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Sample records for phytohemagglutinin

  1. EARLY EVENTS IN LYMPHOCYTE TRANSFORMATION BY PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININ

    PubMed Central

    Pogo, Beatriz G. T.

    1972-01-01

    The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities of isolated nuclei from lymphocytes were examined after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The nuclear fraction was prepared with Mg++ or Mn++ to distinguish between polymerase I (nucleolar) and polymerase II (nucleoplasmic). Distinction between polymerases II and III was obtained by the addition of α-amanitin to the reaction mixture. The results indicated that within 15 min after exposure to PHA the activity of polymerase I increased. Polymerase II activity increased after 1 hr. The enhancement was linear for 6 hr and then leveled off for the subsequent 48 hr. Small increase in polymerase III activity was observed at 48 hr. Inhibition of protein synthesis at the time of exposure to PHA did not prevent the increase in activities during the initial 6 hr. These results imply that the initial increase in enzymatic activities is dependent upon preexisting polymerase molecules and/or factors. PMID:5028256

  2. Biosynthesis and processing of phytohemagglutinin in developing bean cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Vitale, A; Ceriotti, A; Bollini, R; Chrispeels, M J

    1984-05-15

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is a family of tetrameric isolectins which accumulate in the protein bodies of developing Phaseolus vulgaris cotyledons. Each tetramer contains erythroagglutinating (E) or lymphocyte-mitogenic (L) subunits, or a combination of both. The subunits have Mr around 33000, E being slightly larger than L. Phytohemagglutinin is a glycoprotein, and its carbohydrate moiety contains N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, fucose and xylose, indicating that this protein has complex oligosaccharide sidechains. Several steps in the biosynthesis and in the cotranslational and post-translational processing of the glycopolypeptides of PHA have been identified. The polypeptides of PHA are synthesized by polysomes attached to the endoplasmic reticulum. The glycosylation of the polypeptides is a cotranslational process, in which each PHA polypeptide usually acquires two oligosaccharide sidechains. The oligosaccharides of PHA isolated from the endoplasmic reticulum are susceptible to digestion with alpha-mannosidase and endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H indicating that they are of the high-mannose type. In the presence of tunicamycin two unglycosylated polypeptides of PHA are synthesized, indicating that the differences in Mr between the E and L subunits of PHA are not due to differences in glycosylation alone. Transport of PHA to the protein bodies is mediated by the Golgi apparatus where at least part of the oligosaccharide chains of PHA are modified [ Chrispeels , M. J. (1983) Planta ( Berl .) 157, 454-461, and 158, 140-151]. The modified oligosaccharide chains of PHA are then gradually trimmed to a smaller size when the protein is already in the protein bodies. This processing results in an increase in the mobility of the PHA subunits in denaturing polyacrylamide gels.

  3. [Determination of antigens A1 and A2 in erythrocytes by phytohemagglutinins].

    PubMed

    Potapov, M I

    2004-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinins antiH2 antiA1 and antiA2, when used jointly, ensure a reliable diagnosis of subantigens A1 and A2. Vegetable extracts are easier-to-find and safer for the purpose versus rare and hard-to-standardize corresponding isosera.

  4. The Significance Application of Indigenous Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) Mitogen on Metaphase and Cell Culture Procedure.

    PubMed

    Movafagh, Abolfazl; Heydary, Hassan; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Azargashb, Eznollah

    2011-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin, obtained from the red kidney bean that binds to the membranes of T-cells and stimulates metabolic activity, cell division, etc. The object of this research was the comparison between self made PHA (Indigenous) and imported commercial one, following conventional and High Resolution Cell Synchronization technique (HRCS) .From each blood sample of healthy individual donor replicate cell culture with two different PHA (self-made and commercial imported) with same concentration were cultured simultaneously. For culture cells, 3-5 × 106(6) cells were cultured in 4 mL medium( RPMI 1640 supplemented with 15 per cent heat inactivated fetal bovine serum, 0.1 mL Phytohemagglutinin was added and kept at 37°C in an atmosphere containing 5% CO2. The processing of mitotic division from 48 h and 72 h cultures was performed according to the standard and High Resolution Cell Synchronization technique. Cytogenetic studies were performed in 100 normal healthy blood donor individuals. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS (version 16, Inc.USA) software.Our results indicate that the preparation of fresh Phytohemagglutinin at the time of cell division and cell culture procedure reveals satisfactory score. The overall frequency of mitotic index in our study was better when compared with commercial imported Phytohemagglutinin (p < 0.001).The significant differences in the results may be due to fresh preparation. However, cost effective, easy and nearest approach of this indigenous product and high demand for this product among health care services can be considered.

  5. [Elimination of large pyroninophilic cells due to the effect of phytohemagglutinin].

    PubMed

    Bykovskaia, S N; Bykovskiĭ, A F; Shepelenko, A M

    1975-09-01

    Large pyroninophilic lymphocytes adsorbed on the surface of target-cells disappeared after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) addition. Incubation during 45 minutes in the presence of PHA did not reveal cisternas of the granular endoplasmatic reticulum and the number of mitochondrias decreased. The H3-thymidine-labeled cells were almost eliminated. There appeared population of small lymphocytes with even outline and clear cytoplasm, poor in organellas, with ribosomas freely scattered in it. After 24--48 hours of incubation they transformed into blasts, large cells with clear nucleus and clear cytoplasm in which no cisternas of granular endoplasmatic reticulum were revealed.

  6. Activation of c-myb expression by phytohemagglutinin stimulation in normal human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Torelli, G; Selleri, L; Donelli, A; Ferrari, S; Emilia, G; Venturelli, D; Moretti, L; Torelli, U

    1985-01-01

    The expression of c-myb in normal human T lymphocytes directly derived from a normal subject and not adapted to continuous growth in culture was found to be markedly increased after phytohemagglutinin stimulation. In the same cells, the expression of c-myc mRNA is a much earlier event compared with the appearance of c-myb mRNA, which takes place soon after that of histone H3 mRNA. The increase in c-myb expression was not due to a particular T-lymphocyte subset, as shown by in situ hybridization assays. Images PMID:3915538

  7. Effect of malathion on nucleic acid synthesis in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Czajkowska, A; Walter, Z

    1980-01-01

    The effect of malathion, an organophosphorus insecticide, on DNA and RNA synthesis was investigated by measuring the rate of incorporation of 3H thymidine and 3H uridine, respectively, into human lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Increasing concentrations of malathion, from 10 to 70 micrograms/ml, were added to human lymphocyte cultures at different times in relation to PHA introduction. The lowest applied dose of malathion (10 micrograms/ml) in most cases led to increased incorporation of both 3H thymidine and 3H uridine. Higher concentrations of malathion (30, 50, 70 micrograms/ml) caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease of radioisotope incorporation.

  8. High mannose oligosaccharide of phytohemagglutinin is attached to asparagine 12 and the modified oligosaccharide to asparagine 60. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Phytohemagglutinin, the lectin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris, has a high mannose and a modified (fucosylated) oligosaccharide on each polypeptide. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography of tryptic digests of (/sup 3/H)fucose or (/sup 3/H)glucosamine labeled phytohemagglutinin, followed by amino acid sequencing of the isolated glycopeptides, shows that the high mannose oligosaccharide is attached to Asn/sup 12/ and the modified oligosaccharide to Asn /sup 60/ of the protein. In animal glycoproteins, high mannose chains are rarely found at the N-terminal side of complex chains.

  9. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  10. Synthesis of Lectin-Like Protein in Developing Cotyledons of Normal and Phytohemagglutinin-Deficient Phaseolus vulgaris1

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Alessandro; Zoppè, Monica; Fabbrini, M. Serena; Genga, Annamaria; Rivas, Liliana; Bollini, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    The genome of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris contains a small gene family that encodes lectin and lectin-like proteins (phytohemagglutinin, arcelin, and others). One of these phytohemagglutinin-like genes was cloned by L. M. Hoffman et al. ([1982] Nucleic Acids Res 10: 7819-7828), but its product in bean cells has never been identified. We identified the product of this gene, referred to as lectin-like protein (LLP), as an abundant polypeptide synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of developing bean cotyledons. The gene product was first identified in extracts of Xenopus oocytes injected with either cotyledonary bean RNA or LLP-mRNA obtained by hybrid-selection with an LLP cDNA clone. A tryptic map of this protein was identical with a tryptic map of a polypeptide with the same SDS-PAGE mobility detectable in the ER of bean cotyledons pulse-labeled with either [3H]glucosamine or [3H]amino acids, both in a normal and in a phytohemagglutinin-deficient cultivar (cultivars Greensleeves and Pinto UI 111). Greensleeves LLP has Mr 40,000 and most probably has four asparagine-linked glycans. Pinto UI 111 LLP has Mr 38,500. Unlike phytohemagglutinin which is a tetramer, LLP appears to be a monomer by gel filtration analysis. Incorporation of [3H]amino acids indicates that synthesis of LLP accounts for about 3% of the proteins synthesized on the ER, a level similar to that of phytohemagglutinin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16666845

  11. Isolectins of phytohemagglutinin are able to induce apoptosis in HEp-2 carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kochubei, T O; Maksymchuk, O V; Piven, O O; Lukash, L L

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of total phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and its isolectins on cell death and apoptosis in human HEp-2 carcinoma cells and to analyze the possible molecular mechanisms of lectin induced apoptosis. The commercial preparation of the kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectins and HEp-2 cells were used. Apoptosis index was determined using acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining. The expression levels of apoptosis mediator cleaved caspase-3 and proapoptotic Bax protein were studied by Western blot analysis. The gene expression levels were analyzed by qPCR. PHA and its isolectins induced apoptosis in HEp-2 cells accompanied by the increased expression of caspase-3 cleaved form, with PHA-E being the most effective. The treatment of HEp-2 cells with PHA or its isolectins resulted in a marked increase of Bax on both mRNA and protein levels. PHA and its isolectins were shown to induce the apoptosis in human HEp-2 carcinoma cells via increasing proapoptotic protein Bax and activating caspases-3.

  12. Genetic selection of mice for quantitative responsiveness of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Stiffel, C; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Decreusefond, C; Lambert, F

    1977-05-01

    A two-way selection was performed in mice according to the quantitative in vitro response of lymph node lymphocytes to the mitogenic activity of phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The foundation population was composed of outbred mice produced by reciprocal mating of equal numbers of mice from four different colonies. The selective breeding was carried out by mating of mice at each generation giving the best or the lowest response, respectively. The progressive interline separation produced by 6 generations of selective breeding demonstrates that responsiveness to PHA is submitted to polygenic regulation. The heritability of the character investigated is 0.28 +/- 0.08. The interline separation is also found with another T mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A). In spleen cells PHA and Con A produce a similar interline difference. In contrast, the purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) stimulated both lines equally, and E. coli lipopolysaccharide gave only a slightly higher response in high line. This finding implies that our selection based upon response to PHA did not influence B cell function.

  13. Leucoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin: purification, characterization, proteolytic digestion and assessment for allergenicity potential in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Sharma, Akanksha; Das, Mukul; Jain, S K; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2014-04-01

    Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is consumed worldwide as a vegetarian protein source. But, at the same time the allergenicity potential of red kidney bean is a matter of concern. This study is aimed towards purification, characterization, thermal stability, proteolytic digestion and allergenicity assessment of one of the clinically relevant allergens of red kidney bean. The purification of red kidney bean allergic protein was carried out with the help of column chromatography, IgE immunoblotting and reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The purified protein was characterized by peptide mass finger printing (PMF) and studied for its thermal stability, and proteolytic resistance using simulated gastric fluid (SGF) assay. The allergenicity potential of the purified protein was studied in BALB/c mice. The purified protein was identified as leucoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) with molecular weight 29.5 kDa. The PHA-L showed resistance to heat as well as proteolytic enzyme. Higher levels of total IgE, specific IgE, and histamine were observed in PHA-L treated BALB/c mice when compared to control. Overall, PHA-L possesses characteristics of allergens and may play a potential role in the red kidney bean induced allergy.

  14. [The effect of irradiation by a He-Ne laser and phytohemagglutinin on lymphocyte mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Manteĭfel', V M; Andreĭchuk, T N; Karu, T I

    1991-01-01

    Electron-microscopic morphometry has been applied to study mitochondria on ultrathin sections of lymphocytes from human peripheral blood. It has been shown that the stimulation of lymphocytes by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) 1 h causes increases in the quantity of mitochondria per cellular section (17%) as well as in the total area of mitochondria per cell section (35%), i.e. an increase in mitochondrial mass. Taking into account known facts about growth and division of mitochondria in late phases of cellular cycle, one can suppose that described above changes in mitochondria during G0----G1 transition under action of PHA belong to an early phase of biogenesis of mitochondria. In the contrary, irradiation of lymphocytes with He-Ne-laser (lambda = 632.8 nm) in dose 56 J/m2 which does not cause the G0----C1 transition, results in the increase in the number of mitochondria per cellular section (20%) but not increase in the total area of mitochondria per cell section. The last finding indicates to some modification of space configuration of the mitochondria without any changes in their mass. The increase in the quantity of mitochondria per cellular section after the irradiation could be related with the increase in electrochemical proton gradient and in phosphorylating activity of mitochondria. He-Ne-laser radiation as well as mitogen PHA cause some deaggregation of mitochondria (this is more pronounced in case of PHA) which may be related to their functional activation.

  15. Antimetabolic effect of phytohemagglutinin to the grain aphid Sitobion avenae fabricius.

    PubMed

    Sprawka, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Goławski, A; Czerniewicz, P; Sytykiewicz, H

    2012-09-01

    The insecticidal activity of plant lectins against a wide range of insect species have been intensively studied. Understanding the mechanism of the toxicity of lectins is one of the studied aspects. In the present research, the first step was determine the effect of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) on the development, fecundity and mortality of grain aphid. Next, the effect of PHA lectin on the activity of such enzymes as: α- and β-glucosidases, alkaline (AkP) and acid (AcP) phosphatases, aminopeptidase N and cathepsin L involved in the metabolism of sugar, phosphorus and proteins of an adult apterae aphids was investigated. The PHA lectin added into the liquid diet increased the pre-reproductive period, mortality of Sitobion avenae, the time of generation development and decreased its fecundity and the intrinsic rate of natural increase. In addition, activity of α-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N of adult apterae exposed to PHA were reduced. The results indicate that the insecticidal activity of PHA on S. avenae may involve changes in activity of the enzymes in the midgut and it may be part of its toxicity.

  16. Phytohemagglutinin from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) inhibits sodium and chloride absorption in the rabbit ileum.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, J W; Laurenson, J P; Gorelick, F S; Banwell, J G

    1986-06-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), can induce malabsorption and diarrhea when fed to rats. In this study, we determined the effect of PHA on ion transport in the rabbit ileum in vitro. Compared with control tissues, PHA (1 mg/ml) added to the mucosal solution increased short-circuit current (1.1 +/- 0.2 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.001), decreased net Na (-1.0 +/- 0.5 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.02) and Cl (-1.2 +/- 0.6 microEq/cm2 X h, p less than 0.025) absorption, and decreased tissue conductance (-1.8 +/- 0.5 mS/cm2, p less than 0.001). Serosal addition of PHA had no effect on the short-circuit current or tissue conductance. Mucosal PHA did not increase mucosal levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate or cyclic guanosine monophosphate. Removal of serosal calcium did not affect the increase in short-circuit current induced by mucosal PHA. Utilizing fluorescent microscopy, rhodamine-labeled PHA was found to bind to the luminal border of villus cells, but not to crypt cells, in the ileum. In the descending rabbit colon, PHA did not affect either the short-circuit current or conductance, and rhodaminated PHA did not bind to the epithelial surface. Using the increase in short-circuit current as an indicator of absorption, PHA did not affect Na-coupled glucose or amino acid absorption in the ileum. This study suggests that dietary lectins may play a role in regulating intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport.

  17. [Effect of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) from Yunnan white kidney bean on development of mouse embryos].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifen; Wang, Changmei; Yang, Mingjie; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Minkang

    2011-06-01

    To study the effect of different concentration of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) on mouse embryo development. In experiment 1, crude and purified PHA extracted from Yunnan white kidney bean with different concentration were added into M16 culture medium, the final concentration of PHA were: 50, 100, 200, 500, 1 000, 2 000 and 5 000 mg x L(-1) respectively. 2-cell stage embryos were collected and cultured in PHA containing or control medium for 72-96 h and their development were recorded. In experiment 2, different stage of embryos from 1-cell to blastocyst were treated by different concentrations of PHA same as experiment 1 and 10 000 mg x L(-1) in culture medium for 24 h before washing and cultured in M16 + PVA without PHA to blastocyst or hatching blastocyst stage. Low concentrations PHA at 50-100 mg x L(-1) promoted embryo development and increased the number of blastocyst stage embryos. In contrast, high concentrations of PHA (> 1 000 mg x L(-1)) blocked the embryos development from 1-cell to blastocyst stage and showed apoptosis morphology or death. Depending on the concentrations, PHA from white kidney bean shown promotion or inhibition on mouse embryo development. 1-cell stage embryo shown more sensitive to PHA treatment than that of later stage embryos. Pretreatment 24 h in PHA containing medium can influence the further development of embryos. Low concentrations of PHA is benefit to embryo development, but high concentrations of PHA (> 1 000 mg x L(-1)) will block of the development of embryos.

  18. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  19. Immune responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin displays species but not sex differences in three anuran species

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chenchen; Qu, Kangshan; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced skin swelling response is widely used as a rough surrogate of integrative cell-mediated and innate immunity across multiple vertebrate taxa due to its simplification and feasibility. However, little is known whether there are sex and interspecific differences of immune responsiveness to PHA in ectotherms, especially for anurans. Therefore, we studied sex and species differences of PHA response in three anurans, Asiatic toads (Bufo gargarizans), Dark-spotted frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) and Mongolian toads (Pseudepidalea raddei), captured in northern regions of Anhui Province (China). Footpad thickness was measured prior to (0 h) and after (6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h) a PHA injection and normalized against saline injection in the opposite footpad. Body mass was recorded at the beginning (0 h) and end of each assay (72 h). Results showed effects of PHA assay, sex and taxa on body mass. Relative maximum swelling response (PHAmax) ranged from 18.58–29.75%, 9.77 to 20.56% and 21.97 to 31.78% and its occurrence over time was apparent 10.6–19.72 h , 7.74–14.01 h and 17.39–23.94 h postinjection for Asiatic toads, Dark-spotted frogs and Mongolian toads, respectively. Finally, the magnitude or timing of PHAmax in Dark-spotted frogs was significantly thinner and faster than in Mongolian toads, and Asiatic toads had an in-between value, not different from the other two species. The magnitude of PHAmax was significantly positively correlated with the timing of PHAmax considering individuals altogether, but not when analyzed within species. Our results indicate that male and female anuran species respond similarly to PHA antigen stimulation, but the magnitude and timing of PHAmax is species-specific. Briefly, we provide new evidence for the suitability of PHA assay in non-model anuran species with different body sizes, and exhort the need to further investigate the nature of PHA assay at the hematological and histological levels in order

  20. Overshoot phenomenon of phytohemagglutinin response after chemotherapy and its relationship to remission in acute non-lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harada, M; Mori, T; Kodo, H; Ishino, C; Matsue, K; Hattori, K

    1979-02-01

    To define the relationship between cell-mediated immunity and responses to chemotherapy or prognosis, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity, E- and active E-rosette tests, and mitogenic responses of lymphocytes were examined in 15 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Its results indicated that cell-mediated immunity before remission induction chemotherapy did not correlate with the outcome of treatment. In contrast, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity and mitogenic response tested after remission induction correlated with therepeutic effect. Further a "rebound" or overshoot of phytohemagglutinin responsiveness was observed in patients achieving remission. Serial studies on cell-mediated immunity may be useful for predicting therapuetic efficacy and prognosis in patients with acute leukemia.

  1. Defective cellular immunity in renal failure: depression of reactivity of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin by renal failure serum

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, W. Marcus; Sanford, Jay P.

    1971-01-01

    In defining host resistance factors in uremia, experiments were designed to assess the effect of renal failure serum upon the reactivity of normal human lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin in vitro. Normal buffy coat cells were resuspended in sera obtained from normal subjects and from 14 patients with renal failure, then stimulated with phytohemagglutinin M and the cellular response measured by the increase in thymidine or uridine uptake. The mean thymidine uptake by stimulated cells in normal sera was 14,389 ±1695 (SEM) cpm per 2 × 106 lymphocytes. Uridine uptake under the same conditions was 12,540 ±1887 cpm. Compared to these are a mean thymidine uptake of 2740 ±457 cpm and uridine uptake of 3928 ±667 cpm in renal failure sera. Both differences are significant at P<0.01 level. For controls representing “chronic illnesses,” sera from patients with pneumococcal meningitis, cirrhosis of the liver without jaundice, rheumatoid arthritis, and paraplegia with urinary tract infection did not cause suppression. No single drug had been taken by all the renal failure patients; three patients were taking no drugs. The serum from one patient with acute renal failure suppressed thymidine uptake while her serum obtained after recovery from her illness supported a normal lymphocyte response. Improvement of lymphocyte response was also noted in 9 of 10 sera obtained from patients immediately after hemodialysis. These observations plus the inhibition of stimulated cells by normal serum mixed with renal failure serum indicate the presence of a dialyzable inhibitory factor rather than the absence of a supporting factor in the renal failure sera. Lymphocytes preincubated for 24 hr in renal failure serum responded normally when transferred to normal serum and stimulated. Cells stimulated in normal serum and transferred to renal failure serum within the initial 24 hr of incubation demonstrated depressed thymidine uptake. Also, cell survival for 72 hr incubation as judged by

  2. The cell agglutination agent, phytohemagglutinin-L, improves the efficiency of somatic nuclear transfer cloning in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Du, Fuliang; Shen, Perng-Chih; Xu, Jie; Sung, Li-Ying; Jeong, B-Seon; Lucky Nedambale, Tshimangadzo; Riesen, John; Cindy Tian, X; Cheng, Winston T K; Lee, Shan-Nan; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2006-02-01

    One of the several factors that contribute to the low efficiency of mammalian somatic cloning is poor fusion between the small somatic donor cell and the large recipient oocyte. This study was designed to test phytohemagglutinin (PHA) agglutination activity on fusion rate, and subsequent developmental potential of cloned bovine embryos. The toxicity of PHA was established by examining its effects on the development of parthenogenetic bovine oocytes treated with different doses (Experiment 1), and for different durations (Experiment 2). The effective dose and duration of PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min incubation) was selected and used to compare membrane fusion efficiency and embryo development following somatic cell nuclear transfer (Experiment 3). Cloning with somatic donor fibroblasts versus cumulus cells was also compared, both with and without PHA treatment (150 microg/mL, 20 min). Fusion rate of nuclear donor fibroblasts, after phytohemagglutinin treatment, was increased from 33 to 61% (P < 0.05), and from 59 to 88% (P < 0.05) with cumulus cell nuclear donors. The nuclear transfer (NT) efficiency per oocyte used was improved following PHA treatment, for both fibroblast (13% versus 22%) as well as cumulus cells (17% versus 34%; P < 0.05). The cloned embryos, both with and without PHA treatment, were subjected to vitrification and embryo transfer testing, and resulted in similar survival (approximately 90% hatching) and pregnancy rates (17-25%). Three calves were born following vitrification and embryo transfer of these embryos; two from the PHA-treated group, and one from non-PHA control group. We concluded that PHA treatment significantly improved the fusion efficiency of somatic NT in cattle, and therefore, increased the development of cloned blastocysts. Furthermore, within a determined range of dose and duration, PHA had no detrimental effect on embryo survival post-vitrification, nor on pregnancy or calving rates following embryo transfer.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response.

  4. Ultrastructure and morphometric analysis of hypertrophic nucleoli in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, S H; Chang, L Y; Wessely, Z; Klavins, J V

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructure of hypertrophic nucleoli in large cells from each of 5 successive cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (regardless of predominant cell type) showed irregularly rounded or ovoid, mostly compact forms with few scattered light spaces. Occasional nucleolonemal forms were noted. Few ring forms or transitional forms between ring and compact or nucleolonemal types were present. Granular components occupied 78.5 +/- 1.0% of the mean total area of 132 lymphoma large cell nucleoli of all configurations studied. Hypertrophic nucleoli in 27 phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes were predominantly nucleolonemal with 74.2 +/- 10.6% granular composition. The qualitative and quantitative distribution of nucleolar granular moieties did not vary significantly between individual cases of lymphoma nor quantitatively between these and nucleoli in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes. These observations lend further credence to the suggestion of the lymphocyte as a common progenitor cell type for the large B and T cell of malignant lymphomas. Some functional similarity of their nucleoli and those of PHA-stimulated lymphocytes in their participation in ribonucleic acid synthesis is implied. Generally compact nucleoli of lymphomas in contrast to nucleolonemal forms of PHA-stimulated lymphocytes may be pathognomonic for large lymphocytic cells undergoing neoplasia.

