membrane Mesenchymal Stem Cells on T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alikarami, Fatemeh; Yari, Fatemeh; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nikougoftar, Mahin; Jalili, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are isolated from different sources like placenta. The placenta and its membranes like Amniotic Membrane (AM) are readily available and easy to work with. There is only limited knowledge on the immunomodulatory properties of human Amniotic Membrane-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hAM-MSCs). The aim of this study was to survey the suppressive activity of hAM-MSCs on T lymphocytes in vitro. Methods: Human AMs were obtained after caesarean section births from healthy women. After enzymatic digestion, cells were cultured and hAM-MSCs were obtained. In addition, human T lymphocytes were isolated and co-cultured with hAM-MSCs for 72 hr in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Subsequently, proliferation of T cells was analyzed using BrdU and subsequently flow cytometry technique. Besides, the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ was examined by ELISA method. Additionally, the expression of activation markers (CD38, HLA-DR) was studied on T lymphocytes by flow cytometry technique. Results: It was revealed that hAM-MSCs could significantly suppress the proliferation of T lymphocytes (p≤0.01) and significantly decrease the production of IFN-γ by T cells (p<0.05). hAM-MSCs also down regulated the expression of activation markers on the surface of T lymphocytes, CD38 and HLA-DR. The difference was significant between the case and control samples (p<0.05). All the comparisons were carried out between the case (Tcell+PHA+hAM-MSCs) and control (Tcell+PHA) groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, hAM-MSCs could inhibit the (mitogen-activated) T cells even in the absence of blood monocytes. Besides, hAM-MSCs-mediated inhibition of T lymphocytes was combined with down regulation of activation markers. PMID:26306147

  8. Recurring structural chromosome abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, M; Finn, W G; Yelavarthi, K K; Roenigk, H H; Samuelson, E; Peterson, L; Kuzel, T M; Rosen, S T

    1997-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from 19 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF)/Sézary syndrome (SS) stimulated with either phytohemagglutinin, a conventional mitogen, or a combination of interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus IL-7. The use of both PHA-stimulated and IL-2 plus IL-7-stimulated cultures enhanced the ability to identify clonal abnormalities. Clonal abnormalities were observed in 11 patients (53%) including one with monosomy for the sex chromosome as the sole abnormality. Five of the 11 patients with clonal abnormalities had normal peripheral white blood cell counts, indicating detectability of clones in the absence of frankly leukemic disease. The presence of clonal abnormalities correlated with advanced stage disease and a significantly reduced survival duration from the time of cytogenetic studies. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 1 and 8 were observed in six cases. In five cases with aberrations of chromosome 1, loss of material involved the region between 1p22 and 1p36. In an additional case, a reciprocal translocation involving 1p33 was observed. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 10 and 17 were observed in 5 cases, clonal abnormalities involving chromosome 2 in 4 cases, and clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 15, 19, and 20 in 3 cases. In 2 cases a der(8)t(8;17)(p11;q11) was observed. Regions of the genome that encode T-cell receptors were not involved in abnormalities. The region between 1p22 and 1p36 is identified as a region of the genome that requires detailed analysis toward the identification of potential gene(s) involved in the process of malignant transformation and/or progression in MF/SS.

  9. HMGN2, a new anti-tumor effector molecule of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) and natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated as important cells in antitumor responses. Our previous research has shown that high mobility group nucleosomal-binding domain 2 (HMGN2) could be released by IL-2 and PHA stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and also induced tumor cells apoptosis at low doses. In this study, we isolated and cultured PBMCs and CD8+ T cells to analyze the expression and antitumor effects of HMGN2. Methods PBMCs from healthy donors were isolated using Human Lymphocyte Separation tube. CD8+ T cells were separated from the PBMCs using MoFlo XDP high-speed flow cytometry sorter. Activation of PBMCs and CD8+ T cells were achieved by stimulating with Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or tumor antigen. In addition, the methods of ELISA, intracellular staining, and fluorescence-labeling assays were used. Results PHA induced PBMCs to release high levels of HMGN2, and CD8+ T cells was the major cell population in PBMCs that release HMGN2 after PHA activation. Tumor antigen-activated CD8+ T cells also released high levels of HMGN2. Supernatants of tumor antigen-activated CD8+ T cells were able to kill tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. This antitumor effect could be significantly blocked by using an anti-HMGN2 antibody. Fluorescence-labeling assays showed that the supernatant proteins of activated CD8+ T cells could be transported into tumor cells, and the transport visibly decreased after HMGN2 was depleted by anti-HMGN2 antibody. Conclusions These results suggest that HMGN2 is an anti-tumor effector molecule of CD8+ T cells. PMID:25060707

  10. Immunological status of the progeny of breeder hens kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)-contaminated feed.

    PubMed

    Zahoor-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Khan, Ahrar; Javed, Ijaz; Saleemi, Muhammad Kashif

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the immunological status of the progeny of breeder hens kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)-contaminated feed. For this purpose, 84 White Leghorn (WL) layer breeder hens (40-weeks-of-age) were divided into seven groups (A-G). Hens in the Group A were fed a commercial layer ration while those in Groups B-G were kept on a diet amended with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, or 10.0 mg OTA/kg, respectively, for 3 weeks. Fertile eggs were set for hatching on the weekly basis to get the progeny of each week separately. Hatched chicks (n = 10 from each group) were euthanized at Day 14 of age, and their immunological organs weighed and fixed in neutral buffered formalin. An indirect immunoperoxidase method was applied to study the frequency of immunoglobulin(s)-bearing cells in the spleen and bursa of Fabricius from these progeny. From other chicks within each set, at Day 16 of age, lymphoblastogenic responses against an intradermal administration of phytohemagglutinin (PHA-P) were determined. Relative weights of the bursa of Fabricius and of the thymus were significantly lower in the progeny of hens fed OTA-contaminated diet for 14 and 21 days. The frequencies of IgA-, IgG-, and IgM-bearing cells were also significantly (P ≤ 0.05) lower in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen of the progeny chicks obtained from dams fed the OTA-mixed diet. Progeny chicks obtained from the breeder hens fed higher doses of OTA showed significantly lower responses to PHA-P than did counterpart chicks from control hens. The findings of this study suggested that there were immunosuppressive effects from OTA in the progeny obtained from breeder hens kept on OTA-contaminated diets.

  11. CD4-mediated and CD8-mediated cytotoxic and proliferative immune responses to Toxoplasma gondii in seropositive humans.

    PubMed Central

    Purner, M B; Berens, R L; Nash, P B; van Linden, A; Ross, E; Kruse, C; Krug, E C; Curiel, T J

    1996-01-01

    Both CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are part of the human immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. To further our understanding of Toxoplasma immunity, we investigated factors influencing stimulation of CD4+ or CD8+ human T. gondii-specific immune cells. Both antigen-pulsed and Toxoplasma-infected antigen-presenting cells (APC) induced cell proliferation. Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited strong proliferation of CD4+ cells, but little or no proliferation of CD8+ cells, unless high antigen loads were used. Toxoplasma-infected APC stimulated specific cytotoxicity poorly or not at all, owing to death of stimulated cultures, whereas antigen-pulsed APC strongly elicited specific cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity elicited by either type of APC resided exclusively in CD4+ T cells in polyclonal cultures. Thus, Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited stronger CD4-mediated than CD8-mediated cell proliferation and generated CD4+ CTL more readily than CD8+ CTL. Nonetheless, specific CD8+ memory cells were demonstrated, and rare CD8+ Toxoplasma-specific CTL were subcloned. Fixed Toxoplasma-infected APC (which induce CD8+ CTL) also elicited cell proliferation, but polyclonal cultures stimulated with these infected APC did not die. Unfixed Toxoplasma-infected APC strongly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-induced cell proliferation, whereas fixed APC did not. These data suggested that infected APC were inhibitory or lethal to some immune cells. Further investigations into interactions between immune cells and Toxoplasma-infected cells likely will help elucidate factors involved in the immunopathogenesis of Toxoplasma infection. As other intracellular parasites, including Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp., also elicit CD4+ CTL, such work may help establish paradigms governing immunity to intracellular parasites. PMID:8926107

  12. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune function and hematology in American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fallacara, Dawn M.; Halbrook, Richard S.; French, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-nine adult male American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were assigned to one of three diet formulations including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 μg/g (dry wt) methylmercury (MeHg). Kestrels received their diets daily for 13 weeks to assess the effects of dietary MeHg on immunocompetence. Immunotoxic endpoints included assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and primary and secondary antibody-mediated immune responses (IR) via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. Select hematology and histology parameters were evaluated to corroborate the results of functional assays and to assess immunosuppression of T and B cell-dependent components in spleen tissue. Kestrels in the 0.6 and 3.9 μg/g MeHg groups exhibited suppression of CMI, including lower PHA stimulation indexes (p = 0.019) and a 42 to 45% depletion of T cell-dependent splenic lymphoid tissue (p = 0.006). Kestrels in the 0.6 μg/g group exhibited suppression of the primary IR to SRBCs (p = 0.014). MeHg did not have a noticeable effect on the secondary IR (p = 0.166). Elevation of absolute heterophil counts (p p p = 0.003) was apparent in the 3.9 μg/g group at week 12. Heterophilia, or the excess of heterophils in peripheral blood above normal ranges, was apparent in seven of 17 (41%) kestrels in the 3.9 μg/g group and was indicative of an acute inflammatory response or physiological stress. This study revealed that adult kestrels were more sensitive to immunotoxic effects of MeHg at environmentally relevant dietary concentrations than they were to reproductive effects as previously reported.

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue and amnion influence T-cells depending on stimulation method and presence of other immune cells.

    PubMed

    Kronsteiner, Barbara; Wolbank, Susanne; Peterbauer, Anja; Hackl, Christa; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabriel, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells exerting immunomodulatory effects on cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. It has been shown that an inflammatory milieu is required for the activation of MSC-mediated immunomodulation, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in this process. We determined the influence of IFN-γ on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs). We further evaluated the effect of MSCs on stimulated T-cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a cell-contact independent setting. On IFN-γ treatment, ASCs and hAMSCs possessed significantly higher antiproliferative properties and showed surface characteristics of nonprofessional antigen presenting cells (HLA-DR(+)CD40(med+)CD54(high)) with a possible regulatory phenotype (PD-L1(+)PD-L2(+)). The effect of ASCs and hAMSCs on cytokine secretion and T-cell activation was dependent on stimulation method and cellular context. Although ASCs and hAMSCs highly inhibited cytokine secretion of stimulated PBMCs, this was not observed in the case of purified T-cells. The presence of ASCs even favored the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ by T-cells, although T-cell proliferation was efficiently inhibited. Further, ASCs enhanced the number of CD69(+) T-cells independent of the stimuli and cellular context. Interestingly, ASCs significantly suppressed CD25 expression on phytohemagglutinin stimulated PBMCs but had no effect on αCD3/αCD28 stimulated cells. Depending on the stimulation method and cellular context, immune cells create a specific cytokine milieu in vitro, thus differently influencing MSCs and, in turn, affecting their action on immune cells.

  14. Signals involved in T cell activation. I. Phorbol esters enhance responsiveness but cannot replace intact accessory cells in the induction of mitogen-stimulated T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1985-11-01

    The role of accessory cells (AC) in the initiation of mitogen-induced T cell proliferation was examined by comparing the effect of intact macrophages (M phi) with that of 4-..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In high-density cultures, purified guinea pig T cells failed to proliferate in response to stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), or PMA alone. The addition of M phi to PHA or Con A but not PMA-stimulated cultures restored T cell proliferation. The addition of PMA to high-density T cell cultures stimulated with PHA or Con A also permitted (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, but was less effective than intact M phi in this regard. This action of PMA was dependent on the small number of Ac contaminating the T cell cultures as evidenced by the finding that PMA could not support mitogen responsiveness of T cells that had been depleted of Ia-bearing cells by panning, even when these cells were cultured at high density. A low-density culture system was used to examine in greater detail the possibility that PMA could completely substitute for M phi in promoting T cells activation. In low-density cultures, mitogen-induced T cell proliferation required intact M phi. These results support a model of T cell activation in which AC play at least two distinct roles. The initiation of the response requires a signal conveyed by an intact M phi, which cannot be provided by either a M phi supernatant factor or PMA. The response can be amplified by additional M phi or M phi supernatant factors. PMA can substitute for M phi in this regard and can provide the signal necessary for amplification of T cell proliferation supported by small numbers of intact AC.

  15. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  16. Effects of different levels of vitamin premix in finisher diets on performance, immuno-competence and meat lipid oxidation of chickens fed on corn-soybean meal

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Hoseein; Alahyari-Shahrasb, Majid; Kiani, Ali; Bagherirad, Mona; Shivazad, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the effects of a vitamin premix (VP) reduction or withdrawal from finisher diet (29-43 days) on performance, immuno-competence, and characteristics of leg bones and meat lipid oxidation of chickens fed on corn-soybean meal based diet. A total of 900 male broiler chickens (Ross 308) were allocated to five treatment groups (0, 33%, 66%, 100% and 133% VP), with nine replicates per treatment group. At 29 and 36 days of ages, four birds from each replicate were injected with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The cell-mediated immunity was determined via phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and 1-chloro 2-4-dinitrobenzen (DNCB) at 34 and 42 days of ages. At 33, 38 and 43 days of age, 42 days of ages, and two birds of each replicate were slaughtered and bone parameters measured. The oxidative stability was evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) on the thigh samples that were stored for 90 day at -80 ˚C. The results showed that reduction or withdrawal of VP from diets at different time points of the finisher period did not affect performance, immunocompetence and characteristics of leg bones. Results of TBARS showed that lipid peroxidation of the treatment without VP was significantly higher than of the other treatments when slaughtered at 43 days of age. Finally, the results of this study demonstrated that it is not possible to reduce the VP in finisher broilers’ diets without negative effects on meat quality during the time of freezing. PMID:25593680

  17. Immunological and reproductive health assessment in herring gulls and black-crowned night herons in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Keith A; Echols, Kathy R; May, Thomas M; Peterman, Paul H; Gale, Robert W; Orazio, Carl E

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown inexplicable declines in breeding waterbirds within western New York/New Jersey Harbor between 1996 and 2002 and elevated polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs. The present study assessed associations between immune function, prefledgling survival, and selected organochlorine compounds and metals in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) in lower New York Harbor during 2003. In pipping gull embryos, lymphoid cells were counted in the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (sites of T and B lymphocyte maturation, respectively). The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response assessed T cell function in gull and heron chicks. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured in vitro in adult and prefledgling gulls. Reference data came from the Great Lakes and Bay of Fundy. Survival of prefledgling gulls was poor, with only 0.68 and 0.5 chicks per nest surviving to three and four weeks after hatch, respectively. Developing lymphoid cells were reduced 51% in the thymus and 42% in the bursa of gull embryos from New York Harbor. In vitro lymphocyte assays demonstrated reduced spontaneous proliferation, reduced T cell mitogen-induced proliferation, and increased B cell mitogen-induced proliferation in gull chicks from New York Harbor. The PHA skin response was suppressed 70 to 80% in gull and heron chicks. Strong negative correlations (r = -0.95 to -0.98) between the PHA response and dioxins and PCBs in gull livers was strong evidence suggesting that these chemicals contribute significantly to immunosuppression in New York Harbor waterbirds.

  18. The in vitro exposure to cypermethrin does not inhibit the proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Tatiana Fernandes Araujo; Lauton Santos, Sandra; Nicomedes, Ulisses Lara; Brito-Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of in vitro exposure to cypermethrin on peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferative response, considering reduced peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferative response observed in individuals occupationally exposed to pyrethroids. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 21 healthy subjects (28.0 ± 9.0 years old). The effect of cypermethrin (at 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/ml) on cell viability was evaluated by flow cytometry using an apoptosis detection kit. Cell proliferation (PI) was evaluated by 5-(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) fluorescence decay using flow cytometry. Cells labeled with CFSE were exposed, in vitro, to cypermethrin (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 2.5 and 4 μg/ml) and stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA 1.0 or 5.0 μg/ml) for 5 d (37 °C, 5% CO2). The in vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with cypermethrin did not induce apoptosis or necrosis after 5 d in culture. Stimulation by PHA induced cell proliferation (PI = 1.29 ± 1.09 and 2.01 ± 0.62, PHA at 1.0 and 5.0 μg/ml, respectively, mean ± SD) and in vitro exposure to cypermethrin did not alter cellular proliferative response to PHA (PI = 1.80 ± 0.50, 2.60 ± 0.05 and 2.10 ± 1.20 for cypermethrin at 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/ml, respectively, and PHA at 5.0 μg/ml). In vitro treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with cypermethrin, at the doses tested, does not affect cell viability or proliferation. These findings suggest that the reduction of proliferation observed on lymphocytes derived from individuals occupationally exposed to pesticides may be related to other mechanisms than direct action of cypermethrin on lymphocytes.

  19. Evaluation of Cytogenetic Alterations in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy using Cytokinesis-Blocked Micronucleus Assay.

    PubMed

    Emamgholizadeh Minaei, Soraya; Mozdarani, Hossein; Motazakker, Morteza; Mansouri, Mohsen; R Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    The effects of combined radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy in the severity of cytogenetic alterations expressed as micronucleus (MN) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients treated for esophageal cancer was evaluated. To do this, blood was obtained from 23 and 15 esophageal cancer patients scheduled for chemo-radiotherapy and RT alone, respectively, before, during, and after treatment. Blood samples were cultured in RPMI-1640 complete medium containing 1% phytohemagglutinin and incubated in a CO2 incubator. Cytochalasin-B was added to the cultures at a final concentration of 5 μg/ml. Finally, harvesting, slide making, and analysis were performed according to standard procedures. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the frequencies of MN in lymphocytes of individuals before being treated with RT alone or chemo-radiotherapy. In the middle of treatment, (after 12 fractions of RT) the frequency of MN increased significantly compared with their concurrent pre-treatment samples in both groups (four-fold). However, the frequency of MN observed for RT patients was not significantly different with those received chemo- and radiotherapy. At the end of treatment, (after 24 fractions of radiotherapy) an increase in the MN frequency was observed for chemo-radiation group significantly higher than RT group (P=0.022). Mild increase in MN frequency in lymphocytes of patients receiving chemoradiation only after the completion of treatment course might be indicative of resistance induced by chemotherapeutics to the clastogenic effects of radiation. Therefore, using these agents repeatedly for cancer treatment in combination with radiation might not cause severe adverse biological effects in normal tissues.

  20. Stimulation by concanavalin A of cartilage-matrix proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.Q.; Nakashima, K.; Iwamoto, M.; Kato, Y. )

    1990-06-15

    The effect of concanavalin A on proteoglycan synthesis by rabbit costal and articular chondrocytes was examined. Chondrocytes were seeded at low density and grown to confluency in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, and then the serum concentration was reduced to 0.3%. At the low serum concentration, chondrocytes adopted a fibroblastic morphology. Addition of concanavalin A to the culture medium induced a morphologic alteration of the fibroblastic cells to spherical chondrocytes and increased by 3- to 4-fold incorporation of (35S)sulfate and (3H)glucosamine into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that was characteristically found in cartilage. The stimulation of incorporation of labeled precursors reflected real increases in proteoglycan synthesis, as chemical analyses showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecules containing hexuronic acid in concanavalin A-maintained cultures. Furthermore, the effect of concanavalin A on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans was greater than that of various growth factors or hormones. However, concanavalin A had smaller effects on (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans and (3H)glucosamine incorporation into hyaluronic acid and chondroitinase AC-resistant glycosaminoglycans. Since other lectins tested, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, and phytohemagglutinin, had little effect on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans, the concanavalin A action on chondrocytes seems specific. Although concanavalin A decreased (3H)thymidine incorporation in chondrocytes, the stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis could be observed in chondrocytes exposed to the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, cytosine arabinoside. These results indicate that concanavalin A is a potent modulator of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes.

  1. A hollow-fiber bioreactor for expanding HIV-1 in human lymphocytes used in preparing an inactivated vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Leong, Maggie; Babbitt, William; Vyas, Girish

    2007-10-01

    An inactivated HIV vaccine intended to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies is designed to use a pool of population-prevalent HIV-1 from plasma (PHIV), isolated before evolution of antibody-mediated genetic mutations. A suitable cell substrate (CS) for isolating such PHIV is peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after stimulating with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin-2 (IL-2). Feasibility of employing a hollow-fiber bioreactor under optimized conditions was investigated for large-scale expansion and efficient recovery of concentrated PHIV. Each CS batch was infected in vitro with a prototype PHIV, the infected cells were introduced into the bioreactor for 7-10 days in co-culture, and the cell-free supernatants were assayed for p24 antigen as an index of HIV synthesis. PBMC versus CD8-depleted (CD8D) CS, 20kDa versus 5kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) bioreactor cartridges, 7- versus 10-day culture periods, and varying concentrations of IL-2, fetal bovine serum (FBS) and glucose content in the medium were functionally evaluated for p24 yield. PBMC cultures in 20kDa MWCO cartridges with 15% FBS, 80IU/mL IL-2 and 2.0g/L glucose produced the highest p24 yield; however, CD8D-CS, 20-30% FBS and 80 IU/mL IL-2 within 5kDa cartridges and 2.0 g/L glucose in the circulating medium was more cost-effective for synthesis of virion p24.

  2. Immunosuppressive and hepatoprotective potential of Sarcococca saligna and its biomarker components.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hamid; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Iqbal, Naveed; Adhikari, Achyut; Abdalla, Omer Mohamed; Ahmed Mesaik, M; Kabir, Nurul

    2015-09-01

    Sarcococca saligna methanolic extract, fractions and isolated pure compounds saracocine (1), saracodine (2), pachyximine-A (3) and terminaline (4) were found to possess potent immunosuppressive activities. The fractions and compounds were tested in-vitro for their effects on human T-cell proliferation, and cytokine (IL-2) production. All the fractions, sub-fractions and purified compounds showed significant suppressive effect on IL-2 production in a dose-dependent manner. They also exhibited a suppressive effect on the phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-cell proliferation. None of the extracts and purified compounds showed any cytotoxicity effects on the 3T3 mice fibroblast cell line. The crude extract, DCM fraction (pH9), DCM fractions (pH7) and one of the steroidal alkaloids (terminaline) were checked in-vivo for their hepato-protective potential against CCl4-induced liver injury. In in-vivo experiments, the basic and neutral DCM fractions and terminaline (4) significantly reduced inflammation in the liver. DCM fraction (pH9), DCM fractions (pH7) and compound 4 reduced the serum enzyme levels (ALT, AST, and ALP) down to control levels despite CCl4 treatment. They also reduced the CCl4-induced damaged area to almost zero as assessed by histopathology. The pale necrotic areas and mixed inflammatory infiltrate which are seen after CCl4 treatment were absent in the cases of basic, neutral fractions and terminaline treatment. These hepato-protective effects were better than the positive control silymarin. Our results suggest the therapeutic effect of S. saligna extract, fractions and bioactive steroidal alkaloids against CCl4-induced liver injury in vivo and their immunosuppressive function in vitro.

  3. Selective antiviral activity of synthetic soluble L-tyrosine and L-dopa melanins against human immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Montefiori, D C; Zhou, J Y

    1991-01-01

    Melanins are pigments found in hair, skin, irides of the eye, and brain. Their functions in mammals include protection from exposure to sunlight, camouflage from predators, sexual recognition within species, and possible electron transfer reactants. Most natural melanins exist in an insoluble form, which is one reason there is little information on the biological properties of soluble melanins. Here, synthetic soluble melanins were obtained by chemical oxidation of L-tyrosine or spontaneous oxidation of L-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). Replication of human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) was inhibited by soluble melanin in two human lymphoblastoid cell lines (MT-2 and H9) and in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human T cells. Effective concentrations of 0.15-10 micrograms/ml had no cell toxicity. Melanin blocked infection by cell-free virus and interfered with HIV-induced syncytium formation and cytopathic effects when fusion-susceptible, uninfected cells, were mixed with chronically infected cells. Melanin also impeded the HIV-1 envelope surface glycoprotein, and T cell specific monoclonal antibody leu-3a (CD4), but not leu-5b (CD2), from binding to the surface of MT-2 cells. No effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity in viral lysates was observed. These results identify a unique biological property of melanin, and suggest that soluble melanins may represent a new class of pharmacologically active substances which should be further investigated for potential therapeutic utility in the treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

  4. Chemical and biological activity of leaf extracts of Chromolaena leivensis.

    PubMed

    Torrenegra, Ruben D; Rodríguez, Oscar E

    2011-07-01

    The flavonoids 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone, 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone and 3,5,7-trihydroxy-6-methoxyflavone were isolated from the leaves of C. leivensis. Preliminary observations in K562 cells (human erythroleukemia) using the trypan blue test, showed a 90% viability at a concentration of 100 microg/mL; however, further testing of the flavonoids at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 microg/mL showed toxicity affecting the morphology of human erythroleukemia cells (K562) and human melanoma cells (A375). Induction of apoptosis was produced by 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone at 72 hours after treatment with arrest in the G2 / M phase of the cell cycle. The A375 cells treated with 50 microg/mL of 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone for 24, 48 and 72 hours, display effects on the behavior of the cell cycle. The flavonoid 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone has activity on the mitochondrial membrane at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 microg/mL, at time intervals of 8 to 12 hours. The flavonoids 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone and 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone at a concentration of 25 microg/mL increased the expression of costimulatory molecules corresponding to the phenotype presented by mature dendritic cells with differentiation markers CD40, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR. The two flavonoids at concentrations between 0.39 and 100 microg/mL slightly increased the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence and in the absence of phytohemagglutinin. These flavonoids at concentrations of 50 and 100 microg/mL slightly increased the proliferation of fibroblasts.