  5. Potentiation of the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) induces phytohemagglutinin-activated Jurkat T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Djillani, Alaeddine; Doignon, Isabelle; Luyten, Tomas; Lamkhioued, Bouchaib; Gangloff, Sophie C; Parys, Jan B; Nüße, Oliver; Chomienne, Christine; Dellis, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the main Ca(2+) entry pathway of non-excitable cells. In the past decade, the activation of this entry has been unveiled, with STIM1, a protein of the endoplasmic reticulum able to sense the intraluminal Ca(2+) content, and Orai1, the pore-forming unit of the Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels. When Ca(2+) ions are released from the endoplasmic reticulum, STIM1 proteins oligomerize and directly interact with Orai1 proteins, allowing the opening of the CRAC channels and a massive Ca(2+) ion influx known as SOCE. As Ca(2+) is involved in various cellular processes, the discovery of new drugs acting on the SOCE should be of interest to control the cell activity. By testing analogs of 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB), a well known, though not so selective effector of the SOCE, we identified methoxy diethylborinate (MDEB), a molecule able to potentiate the SOCE in three leukocyte and two breast cancer cell lines by increasing the Ca(2+) influx amplitude. Unlike 2-APB, MDEB does not affect the Ca(2+) pumps or the Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. MDEB could therefore represent the first member of a new group of molecules, specifically able to potentiate SOCE. Although not toxic for non-activated Jurkat T cells, it could induce the apoptosis of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetics of the formation of a G2 block from tritiated thymidine in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.; Bagwell, C.B.; Irvin, G.L.; Jensen, J.A.

    1980-07-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to monitor the radiation effects promoted by incorporated tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes stained with propidium iodide (PI). Lymphocyte microcultures were continuously labeled or pulse-labeled for various periods of time with different /sup 3/H-TdR concentrations. Two types of DNA histogram analyses were performed on unperturbed and /sup 3/H)TdR perturbed lymphocytes. The data analyses consisted of statistical analyses between averaged groups of histograms (nonparametric analysis) and cell cycle analyses (parametric analysis) to determine the percentages of cells in G0 + G1, S and G2 + M. The results showed that (a) /sup 3/H-TdR when added to proliferating lymphocytes under certain conditions (both short-term continuous and pulse-labeling) caused a highly significant increase in the proportion of tetraploid (4C) cells by FCM, (b) the increase in the proportion of 4C cells represented a block in G2 and (c) the relative increase in the percentage of 4C cells was proportional to /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation which was proportional to labeling time and concentration. Therefore, it was concluded that short labeling times be used to minimize adverse radiation effects when /sup 3/H-TdR is used to assay substances affecting lymphocyte proliferation or in the estimation of cell cycle time.

  7. Zinc-deficient culture medium and protein kinase C inhibitors impair phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of murine splenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.J.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Zinc deficiency inhibits mitogen-induced proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in this process is being evaluated by culturing splenocytes from C57Bl/6 mice in medium containing 5% Chelex-treated fetal bovine serum and the T-cell mitogen, phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA induces proliferation measured by ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal induction at 2.5 {mu}g/ml. The PKC inhibitors staurosporine and H-7 inhibit PHA-stimulated proliferation in concentration-dependent manners with IC{sub 50} values of 2.6 nM and 15 {mu}M, respectively. PHA has little or not effect on proliferation of cells cultured in medium containing 0.8 {mu}M zinc. However, increasing the medium zinc concentration to 16 {mu}M dramatically increases PHA-stimulated proliferation over control cultures. The results suggest that PHA-induced proliferation of murine T-cells is mediated by PKC. It is hypothesized that zinc deficiency inhibits mitogen-stimulated proliferation by preventing PKC coupling to plasma membranes. The results of these studies may provide a mechanism to explain impaired immunocompetence and other clinical problems associated with zinc deficiency.

  8. Delayed-type hypersensitivity, contact sensitivity, and phytohemagglutinin skin-test responses of heat- and cold-stressed calves.

    PubMed

    Kelley, K W; Greenfield, R E; Evermann, J F; Parish, S M; Perryman, L E

    1982-05-01

    Three-week-old Holstein bull calves were used to investigate the effect of a 2-week chronic heat (35 C) or cold (-5 C) exposure on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to purified protein derivative after sensitization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, contact sensitivity (CS) reactions to 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin tests. Heat exposure reduced expression of DTH reactions by 42% and CS reactions by 38% at 24 hours after elicitation of the responses. The PHA-induced skin tests were not affected after 1 week of heat exposure, but this reaction was reduced by 20% after 2 weeks of heat exposure. The immune response of calves exposed to cold air temperatures was more complex. Cold exposure suppressed CS reactions by 39% at the end of both the 1st and 2nd weeks. The PHA response was reduced by 39% after 2 weeks of cold exposure. The DTH response depended on duration of cold exposure. The DTH reaction was increased by 42% after 1 week, but was reduced by 14% after 2 weeks. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental stressors alter host resistance by affecting the immune system. Furthermore, these stress-induced changes in immune events depend on the type of immune response, the nature of the environmental stressor, and the length of time that calves are exposed to the stressor.

  9. Crosslinking of microsomal proteins identifies P-9000, a protein that is co-transported with phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin in bean cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Tanchak, M A; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-11-01

    Developing cotyledons of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., transport within their secretory system (endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus) the abundant vacuolar proteins, phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. To identify proteins that may play a role in vacuolar targeting, we treated cotyledon microsomal fractions with a bifunctional crosslinking reagent, dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate), isolated protein complexes with antibodies to phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin, and analysed the polypeptides by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This allowed us to identify a protein of Mr=9000 (P-9000) that was crosslinked to both phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. P-900 is abundantly present in the endoplasmic reticulum. The aminoterminus of P-9000 shows extensive sequence identity with the amino-terminus of PA1 (Mr=11 000), a cysteine-rich albumin whose processing products accumulate in the vacuoles of pea (Pisum sativum L.) cotyledons. Like PA1, P-9000 is synthesized as a pre-proprotein that is posttranslationally processed into smaller polypeptides. The possible functions of P-9000 are discussed.

  10. Histological assessment of cellular immune response to the phytohemagglutinin skin test in Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Turmelle, Amy S; Ellison, James A; Mendonça, Mary T; McCracken, Gary F

    2010-11-01

    Bats are known reservoirs for numerous emerging infectious diseases, occupy unique ecological niches, and occur globally except for Antarctica. Given their impact on human and agricultural health, it is critical to understand the mechanisms underlying immunocompetence in this reservoir host. To date, few studies have examined immune function in the Order Chiroptera, particularly among natural colonies of bats. The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test has been widely used to measure delayed-type cellular immune response in a wide variety of vertebrates, and has been routinely employed in immunoecological studies. Although this test is frequently described as a measure of T cell proliferation, recent studies indicate it may represent a combination of immune responses. In mammals, the immune response is differentially, temporally and spatially regulated, therefore, we characterized the infiltrating leukocyte response to the PHA skin test in bats by examining a time-series of histological sections from PHA and saline injection areas in 41 Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis). Results suggest that bats exhibit diverse leukocyte traffic within 6 h, and up to 24 h following subcutaneous PHA injection. There was a significant presence of lymphocytes and neutrophils, as well as eosinophils, basophils, and macrophages observed in the PHA-injected tissues, compared with saline-injected control tissues. We observed a highly significant negative correlation between the number of lymphocytes and neutrophils in PHA-injected tissue, with peak lymphocyte response at 12 h, and peak neutrophil response at 24 h post-injection. These results indicate substantial variation in the immune response of individuals, and may aid our understanding of disease emergence in natural populations of bats.

  11. Mifepristone acts as progesterone antagonist of non-genomic responses but inhibits phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, C H; Lai, J N; Liao, C F; Wang, O Y; Lu, L M; Huang, M I; Lee, W F; Shie, M C; Chien, E J

    2009-08-01

    Progesterone is an endogenous immunomodulator that suppresses T cell activation during pregnancy. The stimulation of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) would seem to be the cause of rapid non-genomic responses in human peripheral T cells, such as an elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and decreased intracellular pH (pH(i)). Mifepristone (RU486) produces mixed agonist/antagonist effects on immune cells compared with progesterone. We explored whether RU486 is an antagonist to mPRs and can block rapid non-genomic responses and the induction by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) of cell proliferation. Human male peripheral T cell responses in terms of pH(i) and [Ca(2+)](i) changes were measured using the fluorescent dyes, 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and fura-2, respectively. Expression of mPR mRNA was determined by RT-PCR analysis. Cell proliferation and cell toxicity were determined by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and MTT assay, respectively. The mRNAs of mPRalpha, mPRbeta and mPRgamma were expressed in T cells. RU486 blocked progesterone-mediated rapid responses including, the [Ca(2+)](i) increase and pH(i) decrease, in a dose related manner. RU486 did not block, but enhanced, the inhibitory effect of progesterone on PHA induced cell proliferation. RU486 alone inhibited proliferation induced by PHA and at >25 microM seems to be cytotoxic against resting T cells (P < 0.01). RU486 is antagonistic to the rapid mPR-mediated non-genomic responses, but is synergistic with progesterone with respect to the inhibition of PHA-induced cell proliferation. Our findings shine new light on RU486's clinical application and how this relates to the non-genomic rapid physiological responses caused by progesterone.

  12. Phytohemagglutinin-induced IL2 mRNA in whole blood can predict bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy for multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, T; Mitsuhashi, M; Sagawa, M; Ri, M; Suzuki, K; Abe, M; Ohmachi, K; Nakagawa, Y; Nakamura, S; Chosa, M; Iida, S; Kizaki, M

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has revolutionized the treatment of multiple myeloma. However, bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy (BiPN) is a serious complication that compromises clinical outcome. If patients with a risk of developing BiPN could be predicted, physicians might prefer weekly, reduced-dose, or subcutaneous approaches. To seek biomarkers for BiPN, we conducted a multicenter prospective study using a simple and unique system. Multiple myeloma patients received twice-weekly or weekly 1.3 mg/m2 bortezomib intravenously, and a 2-ml sample of whole blood was obtained before treatment and 2–3 days and 1–3 weeks after the first dose. Induction of gene expression was then quantified by real-time PCR. Of a total of 64 enrolled patients, 53 patient samples qualified for mRNA analysis. The BiPN grade was associated with phytohemagglutinin-induced IL2, IFNG and TNFSF2, as well as with lipopolysaccharide-induced IL6 levels. More importantly, of the 19 patients showing a ⩾3-fold increase in phytohemagglutinin-induced IL2, 14 did not suffer from BiPN (73.7% prediction), whereas of the 34 patients with a <3-fold increase, 23 experienced BiPN (67.6% prediction). Therefore, we concluded that pretreatment of phytohemagglutinin-induced IL2 mRNA levels in whole blood serve as a promising biomarker for predicting BiPN, and this finding warrants validation in a larger study. PMID:24096714

  13. Selective release of excreted DNA sequences from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Effects of trypsin and divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Distelhorst, C W; Cramer, K; Rogers, J C

    1978-01-01

    We studied the synthesis of excreted DNA sequences and their release from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes under conditions permitting optimal cell growth. Cells were labeled by constant exposure to low specific activity [3H]thymidine. Excreted DNA sequences were synthesized during the period of logarithmic cell growth and moved slowly from the high molecular weight chromosomal DNA fraction into the low molecular weight cell DNA fraction (Hirt supernate) from which they could be specifically released by treating the cells briefly with small amounts of various proteases; 1 microgram/ml trypsin for 5 min was optimal. On day 5 of culture, 13.3 +/- 6.9% of the total cellular acid-precipitable [3H]thymidine was released by this treatment. Trypsin-induced release was partially and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells for 16 h with 5 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP. Cells incubated in the absence of divalent cations spontaneously released this Hirt supernatant DNA; after maximal release had occurred under these circumstances, additional trypsin treatment caused no further release of DNA. Trypsin-induced DNA release could be completely and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells in the presence of 10 mM calcium. Trypsin-released DNA was isolated and analyzed by reassociation kinetics. A major component, representing 54% of the DNA, reassociated with a C0t1/2 of 68 mol.s/liter (the value at which DNA association is 50% complete). The reassociation of this DNA was studied in the presence of an excess of DNA isolated from stimulated lymphocytes on day 3 in culture, and in the presence of an excess of resting lymphocyte DNA. The high molecular weight fraction of day-3 cell DNA contained three times more copies of the trypsin-released DNA major component as compared to resting lymphocyte DNA. Hirt supernatant DNA isolated from day-5 stimulated lymphocytes reassociated in an intermediate component representing 34% of the DNA with a Cot1/2 of

  14. Inhibition of mitogenesis induced by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin in adherent-cell supernatants treated with protein extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Parra, C; Montaño, L F; Huesca, M; Rayón, I; Willms, K; Goodsaid, F

    1986-01-01

    Specific stimulation of T cells by phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin was inhibited by a soluble factor(s) secreted by normal adherent cells stimulated with culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) derived from bacterial cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (avirulent) and H37Rv (virulent). The induction of the inhibitory factor was blocked by the presence of hyperimmune antisera to H37Rv or H37Ra CFPE. The inhibitory factor did not seem to be a CFPE reprocessed by the adherent cells. Inhibitory activity was maximal in supernatants of adherent-cell cultures incubated for 48 h; the inhibitory factor was heat labile, and its production was dependent on the concentration of M. tuberculosis CFPE. A mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line, ATCC J774A.1, produced an identical inhibitory factor, thus excluding a non-macrophage-contaminating adherent cell as the source of the factor. This inhibitory factor also interfered with the recognition of phytohemagglutinin and Lens culinaris lectin by T cells. PMID:3082760

  15. Immune response of mallard ducks treated with immunosuppressive agents: antibody response to erythrocytes and in vivo response to phytohemagglutinin-P.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrank, C.S.; Cook, M.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of two in vivo tests to assay immune competence of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) treated with various immunomodulatory agents was examined. Skin responses to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) injected intradermally and serum antibody levels produced in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were measured. As measured by the skin response to PHA-P, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide or cyclosporine did not respond differently from control-injected ducks. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly significantly suppressed the skin response to PHA-P. As measured by antibody levels in response to SRBC, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide responded with antibody titers similar to controls. Cyclosporine injected intramuscularly reduced the level of immunoglobulin (Ig) G significantly in one of two experiments. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly reduced peak total and IgG titers. These experiments provide information on the viability of these two in vivo tests to reflect immune competence of mallard ducks.

  16. Comparative study on modeccin- and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced secretion of cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyung; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Jiang, Zedong; Nakayama, Yuki; Yamanishi, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    The effects of cytotoxic lectins, modeccin and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) on mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was studied by detecting the induction of inflammatory mediators. Results showed that modeccin induced the release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from RAW264.7 cells with a bell-shape concentration-dependent profile. PHA that showed no significant cytotoxicity on RAW264.7 cells up to 100,000 ng/ml induced much higher level of TNF-α than modeccin. PHA simultaneously induced the secretion of granulocyte colony stimulation factor (G-CSF) from RAW264.7 cells with even much higher level than that of TNF-α, whereas modeccin did not. Furthermore, PHA induced the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells, while no significant level of NO was detected in the modeccin-treated cells. NH₄Cl (a lysomotoropic agent) and cycloheximide (a ribosome inhibitor) strongly inhibited modeccin-induced TNF-α secretion, but no significant inhibitory effects of these reagents on the PHA-induced TNF-α secretion were observed. Contrary to modeccin-induced TNF-α secretion, even slightly increased TNF-α secretion was observed in PHA-treated cells in the presence of 10 mM NH₄Cl. In addition, the inhibition profiles of modeccin-induced TNF-α secretion by various kinase inhibitors were different from those of PHA. These results suggested that the action mode of modeccin to stimulate RAW264.7 cells leading to the secretion of inflammatory molecules, including TNF-α, is distinct from that of PHA. On the other hand, significantly increased translocation of activator protein-1 (AP-1), a crucial transcription factor involved in expression of inflammatory molecules, into nucleus was observed in RAW264.7 cells treated with PHA and modeccin.

  17. The rapid immunosuppression in phytohemagglutinin-activated human T cells is inhibited by the proliferative Ca(2+) influx induced by progesterone and analogs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Veronica Hui-Chen; Chen, Jiann-Jong; Liao, Chen-Chung; Lee, Shinn-Shing; Chien, Eileen Jea

    2016-07-01

    Progesterone, an endogenous immunomodulator, suppresses human T-cell activation during pregnancy. A sustained Ca(2 +) influx is an important signal for T-cell proliferation after crosslinking of T-cell receptor/CD3 complexes by anti-CD3 antibodies or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Progesterone targets cell membrane sites inducing rapid responses including elevated intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and suppressed T-cell PHA-activated proliferation. Interestingly, both PHA and progesterone induce [Ca(2+)]i elevation, but it remains unclear whether the PHA-induced Ca(2+) influx is affected by progesterone leading to T-cell immunosuppression. Primary T-cells were isolated from human peripheral blood and the quench effect on intracellular fura-2 fluorescence of Mn(2+) was used to explore the responses to Ca(2+) influx with cell proliferation being determined by MTT assay. PHA-stimulated Ca(2+) influx was dose-dependently suppressed by progesterone and its agonist R5020, which correlated with PHA-activated T-cell proliferation inhibition. A similar dose-dependent suppression effect on cellular Ca(2+) influx and proliferation occurred with the TRPC channel inhibitor BTP2 and selective TRPC3 channel inhibitor Pyr3. In addition, two progesterone analogs, Org OD 02-0 and 20α-hydroxyprogesterone (20α-OHP), also produced dose-dependent suppression of Ca(2+) influx, but had no effect on proliferation. Finally, inhibition of PHA-activated T-cell proliferation by progesterone is further suppressed by 20α-OHP, but not by Org OD 02-0. Overall, progesterone and R5020 are able to rapidly decrease PHA-stimulated sustained Ca(2+) influx, probably via blockade of TRPC3 channels, which suppresses T-cell proliferation. Taken together, the roles of progesterone and its analogs regarding the rapid response Ca(2+) influx need to be further explored in relation to cytokine secretion and proliferation in activated T-cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CD4+ T cells dominate the leukocyte infiltration response initiated by intra-dermal injection of phytohemagglutinin into growing feathers in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K S; Erf, G F

    2017-10-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) is commonly used to evaluate cell-mediated immunocompetence. In chickens, PHA is typically injected intra-dermally (i.d.) into the skin (e.g., wing web, wattle, or footpad), and the tissue swelling response is monitored, whereby the extent of tissue swelling positively relates to the individual's cell-mediated immune system capabilities. Although i.d. injected PHA was shown to stimulate mononuclear cell and basophil infiltration to the site of injection, reports on temporal, qualitative, and quantitative aspects of the local cutaneous PHA response are limited. The objective of this study was to use the growing feather (GF) as a cutaneous test site to assess and monitor the type and relative amounts of leukocytes present in the pulp of PHA-injected GF. For this study, male, non-vaccinated Light-brown Leghorn chickens reared at the Arkansas Experiment Station Poultry Health Laboratory were used. At 9 wk of age, the dermis of 20 18-day-old regenerating GF was injected with 10 μL of either PBS diluent or 300 μg/mL PHA-P (5 chickens per treatment). GF were collected from each chicken before (zero) and at 0.25, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 d post injection. At each time point, one GF was collected for immunofluorescent staining of pulp cell suspensions and leukocyte population analysis by flow cytometry, and another GF for histological analysis. Histological analysis confirmed participation of granulocytes and mononuclear cells, primarily lymphocytes, in the cutaneous PHA response. As revealed by flow cytometric cell population analysis, T cells, especially CD4+ T cells, constituted the major portion of the mononuclear cell infiltrate. Levels of CD4+ T cells were greatly elevated in PHA-injected GF within 6 h and remained elevated throughout the 7-day examination period. γδ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and B cells also infiltrated in response to PHA although at lower levels and with different time-course patterns from CD4+ T cells. The dominant presence

  19. Phytohemagglutinin facilitates the aggregation of blastomere pairs from Day 5 donor embryos with Day 4 host embryos for chimeric bovine embryo multiplication.

    PubMed

    Simmet, Kilian; Reichenbach, Myriam; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-12-01

    Multiplication of bovine embryos by the production of aggregation chimeras is based on the concept that few blastomeres of a donor embryo form the inner cell mass (ICM) and thus the embryo proper, whereas cells of a host embryo preferentially contribute to the trophectoderm (TE), the progenitor cells of the embryonic part of the placenta. We aggregated two fluorescent blastomeres from enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic Day 5 morulae with two Day 4 embryos that did not complete their first cleavage until 27 hours after IVF and tested the effect of phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA) on chimeric embryo formation. The resulting blastocysts were characterized by differential staining of cell lineages using the TE-specific factor CDX2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy to facilitate the precise localization of eGFP-positive cells. The proportions of blastocyst development of sandwich aggregates with (n = 99) and without PHA (n = 46) were 85.9% and 54.3% (P < 0.05), respectively. Epifluorescence microscopy showed that the proportion of blastocysts with eGFP-positive cells in the ICM was higher in the PHA group than in the no-PHA group (40% vs. 16%; P < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the total cell numbers of blastocysts from the PHA group of aggregation chimeras (n = 17; 207.8 ± 67.3 [mean ± standard deviation]) were higher (P < 0.05) than those of embryos without ZP and exposed to PHA (n = 30; 159.6 ± 42.2) and of handling control embryos (n = 19; 176.9 ± 53.3). The same was true for ICM cell counts (56.5 ± 22.0 vs. 37.7 ± 14.2 and 38.7 ± 12.4) and TE cell counts (151.2 ± 58.0 vs. 121.9 ± 37.4 and 138.3 ± 53.0), whereas the ICM/total cell number ratio was not different between the groups. Of the 17 chimeric blastocysts analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, nine had eGFP-positive cells (three of them in the ICM, three in the TE, and three in both lineages). When integration in

  20. Differential expression of migration inhibitory and migration stimulatory factors in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. 2. Effects of mitogenic or allogeneic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; Suzuki, K; Couderc, J; el-Gharbi, N; Decreusefond, C; Stiffel, C

    1991-01-01

    Expression of migration inhibition factor (MIF) following in vitro stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or allogeneic cells was explored in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) response of their lymphoid cells to PHA. Hi/PHA mice also have greater cell-mediated immune responses in mixed lymphocyte culture and graft-versus-host reactions, the poorer cell-mediated immune response of Lo/PHA being accompanied by a higher frequency of malignant tumours. Expression of MIF in PHA-pulsed spleen cell supernatants measured by a sensitive photoelectric method was found to be modulated by the concomitant presence of migration stimulation factor (MStF) derived from T cells. Both lymphokines were better expressed in Lo/PHA, as compared to Hi/PHA, under appropriate experimental conditions. Use of a low proliferative dose of mitogen (5 micrograms/ml PHA, 2-hour pulse) followed by culture in serum-free medium led Lo/PHA to express the highest titres of MIF, whereas a proliferative dose of PHA (50 micrograms/ml, 2-hour pulse) caused abrogation or occultation of expression of MIF and elective expression of MStF in this line. Hi/PHA mice expressed MIF equally at both mitogen doses, with transient expression of MStF followed by MIF after 50 micrograms/ml PHA, the kinetics of expression of the two lymphokines being different. Expression of MStF by spleen cells was an early event after PHA stimulation. In contrast to mitogenic stimulation, allogeneic stimulation in one-way mixed lymphocyte culture led to similar expression of MIF by both lines of mice. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Differential expression of migration inhibitory and migration stimulatory factors in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. 1. Migration stimulatory factor(s) from T and B cells of immune spleen.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; el-Gharbi, N; Siddiqui, M U; Couderc, J; Decreusefond, C; Stiffel, C

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the lymphokine migration inhibition factor in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) response of their lymph node cells to phytohemagglutinin was found to be modulated by concomitant expression of migration stimulation factor(s) [MStF(s)]. The expression of both lymphokines was dependent on genetic character and the immunizing dose of antigen. In mice immunized 5 days earlier with 50 micrograms ovalbumin in Freund's complete adjuvant (Ova in FCA immune), migration inhibition factor, assessed with a sensitive photoelectric method, was well expressed by male spleen or lymph node 24-hour culture supernatants of Lo/PHA but Hi/PHA, especially female, expressed marked MStF(s) instead. Immunization with 500 micrograms Ova in FCA markedly enhanced expression of MStF(s) in Lo/PHA but inhibited it in Hi/PHA. MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens of the two lines were found to derive from both T and B cells, B cell activity being greater. Lo/PHA were by far better expressors of both T- and B-cell-derived MStF(s) as compared to Hi/PHA (p less than 0.01). Spleen cells of mice immunized with FCA alone also expressed MStF(s) but to lesser extent than Ova in FCA immune spleens, expression by Lo/PHA B cells being significantly higher than in Hi/PHA (p less than 0.05). The MStF(s) of Ova in FCA immune spleens was found to be non-immunoglobulin in nature.