  5. Discodermolide--a new, marine-derived immunosuppressive compound. I. In vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Longley, R E; Caddigan, D; Harmody, D; Gunasekera, M; Gunasekera, S P

    1991-10-01

    The in vitro immunosuppressive properties of a novel, marine-derived compound, discodermolide, are reported here. Discodermolide suppressed the proliferative responses of splenocytes in the murine two-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and concanavalin A stimulated cultures, with IC50 values of 0.24 microM and 0.19 microM, respectively. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity for murine splenocytes at concentrations of discodermolide as high as 1.26 microM. Similarly, discodermolide suppressed the proliferative responses of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) in the two-way MLR, and Con A and phytohemagglutinin mitogenesis. The IC50 values were 5.65 microM, 28.02 microM, and 30.12 microM for the MLR, Con A, and PHA mitogenic responses, respectively. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity toward human PBL at discodermolide concentrations as high as 80.64 microM. Discodermolide was equally effective, compared with cyclosporine, in suppressing the PMA-ionomycin induced proliferation of purified, murine T cells, with IC50 values of 9.0 nM and 14.0 nM for discodermolide and CsA, respectively. The production of IL-2 by PMA-ionomycin stimulated T cells was not inhibited by discodermolide; however, the percentage of IL-2 receptor-bearing cells as measured by immunofluorescence with 7D4 antibody, specific for the 55-kDa chain (p55) comprising the murine IL-2 receptor, was reduced. The expression of a similar chain comprising the human IL-2 receptor (Tac antigen, p55) by PHA or Con-A-stimulated PBL was similarly suppressed by discodermolide. The precise mechanism of action of discodermolide remains to be elucidated.

  6. Single or multicellular origin of human T lymphocyte colonies in vitro: modification by 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA).

    PubMed

    Singer, J W; Ernst, C; Whalen, C K; Steinmann, L; Fialkow, P J

    1981-04-01

    The assumption that human T lymphocyte colonies have a unicellular origin has been directly tested with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 2 women heterozygous for the common X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) gene (GdB) and the variant GdA. T cells were cultured in semisolid medium in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and T lymphocyte growth factor with or without preincubation in suspension culture with PHA (2-stage and 1-stage assays, respectively). The enzyme type of individual T cell colonies was then determined electrophoretically at the lowest colony density with adequate growth (usually less than 100 colonies/dish). In the 2-stage system, 90 of 97 tested colonies had equal amounts of A and B enzyme activities suggesting multicellular origin of the colonies. Similarly, in the single-stage system, 21 of 31 colonies had both A and B enzymes. Increasing the density of the soft agar did not influence the frequency of A/B colonies. However, when 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a promoter of T cell colony growth shown in other systems to inhibit metabolic cooperation, was added, a striking decrease in frequency of colonies with both G-6-PD types was found. In the 2-stage culture, 0 of 9 colonies had a double-enzyme type and in the single-stage system, the frequency of A/B colonies declined to 9 of 34 (p less than 0.025). The data suggest that despite the apparent multicellular origin of T cell colonies in cultures with TPA, most colonies do originate from single cells when cultured with TPA at low colony densities. Stimulation of cell growth or inhibition of metabolic cooperation between cells by TPA are possible explanations for these differences. PMID:6970773

  7. Immune status of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Giri, Neelam; Alter, Blanche P; Penrose, Keri; Falk, Roni T; Pan, Yuanji; Savage, Sharon A; Williams, Marcus; Kemp, Troy J; Pinto, Ligia A

    2015-08-01

    Immune function abnormalities have been reported in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and, rarely, in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), but large systematic studies are lacking. We assessed immunological parameters in 118 patients with these syndromes and 202 unaffected relatives. We compared the results in patients with reference values, and with values in relatives after adjusting for age, sex, corticosteroid treatment, and severe bone marrow failure (BMF). Adult patients (≥18 years) with FA had significantly lower immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM), total lymphocytes, and CD4 T cells than reference values or adult relatives (P < 0.001); children with FA had normal values. Both children and adults with FA had lower B- and NK cells (P < 0.01) than relatives or reference values. Patients with DC had essentially normal immunoglobulins but lower total lymphocytes than reference values or relatives, and lower T-, B-, and NK-cells; these changes were more marked in children than adults (P < 0.01). Most patients with DBA and SDS had normal immunoglobulins and lymphocytes. Lymphoproliferative responses, serum cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, and cytokine levels in supernatants from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures were similar across patient groups and relatives. Only patients with severe BMF, particularly those with FA and DC, had higher serum G-CSF and Flt3-ligand and lower RANTES levels compared with all other groups or relatives (P < 0.05). Overall, immune function abnormalities were seen mainly in adult patients with FA, which likely reflects their disease-related progression, and in children with DC, which may be a feature of early-onset severe disease phenotype. PMID:25963299

  8. Do climatic conditions affect host and parasite phenotypes differentially? A case study of magpies and great spotted cuckoos.

    PubMed

    Soler, Juan J; De Neve, Liesbeth; Martín-Gálvez, David; Molina-Morales, Mercedes; Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    Climatic conditions, through their effects on resource availability, may affect important life history strategies and trade-offs in animals, as well as their interactions with other organisms such as parasites. This impact may depend on species-specific pathways of development that differ even among species with similar resource requirements (e.g., avian brood parasites and their hosts). Here we explore the degree of covariation between environmental-climatic conditions and nestling phenotypes (i.e., tarsus length, body mass, immune response to phytohemagglutinin injection) and ectoparasite loads of great spotted cuckoos (Clamator glandarius) and those of their magpie (Pica pica) hosts, both within and among 11 study years (1997-2011). Our main results were that (1) nestling phenotypes differed among years, but differently for great spotted cuckoos and magpies; (2) nestling phenotypes showed significant among-year covariation with breeding climatic conditions (temperature and precipitation); and (3) these associations differed for cuckoos and magpies for some phenotypic traits. As the average temperature at the beginning of the breeding season (April) increased, body mass and tarsus length increased only for cuckoos, but not for magpie hosts, while immune response decreased in both species. Finally, (4) the strength of the within-year relationships between the probability of ectoparasitism by Carnus hemapterus flies and laying date (used as an estimate of the within-year variation in climatic conditions) was negatively affected by the annual accumulated precipitation in April. These results strongly suggest that variation in climatic conditions would result in asymmetric effects on different species with respect to the probability of ectoparasitism, immunity and body size. Such asymmetric effects may affect animal interactions in general and those of brood parasites and their hosts in particular.

  9. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90–100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  10. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials.

  11. Ex vivo expanded human circulating Vδ1 γδT cells exhibit favorable therapeutic potential for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dang; Wu, Pin; Wu, Xianguo; Ye, Jun; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Shuai; Ni, Chao; Hu, Guoming; Xu, Jinghong; Han, Yuehua; Zhang, Ting; Qiu, Fuming; Yan, Jun; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Gamma delta T (γδT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes with strong, MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity against cancer cells and show a promising prospect in adoptive cellular immunotherapy for various malignancies. However, the clinical outcome of commonly used Vγ9Vδ2 γδT (Vδ2 T) cells in adoptive immunotherapy for most solid tumors is limited. Here, we demonstrate that freshly isolated Vδ1 γδT (Vδ1 T) cells from human peripheral blood (PB) exhibit more potent cytotoxicity against adherent and sphere-forming human colon cancer cells than Vδ2 T cells in vitro. We also develop an optimized protocol to preferentially expand Vδ1 T cells isolated from PB of both healthy donors and colon cancer patients by in vitro short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin-7 (IL-7). Expanded Vδ1 T cells highly expressed cytotoxicity-related molecules, chemokine receptors and cytokines with enhanced cytolytic effect against adherent and sphere-forming colon cancer cells in a cell-to-cell contact dependent manner. In addition, PHA and IL-7 expanded Vδ1 T cells showed proliferation and survival advantage partly through an IL-2 signaling pathway. Furthermore, ex vivo expanded Vδ1 T cells also restrained the tumor growth and prolonged the tumor-burdened survival of human colon carcinoma xenografted mice. Our findings suggest that human PB Vδ1 T cells expanded by PHA and IL-7 are a promising candidate for anticancer adoptive immunotherapy for human solid tumors such as colon cancer. PMID:25949914

  12. Nutritional quality of legumes, and their role in cardiometabolic risk prevention: a review.

    PubMed

    Bouchenak, Malika; Lamri-Senhadji, Myriem

    2013-03-01

    Legumes (including alfalfa, clover, lupins, green beans and peas, peanuts, soybeans, dry beans, broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, and lentils) represent an important component of the human diet in several areas of the world, especially in the developing countries, where they complement the lack of proteins from cereals, roots, and tubers. In some regions of the world, legume seeds are the only protein supply in the diet. The health benefits of legume consumption have received rising interest from researchers, and their consumption and production extends worldwide. Among European countries, higher legume consumption is observed around the Mediterranean, with per capita daily consumption between 8 and 23 g, while in Northern Europe, the daily consumption is less than 5 g per capita. The physiological effects of different legumes vary significantly. These differences may result from the polysaccharides composition, in particular, the quantity and variety of dietary fibers and starch, protein make-up, and variability in phytochemical content. The majority of legumes contain phytochemicals: bioactive compounds, including enzyme inhibitors, phytohemagglutinins (lectins), phytoestrogens, oligosaccharides, saponins, and phenolic compounds, which play metabolic roles in humans who frequently consume these foods. Dietary intake of phytochemicals may provide health benefits, protecting against numerous diseases or disorders, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation. The synergistic or antagonistic effects of these phytochemical mixtures from food legumes, their interaction with other components of the diet, and the mechanism of their action have remained a challenge with regard to understanding the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. Their mitigating effects and the mechanism of their action need to be further addressed if we are to understand the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. This review provides an overview

  13. In Vitro Effects of Sodium Benzoate on Th1/Th2 Deviation in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, N; Amirghofran, Z; Nikseresht, A; Ashjazade, N; Zoghi, S; Tahvili, S; Kamali-Sarvestani, E

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) can improve the clinical manifestations in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sodium benzoate (NaB) deviates the cytokine profile to Th2 (or IL-4 producing) cells in EAE and thus might be effective in the treatment of MS. Therefore, in this study the effect of different concentrations of NaB on the percentage and mRNA levels of IL-4 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-producing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 20 Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients and eight healthy controls was evaluated in the presence of mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) or specific antigen (myelin basic protein, MBP). Our results showed that in the patient's group the percentage of CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells was significantly increased in the presence of all concentrations of NaB when PBMCs were stimulated by MBP (p = 0.001) or PHA (p < 0.03). The same results were obtained for normal donors in the highest concentration of NaB, 1000 µg/ml (p = 0.02). Moreover, in the patient's group the percentage of CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) cells was decreased significantly when the PBMCs were stimulated by PHA and NaB (p < 0.004) or by MBP and 1000 µg/ml of NaB (p < 0.03). The effect of NaB on IL-4 and IFN-γ production was also documented at the mRNA levels. In conclusion, our data suggest that NaB is able to induce IL-4 production by human PBMCs and therefore might be a useful candidate for conjunctive therapy in RR-MS. PMID:27611715

  14. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  15. Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Pavitra

    CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

  16. Systemic immunotoxicity in AJ mice following 6-month whole body inhalation exposure to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed

    Burchiel, Scott W; Lauer, Fredine T; McDonald, Jacob D; Reed, Matthew D

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the effects of subchronic diesel exposure on indicators of systemic immunity in mice. AJ mice were exposed daily for 6 months (6 h/day) to atmospheres containing one of four concentrations (30, 100, 300, and 1000 microg/m(3)) of diluted diesel exhaust (DE) in whole body exposure chambers. The effects of DE were compared to chamber exposure controls receiving fresh air. DE was assessed for effects on systemic immunity by measuring the proliferative response of spleen cells following stimulation with T cell (phytohemagglutinin, or PHA) or B cell (lipopolysaccharide, or LPS) mitogens. The results showed that DE at all exposure levels suppressed the proliferative response of T cells. B cell proliferation was increased at 30 microg/m(3) and was unaffected at the 100, 300, and 1000 microg/m(3) exposures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to suppress spleen cell mitogenic responses, and it has been hypothesized by several groups that PAHs and perhaps benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-quinones (BPQs) may be responsible for the effects of DE or diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Therefore, a second purpose of these studies was to determine the effects of in vitro BPQs on AJ mouse spleen cell mitogenic responses and compare to DE in preliminary studies. Unlike DE, BPQs were found to increase T cell proliferation. In addition, analysis of chamber atmospheres showed that there was little if any PAH and BPQs in DE. Therefore, these results demonstrate that because of the absence of BPQs in DE, they are likely not responsible for the immunosuppressive effect of DE on murine spleen cell responses.

  17. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) activities of 3-deazaadenosine analogs: increased potency against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, D L; Mikovits, J A; Joshi, B; Hewlett, I K; Estrada, J S; Wolfe, A D; Garcia, G E; Doctor, B P; Burke, D S; Gordon, R K

    1995-01-01

    3-Deazaadenosine (DZA), 3-deaza-(+/-)-aristeromycin (DZAri), and 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) are powerful modulators of cellular processes. When tested against H9 cells infected acutely with two different strains of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and in the chronically infected monocytoid cell lines U1 and THP-1, the 3-deazanucleosides caused a marked reduction in p24 antigen production. Similar reductions in p24 antigen were seen in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Strikingly, in comparing the therapeutic indices between the paired pre- and post-3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) treatment HIV-1 isolates, DZNep and neplanocin A showed an increase of 3- to 18-fold in their potency against AZT-resistant HIV-1 isolates. In H9 cells treated with DZNep and DZAri, the formation of triphosphate nucleotides of DZNep and DZAri was observed. The mode of action of DZNep and DZAri appears complex, at least in part, at the level of infectivity as shown by decreases in syncytia formation in HIV-1-infected H9 cells and at the level of transcription as both drugs inhibited the expression of basal or tat-induced HIV-1 long terminal repeat chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in stably transfected cell lines. Since DZNep induced in H9 cells a rapid expression of nuclear binding factors that recognize the AP-1 transcription site, the anti-HIV-1 activity of the DZA analogs could partly be the induction of critical factors in the host cells. Thus, the 3-deazanucleoside drugs belong to an unusual class of anti-HIV-1 drugs, which may have therapeutic potential, in particular against AZT-resistant strains. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7816820

  18. Vitamin A supplementation reduces IL-17 and RORc gene expression in atherosclerotic patients.

    PubMed

    Mottaghi, A; Ebrahimof, S; Angoorani, P; Saboor-Yaraghi, A-A

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin A is a potential mediator of T helper cells in atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitamin A supplementation on expression of Th17 cells-related IL-17 and RORc genes in atherosclerotic patients. Thirty one atherosclerotic patients and 15 healthy controls were studied for 4 months. Atherosclerotic patients were randomly divided into vitamin A or placebo groups. Healthy controls and patients in vitamin A group received 25,000 IU retinyl palmitate per day. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultured and divided into three groups including fresh cells, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells and ox-LDL-activated T cells. Gene expressions of T cells were studied by real-time PCR. In atherosclerotic patients, vitamin A supplementation resulted in significant decrease in IL-17 gene expression by 0.63-fold in fresh cell, 0.82-fold in PHA-activated cells and 0.65-fold in ox-LDL-activated cells (P < 0.05 for all). RORc gene expression in fresh cells as well as ox-LDL-activated cells decreased significantly after vitamin A supplementation in atherosclerotic patients (P = 0.0001 for both). In PHA-activated cells, vitamin A supplementation significantly decreased RORc gene in both atherosclerotic patients and healthy subjects by 0.87-fold and 0.72, respectively, while in placebo group, the RORc gene expression significantly increased by 1.17-fold (P < 0.05 for all). Findings of this study suggest that vitamin A supplementation may be an effective approach to slow progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:24845870

  19. Identification of a novel surface protein on activated CD4+ T cells that induces contact-dependent B cell differentiation (help)

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes provide contact-dependent stimuli to B cells that are critical for the generation of specific antibody responses in a process termed T helper function. The surface structures on activated CD4+ T cells that mediate this function are not fully known. We previously reported the isolation of a functionally unique subclone of the Jurkat leukemic T cell line (D1.1) that constitutively expressed contact-dependent helper effector function. To identify T cell surface molecules that mediate contact-dependent T helper function, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated 5c8, was generated that inhibits D1.1-mediated B cell activation and immunoprecipitates a novel 30-kD protein structure from surface-iodinated D1.1 cells. Normal CD4+ T cells express 5c8 antigen (Ag) transiently 5-6 h after activation by phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin with maximal expression 5-6 h after activation and absence of expression by 24 h. In contrast, neither resting nor activated CD8+ T cells express 5c8 Ag. In functional studies, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of fixed, activated CD4+ T cells to induce B cell surface CD23 expression. In addition, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to direct terminal B cell differentiation driven by pokeweed mitogen. Taken together, these data suggest that 5c8 Ag is a novel, activation-induced surface T cell protein that is involved in mediating a contact-dependent element of the helper effector function of CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:1348081

  20. A modified host-cell reactivation assay to measure repair of alkylating DNA damage for assessing risk of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luo; Wei, Qingyi; Shi, Qiuling; Guo, Zhaosheng; Qiao, Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R

    2007-07-01

    The nicotine-derived nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lung adenocarcinoma through formation of DNA adducts. Our previous research on susceptibility to tobacco-induced carcinogenesis focused on benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE) as the in vitro mutagen for phenotype measurements of DNA repair capacity (DRC) in mammalian cells. Here, we present a modified host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay to measure lymphocytic DRC for alkylating DNA damage as is induced by the tobacco-specific nitrosamine, NNK. We substituted dimethyl sulfate (DMS) to create alkylating damage in pCMVluc plasmid DNA and established the damage-repair dose-response curves in both normal and nucleotide excision repair-deficient lymphoblastoid cell lines and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated primary lymphocytes. We then successfully measured the DRC in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes from 48 patients with lung adenocarcinoma and 45 cancer-free controls and tested our hypothesis that lower DRC for alkylating damage is associated with an increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma. The cases exhibited a lower mean DRC than did the controls. A >3-fold increased risk (odds ratio = 3.21; 95% confidence interval = 1.25-8.21) was found for those with DRC levels below the control median. There was no correlation between the DRC measured with this DMS-HCR assay and that from the parallel BPDE-HCR assay. Interestingly, risk increased to >10-fold for those with sub-optimal DRC measured by both DMS- and BPDE-HCR assays. We conclude that variability in DRC is a risk factor for lung cancer and our results provide proof of principle for a new assay that can assess DRC for NNK-induced DNA damage. PMID:17341660

  1. The role of interleukin-6 in mitogenic T-cell activation: detection of interleukin-2 heteronuclear RNA by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Walz, G; Stevens, C; Zanker, B; Melton, L B; Clark, S C; Suthanthiran, M; Strom, T B

    1991-05-01

    It has been documented that interleukin-6 (IL-6) supports the proliferation of purified, anti-CD3-stimulated murine T cells. We found that stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with anti-CD3 induced a significant accumulation of IL-6 mRNA, indicating that antigen-mediated T-cell activation may involve IL-6 release from accessory cells. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) had little effect upon IL-6 gene expression. In keeping with these findings, anti-IL-6 reduced but did not abolish anti-CD3-mediated proliferation of PBMCs, but had no significant effect upon PHA-stimulated proliferation. The addition of recombinant (r) IL-6 enhanced the proliferation of anti-CD3-stimulated PBMCs and increased the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA in PHA-stimulated PBMCs during the first 5 hr of culture. Nuclear run-off experiments did not reveal significant changes in IL-2 transcription in PHA plus rIL-6-treated PBMCs attempting to assume that IL-6 mediates stabilization of IL-2 mRNA. However, monitoring of partially spliced IL-2 mRNA by polymerase chain reaction revealed a clear increase in IL-2 heteronuclear RNA. Thus IL-6 increases the rate of IL-2 transcription which was not detectable by conventional in vitro transcription assays. We conclude that anti-CD3 triggers T-cell proliferation through a process that is partially but not entirely dependent upon release of IL-6. IL-6, in turn, supports IL-2 transcription. Insofar as anti-CD3 mimics antigen-triggered activation of the T-cell receptor complex, IL-6 appears to support the early immune response by augmenting antigen-triggered IL-2 gene expression. PMID:1827050

  2. Ajoene inhibits the activation of human endothelial cells induced by porcine cells: implications for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Benatuil, Lorenzo; Apitz-Castro, Rafael; Romano, Egidio

    2003-07-01

    Ajoene, is an organosulfur compound derived from garlic that strongly inhibit platelet aggregation, proliferation of human lymphocytes induced by phytohemagglutinin, and in general, blocks membrane-mediated signaling of cell activation. As a thrombotic microangiopathy frequently complicates procedures designed to induce pig-to-baboon chimerism by infusion of large amounts of pig progenitor cells in baboons, it was thought that ajoene might be useful to prevent such complication. For such purpose, we studied the effects of ajoene on the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced by pig peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p-PBMC). Co-cultures of p-PBMC with HUVEC results in activation of the HUVEC as shown by over-expression of E-selectin and vascular cells adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Ajoene (25 microm) strongly inhibits HUVEC activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or p-PBMC as shown by a down regulation of VCAM-1 and of E-selectin expression. After 5 or 8 h of pre-treatment with Ajoene, HUVEC incubated with TNF and p-PBMC showed an E-selectin or VCAM-1 expression, respectively, at levels similar to the positive control indicating that the inhibitory effect is transient. Ajoene at concentration of 25 microm or lower did not affect HUVEC viability. Based on the finding that Ajoene has a strong, although transient, inhibitory effect on the activation of the endothelium induced by pig cells and its known anti-platelet activity, it is suggested that this garlic compound could be useful to prevent the development of microangiopathy and thrombotic disorders seen in primates infused with pig cells.

  3. Plasma Derived From Human Umbilical Cord Blood Modulates Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Mononuclear Cells Isolated From the Peripheral Blood of ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Ehrhart, Jared; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Jahan, Israt; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Gooch, Clifton; Sanberg, Paul R; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. This disease clinically manifests as gradual muscular weakness and atrophy leading to paralysis and death by respiratory failure. While multiple interdependent factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS, increasing evidence shows the possible presence of autoimmune mechanisms that promote disease progression. The potential use of plasma derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) as a therapeutic tool is currently in its infancy. The hUCB plasma is rich in cytokines and growth factors that are required for growth and survival of cells during hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of hUCB plasma on the mitogen-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from the peripheral blood of ALS patients and apoptotic activity by detection of caspase 3/7 expression of the isolated MNCs in vitro. Three distinct responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation of MNCs were observed, which were independent of age, disease duration, and the ALS rating scale: Group I responded normally to PHA, Group II showed no response to PHA, while Group III showed a hyperactive response to PHA. hUCB plasma attenuated the hyperactive response (Group III) and potentiated the normal response in Group I ALS patients, but did not alter that of the nonresponders to PHA (Group II). The elevated activity of caspase 3/7 observed in the MNCs from ALS patients was significantly reduced by hUCB plasma treatment. Thus, study results showing different cell responses to mitogen suggest alteration in lymphocyte functionality in ALS patients that may be a sign of immune deficiency in the nonresponders and autoimmunity alterations in the hyperactive responders. The ability of hUCB plasma to modulate the mitogen cell response and reduce caspase activity suggests that the use of hUCB plasma alone, or with

  4. N-acetylglucosamine inhibits T-helper 1 (Th1)/T-helper 17 (Th17) cell responses and treats experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Ani; Araujo, Lindsey; Naidu, Nandita N; Place, Dylan J; Choudhury, Biswa; Demetriou, Michael

    2011-11-18

    Current treatments and emerging oral therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) are limited by effectiveness, cost, and/or toxicity. Genetic and environmental factors that alter the branching of Asn (N)-linked glycans result in T cell hyperactivity, promote spontaneous inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in mice, and converge to regulate the risk of MS. The sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) enhances N-glycan branching and inhibits T cell activity and adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we report that oral GlcNAc inhibits T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 17 (Th17) responses and attenuates the clinical severity of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE when administered after disease onset. Oral GlcNAc increased expression of branched N-glycans in T cells in vivo as shown by high pH anion exchange chromatography, MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy and FACS analysis with the plant lectin l-phytohemagglutinin. Initiating oral GlcNAc treatment on the second day of clinical disease inhibited MOG-induced EAE as well as secretion of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17, and interleukin-22. In the more severe 2D2 T cell receptor transgenic EAE model, oral GlcNAc initiated after disease onset also inhibits clinical disease, except for those with rapid lethal progression. These data suggest that oral GlcNAc may provide an inexpensive and nontoxic oral therapeutic agent for MS that directly targets an underlying molecular mechanism causal of disease. PMID:21965673

  5. [Immunocompetence and reproductive characteristics of male Campbell dwarf hamsters selected for low and high humoral immune response to SRBC: testing the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Rogovin, K A; Khrushcheva, A M; Shekarova, O N; Bushuev, A V; Sokolova, O V; Vasil'eva, N Iu

    2014-01-01

    We selected Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905) for low and high humoral immune response to the sheep red blood cells (SRBC) challenge in three generations (P, F1, F2). Non-specific innate immunity and acquired T-cell immunity, resting metabolic rate, testosterone, and cortisole hormone levels, reproductive characteristics, including maturation related morphological traits, and aggressive behavior were studied within sets of males:with low (LI) and high (HI) immune response to SRBC. We found no difference between LI and HI males in cutaneous response to injection of phytohemagglutinin, (DTH test for T-cell immunity), in activity of Peroxidase - Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide System of Neutrophils , in the white blood count, in resting metabolic rate, in body mass and ano-genital distance at the age of two months, in the blood level of testosterone before and after recurrent immunization by SRBC and in the blood level of cortisole in response to the social stressor (10 min encounter in the neutral arena). At that, LI males had significantly higher basal level of blood cortisole, were less aggressive in response to stranger male and had smaller testosterone-dependent mid-ventral specific skin gland at the age of two months. Males of two groups did not differ in the initial mating success with intact young females (time since pair formation until first litter born), although females of LI males born fewer number of pups. In fact, our results do not support the Handicap Immunocompetence Hypothesis (Folstad, Karter, 1999) which is based on the assumption of trade-off between immunocompetence and reproductive effort. PMID:25782275

  6. Dietary protein and chromium tripicolinate in Suffolk wether lambs: effects on production characteristics, metabolic and hormonal responses, and immune status.

    PubMed

    Gentry, L R; Fernandez, J M; Ward, T L; White, T W; Southern, L L; Bidner, T D; Thompson, D L; Horohov, D W; Chapa, A M; Sahlu, T

    1999-05-01

    Thirty-two Suffolk wether lambs were fed for 84 d in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment using two levels of dietary protein (9.0 to 12.1% CP, low protein, LP; or 12.8 to 14.4% CP, high protein, HP) and supplemental Cr (none, C; or 400 ppb Cr as chromium tripicolinate, Cr). At 14- to 21-d intervals, lambs were weighed, and jugular blood samples were collected. Mean ADG and carcass weight (P > .10) did not differ. In lambs fed HP, Cr reduced liver weight and increased kidney weight (P < .01). Lambs fed HP had elevated plasma urea N (PUN; P < .01) and albumin (P < .04). During an i.v. epinephrine challenge on d 43, plasma cortisol declined in lambs fed Cr (Cr x time, P < .03) and in lambs fed LP (CP x time, P < .001). An i.v. glucose tolerance test conducted 3 h later showed that supplemental Cr decreased glucose clearance rate in lambs fed HP (CP x Cr, P < .10) but not in lambs fed LP. On d 62, PUN was increased in lambs fed HP (P < .001) between 0 and 3 h postprandial, and there was a Cr x CP interaction (P < .04). Postprandial plasma NEFA declined with Cr vs C (Cr x time, P < .07) and with HP vs LP (CP x time, P < .10). By d 66, lambs fed Cr had an elevated (P < .03) blood platelet and fibrinogen content. Chromium increased erythrocyte count in lambs fed HP (Cr x CP, P < .08), and isolated peripheral lymphocytes had greater blastogenic response to 4 microg/mL of phytohemagglutinin (Cr x CP, P < .001). The lymphocyte response to pokeweed mitogen (.2 microg/mL) was reduced in lambs fed Cr (P < .10). In the present experiment, Cr supplementation had minimal and inconsistent effects on production and metabolic criteria of lambs.

  7. Functional inactivation of lymphocytes by methylene blue with visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Mo, Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Xun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jia, Yao; Huang, Yuwen

    2015-10-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic white blood cells (WBCs) may cause adverse reactions in immunocompromised recipients, including transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), which is often fatal and incurable. In this study, the in vitro effect of methylene blue with visible light (MB + L) treatment on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production was measured to investigate whether MB + L can be used to prevent immune reactions that result from transfused lymphocytes. WBCs and 3 μM of MB were mixed and transferred into medical PVC bags, which were then exposed to visible light. Gamma irradiation was conducted as a parallel positive control. The cells without treatment were used as untreated group. All the groups were tested for the ability of cell proliferation and cytokine production upon stimulation. After incubation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or plate-bound anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, the proliferation of MB + L/gamma-irradiation treated lymphocytes was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) as compared to the untreated ones; the proliferation inhibitive rate of the MB + L group was even higher than that of gamma-irradiated cells (73.77% ± 28.75% vs. 44.72% ± 38.20%). MB + L treated cells incubated up to 7 days with PHA also showed no significant proliferation. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1β present in the supernatant of MB + L treated lymphocytes upon stimulation were significantly lower than those of untreated lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that MB + L treatment functionally and irreversibly inactivated lymphocytes by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and the production of cytokines. MB + L treatment might be a promising method for the prevention of adverse immune responses caused by WBCs. PMID:26295729

  8. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  9. Effects of Space Missions on the Human Immune System: A Meta-Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Barger, L. K.; Baldini, F.; Huff, D.

    1995-01-01

    Future spaceflight will require travelers to spend ever-increasing periods of time in microgravity. Optimal functioning of the immune system is of paramount importance for the health and performance of these travelers. A meta-analysis statistical procedure was used to analyze immune system data from crew members in United States and Soviet space missions from 8.5 to 140 days duration between 1968 and 1985. Ten immunological parameters (immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, white blood cell (WBC) count, number of lymphocytes, percent total lymphocytes, percent B lymphocytes, percent T lymphocytes, and lymphocyte reactivity to mitogen) were investigated using multifactorial, repeated measure analysis of variance. With the preflight level set at 100, WBC count increased to 154 +/- 14% (mean +/- SE; p less than or equal to 0.05) immediately after flight; there was a decrease in lymphocyte count (83 +/- 4%; p less than or equal to 0.05) and percent of total lymphocytes (69 +/- 1%; p less than or equal to 0.05) immediately after flight, with reduction in RNA synthesis to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) to 51 +/- 21% (p less than or equal to 0.05) and DNA synthesis to PHA to 61 +/- 8% (p less than or equal to 0.05) at the first postflight measurement. Thus, some cellular immunological functions are decreased significantly following spaceflight. More data are needed on astronauts' age, aerobic power output, and parameters of their exercise training program to determine if these immune system responses are due solely to microgravity exposure or perhaps to some other aspect of spaceflight.

  10. Novel path to apoptosis: small transmembrane pores created by staphylococcal alpha-toxin in T lymphocytes evoke internucleosomal DNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, D; Walev, I; Berger, T; Liebetrau, M; Palmer, M; Bhakdi, S

    1994-01-01

    Peripheral-blood human T lymphocytes were treated with Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin. Membrane permeabilization was assessed by measuring efflux of K+ and Rb+ and influx of Na+, Ca2+, and propidium iodide. Cellular ATP and [3H]thymidine incorporation following lectin stimulation were measured as parameters for cell viability. Internucleosomal cleavage characteristic of programmed cell death was assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis and by quantifying low-molecular-weight, [3H]thymidine-labeled DNA fragments. Nanomolar concentrations of alpha-toxin evoked protracted, irreversible ATP depletion in both activated and resting T lymphocytes. Toxin-damaged cells also lost their ability to incorporate [3H]thymidine upon subsequent stimulation with phytohemagglutinin. These cells carried toxin hexamers, and their plasma membranes became permeable for monovalent ions but not for Ca2+ and propidium iodide. The permeabilization event was followed by internucleosomal DNA degradation characteristic of programmed cell death. Membranes of cells treated with high toxin doses (> 300 nM) became permeable to both Ca2+ and propidium iodide. In this case, ATP depletion occurred within minutes and no DNA degradation was observed. When cells were suspended in Na(+)-free buffer, alpha-toxin applied at low doses still bound and formed hexamers. However, these cells displayed neither DNA degradation nor loss of viability. The data indicate that formation of very small but not of large alpha-toxin pores may trigger programmed cell death in lymphocytes and that uncontrolled flux of Na+ ions may be an important event precipitating the suicide cascade. Images PMID:8132337

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-I stimulates IL-10 production in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Ron; Coppens, Astrid

    2004-10-01

    There is vast body of evidence that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I exerts immunomodulatory effects in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies indicate that stimulatory effects of IGF-I may be exerted through augmentation of inflammatory cytokine production. To further explore the immunomodulatory effects of IGF-I through regulation of cytokine production, we tested the in vitro effects of IGF-I on the secretion of inflammatory T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). To this end, PBMC were stimulated with the T cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and cytokines in the culture media were assessed after 18, 42, 66, and 80 h of culture. We found that IGF-I stimulated the secretion of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 by 40-70% in PHA-stimulated PBMC. In addition, we observed a small stimulatory effect (15%) on the secretion of another Th2 cytokine IL-4. The secretion of IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, interferon-gamma, and the inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha was not or was hardly affected. IL-10 secretion was also stimulated in purified T cells, and we established that IGF-I also stimulated IL-10 mRNA expression by 100-150%. The monocyte-activating bacterial cell-wall product lipopolysaccharide induced IL-10 production in PBMC, but this was not affected by IGF-I. As IL-10 predominantly exerts anti-inflammatory actions and suppresses Th1-dependent immune responses, our results indicate that IGF-I may exert inhibitory actions on inflammatory and Th1-mediated cellular immune responses through stimulation of IL-10 production in T cells.

  12. Toxicity Assessment of Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Widely Consumed by Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ismail, Hanen; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed at assessing the content and the functional properties of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in different varieties of beans widely consumed in Tunisia through soaking, cooking, autoclaving, germination, and their combinations. This study was carried out on three varieties of white beans grown in different localities of Tunisia, namely Twila, Coco, and Beldia, as well as on imported and local canned beans. All bean samples underwent biochemical and immunological evaluation by employing several techniques such as indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), hemagglutinating assay, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biochemical and immunological analyses indicated that raw dry beans contained a considerable amount of proteins and PHAs. ELISA demonstrated that soaking, either in plain water or in alkaline solution, caused an increase in the concentration of PHA. A slight increase of PHA was produced equally by germination during 4 days in all bean varieties. Cooking or autoclaving of presoaked beans resulted in a complete disappearance of PHA. ELISA test also proved that both imported and local canned beans contained fingerprints of PHA. Hemagglutination assays showed that not only cooked and autoclaved presoaked beans lacked the ability to agglutinate red blood cells but also autoclaved unsoaked beans did. In agar gel immunodiffusion using rabbit anti-PHA serum, raw, soaked, cooked unsoaked, and sprouted beans gave precipitin arc reactions, indicating that PHA existed in immunoreactive form in the tested seeds. SDS-PAGE electrophoretograms showed protein isolates of Twila and Beldia beans to have different profiles through soaking, cooking, and autoclaving processes. This work revealed that the combination of soaking and cooking/autoclaving was the best way in reducing PHA content and its activity in all bean varieties when compared with germination. PMID:26355953

  13. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus utilizing the cotransfection method and analysis of cellular tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Murthy, S; Cartas, M; Monken, C; Srinivasan, A

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) isolated from infected individuals show tremendous genetic and biologic diversity. To delineate the genetic determinants underlying specific biologic characteristics, such as rate of replication, cytopathic effects, and ability to infect macrophages and T4 lymphoid cells, generation of hybrid HIV using viruses which exhibit distinct biologic features is essential. To develop methods for generating hybrid HIV, we constructed truncated HIV proviral DNA plasmids. Upon digestion with restriction enzymes, these plasmid DNAs were cotransfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells to generate hybrid HIV. The hybrid HIVs derived by this method were infectious upon transmission to both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and established human leukemic T-cell lines. The virus derived from molecular clone pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) productively infected CEMx174 cells. On the other hand, molecular clone pARV (HIVSF2)-derived virus did not show productive infection of CEMx174 cells when used as a cell-free virus. The hybrid HIV containing the 3' end of the genome from pARV and the 5' end of the genome from pHXB2 was effective in infecting CEMx174 cells, but the converse hybrid containing 5' pARV and 3' pHXB2 was not effective in infecting CEMx174 cells. These results suggest that differences in the genes outside of env and nef play a role in the ability of the virus to infect a certain cell type. The intracellular ligation method should be useful in the analysis of related and unrelated HIV-1 isolates with common restriction enzyme cleavage sites. Images PMID:1678438

  14. Generation of hybrid human immunodeficiency virus utilizing the cotransfection method and analysis of cellular tropism.

    PubMed

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Murthy, S; Cartas, M; Monken, C; Srinivasan, A

    1991-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) isolated from infected individuals show tremendous genetic and biologic diversity. To delineate the genetic determinants underlying specific biologic characteristics, such as rate of replication, cytopathic effects, and ability to infect macrophages and T4 lymphoid cells, generation of hybrid HIV using viruses which exhibit distinct biologic features is essential. To develop methods for generating hybrid HIV, we constructed truncated HIV proviral DNA plasmids. Upon digestion with restriction enzymes, these plasmid DNAs were cotransfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells to generate hybrid HIV. The hybrid HIVs derived by this method were infectious upon transmission to both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and established human leukemic T-cell lines. The virus derived from molecular clone pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) productively infected CEMx174 cells. On the other hand, molecular clone pARV (HIVSF2)-derived virus did not show productive infection of CEMx174 cells when used as a cell-free virus. The hybrid HIV containing the 3' end of the genome from pARV and the 5' end of the genome from pHXB2 was effective in infecting CEMx174 cells, but the converse hybrid containing 5' pARV and 3' pHXB2 was not effective in infecting CEMx174 cells. These results suggest that differences in the genes outside of env and nef play a role in the ability of the virus to infect a certain cell type. The intracellular ligation method should be useful in the analysis of related and unrelated HIV-1 isolates with common restriction enzyme cleavage sites.

  15. The influence of atopy and asthma on immune responses in inner-city adults.

    PubMed

    Kakumanu, Sujani; Jaffee, Katy; Visness, Cynthia M; Dresen, Amy; Burger, Melissa; Witter, Frank R; O'Connor, George T; Cruikshank, William W; Shreffler, Wayne G; Bacharier, Leonard B; Gern, James E

    2016-03-01

    Asthma in the inner-city population is usually atopic in nature, and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying immune abnormalities that underlie asthma in urban adults have not been well defined. We investigated the influence of atopy and asthma on cytokine responses of inner-city adult women to define immune abnormalities associated with asthma and atopy. Blood samples were collected from 509 of 606 inner-city women enrolled in the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma (URECA) study. We tested for associations between atopy and asthma status and cytokine responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated ex vivo with a panel of innate and adaptive immune stimulants. Atopic subjects had heightened Th2 cytokine responses (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) to cockroach and dust mite antigens, tetanus toxoid, and phytohemagglutinin (P < 0.05 for all). Differences in cytokine responses were greatest in response to stimulation with cockroach and dust mite. In a multivariate analysis, atopy was broadly related to increased Th2-like responses to all antigens and PHA, while asthma was only weakly related to mitogen-induced IL-4 and IL-5 responses. There were few asthma or allergy-related differences in responses to innate stimuli, including IFN-α and IFN-γ responses. In this inner-city adult female population, atopy is associated with enhanced Th2 responses to allergens and other stimuli, and there was little or no additional signal attributable to asthma. In particular, these data indicate that altered systemic interferon and innate immune responses are not associated with allergies and/or asthma in inner-city women. PMID:27042305

  16. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  17. MHC class II transcription is associated with inflammatory responses in a wild marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Montano-Frías, Jorge E; Vera-Massieu, Camila; Álvarez-Martínez, Roberto; Flores-Morán, Adriana; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important non-specific and rapid responses that a vertebrate can elicit in response to damage or a foreign insult. To date, despite increasing evidence that the innate and adaptive branches of immunity are more intricately related than previously thought, few have examined interactions between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, a polymorphic region of the vertebrate genome that is involved with antigen presentation) and inflammation, and even less is known about these interactions in an eco-immunological context. Here, we examined the effect of MHC class II DRB gene multiplicity and transcription on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced inflammation during the early stages of development of California sea lions. Neither constitutive nor expressed ZacaDRB diversity was found to be associated with pup responses to PHA at any of the stages of pup development. However, for two-month-old pups, those with a specific MHC-DRB locus (ZacaDRB-A) tended to have less efficient responsive inflammation. Transcription of distinct MHC-DRB loci was also linked to PHA-induced inflammation, with patterns that varied markedly between ages, and that suggested that ongoing infectious processes could limit the capacity to respond to a secondary challenge. Life history constraints and physiological processes associated with development of California sea lions, in conjunction with their changing pathogenic environment could explain the observed effects of MHC class II transcription on PHA-induced inflammation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to examine the importance of expressed vs. constitutive MHC loci on inflammation in a natural population. PMID:27137083

  18. Lymphocyte transformation suppression caused by pyoderma--failure to demonstrate it in uncomplicated demodectic mange.

    PubMed

    Barta, O; Waltman, C; Oyekan, P P; McGrath, R K; Hribernik, T N

    1983-01-01

    Three dogs with demodectic mange uncomplicated by a bacterial infection and 9 dogs with demodectic mange and pyoderma were tested for their lymphocyte response to phytomitogens in vitro and for the presence of the serum's lymphocyte immunoregulatory factors (SLIF) suppressing blastogenesis. None of the 3 dogs with uncomplicated demodectic mange showed any detectable dysfunction of their lymphocytes or presence of the blastogenesis suppressing SLIF. Their lymphocytes generally responded to the mitogens with more blastogenesis than lymphocytes from healthy controls. On the other hand, in the group of 9 dogs with demodicosis complicated by a bacterial infection, high levels of the blastogenesis suppressing SLIF for concanavalin A-sensitive cells were detected in 4 dogs, for phytohemagglutinin-sensitive cells in 2 dogs, and for pokeweed mitogen-sensitive cells in 1 (of only 3 tested) dog. Dysfunction of lymphocytes per se (detected by a decreased blastogenesis in nonsuppressive normal canine and bovine sera) was detected in 3 dogs with demodicosis with pyoderma. The success of the treatment of demodectic mange or the bacterial skin infection did not correlate with the previous presence or absence of the blastogenesis suppressing SLIF. The treatment of pyoderma was less successful in dogs with an increase in blastogenesis of unstimulated cells in fresh normal canine serum over that in autologous serum. All 3 dogs with a detected dysfunction of their lymphocytes either died or were euthanatized as untreatable cases. It is concluded that the development of demodectic mange per se did not cause the appearance of the blastogenesis suppressing SLIF, which was primarily related to the appearance and extent of the secondary bacterial skin infection.

  19. Proliferative responses to recall antigens are associated with pregnancy outcome in women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed Central

    Bermas, B L; Hill, J A

    1997-01-01

    Maternal tolerance of the fetal hemiallograft suggests that immunomodulation occurs during gestation. Therefore, recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) may represent a failure of the immune changes that maintain pregnancy. We hypothesized that fertile women but not women with RSA may lose their immune responses to recall antigens when pregnant. This phenomenon has been seen in immunosuppressed transplant recipients and is associated with graft survival. Therefore, we evaluated proliferative responses to recall antigens in four groups of women: group 1, nonpregnant fertile women with no history of pregnancy loss and at least one prior healthy pregnancy, n = 13; group 2, nonpregnant women with a history of three or more spontaneous abortions, n = 28; group 3, healthy pregnant women between 6 and 9 wk of gestation without a history of prior pregnancy loss, n = 15; and group 4, pregnant women between 6 and 9 wk of gestation, with a history of RSA, n = 22. Proliferative responses of peripheral blood leukocytes to the recall antigens influenza and tetanus, alloantigens, and phytohemagglutinin were determined prospectively. Positive responses (stimulation index > 3) to recall antigens (a response to either influenza or tetanus was considered positive) were as follows: group 1 (nonpregnant fertile women), 11/13 (85%); group 2 (nonpregnant RSA women), 24/28 (86%); group 3 (pregnant fertile women), 4/15 (27%) (P

  20. Characterization of α-Amylase-Inhibitor, a Lectin-Like Protein in the Seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Joaquin; Altabella, Teresa; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1990-01-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect α-amylases, but not of plant α-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, α-amylase inhibitor (αAl) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Purified αAl can be resolved by SDS-PAGE into five bands (Mr 15,000-19,000), four of which have covalently attached glycans. These bands represent glycoforms of two different polypeptides. All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it (LM Hoffman [1984] J Mol Appl Genet 2: 447-453; J Moreno, MJ Chrispeels [1989] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 86:7885-7889). The primary translation product of αAl is a polypeptide of Mr 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of Mr 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (Mr 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that αAl is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmlc reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667338

  1. Effect of In Ovo exposure to an organochlorine mixture extracted from double crested cormorant eggs (Phalacrocorax auritus) and PCB 126 on immune function of juvenile chickens.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, E T; Wiley, F; Grasman, K A; Tillitt, D E; Sikarskie, J G; Bowerman, W W

    2007-11-01

    Organochlorine (OC) contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been associated with immune modulation in wild fish-eating birds from the Great Lakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune function of juvenile chickens after in ovo exposure to PCB 126 or an environmentally relevant OC mixture extracted from eggs of double crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA. Fertile white leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected before incubation with 0.55-1.79 ng TCDD equivalents (TEQ)/egg PCB 126 and 1.2-4.9 ng TEQs/egg of cormorant egg extract into the air cell in two separate experiments. After hatching, the immune function was tested using in vivo phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response in 11-day-old chicks, antibody titers to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in 28-day-old chicks, and, at necropsy, thymus and bursal mass and cellularity. PCB 126 decreased antibody titers at all doses and decreased the thymus and bursa index but not cellularity at 1.79 ng TEQ/egg. The cormorant egg extract caused no significant alterations in immune function even though it has been demonstrated as immunotoxic in chicken embryos. However, twofold to threefold increases in total anti-SRBC titers in 28-day-old chicks exposed to 1.2 or 2.4 ng TEQ/egg of cormorant extract were similar to elevations in anti-SRBC titer observed in Caspian tern (Sterna caspia) chicks from a highly OC-contaminated site in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. Posthatch exposure to OC through fish consumption in addition to in ovo OC exposure might be associated with the immune modulation reported in wild birds. Chicks in this study might have begun to compensate for embryonic immunotoxicity by the ages at which we studied them. PMID:17882474

  2. Spaceflight effects on T lymphocyte distribution, function and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Daila S.; Slater, James M.; Luo-Owen, Xian; Rizvi, Asma; Chapes, Stephen K.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is highly sensitive to stressors present during spaceflight. The major emphasis of this study was on the T lymphocytes in C57BL/6NTac mice after return from a 13-day space shuttle mission (STS-118). Spleens and thymuses from flight animals (FLT) and ground controls similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEM) were evaluated within 3–6 h after landing. Phytohemagglutinin-induced splenocyte DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in FLT mice when based on both counts per minute and stimulation indexes (P < 0.05). Flow cytometry showed that CD3+ T and CD19+ B cell counts were low in spleens from the FLT group, whereas the number of NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells was increased (P < 0.01 for all three populations vs. AEM). The numerical changes resulted in a low percentage of T cells and high percentage of NK cells in FLT animals (P < 0.05). After activation of spleen cells with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interleukin-2 (IL-2) was decreased, but IL-10, interferon-γ, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α were increased in FLT mice (P < 0.05). Analysis of cancer-related genes in the thymus showed that the expression of 30 of 84 genes was significantly affected by flight (P < 0.05). Genes that differed from AEM controls by at least 1.5-fold were Birc5, Figf, Grb2, and Tert (upregulated) and Fos, Ifnb1, Itgb3, Mmp9, Myc, Pdgfb, S100a4, Thbs, and Tnf (downregulated). Collectively, the data show that T cell distribution, function, and gene expression are significantly modified shortly after return from the spaceflight environment. PMID:18988762

  3. Immunological and reproductive health assessment in herring gulls and black-crowned night herons in the Hudson–Raritan Estuary and Black-Crowned Night Herons in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grasman, Keith A.; Echols, Kathy R.; May, Thomas M.; Peterman, Paul H.; Gale, Robert W.; Orazio, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown inexplicable declines in breeding waterbirds within western New York/New Jersey Harbor between 1996 and 2002 and elevated polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs. The present study assessed associations between immune function, prefledgling survival, and selected organochlorine compounds and metals in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) in lower New York Harbor during 2003. In pipping gull embryos, lymphoid cells were counted in the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (sites of T and B lymphocyte maturation, respectively). The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response assessed T cell function in gull and heron chicks. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured in vitro in adult and prefledgling gulls. Reference data came from the Great Lakes and Bay of Fundy. Survival of prefledgling gulls was poor, with only 0.68 and 0.5 chicks per nest surviving to three and four weeks after hatch, respectively. Developing lymphoid cells were reduced 51% in the thymus and 42% in the bursa of gull embryos from New York Harbor. In vitro lymphocyte assays demonstrated reduced spontaneous proliferation, reduced T cell mitogen-induced proliferation, and increased B cell mitogen-induced proliferation in gull chicks from New York Harbor. The PHA skin response was suppressed 70 to 80% in gull and heron chicks. Strong negative correlations (r = –0.95 to –0.98) between the PHA response and dioxins and PCBs in gull livers was strong evidence suggesting that these chemicals contribute significantly to immunosuppression in New York Harbor waterbirds.