  2. Excretion of Deoxyribonucleic Acid by Lymphocytes Stimulated with Phytohemagglutinin or Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, John C.; Boldt, David; Kornfeld, Stuart; Skinner, Sister Ann; Valeri, C. Robert

    1972-01-01

    When human lymphocytes are cultured in the presence of phytomitogens, 70-90% of the cells undergo blast transformation and synthesize DNA. However, less than 40% of these lymphocytes actually undergo mitosis while 35-90% of the newly synthesized DNA is excreted into the media. The release of DNA by the cells is selective since experiments with [14C]uridine indicate that RNA is not lost into the culture media. DNA excretion occurs under many culture conditions. The excreted DNA has an estimated molecular weight of 3 to 12 × 106 as determined by gel filtration on Sepharose 2B. It forms a single sharp peak at a density of 1.055 g/cm3 when examined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, suggesting that the DNA is complexed to protein or lipid. PMID:4505646

  3. Glucocorticoid suppression of human lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Influence of phytohemagglutinin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Segel, G.B.; Lukacher, A.; Gordon, B.R.; Lichtman, M.A.

    1980-04-01

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to suppress lectin-stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis in some studies, whereas in other studies, the hormones have had little effect. We have found that the position on the PHA dose-response curve that is studied is the most important determinant of whether cortisol inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into lymphocyte DNA. The proportion of monocytes in culture also influenced the cortisol effect, but it was quantitatively less important than PHA concentration. Cortisol (5 nM to 100 ..mu..M) had little effect on blastogenesis or thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures that contained both a high concentration (14% +- 2 (S.E.)) of monocytes and a concentration of PHA (0.6 to 1.2 ..mu..g/ml) that produced maximal stimulation of mitogenesis. When monocytes were reduced from 14 to 1.4%, cortisol (5 ..mu..M) caused a 30% reduction in thymidine incorporation in cultures stimulated by 0.6 to 1.2 ..mu..g/ml PHA. Much greater cortisol suppression of thymidine incorporation occurred if the concentration of PHA was reduced. For example, reduction of the PHA concentration from 1.2 to 0.075 ..mu..g/ml resulted in an increase in suppression by 5 ..mu..M cortisol from 5 to 90% even in the presence of 14% monocytes. These data indicate that the suppressive effects of glucocorticoids on blastogenesis and thymidine incorporation in vitro depend principally on the concentration of PHA used to stimulate blastogenesis and secondarily on the proportion of monocytes in the culture system.

  4. [Genetic selection of mice for quantitative responsiveness of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin].

    PubMed

    Stiffel, C; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Decreusefond, C; Lambert, F

    1977-01-01

    A two-way selection was performed in mice according to the quantitative response of small lymphocytes to the mitogenic activity of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). The response of inguinal lymph node cells of each mouse to an optimal dose of PHA was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation using a micro-plate method. Starting from four outbred mouse strains we mated on the one hand mice getting the best response and on the other hand mice getting the poorest response. A progressive separation of the two lines was observed. At the 7th generation a 3-fold difference was found between the two lines. A similar interline difference was observed when concanavalin A (ConA) was used as mitogen. The separation of the two lines was also evident when spleen cells or thymus cells were cultured with PHA or ConA.

  5. In vitro viability of lymphoid cells from lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Stiffel, C; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Decreusefond, C; Lambert, F

    1983-04-01

    The kinetics of viability of lymph node and spleen cells of mice genetically selected for "high" or "low" in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA were studied in PHA or PPD-stimulated short-term cultures. Lo/PHA cells were found to be less viable than Hi/PHA cells in unstimulated control cultures. PHA improved the viability of Lo/PHA cells while inducing proliferation of Hi/PHA cells with the appearance of more and larger lymphoblasts in the latter. PPD only improved the viability of spleen cell cultures, more so for the Hi/PHA line. The interline difference in thymidine uptake was smaller after PPD than after PHA stimulation. Modifications of culture conditions designed to decrease the interline difference in cell viability lessened but did not abolish the separation between the two lines for the PHA response as measured by thymidine uptake.

  6. Delayed hypersensitivity and migration inhibition in two lines of mice genetically selected for high or low responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Rahman, S; El Rouby, S; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Stiffel, C; Decreusefond, C; Liacopoulos, P

    1983-04-15

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cell migration inhibition (MI) were studied in two lines of mice genetically selected for the high (Hi/PHA) or low (Lo/PHA) in vitro response of their lymphoid cells to phytochemagglutinin (PHA). A rapid photoelectric procedure for reading cell migrations enabled the study of MI over a wide range (10 log) of antigen concentrations in vitro. Hi/PHA mice required immunization with a 10 times higher dose of ovalbumin (OVA) in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) than Lo/PHA mice for a comparable response in DTH (footpad swelling) and MI of their induced peritoneal exudate cells (PEC). Lo/PHA spleen showed marked bizonal MI on Day 5 after immunization with low doses (0.1 and 0.5 micrograms) of OVA in FCA, one peak being obtained in presence of in vitro concentrations of 10(-3) or 10(-2) micrograms/ml OVA and another peak at 1 or 10 micrograms/ml, whereas Hi/PHA spleen showed stimulation of migration. In contrast, MI in Lo/PHA spleen failed to persist beyond Day 19, whereas it appeared progressively in Hi/PHA spleen, being maximal by Day 27. Low-zone inhibition in Hi/PHA spleen and PEC was lacking or poor even after immunization with higher doses of OVA in FCA. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Structure and Activity Changes of Phytohemagglutinin from Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Affected by Ultrahigh-Pressure Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjun; Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2015-11-04

    Phytohemagglutin (PHA), purified from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) by Affi-Gel blue affinity chromatography, was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) treatment (150, 250, 350, and 450 MPa). The purified PHA lost its hemagglutination activity after 450 MPa treatment and showed less pressure tolerance than crude PHA. However, the saccharide specificity and α-glucosidase inhibition activity of the purified PHA did not change much after UHP treatment. Electrophoresis staining by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) manifested that the glycone structure of purified PHA remained stable even after 450 MPa pressure treatment. However, electrophoresis staining by Coomassie Blue as well as circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) assay proved that the protein unit structure of purified PHA unfolded when treated at 0-250 MPa but reaggregates at 250-450 MPa. Therefore, the hemagglutination activity tends to be affected by the protein unit structure, while the stability of the glycone structure contributed to the remaining α-glucosidase inhibition activity.

  8. Sensitivity of cultured lymphocytes from patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome to ultraviolet light and phytohemagglutinin stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, P.; Celotti, L.; Furlan, D.; Pattarello, I.; Peserico, A. )

    1990-01-01

    DNA repair and replication after in vitro UV irradiation were determined in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from 6 patients with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and from a group of control donors. DNA repair synthesis (UDS) was measured in unstimulated lymphocytes by incubation with 3H-TdR in the presence of hydroxyurea for 3 and 6 h after UV irradiation (6-48 J/m2). DNA replication was measured in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, UV-irradiated or mock-irradiated, by incubation with 3H-TdR for 24 h. The effect of the mitogen was followed during 5 days after stimulation by determining the incorporation of 3H-TdR, the increase of cell number, and the mitotic index. NBCCS and control lymphocytes showed equal sensitivity to UV light in terms of UDS and reduced response to PHA. On the contrary, the mitotic index and the number of cells in stimulated cultures were significantly lower in the affected subjects. These data suggest an altered progression along the cell cycle, which could be characteristic of stimulated NBCCS lymphocytes.

  9. THE IN VITRO TRANSFORMATION OF FROZEN-STORED LYMPHOCYTES IN THE MIXED LYMPHOCYTE REACTION AND IN CULTURE WITH PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININ AND SPECIFIC ANTIGENS

    PubMed Central

    Mangi, Richard J.; Mardiney, Michael R.

    1970-01-01

    We have investigated the in vitro transformation of lymphocytes that have been frozen and stored at low temperatures. Cells frozen at different times and stored for various times do transform in a reproducible manner when placed in culture with PHA or as one population of the two-way or the one-way MLR. When frozen-stored lymphocytes are cultured with specific antigen or as both partners in the MLR the response is minimal. The freezing process destroys neutrophils, and the remaining population transforms in a manner similar to cultures of purified lymphocytes. Practical aspects of the technique are discussed and we have suggested possible practical applications for future investigation. PMID:5523965

  10. Cutaneous response to PHA-M and hematological changes in corticosteroid treated cows.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, R M; Horney, B; Beiner, L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of corticosteroids on the reaction to the intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin was examined in normal cattle. The associated hematological changes were also examined. Normal, untreated cattle responded to an injection of 1 mg phytohemagglutinin in 0.1 mL saline by a 40 to 80% increase in double skin thickness while corticosteroid treated animals had responses approximately one half of the controls. Neutrophils predominated early in the reaction but were replaced by increasing proportions of lymphoid cells towards 72 hours. These results indicate that an intact and functional inflammatory mechanism is required for a cutaneous response to phytohemagglutinin. Normal animals had a physiological leukocytosis characterized by an increase in mature neutrophils and lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treated animals had a mature neutrophilia, lymphopenia, eosinopenia and monocytosis. These hematological changes were qualitatively similar to those seen in other species. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7337870

  11. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  12. Human Lymphotoxin: Purification and Some Properties

    PubMed Central

    Granger, G. A.; Laserna, E. C.; Kolb, W. P.; Chapman, F.

    1973-01-01

    Lymphotoxin is secreted by human lymphocytes stimulated with phytohemagglutinin in vitro. Combinations of DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex chromatography, acrylamide gel electrophoresis, and isoelectric focusing were used to purify lymphotoxin 2000- to 4000-fold; 15-25% of the activity has been recovered. Lymphotoxin appears to be a weakly charged molecule(s) of molecular weight about 90,000-100,000 that migrates in Pevikon block electrophoresis as a β- or α2 globulin. It is a discrete molecule(s), because it is completely separable from medium serum proteins and carrier and phytohemagglutinin proteins. Isoelectric-focusing studies indicate that there may be a limited heterogeneity among lymphotoxin molecules. PMID:4509662

  13. Cellular Antigens in the Structure of Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    emulsified in a physiological solution; 2) a mixture of tween (5 mg/ml of viral sus- pension) with two units of ether (20 min’s at 200 with agitation). The j...phytohemagglutinins. Ve employed th( mei:hod of sele:c:ive adsorption of antibodies of normal human serum a and ,3 (cor- respondingly lecithin ) according to

  14. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  15. [Production of interleukin-2 by peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with soft tissue sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Berezhnaia, N M; Goretskiĭ, B A; Konovalenko, V F; Palivets, A Iu; Tolstopiatov, B A

    1987-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) was studied in 9 healthy subjects and 19 patients with soft tissue sarcomas. Mean IL-2 production by PBL in 19 patients was significantly diminished as compared with the control. Surgery leads to an increase of IL-2 production, however, the levels observed in the control do not restore completely.

  16. Alteration of membrane phospholipid methylation by adenosine analogs does not affect T lymphocyte activation

    SciTech Connect

    Gormand, F.; Pacheco, Y. ); Fonlupt, P. ); Revillard, J.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Membrane phospholipid methylation has been described during activation of various immune cells. Moreover recent data indicated modulation of immune cells functions by adenosine. As S-adenosyl-methionine and S-adenosyl-homocysteine are adenosine analogs and modulators of transmethylation reactions, the effects of SAH and SAM were investigated on membrane phospholipid methylation and lymphocyte activation. SAM was shown to induce the membrane phospholipid methylation as assessed by the {sup 3}Hmethyl-incorporation in membrane extract. This effect was inhibited by SAH. In contrast SAM and SAH did not affect the phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. SAH neither modified the early internalization of membrane CD3 antigens nor did it prevent the late expression of HLA-DR antigens on lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin. These results indicate that in vitro alteration of phospholipid methylation does not affect subsequent steps of human T lymphocyte activation and proliferation.

  17. Effect of chronologic age on induction of cystathionine synthase, uroporphyrinogen I synthase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gartler, S M; Hornung, S K; Motulsky, A G

    1981-01-01

    The activities of cystathionine synthase [L-serine hydro-lyase (adding homocysteine), EC 4.2.1.22], uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8], and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glucose-6-phosphate:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.49) have been measured in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes of young and old human subjects. A significant decrease in activity with age was observed for cystathionine synthase and uroporphyrinogen I synthase but not for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. These changes could not be related to declining phytohemagglutinin response with aging. Age-related decreases in activity of some enzymes may be relevant for an understanding of the biology of aging. False assignment of heterozygosity, and even homozygosity, for certain genetic disorders, such as homocystinuria, may result when low enzyme levels are detected in the lymphocytes of older people. PMID:6940198

  18. Relationship of Adenovirus to Lymphocytes in Naturally Infected Human Tonsils and Adenoids

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Veen, J.; Lambriex, M.

    1973-01-01

    Purified lymphocytes from human tonsil and adenoid specimens were cultured with and without phytohemagglutinin. Adenovirus was isolated from lymphocytes of 8 of 90 specimens tested. With one exception, it was necessary to culture the lymphocytes before infectious virus could be detected. Phytohemagglutinin stimulation enhanced the recovery of virus. The results suggest that lymphocytes in tonsils and adenoids may be naturally infected with adenovirus and that, in positive cultures, at least 1 of every 107 cells harbors virus or viral precursor at initiation of the cultures. Adenovirus was demonstrated directly in fresh suspensions of unpurified cells from tonsils and adenoids in seven cases. In five of these cases, at least 1 of every 106 cells contained infectious virus. Adenovirus was isolated from 61 (62%) of 98 tonsil and adenoid specimens by the conventional method of tissue fragment culture after various periods of cultivation. The viruses isolated were of serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 6. PMID:4796933

  19. Effect of viral and bacterial pneumonias on cell-mediated immunity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, C A; Linnemann, C C; Schiff, G M; Phair, J P

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was assessed during infection and after convalescence in 12 patients with influenza pneumonia and 10 patients with bacterial pneumonia. The patients with influenza pneumonia had a marked impairment of skin test reactivity, and their lymphocytes showed a diminished response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase stimulation in vitro. Suppression of CMI was related to the severity of the pneumonia. Patients with bacterial pneumonia showed as great a suppression of the response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase as the patients with viral pneumonia. All parameters of CMI returned to normal in both groups after convalescence. The depression of CMI could not be related to a decrease in the number of thymus-derived lymphocytes or to serum-suppressive factors in these patients. PMID:1082445

  20. Lymphocyte Transformation in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tschudi, E. Irene; Anziano, Dante F.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    1972-01-01

    The in vitro response of human peripheral lymphocytes to Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi antigens and to phytohemagglutinin was used to study the role of cellular immunity in Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis). Solubilized T. cruzi antigens elicited 5 to 30% transformed cells in 5-day cultures of lymphocytes from adults chronically infected with T. cruzi. No major difference was noted between the response of 22 asymptomatic individuals and of 3 patients with chagasic cardiopathy. No correlation was found between degree of lymphocytic transformation and serum antibody titer. Lymphocytes from 15 normal controls yielded no significant transformation. Intradermal tests provoked a local delayed hypersensitivity reaction in infected individuals only, as evaluated clinically and histologically. The response to phytohemagglutinin of lymphocytes from chronically infected individuals was identical with that of normal controls. Images PMID:4629392

  1. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  2. Inactivation of human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus by formaldehyde-based reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.S.; Loskoski, S.L.; McDougal, J.S.

    1987-04-01

    Neutral buffered Formalin, a fixative used in most pathology laboratories, was found to inactivate human T-lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus. Preparations containing this virus with infectivity titers of > 10/sup 5/ were treated with 1% or greater neutral buffered Formalin; after treatment, virus was undetectable (titer, <10/sup 1/). In addition, when infected phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with paraformaldehyde, transmission of the virus to other such lymphocytes was eliminated. 4 references, 2 tables.

  3. Immune Responses in Broiler Chicks Fed Propolis Extraction Residue-supplemented Diets

    PubMed Central

    Eyng, C.; Murakami, A. E.; Santos, T. C.; Silveira, T. G. V.; Pedroso, R. B.; Lourenço, D. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of propolis extraction residue in the feed of broilers from 1 to 21 d of age on phagocytic activity of macrophages, cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin, antibody production against Newcastle disease, lymphoid organ weight and hematological profile and to determine the optimal level of inclusion. 120 chicks, reared in metabolism cages until 21 days of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% of propolis residue) and six replications. The relative weight of thymus and monocyte percentage were affected by propolis residue, with a quadratic response (p<0.05) and lowest values estimated at 2.38% and 2.49%, respectively. Changes in relative weight of cloacal bursa and spleen, percentage of lymphocyte, heterophil, basophil, eosinophil, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, antibody production against Newcastle disease, phagocytic activity of macrophages and the average number of phagocytosed erythrocytes were not observed. The nitric oxide production with regard to positive control (macrophages+erythrocytes) decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased doses of propolis residue. The remaining variables of nitric oxide production (negative control – macrophages, and difference between the controls) were not affected by propolis residue. The cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response to phytohemagglutinin as determined by the increase in interdigital skin thickness exhibited a quadratic response (p<0.05), which predicted a lower reaction response at a dose of 2.60% of propolis residue and highest reaction response after 43.05 hours of phytohemagglutinin injection. The inclusion of 1% to 4% of propolis extraction residue in broiler diets from 1 to 21 days of age was not able to improve the immune parameters, despite the modest changes in the relative weight in thymus, blood monocyte percentage, nitric oxide concentration, and

  4. Ki-67 Expression in Human Tumors Measured by Flow Cytometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    the MoAh Ki-67 reagent. To evaluate this possibility. a sample of spleen from a patient with hairy - cell leukemia was analyzed. These cells have very...stimulated lymphocNytes. Hfigher ratios for the hairy - cell leukemia would have been expected to result had nonspecific protein staining t v FITC occurred... Hairy - Cell Leukemia 1.68 1.49 1.43 Periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde fixative 0.5 ,c paraformaldehyde/0. 1% Triton X- 100 fixation Phytohemagglutinin

  5. Radioiodination of interleukin 2 to high specific activities by the vapor-phase chloramine T method

    SciTech Connect

    Siekierka, J.J.; DeGudicibus, S.

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL-2) was radioiodinated utilizing the vapor phase chloramine T method of iodination. The method is rapid, reproducible, and allows the efficient radioiodination of IL-2 to specific activities higher than those previously attained with full retention of biological activity. IL-2 radioiodinated by this method binds with high affinity to receptors present on phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and should be useful for the study of receptor structure and function.

  6. A comparison of irradiation and mitomycin as blocking agents in the mixed lymphocyte reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Pogue, L.; Troup, G.M.; Standefer, J.C.

    1984-05-01

    In comparison with administration of mitomycin, lethal irradiation (2,000 rad) of the stimulator cells in a one-way mixed leukocyte culture results in a reduced response due at least in part to the release of inhibitory materials by the irradiated cells. These inhibitory molecules may be partially removed by washing and possess differential reactivity with respect to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, and pokeweed mitogen.

  7. Deficient cutaneous response to PHA-P in healthy puppies from a kennel with a high prevalence of demodicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, B N; Markham, R J; Hazlett, C

    1979-01-01

    Intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin was used to evaluate the integrity of cell-mediated immunological reactions in Doberman puppies thought to be predisposed to demodicosis. Results indicate a statistically significant deficiency of cutaneous delayed response in these dogs when compared with age matched Beagles, adult Dobermans or random control dogs of various ages and breeding. The high prevalence of demodicosis in the kennel of origin may have been due to the observed deficiency of cutaneous immune function. PMID:548162

  8. Effects of concanavalin A on chondrocyte hypertrophy and matrix calcification.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Pan, H; Ishida, H; Nakashima, K; Suzuki, F; Nishimura, M; Jikko, A; Oda, R; Kato, Y

    1997-03-21

    Resting chondrocytes do not usually undergo differentiation to the hypertrophic stage and calcification. However, incubating these cells with concanavalin A resulted in 10-100-fold increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, binding of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3, type X collagen synthesis, 45Ca incorporation into insoluble material, and calcium content. On the other hand, other lectins tested (including wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, pea lectin, phytohemagglutinin-L, and phytohemagglutinin-E) marginally affected alkaline phosphatase activity, although they activate lymphocytes. Methylmannoside reversed the effect of concanavalin A on alkaline phosphatase within 48 h. Concanavalin A did not increase alkaline phosphatase activity in articular chondrocyte cultures. In resting chondrocyte cultures, succinyl concanavalin A was as potent as concanavalin A in increasing alkaline phosphatase activity, the incorporation of [35S]sulfate, D-[3H]glucosamine, and [3H]serine into proteoglycans, and the incorporation of [3H]serine into protein, although concanavalin A, but not succinyl concanavalin A, induced a rapid change in the shape of the cells from flat to spherical. These findings suggest that concanavalin A induces a switch from the resting, to the growth-plate stage, and that this action of concanavalin A is not secondary to changes in the cytoskeleton. Chondrocytes exposed to concanavalin A may be useful as a novel model of endochondral bone formation.

  9. Effect of subclinical levels of T-2 toxin on the bovine cellular immune system.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, D D; Buening, G M; Osweiler, G D; Hook, B S

    1984-01-01

    The effect of subclinical levels of mycotoxin T-2 on the cells of the bovine immune system was investigated in two in vivo experiments. In experiment 1, five calves were orally dosed with 0.3 mg/kg/day of T-2 toxin for 56 days and five calves were pair fed controls. The neutrophil function as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction was reduced in the mycotoxin treated calves. The cutaneous reaction to intradermally injected phytohemagglutinin was reduced in the T-2 toxin treated calves. B-cell (SIg+) numbers increased slightly, but T-cell (PNA+) numbers were not affected during the experimental period. In the second experiment, six calves were given 0.5 mg/kg/day T-2 toxin orally for 28 days and six calves were pair fed controls. B-cell numbers and the response of a B-cell enriched fraction to phytohemagglutinin increased after toxin administration. T-cell numbers and the response of a T-cell enriched fraction and the whole mononuclear cell population to phytohemagglutinin was reduced only on day 19 posttoxin administration. The in vitro (T-2 toxin) exposure of the mononuclear cell population, B-cell enriched, or T-cell enriched fraction reduced their lymphoblastic response to mitogens. A 50% reduction was induced by as little as 1.4 ng/mL of T-2 toxin. PMID:6332662

  10. T-cell subpopulations, expression of interleukin-2 receptor, and production of interleukin-2 and gamma interferon in human American cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Castes, M; Cabrera, M; Trujillo, D; Convit, J

    1988-01-01

    Leukocyte subpopulations, the expression of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor, and the production of IL-2 and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) were studied in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of American cutaneous leishmaniasis patients that had been stimulated in vitro with either leishmanial antigen or mitogen (phytohemagglutinin M). The 75 patients examined were classified as having either the localized (LCL; 66 patients), mucocutaneous (MCL; 5 patients), or the rare diffuse (DCL; 4 patients) form of the disease. Patients with DCL, who are characterized by their defective cell-mediated immune response to leishmanial antigen, failed to express the IL-2 receptor and did not produce IFN-gamma when exposed to the antigen but did so when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin M. Both LCL and MCL patients showed strong proliferative responses to leishmanial antigen; these were by far the greatest in MCL patients. Both groups had significantly increased IL-2 receptor expression and IFN-gamma production after exposure to either antigen or mitogen, and these were highest in the MCL patients. Concerning the leukocyte subpopulations evaluated (CD2, CD4, CD8, CD20, MO2), the most significant findings were a decrease of both CD4+ cells and the CD4/CD8 ratio in MCL patients compared with the other groups. Considering IL-2 production, in response to phytohemagglutinin M both MCL and LCL patients showed amounts of IL-2 comparable to those of the controls. Our results help explain the anergy of T cells from DCL patients to leishmanial antigen, which could lead to a defective production of IFN-gamma and possibly contribute to their incapacity to kill the Leishmania parasite. Concerning MCL patients, the significantly increased expression of IL-2 receptor, decreased expression of the CD4 (helper-inducer of suppression) phenotype, and elevated IFV-gamma production might partially explains the state of hypersensitivity and mucosal damage exhibited by these patients. PMID:3133391

  11. The uleine-rich fraction of Himatanthus lancifolius blocks proliferative responses of human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Nardin, Jeanine Marie; Lima, Melissa Pires; Machado, Julio Cesar; Hilst, Luciana Farhat; Santos, Cid Aimbiré de Moraes; Weffort-Santos, Almeriane Maria

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to report the effects shown by the uleine-rich fraction extracted from the barks of Himatanthus lancifolius (Muell. Arg.) Woodson (Apocynaceae) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in which we were able to inhibit the proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes by blocking their transformation into blast-dividing cells. Furthermore, it inhibited the proliferation of Daudi and Reh cells, two leukemic cell lines of lymphoid origin. The present study widens the biological applications of H. lancifolius' alkaloids to include its possible use as a modulator of the immune system.

  12. Human cellular immune responsiveness following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Dardano, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral circulating lymphocytes were separated from astronaut blood samples three times before and two times after the first four US Space Shuttle flights. The ability of the in vitro T lymphocytes to respond to Phytohemagglutinin by blastogenesis was found to be reduced for each crewmember following spaceflight. In addition, the astronauts experienced a postflight increase in neutrophils and a decrease in eosinophils. These postflight changes in leukocytes are shown to increase with subjectively-evaluated increases in the incidence of inflight stress, indicating that stress, and not hypogravity, is likely to be the major effector of these changes.