  4. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  5. Effects of Age, Sex and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type-II on Silver Stained Nucleolar Organizer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G.; Lane, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver stained nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) were studied in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes from 55 Caucasian control individuals (34 females with average age of 24 years and age range 19 weeks gestation to 87 years; 21 males with average age of 31 years and age range 29 weeks gestation to 72 years) and 13 individuals (7 females, 6 males; average age 38.8 years with age range 25—58 years) with multiple endocrine neoplasia-type II (MEN-II), an autosomal dominant malignancy with increased chromosome breakage. For the first time, AgNORs were examined in lymphocytes from normal fetuses and patients with MEN-II in order to determine the effects of age, sex or malignancy on the number of AgNORs. No significant difference in the average number of AgNORs were found in fetal cells (8.2 ± S.D. 0.7/cell) when compared with cells from older individuals including those over 65 years of age (8.0 ± S.D. 0.8/cell). There was a statistically significant negative correlation (P< 0.05) between the modal number of AgNORs on G but not D chromosomes in both males and females. A negative correlation was also found between the mean number of AgNORs and age but was not statistically significant. The average number of AgNORs in the MEN-II individuals was 8.5 ± S.D. 0.7/cell, which was not significantly different than 8.2 ± S.D. 0.7/cell observed in age-matched control subjects. PMID:2471022

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells.

  7. Cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to radiofrequency radiation at a cellular telephone frequency (835.62 MHz, FDMA).

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Leal, B Z; Meltz, M L; Pickard, W F; Bisht, K S; Roti Roti JL; Straube, W L; Moros, E G

    2001-01-01

    Freshly collected peripheral blood samples from four healthy human volunteers were diluted with RPMI 1640 tissue culture medium and exposed in sterile T-75 tissue culture flasks in vitro for 24 h to 835.62 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation, a frequency employed for customer-to-base station transmission of cellular telephone communications. An analog signal was used, and the access technology was frequency division multiple access (FDMA, continuous wave). A nominal net forward power of 68 W was used, and the nominal power density at the center of the exposure flask was 860 W/m(2). The mean specific absorption rate in the exposure flask was 4.4 or 5.0 W/kg. Aliquots of diluted blood that were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.50 Gy of gamma radiation were used as negative or positive controls. Immediately after the exposures, the lymphocytes were stimulated with a mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and cultured for 48 or 72 h to determine the extent of genetic damage, as assessed from the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei. The extent of alteration in the kinetics of cell proliferation was determined from the mitotic indices in 48-h cultures and from the incidence of binucleate cells in 72-h cultures. The data indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation- and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to mitotic indices, incidence of exchange aberrations, excess fragments, binucleate cells, and micronuclei. In contrast, the response of the lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation was significantly different from both RF-radiation- and sham-exposed cells for all of these indices. Thus, under the experimental conditions tested, there is no evidence for the induction of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro for 24 h to 835.62 MHz RF radiation at SARs of 4.4 or 5.0 W/kg. PMID:11121222

  8. Increased production of interleukin-6 by T lymphocytes from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lapeña, P; Prieto, A; Garcia-Suarez, J; Reyes, E; San Miguel, J; Jorda, J; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1996-01-01

    Alterations in T lymphocyte functions may affect other cellular components of the immune system. Several lymphokines produced by T cells are involved in the proliferation and differentiation of human B lymphocytes. Alterations in the secretion of these molecules may be implicated in the development of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases. We have investigated the production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by T lymphocytes from 14 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and 16 healthy controls. The phenotypical and functional characteristics of these T lymphocytes were also studied. The proliferative response to vegetal lectin phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was decreased in T lymphocytes from MM patients (p < 0.01). This defective proliferative response cannot be ascribed to either defective IL-2 production or diminished receptor expression, since neither of these parameters showed a significant difference between MM patients and healthy controls (p < 0.05). However, the defective proliferative response of T lymphocytes from MM patients was reverted by the addition of saturating amounts of exogenous IL-2 (p > 0.05) but not by exogenous IL-6 (p < 0.05). The IL-6 production by PHA-stimulated T lymphocytes from the MM patients was significantly higher than in healthy controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that T lymphocytes from MM patients show a functional alteration with a defective proliferative response to PHA that is reverted by exogenous addition of IL-2. After lectin stimulation, the production of IL-2 by T lymphocytes from those patients was normal, while IL-6 secretion was increased.

  9. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-01-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  10. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  11. Effects of feeding blends of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on performance, metabolism, hematology, and immunocompetence of ducklings.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S R; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Sefton, A E; Downey, R; Woodward, B

    2005-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on performance, metabolism, hematology, and immune competence of ducklings. Four hundred sixty-four 1-d-old White Pekin male ducklings were fed starter (0 to 2 wk), grower (3 to 4 wk), and finisher (5 to 6 wk) diets formulated with uncontaminated grains, a low level of contaminated grains, a high level of contaminated grains, or the higher level of contaminated grains + 0.2% polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent. Body weight gains, feed consumption, and feed efficiency were not affected by diet. However, consumption of contaminated grains decreased plasma calcium concentrations after 2 wk and plasma uric acid concentrations at the 4-wk assessment point. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations and hematocrit decreased when ducks were fed contaminated grains for 4 or 6 wk, respectively. In contrast, total numbers of white blood cells and lymphocytes increased transiently in birds fed contaminated grains for 4 wk. The antibody response to sheep red blood cells (CD4+ T cell dependent) and the cell-mediated response to phytohemagglutinin-P (also CD4+ T cell dependent) were not affected by diet, but consumption of contaminated grains for 6 wk decreased the duration of peak cell-mediated response to dinitrochlorobenzene (CD8+ T cell dependent) assessed in a skin test. Feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins, even at levels widely regarded as high, exerted only minor adverse effects on plasma chemistry and hematology of ducklings, and production parameters were unaffected in this avian species. Mycotoxin-contaminated feeds may, however, render these animals susceptible to infectious agents such as viruses against which the CD8+ T cell provides necessary defence. Glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent was not effective in preventing alterations caused by Fusarium mycotoxins.

  12. Human peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express Th1-like cytokine mRNA and proteins following in vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, M B; Golding, H; Betts, M; Yamauchi, A; Bloom, E T; Butler, L E; Stevan, L; Golding, B

    1995-01-01

    Defining the pattern of lymphokine production associated with Brucella abortus is critical for advancing the development of B. abortus as a vaccine carrier. In the present study we investigated the ability of heat-inactivated B. abortus or lipopolysaccharide from B. abortus to induce lymphokine production from purified human T cells in vitro. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, and IL-5 induction was assayed by mRNA-specific PCR and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bioassay for protein production. Following depletion of monocytes and B cells, B. abortus increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 mRNA expression in purified T cells compared with expression in unstimulated cells. In contrast, no IL-5 mRNA expression and only transient low-level IL-4 mRNA expression and no IL-4 protein secretion were detected. Phytohemagglutinin or phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin induced mRNA and protein for all these cytokines. Similar results were obtained with LPS purified from B. abortus. Removal of NK cells did not reduce lymphokine production, and enriched NK cells did not express IFN-gamma mRNA or secrete IFN-gamma protein in response to B. abortus, indicating that NK cells were not the responding population. Both CD4+ and CD8+ populations produced IFN-gamma and IL-2 in response to B. abortus. Preincubation of resting T cells with B. abortus or LPS from B. abortus for 7 days induced their differentiation into Th1-like cells as judged by their subsequent lymphokine response to phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin. These results suggest that B. abortus can induce differentiation of Th0 into Th1-type cells. PMID:7790090

  13. Interleukin-17A-Induced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Superior Modulators of Immunological Function.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Kisha Nandini; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Hope, Christopher M; Krishnan, Ravi; Carroll, Robert P; Gronthos, Stan; Grey, Shane T; Coates, Patrick T

    2015-09-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-preactivated mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-γ) are highly immunosuppressive but immunogenic in vivo due to their inherent expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules. Here, we present an improved approach where we modified human bone marrow-derived MSC with interleukin-17A (MSC-17) to enhance T cell immunosuppression but not their immunogenicity. MSC-17, unlike MSC-γ, showed no induction or upregulation of MHC class I, MHC class II, and T cell costimulatory molecule CD40, but maintained normal MSC morphology and phenotypic marker expression. When cocultured with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated human T cells, MSCs-17 were potent suppressors of T cell proliferation. Furthermore, MSC-17 inhibited surface CD25 expression and suppressed the elaboration of Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and IL-2 when compared with untreated MSCs (UT-MSCs). T cell suppression by MSC-17 correlated with increased IL-6 but not with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1, cyclooxygenase 1, and transforming growth factor β-1. MSC-17 but not MSC-γ consistently induced CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (iTregs) from PHA-activated CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. MSC-induced iTregs expressed CD39, CD73, CD69, OX40, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR). These suppressive MSCs-17 can engender Tregs to potently suppress T cell activation with minimal immunogenicity and thus represent a superior T cell immunomodulator for clinical application. PMID:26037953

  14. A cluster of human T-lymphotropic virus type-I carriers found in the southern district of Tokushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, M; Iishi, Y; Horiuchi, N; Nakao, K; Okagawa, K; Saito, S; Minami, Y; Katoh, K

    1989-03-01

    Since we had experience of eight patients with adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma from 130 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma between 1978 and 1986, a sero-epidemiological survey of anti human lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I) antibody was performed using a gelatin particle agglutination test, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay for 2,190 adults (768 men and 1,422 women) aged between 21 and 86 years, in the southern district of Tokushima Prefecture. The inconclusive data obtained using the above mentioned methods have been re-examined by western blotting analysis using enzyme-labelled anti IgM and anti IgG. There was an overall prevalence rate of 6.0% (132/2, 190) but higher rate were found in village C (10.9%) and village D (14.2%). These two villages together with town K (6.1% seropositive) form one community unit with a small population in a mountain area, which could be prone to producing a cluster of HTLV-I carriers. Town G with 8.0% sero-positivity is on the Pacific Ocean coast neighboring one of the endemic areas in the eastern section of Kohchi Prefecture. Interestingly, only IgM antibody was detected in 17 of 137 carriers (13%), all females who had never had a blood transfusion, suggesting them to h ave been in a sort of immunodeficient state, as reported in cases of HTLV-I infection. In 13 of 29 HTLV-I carriers (44.8%) from villages C and D, the viral antigen was detected in 1-9% (0.41 +/- 0.19%) of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells after being cultured with phytohemagglutinin for three days. The data indicate that those carriers had evidently been infected with the HTLV-I virus.

  15. Effect of in ovo exposure to an organochlorine mixture extracted from double crested cormorant eggs (Phalacrocorax auritus) and PCB 126 on immune function of juvenile chickens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, E.T.; Wiley, F.; Grasman, K.A.; Tillitt, D.E.; Sikarskie, J.G.; Bowerman, W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been associated with immune modulation in wild fish-eating birds from the Great Lakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune function of juvenile chickens after in ovo exposure to PCB 126 or an environmentally relevant OC mixture extracted from eggs of double crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA. Fertile white leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected before incubation with 0.55-1.79 ng TCDD equivalents (TEQ)/egg PCB 126 and 1.2-4.9 ng TEQs/egg of cormorant egg extract into the air cell in two separate experiments. After hatching, the immune function was tested using in vivo phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response in 11-day-old chicks, antibody titers to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in 28-day-old chicks, and, at necropsy, thymus and bursal mass and cellularity. PCB 126 decreased antibody titers at all doses and decreased the thymus and bursa index but not cellularity at 1.79 ng TEQ/egg. The cormorant egg extract caused no significant alterations in immune function even though it has been demonstrated as immunotoxic in chicken embryos. However, twofold to threefold increases in total anti-SRBC titers in 28-day-old chicks exposed to 1.2 or 2.4 ng TEQ/egg of cormorant extract were similar to elevations in anti-SRBC titer observed in Caspian tern (Sterna caspia) chicks from a highly OC-contaminated site in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. Posthatch exposure to OC through fish consumption in addition to in ovo OC exposure might be associated with the immune modulation reported in wild birds. Chicks in this study might have begun to compensate for embryonic immunotoxicity by the ages at which we studied them. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. Increased Expression of Regulatory T Cells and Down-Regulatory Molecules in Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Maria L.; Pagliari, Carla; Trindade, Maria Angela B.; Yamashitafuji, Tania M.; Duarte, Alberto José S.; Cacere, Camila R.; Benard, Gil

    2012-01-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) play an important role in the mechanism of host's failure to control pathogen dissemination in severe forms of different chronic granulomatous diseases, but their role in leprosy has not yet been elucidated; 28 newly diagnosed patients (16 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 12 patients with tuberculoid leprosy) and 6 healthy Mycobacterium leprae-exposed individuals (contacts) were studied. Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry (CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated in vitro with a M. leprae antigenic preparation and phytohemagglutinin as well as in skin lesions by immunohistochemistry. The lymphoproliferative (LPR), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses of the in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the in situ expression of IL-10, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) were also determined. We show that M. leprae antigens induced significantly lower LPR but significantly higher Treg numbers in lepromatous than tuberculoid patients and contacts. Mitogen-induced LPR and Treg frequencies were not significantly different among the three groups. Tregs were also more frequent in situ in lepromatous patients, and this finding was paralleled by increased expression of the antiinflammatory molecules IL-10 and CTLA-4 but not TGF-β. In lepromatous patients, Tregs were intermingled with vacuolized hystiocyte infiltrates all over the lesion, whereas in tuberculoid patients, Tregs were rare. Our results suggest that Tregs are present in increased numbers, and they may have a pathogenic role in leprosy patients harboring uncontrolled bacillary multiplication but not in those individuals capable of limiting M. leprae growth. PMID:22556091

  17. Increased expression of regulatory T cells and down-regulatory molecules in lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Maria L; Pagliari, Carla; Trindade, Maria Angela B; Yamashitafuji, Tania M; Duarte, Alberto José S; Cacere, Camila R; Benard, Gil

    2012-05-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) play an important role in the mechanism of host's failure to control pathogen dissemination in severe forms of different chronic granulomatous diseases, but their role in leprosy has not yet been elucidated; 28 newly diagnosed patients (16 patients with lepromatous leprosy and 12 patients with tuberculoid leprosy) and 6 healthy Mycobacterium leprae-exposed individuals (contacts) were studied. Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry (CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated in vitro with a M. leprae antigenic preparation and phytohemagglutinin as well as in skin lesions by immunohistochemistry. The lymphoproliferative (LPR), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses of the in vitro-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the in situ expression of IL-10, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) were also determined. We show that M. leprae antigens induced significantly lower LPR but significantly higher Treg numbers in lepromatous than tuberculoid patients and contacts. Mitogen-induced LPR and Treg frequencies were not significantly different among the three groups. Tregs were also more frequent in situ in lepromatous patients, and this finding was paralleled by increased expression of the antiinflammatory molecules IL-10 and CTLA-4 but not TGF-β. In lepromatous patients, Tregs were intermingled with vacuolized hystiocyte infiltrates all over the lesion, whereas in tuberculoid patients, Tregs were rare. Our results suggest that Tregs are present in increased numbers, and they may have a pathogenic role in leprosy patients harboring uncontrolled bacillary multiplication but not in those individuals capable of limiting M. leprae growth. PMID:22556091

  18. Comparison of F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase chromosome damage induced by high doses of low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Willingham, V.; Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although biophysical models predict a difference in the ratio of interchromosomal to intrachromosomal interarm exchanges (F ratio) for low- and high-LET radiations, few experimental data support this prediction. However, the F ratios in experiments to date have been generated using data on chromosome aberrations in samples collected at the first postirradiation mitosis, which may not be indicative of the aberrations formed in interphase after exposure to high-LET radiations. In the present study, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 2 and 5 Gy of gamma rays and 3 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions (LET = 140 keV/micrometer), stimulated the cells to grow with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and collected the condensed chromosomes after 48 h of incubation using both chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and the conventional metaphase techniques. The PCC technique used here condenses chromosomes mostly in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The F ratio was calculated using data on asymmetrical chromosome aberrations in both the PCC and metaphase samples. It was found that the F ratios were similar for the samples irradiated with low- and high-LET radiation and collected at metaphase. However, for irradiated samples assayed by PCC, the F ratio was found to be 8.2 +/- 2.0 for 5 Gy gamma rays and 5.2 +/- 0.9 for 3 Gy iron ions. The distribution of the aberrations indicated that, in the PCC samples irradiated with iron ions, most of the centric rings occurred in spreads containing five or more asymmetrical aberrations. These heavily damaged cells, which were either less likely to reach mitosis or may reach mitosis at a later time, were responsible for the difference in the F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase analysis after exposure to iron ions.

  19. Quality control of extracorporeal photochemotherapy: Proliferation assay using CFSE validated according to ISO 15189:2007 standards.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Faivre; Lucie, Lecouflet; Wang-Qing, Liu; Isabelle, Khadher; Camille, Lahaie; Michel, Vidal; Sabine, Legouvello; Jean-Louis, Beaumont; Philippe, Bierling; Hélène, Rouard; Brigitte, Birebent

    2014-09-01

    Background: For the last 40 years, the technique of extracorporeal photopheresis has constantly developed. Among irradiation systems, those called 'off-line' allow the validation of the quality of the cell therapy product. The inhibition of the proliferation of lymphocytes after UVA irradiation is usually verified by the tritiated thymidine assay as in vitro proliferation assay. The document presented here describes the results obtained while performing the setting up of an alternative proliferation assay using flow cytometry according to ISO 15189:2007 Standard. Methods: Cells samples taken before and after UVA irradiation were labeled with CFSE and then cultured with phytohemagglutinin. After 3 days, an analysis of the CFSE staining was realized by flow cytometry. In order to validate the shift in the method used according to Standard, the following tests were performed: 1) comparison with the reference method, 2) robustness test, 3) reagents stability. Results: Comparison method demonstrated that the sensitivity of the CFSE test is 100%, the specificity is 89% and the concordance is almost complete. The CFSE test is robust regarding parameters like cell concentration or PHA concentration. PHA and CFSE are stable for 6 months and one year, respectively. Conclusion: Validation of this alternative test, according to the ISO 15189:2007 Standard, has demonstrated good concordance with reference method. The results of the robustness and stability of reagents are appropriate for its routine use. Thus, the benefits of alternative technique make it a wise choice for the quality control of ECP in a cell therapy laboratory. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  20. Impact of lithium alone and in combination with antidepressants on cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petersein, Charlotte; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Schmidt, Frank M; Lichtblau, Nicole; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important psychopharmacological agent for the treatment of unipolar as well as bipolar affective disorders. Lithium has a number of side effects such as hypothyroidism and aggravation of psoriasis. On the other hand, lithium has pro-inflammatory effects, which appear beneficial in some disorders associated with immunological deficits, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, immunological characteristics of lithium may be an important consideration in individualized therapeutic decisions. We measured the levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-22, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the stimulated blood of thirty healthy subjects supplemented with lithium alone, the antidepressants citalopram, escitalopram or mirtazapine alone, the combination of each antidepressant with lithium, and a no drug control. These drugs were tested under three blood stimulant conditions: murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 and the 5C3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3/5C3), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and unstimulated blood. Lithium, alone and in combination with any of the tested antidepressants, led to a consistent increase of IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the unstimulated as well as the stimulated blood. In the OKT3/5C3- and PHA-stimulated blood, IL-17 production was significantly enhanced by lithium. Lithium additionally increased IL-2 concentrations significantly in PHA-stimulated blood. The data support the view that lithium has pro-inflammatory properties. These immunological characteristics may contribute to side effects of lithium, but may also explain its beneficial effects in patients suffering from HIV infection or SLE.

  1. In vitro production of functional immune cells derived from human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Payuhakrit, Witchuda; Panichakul, Tasanee; Charoenphon, Natthawut; Chalermsaenyakorn, Panus; Jaovisidha, Adithep; Wongborisuth, Chokdee; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from cord blood are potentially high sources for transplantation due to their low immunogenicity and the presence of the multipotent cells. These cells are capable of differentiating to produce various lineages of blood cells under specific conditions. We have enriched highly purified CD34+ cells from cord blood, determined in vitro growth of the cells in culture systems in the absence (condition A) or presence of GM-CSF and G-CSF (condition B), and determined the profile of immune cells during the period of cultivation by using flow cytometry. PhytohemagglutininA (PHA) was used as a mitogen to stimulate T lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells. GM-CSF and G-CSF prolonged the survival of the growing cells and also maintained expansion of cells in blastic stage. By day 12 of cultivation, when cell numbers peaked, various types of immune cells had appeared (CD14+ cells, CD40+HLA-DR+ cells, CD3+CD56+ cells, CD19+ cells, CD3+CD4+ cells, CD3+CD8+cells and CD3-CD56+). A significantly higher percentage of monocytes (p = 0.002) were observed under culture with GM-CSF, G-CSF when compared with culture without GM-CSF, G-CSF. In addition, T lymphocytes derived from HSC responded to 50 µg/ml of PHA. This is the first report showing the complete differentiation and proliferation of immune cells derived from CD34+ HSC under in vitro culture conditions. Lymphocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells and polymorph nuclear cells derived from HSC in vitro are unique, and thus may benefit various studies such as innate immunity and pathophysiology of immune disorders. PMID:26933404

  2. Treatment of NZB/NZW mice with total lymphoid irradiation: long-lasting suppression of disease without generalized immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Arndt, R.; Okada, S.; Ward, R.; Thach, A.B.; Strober, S.

    1986-05-01

    We used total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; total dose = 3400 rad) to treat the lupus-like renal disease of 6-mo-old female NZB/NZW mice. Similar to our past studies, this treatment resulted in a marked prolongation of survival, decrease in proteinuria, and decrease in serum anti-DNA antibodies compared with untreated littermate controls. Although there was no evidence of disease recurrence in TLI-treated mice until after 12 mo of age, the in vitro proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin by NZB/NZW spleen cells recovered within 6 wk such that responses were greater than control NZB/NZW animals. A similar recovery and overshoot after TLI were evident in the primary antibody response to the T cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Both the total and IgG anti-SRBC antibody responses after TLI were greater than those of untreated NZB/NZW controls, and were comparable with those of untreated non-autoimmune mice. Despite this increased response to mitogens and antigens after TLI, we noted a decrease in spontaneous splenic IgG-secreting cells and a decrease in IgG but not IgM antinuclear antibody production. Nonspecific suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response were detectable in the spleens of NZB/NZW mice early after TLI. However, the disappearance of suppressor cells was not associated with recrudescence of disease activity. Furthermore, transfer of large numbers of spleen cells from TLI-treated NZB/NZW mice did not result in disease suppression in untreated age-matched recipients. In summary, treatment of NZB/NZW mice with TLI results in a prolonged remission in autoimmune disease, which is achieved in the absence of generalized immunosuppression.

  3. CD69-mediated pathway of lymphocyte activation: anti-CD69 monoclonal antibodies trigger the cytolytic activity of different lymphoid effector cells with the exception of cytolytic T lymphocytes expressing T cell receptor alpha/beta

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The effect of anti-CD69 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on the induction of the cytolytic activity in different types of lymphoid effector cells has been investigated. Three anti-CD69 mAbs, including the reference mAb MLR3 and two new mAbs (c227 and 31C4), have been used. All cloned CD3-CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells belonging to different subsets (as defined by the surface expression of GL183 and/or EB6 antigens) were efficiently triggered by anti-CD69 mAbs and lysed P815 mastocytoma cells in a redirected killing assay. Triggering of the cytolytic activity could also be induced in CD3-CD16- NK clones, which fail to respond to other stimuli (including anti-CD16, anti-CD2 mAbs, or phytohemagglutinin). A similar triggering effect was detected in T cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+ clones belonging to different subsets. On the other hand, anti-CD69 mAbs could not induce triggering of the cytolytic activity in TCR alpha/beta+ cytolytic clones. Since all thymocytes are known to express CD69 antigen after cell activation, we analyzed a series of phenotypically different cytolytic thymocyte populations and clones for their responsiveness to anti-CD69 mAb in a redirected killing assay. Again, anti-CD69 mAb triggered TCR gamma/delta+ but not TCR alpha/beta+ thymocytes. Anti-CD69 mAb efficiently triggered the cytolytic activity of "early" thymocytes lines or clones (CD3-4-8-7+), which lack all other known pathways of cell activation. Thus, it appears that CD69 molecules may initiate a pathway of activation of cytolytic functions common to a number of activated effector lymphocytes with the remarkable exception of TCR alpha/beta+ cytolytic cells. PMID:1720808

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in utero produces sheep-goat chimeras.