  13. Studies on the antigenicity of bone. I. Freeze-dried and deep-frozen bone allografts in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, G E; Strong, D M; Sell, K W

    1976-09-01

    The antigenicity of deep-frozen and freeze-dried cortical and corticocancellous bone allografts placed orthotopically in rabbits was studied using a sensitive microcytotoxicity assay. Target cells were phytohemagglutinin-P-stimulated, 51chromium-labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes from the bone donors (Dutch belted rabbits), and sera or peripheral blood lymphocytes from the graft recipients (New Zealand white rabbits) were used as effectors of cytotoxicity. Fresh allografts and deep-frozen corticocancellous bone evoked detectable humoral and cell-mediated immunity,, whereas freeze-dried cortical bone allografts failed to sensitize the recipients and were the least antigenic of the allografts examined.

  14. Response of sheep lymphocytes to PHA: quantitation by nuclear volume measurement and cell counts (40764)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.

    1980-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin response of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of sheep was studied. Assessment of proliferative response was performed by determination of nuclear volumes and cell counts in cultures from 14 sheep and by incorporation of tritiated thymidine in cultures in four additional sheep. PBL of sheep were found to transform and proliferate with PHA similarly to human peripheral blood lymphocytes with minor differences. Quantitation of the proliferative response by determining the cell count and nuclear volumes provided more information on cell kinetics in culture than the commonly used isotope-labeled thymidine incorporation method.

  15. Human cellular immune responsiveness following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Dardano, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral circulating lymphocytes were separated from astronaut blood samples three times before and two times after the first four US Space Shuttle flights. The ability of the in vitro T lymphocytes to respond to Phytohemagglutinin by blastogenesis was found to be reduced for each crewmember following spaceflight. In addition, the astronauts experienced a postflight increase in neutrophils and a decrease in eosinophils. These postflight changes in leukocytes are shown to increase with subjectively-evaluated increases in the incidence of inflight stress, indicating that stress, and not hypogravity, is likely to be the major effector of these changes.

  16. Structural comparisons of two allelic variants of human placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Millán, J L; Stigbrand, T; Jörnvall, H

    1985-01-01

    A simple immunosorbent purification scheme based on monoclonal antibodies has been devised for human placental alkaline phosphatase. The two most common allelic variants, S and F, have similar amino acid compositions with identical N-terminal amino acid sequences through the first 13 residues. Both variants have identical lectin binding properties towards concanavalin A, lentil-lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, phytohemagglutinin and soybean agglutinin, and identical carbohydrate contents as revealed by methylation analysis. CNBr fragments of the variants demonstrate identical high performance liquid chromatography patterns. The carbohydrate containing fragment is different from the 32P-labeled active site fragment and the N-terminal fragment.

  17. Effect of guanidino-propionic acid on lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shainkin-Kestenbaum, R; Winikoff, Y; Dvilansky, A; Chaimovitz, C; Nathan, I

    1986-01-01

    The 'uremic toxin', guanidino propionic acid (GPA), which was detected in uremic serum in correlation with BUN level, modified the mitogenic response of normal lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Mild modifications can be detected in the concentrations which are found in uremic patients. Other guanidino compounds which have been detected in uremic sera, such as guanidino succinic acid (GSA), guanidino butyric acid (GBA) and guanidino acetic acid (GAA), show similar inhibitory pathways. It is suggested that guanidino compounds contribute to the immunological disturbances in uremia. The complexity of their action on lymphocyte mitogenic response is probably the cause of the conflicting results which have been reported in the literature.

  18. Glycyl-L-Glutamine: A Dipeptide Neurotransmitter Derived from Beta- Endorphin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Weber and Pert, 1984; Morley et al., 1987). McCain et al. showed that very low concentrations of glycyl-L-glutamine enhance phytohemagglutinin (PHA...A12 AChE has not been identified. Recently, Lotwick et al. reported that very low glycyl-L-glutamine concentrations (10 nM - 10 AM) induce A12 AChE...isolated by centrifugation through 5.7 M CsCl fol- lowed by phenol/chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. RNA was then electrophoresed on

  19. Recovery and viability of Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Grieve, R B; Mika-Grieve, M; Lok, J B; Marchell, T F; Cupp, E W

    1984-09-01

    The viability of Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae recovered from canine blood by different methods was determined. Microfilaria recovery techniques included saponin lysis, saponin lysis with a trypsin treatment, dextran sedimentation and phytohemagglutinin treatment. Criteria for evaluating viability were microfilarial motility in vitro at 37 degrees C, microfilarial development in mosquitoes and the ability of microfilariae to circulate in mice. Although each method produced motile microfilariae, differences among groups of microfilariae recovered by different techniques were apparent by each of the criteria for viability. Saponin lysis gave superior yields of viable microfilariae.

  20. Amphotericin B and 5-Fluorocytosine: In Vitro Effects on Lymphocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Roselle, Gary A.; Kauffman, Carol A.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, and the combination of both drugs on lymphocyte function in vitro were investigated. Amphotericin B, alone or in combination with 5-fluorocytosine, significantly suppressed both spontaneous lymphocyte transformation and the response of lymphocytes to stimulation with streptokinase-streptodornase. 5-Fluorocytosine had no effect on spontaneous or antigen-induced transformation. Lymphocyte responses to the mitogens phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A were not changed by exposure to amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, or the combination of both drugs. T-lymphocyte receptors for sheep erythrocytes and B-lymphocyte surface immunoglobulin and receptors for complement were not changed by treatment with amphotericin B or 5-fluorocytosine. PMID:708017

  1. Tissue Factor Activity in Lymphocyte Cultures from Normal Individuals and Patients with Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Rickles, Frederick R.; Hardin, John A.; Pitlick, Frances A.; Hoyer, Leon W.; Conrad, Marcel E.

    1973-01-01

    The procoagulant material of lymphocytes has been characterized as tissue factor. Lymphocytes stimulated with phytohemagglutinin or the purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus developed procoagulant activity with incubation in tissue culture. While this material corrected the prolonged clotting time of factor VIII (AHF) deficient plasma, we have shown, utilizing a sensitive radioimmunoassay, that no AHF antigen was present in the cell cultures. Further, we have demonstrated this material to be tissue factor by coagulation techniques and immunological cross-reactivity. The published data regarding factor VIII synthesis is reviewed in light of these observations and comments are made regarding the role of the lymphocyte procoagulant. PMID:4634046

  2. Evidence of chromosomal instability in neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hafez, M.; Sharaf, L.; Abd el-Nabi, S.M.; el-Wehedy, G.

    1985-05-15

    Blood lymphocytes from six unrelated patients with neurofibromatosis and three normal controls were examined for their response to different doses (0, 75, 150, 300, 400 rad) of x-radiation, as measured by chromosome aberrations (gaps, breaks, dicentrics, centric rings, acentric ring, fragments, and minutes). Cytogenetic studies on phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cells revealed chromosomal instability in the neurofibromatosis lymphocytes as shown by the significant increase in the in the incidence of gaps, breaks and dicentrics. This increase paralleled the increase in the dose of irradiation. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  3. Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed

  4. Fusion of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    tetanus toxoid (10 μg/mL) or media alone. After 5 days of coculture, expression of IFN-γ by CD4+ and CD8+ populations was determined by intracellular FACS...Vaccine potency and Phytohemagglutinin and tetanus -induced induced T-cell proliferation As a measure of potency of the generated vaccine as antigen...well U-bottomed plates for 4 days with 4 μg/ml PHA and tetanus toxoid (10 μg/mL (Figure 2, below). Proliferation was determined by measuring

  5. Suppressor cell hyperactivity relative to allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation as a manifestation of defective T-T-cell interactions in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Stenina, M.A.; Potapova, A.A.; Biryukov, A.V.; Skripnik, A.Yu.; Cheredeev, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the state of immunoregulatory process in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at the T-T-cell interaction level and seek to test the possibility of the pharmacological modulation of this process. The proliferative activity of mononuclear lymphocytes, extracted from the blood of ten lupus patients, was assessed by measuring the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into cultures stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and theophylline. The comparative effects of each of these agents on the immunoregulatory and proliferative activity of the lymphocytes are reported.

  6. Thermal stability of Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin: a differential scanning calorimetry study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2002-09-30

    Phaseolus vulgaris phytohemagglutinin L is a homotetrameric-leucoagglutinating seed lectin. Its three-dimensional structure shows similarity with other members of the legume lectin family. The tetrameric form of this lectin is pH dependent. Gel filtration results showed that the protein exists in its dimeric state at pH 2.5 and as a tetramer at pH 7.2. Contrary to earlier reports on legume lectins that possess canonical dimers, thermal denaturation studies show that the refolding of phytohemagglutinin L at neutral pH is irreversible. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the denaturation of this lectin as a function of pH that ranged from 2.0 to 3.0. The lectin was found to be extremely thermostable with a transition temperature around 82 degrees C and above 100 degrees C at pH 2.5 and 7.2, respectively. The ratio of calorimetric to vant Hoff enthalpy could not be calculated because of its irreversible-folding behavior. However, from the DSC data, it was discovered that the protein remains in its compact-folded state, even at pH 2.3, with the onset of denaturation occurring at 60 degrees C.

  7. A novel insight into the immunologic basis of chronic granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Rae, William; Doffinger, Rainer; Shelton, Fenella; Sproson, Eleanor; Ismail-Koch, Hasnaa; Lund, Valerie J.; Harries, Philip G.; Eren, Efrem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (CGIFRS) is a rare disease. The underlying immune responses that drive the development of CGIFRS, as opposed to successful pathogen clearance and controlled inflammation, are not currently known. Objective: To characterize the immune responses associated with CGIFRS. Methods: In addition to a battery of basic investigations, more in-depth immunologic testing involves ex vivo whole-blood stimulation with the polyclonal T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin and fungal antigens with interleukin (IL) 12, was undertaken to investigate cell-mediated immune responses associated with CGIFRS. Results: Ex vivo whole-blood stimulation with the polyclonal T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin and fungal antigens with IL-12 identified reduced interferon gamma and increased IL-17A levels within the supernatant, which indicated increased in vivo T-helper (Th)17 responses and impaired Th1 responses compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the development of CGIFRS may be associated with an abnormally exaggerated host Th17 response, which caused failure to clear the fungal pathogen with refractory fungal infection of mucosal membranes, resulting in chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:27658186

  8. Immune response and disease resistance of calves fed chromium nicotinic acid complex or chromium chloride.

    PubMed

    Kegley, E B; Spears, J W; Brown, T T

    1996-07-01

    Twenty-one Holstein bull calves (< 7 d of age at the initiation of the experiment) fed a milk replacer diet were used to assess the effects of supplemental Cr on immune response. Treatments consisted of milk replacer without supplemental Cr (control) or milk replacer with 0.4 ppm of supplemental Cr from CrCl3 or a Cr-nicotinic acid complex. On d 64, increases in skinfold thickness after an intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin were measured to evaluate cell-mediated immune response. Calves supplemented with Cr-nicotinic acid complex had a greater response than did controls at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after injection. Calves supplemented with CrCl3 had a greater response than did controls at 24 and 48 h after injection. In vitro blastogenic responses of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen and antibody response to porcine red blood cells were not affected by treatment. Following a disease challenge with an intranasal dose of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis on d 75, body temperature tended to be lower for calves supplemented with Cr-nicotinic acid complex than for control calves. Calves supplemented with either Cr source had lower serum cortisol concentrations at 5 d after challenge. Chromium supplementation enhanced cell-mediated immune function.

  9. FINE STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF INTERPHASE NUCLEI OF LYMPHOCYTES STIMULATED TO GROWTH ACTIVITY IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyasu, K.; Madden, S. C.; Zeldis, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes fine structural changes of interphase nuclei of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated to growth by short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin. Chromatin is found highly labile, its changes accompanying the sequential increases of RNA and DNA synthesis which are known to occur in lymphocyte cultures. In "resting" lymphocytes, abundant condensed chromatin appears as a network of large and small aggregates. Early in the response to phytohemagglutinin, small aggregates disappear during increase of diffuse chromatin regions. Small aggregates soon reappear, probably resulting from disaggregation of large masses of condensed chromatin. Loosened and highly dispersed forms then appear prior to the formation of prophase chromosomes. The loosened state is found by radioautography to be most active in DNA synthesis. Small nucleoli of resting lymphocytes have concentric agranular, fibrillar, and granular zones with small amounts of intranucleolar chromatin. Enlarging interphase nucleoli change chiefly (1) by increase in amount of intranucleolar chromatin and alteration of its state of aggregation and (2) by increase in granular components in close association with fibrillar components. PMID:5699935

  10. Feed intake, body weight, body condition score, musculation, and immunocompetence in aged mares given equine somatotropin.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K; Christensen, R A; Konopka, A; Scanes, C G; Hafs, H D

    1997-03-01

    Sixteen 20- to 26-yr-old mares were given 0, 6.25, or 12.5 mg/d equine somatotropin (eST) to determine whether aged mares respond to ST with changes in feed intake, body weight, body condition score (based mostly on fat cover), or immunocompetence. Neither dry matter intake, body weight, nor body condition scores were altered during the 6 wk of eST injection. However, based on photographs taken to evaluate musculation before and after treatment (scores 0 to 4), mares given eST developed greater (P < .07) muscle definition (1.8 +/- .6 and 2.5 +/- .6 for 6.25 and 12.5 mg eST/d, respectively) than control mares (.7 +/- .4). Total circulating leukocytes increased (P < .05) in both of the eST-treated groups during the 6-wk injection period, caused by an increase (P < .05) in granulocytes. Lymphocyte numbers were not altered. Granulocyte oxidative burst activity was not altered by eST treatment. Although lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, or lipopolysaccharide were not altered during the treatment period, lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen increased twofold in eST-treated horses at 2 wk after eST treatment. In overview, the increased musculation and the increase in granulocyte numbers in mares given eST suggest that eST supplementation may improve the health and well-being of aged mares.

  11. Modified lymphocyte response to mitogens after intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Brownback, P E; Barrow, W W

    1988-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of glycopeptidolipid (GPL) antigens from Mycobacterium avium complex serovar 4 resulted in the decreased ability of murine splenic lymphocytes to respond to nonspecific-mitogen-induced blastogenesis when exposed to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide. Adherent cell depletion and cell mixing experiments with T lymphocytes indicated that macrophages were not a major contributor to the immunosuppression observed in this study. Enumeration of splenic lymphocytes by means of flow-cytometry with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of GPL antigens resulted in a significant decrease in Thy-1+ and Lyt-1+ cells but no change in the numbers of Lyt-2+ cells. Treatment with GPL antigens in vitro affected the ability of splenic mononuclear cells to respond optimally for concanavalin A-induced blastogenesis at 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml and lipopolysaccharide-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. However, in vitro treatment with GPL antigens did not affect phytohemagglutinin-induced blastogenesis at concentrations ranging from 5 to 40 micrograms of GPL per 4 X 10(5) cells per 0.2 ml. These findings suggest that GPL antigens or their metabolites affect lymphocyte function and may be important cofactors in the overall pathogenesis of M. avium complex infections. PMID:3258582

  12. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides counteract inhibition on CD71 and FasL expression by culture supernatant of B16F10 cells upon lymphocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LI-XIN; LIN, ZHI-BIN; DUAN, XIN-SUO; LU, JIE; GE, ZHI-HUA; LI, MIN; XING, EN-HONG; LAN, TIAN-FEI; JIANG, MIAO-MIAO; YANG, NING; LI, WEI-DONG

    2013-01-01

    Immune responses to tumor-associated antigens are often detectable in tumor-bearing hosts, but they fail to eliminate malignant cells or prevent development of metastases. Tumor cells produce factors such as interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that suppress the function of immune cells or induce apoptosis of immune cells. Culture supernatant of tumor cells may contain these immunosuppressive factors which suppress lymphocyte activation. CD71 and FasL are two important molecules that are expressed upon lymphocyte activation. Counteraction against suppression CD71 and FasL expression upon lymphocyte activation may benefit tumor control. A potential component with this effect is Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (Gl-PS). In this study, Gl-PS was used on lymphocytes incubating with culture supernatant of B16F10 melanoma cells (B16F10-CS) in the presence of phytohemagglutinin. Following induction with phytohemagglutinin, B16F10-CS suppressed CD71 expression in lymphocytes (as detected by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry), proliferation in lymphocytes (as detected by MTT assay), and FasL expression in lymphocytes (as detected by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis), while Gl-PS fully or partially counteracted these suppressions. Gl-PS showed counteractive effects against suppression induced by B16F10-CS on CD71 and FasL expression upon lymphocyte activation, suggesting the potential of Gl-PS to facilitate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23596479

  13. Interaction of herpesvirus with spleen cell subpopulations comparison of a neurotropic and a lymphotropic virus.

    PubMed

    Chow, T C; Hsiung, G D

    1980-12-01

    We studied the interaction of a neurotropic herpesvirus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2), and a lymphotropic herpesvirus, guinea pig herpes-like virus (HLV), with guinea pig spleen cells. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 and HLV can attach to and penetrate into B- or T-enriched cells. Less than 1.4% of the total B- or T-enriched cell populations were susceptible to infection by HLV and to some degree to HSV-1 or HSV-2 as determined by infectious center assays. After specific antiserum treatment, higher titers of intracellular virus were detected in HLV-infected cells than in HSV-1- or HSV-2-infected cells. Both B-enriched and T-enriched cells could support HLV replication, but not that of HSV-1 or HSV-2. The replication of HSV-1 was demonstrated in guinea pig spleen cells pretreated with lipopolysaccharide but not with phytohemagglutinin. Furthermore, when cells were separated into B- and T-enriched cells, the B- enriched cells prestimulated with lipopolysaccharide were susceptible to HSV-1 replication, whereas the T-enriched cells prestimulated with phytohemagglutinin were not. The differences observed in vitro in the interactions of these two herpesviruses with guinea pig spleen cell subpopulations may provide a basis for understanding the differences observed in vivo in the pathogenesis of these two viruses; i.e., HLV is capable of infecting and persisting in guinea pig lymphocytes, whereas HSV is not.

  14. Use of whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls.

    PubMed

    Redig, P T; Dunnette, J L; Sivanandan, V

    1984-11-01

    Mitogen-induced whole blood lymphocyte stimulation tests for immunocompetency studies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were developed. Combinations of incubation times, blood dilutions, concentrations of [3H]thymidine and [125I]2-deoxyuridine, antibiotics, phytohemagglutinin-P, and concanavalin A were tested for their effects on the stimulation index (SI). An antibiotic combination of gentamicin plus amphotericin B yielded low SI with lymphocytes from bald eagles, but not with lymphocytes from great horned owls or red-tailed hawks. Penicillin plus streptomycin caused no such depression of SI. Lymphocytes from all 3 species yielded maximum responses with a 48-hour prelabel and 12- to- 16 hour postlabel incubation period at 41 C and 1:20 blood dilution. Optimal mitogen concentrations for lymphocytes from bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and great horned owls were 25 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of phytohemagglutinin-P/well, respectively, and 2.5 micrograms, 10 micrograms, and 10 micrograms of concanavalin A/well, respectively. Differences in SI were not seen between the 2 radioactive labels. The optimal concentration of the [3H]thymidine label ranged from 0.06 to 0.125 microCi/well.

  15. Suppression of T-lymphocyte responses to Entamoeba histolytica antigen by immune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Salata, R A; Martinez-Palomo, A; Canales, L; Murray, H W; Trevino, N; Ravdin, J I

    1990-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients cured of amebic liver abscesses proliferate and produce gamma interferon upon incubation with soluble Entamoeba histolytica antigen: however, amebic liver abscesses exhibit a relentless progression without treatment. To determine whether suppressive factors are present in sera, we studied T-lymphocyte responses to total soluble E. histolytica antigen by using cells from five patients treated for amebic liver abscesses in the presence of 15 different immune sera and 10 control sera. In the presence of immune sera, E. histolytica antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation decreased by 63% and production of gamma interferon was reduced by 93.2% (P less than 0.01). Immune sera had no effect on the mitogenic responses of patient lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or on the proliferative responses of control lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or tetanus toxoid. The suppressive activity of immune sera diminished as the time between therapy for amebic liver abscesses and serum collection increased (P less than 0.05). Suppressive activity did not correlate with the titers of serum anti-amebic antibody and was not affected when serum was absorbed with viable amebic trophozoites. In conclusion, soluble factors present in the sera of amebic liver abscess patients suppressed in vitro lymphocyte responses to E. histolytica antigen and may have contributed to the lack of development of effective in vivo cell-mediated immune responses following the onset of amebic liver abscesses. Images PMID:2123828

  16. Triterpenes from Euphorbia spinidens with immunomodulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Ghannadian, M; Akhavan, A; Abdalla, O M; Ayatollahi, A M; Mohammadi-Kamalabadi, M; Ghazanfari, H

    2013-07-01

    Dried aceton-chloroform extract of aerial parts of Euphorbia spinidens Bornm. ex Prokh. endemic to Iran, yielded two new triterpenoids, lup-20(29)-ene-33, 28 diol commonly known as betulin and (3β,23E)-Cycloarta-23-ene-3,25-diol. The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by 13C- and 1H-NMR as well as 2D-NMR, IR and by the aid of mass fragmentation pattern. In phagocyte chemiluminescence assay, different concentrations of compounds were incubated with the human whole blood in triplicate and the chemiluminescence activity of phagocytic cells were measured by using serum opsonized zymosan and luminol. For lymphocyte proliferation assay, peripheral human blood lymphocytes were incubated with different concentrations of the test compound in supplemented Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium along with 5.0 μg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at 37°C in CO2 environment for 72 h and proliferation level was determined by Beta-scintillation counter. In phagocyte chemiluminescence assay, betulin showed moderate inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst in the neutrophils, while addition of betulin triterpene was able to stimulate the proliferation of the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) treated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs).

  17. Effects of chronic heat and cold stressors on plasma immunoglobulin and mitogen-induced blastogenesis in calves.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D W; Osborne, C A; Evermann, J F; Parish, S M; Gaskins, C T

    1982-08-01

    Fifty-six Holstein calves were used to investigate effects of heat and cold stressors on mitogen-induced blastogenesis of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and immunoglobulins G1 and M in blood plasma. Calves were exposed to constant hot (35 degrees C), constant cold (-5 degrees C), or thermoneutral (23 degrees C) ambient conditions in environmentally-controlled chambers. Immune responses were measured soon after introduction into environmental chambers (3 days) and after various degrees of adaptation (7 and 14 days). Mortality was greater among heat- and cold-exposed calves than among thermoneutral calves. Neither heat nor cold exposure had a direct effect on blastogenesis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A. Plasma from heat- and cold-exposed calves then was incorporated into the culture medium at a final concentration of 5% and tested in a mitogenesis assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a single healthy donor. Plasma from heat-exposed calves consistently enhanced tritiated thymidine incorporation into normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells by phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A as compared to plasma from cold-exposed calves. After heat exposure for 3 to 14 days, immunoglobulin G1 averaged 27% less in heat-exposed calves than in calves that were held at thermoneutrality, but M was unaffected. Cold exposure did not have a consistent effect on G1 or M. These data demonstrate that chronic heat and cold stressors affect calves by altering both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity.

  18. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  19. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term followup of patients treated with 750 rads or 2,000 rads

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, M.; Hassan, J.; Scott, D.L.; Hanly, J.G.; Moriarty, M.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1989-05-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were randomized to receive 750 or 2,000 rads of lymphoid irradiation (LI) in a double-blind comparative study, and were followed for a maximum of 48 months (mean 40 months) after treatment. During followup, sustained immunomodulation (including lymphopenia, particularly of the T helper cell subset; reduced ratio of helper cells to suppressor cells; and impaired in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) was observed. Significant improvements in early morning stiffness, Ritchie articular index, pain score, grip strength, and 15-meter walk time were observed in both treatment groups, but these were not sustained through the followup period. Progressive joint damage was observed radiologically in both groups during followup. Thus, LI induced sustained immunosuppression, but resulted in only short-lived clinical improvement and was associated with progressive joint erosion in these patients.

  20. Identification of CD3+ T lymphocytes in the green turtle Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fernando A; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Romero-Rojas, Andres; Work, Thierry M; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, Erik; Estrada-Garcia, Iris

    2009-10-15

    To understand the role of the immune system with respect to disease in reptiles, there is the need to develop tools to assess the host's immune response. An important tool is the development of molecular markers to identify immune cells, and these are limited for reptiles. We developed a technique for the cryopreservation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and showed that a commercially available anti-CD3 epsilon chain antibody detects a subpopulation of CD3 positive peripheral blood lymphocytes in the marine turtle Chelonia mydas. In the thymus and in skin inoculated with phytohemagglutinin, the same antibody showed the classical staining pattern observed in mammals and birds. For Western blot, the anti-CD3 antibodies identified a 17.6k Da band in membrane proteins of peripheral blood mononuclear cell compatible in weight to previously described CD3 molecules. This is the first demonstration of CD3+ cells in reptiles using specific antibodies.

  1. AntiTumor and Immunoregulatory Effects of Fermented Papaya Preparation (FPP: SAIDOPS501).

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinki; Eikawa, Shingo; Kaya, Savas; Imao, Mitsuko; Aji, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Various beneficial effects have been described for fermented papaya preparation (FPP: SAIDOPS501) based on its antioxidative and antiinflammatory functions. The present study was designed to determine the effects of FPP on carcinogenesis in vivo, and immunomodulatory function in vitro. Mice were injected with RL male 1 cells subcutaneously or 3methylcholantherene (MCA) intravenously to induce cancer and orally or intraperitoneally treated with FPP solution. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from healthy volunteers and patients with atopic dermatitis, treated with FPP, and subjected to measurement of cytokine production and changes in Foxp3expressing regulatory T cell (Treg) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Administration of FPP suppressed tumor size and the incidence of malignancy. In vitro, treatment of PBMC with FPP induced IL1?, TNFα and IFNγ production. Moreover, FPP suppressed proliferation of PHAstimulated Foxp3expressing Treg. These results suggest that FPP has chemotherapeutic properties.

  2. In vitro effects of nickel-sulphate on immune functions of normal and nickel-allergic subjects: a regulatory role for zinc.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Roberto; Buttari, Brigitta; Camera, Emanuela; Dell'Anna, Maria Lucia; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Di Giampaolo, Luca; Reale, Marcella; Schiavone, Cosima; Verna, Nicola; Di Gioacchino, Mario; Sabbioni, Enrico; Boscolo, Paolo; Picardo, Mauro

    2003-01-01

    Nickel hypersensitivity represents a very common human disease state, mainly occurring in females, defined as allergic contact dermatitis. Ni is a transition metal whose activity may be modulated by congeners. Zinc, an essential component for living organisms, has been shown to counteract Ni effects in patients with Ni hypersensitivity. We analysed immune responses to both Ni and Zn in healthy subjects and patients with allergic contact dermatitis to Ni. Our in vitro results show that Ni modulates surface receptors expression, reduces phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-driven lymphoproliferation, and upregulates some proinflammatory cytokines production, including interferon (IFN)-gamma. Zn also induced CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation, but it abolished or reduced most Ni-mediated effects. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Zn and Ni, as part of the heavy transition metals, may exchange roles in immune-mediated phenomena leading to expression of allergic contact dermatitis.

  3. Laser modulation of human immune system: inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation by a gallium-arsenide laser at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, A.; Abergel, R.P.; Uitto, J.

    1987-01-01

    Cultured human lymphocytes were subjected to irradiation with a gallium-arsenide laser at energy fluence varying from 2.17 to 651 mJ/cm2, and the cell proliferation was assessed by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. Both mitogenic proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and spontaneous cell proliferation were markedly inhibited by the laser irradiation at energy fluence as low as 10.85 mJ/cm2. Similarly, the functional response of cells to antigen stimulation in a one-way mixed-lymphocyte reaction was also diminished as a result of laser irradiation. The results indicate that laser irradiation at low energy can interfere with immune system in vitro, and similar modulation could potentially occur in human subjects exposed to laser irradiation in vivo.

  4. Effects of coal dust and diesel exhaust on immune competence in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mentnech, M.S.; Lewis, D.M.; Olenchock, S.A.; Mull, J.C.; Koller, W.A.; Lewis, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The effects on the immune system of rats that had been exposed to a 2-mg/m/sup 3/ dose of either respirable coal dust, diesel exhaust fumes and particulates, or the combination of these were studied. Animals that were housed similarly but exposed only to filtered air served as controls. After 12 and 24 mo of exposure, the rats were tested for immunocompetency by enumerating antibody-producing cells in the spleen 4 d after immunization with sheep erythrocytes and by monitoring the proliferative response of splenic T-lymphocytes to the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin. The results of this study indicate that no major alterations occurred in the immunologic functions measured as a result of exposure to either coal dust, diesel exhaust fumes and particulates, or their combination.

  5. Seed storage protein deficiency improves sulfur amino acid content in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.): redirection of sulfur from gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Meghan; Chapman, Ralph; Beyaert, Ronald; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2008-07-23

    The contents of sulfur amino acids in seeds of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are suboptimal for nutrition. They accumulate large amounts of a gamma-glutamyl dipeptide of S-methyl-cysteine, a nonprotein amino acid that cannot substitute for methionine or cysteine in the diet. Protein accumulation and amino acid composition were characterized in three genetically related lines integrating a progressive deficiency in major seed storage proteins, phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin, and arcelin. Nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur contents were comparable among the three lines. The contents of S-methyl-cysteine and gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine were progressively reduced in the mutants. Sulfur was shifted predominantly to the protein cysteine pool, while total methionine was only slightly elevated. Methionine and cystine contents (mg per g protein) were increased by up to ca. 40%, to levels slightly above FAO guidelines on amino acid requirements for human nutrition. These findings may be useful to improve the nutritional quality of common bean.

  6. Chemical constituents, in vitro protein digestibility, and presence of antinutritional substances in amaranth grains.

    PubMed

    Correa, A D; Jokl, L; Carlsson, R

    1986-06-01

    The chemical composition, content of antinutritional factors, and the in vitro protein digestibility of grains of the pseudo-cereal Amaranthus were analyzed. The plants were grown in Brazil (without fertilizer), Puerto Rico (100 kg N/ha), and California (200 kg N/ha). The seed analysis gave the following values (%DM): 14.4 - 16.9 protein (N X 6.25), 4.8 - 6.8 fat, 2.5 - 3.9 ash, and 2.3 - 2.9 crude fiber. The trypsin inhibitors, phenolics and saponine contents were low, and the phytohemagglutinin activity, fairly low. The in vitro protein digestibility was 61 - 76%. Digestibility was not correlated to the analyzed proximal composition nor to the antinutritional factors. The grain composition indicates a food value equivalent to that of conventional food grains.

  7. Effects of vector-averaged gravity on the response to different stimulatory signals in T-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadrucci, Sonia; Henggeler, Daniele; Lovis, Pascal; Lambers, Britta; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of several combinations of activators on the stimulation of purified T-Lymphocytes under vector-averaged gravity generated by the random positioning machine (RPM). Our results show that anti-CD3 antibody in combination with either anti-CD28 or Interleukin-2 (IL-2) acted favourably on the proliferation independently of gravity conditions. It was observed that proliferation in the RPM samples only decreased if the combination of activators included the lectins Concanavalin A (Con A) or Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in combination with anti-CD28. In these samples, we further found a clear deficit in the upregulation of c- fos, IL-2 and the α-subunit of the IL-2 receptor (IL- 2Rα). Our results suggest that attenuation in T-cell activation is most likely due to a reduced expression and induction of early stimulatory factors, and is activator- dependent.

  8. PHA-stimulated immune-responsiveness in mercury-dosed zebra finches does not match results from environmentally exposed songbirds.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Mitchell T; Spear, Eliza L; Varian-Ramos, Claire W; Cristol, Daniel A

    2015-04-01

    Dietary mercury exposure is associated with suppressed immune responsiveness in birds. This study examined the immune-responsiveness of domestic zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) experimentally exposed to mercury through their diet. We used the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling test to assay the effect of two modes of mercury exposure. Some finches received exposure to mercury only after reaching sexual maturity, while others were maintained on a mercury-dosed diet throughout life, including development. Each bird received one of five dietary concentrations of methylmercury cysteine (0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 or 2.4 ppm). In contrast to a study on wild songbirds at a mercury-contaminated site, we detected no relationship between mercury level and immunological response to PHA, regardless of mode of exposure. This result represents the first major difference found by our laboratory between wild birds exposed to environmental mercury and captive birds experimentally exposed to mercury.

  9. Lymphocyte transformation in presumed ocular histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganley, J.P.; Nemo, G.J.; Comstock, G.W.; Brody, J.A.

    1981-08-01

    Lymphocytes from individuals with inactive macular disciform lesions of presumed ocular histoplasmosis challenged with three histoplasmin antigens incorporated tritiated thymidine at a significantly higher rate than histoplasmin-stimulated lymphocytes of matched control and peripheral scar groups. This finding is consistent with the etiologic association of the disciform ocular syndrome and previous systemic infection with Histoplasma capsulatum. The disciform group had a higher mean response than the other two groups to pokeweed mitogen but not to phytohemagglutinin and had higher mean counts per minute to the specific antigens Toxoplasma gondii, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M battery, and M gaus, but not to Candida albicans. These data would suggest that individuals with the disciform lesion of presumed ocular histoplasmosis have a hyperreactive cellular immune response; this response may play an important role in the development of the disciform.

  10. Immunological responses to polyvalent canine vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, T; Taura, Y; Une, S; Yoshitake, M; Nakama, S; Watanabe, S

    1995-04-01

    The immunological responses to commercially available polyvalent vaccines in dogs were examined. There was a tendency in decreased lymphocyte counts on day 7 in the puppy and adult dogs. There was a significant increase in the blastogenesis of lymphocytes on day 7 and 21 in puppies, whereas no significant changes were seen in the adult dogs. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and canine parvo-virus (CPV) vaccine monitored 0, 3, 8 weeks after vaccination produced strong reactions, in particular those to CPV vaccine rose significantly after vaccination and maintained the higher responses for at least 2 months. Therefore, it is considered that vaccination is immunomodulative rather than immunosuppressive and that DTH responses to PHA and CPV vaccine are helpful to monitor non-specific and specific immune functions in vivo.

  11. Development of an interleukin-2 receptor expression assay and its use in evaluation of cellular immune responses in bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Erickson, K L; DiMolfetto-Landon, L; Wells, R S; Reidarson, T; Stott, J L; Ferrick, D A

    1995-04-01

    We describe optimization of a peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte proliferation assay and development of an interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression assay for bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes obtained from both Sea World (February 1993) and the Naval Command Control and Ocean Surveillance Center (March 1993) (San Diego, California, USA) were stimulated with the mitogens concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and evaluated for optimum proliferation and IL-2R expression. Based on these optimization assays, standard conditions were established and used to assess immune function in a population of apparently healthy, free-ranging bottlenose dolphins from Sarasota Bay, Florida (USA) in June 1993. A positive correlation was observed between proliferation assays using ConA and PHA as the stimulants. However, IL-2R expression induced by both mitogens differed significantly.

  12. DNA repair after gamma radiation and superoxide dismutase activity in lymphocytes from subjects of far advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Licastro, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Battelli, M.G. . Inst. of General Pathology); Franceschi, C. . Inst. of General Pathology); Tabacchi, P.; Cenci, M.; Barboni, F. . Lab. of Clinical Analysis); Pallenzona, D. . Ist. di Genetica)

    1982-01-01

    DNA repair after gamma radiation was studied in purified T lymphocytes from young and aged subjects. Two different assays were employed. In the first, T lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for 72 h and then treated with hydroxyurea, irradiated with 30 K rads and pulsed with (/sup 3/H)thymidine (TdR) for 4 h. In the second, T lymphocytes were first irradiated with graded doses of gamma rays (200-800 rads) and then stimulated with PHA, cultured for 72 h and pulsed with /sup 3/H-TdR for the last 6 h of culture. T lymphocytes from aged subjects showed a lack of DNA repair synthesis in the first assay whereas only minor differences were found in the second assay between the two groups, i.e., a certain degree of radioresistance in aged lymphocytes. Lymphocyte superoxide dismutase activity showed great individual variations in both groups and a slight increase in old subjects.

  13. Estrogenic xenobiotics affect the intracellular activation signal in mitogen-induced human peripheral blood lymphocytes: immunotoxicological impact.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Okuma, M; Kazuno, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, T; Furuya, H; Kayama, F; Suwa, Y; Fujii, W; Fresa, K L

    1998-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to elucidate the effect of estrogenic xenobiotics on the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL). Our findings follow: (a) the proliferation of PBL in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was mediated by protein kinase C activity, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on protein kinase C activity of PHA-stimulated PBL; (b) cytoplasmic extracts from PHA-stimulated PBL greatly activated DNA replication, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on these activities. The results suggest that the cytoplasmic signal-generating system in mitogen-treated PBL is inhibited by estrogenic xenobiotics, and that the defect occurs at all stages in the sequence of events leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation.

  14. Effect of diphenylhydantoin and cortisol on the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinney, A.A. Jr.; Knobeloch, L.; Norback, D.

    1988-06-01

    Normal human lymphocytes cultured in the presence of phytohemagglutinin were blocked in G/sub 0/G/sub 1/ when diphenylhydantoin (DPH) or cortisol 3.6 x 10/sup -4/ M was added at the beginning of culture. The suppression of culture growth was analyzed by flow cytometry and confirmed by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation and mitotic rate analysis. The correlation of these measurements with flow cytometry was good for DNA synthesis and excellent for mitosis. There was an additive effect of the G/sub 0/G/sub 1/ retention of cells when both drugs were present in the culture. These data may partially explain the suppression of cell-mediated immunity which occurs in DPH-treated patients.

  15. Expression of Ia-like antigens by human vascular endothelial cells is inducible in vitro: demonstration by monoclonal antibody binding and immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Pober, J S; Gimbrone, M A

    1982-01-01

    The expression of Ia-like antigens by cultured human endothelial cells has been investigated by means of monoclonal antibody binding to intact cells and by immunoprecipitation of radioiodinated membrane proteins. Primary growing and confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelium express little, if any, detectable Ia-like antigens under standard culture conditions. However, treatment of primary cultures with the lectin phytohemagglutinin induces the expression of Ia-like antigens. This action of the lectin uniformly affects all the endothelial cells in a culture, does not depend on cell division, and is associated with a cell shape change. The data presented in this report provide unequivocal serological and biochemical demonstration of Ia-like antigens on human vascular endothelial cells. The fact that the expression of Ia-like antigens by endothelium can be induced may have important implications for organ transplantation and for regulation of the immunological response. Images PMID:6815654

  16. Decrease of the lymphoproliferative response to varicella-zoster virus antigen in the aged.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, R; Florent, G; Just, M

    1981-01-01

    Humoral antibodies and specific cellular immune reactions (proliferative immune response in the lymphocyte transformation test) to varicella-zoster virus antigen were measured in children, young adults, and elderly people. In children and young adults, the humoral varicella-zoster-specific antibodies and the virus-specific cellular immune response generally coincided. In the over-60 age group, however, a discrepancy was often observed between these parameters. Ninety percent of the elderly subjects showed humoral antibodies, but only 64% still had a measurable varicella-zoster-specific immune response. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the virus antigen-specific immune response and the mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (phytohemagglutinin stimulation). One in three elderly people, therefore, showed no cellular immune response to the varicella-zoster virus antigen, and this person could probably be regarded as a potential herpes zoster patient. PMID:6163722

  17. [The influence of Spirulina and Selen-Spirulina on some indexes of rat's immune status].

    PubMed

    Trushina, E N; Gladkikh, Ol; Gadzhieva, Z M; Mustafina, O K; Pozdniakov, A L

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence for the immune-enhancing effect of Spirulina (Sp) and Selen-Spirulina (Se-Sp) in male Wistar rats. The rats of control group fed half-synthetic diet. Rats of experimental groups consumed the half-synthetic diets with Sp (10 g/kg diet) or Se-Sp (350 microg Se/kg diet) for 2 weeks. Using rats lymphocytes in vitro after phytohemagglutinin stimulation was demonstrated that lymphocytes from Sp and Se-Sp groups secreted of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma more control group. Induction of interleukin-4 was comparable with once of control group. We believed that Sp and Se-Sp are more effective in stimulating a Th-1--type response and hence potentiates cell-mediated immunity. The immunostimulatory effect of Sp and Se-Sp was confirmed by morphologic and morphometric investigation of rats spleen, also with by NBT-test of peritoneal macrophages.

  18. Altered Cell Viability and Proliferation Activity of Peripheral Lymphocytes in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Chang; Kwon, Young-Ah; Kim, Hyeran; Kim, Seonwoo; Ahn Jo, Sangmee

    2010-01-01

    Objective We evaluated cell viability and proliferation activity of peripheral lymphocytes as potential models of neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods We analyzed the cell viability and proliferation activity of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated lymphocytes from 68 AD patients and 33 normal controls. The cellular measures were made at baseline (0 hr), 24 hrs, 48 hrs, 72 hrs, and 96 hrs after PHA stimulation. Results Cell viability in the AD patients was significantly decreased at 72 hrs and 96 hrs, compared with the normal controls. The declining ramp of the proliferation activity from 48 hrs to 72 hrs after PHA stimulation was significantly related to cell viability at 72 hrs and at 96 hrs in the AD patients. Conclusion Lymphocytes from patients with AD have altered viability and proliferation characteristics in culture following PHA stimulation. These findings suggest that lymphocytes may be used as a peripheral tissue model of cell cycle dysregulation in AD. PMID:20396436

  19. Individual susceptibility to DNA telomerase inhibitors: a study on the chromosome instability induced by 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine in lymphocytes of elderly twins.

    PubMed

    Caporossi, Daniela; Argentin, Gabriella; Pittaluga, Monica; Parisi, Paolo; Tedeschi, Bruna; Vernole, Patrizia; Cicchetti, Rosadele

    2004-03-01

    The activation of telomerase in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral lymphocytes is thought to play a role in telomere maintenance and DNA repair. Considering the importance of this enzyme in both cancer and senescence, we studied the effects of the telomerase inhibitor 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of elderly monozygotic and dizygotic twins, evaluated with respect to the genotoxic effects induced in unrelated young subjects. Our results show that the cytogenetic damage induced by 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine in human PBL was mainly regulated by genetic factors and allowed the identification of hypersensitive subjects. Ageing, which did not modify the individual susceptibility to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine induction of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, nevertheless determined an overall increase in nuclear damage.

  20. Chemical induction of sister-chromatid exchanges in human lymphocytes treated in G0 prior to stimulation by different mitogens and revealed 72 h later in second division cells.

    PubMed

    Deknudt, G

    1986-05-01

    Frequencies of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) were determined in second-division metaphases of human lymphocytes, exposed for 1 h during the G0 phase to mitomycin C (MMC) alone or to cyclophosphamide (CP) in the presence of S9 mix. The cells were then cultured for 72 h in the presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), Wistaria floribunda (WFA) or Lens culinaris (LcH-A) extracts. Large differences in mitotic indices (MI) and cell-cycle kinetics were observed among cells subjected to the various treatments. However, in the controls as well as in the cultures submitted to a G0 mutagenic exposure, the yield of SCE was not influenced by the mitogenic agent and was, therefore, independent of the proliferation properties of the cultured lymphocyte population.

  1. Peripheral lymphocyte response to PHA and T cell population among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, M.; Yamakido, M.; Kobuke, K.; Dock, D.S.; Hamilton, H.B.; Awa, A.A.; Kato, H.

    1983-03-01

    The percentage of T lymphocytes of atomic bomb survivors showed no change as a function of age or exposure dose. The percentage of T cells was slightly lower in malignant-tumor patients than in the control group, but was significantly higher in the group with chromosomal aberrations than in the control group. The percentages of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced transformation of peripheral lymphocytes decreased significantly with age in the 0 rad control group and the 200+ rad exposure group, particularly so in the latter. The malignant-tumor group also showed lower percentages of PHA-induced transformation than the control group. The percentages of PHA-induced transformation of lymphocytes of the chromosomal-aberration group were significantly depressed as compared with that of the control group.

  2. Imatinib sensitizes T-cell lymphocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients to FasL-induced cell death: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Legros, Laurence; Ebran, Nathalie; Stebe, Emmanuelle; Rousselot, Philippe; Rea, Delphine; Cassuto, Jill Patrice; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Hueber, Anne-Odile

    2012-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that imatinib may affect immune responses, especially those mediated by T lymphocytes. Fas (CD95/Apo-1), a cell death receptor, is a key regulator of the immune system. We have explored the consequences of treatment on the Fas system in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib. In comparison with healthy controls, we found not only a mild blood lymphopenia but also impairment of phytohemagglutinin activation in CD4Fas and CD8Fas lymphocytes of imatinib-treated patients. Moreover, these lymphocyte populations were more sensitive to FasL-induced cell death in relation to an increase in Fas expression at the cell surface. Taken together, these results reveal the role of Fas receptor in the lymphopenia observed in patients treated with imatinib, with potential deleterious consequences on antileukemic responses against this immunogenic hematological malignancy.

  3. Effect of antioxidants on the proliferative response of canine lymphocytes in serum from dogs with vitamin E deficiency.

    PubMed

    Langweiler, M; Sheffy, B E; Schultz, R D

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro effect of vitamin E and 3 other antioxidants--ethoxyquin, 2-mercaptoethanol, and ascorbic acid--on proliferation of canine lymphocytes was examined. Lymphocytes from 2 groups of dogs given a vitamin E-deficient diet or whelped from a bitch fed such a diet were cultured with pooled samples of serum from dogs fed a vitamin E-deficient diet or whelped from a bitch fed such a diet, or normal canine serum, and stimulated with phytohemagglutinin. Added vitamin E enhanced the responsiveness in serum from the dogs with vitamin E deficiency, but not in normal canine serum. A similar effect was noted with added ethoxyquin and 2-mercaptoethanol. Ascorbic acid had no effect on proliferation in either serum pool. These results indicated that depressed lymphocyte responsiveness seen with serum from vitamin E-deficient dogs may, at least in part, be due to a loss of antioxidant activity in this serum.

  4. Identification of CD3+ T lymphocytes in the green turtle Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz, F.A.; Estrada-Parra, S.; Romero-Rojas, A.; Work, T.M.; Gonzalez-Ballesteros, E.; Estrada-Garcia, I.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role of the immune system with respect to disease in reptiles, there is the need to develop tools to assess the host's immune response. An important tool is the development of molecular markers to identify immune cells, and these are limited for reptiles. We developed a technique for the cryopreservation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and showed that a commercially available anti-CD3 epsilon chain antibody detects a subpopulation of CD3 positive peripheral blood lymphocytes in the marine turtle Chelonia mydas. In the thymus and in skin inoculated with phytohemagglutinin, the same antibody showed the classical staining pattern observed in mammals and birds. For Western blot, the anti-CD3 antibodies identified a 17.6 kDa band in membrane proteins of peripheral blood mononuclear cell compatible in weight to previously described CD3 molecules. This is the first demostration of CD3+ cells in reptiles using specific antibodies. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Immunological aspects of the common food colorants, amaranth and tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Koutsogeorgopoulou, L; Maravelias, C; Methenitou, G; Koutselinis, A

    1998-02-01

    We describe a sensitive and reproducible microassay model using human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for discrimination between the cytotoxic and immunosuppressive effects of food colorants such as amaranth and tartrazine. The cytotoxic effects of a wide range of concentrations of these substances were studied on human PBL by the colorimetric in vitro cytotoxicity assays, neutral red uptake (NR) and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The immunotoxic properties of these 2 substances were determined by a [3H]-thymidine DNA incorporation assay on phytohemagglutinin stimulated or non-stimulated lymphocytes, as well as by a Cr51 release Natural Killer assays. The results showed clear immunosuppressive effects from the 2 substances tested, although the concentrations chosen for this study proved to be non-cytotoxic by NR and MTT cytotoxic endpoints.

  6. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  7. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.J.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  8. Tumor xenotransplantation in Wistar rats after treatment with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenhout, J.; Kazem, I.; Jerusalem, C.R.; Bakkeren, J.A.; de Jong, J.; Kal, H.B.; van Munster, P.J.

    1982-10-01

    Three-month-old male Wistar rats were treated with cyclophosphamide and total lymphoid irradiation, and C22LR mouse osteosarcoma was transplanted into the rats. The effects of immunosuppression were monitored by lymphocyte counts, serum IgG determinations, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) responses, measurement of the proportion of B cells, and histopathological studies of the lymphoid organs. At eight days after treatment, the lymphocyte counts, IgG levels, and PHA and Con A values were decreased. Mitotic activity started in the depleted B and T cell areas of the peripheral lymphatic organs two weeks after treatment. There was a 94% graft take of the osteosarcoma. It was determined that the optimum time for tumor xenograft transplantation is 4 days after treatment. The duration of growth was 11 days, and this was followed by regression up to day 21.

  9. Immunomodulatory activity of various fractions derived from Physalis angulata L extract.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Chiang, H C; Kan, W S; Hone, E; Shih, S J; Won, M H

    1992-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of Physalis angulata L. extract fraction VII (PA-VII), PA-VII-A, PA-VII-B and PA-VII-C were investigated in this study. The results showed that PA-VII and PA-VII-C strongly enhanced blastogenesis response, PA-VII-B had moderate activity, and PA-VII-A exerted only slight effect on cell proliferation. A synergistic effect was observed when the suboptimal dosage of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was added to the culture. Furthermore, PA-VII and PA-VII-C possessed stimulatory activity on B cells and less effect on T cells. The antibody responses were also augmented by PA-VII, PA-VII-B and PA-VII-C, but not by PA-VII-A. The enhancement of antibody response could be observed both in BALB/c and C3H/HeJ mice.