    PubMed

    Oppenheim, S M; Muench, M O; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Moyer, A L; BonDurant, R H; Rowe, J D; Anderson, G B

    2001-01-01

    Both allogeneic and xenogeneic hematopoietic chimera models have been developed, including fetal sheep models that demonstrated high levels of stable, multilineage engraftment created by in utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of in utero transplantation to create xenogeneic sheep-goat hematopoietic chimeras. Fetal liver cells and T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow were tested as sources of hematopoietic stem cells. Donor cells were injected intraperitoneally into 130 recipient fetuses between 49 and 62 days of gestation. Groups 1 and 2 received crude fetal liver cell preparations. Group 3 received fetal liver cells that were incubated overnight in a phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte-conditioned medium (PHA-LCM). In Group 4, hematopoietic stem cells were concentrated by using additional density separations. Group 5 fetal recipients received low-density, T-cell-depleted adult bone marrow cells. In Group 1, fetuses were accessed via hysterotomy. Hematopoietic stem cells were injected into Groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 without cutting through the uterine wall. Fetal survival in the five groups ranged from 56 to 100%. The percentage of chimeras from injected fetuses ranged from 43 to 92% by FACS and PCR analyses; however, levels of chimerism were low (<1%). The highest rates of chimerism were found among recipients of low-density fetal liver cells. Despite the pre-immunocompetent status of the fetal recipients and the genetic similarities between sheep and goats, high levels of engraftment were not observed. The consistently low levels of chimerism observed in this study, as well as the poor results recently reported by others using these procedures, indicate that significant barriers exist to transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in utero. PMID:11358392

  5. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  6. Induction and repair of DNA damage measured by the comet assay in human T lymphocytes separated by immunomagnetic cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2014-11-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage in whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents. Cytogenetic assays with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured T lymphocytes are also frequently performed in human biomonitoring. Cytogenetic effects (micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges) may be induced in vivo but also occur ex vivo during the cultivation of lymphocytes as a consequence of DNA damage present in lymphocytes at the time of sampling. To better understand whether DNA damage measured by the comet assay in PBMC is representative for DNA damage in T cells, we comparatively investigated DNA damage and its repair in PBMC and T cells obtained by immunomagnetic cell sorting. PBMC cultures and T cell cultures were exposed to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action and DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after the end of a 2h exposure and after 18h post-incubation. The mutagens tested were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), styrene oxide and potassium bromate. MMS and potassium bromate were also tested by the modified comet assay with formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein. The results indicate that the mutagens tested induce DNA damage in PBMC and T cells in the same range of concentrations and removal of induced DNA lesions occurs to a comparable extent. Based on these results, we conclude that the comet assay with PBMC is suited to predict DNA damage and its removal in T cells.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced CXCL10 mRNA Level and Six Stimulant-mRNA Combinations in Whole Blood: Novel Biomarkers for Bortezomib Responses Obtained from a Prospective Multicenter Trial for Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Sagawa, Morihiko; Ri, Masaki; Suzuki, Kenshi; Abe, Masahiro; Ohmachi, Ken; Nakagawa, Yasunori; Nakamura, Shingen; Chosa, Mizuki; Iida, Shinsuke; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    To identify predictive biomarkers for clinical responses to bortezomib treatment, 0.06 mL of each whole blood without any cell separation procedures was stimulated ex vivo using five agents, and eight mRNAs were quantified. In six centers, heparinized peripheral blood was prospectively obtained from 80 previously treated or untreated, symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) patients with measurable levels of M-proteins. The blood sample was procured prior to treatment as well as 2-3 days and 1-3 weeks after the first dose of bortezomib, which was intravenously administered biweekly or weekly, during the first cycle. Six stimulant-mRNA combinations; that is, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), LPS-CXCL chemokine 10 (CXCL10), LPS-CCL chemokine 4 (CCL4), phytohemagglutinin-CCL4, zymosan A (ZA)-GMCSF and ZA-CCL4 showed significantly higher induction in the complete and very good partial response group than in the stable and progressive disease group, as determined by both parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (unpaired Mann-Whitney test) tests. Moreover, LPS-induced CXCL10 mRNA expression was significantly suppressed 2-3 days after the first dose of bortezomib in all patients, as determined by both parametric (t-test) and non-parametric (paired Wilcoxon test) tests, whereas the complete and very good partial response group showed sustained suppression 1-3 weeks after the first dose. Thus, pretreatment LPS-CXCL10 mRNA and/or the six combinations may serve as potential biomarkers for the response to bortezomib treatment in MM patients.

  8. Immunological and clinical observations in diabetic kidney graft recipients pretreated with total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Vanrenterghem, Y.; Roels, L.; Ang, K.K.; Bouillon, R.; Lerut, T.; Gruwez, J.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.; Michielsen, P.

    1987-03-01

    In a feasibility study, twenty patients with end-stage diabetic nephropathy were treated with fractionated total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI, mean dose 25 Gy), before transplantation of a first cadaveric kidney. During radiotherapy, only one patient had a serious side effect (bone marrow depression). After transplantation four patients died (one of a myocardial infarction, one of ketoacidosis, and two of infections occurring during treatment of rejection crises). One graft was lost because of chronic rejection. The other 15 patients have a functioning graft (mean follow-up 24 months) and receive low-dose prednisone alone (less than 10 mg/day, n = 11) or in conjunction with cyclosporine (n = 4) as maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. A favorable clinical outcome after TLI (no, or only one, steroid-sensitive rejection crisis) was significantly correlated with a high pre-TLI helper/suppressor lymphocyte ratio, a short interval between TLI and the time of transplantation, and the occurrence of functional suppressor cells early after TLI. The most striking immunological changes provoked by TLI consisted of a long-term depression of the mixed lymphocyte reaction and of the phytohemagglutinin, and Concanavalin A or pokeweed-mitogen-induced blastogenesis. A rapid and complete recovery of the natural killer cell activity was observed after TLI. A permanent inversion of the OKT4+ (T helper/inducer) over OKT8+ (T suppressor/cytotoxic) lymphocyte ratio was provoked by a decrease of the OTK4+ subpopulation, together with a supranormal recovery of the OKT8+ lymphocytes. A majority of the latter lymphocytes did also express the Leu 7 and the Leu 15 phenotype.

  9. Effect of phorbol esters on iron uptake in human hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, U.; Titeux, M.; Louache, F.; Thomopoulos, P.; Rochant, H.

    1984-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on iron uptake into human hematopoietic cell lines K562, U937, and HL-60. TPA inhibited both cell growth and iron uptake by these cell lines. This effect was rapid, which is typical of phorbol esters which are biologically active, and it occurred at very low concentrations of TPA. This effect of TPA was dependent upon an inhibition of the transferrin-binding capacity as estimated on intact cells. However, experiments with transferrin binding on cell samples dissolved in 1% Triton X-100 showed that TPA-treated cells exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity similar to that of control cells. On the basis of this result, it is suggested that TPA modified a part of transferrin receptors present in the cells; as a result of this modification, these receptors became unavailable for binding transferrin, but they remained physically present in the cell. Other compounds capable of inducing the differentiation of leukemic cells, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, butyrate, retinoic acid, and 1 alpha,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3, did not acutely inhibit iron uptake. We also investigated the effect of TPA on transferrin receptors in a cellular system in which phorbol esters stimulate cell proliferation. At 16 X 10(-9) M, TPA markedly stimulated the proliferation of T-lymphocytes. However, in spite of this marked stimulation of cell proliferation, TPA-stimulated lymphocytes exhibited a transferrin-binding capacity much inferior to cells stimulated by other mitogens, such as phytohemagglutinin.

  10. Lymphocyte Activation during Acute Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV89.6PD Infection in Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marianne; Waterman, Paul M.; Mitchen, Jacque L.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Brown, Charles; Trivedi, Parul; Horejsh, Douglas; Dykhuizen, Marta; Kitabwalla, Moiz; Pauza, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Host-virus interactions control disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus-infected human beings and in nonhuman primates infected with simian or simian/human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIV). These interactions evolve rapidly during acute infection and are key to the mechanisms of viral persistence and AIDS. SHIV89.6PD infection in rhesus macaques can deplete CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes within 2 weeks after exposure and is a model for virulent, acute infection. Lymphocytes isolated from blood and tissues during the interval of acute SHIV89.6PD infection have lost the capacity to proliferate in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). T-cell unresponsiveness to mitogen occurred within 1 week after mucosal inoculation yet prior to massive CD4+ T-cell depletion and extensive virus dissemination. The lack of mitogen response was due to apoptosis in vitro, and increased activation marker expression on circulating T cells in vivo coincided with the appearance of PHA-induced apoptosis in vitro. Inappropriately high immune stimulation associated with rapid loss of mature CD4+ T cells suggested that activation-induced cell death is a mechanism for helper T-cell depletion in the brief period before widespread virus dissemination. Elevated levels of lymphocyte activation likely enhance SHIV89.6PD replication, thus increasing the loss of CD4+ T cells and diminishing the levels of virus-specific immunity that remain after acute infection. The level of surviving immunity may dictate the capacity to control virus replication and disease progression. We describe this level of immune competence as the host set point to show its pivotal role in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:10559340

  11. Toxicity Assessment of Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Widely Consumed by Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ismail, Hanen; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed at assessing the content and the functional properties of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in different varieties of beans widely consumed in Tunisia through soaking, cooking, autoclaving, germination, and their combinations. This study was carried out on three varieties of white beans grown in different localities of Tunisia, namely Twila, Coco, and Beldia, as well as on imported and local canned beans. All bean samples underwent biochemical and immunological evaluation by employing several techniques such as indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), hemagglutinating assay, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biochemical and immunological analyses indicated that raw dry beans contained a considerable amount of proteins and PHAs. ELISA demonstrated that soaking, either in plain water or in alkaline solution, caused an increase in the concentration of PHA. A slight increase of PHA was produced equally by germination during 4 days in all bean varieties. Cooking or autoclaving of presoaked beans resulted in a complete disappearance of PHA. ELISA test also proved that both imported and local canned beans contained fingerprints of PHA. Hemagglutination assays showed that not only cooked and autoclaved presoaked beans lacked the ability to agglutinate red blood cells but also autoclaved unsoaked beans did. In agar gel immunodiffusion using rabbit anti-PHA serum, raw, soaked, cooked unsoaked, and sprouted beans gave precipitin arc reactions, indicating that PHA existed in immunoreactive form in the tested seeds. SDS-PAGE electrophoretograms showed protein isolates of Twila and Beldia beans to have different profiles through soaking, cooking, and autoclaving processes. This work revealed that the combination of soaking and cooking/autoclaving was the best way in reducing PHA content and its activity in all bean varieties when compared with germination.

  12. Calcitriol stimulates prolactin expression in non-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: breaking paradigms.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Lorenza; Martínez-Reza, Isela; García-Becerra, Rocío; González, Leticia; Larrea, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel

    2011-08-01

    Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D(3), exerts immunomodulatory effects through the vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR) and increases prolactin (PRL) expression in the pituitary and decidua. Nevertheless, the effects of calcitriol upon lymphocyte PRL have not been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated calcitriol effects upon PRL in resting and phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Immunoblots showed constitutive expression of the 50-kDa VDR species in activated PBMNC and Jurkat cells, while a 75-kDa species was recognized in both resting and activated-PBMNC. Only in resting PBMNC calcitriol significantly stimulated PRL expression in a dose-dependent manner. The positive control CYP24A1, a highly VDR-responsive gene, was stimulated by calcitriol, effect that was stronger in resting than in activated-PBMNC (P<0.05), and without effect in Jurkat cells. Calcitriol upregulation of PRL and CYP24A1 was significantly inhibited by the VDR antagonist TEI-9647. EMSA showed that resting PBMNC contain a protein that binds to DR3-type VDRE. Cell activation reduced basal CYP24A1 while induced CYP27B1, VDR and pregnane X receptor (PXR) expression. In summary, calcitriol stimulated PRL and CYP24A1 gene expression in quiescent lymphocytes through a VDR-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that the 75-kDa VDR species could be participating in calcitriol-mediated effects, and that activation induces factors such as PXR that restrain VDR transcriptional processes. This study supports the presence of a functional VDR in quiescent lymphocytes, providing evidence to reevaluate the VDR paradigm that assumes that lymphocytes respond to calcitriol only after activation. Altogether, our results offer new insights into the mechanisms whereby PRL is regulated in immune cells.

  13. Transplantation Outcomes for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sung-Yun; Logan, Brent R.; Griffith, Linda M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Parrott, Roberta E.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Kapoor, Neena; Hanson, Imelda C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Jyonouchi, Soma; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Small, Trudy N.; Burroughs, Lauri; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Haight, Ann E.; Grizzle, Audrey; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Chan, Ka Wah; Fuleihan, Ramsay L.; Haddad, Elie; Loechelt, Brett; Aquino, Victor M.; Gillio, Alfred; Davis, Jeffrey; Knutsen, Alan; Smith, Angela R.; Moore, Theodore B.; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Goldman, Frederick D.; Connelly, James A.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Xiang, Qun; Shearer, William T.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Cowan, Morton J.; O’Reilly, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium was formed to analyze the results of hematopoietic-cell transplantation in children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies. Factors associated with a good transplantation outcome need to be identified in order to design safer and more effective curative therapy, particularly for children with SCID diagnosed at birth. METHODS We collected data retrospectively from 240 infants with SCID who had received transplants at 25 centers during a 10-year period (2000 through 2009). RESULTS Survival at 5 years, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and CD3+ T-cell and IgA recovery were more likely among recipients of grafts from matched sibling donors than among recipients of grafts from alternative donors. However, the survival rate was high regardless of donor type among infants who received transplants at 3.5 months of age or younger (94%) and among older infants without prior infection (90%) or with infection that had resolved (82%). Among actively infected infants without a matched sibling donor, survival was best among recipients of haploidentical T-cell–depleted transplants in the absence of any pretransplantation conditioning. Among survivors, reduced-intensity or myeloablative pre-transplantation conditioning was associated with an increased likelihood of a CD3+ T-cell count of more than 1000 per cubic millimeter, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and IgA recovery but did not significantly affect CD4+ T-cell recovery or recovery of phytohemagglutinin-induced T-cell proliferation. The genetic subtype of SCID affected the quality of CD3+ T-cell recovery but not survival. CONCLUSIONS Transplants from donors other than matched siblings were associated with excellent survival among infants with SCID identified before the onset of infection. All available graft sources are expected to lead to excellent survival among asymptomatic infants. (Funded by the

  14. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the immune function of juvenile common loons (Gavia immer)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Grasman, K.A.; Hines, R.K.; Meyer, M.W.; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, A.; Spalding, M.G.; Gray, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a dose-response laboratory study to quantify the level of exposure to dietary Hg, delivered as methylmercury chloride (CH3HgCl), that is associated with suppressed immune function in captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks. We used the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test to assess T-lymphocyte function and the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination test to measure antibody-mediated immunity. The PHA stimulation index among chicks receiving dietary Hg treatment did not differ significantly from those of chicks on the control diet (p = 0.15). Total antibody (immunoglobulin [Ig] M [primary antibody] + IgG [secondary response]) production to the SRBC antigen in chicks treated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg), however, was suppressed (p = 0.04) relative to chicks on control diets. Analysis indicated suppression of total Ig production (p = 0.025 with comparisonwise ?? level = 0.017) between control and 0.4 ??g Hg/g wet food intake treatment groups. Furthermore, the control group exhibited a higher degree of variability in antibody response compared to the Hg groups, suggesting that in addition to reducing the mean response, Hg treatment reduced the normal variation attributable to other biological factors. We observed bursal lymphoid depletion in chicks receiving the 1.2 ??g Hg/g treatment (p = 0.017) and a marginally significant effect (p = 0.025) in chicks receiving the 0.4 ??g Hg/g diet. These findings suggest that common loon chick immune systems may be compromised at an ecologically relevant dietary exposure concentration (0.4 ??g Hg/g wet wt food intake). We also found that chicks hatched from eggs collected from low-pH lakes exhibited higher levels of lymphoid depletion in bursa tissue relative to chicks hatched from eggs collected from neutral-pH lakes. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  15. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune system development in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fallacara, Dawn M.; Halbrook, Richard S.; French, John B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on immune system development in captive-reared nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) to determine whether T cell–mediated and antibody-mediated adaptive immunity are targets for MeHg toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nestlings received various diets, including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 μg/g (dry wt) MeHg for up to 18 d posthatch. Immunotoxicity endpoints included cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and antibody-mediated immune response via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. T cell– and B cell–dependent histological parameters in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius were correlated with the functional assays. For nestlings in the 0.6 and 3.9 μg/g MeHg groups, CMI was suppressed by 73 and 62%, respectively, at 11 d of age. Results of this functional assay were correlated with T cell–dependent components of the spleen and thymus. Dose-dependent lymphoid depletion in spleen tissue directly affected the proliferation of T-lymphocyte populations, insofar as lower stimulation indexes from the PHA assay occurred in nestlings with lower proportions of splenic white pulp and higher THg concentrations. Nestlings in the 3.9 μg/g group also exhibited lymphoid depletion and a lack of macrophage activity in the thymus. Methylmercury did not have a noticeable effect on antibody-mediated immune function or B cell–dependent histological correlates. We conclude that T cell–mediated immunosuppression is the primary target of MeHg toward adaptive immunity in developing kestrels. This study provides evidence that environmentally relevant concentrations of MeHg may compromise immunocompetence in a developing terrestrial predator and raises concern regarding the long-term health effects of kestrels that were exposed to dietary MeHg during early avian development.

  16. Immunobiological activity and antiviral regulation efforts of Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8α during NGVEV and GPV infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Zhao, Qiurong; Qi, Yulin; Liu, Fei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    The CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are involved in the clearance of viruses. However, the functional characterization of goose CD8α is still unclear. The immunobiological characterization of goose CD8α in goose spleen mononuclear cells (MNCs) was examined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). It was shown that CD8α mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by in vitro treatment of MNCs with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) in a dose-dependent way, but lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) did not have this same effect. Moreover, the time-course effect of CD8α expression in response to mitogens (PHA, ConA, and poly I:C) was evaluated in MNCs. A significant increase in the transcriptional levels of CD8α was detected in new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV)-infected goose MNCs at 48 h postinfection (PI) and in goose parvovirus (GPV)-infected MNCs at 72 h PI. Also, the number of CD8α+ cells was significantly increased during viral infection from 72 h on. The seminal changes in mRNA profiles of antiviral cytokines (IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IL-18) were observed and were significantly increased during late phases of NGVEV and GPV infection. Accordingly, our data not only contribute to the understanding of the immune characteristics of goose CD8α, but they also provide new insight into the innate antiviral immunity of geese.

  17. Manipulation of the phenotypic appearance of individuals in groups of laying hens: effects on stress and immune-related variables.

    PubMed

    Nazar, F N; Marin, R H; Liste, G; Campderrich, I; Estevez, I

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated whether phenotypic appearance (PA) alteration during two developmental phases in laying hens, reared in two different group sizes, affects stress and immune responses. After hatching, 750 chicks were randomly assigned to 30 pens at a group size of either 10 or 40 birds. Then, the appearance of 0, 30, 50, 70 or 100% of the chicks in each pen was altered by blackdyeing their head feathers (marked); remaining chicks were unmarked. At 32 weeks, basal and postacute stress plasma corticosterone concentration, leukocyte counts, phytohemagglutinin-p lymphoproliferative and primary antibody responses were measured in six birds/pen. Analysis of variances (ANOVAs) showed no differences among treatment combinations. In a second phase, birds within initially homogeneous pens were sequentially either marked or had dye bleached to alter PA of 70% of hens in each flock (= group in a pen). Hens within initially heterogeneous pens remained unaltered as controls. The above variables were remeasured. Hens in phenotypically manipulated pens showed modified leukocyte counts compared to hens in control pens, indicating a chronic stress reaction in all penmates (whether individual PA was altered or not). Social isolation increased plasma corticosterone concentration. However, within groups of n = 40, phenotypically unaltered hens had lower responses than their altered penmate counterparts, suggesting that remaining in a stable PA group aids better coping with challenges. Although all hens in manipulated pens showed modified leukocyte counts, their antibody and lymphoproliferative responses did not differ from controls suggesting that all groupmates were able to immunologically cope with the challenges presented, within the timeframe evaluated. PMID:26364806

  18. Non-genomic rapid inhibition of Na+/H+-exchange 1 and apoptotic immunosuppression in human T cells by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Pang; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Huang, Zih-Ling; Wang, Olivia Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Michael I-Ta; Lu, Li-Ming; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chien, Chau-Heng; Chien, Eileen Jea

    2010-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been employed as immunosuppressive agents for many years. However, it is still unclear how GCs instantly uncouple T cells from acute stressful inflammatory. In terms of time scale, the genomic activity of the classic GC receptor cannot fulfill this role under crisis; but a rapid non-genomic response can. In a previous study, intracellular acidification was found to be due to a rapid non-genomic inhibition of Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 (NHE1) and this event led to the immunosuppression of T cell proliferation by progesterone. The aim of this study was to examine whether there is a rapid acidification response caused by an inhibition of NHE1 activity and to explore the differential non-genomic effect on immunosuppression of hydrocortisone and dexamethasone. The IC(50) values for NHE1-dependent pH(i) recovery by hydrocortisone and dexamethasone are 250 and 1 nM, respectively. Co-stimulation of GCs with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is able to inhibit PHA-induced IL-2 secretion, IL-4 secretion, and T-cell proliferation. Furthermore, apoptosis in PHA-activated T cells is not induced by hydrocortisone but by dexamethasone. The mechanism of immunosuppression on proliferation by dexamethasone was found to be different of hydrocortisone and seems to involve cytotoxicity against T cells. Moreover, apoptosis induced by dexamethasone and impermeable dexamethasone-bovine serum albumin suggests that the apoptotic immunosuppression occurs through both the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic sites. The rapid inhibitory responses triggered by GCs would seem to release T cells instantly when an acute stress-related response is needed. Nonetheless, the apoptotic immunosuppression by dexamethasone is attributable to its severe cytotoxicity.

  19. Non-genomic immunosuppressive actions of progesterone inhibits PHA-induced alkalinization and activation in T cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Eileen Jea; Chang, Ching-Pang; Lee, Wen-Feng; Su, Tsung-Hsien; Wu, Chia-Hsun

    2006-09-01

    Progesterone is an endogenous immunomodulator, and can suppress T-cell activation during pregnancy. When analyzed under a genome time scale, the classic steroid receptor pathway does not have any effect on ion fluxes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the non-genomic effects on ion fluxes by progesterone could immunosuppress phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced human peripheral T-cell activation. The new findings indicated that, first, only progesterone stimulated both [Ca2+]i elevation and pHi decrease; in contrast, estradiol or testosterone stimulated [Ca2+]i elevation and hydrocortisone or dexamethasone stimulated pHi decrease. Secondly, the [Ca2+]i increase by progesterone was dependent on Ca2+ influx, and the acidification was blocked by Na+/H+ exchange (NHE) inhibitor, 3-methylsulphonyl-4-piperidinobenzoyl, guanidine hydrochloride (HOE-694) but not by 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride (DMA). Thirdly, progesterone blocked phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or PHA-induced alkalinization, but PHA did not prevent progesterone-induced acidification. Fourthly, progesterone did not induce T-cell proliferation; however, co-stimulation progesterone with PHA was able to suppress PHA-induced IL-2 or IL-4 secretion and proliferation. When progesterone was applied 72 h after PHA stimulation, progesterone could suppress PHA-induced T-cell proliferation. Finally, immobilization of progesterone by conjugation to a large carrier molecule (BSA) also stimulated a rapid [Ca2+]i elevation, pHi decrease, and suppressed PHA-induced proliferation. These results suggested that the non-genomic effects of progesterone, especially acidification, are exerted via plasma membrane sites and suppress the genomic responses to PHA. Progesterone might act directly through membrane specific nonclassical steroid receptors to cause immunomodulation and suppression of T-cell activation during pregnancy.