  10. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type.

  11. In vitro study of interactions between silicon-containing nanoparticles and human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Rudimov, E G; Gornostaeva, A N; Beklemyshev, V I; Makhonin, I I; Maugeri, U O G; Buravkova, L B

    2013-07-01

    The effects of silicon dioxide-based nanoparticles on the viability and proliferative activity of human peripheral blood cultured lymphocytes were studied. All nanoparticles in a concentration of 100 μg/ml produced a significant cytotoxic effect, its intensity depending on particles' structure: SiO2 nanoparticles were least toxic, while Ce3(+)-intercaled montmorillonite nanoparticles were most toxic. The cells died mainly by apoptosis and postapoptotic necrosis. Incubation with nanoparticles in a concentration of 100 μg/ml for 72 h caused death of all phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes, while in concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/ml the nanoparticles had no effect of proliferative activity of cells. The results suggest that the effects of nanoparticles on cells are determined by the nanoparticle concentration and size, as well as by their structure.

  12. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Villanueva, Marvin A; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Subedi, Suraj; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Matsuba, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants.

  13. The effect of lead on immune and viral interferon production.

    PubMed Central

    Blakley, B R; Archer, D L; Osborne, L

    1982-01-01

    Female BDF1 mice were exposed to lead acetate in the drinking water at concentrations ranging form 0 to 1000 micrograms/mL lead for three weeks. The mice tolerated these levels of lead exposure without exhibiting signs of clinical toxicity. Weight gains were not affected by lead exposure. The production of viral interferon induced by the oral administration of tilorone was not altered by lead exposure. The T-lymphocyte mitogens concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and staphylococcal enterotoxin A induced immune interferon to varying degrees, with concanavalin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A exhibiting the most potent induction capabilities. The production of immune interferon induced by T-lymphocyte mitogens was not suppressed by lead exposure. PMID:6176302

  14. Immunomodulatory effects of iscador: a Viscum album preparation.

    PubMed

    Hajto, T

    1986-01-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of Iscador (a mistletoe, Viscum album extract) were investigated. After a single intravenous infusion of Iscador several immunological parameters in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients were examined. Parallel with neutrophilia, and with an increase of juvenile neutrophils, a significant enhancement of phagocytic activity of granulocytes was shown. After short decreases during the first 24 h, significant increases in natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities as well as augmented levels of large granular lymphocytes were observed. These NK/ADCC responses followed a kinetic pattern similar to that after treatment with alpha-interferon described by others. Further significant increases in mitogenic responses to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A were observed.

  15. Specific in vivo and nonspecific in vitro alloreactivities of adult frogs (Xenopus laevis) that were thymectomized during early larval life.

    PubMed

    Nagata, S; Cohen, N

    1983-07-01

    Thymectomy of very young Xenopus larvae abrogated in vitro proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and allogeneic leukocytes. Thymectomized (Txd) frogs, however, still rejected first-set skin allografts chronically and second-set grafts (but not third-party grafts) more rapidly. The specific second-set rejection reaction by Txd frogs was transferable in vivo to secondary Txd hosts (with major histocompatibility complex identical to the cell donor) by the subcutaneous injection of a mixture of splenic and peripheral blood leukocytes. Spleen cells used in this adoptive transfer experiment (i.e., immune cells) were responsive to allogeneic cells from the original donor strain as well as from unrelated donors in mixed leukocyte culture in vitro but were still unreactive to PHA. The results are consistent with an extrathymic pathway of alloreactive cell differentiation in this species, although the physiological significance of such a pathway is not clear.

  16. Nonspecific suppressive effect of bovine herpesvirus type 1 on bovine leukocyte functions.

    PubMed Central

    Filion, L G; McGuire, R L; Babiuk, L A

    1983-01-01

    The effect of bovine herpesvirus type 1 on the specific and nonspecific immune response of calves was examined. Animals with or without prior aerosol exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 were aerosol challenged with 10(8) PFU of virus. Blood and serum samples were taken before and after virus challenge for determining cell-mediated, humoral, and neutrophil responses. A significant depression of the blastogenic responses to phytohemagglutinin, P. haemolytica, and Pasteurella multocida and of neutrophil chemotactic response was observed 4 to 7 days after challenge. However, the antibacterial activity of neutrophils was not significantly affected by virus exposure. Anti-bovine herpesvirus type 1 antibody responses were detected 11 days postchallenge. A significant elevation of the anti-P. haemolytica antibody response (day 0 versus day +11) was detected in animals previously exposed to P. haemolytica. PMID:6311742

  17. A potassium ionophore (Nigericin) inhibits stimulation of human lymphocytes by mitogens

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Nigericin, an ionophore that exchanges K+ for H+ across most biologic membranes, reversibly inhibited the proliferative response of human lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Inhibition occurred at nigericin concentrations of 10(-8) M or greater, and only during the early event of mitogenesis. There was no effect if nigericin was added 24 h or later after the initiation of PHA-stimulated cultures. The effect was not the result of toxicity or impaired mitochondrial respiration. At similar concentrations, nigericin also inhibited lymphocyte responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures and to other mitogens including concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, and the calcium ionophore A23187. The findings support the view that one or more transmembranous events, mediated by changes in cation flux and/or membrane potential, are critical in the initial stages of lymphocyte mitogenesis. PMID:146727

  18. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3: a novel immunoregulatory hormone.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Provvedini, D M; Manolagas, S C

    1984-06-29

    The hormonal form of vitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], at picomolar concentrations, inhibited the growth-promoting lymphokine interleukin-2, which is produced by human T lymphocytes activated in vitro by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin. Other metabolites of vitamin D3 were less effective than 1,25(OH)2D3 in suppressing interleukin-2; their order of potency corresponded to their respective affinity for the 1,25(OH)2D3 receptor, suggesting that the effect on interleukin-2 was mediated by this specific receptor. The proliferation of mitogen-activated lymphocytes was also inhibited by 1,25(OH)2D3. This effect of the hormone became more pronounced at later stages of the culture. These findings demonstrate that 1,25(OH)2D3 is an immunoregulatory hormone.

  19. Depressed mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes at skin temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Lauwasser, M; Shands, J W

    1979-01-01

    The responsiveness of murine lymphocytes and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, and endotoxin was tested in vitro at 32, 35, and 37 degrees C. The responses at 32 degrees C were delayed and often depressed. Mouse cells responded equally well at 35 and 37 degrees C. Human lymphocytes often responded more rapidly at 37 than at 35 degrees C. Since skin temperature, particularly that of the distal extremities, is usually 32 degrees C or less, a relative deficiency in cell-mediated immunity may exist in these sites. This may be part of the reason for the usual localization of certain infections, such as sporotrichosis, to these coller areas. PMID:457281

  20. Immunomodulatory effects of inosine pranobex on cytokine production by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lasek, Witold; Janyst, Michał; Wolny, Rafał; Zapała, Łukasz; Bocian, Katarzyna; Drela, Nadzieja

    2015-06-01

    Inosine pranobex (inosine dimepranol acedoben, isoprinosine) (Inos) is an immunomodulatory and antiviral drug used in some viral infections, especially in patients with weakened immunity. In the present study, effects of Inos on the production of cytokines attributable to Th1 (IL-2, IFN-g, and TNF-a) or Th2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) were tested in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Inos enhanced TNF-a secretion significantly (in short-term--24-hour, and prolonged term--72-hour cultures) and IFN-g (in 72-hour cultures). Surprisingly, production of IL-10 by PHA-stimulated lymphocytes was suppressed by Inos in a dose-dependent manner in both 24-hour and 72-hour cultures. These results shed some light on immunomodulatory properties of Inos and suggest applicability of this agent in patients with a depressed function of the immune system.

  1. Immunologic monitoring of patients with small cell anaplastic carcinoma who are treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, C.; Grange, C.; Carpentier, F.; Bensa, J.C.; Bolla, M.; Paramelle, B.

    1980-08-01

    From January to October 1978 the diagnosis of small cell anaplastic carcinoma was made in 12 patients. Patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy and were followed for 13 months. Before treatment lymphocyte stimulation (L.S.) and blood T and B lymphocytes were within normal range. Positive skin tests were observed in patients who had a large weight loss. After treatment, the number of lymphocytes dropped, but the T/B radio did not change. T lymphocyte function was impaired (decrease of LS with phytohemagglutinine) but B lymphocyte function was normal (normal LS with Pockeweed Mitogen). The skin tests became negative after radiotherapy or when patients had a loss of body weight of more than 10%. In spite of its imprecision, skin tests appear to be the best to follow immunological status. More sophisticated tests gave no supplementary information. Immunological status could not be related to prognosis.

  2. The influence of typical and atypical neuroleptic drugs in the production of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Sebastian; Peters, Marion; Rothermundt, Matthias; Arolt, Volkert; Kirchner, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Alterations of cytokine levels represent the most consistent finding from studies concerning the involvement of the immune system in the etiology of schizophrenia. These results have been discussed controversially due to the potential influence of drug treatment on cytokine production and on the experimental procedures used for cytokine measurement. In the present study, the influences of typical and atypical neuroleptic drugs (haloperidol and clozapine) as well as a tricyclic antidepressive drug (amitriptyline) on cytokine levels (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) were examined in vitro in a whole blood assay under various conditions of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation and drug incubation. Stimulation was enhanced by haloperidol and clozapine, but not by the antidepressant, meaning that the results of decreased cytokine levels seen in earlier studies in schizophrenic patients cannot be explained through drug influences alone. Furthermore, our findings allow us to conclude that, in contrast to the antidepressant drug, the typical and atypical neuroleptic drugs seem to influence the examined cytokine levels.

  3. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  4. Habitat structure is associated with the expression of carotenoid-based coloration in nestling blue tits Parus caeruleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriero, Elena; Fargallo, Juan Antonio

    2006-04-01

    We investigated how the expression of carotenoid-based plumage coloration (lightness and chroma) in nestling blue tits Parus caeruleus is associated with forest structure in oak forests of central Spain. We found evidence of a reduced expression of carotenoid-based coloration in nestlings growing up in successionally young and structurally simple forest territories. Our results suggest that breast feather coloration can be used as an indicator of nestling quality because nestlings with more intense yellow plumage coloration had larger body size and stronger immune responses to the injection of phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Given the association of forest structural complexity with carotenoid-based plumage coloration, our findings suggest that variation in habitat structure may have a significant impact on forest birds in their first stages of life which has implications for forest management practices.

  5. Transgenic cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds expressing a bean alpha-amylase inhibitor 1 confer resistance to storage pests, bruchid beetles.

    PubMed

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Bakshi, Souvika; Purkayastha, Jubilee; Panda, Sanjib Kumar; Sahoo, Lingaraj

    2008-12-01

    Cowpea is one of the important grain legumes. Storage pests, Callosobruchus maculatus and C. chinensis cause severe damage to the cowpea seeds during storage. We employ a highly efficient Agrobacterium-mediated cowpea transformation method for introduction of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (alphaAI-1) gene into a commercially important Indian cowpea cultivar, Pusa Komal and generated fertile transgenic plants. The use of constitutive expression of additional vir genes in resident pSB1 vector in Agrobacterium strain LBA4404, thiol compounds during cocultivation and a geneticin based selection system resulted in twofold increase in stable transformation frequency. Expression of alphaAI-1 gene under bean phytohemagglutinin promoter results in accumulation of alphaAI-1 in transgenic seeds. The transgenic protein was active as an inhibitor of porcine alpha-amylase in vitro. Transgenic cowpeas expressing alphaAI-1 strongly inhibited the development of C. maculatus and C. chinensis in insect bioassays.

  6. Abnormal lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation in multiple skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Munch-Petersen, B.; Frentz, G.; Squire, B.; Wallevik, K.; Horn, C.C.; Reymann, F.; Faber, M. )

    1985-06-01

    The lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) was investigated by two different methods in 29 unselected patients with multiple epidermal cancer. The ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis was determined as the increase in incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in irradiated cells compared with non-irradiated cells after incubation for 2 h. The ultraviolet tolerance was measured as the ultraviolet dose necessary for 50% reduction in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Patients with both squamous cell differentiated tumours and basal cell carcinomas had very high ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis values. The ultraviolet tolerance in patient lymphocytes was considerably lower than in control lymphocytes with the lowest values occurring in patients with clinical sun intolerance. These investigations may be of predictive value in skin carcinogenesis.

  7. Up-regulation of telomerase activity in Herpesvirus saimiri immortalized human T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Harnack, U; Lehmann, C; Matthes, E; Pecher, G

    2001-01-01

    Human T-lymphocytes can be transformed to unlimited growth by Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). We studied the telomerase activity of a recently established HVS immortalized human CD4 T cell clone in comparison to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and unstimulated or phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated CD4 T-cells by a Telomeric Repeat Amplification-Protocol (TRAP) -Assay. Telomerase activity in PHA-stimulated CD4 T-cells was seven-fold and in HVS-infected CD4 T-cells 14-fold higher than in untreated CD4 T-cells. The HVS immortalized T-cell clone provides a useful tool for studying the regulation of telomerase activity during carcinogenesis and for testing of telomerase-inhibitory drugs.

  8. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  9. Isolation of a mutant Arabidopsis plant that lacks N-aetyl glucosaminyl transferase I and is unable to synthesize Golgi-modified complex N-linked glycans

    SciTech Connect

    Schaewen, A. von; O'Neill, J.; Chrispeels, M.J. ); Sturm, A. )

    1993-08-01

    The complex asparagine-linked glycans of plant glycoproteins, characterized by the presence of [beta]1[yields]2 xylose and [alpha]1[yields]3 fucose residues, are derived from typical mannose[sub 9](N-acetylglucosamine)[sub 2] (Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2]) N-linked glycans through the activity of a series of glycosidases and glycosyl transferases in the Golgi apparatus. By screening leaf extracts with an antiserum against complex glycans, we isolated a mutant of Arbidopsis thaliana that is blocked in the conversion of high-manne to complex glycans. In callus tissues derived from the mutant plants, all glycans bind to concanavalin A. These glycans can be released by treatment with endoglycosidase H, and the majority has the same size as Man[sub 5]GlcNAc[sub 1] glycans. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, the mutant cells synthesize Man[sub 9]GlcNAc[sub 2] and Man[sub 8]GlcNAc[sub 2] glycans, suggesting that the biochemical lesion in the mutant is not in the biosynthesis of high-mannose glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum but in their modification in the Golgi. Direct enzyme assays of cell extracts show that the mutant cells lack N-acetyl glucosaminyl transferase I, the first enzyme in the pathway of complex glycan biosynthesis. The mutant plants are able to complete their development normally under several environmental conditions, suggesting that complex glycans are not essential for normal developmental processes. By crossing the complex-glycan-deficient strain of A. thaliana with a transgenic strain that expresses the glycoprotein phytohemagglutinin, a unique strain was obtained that synthesizes phytohemagglutinin with two high-mannose glycans, instead of one high-mannose and one complex glycan. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Alteration of lymphocyte function due to anesthesia: in vivo and in vitro suppression of mitogen-induced blastogenesis by sodium pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Formeister, J F; MacDermott, R P; Wickline, D; Locke, D; Nash, G S; Reynolds, D G; Roberson, B S

    1980-05-01

    The mechanism of decreased lymphocyte responsiveness after major surgery is unclear. Because sodium pentobarbital, and intermediately long-acting barbiturate, will reproducibly induce anesthesia in experimental animals, we utilized a canine model to investigate its effect on lymphocyte proliferation induced by the mitogenic lectins erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (E-PHA) and leukoagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (L-PHA). Although no effect was observed at 10 minutes or 1 hour after an anesthetic dose of sodium pentobarbital, after 1 and 3 hours of anesthesia, canine lymphocytes were significantly suppressed, as demonstrated by decreased responsiveness to E-PHA and L-PHA mitogen stimulation. After 3-hours the majority of animals had mitogenesis values of less than 50% of the preanesthetic control values. Recovery, as measured by a return to at least 70% of the preanesthetic mitogenesis value, was noted in the majority of animals at 24, 48, and 72 hours. In order to investigate the machanisms of the in vivo capability of sodium pentobarbital to induce immunosuppression of lymphocyte transformation, in vitro studies were carried out. Sodium pentobarbital was found to significantly inhibit mitogen-induced canine mononuclear cell blastogenesis at anesthetic (1.5 to 3.0 mg%) drug concentrations in vitro. Lymphocytes pretreated with barbiturate and washed prior to plating did not show this inhibiting effect. Our findings suggest that depression of the immune response reported in patients after operation could result from short-acting barbiturates administered during the induction phase of clinical anesthesia. Furthermore, the suppression may involve in vivo metabolism of pentobarbital, hormones or other in vivo factors, since washed lymphocytes from the in vivo but not the in vitro experiments demonstrated suppression. These results indicate that anesthesia may be an important factor in the immunosuppression reported after major surgery.

  11. Standardization of sensitive human immunodeficiency virus coculture procedures and establishment of a multicenter quality assurance program for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group. The NIH/NIAID/DAIDS/ACTG Virology Laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Hollinger, F B; Bremer, J W; Myers, L E; Gold, J W; McQuay, L

    1992-01-01

    An independent quality assurance program has been established by the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for monitoring virologic assays performed by nearly 40 laboratories participating in multicenter clinical trials in the United States. Since virologic endpoints are important in evaluating the timing and efficacy of therapeutic interventions, it is imperative that virologic measurements be accurate and uniform. When the quality assurance program was initially created, fewer than 40% of the laboratories could consistently recover human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-infected patients. By comparing coculture procedures in the more competent laboratories with those in laboratories who were struggling to isolate virus, optimal conditions were established and nonessential reagents and practices were eliminated. Changes were rapidly introduced into a laboratory when experience dictated that such modifications would result in a favorable outcome. Isolation of HIV was enhanced by optimizing the numbers and ratios of patient and donor cells used in cultures, by standardizing PBMC separation procedures, by using fresh rather than frozen donor PBMCs, by processing whole blood within 24 h, and by using natural delectinated interleukin 2 instead of recombinant interleukin 2 products in existence at that time. Delays of more than 8 h in the addition of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor cells to freshly separated patient PBMCs reduced recovery. Phytohemagglutinin in cocultures and the addition of Polybrene and anti-human alpha interferon to media were not important in HIV isolation. The introduction of a consensus protocol based on this information brought most laboratories quickly into compliance. In addition, monthly monitoring has successfully maintained proficiency among the laboratories, a process that is critical for the scientific integrity of collaborative multicenter trials

  12. Immunoregulatory T cells in man. Histamine-induced suppressor T cells are derived from a Leu 2+ (T8+) subpopulation distinct from that which gives rise to cytotoxic T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sansoni, P.; Silverman, E.D.; Khan, M.M.; Melmon, K.L.; Engleman, E.G.

    1985-02-01

    One mechanism of histamine-mediated inhibition of the immune response in man is to activate T suppressor cells that bear the Leu 2 (OKT8) marker. The current study was undertaken to characterize the histamine-induced suppressor cell using a monoclonal antibody (9.3) shown previously to distinguish cytotoxic T cells from antigen-specific suppressor T cells. Leu 2+ cells isolated from peripheral blood were further separated with antibody 9.3 into Leu 2+, 9.3+, and Leu 2+, 9.3- subsets and each subset was incubated with different concentrations of histamine before determining their ability to suppress immune responses in vitro. The results indicate that the Leu 2+, 9.3- subpopulation includes all histamine-induced suppressor cells, that 10(-4) M histamine is the optimal concentration for suppressor cell induction, and that exposure of Leu 2+, 9.3- cells to histamine for 30 s is sufficient to initiate the induction process. After treatment with histamine these cells inhibit both phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation and pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell differentiation. The suppression of phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation was resistant to x-irradiation with 1,200 rad, either before or after histamine exposure, suggesting that Leu 2+, 9.3- cells need not proliferate to become suppressor cells or exert suppression. Moreover, suppression by these cells was not due to altered kinetics of the response. Finally, a histamine type 2 receptor antagonist (cimetidine) but not a type 1 receptor antagonist (mepyramine) blocked the induction of suppressor cells. On the basis of these results and our previous studies of antigen specific suppressor cells, we conclude that Leu 2+ suppressor cells in man are derived from a precursor pool that is phenotypically distinct from cells that can differentiate into cytotoxic T cells.

  13. Biological and immunological characterization of a human liver immunoregulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Schrempf-Decker, G E; Baron, D P; Brattig, N W; Bockhorn, H; Berg, P A

    1983-01-01

    The liver immunoregulatory protein (LIP) was originally characterized as human liver-derived soluble factor which inhibited the alloantigen and phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation of human lymphocytes (1). Soluble extracts prepared under the same experimental conditions from kidney, spleen, heart, lymph nodes, and erythrocytes did not exert any inhibitory activity (2). The purpose of this study was to characterize the immunobiological properties of LIP. In the primary one-way mixed lymphocyte culture, LIP depressed the generation of suppressor T cells which inhibited the lymphocyte proliferation induced by phytohemagglutinin or alloantigens. In addition, LIP suppressed in primary mixed lymphocyte culture the induction of cytotoxic T cells and memory cells as determined by cell-mediated lympholysis and secondary mixed lymphocyte culture, respectively. In the presence of LIP, the concanavalin A-mediated induction of suppressor T cells, the pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG synthesis in vitro and the cytolytic activity of K cells reacting in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity were also inhibited. Cytotoxic effects could be excluded since the viability of human lymphoblastoid cells, hepatocytes, and allogeneically stimulated lymphocytes was not affected by LIP. LIP was shown to be different from other liver-derived substances like acute phase proteins, immunoregulatory alpha-globulins, C-reactive protein, lipoproteins, and F antigen. Furthermore, LIP is not identical to other serum components like the immunoregulatory rosette inhibition factor and the serum inhibitory factor (3). However, the characteristics described herein strongly indicate that LIP is very similar to the liver extract described by Chisari (4) and the liver-derived inhibitory protein (LIP) described by Grol and Schumacher (5).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dual role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating cell adhesion mediated by the integrin lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lub, M; van Kooyk, Y; van Vliet, S J; Figdor, C G

    1997-01-01

    Intracellular signals are required to activate the leukocyte-specific adhesion receptor lymphocyte function-associated molecule-1 (LFA-1; CD11a/CD18) to bind its ligand, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this study, we investigated the role of the cytoskeleton in LFA-1 activation and demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) can both enhance and inhibit LFA-1-mediated adhesion, depending on the distribution of LFA-1 on the cell surface. We observed that LFA-1 is already clustered on the cell surface of interleukin-2/phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. These cells bind strongly ICAM-1 and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton inhibits adhesion. In contrast to interleukin-2/phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, resting lymphocytes, which display a homogenous cell surface distribution of LFA-1, respond poorly to intracellular signals to bind ICAM-1, unless the actin cytoskeleton is disrupted. On resting peripheral blood lymphocytes, uncoupling of LFA-1 from the actin cytoskeleton induces clustering of LFA-1 and this, along with induction of a high-affinity form of LFA-1, via "inside-out" signaling, results in enhanced binding to ICAM-1, which is dependent on intact intermediate filaments, microtubules, and metabolic energy. We hypothesize that linkage of LFA-1 to cytoskeletal elements prevents movement of LFA-1 over the cell surface, thus inhibiting clustering and strong ligand binding. Release from these cytoskeletal elements allows lateral movement and activation of LFA-1, resulting in ligand binding and "outside-in" signaling, that subsequently stimulates actin polymerization and stabilizes cell adhesion. Images PMID:9190212

  15. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  16. Modest weight loss through a 12-week weight management program with behavioral modification seems to attenuate inflammatory responses in young obese Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lee, AeJin; Jeon, Kyeong Jin; Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Hye-Kyeong; Han, Sung Nim

    2015-04-01

    Obesity has been reported to impair immune functions and lead to low-grade long-term inflammation; however, studies that have investigated the impact of weight loss on these among the young and slightly obese are limited. Thus, we investigated the effect of a 12-week weight management program with behavioral modifications on cell-mediated immune functions and inflammatory responses in young obese participants. Our hypothesis was that weight loss would result in improved immune functions and decreased inflammatory responses. Sixty-four participants (45 obese and 19 normal weight) finished the program. Obese (body mass index ≥25) participants took part in 5 group education and 6 individual counseling sessions. Normal-weight (body mass index 18.5-23) participants only attended 6 individual sessions. The goal for the obese was to lose 0.5 kg/wk by reducing their intake by 300 to 500 kcal/d and increasing their physical activity. Program participation resulted in a modest but significant decrease in weight (2.7 ± 0.4 kg, P < .001) and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated interleukin-1β production (from 0.85 ± 0.07 to 0.67 ± 0.07 ng/mL, P < .05) in the obese. In the obese group, increase in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated interleukin-10 production, a TH2 and anti-inflammatory cytokine, approached significance after program participation (from 6181 ± 475 to 6970 ± 632 pg/mL, P = .06). No significant changes in proliferative responses to the optimal concentration of concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin were observed in the obese after program participation. Collectively, modest weight loss did not change the cell-mediated immune functions significantly but did attenuate the inflammatory response in young and otherwise healthy obese adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes in cytokine production and composition of peripheral blood leukocytes during pregnancy are not associated with a difference in the proliferative immune response to the fetus.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Lisa E E L O; van der Hoorn, Marie-Louise P; van der Mast, Barbara J; Tilburgs, Tamara; van der Lee, Nadine; van der Keur, Carin; van Beelen, Els; Roelen, Dave L; Claas, Frans H J; Scherjon, Sicco A

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed peripheral blood from women at term pregnancy for leukocyte composition, in vitro proliferative responses and cytokine production after nonspecific and fetus-specific stimulation. Maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected and stimulated with umbilical cord blood (UCB) of the mother's own child, third-party UCB, nonspecific stimulus phytohemagglutinin, and anti-CD3 antibody, with PBMCs of nonpregnant women (cPBMC) as controls. Nine combinations of patient, child, third party child, and controls were selected on basis of sharing one human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR antigen. The response of mPBMC upon specific stimulation with fetal antigens was similar to that of cPBMC. No differences were found when comparing the mother's response upon stimulation to her own child with stimulation to that with a control child. Nonspecific stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and anti-CD3 antibody did not reveal a difference in proliferation rate between mPBMC and cPBMC. However, mPBMC contained a higher percentage of CD14(+) cells (p = 0.001) and activated T cells (CD25(dim), p < 0.0001), but a lower percentage CD16(-)CD56(bright) natural killer (NK) cells (p = 0.001) and CD16(+)CD56(+) NK cells (p = 0.003). mPBMC produced more interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-17 compared with cPBMC (p < 0.05). We found differences in lymphocyte composition and cytokine production between mPBMC and cPBMC. These differences did not result in quantitative changes in proliferative responses during pregnancy compared with responses in nonpregnant controls. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunosuppression in irradiated breast cancer patients: In vitro effect of cyclooxygenase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, J.; Blomgren, H.; Rotstein, S.; Petrini, B.; Hammarstroem, S.