  20. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  1. Modulation of experimental autoimmune uveitis with formosanin-C in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wu, R T; Lin, W J; Chiang, H C; Horng, L Y; Chung, Y M

    1990-01-01

    Formosanin-C, a diosgenin saponin, was isolated from a perennial herb, Paris formosana Hayata (Liliaceae) which has been used as a folk remedy for snake bite and as an anti-inflammatory or anti-neoplastic agent. Its effect on the development of S-antigen-induced experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in guinea pigs was studied. Guinea pigs treated with formosanin-C (1.5 mg/kg/2 days and 0.5 mg/kg/2 days) were compared with untreated guinea pigs in regard to the development of EAU, lymphocytic proliferative responses, and anti-S-antigen serum antibodies. The higher dosage of formosanin-C (1.5 mg/kg) obviously delayed the onset of EAU. Treatment of this drug, 1.5 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg doses, significantly inhibited the specific lymphocytic response of lymph node and spleen cells to S-antigen. On the contrary, treatment in 1.5 mg/kg dose significantly increased the response of lymph node and spleen cells to the polyclonal T cell mitogen, phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Treatment with formosanin-C in both the 1.5 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg doses had a minimal effect on the lymphocytic response of lymph node to concanavalin-A (ConA), while a noticeable suppressive effect on the response of spleen cells to ConA was observed in the 1.5 mg/kg dose. This agent in 1.5 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg doses significantly inhibited the anti-S-antigen antibody production by days 14 and 18 postimmunization. This study suggests that formosanin-C, an immunomodulator, may offer a new approach to modulate the development of EAU. PMID:2097314

  2. Synthesis of DNA and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose) in Normal and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Nathan A.; Adams, Jessie W.; Sikorski, Georgina W.; Petzold, Shirley J.; Shearer, William T.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 9 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and 12 normal control donors. The cells were assayed for synthesis of DNA and poly-(adenosine diphosphate ribose) (poly[ADPR]) immediately after isolation and on successive days following their treatment with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Two different techniques were used to measure DNA synthesis. In the standard technique, DNA synthesis was measured by incubating intact cells with [3H]deoxythymidine. In the new technique, the lymphocytes were first rendered permeable to nucleotides, then DNA synthesis was measured by incubating them with [3H]deoxythymidine triphosphate in the presence of deoxyATP, deoxyGTP, deoxyCTP, ATP, and Mg++. Both assays showed the anticipated rise in DNA synthesis after PHA stimulation of normal cells. PHA-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with CLL demonstrated low levels of DNA synthesis in both assay systems. The initial levels of poly(ADPR) synthesis were greater in CLL lymphocytes than in normal cells. Studies with a T-cell-depleted population of normal cells showed the same activity for poly(ADPR) synthesis that was demonstrated by the original population of normal cells. PHA stimulation produced an increase in poly(ADPR) synthesis in both the normal and CLL cells. The increase in poly(ADPR) synthesis in normal cells was coincident with the increase in DNA synthesis. The increase in poly(ADPR) synthesis in the CLL cells was dissociated from the delayed and diminished increase in DNA synthesis. Thus, CLL cells have higher than normal initial levels of poly(ADPR) synthesis. Poly(ADPR) synthesis is dissociated from DNA synthesis in CLL cells whereas it varies directly with DNA synthesis in normal lymphocytes. PMID:659624

  3. No evidence for a trade-off between reproductive investment and immunity in a rodent.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Chao; Yang, Deng-Bao; Wang, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Life history theory assumes there are trade-offs between competing functions such as reproduction and immunity. Although well studied in birds, studies of the trade-offs between reproduction and immunity in small mammals are scarce. Here we examined whether reduced immunity is a consequence of reproductive effort in lactating Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii). Specifically, we tested the effects of lactation on immune function (Experiment I). The results showed that food intake and resting metabolic rate (RMR) were higher in lactating voles (6≤ litter size ≤8) than that in non-reproductive voles. Contrary to our expectation, lactating voles also had higher levels of serum total Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) IgG and no change in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) response and anti-KLH Immunoglobulin M (IgM) compared with non-reproductive voles, suggesting improved rather than reduced immune function. To further test the effect of differences in reproductive investment on immunity, we compared the responses between natural large (n≥8) and small litter size (n≤6) (Experiment II) and manipulated large (11-13) and small litter size (2-3) (Experiment III). During peak lactation, acquired immunity (PHA response, anti-KLH IgG and anti-KLH IgM) was not significantly different between voles raising large or small litters in both experiments, despite the measured difference in reproductive investment (greater litter size, litter mass, RMR and food intake in the voles raising larger litters). Total IgG was higher in voles with natural large litter size than those with natural small litter size, but decreased in the enlarged litter size group compared with control and reduced group. Our results showed that immune function is not suppressed to compensate the high energy demands during lactation in Brandt's voles and contrasting the situation in birds, is unlikely to be an important aspect mediating the trade-off between reproduction and

  4. Immunological and reproductive health assessment in herring gulls and black-crowned night herons in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Keith A; Echols, Kathy R; May, Thomas M; Peterman, Paul H; Gale, Robert W; Orazio, Carl E

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown inexplicable declines in breeding waterbirds within western New York/New Jersey Harbor between 1996 and 2002 and elevated polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs. The present study assessed associations between immune function, prefledgling survival, and selected organochlorine compounds and metals in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) in lower New York Harbor during 2003. In pipping gull embryos, lymphoid cells were counted in the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (sites of T and B lymphocyte maturation, respectively). The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response assessed T cell function in gull and heron chicks. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured in vitro in adult and prefledgling gulls. Reference data came from the Great Lakes and Bay of Fundy. Survival of prefledgling gulls was poor, with only 0.68 and 0.5 chicks per nest surviving to three and four weeks after hatch, respectively. Developing lymphoid cells were reduced 51% in the thymus and 42% in the bursa of gull embryos from New York Harbor. In vitro lymphocyte assays demonstrated reduced spontaneous proliferation, reduced T cell mitogen-induced proliferation, and increased B cell mitogen-induced proliferation in gull chicks from New York Harbor. The PHA skin response was suppressed 70 to 80% in gull and heron chicks. Strong negative correlations (r = -0.95 to -0.98) between the PHA response and dioxins and PCBs in gull livers was strong evidence suggesting that these chemicals contribute significantly to immunosuppression in New York Harbor waterbirds. PMID:23212976

  5. Interaction of human leukocytes and Entamoeba histolytica. Killing of virulent amebae by the activated macrophage.

    PubMed

    Salata, R A; Pearson, R D; Ravdin, J I

    1985-08-01

    Capable effector mechanisms in the human immune response against the cytolytic, protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica have not been described. To identify a competent human effector cell, we studied the in vitro interactions of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes (MC), and MC-derived macrophages with virulent axenic amebae (strain HMI-IMSS). Amebae killed neutrophils, PBMC, MC, and MC-derived macrophages (P less than 0.001), without loss of parasite viability. The addition of heat-inactivated immune serum did not enable leukocytes to kill amebae, nor did it protect these host cells from amebae. MC-derived macrophages, activated with lymphokine elicited by the mitogens conconavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, or an amebic soluble protein preparation (strain HK9), killed 55% of amebae by 3 h in a trypan blue exclusion assay (P less than 0.001); during this time, 40% of the activated macrophages died. Lysis of amebae was confirmed using 111Indium oxine radiolabeled parasites and was antibody independent. Macrophage death appeared to be due to the deleterious effect of lysed amebae rather than the contact-dependent effector mechanisms of E. histolytica. Adherence between activated macrophages and amebae was greater than that between other leukocytes and amebae (P less than 0.001). Microscopic observations, kinetic analysis of the killing of amebae by activated macrophages, and suspension of amebae with adherent activated macrophages in a 10% dextran solution indicated that contact by activated macrophages was necessary to initiate the killing of amebae. Catalase but not superoxide dismutase inhibited the amebicidal capacity of activated macrophages (P less than 0.001). However, activated macrophages from an individual with chronic granulomatous disease were able to kill amebae, but not as effectively as normal cells (P less than 0.01). In summary, activated MC-derived macrophages killed virulent E. histolytica

  6. Most human CD3+WT31- clones with T cell receptor C gamma 1 rearrangements show strong non-MHC-restricted cytotoxic activity in contrast to those with C gamma 2 rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E

    1989-04-01

    Clones expressing CD3 in the absence of WT31 expression were obtained by growing highly purified WT31- cells in the presence of interleukin 2 and phytohemagglutinin. Most clones showed rearrangements of T cell receptor (TcR) gamma genes on both chromosomes involving all five currently identified J gamma segments. About a third of these clones had a rearranged 12 kb Kpn I band with the J gamma probe, consistent with a V9JPC gamma 1 rearrangement. All clones with both chromosomes rearranged to C gamma 2 had low or intermediate cytotoxic activity while most of those with at least one chromosome rearranged to C gamma 1 had high cytotoxic activity against both natural killer-sensitive and natural killer-resistant targets. This applied both to clones with and without the V9JPC gamma 1 rearrangement. Of three clones with both C gamma 1 and C gamma 2 rearrangements two had high activity and the other was only weakly cytotoxic. In addition, most clones showed rearrangement of TcR beta genes. Some clones were capable of secreting levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha which were as high as those produced by CD3+4+WT31+ T cell clones. The results suggest that most human CD3+WT31- clones expressing a disulfide-linked C gamma 1/delta heterodimer are capable of mediating strong non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity whereas those expressing non-disulfide-linked C gamma 2/delta heterodimers are not.

  7. Purification and characterization of a thermostable beta-galactosidase from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. PDR14.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Kayastha, Arvind M; Seckler, Robert

    2003-04-01

    Using five different steps, beta-Galactosidase has been purified from kidney beans to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity with approximately 90-fold purification with a specific activity of 281 units mg-1 protein. A single band was observed in native PAGE. Activity staining of the native gel with 5-bromo 4-chloro 3-indoxyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) at pH 4.0 also produced a single band. Analytical gel filtration in Superdex G-75 revealed the molecular mass of the native protein to be approximately 75 kD. 10% SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed two subunits of molecular masses, 45 and 30 kD, respectively. Hence, beta-galactosidase from kidney beans is a heterodimer. A typical protein profile with lambda max at 280 nm was observed and A280/A260 ratio was 1.52. The N-terminal sequence of the 45 kD band showed 86% sequence homology with an Arabidopsis thaliana and 85% with Lycopersicon esculentum putative beta-galactosidase sequences. The Electrospray Mass Spectrometric analysis of this band also revealed a peptide fragment that had 90% sequence homology with an Arabidopsis thaliana putative beta-galactosidase sequence. The N-terminal sequencing of the 30 kD band as well as mass spectrometric analysis both by MALDI-TOF and ES MS revealed certain sequences that matched with phytohemagglutinin of kidney beans. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 4.0 and it hydrolysed o- and p-nitrophenyl beta-D galactopyranoside with a Km value of 0.63 mmol/L and 0.74 mmol/L, respectively. The energy of activation calculated from the Arrhenius equation was 14.8 kcal/mol enzyme site. The enzyme was found to be comparatively thermostable showing maximum activity at 67 degrees C. Thermal denaturation of the enzyme at 65 degrees C obeys single exponential decay with first order-rate constant 0.105 min-1. Galactose, a hydrolytic product of this enzyme was a competitive inhibitor with a Ki of 2.7 mmol/L.

  8. Fuel feeds function: Energy balance and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, A; Viergutz, T; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M; Schweigel-Röntgen, M

    2013-01-01

    A general phenomenon in peripartum mammals is the breakdown of (acquired) immunity. The incidence of parasite load, disease and inflammation often rise during the specific energetically demanding time of pregnancy and lactation. In this period, blood leukocytes display decreased DNA synthesis in response to mitogens in vitro. Leukocyte activation, the phase of the cell cycle preceding the DNA synthetic phase has hardly been investigated, but the few studies suggest that leukocyte activation may also be impaired by the limited energy/nutrient availability. Leukocyte activation is characterized by manifold processes, thus, we used the cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) as a measure of ATP turnover to support all these processes. We hypothesized that the activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) - in terms of oxygen consumed over basal levels after in vitro stimulation - is altered by energy balance around parturition. We studied peripartum high-yielding dairy cows because they undergo substantial fluctuations in energy intake, energy output and body fat mass. We established a fluorescence-based test strategy allowing for long-term (≥24h) quantification of O(2)-consumption and studied the peripartum period from 5 weeks ante partum to 5 weeks postpartum. In addition, we determined cellular lactate production, DNA/RNA synthesis and cell size and zoo-technical parameters such as animal energy intake and milk yield were assessed, as well as selected plasma parameters, e.g. glucose concentration. The basal OCR of PBMC from pregnant, non-lactating cows (n=6, -5 weeks ante partum) was 1.19±0.15 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) and increased to maximum levels of 2.54±0.49 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC. The basal OCR did not change over the peripartum period. Whereas the activation indices, herein defined as the PHA-induced 24h-increase of OCR above baseline, amounted to 1.1±0.3, 4.2±0.3, 4.1±1.1, 2.1±0.3, and

  9. [Isolation and biological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta decidua basalis].

    PubMed

    Han, Zhi-Bo; Wang, You-Wei; Wang, Tao; Chi, Ying; Yang, Zhou-Xin; Ji, Yue-Ru; Meng, Lei; Yang, Ping; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2013-06-01

    Comparing to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), placenta-derived MSCs have the advantages of adequate sources, low immunogenicity, little risk of viral contamination, and no ethical controversy, and thus possess a better prospect for clinical application. Placental tissue not only includes chorionic and amniotic, but also contains decidua basalis which locate in the maternal placenta surface. The biological characteristics of MSCs isolated from decidua basalis have not been well studied. This study was aimed to investigate the biologic characteristics of placenta decidua basalis-derived MSC from placenta decidua basalis (DB) by enzymatic digestion. Short tandem repeats (STR) test was used to identify the cells derived from the maternal placenta surface. Growth rate of decidua basalis mesenchymal stem cells (DB-MSC) was measured by MTT. Cell cycle and cell phenotype were detected by flow cytometry. Inducing differentiation was used to evaluate multipotency of DB-MSC. For testing the immunosuppression of DB-MSC, they were co-cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and then IFN-γ in the co-cultured media was quantified by ELISA. The results showed that the cells were derived from the maternal placenta by STR analysis. DB-MSC showed typical fibroblast morphology in the culture and were positive for the MSC surface markers: CD90, CD73, CD105, CD44 and negative for CD45, CD11b, and CD34. DB-MSC underwent osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation in inducing medium. DB-MSC could inhibit the secretion of IFN-γ by PBMNC. It is concluded that the cells are isolated from placenta decidua basalis and possess the basic characteristics of MSC. DB-MSC can be an important maternal autologous MSC and may be a safe and effective treatment for immune system diseases, which makes the DB-MSC as an important source of autologous MSC from mother. DB-MSC can be safely for the treatment of the mother's immune

  10. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Valentino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  11. Identification by In Vivo Genomic Footprinting of a Transcriptional Switch Containing NF-κB and Sp1 That Regulates the IκBα Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Algarté, Michèle; Kwon, Hakju; Génin, Pierre; Hiscott, John

    1999-01-01

    In unstimulated cells, NF-κB transcription factors are retained in the cytoplasm by inhibitory IκB proteins. Upon stimulation by multiple inducers including cytokines or viruses, IκBα is rapidly phosphorylated and degraded, resulting in the release of NF-κB and the subsequent increase in NF-κB-regulated gene expression. IκBα gene expression is also regulated by an NF-κB autoregulatory mechanism, via NF-κB binding sites in the IκBα promoter. In previous studies, tetracycline-inducible expression of transdominant repressors of IκBα (TD-IκBα) progressively decreased endogenous IκBα protein levels. In the present study, we demonstrate that expression of TD-IκBα blocked phorbol myristate acetate-phytohemagglutinin or tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced IκBα gene transcription and abolished NF-κB DNA binding activity, due to the continued cytoplasmic sequestration of RelA(p65) by TD-IκBα. In vivo genomic footprinting revealed stimulus-responsive protein-DNA binding not only to the −63 to −53 κB1 site but also to the adjacent −44 to −36 Sp1 site of the IκBα promoter. In vivo protection of both sites was inhibited by tetracycline-inducible TD-IκBα expression. Prolonged NF-κB binding and a temporal switch in the composition of NF-κB complexes bound to the −63 to −53 κB1 site of the IκBα promoter were also observed; with time after induction, decreased levels of transcriptionally active p50-p65 and increased p50–c-Rel heterodimers were detected at the κB1 site. Mutation of either the κB1 site or the Sp1 site abolished transcription factor binding to the respective sites and the inducibility of the IκBα promoter in transient transfection studies. These observations provide the first in vivo characterization of a promoter proximal transcriptional switch involving NF-κB and Sp1 that is essential for autoregulation of the IκBα promoter. PMID:10454561

  12. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor mediated dynamic immune dysfunction in children with fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of inheritable intellectual disability in male children, and is predominantly caused by a single gene mutation resulting in expanded trinucleotide CGG-repeats within the 5’ untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene. Reports have suggested the presence of immune dysregulation in FXS with evidence of altered plasma cytokine levels; however, no studies have directly assessed functional cellular immune responses in children with FXS. In order to ascertain if immune dysregulation is present in children with FXS, dynamic cellular responses to immune stimulation were examined. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were from male children with FXS (n = 27) and from male aged-matched typically developing (TD) controls (n = 8). PBMC were cultured for 48 hours in media alone or with lipopolysaccharides (LPS; 1 μg/mL) to stimulate the innate immune response or with phytohemagglutinin (PHA; 8 μg/mL) to stimulate the adaptive T-cell response. Additionally, the group I mGluR agonist, DHPG, was added to cultures to ascertain the role of mGluR signaling in the immune response in subject with FXS. Supernatants were harvested and cytokine levels were assessed using Luminex multiplexing technology. Results Children with FXS displayed similar innate immune response following challenge with LPS alone when compared with TD controls; however, when LPS was added in the presence of a group I mGluR agonist, DHPG, increased immune response were observed in children with FXS for a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6 (P = 0.02), and IL-12p40 (P < 0.01). Following PHA stimulation, with or without DHPG, no significant differences between subjects with FXS and TD were seen. Conclusions In unstimulated cultures, subjects with FXS did not display altered dynamic immune response to LPS or PHA alone; however, subjects with FXS showed an altered response to co

  13. RANTES and MCP-3 inhibit the replication of T-cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains (SF-2, MN, and HE).

    PubMed Central

    Schols, D; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; De Clercq, E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the C-C chemokines RANTES (regulation upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted) and MCP-3 (monocyte chemotactic protein 3) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) activated in vitro with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were investigated. The following T-cell line-tropic (T-tropic) HIV strains were tested: HIV type 1 (HIV-1) SF-2, HIV-1 IIIB, HIV-1 MN, HIV-1 NDK, HIV-1 HE, HIV-1 NL4-3, HIV-2 ROD, and HIV-2 EHO. The strain most sensitive to the antiviral effects of RANTES and MCP-3 appeared to be HIV-1 SF-2. A 50% inhibitory concentration for HIV-1 SF-2 of 4 ng of RANTES per ml was obtained, and that of MCP-3 was about 1 ng/ml. However, MCP-3 was inactive at 100 ng/ml. Other HIV-1 strains, such as MN and HE, were less sensitive to the antiviral effects of RANTES and MCP-3, whereas all the other HIV strains tested were insensitive. Although the ratio of CD3+ CD4+ to CD3+ CD8+ T cells was the same in HIV-infected PBMC cultures treated or untreated with the chemokines, RANTES and MCP-3 interfered with the binding of monoclonal antibody (MAb) OKT4 to the CD4 receptor on T cells but not with the binding of MAb OKT4A. Therefore, RANTES and MCP-3 not only interfere with the HIV-induced fusion process but also have some modulating effect on the CD4 cell receptor. The chemokines did not affect HIV-1 binding to PHA-stimulated PBMC. Taken together, our observations point to the important role that both RANTES and MCP-3 may play in inhibiting HIV-1 replication of certain T-tropic strains in primary PBMC cultures. This may have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies designed to slow down disease progression in AIDS. PMID:9311806

  14. Antibody and lymphoblastogenic responses of dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from North American mammals.

    PubMed

    Barr, S C; Dennis, V A; Klei, T R; Norcross, N L

    1991-09-01

    The humoral and cellular immune responses of dogs infected with either a non-pathogenic Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from a North American dog (Tc-D) or a pathogenic T. cruzi isolate from an opossum (Tc-O) were studied over a 240 day period. Antibody to T. cruzi epimastigote antigens prepared from Tc-O or Tc-D isolates were first detected by ELISA by Day 26 post infection (PI), peaked by day 175 PI and remained elevated throughout the experimental period in both Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs. Differences in antibody levels between infected groups were not detected. Western blot analyses were performed using Tc-O and Tc-D epimastigote antigens probed with pooled sera and sera from individual Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs prior to infection (Day 0), and during the acute (Day 16-35 PI), indeterminate (Day 50-135 PI) and chronic (Day 235 PI) stages of infection. Generally, the patterns, number of protein bands, and temporal appearance of the protein bands identified by pooled sera and sera from individual dogs within each antigen preparation were similar. However, similarities and differences were present in antibody responses between sera from Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs. Blastogenic responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Tc-O and Tc-D infected dogs to mitogens (concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed) were not significantly different from controls at any time during the experimental period. The PBMC from both groups of dogs were unresponsive to epimastigote antigens during the acute stage of infection. Statistically significant differences (P less than 0.05) in PBMC responsiveness from controls were observed on Days 70 and 175 PI. Responses decreased to pre-infection levels by Day 240 PI. These studies demonstrate that although two North American T. cruzi isolates have markedly different virulence for dogs, some aspects of their cellular and humoral immune responses are similar while other responses, such as antibody recognition of specific T

  15. Effect of nutrition support on immunity in paediatric patients with beta-thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Tienboon, Prasong

    2003-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies have been variably observed in thalassaemia and the aetiology of many of the immune abnormalities in thalassaemic children are poorly defined. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that certain immune abnormalities have a nutritional basis. Nutritional status, selective quantitative and functional indices of immunity were studied in twelve children (7 females, 5 males; mean age 28 months, SD 5 and range 19.8-35.5), with thalassaemia major before and after a one month period of intensive nutrition support (the study diet consisted of 'Enfapro' liquid formula (Mead Johnson) with added dextrose and corn oil to achieve a caloric density of 1.1 kcal/cc in addition to vitamins and minerals). Each child was provided approximately 150 kcal/day and 4 g of protein/day. Lymphocyte proliferation to Concanavalin A (Con A) (P = 0.008) and Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) (P = 0.002) was depressed upon entry into the study, however the response to Con A attained normal values by the end of the intervention. Compared to baselines, the proliferative response to Con A (P = 0.005) and Phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) (P = 0.031) both improved after the nutrition support. Although there was no general correlation of zinc status with lymphocyte proliferation, normal baseline zinc status was associated with improvement of proliferation. The %CD4 increased (P = 0.036), primarily because of a decrease in total lymphocytes and to lesser extent a decrease in CD8 lymphocytes. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were found to be elevated on admission but were not significantly affected by the nutrition intervention. C3 concentrations were uniformly depressed on admission but increased by the end of the study protocol (P = 0.037). C4 and CH50 activity were not significantly influenced by the intervention. In conclusion, children with beta thalassaemia have abnormalities of lymphocyte function as well as key complement components that are responsive to nutrition support. In

  16. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and natural killer cell (NK) function using an integrative approach in late stage cancers.

    PubMed

    See, Darryl; Mason, Stephanie; Roshan, Ramesh

    2002-05-01

    Natural products may increase cytotoxic activity of Natural Killer Cells (NK) Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha) while decreasing DNA damage in patients with late-stage cancer. Pilot studies have suggested that a combination of Nutraceuticals can raise NK cell function and TNF-alpha alpha activity and result in improved clinical outcomes in patients with late stage cancer. The objective of the study is to determine if Nutraceuticals can significantly raise NK function and TNF levels in patients with late stage cancer. After informed consent was obtained, 20 patients with stage IV, end-stage cancer were evaluated (one bladder, five breast, two prostate, one neuroblastoma, two non-small cell lung, three colon, 1 mesothelioma, two lymphoma, one ovarian, one gastric, one osteosarcoma). Transfer Factor Plus (TFP+, 3 tablets 3 times per day), IMUPlus (non denatured milk whey protein, 40 gm/day); Intravenous (50 to 100 gm/day) and oral (1-2 gm/day) ascorbic acid; Agaricus Blazeii Murill teas (10 gm/day); Immune Modulator Mix (a combination of vitamin, minerals, antioxidants and immune-enhancing natural products); nitrogenated soy extract (high levels of genistein and dadzein) and Andrographis Paniculata (500 mg twice, daily) were used. Baseline NK function by standard 4 h 51Cr release assay and TNF alpha and receptor levels were measured by ELISA from resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated adherent and non-adherent Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell (PBMC). Total mercaptans and glutathione in plasma were taken and compared to levels measured 6 months later. Complete blood counts and chemistry panels were routinely monitored. As of a mean of 6 months, 16/20 patients were still alive. The 16 survivors had significantly higher NK function than baseline (p < .01 for each) and TNF-alpha levels in all four cell populations studied (p < .01 for each). Total mercaptans (p < .01) and TNF-alpha receptor levels were significantly reduced (p < .01). It was also observed

  17. Human gammadelta T lymphocytes exert natural and IL-2-induced cytotoxicity to neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, K E; Geiselhart, A; Wessels, J T; Niethammer, D; Handgretinger, R

    2000-01-01

    Human gammadelta T lymphocytes play an important role in nonadaptive reactions to infection and early tumor defense. This is the first report that freshly isolated, native gammadelta T cells of some healthy donors can kill human neuroblastoma cells to varying degrees. Their killing ability was increased and maintained during expansion and cultivation with interleukin-2 (IL-2; 400 IU/mL) for as long as 30 days (100% specific lysis at an effector-to-target cell (E:T) ratio of 20:1). gammadelta T lymphocytes without this spontaneous killing ability gained a specific cytolytic activity of 81% +/- 10.4% SD after stimulation with IL-2 for 24 hours. gammadelta cells were isolated from peripheral blood by positive enrichment (using a magnetic cell sorting system; purity, 95.2% +/- 3.2% SD, n = 21). High natural cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma cell lines (>50% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1) was exhibited by one of 11 donors, whereas two of 11 showed medium cytotoxicity (30% to 50% specific lysis). Eight of 11 donors showed very slight or no lytic activity against human neuroblastoma cells (<30% specific lysis). gammadelta T cells were also cytotoxic against Daudi (32.7% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1), Raji (10.3%), Colo 205 (23.1%), A 204 (54%), K 562 (100%), and SK-N-MC (100%) cells. Isolated gammadelta T cells were grown in Iscove modified Dulbecco medium with IL-2 (400 IU/mL). Increased cell proliferation (38.5% to 182%) was induced with phytohemagglutinin, IL-15, Clodronat, OKT3, or various combinations of these. Results of cold target inhibition assays suggest a natural killer-like activity of the gammadelta T-cell killing mechanism. Peptidase or papain render neuroblastoma cells unsusceptible to gammadelta T-cell killing, suggesting the involvement of antigen peptide(s) in the process of neuroblastoma cell killing. Treatment with acid phosphatase reduced specific lysis by 66.5% +/- 34.1% SD, which suggests a binding to phosphorylated

  18. Dietary chromium methionine supplementation could alleviate immunosuppressive effects of heat stress in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, R; Rasouli, E

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of chromium methionine (CrMet) on performance, immune responses, and stress status of broiler chicks subjected to heat-stress conditions. A total of 450 day-old Ross 308 broiler chicks were randomly distributed between 5 replicate pens (15 birds each) of 6 experimental treatments according to a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments including 2 temperature conditions (thermoneutral and heat stress) and 3 supplemental Cr levels (0, 500, and 1,000 μg/kg as CrMet). For induction of heat stress, the house temperature was set at 35 ± 2°C from 15 to 42 d of age. Results showed that the chicks subjected to heat-stress condition had lower (P < 0.01) feed intake, BW gain, and deteriorated (P < 0.05) feed conversion values compared with those kept in the thermoneutral house. Dietary supplementation with CrMet increased (P < 0.01) feed intake and improved (P < 0.01) weight gain and feed efficiency. There were significant Cr level × temperature interactions, so that inclusion of CrMet into the diets was more effective in heat-stressed chicks. Exposure to heat stress suppressed (P < 0.01) cutaneous hypersensivity response to phytohemagglutinin-P injection at 30 d of age, and dietary supplementation of 500 μg Cr/kg induced (P < 0.05) this response, with the greater impacts in heat-stressed chicks, resulting in a significant (P < 0.01) Cr × temperature interaction. Antibody responses against Newcastle and infectious bronchitis disease viruses were diminished (P < 0.01) in heat-stressed chicks. Dietary inclusion of CrMet improved (P < 0.05) antibody responses to different immunostimulants, and this effect was more pronounced in heat-stressed chicks. Exposure to heat stress caused a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the proportion of helper (CD4+) T lymphocytes and increased cytotoxic (CD8+) T lymphocytes, resulting in a decreased (P < 0.01) CD4+ to CD8+ ratio in peripheral blood

  19. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular docking studies of benzyl, alkyl and glycosyl [2-(arylamino)-4,4-dimethyl-6-oxo-cyclohex-1-ene]carbodithioates, as potential immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    El Ashry, El Sayed H; Amer, Mohammad R; Abdalla, Omer M; Aly, Aly A; Soomro, Samreen; Jabeen, Almas; Halim, Sobia Ahsan; Ahmed Mesaik, M; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2012-05-01

    The immunomodulating properties of functionalized [2-(arylamino)-4,4-dimethyl-6-oxo-cyclohex-1-ene] carbodithioates and 6,6-dimethyl-4-(2-(propan-2-ylidene)hydrazinyl)-6,7-dihydro-2H-indazole-3(5H)-thione compounds have been investigated. Four of them, 13, 18, 19 and 20 inhibited PBMC proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in a dose dependent manner with an IC(50) of ≤ 20 μM. The Th-1 cytokine, interleukin-2 (IL-2) in PHA/PMA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is significantly inhibited by 13, 19 and 20 with an IC(50) of 8.4 ± 0.4, 5.34 ± 0.15 and 4.9 ± 0.7 μM, respectively. They also inhibited the PMA/lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α production in human monocytic leukemia cells (THP-1), by 86%, 46% and 59.2% for IL-1β and by 83.8%, 48.2% and 58.7% for TNF-α, respectively. Only 20 showed significant suppressive activity against the phagocyte oxidative burst in a dose dependent manner, with an IC(50) of 23.8 μM. LPS-induced nitrites in mouse macrophages were found to be inhibited by compounds 6, 8, 13-15 and 19 with an IC(50), which range between 7.7 and 63 μM. The cytotoxicity for the active compounds was also studied on Rat Wistar Hepatocyte cell line, CC1 and the Mouse Fibroblast cell line 3T3 NIH in the presence of compounds using a standard MTT assay. Furthermore, structural-activity relationship using automated docking software revealed that active compounds 7, 13 and 19, adapted the same binding mode, however the most active compound 20 is found deeply inserted within the ligand binding site of IL-2, as multiple hydrophobic and hydrophilic key interactions stabilize the compound inside the binding site, thus contributing higher activity.

  20. Immunological markers for tolerance to avian malaria in Hawai`i `Amakihi: new tools for restoring native Hawaiian forest birds?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated three assays for non-specific or innate immune capacity to see if measurements were independent of malarial infection and capable of distinguishing malaria-tolerant, low-elevation Hawaiʽi ʽAmakihi from malaria-susceptible, high-elevation ʽAmakihi. ʽAmakihi were captured at Malama Ki Forest Reserve (20 m), Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (1800 m), and Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve (1700 m), bled for collection of plasma and packed erythrocytes for malarial diagnostics, and either transported to Kīlauea Field Station Aviary and held in captivity for 48 hours for inoculation of wing webs with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA) or released immediately in the field after collection of a blood sample. All birds were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microscopy to determine infection status. We found no significant association between malarial infection status and degree of wing web swelling after inoculation with PHA (T = -0.174, df = 13, P = 0.864) and no association between origin of birds from low- and high-elevation populations and degree of wing web swelling (T = 0.113, df = 52, P = 0.911). Infected ʽAmakihi from low elevation had significantly higher small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity than uninfected individuals from the same population (T = -2.675, df = 21, P = 0.014), so we limited comparisons to uninfected birds. Uninfected ʽAmakihi from low elevations did not differ in small molecule plasma antioxidant capacity from uninfected ʽAmakihi from high elevation (T = -0.260, df = 46, P = 0.796). Compared to high-elevation birds, low-elevation ʽAmakihi had significantly higher titers of natural antibodies (NAb) as measured by complement-mediated lysis of rabbit erythrocytes (Mann-Whitney U = 27, X2= 32.332, df = 1, P < 0.0001). This innate immunological difference may be related to ability to survive malarial infection and may prove to be important for understanding possible mechanisms for the evolution of disease tolerance in

  1. Dietary bovine lactoferrin alters mucosal and systemic immune cell responses in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Reznikov, Elizabeth A; Contractor, Nikhat; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-04-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional immune protein found at high concentrations in human milk. Herein, the effect of dietary bovine LF (bLF) on mucosal and systemic immune development was investigated. Colostrum-deprived piglets were fed formula containing 130 [control (Ctrl)], 367 (LF1), or 1300 (LF3) mg of bLF/(kg body weight · d). To provide passive immunity, sow serum was provided orally during the first 36 h of life. Blood, spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and ascending colon (Asc) contents were collected on day 7 (n = 10-14/group) and day 14 (n = 10-12/group). Immune cell populations were quantified by flow cytometry and immunoglobulins (Igs) were measured by ELISA. Additionally, immune cells were isolated from spleen and MLNs (n = 7/group) on day 7 and stimulated ex vivo with phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ± LF for 72 h. Secreted cytokine concentrations were quantified by multiplex assay. Lymphocyte populations [cluster determinant (CD)4, CD8, and natural killer cells] developed normally and were unaffected by dietary bLF. LF3 piglets tended to have 1.4 to 2 times more serum IgG than Ctrl piglets (P = 0.07) or LF1 piglets (P = 0.03), but IgA in Asc contents was unaffected by bLF. Asc IgA was 4 times higher on day 14 than day 7. Spleen cells from LF3 piglets produced 2 times more interleukin (IL)-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α ex vivo than those from Ctrl or LF1 piglets. MLN cells from LF1 and LF3 piglets produced 40% more IL-10 and tended to produce 40% more IL-6 (P = 0.05) than those from Ctrl piglets. However, ex vivo bLF did not affect the cytokine response of spleen or MLN cells to LPS. In summary, dietary bLF alters the capacity of MLN and spleen immune cells to respond to stimulation, supporting a role for LF in the initiation of protective immune responses in these immunologically challenged neonates. PMID:24553692

  2. Lectin interactions with the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line: quantitative binding studies and interleukin-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, G.; Bastin, B.

    1988-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pea lectin, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) have been used to investigate their binding properties to Jurkat 77 6.8 leukemic human T cells and their ability to induce these cells to produce interleukin-2 (IL-2). Binding studies showed that the Jurkat cells fixed 0.82 +/- 0.11 microgram pea lectin, 2.02 +/- 0.17 micrograms Con A, 1.85 +/- 0.07 micrograms PHA and 8.88 +/- 0.61 micrograms WGA. Scatchard plots were linear, indicating that the binding process was homogeneous with respect to the binding constant. PHA and Con A bound with the highest affinity (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 9 x 10(9) M-1), followed by pea lectin and WGA (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 3 x 10(9) M-1). The number of lectin binding sites was in agreement with the results of saturation experiments. We also evaluated the effect of the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the binding process. Results show that there were no gross alterations in the value of (apparent) Kass in the case of PHA and WGA. In contrast, the presence of TPA decreased the affinity of Con A and modified the Scatchard profile for pea lectin, which was curvilinear with a concavity turned upward. In this case, data were (apparent) K1 = 17.7 x 10(9) M-1 (high-affinity sites) and (apparent) K2 = 2.6 x 10(9) M-1 (low-affinity sites). The four lectins shared the ability to stimulate Jurkat 77 6.8 cells to secrete IL-2. Optimal lectin concentrations were 20 micrograms/ml (PHA) and 50 micrograms/ml (WGA and Con A). Pea lectin failed to display a dose-response relationship, and IL-2 production increased proportionally with lectin concentration. Con A was the most efficient stimulator (250 U/ml), followed by WGA (160 U/ml) and PHA (108 U/ml).

  3. Immunological responses of male White Leghorn chicks kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)-contaminated feed.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Zahoor Ul; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Saleemi, Muhammad Kashif; Khan, Ahrar; Javed, Ijaz; Noreen, Mnaza

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate some immunological responses of male White Leghorn (WL) chicks kept on an ochratoxin A (OTA)-contaminated diet. For this purpose, 350 1-day-old male WL chicks were divided into five groups (A-E). Group A was kept as control, while Groups B, C, D, and E were fed OTA-contaminated feed at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/Kg diet, respectively, for 21 days, and then basal ration for the remaining period. At 14- and 16-days of age, random chicks (n = 10) from each group were used for analyses of phagocytic function of the reticuloendothelial system or for measuring the lymphoproliferative responses to intradermally-administered T-cell mitogen, phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P), respectively. At 30-days of age, abdominal macrophages were collected from 15 chicks/group and utilized for determination of their phagocytic potential and for nitrite production. Antibody (Ab) titers (i.e., total antibodies, IgM, and IgG) against sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were determined at 7 and 14 days after a primary (at 7 days of age) and a booster (given 14 days after primary [at 21-days of age]) dose (intravenous) of the antigen. Data from the present study showed that the relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius of chicks fed OTA for 14 and 21 days and the spleen of chicks fed OTA for 21 days were significantly lower than their control counterpart. Phagocytic function of reticuloendothelial system evaluated by carbon clearance, and lymphoproliferative response to PHA-P, of chicks kept on OTA-contaminated diet were significantly lowered. The percentage of abdominal macrophages displaying phagocytosis of SRBC, the number of SRBC/macrophage, and nitrite production were each significantly lower in cells from chicks in the OTA-fed groups. Total Ab (at days 7 and 14 post-booster SRBC injection) and IgG (at day 14 post-primary and day 7 post-booster SRBC injection) titers against SRBC showed significant reductions in the groups fed OTA-contaminated diet. The

  4. Immunological status of the progeny of breeder hens kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)- and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-contaminated feeds.

    PubMed

    Ul-Hassan, Zahoor; Khan, Muhammad Zargham; Khan, Ahrar; Javed, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the immunological status of progeny of hens kept on ochratoxin A (OTA)- and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-contaminated feed. For this purpose, White Leghorn (WL) layer breeder hens (40-weeks-of-age) were divided into six groups (A-F). Hens in Group A were fed a commercial layer ration while those in Groups B and C were kept on a diet amended with 3 and 5 mg OTA/Kg, respectively. Group D was fed a ration containing 5 mg AFB(1)/Kg, while hens in Groups E and F were kept on feed amended with OTA and AFB(1) each. All feedings were for 1, 2, or 3 weeks. Fertile eggs were set for hatching on a weekly basis to obtain progeny of each week separately. At 14 days-of-age, subsets of progeny were euthanized and the frequency of immunoglobulin(s)-bearing cells in their spleen and bursa of Fabricius assessed; at 16 days-of-age, other chicks in each set were utilized to determine their lymphoblastogenic responses against phytohemagglutinin (PHA-P). At 30 days-of-age, the final sub-set of chicks/group was euthanized and their peritoneal macrophages harvested for measurements of phagocytic potential and nitrite production. Relative weights of the bursa of Fabricius and of the spleen were significantly lower in the progeny of hens fed mycotoxin-contaminated diets for 14 and 21 days. The frequencies of IgA-, IgG-, and IgM-bearing cells were also significantly lower in the bursa of Fabricius and spleen of progeny chicks obtained from hens fed the OTA + AFB(1) mixed diet. Feeding contaminated diets to breeder hens also resulted in significantly lower responses to PHA-P. In addition, the percentages of peritoneal macrophages displaying phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC), the number of SRBC/macrophage, and nitrite production were each significantly lower in cells from progeny chicks from OTA- and AFB(1)-fed hens. The findings of the present study indicated there were severe immunosuppressive effects in progeny chicks as a result of exposure of their

  5. Effects of mitochondria-targeted plastoquinone derivative antioxidant (SkQ1) on demography of free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) kept in outdoor conditions. reproduction and lifespan: explanation in the framework of ultimate loads.

    PubMed

    Rogovin, K A; Khrushcheva, A M; Shekarova, O N; Ushakova, M V; Manskikh, V N; Sokolova, O V; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2014-10-01

    We studied demographic effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 on free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Thomas, 1905, Rodentia, Cricetidae) in an outdoor vivarium with seasonally varying day length and temperatures. The animals were kept in pairs from their young age. We removed litters from parental cages at their age of 25 days. Experimental hamsters received daily 50 nmol/kg SkQ1 with water by oral dosing, whereas control animals received water. SkQ1 had no effect on the lifespan of either males or females in reproductive pairs. Mortality among females was higher than among males irrespective of SkQ1 treatment, this being related to higher costs of reproduction in females. However, SkQ1 accelerated breeding in pairs in the first half of the reproductive period of a year. Although there were no statistical differences in body mass of males and females between experimental and control animals during most of their life, SkQ1-receiving males had higher body mass at the end of their life. The opposite tendency was characteristic for old females. One-year-old males and females of the experimental and control groups showed no difference in intensity of immune response to sheep red blood cells. The dermal hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin (test for T-cell immunity) was significantly higher in SkQ1-treated 1- and 1.5-year-old males. This was not true for females. There was a tendency toward increased density of the neutrophil population in blood in 1-year-old SkQ1-treated males. However, experimental males showed no difference from control males in the activity of the "peroxidase-endogenous hydrogen peroxide system" of neutrophils. The background level of stress estimated by the concentration of cortisol in blood serum was significantly lower in the SkQ1-treated males during autumn adaptive adjustment of the organism. A similar trend was also observed during the January frosts, when the background level of stress was

  6. Construction and biological characterization of an interleukin-12 fusion protein (Flexi-12): delivery to acute myeloid leukemic blasts using adeno-associated virus.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Macdonald, I; Corbett, T; Hacking, G; Lowdell, M W; Prentice, H G

    1997-06-10

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a cytokine that exhibits pleiotropic effects on lymphocytes and natural killer cells and has been shown to have promise for the immunotherapy of cancer. The combination of the immune costimulatory molecule B7.1 and IL-12 has been shown to be synergistic for T cell activation. By transfecting tumor cells with both IL-12 and B7.1 cDNAs, it may be possible to use these modified targets as vaccines. A major obstacle in designing a vector to deliver these genes results from the structure of IL-12. Functional IL-12 is a heterodimer composed of two distinct subunits that are encoded by separate genes on different chromosomes. Production of functional IL-12 requires the coordinated expression of both genes. This presents several problems in vectors, particularly those in which additional genes, either a co-stimulatory gene or a selectable marker, are inserted. Therefore, we have constructed a single cDNA that encodes a single-chain protein, called Flexi-12, which retains all of the biological characteristics of recombinant IL-12 (rIL-12). The monomeric polypeptide Flexi-12 is able to induce the proliferation of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts, induce PHA blasts to secrete interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and additionally, by preincubation, enhance the killing of K562 targets by PBLs. These phenomena are in a dose-dependent manner comparable to that seen with rIL-12. We have also shown that tyrosine phosphorylation of the STAT 4 transcription factor, which has been shown to be unique to the IL-12 signaling pathway, occurs with Flexi-12 at levels similar to those seen with rIL-12. We have packaged Flexi-12 into a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and used this vector to infect acute myeloid leukemic (AML) blasts. Infected AML blasts produced between 2 and 6 ng of IL-12/10(6) cells per ml per 48 hr. These studies also confirm that AAV is an efficient delivery vehicle for cytokines to leukemic cells. Direct analysis of these modified cells acting

  7. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E; Chapman, B Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L; Pauls, Karl P; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  8. Sequencing and expression analysis of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ chains in mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zheng; Nie, Pin

    2013-01-01

    The genomic and cDNA sequences of the CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ homologues in the mandarin fish, Siniperca chuats i, were determined. As in other vertebrate CD3 molecules, the deduced amino acid sequences of mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ contained conserved residues and motifs, such as cysteine residues and CXXC and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs. However, mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ showed some differences to their mammalian counterparts, specifically the absence of a negatively charged residue in the transmembrane region of CD3γ/δ. Additionally, while an N -glycosylation site was present in CD3ɛ, the site was not observed in CD3γ/δ. The CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ subunit sequences contain six and five exons, respectively, consistent with homologues from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ in mandarin fish are closely related to their counterparts in Acanthopterygian fish. Real-time PCR showed CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were expressed mainly in the thymus and spleen in normal healthy fish and, to a lesser extent, in mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, such as the intestine and gills. When lymphocytes isolated from head kidney were treated with the mitogens phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, mRNA expression levels of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were significantly elevated within 12 h of treatment. This indicated the presence of T lymphocytes in the head kidney of teleost fish, and also the recognition of mitogens by the lymphocytes. Mandarin fish infected with the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare also showed an increase in the expression of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ mRNA, indicating that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ lymphocytes are involved in the immune response of this species.

  9. Application of Concanavalin A during immune responsiveness skin-swelling tests facilitates measurement interpretation in mammalian ecology.

    PubMed

    Bílková, Barbora; Albrecht, Tomáš; Chudíčková, Milada; Holáň, Vladimír; Piálek, Jaroslav; Vinkler, Michal

    2016-07-01

    The skin-swelling test is a simple and widespread method used in field ecological research to estimate cellular immune responsiveness in animals. This immunoecological test is based on measuring the magnitude of tissue swelling response at specific times following subcutaneous application of an experimental pro-inflammatory stimulant. In the vast majority of studies across vertebrate taxa, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is used as a universal stimulant. Given the complexity of immune response activation pathways of PHA, however, interpretation of test results can be ambiguous. Goal of this study was to improve methodology of the skin-swelling test to decrease this ambiguity. Here, we present an alternative protocol aimed at facilitating interpretation of skin-swelling data for mammals. Based on previous evidence suggesting that mammalian T cells are readily activated by Concanavalin A (ConA) in vitro, we compared cellular immune responses in vivo to PHA and ConA as an alternative pro-inflammatory stimulant in mice. We measured magnitude of tissue swelling and compared it with intensity of blood cell infiltration into tissue over a 72-hour interval. Our results corroborate that PHA and ConA show important differences in both dynamics and response amplitude in rodents. ConA induces stronger swelling with a distinct leukocyte activity pattern and higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin 6 [IL-6] and interferon gamma[IFN-γ]) expression than PHA during peak response (24-h post-treatment). Furthermore, unlike PHA, magnitude of swelling was positively associated with cellular activity (number of neutrophils infiltrating tissue) following ConA injection. We conclude that ConA is the more suitable stimulant for skin-swelling tests in mammals. This is because of the molecular binding specificity in the two lectins, that is, ConA specifically activates T cells while PHA also triggers erythroagglutination. We propose that ConA be used in all future ecological testing in

  10. Induction of apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes by the ether phospholipid ET-18-OCH3: Involvement of the Fas receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Cabaner, Christelle; Gajate, Consuelo; Macho, Antonio; Muñoz, Eduardo; Modolell, Manuel; Mollinedo, Faustino

    1999-01-01

    Activated T-cells constitute a target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. We have found that the antitumour ether phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3; edelfosine) induced dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes, but not in resting T-cells. T-lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 or with concanavalin A. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation through cell cycle and TUNEL analyses, as well as through visualization of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in agarose gels.The ET-18-OCH3-mediated apoptotic response in activated T-lymphocytes was less intense than in human leukaemic T cell lines, such as Jurkat cells and Peer cells; namely about 25% apoptosis in activated T-cells versus about 46–61% apoptosis in T leukaemic cells after 24 h treatment with 10 μM ET-18-OCH3.The ET-18-OCH3 thioether analogue BM 41.440 (ilmofosine) showed a similar apoptotic capacity to that found with ET-18-OCH3 in activated T-cells, whereas the phospholipid analogue hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) failed to promote this response.The uptake of [3H]-ET-18-OCH3 was much larger in activated T-cells than in resting lymphocytes.Using a cytofluorimetric approach we have found that ET-18-OCH3 induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species in activated T-cells, but not in resting lymphocytes.ET-18-OCH3 induced an increase in Fas (APO-1/CD95) ligand mRNA expression in activated T-cells, and incubation with a blocking anti-Fas (APO-1/CD95) antibody partially inhibited the ET-18-OCH3-induced apoptosis of activated T-lymphocytes.These results demonstrate that mitogen-activated T-cells, unlike resting lymphocytes, are able to take up significant amounts of ET-18-OCH3, and are susceptible to undergo apoptosis by the ether lipid via, in part, the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor/ligand system. This ET-18-OCH3

  11. Purification and characterization of a thermostable beta-galactosidase from kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cv. PDR14.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Kayastha, Arvind M; Seckler, Robert

    2003-04-01

    Using five different steps, beta-Galactosidase has been purified from kidney beans to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity with approximately 90-fold purification with a specific activity of 281 units mg-1 protein. A single band was observed in native PAGE. Activity staining of the native gel with 5-bromo 4-chloro 3-indoxyl beta-D-galactopyranoside (X-Gal) at pH 4.0 also produced a single band. Analytical gel filtration in Superdex G-75 revealed the molecular mass of the native protein to be approximately 75 kD. 10% SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed two subunits of molecular masses, 45 and 30 kD, respectively. Hence, beta-galactosidase from kidney beans is a heterodimer. A typical protein profile with lambda max at 280 nm was observed and A280/A260 ratio was 1.52. The N-terminal sequence of the 45 kD band showed 86% sequence homology with an Arabidopsis thaliana and 85% with Lycopersicon esculentum putative beta-galactosidase sequences. The Electrospray Mass Spectrometric analysis of this band also revealed a peptide fragment that had 90% sequence homology with an Arabidopsis thaliana putative beta-galactosidase sequence. The N-terminal sequencing of the 30 kD band as well as mass spectrometric analysis both by MALDI-TOF and ES MS revealed certain sequences that matched with phytohemagglutinin of kidney beans. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 4.0 and it hydrolysed o- and p-nitrophenyl beta-D galactopyranoside with a Km value of 0.63 mmol/L and 0.74 mmol/L, respectively. The energy of activation calculated from the Arrhenius equation was 14.8 kcal/mol enzyme site. The enzyme was found to be comparatively thermostable showing maximum activity at 67 degrees C. Thermal denaturation of the enzyme at 65 degrees C obeys single exponential decay with first order-rate constant 0.105 min-1. Galactose, a hydrolytic product of this enzyme was a competitive inhibitor with a Ki of 2.7 mmol/L. PMID:12756912

  12. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  13. Expression profiles of the immune genes CD4, CD8β, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in mitogen-stimulated koala lymphocytes (Phascolarctos cinereus) by qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Maher, Iona E; Griffith, Joanna E; Lau, Quintin; Reeves, Thomas; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the immune response of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is needed urgently, but has been limited by scarcity of species-specific reagents and methods for this unique and divergent marsupial. Infectious disease is an important threat to wild populations of koalas; the most widespread and important of these is Chlamydial disease, caused by Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia pneumoniae. In addition, koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is of 100% prevalence in northern Australia, has been proposed as an important agent of immune suppression that could explain the koala's susceptibility to disease. The correct balance of T regulatory, T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 lymphocyte responses are important to an individual's susceptibility or resistance to chlamydial infection. The ability to study chlamydial or KoRV pathogenesis, effects of environmental stressors on immunity, and the response of koalas to vaccines under development, by examining the koala's adaptive response to natural infection or in-vitro stimulation, has been limited to date by a paucity of species- specific reagents. In this study we have used cytokine sequences from four marsupial genomes to identify mRNA sequences for key T regulatory, Th1 and Th2 cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) along with CD4 and CD8β. The koala sequences used for primer design showed >58% homology with grey short-tailed opossum, >71% with tammar wallaby and 78% with Tasmanian devil amino acid sequences. We report the development of real-time RT-PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes in unstimulated cells and after three common mitogen stimulation protocols (phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin, phorbol myristate acetate/phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A). Phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin was found to be the most effective mitogen to up-regulate the production of IL-4, IL-10 and IFNγ. IL-6 production was not consistently up-regulated by

  14. Changes in gravity inhibit lymphocyte locomotion through type I collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, N. R.; Goodwin, T. J.; Risin, D.; McIntyre, B. W.; Pizzini, R. P.; Cooper, D.; Baker, T. L.; Spaulding, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    Immunity relies on the circulation of lymphocytes through many different tissues including blood vessels, lymphatic channels, and lymphoid organs. The ability of lymphocytes to traverse the interstitium in both nonlymphoid and lymphoid tissues can be determined in vitro by assaying their capacity to locomote through Type I collagen. In an attempt to characterize potential causes of microgravity-induced immunosuppression, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity on human lymphocyte function in vitro using a specialized rotating-wall vessel culture system developed at the Johnson Space Center. This very low shear culture system randomizes gravitational vectors and provides an in vitro approximation of microgravity. In the randomized gravity of the rotating-wall vessel culture system, peripheral blood lymphocytes did not locomote through Type I collagen, whereas static cultures supported normal movement. Although cells remained viable during the entire culture period, peripheral blood lymphocytes transferred to unit gravity (static culture) after 6 h in the rotating-wall vessel culture system were slow to recover and locomote into collagen matrix. After 72 h in the rotating-wall vessel culture system and an additional 72 h in static culture, peripheral blood lymphocytes did not recover their ability to locomote. Loss of locomotory activity in rotating-wall vessel cultures appears to be related to changes in the activation state of the lymphocytes and the expression of adhesion molecules. Culture in the rotating-wall vessel system blunted the ability of peripheral blood lymphocytes to respond to polyclonal activation with phytohemagglutinin. Locomotory response remained intact when peripheral blood lymphocytes were activated by anti-CD3 antibody and interleukin-2 prior to introduction into the rotating-wall vessel culture system. Thus, in addition to the systemic stress factors that may affect immunity, isolated lymphocytes respond to gravitational changes

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation and immune regulation in heat-stressed sheep after supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, M; Ciliberti, M G; Annicchiarico, G; Albenzio, M; Muscio, A; Sevi, A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acids from different sources on immune regulation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation in heat-stressed sheep. The experiment was carried out during the summer 2012. Thirty-two Comisana ewes were divided into 4 groups (8 sheep/group): (1) supplemented with whole flaxseed (FS); (2) supplemented with Ascophyllum nodosum (AG); (3) supplemented with a combination of flaxseed and A. nodosum (FS+AG); and (4) control (C; no supplementation). On d 22 of the experiment, cortisol concentrations in sheep blood were measured after an injection of ACTH. Cellular immune response was evaluated by intradermic injection of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at 0, 15, and 30 d of the trial. Humoral response to ovalbumin (OVA) was measured at 0, 15, and 30 d. At 0, 15, and 30 d of the experiment, blood samples were collected from each ewe to determine production of T-helper (Th)1 cytokines (IL-12 and IFN-γ), and Th2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-13), and concentrations of heat shock proteins (HSP) 70 and 90. Ewes supplemented with flaxseed alone had greater cortisol concentrations and a longer-lasting cell-mediated immune response compared with ewes in the control and other groups. Anti-OVA IgG concentrations increased in all groups throughout the trial, even though ewes in the FS+AG group had the lowest anti-OVA IgG concentrations at 15 d. The level of IL-10 increased in all groups throughout the experiment; the FS+AG group had the lowest IL-13 concentration at 15 and 30 d. The concentration of HSP 70 increased in AG ewes at the end of the experiment and decreased in FS ewes, whereas that of HSP 90 increased in FS ewes compared with FS+AG ewes. Flaxseed supplementation was found to influence in vivo HPA activation in heat-stressed sheep, resulting in increased cortisol concentrations, probably to meet increased energy demand for thermoregulation. Flaxseed supplementation also

  16. In vitro characterization of the immunotoxic potential of several perfluorinated compounds (PFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Emanuela; Sangiovanni, Enrico; Avogadro, Anna; Galbiati, Valentina; Viviani, Barbara; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L.; Dell'Agli, Mario; Germolec, Dori R.