    1989-01-01

    We have documented in previous studies that local irradiation therapy for breast cancer caused severe lymphopenia with reduction of both T and non-T lymphocytes. Non-T cells were relatively more depressed but recovered within six months. The recovery of T cells, on the other hand, remained incomplete 10-11 years after irradiation. Several lymphocyte functions were also severely impaired. An association was found between prognosis and postirradiation mitogen reactivity of lymphocytes from these patients. Mortality up to eight years after irradiation was significantly higher in patients with low postirradiation phytohemagglutinin and PPD reactivity. The radiation induced decrease in mitogenic response seemed mainly to be caused by immunosuppressive monocytes, which suggests that the underlying mechanism might be mediated by increased production of prostaglandins by monocytes. For this reason we examined the effect of some cyclooxygenase products on different lymphocyte functions and found that prostaglandins A2, D2, and E2 inhibited phytohemagglutinin response in vitro. Natural killer cell activity was also reduced by prostaglandins D2 and E2. The next step was to examine various inhibitors of cyclooxygenase in respect to their capacity to revert irradiation-induced suppression of in vitro mitogen response in lymphocytes from breast cancer patients. It was demonstrated that Diclofenac Na (Voltaren), Meclofenamic acid, Indomethacin, and lysin-mono-acetylsalicylate (Aspisol) could enhance mitogen responses both before and after radiation therapy. This effect was most pronounced at completion of irradiation. On a molar basis, Diclofenac Na was most effective followed by Indomethacin, Meclofenamic acid, and lysin-monoacetylsalicylate.

  19. Effects of diets containing grape seed, linseed, or both on milk production traits, liver and kidney activities, and immunity of lactating dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Nudda, A; Correddu, F; Marzano, A; Battacone, G; Nicolussi, P; Bonelli, P; Pulina, G

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the dietary inclusion of grape seed, alone or in combination with linseed, on milk production traits, immune response, and liver and kidney metabolic activity of lactating ewes. Twenty-four Sarda dairy ewes were randomly assigned to 4 dietary treatments consisting of a control diet (CON), a diet containing 300 g/d per head of grape seed (GS), a diet containing 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (LIN), and a diet containing a mix of 300 g/d per head of grape seed and 220 g/d per head of extruded linseed (MIX). The study lasted 10 wk, with 2 wk of adaptation period and 8 wk of experimental period. Milk yield was measured and samples were collected weekly and analyzed for fat, protein, casein, lactose, pH, milk urea nitrogen, and somatic cell count. Blood samples were collected every 2 wk by jugular vein puncture and analyzed for hematological parameters, for albumin, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, creatinine, gamma glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, protein, blood urea nitrogen, and for anti-albumin IgG, IL-6, and lymphocyte T-helper (CD4(+)) and lymphocyte T-cytotoxic (CD8(+)) cells. On d 0, 45, and 60 of the trial, lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin was determined in vivo on each animal by measuring skin-fold thickness (SFT) at the site of phytohemagglutinin injection. Humoral response to chicken egg albumin was stimulated by a subcutaneous injection with albumin. Dietary treatments did not affect milk yield and composition. Milk urea nitrogen and lactose were affected by diet × period. Diets did not influence hematological, kidney, and liver parameters, except for blood urea nitrogen, which decreased in LIN and increased in MIX compared with CON and GS. Dietary treatments did not alter CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD4(+)-to-CD8(+) ratio. The SFT was reduced in GS and MIX and increased in LIN compared with CON. The IgG and IL-6 were affected by diet × period. The reduction in Ig

  20. Nebulized fluticasone propionate, a viable alternative to systemic route in the management of childhood moderate asthma attack: A double-blind, double-dummy study.

    PubMed

    Demirca, Beyza Poplata; Cagan, Hasret; Kiykim, Ayca; Arig, Ulku; Arpa, Medeni; Tulunay, Aysin; Ozen, Ahmet; Karakoc-Aydiner, Elif; Baris, Safa; Barlan, I B

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we compared the clinical and immunological efficacy of nebulized corticosteroid (CS) to systemic route during treatment of moderate asthma attack in children. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, prospective study, 81 children aged 12 months to 16 years experiencing asthma attack randomized into two treatment groups to receive, either; nebulized fluticasone propionate (n = 39, 2000 mcg/day) or oral methylprednisolone (n = 41, 1 mg/kg/day). Pulmonary index scores (PIS) were assessed at admission and at 1st, 4th, 8th, 12th, 24th, 48th hours, as well as, on day 7 and peak expiratory flow (PEF) at baseline and at the 7th day. Daily symptom and medication scores were recorded for all subjects. Immunological studies included phytohemagglutinin induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells culture supernatant for cytokine responses and CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) T regulatory cell (T reg) percentage at baseline and day 7. The changes in PIS and PEF were similar in both treatment groups, with a significant improvement in both values at the 7th day, when compared to baseline. In both groups, significant reductions in symptom and medication scores were observed during the treatment period with no significant difference between the groups. At day 7 of intervention, phytohemagglutinin induced IL-4 level was significantly decreased only in the nebulized group compared to baseline (p = 0.01). Evaluation of cytokine responses by means of fold increase (stimulated (S)/unstimulated (US) ratio) revealed a significant reduction in IL-4, IL-5 and IL-17 only in nebulized group (p = 0.01, 0.01, 0.02; respectively). The fold increase value of IL-5 was significantly lower at 7th day in nebulized group when compared to systemic one (p = 0.02). At 7th day, although in both treatment groups the percentage of T reg cells was suppressed, it remained significantly higher in the nebule one when compared to systemic route (p = 0.04). In the management of

  1. Leishmania donovani: assessment of leishmanicidal effects of herbal extracts obtained from plants in the visceral leishmaniasis endemic area of Bihar, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shubhankar K; Bimal, Sanjiva; Narayan, Shyam; Jee, Chandrawati; Bimal, Devla; Das, P; Bimal, Raageeva

    2011-02-01

    One obstacle faced in the effective control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the limited number of available treatment options. Furthermore, control efforts have been hindered further by the emergence of Leishmania resistance to many of the available drugs. In this study, we investigated the anti-leishmanial properties of 30 medicinally important plants from the VL endemic area of Bihar, India and compared them to two available anti-leishmanial drugs (sodium antimony gluconate and amphotericin B) and two plant lectins (phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A) on Leishmania donovani promastigotes in vitro at 24 and 48 h after initiation of culture. We identified eight plant extracts in addition to phytohemagglutinin and amphotericin B that significantly inhibited the growth of promastigotes (p < 0.03). We further studied the minimum effective concentrations as well as the effect on axenic amastigotes viability and the cell cytotoxicity on human peripheral blood of four (Agave americana, Azadirachta indica, Eclipta alba and Piper longum) of the eight plant extracts that induced significant promastigotes killing (p = 0.00098). Effect-based dose finding analysis revealed that the threshold concentration of A. americana required to eliminate L. donovani after 24h was 0.05 mg/ml. A. indica and P. longum plant extracts eliminated L. donovani promastigotes after 48 h at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5mg/ml, respectively. E. alba eliminated the promastigotes at a concentration of 0.5mg/ml within 24h. The axenic amastigote killing response was 1.90-, 2.52- and 1.3-fold higher than the promastigote killing response with A. indica, A. americana and E. alba plant extracts, respectively. A. americana and A. indica, respectively, led to approximate 2.5- and 1.3-fold declines in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity compared with control. E. alba stimulation resulted in an up-regulation of dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.00329). The CSA from P. longum was found to be least cytotoxic

  2. Supplementing milk replacer with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil on immunocompetence and health of Jersey calves.

    PubMed

    Ballou, M A; DePeters, E J

    2008-09-01

    Fifty-one Jersey bull calves (5 +/- 1 d old) were assigned to 1 of 3 milk replacers to determine the effects of increasing doses of n-3 fatty acids from fish oil on immunocompetence and health. All calves were fed a 22.5% crude protein and 18% lipid industry standard milk replacer supplemented with an additional 2% fatty acids. The 3 treatments differed only in the supplemental lipid source and included a 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils; a 1:1 blend of fish oil and the 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils; and fish oil only. All treatments were supplemented with 150 mg of vitamin E/kg of milk replacer. Body weight, height at withers, and length between withers and pins were measured weekly. Fecal and respiratory scores were recorded multiple times daily, and peripheral blood samples were collected on d 0, 7, 14, 21, and 42 for hematologic and metabolic analyses. Immunocompetence of calves was evaluated in vitro by the ability of neutrophils and monocytes to phagocytose Escherichia coli and produce an oxidative burst and in vivo as the change in ear thickness after an intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin-P, and the primary and secondary humoral responses to ovalbumin. Production and health parameters were unaffected by treatments. There were no significant treatment or treatment x time effects on phagocytosis; however, there was a significant quadratic response for the percentage of neutrophils producing an oxidative burst. Fish oil did not affect the change in ear thickness in response to phytohemagglutinin-P. There was also no treatment effect on the primary IgG humoral response to ovalbumin, but there was a significant quadratic treatment effect on the secondary IgG response. Adding fish oil to milk replacer altered various immune responses, and the effect was dose-dependent; however, neither production performance nor indices of health were altered when fish oil replaced 5 to 10% of the fatty acids in milk replacer.

  3. Human B cell activating factor (BCAF): production by a human T cell tumor line.

    PubMed

    Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Mollier, P; Abadie, A; Olive, D; Mawas, C; Theze, J

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that supernatants from human T cell clones stimulated by a pair of anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies cause resting human B cells to become activated and to proliferate in the absence of any other signals. The activity responsible for these effects was shown to be different from already characterized lymphokines and in particular from IL-2 and IL-4, and was named B Cell Activating Factor or BCAF. In this paper, we describe the production of BCAF by a human T cell tumor line T687 after phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation; this production can be potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We further show that the stimulatory phase can be separated from the secretory phase thereby avoiding contamination of BCAF-containing supernatant by PMA and PHA. Supernatants produced under these conditions do not contain either IL-4 or IFN but contain traces of lymphotoxin and 2 to 10 ng/ml of IL-2. The T687 cell line will allow us to obtain a large volume of supernatant for biochemical study and purification of the molecule(s) responsible for BCAF activity.

  4. An eco-friendly enantioselective access to (R)-naringenin as inhibitor of proinflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Gaggeri, Raffaella; Rossi, Daniela; Daglia, Maria; Leoni, Flavio; Avanzini, Maria Antonia; Mantelli, Melissa; Juza, Markus; Collina, Simona

    2013-08-01

    (RS)-Naringenin is a flavanone well-known for its beneficial health-related properties, such as its anti-inflammatory activity. The preparative enantioselective chromatographic resolution of commercial (RS)-naringenin was performed on a Chiralpak AD-H column (500×50 mm i.d., dp 20 μm) using MeOH as eluent. The developed method is in accordance with the principles of green chemistry, since the environmental impact was lowered by recycling of the eluent, and allowed the production of gram amounts of each enantiomer with high purity (chemical purity >99%, enantiomeric excess (ee) >94%). Racemic and enantiomeric naringenin were subjected to an exhaustive in vitro investigation of anti-inflammatory activity, aimed at evaluating the relevance of chirality. The assay with cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) activated by phytohemagglutinin A revealed that (R)-naringenin was more effective in inhibiting T-cell proliferation than the (S)-enantiomer and the racemate. Moreover, (R)-naringenin significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels such as those of TNF-α and, with less potency, IL-6. These results evidenced the anti-inflammatory potential of naringenin and the higher capacity of (R)-naringenin to inhibit both in vitro hPBMC proliferation and cytokine secretion at non toxic doses. Thus, (R)-naringenin is a promising candidate for in vivo investigation. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  5. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome is associated with high levels of serum IgG4: a clinical manifestation that mimics IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Ryo; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Suga, Norihiro; Kitagawa, Wataru; Miura, Naoto; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Yokoi, Toyoharu; Banno, Syogo; Imai, Hirokazu

    2011-01-01

    A 58-year-old Japanese woman presented with recurrent abdominal pain, chronic urticaria, and petechiae on her extremities, and hypocomplementemia, findings that were consistent with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS). A laboratory examination revealed that she had markedly elevated IgG levels (4,448 mg/dL; normal range, 870-1,700 mg/dL) with particularly high IgG4 levels (1,050 mg/dL; normal range, 48-105 mg/dL) and a high IgG4/total IgG ratio (0.22; normal range, 0.02-0.05). A skin biopsy demonstrated leukocytoclastic vasculitis with IgG4 deposition in the vascular lumen and vascular walls. A lymph node biopsy revealed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia with numerous IgG4-positive cells in the perifollicular area, but no sclerotic findings. A chromosomal analysis of an enlarged lymph node, without phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, demonstrated that one in every three analyzed cells had abnormalities, such as 44, XX, -13, add(15)(p11), -17, -17, and mar.

  6. Interaction of Choriocarcinoma Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    August, Charles S.; Cox, Sheila T.; Naughton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured choriocarcinoma (Be Wo) cells exist that share many of the morphologic and bio-synthetic properties of normal human trophoblasts. In an attempt to develop a model for the immunologic relationship between a sensitized mother and fetus, we mixed Be Wo cells with mitogen-activated cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro. Be Wo cells were resistant to the cytolytic effects of the activated lymphocytes despite 24-h exposure and intimate cell-to-cell contact as determined by microscopy. Control target cells, a line of human hepatoma cells, were readily destroyed. Cytotoxicity was measured by determining residual radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled target cells after exposure to activated lymphocytes. Employing the quantitative assay, we confirmed the morphologic results and showed that Be Wo and a number of other choriocarcinoma cell lines were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Moreover, Be Wo cells were resistant to injury over a wide range of killer to target cell ratios. Significant killing of the Be Wo cells occurred only after prolonged exposure (48 and 72 h) to the activated lymphocytes. We suggest that one mechanism that may assist the fetus (or a choriocarcinoma) in its immunologic survival is the intrinsic resistance of trophoblast cells to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Images PMID:570981

  7. [The human spleen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Jakubovský, J; Zaviacic, M; Schnorrer, M; Geryk, B

    1994-11-01

    Idiopathic (autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, AITP) represents a relatively frequent impairment. It involves a syndrome of various diseases with a shortened thrombocytes survival caused by anti-platelet antibodies. The majority of cases are of secondary character. Spleenectomy often evokes a complete remission of thrombocytopenia. The study describes morphologic findings in spleens of 30 patients with the clinical diagnosis of ITP/AITP. The findings were gained by light microscopy from formol-paraffin blocks and histochemical findings from cryostat sections of non-fixed tissue. The alcaline and acidic phosphatases, nonspecific esterase, chloracetate esterase, and dipeptydilpeptidase IV were investigated enzymohistochemically. Immunoglobulins were examined immunohistochemically and T lymphocytes by means of monoclonal antibodies. The affinity HPA--Helix pomatia agglutinin, PHA--phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris, SBA--soy-bean agglutinin from Glycine max. and PSA--peas bean agglutinin from Pisum sativum were investigated by means of specific antilectin antibodies. The human spleen during idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura accumulates neutrophilic polymorphonuclear granulocytes; platelets-stagnate and are destroyed. These processes can be identified in histologic sections e.g. also by means of anti-fibrinogen antibodies. The red pulp contains foam cells to various extent. Besides generally known processes, the white pulp also displays alterations in composition of cellular compartment of the periarterial lymphatic sheaths. Human spleen distinguishes modified blood platelets as alien corpuscles, and thus eliminates them from the blood circulation system by its immunologic and other mechanisms, the details of which still remain to be clarified. (Fig. 6, Ref. 44.)

  8. Extraction and purification of a lectin from red kidney bean and preliminary immune function studies of the lectin and four Chinese herbal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4-6, back extraction at pH 9-11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4-6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity.

  9. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Novogrodsky, A; Ravid, A; Rubin, A L; Stenzel, K H

    1982-01-01

    Agents that are known to be scavengers of hydroxyl radicals inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to a greater extent than they inhibit mitogenesis induced by concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. These agents include dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoate, thiourea, dimethylurea, tetramethylurea, L-tryptophan, mannitol, and several other alcohols. Their inhibitory effect is not associated with cytotoxicity. The hydroxyl radical scavengers do not inhibit PMA-dependent amino acid transport in T cells or PMA-induced superoxide production by monocytes. Thus, they do not inhibit the primary interaction of PMA with responding cells. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PMA increased cellular guanylate cyclase in most experiments, and dimethyl sulfoxide tended to inhibit this increase. In addition to inhibition of PMA-induced mitogenesis, hydroxyl radical scavengers markedly inhibited the activity of lymphocyte activating factor (interleukin 1). The differential inhibition of lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by different mitogens appears to be related to the differential macrophage requirements of the mitogens. The data suggest that hydroxyl radicals may be involved in mediating the triggering signal for lymphocyte activation. Some of the hydroxyl radical scavengers are inducers of cellular differentiation,. nd it is possible that their differentiating activity is related to their ability to scavenge free radicals. PMID:6122209

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men referred to iran blood transfusion organization research center.

    PubMed

    Frouzandeh, Mahjoubi; Saeideh, Soleimani; Sanaz, Mantegy

    2010-10-01

    The prevalence of somatic chromosomal abnormalities in infertile male individuals has been reported to vary in different literatures. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations among infertile men referred to the Cytogenetic Laboratory of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Centre (IBTO). Chromosomal analysis was performed on phytohemag-glutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocyte cultures of 1052 infertile men using standard cytogenetic methods. The study took place during 1997 to 2007. Total chromosome alterations were revealed in 161 (15.30%) infertile men. The most prevalent chromosomal abnormality in the infertile men was 47, XXY, that was seen in 94 (58.38%) men while one of them had a mosaic karyotype: mos 47, XX[54]/47,XXY[18]/46,XY[9]. In 37 (22.98%) cases, structural aberrations were detected. There were 30 (18.63%) cases of sex reversal. Cytogenetic studies of these patients showed increased chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men in comparison with that of the normal population, justifying the need for cytogenetic analysis of men with idiopathic infertility.

  11. Long-term cytogenetic effects of antineoplastic treatment in relation to secondary leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Genuardi, M.; Zollino, M.; Serra, A.; Leone, G.; Mancini, R.; Mango, G.; Neri, G.

    1988-07-15

    Chromosome translocations are consistently present in leukemias and lymphomas and are likely to represent primary events in the development of these neoplasias. A study of conditions that predispose to leukemia could shed some light on the origin of these translocations and therefore help in clarifying their exact role in the process of neoplastic transformation. Based on this assumption, we studied a group of individuals treated with radiochemotherapy for previous lymphoma and who were at increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia. The group comprised 14 Hodgkin's disease patients, 11 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, and 13 controls. The patients were in remission and had been off therapy for at least 6 months. Chromosomes were studied from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocytes and from bone marrow cells by the direct method and after short-term cultures (72 hours). The latter were also exposed to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Metaphases were scored for chromosome breaks, gaps, and other rearrangements. The percentage of gaps and breaks was significantly higher in patients than in controls. The difference was induced by BrdU and was apparent in bone marrow cells, but not in peripheral lymphocytes. We conclude that individuals exposed to the action of mutagenic agents (radiochemotherapy) have an increased chromosome instability that could be related to their increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia.

  12. Exercise-induced modulation of histone H4 acetylation status and cytokines levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lavratti, Caroline; Dorneles, Gilson; Pochmann, Daniela; Peres, Alessandra; Bard, Andréia; de Lima Schipper, Lucas; Dal Lago, Pedro; Wagner, Luciane Carniel; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the short and long-term effects of a concurrent exercise protocol on global histone H4 acetylation levels and inflammatory markers (interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and cortisol) in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and in peripheral blood of patients with schizophrenia (SZ), as well the intervention impact on anthropometric characteristics. Seventeen individuals were submitted to the intervention three times a week and blood samples were collected pre, 30, 60 and 90days after the intervention started. A remarkable reduction on body mass index and body mass were observed following intervention. The protocol also induced a histone H4 hypoacetylation status in PBMC all times evaluated when compared to the pre intervention period. Although the IL-4 and cortisol levels were not altered in response to the intervention, a reduction in IL-6 production during the 60 and 90days compared to the pre intervention period was observed. Finally, diminished IFN-γ production was found in the 90days period compared to the pre intervention and 30days after periods. In addition, systemic IL-6 levels were lower at 60 and 90days compared to the pre intervention. The concurrent exercise protocol was able to improve anthropometric characteristics in patients with SZ, engaging the modulation of cytokine and histone H4 acetylation levels.

  13. Effects of metronidazole and its metabolites on histamine immunosuppression activity.

    PubMed

    Elizondo, G; Ostrosky-Wegman, P

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported that metronidazole treatment increases human lymphocyte proliferation showing individual differences. This drug and its metabolites are imidazole compounds like histamine and cimetidine. The first is an endogenous amine that inhibits T-helper lymphocyte proliferation, and the second is a histamine antagonist. We presently report the in vitro effects of histamine, cimetidine, imidazole, metronidazole and its two principal metabolites (the acetic acid and hydroxy forms), on the mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Histamine decreased lymphocyte proliferation while (in order of potency) cimetidine, the hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole, imidazole and metronidazole, increased the mitogenic response to PHA in a dose-response fashion. The acetic acid metabolite lacked immunomodulatory effects. Competitive studies showed that cimetidine, metronidazole, and the hydroxy metabolite blocked the inhibitory effect of histamine on lymphocyte proliferation in a dose-related manner. This blockage was non-competitive, suggesting that the target of the imidazole compounds was not the active site of the H2 receptor.