    2012-01-15

    We have previously shown that PFOA and PFOS directly suppress cytokine secretion in immune cells, with different mechanisms of action. In particular, we have demonstrated a role for PPAR-α in PFOA-induced immunotoxicity, and that PFOS has an inhibitory effect on LPS-induced I-κB degradation. These studies investigate the immunomodulatory effects of four other PFCs, namely PFBS, PFOSA, PFDA, and fluorotelomer using in vitro assays. The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was evaluated in lipolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood leukocytes (hPBL) and in the human promyelocytic cell line THP-1, while the release of IL-10 and IFN-γ was evaluated in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated hPBL. All PFCs suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α production in hPBL and THP-1 cells, while IL-6 production was suppressed by PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer. PFBS, PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer inhibited PHA-induced IL-10 release, while IFN-γ secretion was affected by PFOSA, PFOS, PFDA and fluorotelomer. Leukocytes obtained from female donors appear to be more sensitive to the in vitro immunotoxic effects of PFCs when their responses are compared to the results obtained using leukocytes from male donors. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that inhibition of TNF-α release in THP-1 cells occurred at the transcriptional level. All PFCs, including PFOA and PFOS, decreased LPS-induced NF-κB activation. With the exception of PFOA, none of the PFCs tested was able to activate PPARα driven transcription in transiently transfected THP-1 cells, excluding a role for PPARα in the immunomodulation observed. PFBS and PFDA prevented LPS-induced I-κB degradation. Overall, these studies suggest that PFCs affect NF-κB activation, which directly suppresses cytokine secretion by immune cells. Our results indicate that PFOA is the least active of the PFCs examined followed by PFBS, PFDA, PFOS, PFOSA and fluorotelomer. -- Research Highlights: ► PFCs

  17. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E; Chapman, B Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L; Pauls, Karl P; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  18. The chemokine SLC is expressed in T cell areas of lymph nodes and mucosal lymphoid tissues and attracts activated T cells via CCR7.

    PubMed

    Willimann, K; Legler, D F; Loetscher, M; Roos, R S; Delgado, M B; Clark-Lewis, I; Baggiolini, M; Moser, B

    1998-06-01

    Secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, SLC, also known as exodus-2 and 6Ckine, is a novel CC chemokine with selectivity for T lymphocytes and preferential expression in lymphoid tissues. We have studied its production, receptor usage and biological activities. High levels of SLC mRNA were detected in lymph nodes, the gastrointestinal tract and several gland tissues, but no expression was found by Northern blot analysis in freshly isolated or stimulated blood monocytes and lymphocytes, or neutrophils and eosinophils. In situ hybridization revealed constitutive expression of SLC in the T cell areas and the marginal zone of follicles in lymph nodes and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, but not in B cell areas or sinuses. Comparison with immunocytochemical staining showed similarity between the in situ expression of SLC and the distribution of interdigitating dendritic cells but not with sinus-lining dendritic cells, macrophages or T lymphocytes. SLC induced chemotaxis of T lymphocytes and its activity increased considerably when the cells were conditioned with IL-2 or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Under optimal conditions SLC had unusually high efficacy and induced the migration of up to 50 % of input T lymphocytes. SLC also induced Ca2+ mobilization in these cells. Similar responses were obtained with EBI1 ligand chemokine (ELC), and sequential stimulation with both chemokines led to cross-desensitization, suggesting that SLC acts via the ELC receptor, CCR7. This was confirmed using murine pre-B cells stably transfected with CCR7 which bound SLC with high affinity and showed chemotaxis and Ca2+ mobilization in response to both SLC and ELC. In T lymphocytes PHA and IL-2, which enhanced chemotactic responsiveness, also markedly enhanced CCR7 expression. In contrast to all known chemokine receptors, up-regulation of CCR7 by IL-2 was transient. A maximum was reached in 2-3 days and expression returned to initial levels within 8-10 days. The present study shows that SLC is

  19. Interleukin-6 production does not increase with age.

    PubMed

    Beharka, A A; Meydani, M; Wu, D; Leka, L S; Meydani, A; Meydani, S N

    2001-02-01

    Investigators have reported an increase, decrease, or no effect of age on interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. Differences in experimental conditions and the health status of subjects may explain these contradicting results. Because the subjects used in most of the previous studies were not carefully screened for health, we investigated the effect of age on IL-6 production in healthy young and elderly subjects. Twenty young (aged 20-30 years) and 26 elderly (>65 years) men completed the study. Each subject was screened for good health, undergoing physical examinations and laboratory tests. Circulating IL-6 levels were not significantly different between young and elderly subjects. A subgroup of subjects representing both young and elderly volunteers had high (>1000 pg/ml) circulating levels of IL-6. However, circulating IL-6 levels were low (<100 pg/ml) in the majority of subjects in both age groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured for IL-6 production in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin (Con)A for 48 hours. Unstimulated secretion of IL-6 by PBMC cultured in autologous plasma (AP) or fetal bovine serum (FBS) was detectable in the majority of cultures. Age did not influence this spontaneous secretion of IL-6. PBMC stimulation with PHA or ConA significantly increased IL-6 production, but age did not affect the ability of PBMC to secrete IL-6 after stimulation when cultured in FBS. IL-6 production by PBMC cultured in AP and stimulated with PHA was not affected by age. However, when stimulated with ConA, PBMC from the elderly subjects produced less IL-6 than PBMC from the young subjects. Because IL-6 has been suggested to contribute to the age-related increase in prostaglandin (PG)E2 and nitric oxide (NO) production, we investigated the effect of age on the production of IL-6 by murine peritoneal macrophages (Mphi) as well as the effect of IL-6 on the production of other Mphi inflammatory products. Similar to the

  20. Mesothelin-MUC16 binding is a high affinity, N-glycan dependent interaction that facilitates peritoneal metastasis of ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Jennifer AA; Belisle, Jennifer; Onda, Masanori; Rancourt, Claudine; Migneault, Martine; Ho, Mitchell; Bera, Tapan K; Connor, Joseph; Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K; Lee, Byungkook; Pastan, Ira; Patankar, Manish S

    2006-01-01

    Background The mucin MUC16 and the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored glycoprotein mesothelin likely facilitate the peritoneal metastasis of ovarian tumors. The biochemical basis and the kinetics of the binding between these two glycoproteins are not clearly understood. Here we have addressed this deficit and provide further evidence supporting the role of the MUC16-mesothelin interaction in facilitating cell-cell binding under conditions that mimic the peritoneal environment. Results In this study we utilize recombinant-Fc tagged human mesothelin to measure the binding kinetics of this glycoprotein to MUC16 expressed on the ovarian tumor cell line OVCAR-3. OVCAR-3 derived sublines that did not express MUC16 showed no affinity for mesothelin. In a flow cytometry-based assay mesothelin binds with very high affinity to the MUC16 on the OVCAR-3 cells with an apparent Kd of 5–10 nM. Maximum interaction occurs within 5 mins of incubation of the recombinant mesothelin with the OVCAR-3 cells and significant binding is observed even after 10 sec. A five-fold molar excess of soluble MUC16 was unable to completely inhibit the binding of mesothelin to the OVCAR-3 cells. Oxidation of the MUC16 glycans, removal of its N-linked oligosaccharides, and treatment of the mucin with wheat germ agglutinin and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin abrogates its binding to mesothelin. These observations suggest that at least a subset of the MUC16-asscociated N-glycans is required for binding to mesothelin. We also demonstrate that MUC16 positive ovarian tumor cells exhibit increased adherence to A431 cells transfected with mesothelin (A431-Meso+). Only minimal adhesion is observed between MUC16 knockdown cells and A431-Meso+ cells. The binding between the MUC16 expressing ovarian tumor cells and the A431-Meso+ cells occurs even in the presence of ascites from patients with ovarian cancer. Conclusion The strong binding kinetics of the mesothelin-MUC16 interaction and the cell

  1. Associations between immune function and air pollution among postmenopausal women living in the Puget Sound airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lori A.

    Air pollution is associated with adverse health outcomes, and changes in the immune system may be intermediate steps between exposure and a clinically relevant adverse health outcome. We analyzed the associations between three different types of measures of air pollution exposure and five biomarkers of immune function among 115 overweight and obese postmenopausal women whose immunity was assessed as part of a year-long moderate exercise intervention trial. For air pollution metrics, we assessed: (1) residential proximity to major roads (freeways, major arterials and truck routes), (2) fine particulate matter(PM2.5) at the nearest monitor to the residence averaged over three time windows (3-days, 30-days and 60-days), and (3) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) modeled based on land use characteristics. Our immune biomarkers included three measures of inflammation---C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A and interleukin-6---and two measures of cellular immunity---natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T lymphocyte proliferation. We hypothesized that living near a major road, increased exposure to PM2.5 and increased exposure to NO2 would each be independently associated with increased inflammation and decreased immune function. We observed a 21% lower average natural killer cell cytotoxicity among women living within 150 meters of a major arterial road compared to other women. For PM2.5 , we observed changes in 3 of 4 indicators of lymphocyte proliferation stimulated by anti-CD3---an antibody to the T cell receptor associated with increases in 3-day averaged PM2.5. For 30-day averaged PM 2.5 and 60-day averaged PM2.5 we did not observe any statistically significant associations. We observed an increase in lymphocyte proliferation index stimulated by the plant protein phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at 1 of 2 PHA concentrations in association with modeled NO2. For the three inflammatory markers, we observed no notable associations with any of our measures of air pollution. If confirmed, our

  2. Recognition of HLA-A2 mutant and variant target cells by an HLA-A2 allospecific human cytotoxic T lymphocyte line.

    PubMed

    Ware, C F; Krangel, M S; Pious, D; Burakoff, S J; Strominger, J L

    1983-09-01

    HLA-A2 specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) cell lines have been developed using T cell growth factor and coculture of peripheral blood lymphocytes with selected allogeneic target cell lines. The CTL-8 line showed specificity for human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-A2 bearing target cells after 5 weeks in culture when tested against a panel of 14 lymphoblastoid cell lines in a 51Chromium (51Cr) release assay. Purified anti-human leukocyte antigens (HLA) monoclonal antibodies W6/32 and PA2.1 inhibited cytolysis by 85% and 60%, respectively. The CTL-8 line lysed non-HLA-A2 target cells in the presence of lectins concanavalin A (Con A) or phytohemagglutinin-P lectin (PHA-P) indicating the specificity of cytolysis was not due to nonspecific resistance of target cells to the CTL-lytic mechanism. The T5-1 HLA-A2 mutant cell series were tested as targets for the CTL-8 line. Cell clones 8.18.1, 8.21.1 and 8.6.1, which express altered HLA-A2 molecules as determined by their decreased reactivity with allospecific monoclonal antibodies, were lysed by the CTL-8 line as efficiently as the T5-1 wild type. These cell lines also acted as efficient cold target competitors for a normal HLA-A2 target cell. The 8.14.1 cell clone expressed a lower amount of HLA-A2 alloantigen and showed a corresponding decreased reactivity with CTL-8 in direct cytolytic and cold target competitive inhibition assays. In contrast, the M7 and DK1 HLA-A2 variant cell lines, which express normal HLA-A2 serological determinants, were inefficiently lysed by CTL-8 and did not act as competitive inhibitors of normal HLA-A2 target cells. These results support the concept that the alloantigenic determinant(s) recognized by T cells and antibodies occur at separate regions on the HLA-A2 molecule. PMID:6193184

  3. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stroma Cells (hES-MSCs) Engraft In Vivo and Support Hematopoiesis without Suppressing Immune Function: Implications for Off-The Shelf ES-MSC Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ou; Tormin, Ariane; Sundberg, Berit; Hyllner, Johan; Le Blanc, Katarina; Scheding, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) have a high potential for novel cell therapy approaches in clinical transplantation. Commonly used bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs), however, have a restricted proliferative capacity and cultures are difficult to standardize. Recently developed human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (hES-MSCs) might represent an alternative and unlimited source of hMSCs. We therefore compared human ES-cell-derived MSCs (hES-MP002.5 cells) to normal human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). hES-MP002.5 cells had lower yet reasonable CFU-F capacity compared with BM-MSC (8±3 versus 29±13 CFU-F per 100 cells). Both cell types showed similar immunophenotypic properties, i.e. cells were positive for CD105, CD73, CD166, HLA-ABC, CD44, CD146, CD90, and negative for CD45, CD34, CD14, CD31, CD117, CD19, CD 271, SSEA-4 and HLA-DR. hES-MP002.5 cells, like BM-MSCs, could be differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes in vitro. Neither hES-MP002.5 cells nor BM-MSCs homed to the bone marrow of immune-deficient NSG mice following intravenous transplantation, whereas intra-femoral transplantation into NSG mice resulted in engraftment for both cell types. In vitro long-term culture-initiating cell assays and in vivo co-transplantation experiments with cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic cells demonstrated furthermore that hES-MP002.5 cells, like BM-MSCs, possess potent stroma support function. In contrast to BM-MSCs, however, hES-MP002.5 cells showed no or only little activity in mixed lymphocyte cultures and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocyte stimulation assays. In summary, ES-cell derived MSCs might be an attractive unlimited source for stroma transplantation approaches without suppressing immune function. PMID:23383153

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Analysis of lead toxicity in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lead is a metal with many recognized adverse health side effects, and yet the molecular processes underlying lead toxicity are still poorly understood. Quantifying the injurious effects of lead is also difficult because of the diagnostic limitations that exist when analyzing human blood and urine specimens for lead toxicity. Results We analyzed the deleterious impact of lead on human cells by measuring its effects on cytokine production and gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Lead activates the secretion of the chemokine IL-8 and impacts mitogen-dependent activation by increasing the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α and of the chemokines IL-8 and MIP1-α in the presence of phytohemagglutinin. The recorded changes in gene expression affected major cellular functions, including metallothionein expression, and the expression of cellular metabolic enzymes and protein kinase activity. The expression of 31 genes remained elevated after the removal of lead from the testing medium thereby allowing for the measurement of adverse health effects of lead poisoning. These included thirteen metallothionein transcripts, three endothelial receptor B transcripts and a number of transcripts which encode cellular metabolic enzymes. Cellular responses to lead correlated with blood lead levels and were significantly altered in individuals with higher lead content resultantly affecting the nervous system, the negative regulation of transcription and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, we identified changes in gene expression in individuals with elevated zinc protoporphyrin blood levels and found that genes regulating the transmission of nerve impulses were affected in these individuals. The affected pathways were G-protein mediated signaling, gap junction signaling, synaptic long-term potentiation, neuropathic pain signaling as well as CREB signaling in neurons. Cellular responses to lead were altered in subjects with high

  6. Effects of mitochondria-targeted plastoquinone derivative antioxidant (SkQ1) on demography of free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli) kept in outdoor conditions. reproduction and lifespan: explanation in the framework of ultimate loads.

    PubMed

    Rogovin, K A; Khrushcheva, A M; Shekarova, O N; Ushakova, M V; Manskikh, V N; Sokolova, O V; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2014-10-01

    We studied demographic effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 on free-breeding Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Thomas, 1905, Rodentia, Cricetidae) in an outdoor vivarium with seasonally varying day length and temperatures. The animals were kept in pairs from their young age. We removed litters from parental cages at their age of 25 days. Experimental hamsters received daily 50 nmol/kg SkQ1 with water by oral dosing, whereas control animals received water. SkQ1 had no effect on the lifespan of either males or females in reproductive pairs. Mortality among females was higher than among males irrespective of SkQ1 treatment, this being related to higher costs of reproduction in females. However, SkQ1 accelerated breeding in pairs in the first half of the reproductive period of a year. Although there were no statistical differences in body mass of males and females between experimental and control animals during most of their life, SkQ1-receiving males had higher body mass at the end of their life. The opposite tendency was characteristic for old females. One-year-old males and females of the experimental and control groups showed no difference in intensity of immune response to sheep red blood cells. The dermal hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin (test for T-cell immunity) was significantly higher in SkQ1-treated 1- and 1.5-year-old males. This was not true for females. There was a tendency toward increased density of the neutrophil population in blood in 1-year-old SkQ1-treated males. However, experimental males showed no difference from control males in the activity of the "peroxidase-endogenous hydrogen peroxide system" of neutrophils. The background level of stress estimated by the concentration of cortisol in blood serum was significantly lower in the SkQ1-treated males during autumn adaptive adjustment of the organism. A similar trend was also observed during the January frosts, when the background level of stress was

  7. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E.; Chapman, B. Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L.; Pauls, Karl P.; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  8. Longitudinal tracking of cytokines after acute exposure to tuberculosis: association of distinct cytokine patterns with protection and disease development.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rabia; Talat, Najeeha; Shahid, Firdaus; Dawood, Ghaffar

    2007-12-01

    Household contacts (HCs) of patients with tuberculosis (TB) are at higher risk of infection as well as the development of active disease. Longitudinal tracking of antigen-specific cytokines after acute exposure may significantly advance our understanding of the dynamic changes in cytokine patterns associated with disease establishment. To achieve this objective, we carried out a prospective cohort study with healthy HCs after exposure to TB. The patterns of cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-gamma] and interleukin 10 [IL-10]) in response to mycobacterial antigens (culture filtrate [CF] proteins) and nonspecific mitogens (phytohemagglutinin [PHA] and lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) were assessed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 months after exposure. Seven of 109 (6.4%) HCs developed active disease. Six of the seven individuals were females, and active disease developed between 12 and 15 months after exposure in 5/20 families. The most significant findings were the exponential increases ( approximately 1,000-fold) in both the CF protein- and the PHA- or LPS-induced IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio in healthy HCs (n = 26), which peaked at 12 months, compared to the levels in HCs who developed disease (n = 7), in whom relatively flat responses were observed during the 24-month period. Linear trends for 0 to 12 and 0 to 24 months for the CF protein-induced IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio showed significant differences between the two groups, as determined by the use of the Mantel extension test for chi(2) analysis (odds ratio = 0.45; 95% confidence interval = 0.295 to 0.685; P = 0.0002). Our results strongly suggest that the magnitude of the IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio at 12 months after exposure may be a critical determinant in the resolution of infection. These studies provide new insights into the cytokine responses associated with disease establishment or the resolution of infection after natural exposure to TB and have implications for TB control programs as well vaccine efficacy studies. PMID:17928427

  9. Effect of pen size on behavioral, endocrine, and immune responses of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves.

    PubMed

    Grasso, F; Napolitano, F; De Rosa, G; Quarantelli, T; Serpe, L; Bordi, A

    1999-08-01

    Female water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves (n = 28) aged 7 to 10 d were divided into four groups of seven animals each to examine the effects of space allowance (Group A: 2.6 indoor m2 + 2.0 outdoor m2/calf; Group B: 2.6 indoor m2/calf; Group C: 1.5 indoor m2/calf; Group D: 1.0 indoor m2/calf) on behavioral, endocrine, and immune variables for a period of 60 d. Animals were offered 7 L/d of a commercial acidified milk substitute. The calves averaged 45.9 kg initially and 92.4 kg finally. The behavior observations were conducted 7 d after grouping and fortnightly thereafter. At wk 4 and 8, the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test was performed to induce aspecific delayed hypersensitivity. At wk. 1 and 3, calves were injected i.m. with keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Antibody titers were determined at weekly intervals for 7 wk. Calves in pens with greater space allowance (Groups A and B) were less active than Groups C and D (P<.001). The latter groups were also observed feeding more often at wk 7 (P<.01). Calves provided with an outdoor paddock spent less time standing than Groups C and D (P<.01), and lay with a greater number of outstretched legs (P<.001). Groups C and D showed a lower reaction to PHA in both skin tests than did Groups A and B (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). Group A showed an antibody response consistently higher than groups B, C, and D (P<.01, P<.05, and P<.05, respectively). At the end of the experimental period, the calves were subjected to an isolation test lasting 10 min. Group D showed a longer duration of movement with respect to Groups A and B (P<.01); animals from Group C walked more than did Group A (P<.05). Cortisol concentration evaluated 0, 10, 45, 90, 150, and 225 min after separation from the group was higher in Groups C and D than in Groups A and B (P<.01). For all animals, the highest cortisol level was observed immediately after the isolation test (P<.001). Space restriction resulted in evidence of stress in the animals as shown by

  10. Polymorphisms in Host Immunity-Modulating Genes and Risk of Invasive Aspergillosis: Results from the AspBIOmics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lupiañez, C B; Canet, L M; Carvalho, A; Alcazar-Fuoli, L; Springer, J; Lackner, M; Segura-Catena, J; Comino, A; Olmedo, C; Ríos, R; Fernández-Montoya, A; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Solano, C; López-Nevot, M Á; Cunha, C; Oliveira-Coelho, A; Villaescusa, T; Fianchi, L; Aguado, J M; Pagano, L; López-Fernández, E; Potenza, L; Luppi, M; Lass-Flörl, C; Loeffler, J; Einsele, H; Vazquez, L; Jurado, M; Sainz, J

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that immune-modulating single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influence the risk of developing cancer-related infections. Here, we evaluated whether 36 SNPs within 14 immune-related genes are associated with the risk of invasive aspergillosis (IA) and whether genotyping of these variants might improve disease risk prediction. We conducted a case-control association study of 781 immunocompromised patients, 149 of whom were diagnosed with IA. Association analysis showed that the IL4Rrs2107356 and IL8rs2227307 SNPs (using dbSNP numbering) were associated with an increased risk of IA (IL4Rrs2107356 odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20 to 3.09; IL8rs2227307 OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.81), whereas the IL12Brs3212227 and IFNγrs2069705 variants were significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing the infection (IL12Brs3212227 OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.96; IFNγrs2069705 OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.97). An allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT)-stratified analysis revealed that the effect observed for the IL4Rrs2107356 and IFNγrs2069705 SNPs was stronger in allo-HSCT (IL4Rrs2107356 OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 1.20 to 3.09; IFNγrs2069705 OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.59) than in non-HSCT patients, suggesting that the presence of these SNPs renders patients more vulnerable to infection, especially under severe and prolonged immunosuppressive conditions. Importantly, in vitro studies revealed that carriers of the IFNγrs2069705C allele showed a significantly increased macrophage-mediated neutralization of fungal conidia (P = 0.0003) and, under stimulation conditions, produced higher levels of gamma interferon (IFNγ) mRNA (P = 0.049) and IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) cytokines (P value for 96 h of treatment with lipopolysaccharide [PLPS-96 h], 0.057; P value for 96 h of treatment with phytohemagglutinin [PPHA-96 h], 0.036; PLPS+PHA-96 h = 0.030; PPHA-72 h = 0.045; PLPS+PHA-72 h = 0

  11. Aquatic pollution-induced immunotoxicity in wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Luebke, R W; Hodson, P V; Faisal, M; Ross, P S; Grasman, K A; Zelikoff, J

    1997-05-01

    determined that rats fed freeze-dried Baltic Sea herring had higher virus titers after challenge