  14. Comparison of antigen assay and reverse transcriptase assay for detecting human immunodeficiency virus in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Feorino, P; Forrester, B; Schable, C; Warfield, D; Schochetman, G

    1987-01-01

    We compared an antigen capture assay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) with a reverse transcriptase assay to identify and quantify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in culture. In direct comparisons of serial dilutions of lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1, the antigen assay was 100-fold more sensitive than the reverse transcriptase assay in detecting the virus. The antigen assay reacted strongly with 60 different HIV isolates but did not cross-react with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus type 5, or poliovirus type 1 or with extracts from four different control human cell lines and eight different phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from 50 individuals were evaluated by both the antigen assay and the reverse transcriptase assay. The cells from the 34 seropositive individuals were all positive by the antigen assay (range, 3 to 9 days; average time, 5.9 days) and the reverse transcriptase assay (range, 7 to 16 days; average time, 9.6 days). Cells from the 16 seronegative individuals were negative by both assays. These results indicate that the antigen assay is an important addition to the monitoring of HIV production in the lymphocytes of infected patients. PMID:2448334

  15. Effective delivery of immunosuppressive drug molecules by silica coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jangsun; Lee, Eunwon; Kim, Jieun; Seo, Youngmin; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Gilad, Assaf A; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, molecular imaging, and cellular imaging. Various surface modifications have been applied to the particles to stabilize their surface and to give them a moiety for anchoring tags and/or drug molecules. Conventional methods of delivering immunosuppressant drugs often require a high dose of drugs to ensure therapeutic effects, but this can lead to toxic side effects. In this study, we used silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IOSs) for a drug delivery application in which the nanoparticles carry the minimum amount of drug required to be effective to the target cells. IOSs could be loaded with water-insoluble immunosuppressive drug molecules (MPA: mycophenolic acid) and be used as a contrast agent for MRI. We characterized the IOSs for their physicochemical properties and found their average hydrodynamic diameter and core size to be 40.5nm and 5nm, respectively. Following the introduction of MPA-loaded IOSs (IOS/M), we evaluated the secretion dynamics of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The results showed that IOS/M effectively inhibited the secretion of the cytokines interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α, with a minimal concentration of MPA. In conclusion, IOS/M may have potential applications in both efficient drug delivery and MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative analysis of peripheral blood Th0, Th1, Th2 and the Th1:Th2 cell ratio during normal human pregnancy and preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Saito, S; Sakai, M; Sasaki, Y; Tanebe, K; Tsuda, H; Michimata, T

    1999-01-01

    We calculated the percentage of Th1, Th2, Th0 cells and the Th1:Th2 cell ratio of peripheral blood from normal pregnant subjects and preeclampsia patients using flow cytometry which can analyse both the surface marker, CD4, and intracellular cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ. In normal pregnancy, the percentage of Th1 cells was significantly lower in the third trimester, and the ratios of Th1:Th2 were significantly lower in the second and third trimester than in nonpregnant subjects. In contrast, the percentage of Th1 cells and the ratios of Th1:Th2 in preeclampsia were significantly higher than in normal third trimester pregnant subjects. The percentage of Th2 cells in preeclampsia was significantly lower than in third trimester of normal pregnancy. Additionally, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these subjects and patients were cultured with phytohemagglutinin stimulation, and IL-4 and IFN-γ concentrations were determined in the supernatant by enzymed linked immunosorbent assays. The percentage of Th1 and Th2, and the ratios of Th1:Th2 were correlated with cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion level. These results demonstrated that Th2 cells were predominant in the second and third trimesters of normal pregnancy, but Th1 cells predominated in preeclamptic patients. PMID:10469061

  17. Immunomodulation and disease resistance in postyearling rainbow trout infected with Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Ottinger, C.A.; Blazer, V.S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Smith, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Myxobolus cerebralis, the myxosporean parasite that causes whirling disease, has a number of deleterious effects on its salmonid host. Although it is well established that juvenile salmonids in the active stages of whirling disease mount an immune response to the pathogen, the occurrence and longevity of any related immunomodulatory effects are unknown. In this study, postyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss infected with M. cerebralis were examined for leukocyte functions and for resistance to Yersinia ruckeri, a bacterial pathogen of salmonids. Compared with uninfected controls, M. cerebralis-infected fish showed lower proliferative lymphocyte responses to four mitogens (concanavalin A, pokeweed mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and lipopolysaccharide). Conversely, M. cerebralis-infected fish displayed greater bactericidal activity of anterior kidney macrophages than did uninfected fish. After bath challenges with K. ruckeri, M. cerebralis-infected fish had slightly lower survival and a more rapid onset of mortality than did the control fish. Renal tissue and fecal samples from M. cerebralis-infected and uninfected survivors were cultured for the presence of K. ruckeri, and no difference in prevalence was noted between the two groups. Because immunomodulatory changes in the M. cerebralis-infected fish involved functional enhancement and suppression of different leukocyte populations, disease resistance among M. cerebralis-infected fish in the later stages of whirling disease will probably vary with the secondary pathogen and the nature of immune response the pathogen evokes.

  18. Two immunosuppressive compounds from the mushroom Rubinoboletus ballouii using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by bioactivity-guided fractionation.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Fei; Chan, Ben Chung-Lap; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Han, Quan-Bin; Leung, Ping-Chung; Liu, Ji-Kai; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2013-10-15

    Rubinoboletus ballouii is an edible mushroom wildly grown in Yunnan province, China. Up till now, little was known about the chemical and biological properties of this mushroom. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of the ethanolic extract of Rubinoboletus ballouii and its fractions on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude extract of the fruiting bodies of RB was fractionated by high-speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC). Twelve fractions were obtained and the third fraction (Fraction C) exerted the most potent anti-inflammatory activities in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Further fractionation of fraction C led to the isolation of two single compounds which were elucidated as 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin, respectively. The results showed that both 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin exhibited significant immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs by inhibiting [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine uptake and inflammatory cytokines productions such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-1β. Besides, 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one was firstly found in natural resources, and pistillarin was also isolated from the family Boletaceae for the first time. They exhibited great potential in developing as anti-inflammatory reagents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  20. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  1. Mitogen induced proliferative responses of lymphocytes from spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated environments

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, M.; Marzouk, M.S.; Smith, C.L.; Huggett, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The marine fish spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, was collected from five sites in the lower Chesapeake Bay system representing a gradient of sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations. The proliferative responses to mitogens by anterior kidney lymphocytes were assessed using (3H)-thymidine uptake by replicating DNA. The data show two different mitogen-dependent lymphocytic responses as the sediment PAH levels increase at the sampling sites; a suppression of the response to the T cell mitogens, concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin, and a sharp augmentation of the response to B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as well as to poke weed mitogen and peanut agglutinin. The magnitude of the lymphoproliferative responses correlated strongly with the total sediment PAH concentrations (r2 greater than 0.8). A similar correlation was also observed with 15 selected individual PAH compounds regardless of their molecular weights. By maintaining the fish in clean York River water for up to 24 weeks, it was possible to reverse the augmented proliferative responses to LPS of fish from all sampling sites and to increase the reduced responses to Con A, in fish from three sites, and partially in two sites where sediments were highly contaminated with PAH. These results suggest that the proliferative responses of fish lymphocytes to mitogens may be a potentially sensitive biomarker of exposure to, and effects of xenobiotics.

  2. 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    De La Fuente, M; Borrajo, A; Bermúdez, J; Lores, M; Alonso, J; López, M; Santalla, M; De Ron, A M; Zapata, C; Alvarez, G

    2011-02-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for direct human consumption. Proteomic studies in legumes have increased significantly in the last years but few studies have been performed to date in P. vulgaris. We report here a proteomic analysis of bean seeds by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Three different protein extraction methods (TCA-acetone, phenol and the commercial clean-up kit) were used taking into account that the extractome can have a determinant impact on the level of quality of downstream protein separation and identification. To demonstrate the quality of the 2-DE analysis, a selection of 50 gel spots was used in protein identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF). The results showed that a considerable proportion of spots (70%) were identified in spite of incomplete genome/protein databases for bean and other legume species. Most identified proteins corresponded to storage protein, carbohydrate metabolism, defense and stress response, including proteins highly abundant in the seed of P. vulgaris such as the phaseolin, the phytohemagglutinin and the lectin-related α-amylase inhibitor.

  3. Humoral and cellular immunity in chromium picolinate-supplemented lambs.

    PubMed

    Dallago, B S L; McManus, C M; Caldeira, D F; Campeche, A; Burtet, R T; Paim, T P; Gomes, E F; Branquinho, R P; Braz, S V; Louvandini, H

    2013-08-01

    The effects of oral supplementation of chromium picolinate (CrPic) on humoral and cellular immunity in sheep were investigated. Twenty-four male lambs divided into four treatments and received different dosages of CrPic: placebo (0), 0.250, 0.375, and 0.500 mg of chromium/animal/day during 84 days. The base ration was Panicum maximum cv Massai hay and concentrate. Blood samples were collected fortnightly for total and differential leukocyte counts. On days 28 and 56, the lambs were challenged with chicken ovalbumin I.M. Serum samples were collected on days 46 and 74 and subjected to an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure IgG anti-ovalbumin. The cell-mediated immune response was determined by a delay-type hypersensitivity test using phytohemagglutinin. CrPic did not significantly affect humoral immunity in lambs but there was a negative effect on cellular immunity (P < 0.05) as Cr supplementation increased. Therefore, the level of Cr supplementation for lambs must be better studied to address its effect on stressed animals or the possible toxic effects of Cr on the animal itself or its immune system.

  4. Association between lymphocyte proliferation and polychlorinated biphenyls in free-ranging harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups from British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Levin, Milton; De Guise, Sylvain; Ross, Peter S

    2005-05-01

    Recent pinniped die-offs have led to the speculation that persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are immunomodulatory, making individuals more susceptible to viral infections. Eighteen healthy harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups (aged 3-4 weeks) were live-captured from southern British Columbia, Canada, and maintained temporarily in captivity for an immunotoxicological assessment. The relationships between mitogen-induced peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation and blubber concentrations of three major immunotoxic POP classes (the polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins [PCDDs], and the polychlorinated dibenzofurans [PCDFs]) were evaluated. A significant body weight-independent positive correlation was observed between both T-cell mitogen (phytohemagglutinin [PHA])- and B-cell mitogen (lipopolysaccharide [LPS])-induced lymphocyte proliferation and the blubber concentrations of total PCB. Best subset regression analysis revealed that total PCBs, and not total PCDD or total PCDF, explained 24 and 29% of the changes in both T-cell mitogen-and B-cell mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, respectively. Further regression analysis performed on the PCB classes measured in this study showed that di-ortho PCBs accounted for 25 and 30% of the changes in both T-cell and B-cell lymphocyte proliferation, respectively. Results suggest that POPs, and PCBs in particular, are associated with changes in lymphocyte proliferation, something that could result in increased susceptibility to infections in harbor seal pups. Further research is needed to evaluate the relative roles of natural and contaminant-related influences on the immune system of marine mammals.

  5. Constitutive heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and Duffy blood group alleles in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Kosower, N.S.; Gerad, L.; Goldstein, M.; Parasol, N.

    1995-04-24

    Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in unrelated schizophrenic patients, unrelated controls and patients and family members in multiplex families. The size-distribution of chromosome 1 heterochromatic region (1qH, C-band variants) among 21 unrelated schizophrenic patients was different from that found in a group of 46 controls. The patient group had 1qH variants of smaller size than the control group (P < 0.01). Incubation of phytohemagglutinin-treated blood lymphocytes with 5-azacytidine (which causes decondensation and extension of the heterochromatin) led to a lesser degree of heterochromatin decondensation in a group of patients than in the controls (7 schizophrenic, 9 controls, P < 0.01). The distribution of phenotypes of Duffy blood group system (whose locus is linked to the 1qH region) among 28 schizophrenic patients was also different from that in the general population. Cosegregation of schizophrenia with a 1qH (C-band) variant and Duffy blood group allele was observed in one of six multiplex families. The overall results suggest that alterations within the Duffy/1qH region are involved in schizophrenia in some cases. This region contains the locus of D5 dopamine receptor pseudogene 2 (1q21.1), which is transcribed in normal lymphocytes. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status and immune response in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Henry-Christian, J.R.; Johnson, A.A.; Walters, C.S.; Greene, E.J.; Lindsey, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The relationships of iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc status to cell-mediated immune response were investigated among 125 healthy, elderly persons (60-87 years of age). Plasma ferritin, plasma and red cell folate, and plasma vitamin B/sub 12/ levels were assayed immuno-radiometrically. Plasma and hair zinc levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Immune response was determined by transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (con A), and in mixed lymphocyte reaction. Deficiencies of iron, folacin vitamin B/sub 12/ and zinc were each associated (independently) with significantly lower lymphocyte responses to PHA and con A, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (P < 0.01). These findings indicate a depression of cell-mediated immunity in elderly persons deficient in iron, folacin, vitamin B/sub 12/ or zinc. Further, they suggest that deficiencies of these nutrients may play a role in the depression of cell-mediated immunity with age, which in turn may lead to increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and cancer in the elderly.

  7. Micronucleus monitoring to assess human occupational exposure to organochlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Silva Augusto, L.G. da

    1997-10-01

    Health surveillance for hazardous situations due to chemical exposure, in particular those which are carcinogenic, requires sensitive monitoring tests. Although experimental studies have shown the geno-toxic and carcinogenic effect of several organochlorides, the lack of epidemiologic studies prevents their classification as carcinogenic to human beings. In this context, genotoxicity tests of short duration in human cells gain importance. The relation between the clastogenic effects (chromosome breaks) and cancer induction is already known to the scientific literature. The micronucleus test has been proposed as a good indicator of clastogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated, by means of the micronucleus test, 41 workers of a chemical industry in the state of Sao Paulo, southeast region of Brazil, who had been exposed to a mixture of chlorinated solvents (carbon tetrachloride, perchloroethylene, and hexachlorobenzene) and 28 workers who had not been exposed. Peripheral lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin and with cytokinesis blocked by cytochalasin B were used. The results showed that the exposed workers presented a statistically significant higher frequency of micronuclei than the group which had not been exposed. 19 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. The effect of cocoa procyanidins on the transcription and secretion of interleukin 1 beta in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, T K; Powell, J; Van de Water, J; Keen, C L; Schmitz, H H; Hammerstone, J F; Gershwin, M E

    2000-03-03

    Recent data has demonstrated that cacao liquor polyphenols (procyanidins) have antioxidant activity, inhibit mRNA expression of interleukin-2 and are potent inhibitors of acute inflammation. Given the widespread ingestion of cocoa in many cultures, we investigated whether cocoa, in its isolated procyanidin fractions (monomer through decamer), would modulate synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 beta. Both resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were investigated at the levels of transcription and protein secretion. Individual cocoa fractions were shown to augment constitutive IL-1 beta gene expression, although values varied between subjects. Interestingly, the smaller fractions of cocoa (monomer-tetramer) consistently reduced IL-1 beta expression of PHA-stimulated cells by 1-15%, while the larger oligomers (pentamer-decamer) increased expression by 4-52%. These data, observed at the transcription level, were reflected in protein levels in PHA-induced PBMC. The presence or absence of PHA did not alter the effects of the cocoa procyanidins with the exception of the pentamer. This study offers additional data for the consideration of the health-benefits of dietary polyphenols from a wide variety of foods, including those benefits associated specifically with cocoa and chocolate consumption.

  9. Evolutionary analysis of the APA genes in the Phaseolus genus: wild and cultivated bean species as sources of lectin-related resistance factors?

    PubMed

    Lioi, L; Galasso, I; Lanave, C; Daminati, M G; Bollini, R; Sparvoli, F

    2007-11-01

    The APA (Arcelin/Phytohemagglutinin/alpha-Amylase inhibitor) gene family is composed of various members, present in Phaseolus species and coding for lectin and lectin-related seed proteins having the double role of storage and defense proteins. Here members of the APA family have been identified by immunological, functional, and molecular analyses and representative genes were sequenced in nine wild species of Phaseolus. All taxa possessed at least one member of the true lectin gene. No arcelin type sequences have been isolated from the species examined. Among the wild species studied, only P. costaricensis contained an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha-AI). In addition P. augusti, P. maculatus, P. microcarpus, and P. oligospermus showed the presence of the lectin-related alpha-amylase inhibitor-like (AIL) genes and alpha-AI activity. Data from Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of only one lectin gene in P. parvulus and P. filiformis, while an extensive gene duplication of the APA locus was found in the other Phaseolus species. Phylogenetic analysis carried out on the nucleotide sequences showed the existence of two main clusters and clearly indicated that lectin-related genes originated from a paralogous duplication event preceding the development of the ancestor to the Phaseolus genus. The finding of detectable alpha-AI activity in species containing AIL genes suggests that exploiting APA genes variability in the Phaseolus genus may represent a valuable tool to find new members that may have acquired insecticidal activities.

  10. Identification of a Bioactive Compound against Adult T-cell Leukaemia from Bitter Gourd Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Akagi, Isao; Ino, Hisatoshi; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Okayama, Akihiko; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2013-01-01

    In our previous report, an 80% ethanol bitter gourd seed extract (BGSE) was found to suppress proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines. The present study aimed to identify the bioactive compounds from BGSE specific against ATL. From the result of an HPLC-MS analysis, α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA) was present in BGSE at 0.68% ± 0.0022% (±SD, n = 5). In the cell proliferation test, α-ESA potently suppressed proliferation of two ATL cell lines (ED and Su9T01; IC50 = 8.9 and 29.3 µM, respectively) more than several other octadecanoic acids. However, α-ESA moderately inhibited phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; IC50 = 31.0 µM). These results suggest that BGSE-derived α-ESA has potential as a functional food constituent because of its activity against ATL, particularly against ED cells. Moreover, α-ESA might be effective for the prevention of moderate adverse effects of ATL on normal T cells. PMID:27135489

  11. Identification of a Bioactive Compound against Adult T-cell Leukaemia from Bitter Gourd Seeds.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Akagi, Isao; Ino, Hisatoshi; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Okayama, Akihiko; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2013-12-27

    In our previous report, an 80% ethanol bitter gourd seed extract (BGSE) was found to suppress proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell lines. The present study aimed to identify the bioactive compounds from BGSE specific against ATL. From the result of an HPLC-MS analysis, α-eleostearic acid (α-ESA) was present in BGSE at 0.68% ± 0.0022% (±SD, n = 5). In the cell proliferation test, α-ESA potently suppressed proliferation of two ATL cell lines (ED and Su9T01; IC50 = 8.9 and 29.3 µM, respectively) more than several other octadecanoic acids. However, α-ESA moderately inhibited phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; IC50 = 31.0 µM). These results suggest that BGSE-derived α-ESA has potential as a functional food constituent because of its activity against ATL, particularly against ED cells. Moreover, α-ESA might be effective for the prevention of moderate adverse effects of ATL on normal T cells.

  12. Parenteral arginine infusion in humans: nutrient substrate or pharmacologic agent?

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Shou, J; Daly, J M

    1992-01-01

    When given as a dietary supplement, arginine enhances lymphocyte mitogenesis and improves nitrogen balance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate arginine's ability to mediate these same effects when given as the sole nitrogen source with minimum additional calories. Thirty patients were randomized to receive 20 g/day arginine hydrochloride or a mixed amino acid solution (Travasol) by intravenous infusion for 7 days after abdominal operations. Mean patient age, body weight, gender ratios, and preoperative degree of weight loss were similar between groups. Mean plasma arginine and ornithine levels rose to 228 +/- 50 mumol/L and 191 +/- 76 mumol/L in the arginine group during infusion. Mean nitrogen balance was -8.8 g/day and -9.2 g/day in the arginine and Travasol groups, respectively. Mean lymphocyte stimulation indices to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin fell on postoperative day 1 in both groups. No significant differences in patterns of lymphocyte mitogenesis changes were noted between groups. The mean total number of circulating T cells increased in the arginine group at postoperative day 7. Thus, parenteral arginine infusion in postoperative patients provided comparable nitrogen balance to a balanced amino acid solution but did not increase peripheral blood lymphocyte mitogenesis. When arginine is given parenterally as the sole nitrogen source with minimal additional calories to postoperative patients, no enhancement of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation could be demonstrated.

  13. Cytogenetic characterization of circulating malignant cells in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Thangavelu, M.; Yelavarthi, K.K.; Finn, W.G.

    1994-09-01

    Peripheral lymphocytes from 20 patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) were analyzed for clonal chromosomal abnormalities using phytohemagglutinin or a combination of IL-2 and IL-7 as mitogens. Clonal abnormalities were observed in 10 of 16 patients with circulating Sezary cells but in none of the 4 patients without circulating Sezary cells, suggesting a correlation between the presence of clonal abnormalities and circulating Sezary cells. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to correlate with poor prognosis (1 of 6 cases with a single abnormal clone and all 4 cases with complex abnormalities). Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 1 and 8 were observed in 6 cases. In 5 cases involving chromosome 1, loss of material involved the region between 1p33 and 1p36. In an additional case, a reciprocal translocation involving the short arm of chromosome 1 and 1p33 was observed. In 2 cases an apparently identical, balanced translocation involving chromosomes 8 and 17, t(8;17)(p21;q21), was observed. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 10 and 17 (5 cases) and chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9, 13, and 20 (3 cases) were also observed. Future studies of these chromosomes at the molecular level, particularly of the region between 1p33 and 1p36, may help in the identification of the genetic defects associated with malignant transformation in CTCL.

  14. Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8a: cloning, tissue distribution and immunobiological in splenic mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiurong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Yan, Xiaoling; Qi, Yulin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2013-10-25

    CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein, which plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity. Here, we identified Chinese goose CD8α (goCD8α) gene for the first time. The full-length cDNA of goCD8α is 1459bp in length and contains a 711bp open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the waterfowl CD8α formed a monophyletic group. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that transcripts of goCD8α mRNA were high in the immune-related organs and mucosal immune system in gosling, and high in thymus and spleen comparing to other immune-related tissues in goose. The obvious increase of CD8α expression was observed in spleen of acute new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV) infected bird, while the increase of CD8α were observed in the thymus, bursa of fabricius, and cecum of chronic infected bird. The CD8α mRNA transcription level in spleen mononuclear cells was significantly up-regulated when stimulated by phytohemagglutinin, but not by lipopolysaccharide in vitro. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of metal ions on cyprinid fish immune response: In vitro effects of Zn2/sup +/ and Mn/sup 2+/ on the mitogenic response of carp pronephros lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanmi, Z.; Rouabhia, M.; Othmane, O.; Deschaux, P.A.

    1989-04-01

    Lymphocytes from the pronephros of carp (Cyprinus carpio L) have been subjected to transformation by mitogens, concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), with Zn or Mn at varying concentrations. Addition of Zn/sup 2+/ (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) to mitogen-stimulated T and B cells enhanced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. Addition of 10(-5) M Zn/sup 2+/ inhibited the response to Con A, PHA, and LPS. At this concentration, Zn was toxic. Addition of Mn2+ (10(-7) to 10(-3) M) to mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes enhanced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. This effect was observed with Con A- and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, but not with LPS-stimulated lymphocytes. In contrast, addition of 10(-1) M Mn/sup 2+/ to lymphocyte cultures exerted an inhibitor on the response to Con A or to PHA, while the response to LPS was unaffected. Addition of 10(-1) M Mn/sup 2+/ to Con A- or PHA-stimulated cultures at different times after initiation of stimulation indicated that Mn/sup 2+/ was inhibitory only when it was added before the first 16 hr of cultures. The inhibition induced by 10(-1) M Mn2+ could be reversed by adding 2 mM CaCl/sub 2/ to the culture.

  16. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  17. Genetic and environmental components of phenotypic variation in immune response and body size of a colonial bird, Delichon urbica (the house martin).

    PubMed

    Christe, P; Moller, A P; Saino, N; De Lope, F

    2000-07-01

    Directional selection for parasite resistance is often intense in highly social host species. Using a partial cross-fostering experiment we studied environmental and genetic variation in immune response and morphology in a highly colonial bird species, the house martin (Delichon urbica). We manipulated intensity of infestation of house martin nests by the haematophagous parasitic house martin bug Oeciacus hirundinis either by spraying nests with a weak pesticide or by inoculating them with 50 bugs. Parasitism significantly affected tarsus length, T cell response, immunoglobulin and leucocyte concentrations. We found evidence of strong environmental effects on nestling body mass, body condition, wing length and tarsus length, and evidence of significant additive genetic variance for wing length and haematocrit. We found significant environmental variance, but no significant additive genetic variance in immune response parameters such as T cell response to the antigenic phytohemagglutinin, immunoglobulins, and relative and absolute numbers of leucocytes. Environmental variances were generally greater than additive genetic variances, and the low heritabilities of phenotypic traits were mainly a consequence of large environmental variances and small additive genetic variances. Hence, highly social bird species such as the house martin, which are subject to intense selection by parasites, have a limited scope for immediate microevolutionary response to selection because of low heritabilities, but also a limited scope for long-term response to selection because evolvability as indicated by small additive genetic coefficients of variation is weak.

  18. Reproductive state, but not testosterone, reduces immune function in male house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Greenman, Chris G; Martin, Lynn B; Hau, Michaela

    2005-01-01

    The immune system requires energetic and nutritional resources to optimally defend organisms against pathogens and parasites. Because resources are typically limited, immune function may require a trade-off with other physiologically demanding activities. Here, we examined whether photoperiodically induced seasonal states (breeding, molting, or nonbreeding) affected the cutaneous immune response of captive male house sparrows (Passer domesticus). To assess immune function in these birds, we injected the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) into the patagium and measured the resulting wing web swelling. Molting and nonbreeding birds had similar immune responses to PHA injection. However, males in a breeding state showed lower immune responses than both molting and nonbreeding birds even though they did not actually breed. We tested whether this decrease in the PHA swelling response in birds in a breeding state was due to elevated plasma concentrations of testosterone (T) by administering T to birds in a nonbreeding state. Contrary to some evidence in the literature, T did not suppress the response to PHA in house sparrows. Our data show that passerine birds show seasonal modulation in immune function, even in benign environmental conditions. However, even though T is often cited as a strong immunosuppressant, it is not fully responsible for this seasonal modulation.

  19. Responding to inflammatory challenges is less costly for a successful avian invader, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), than its less-invasive congener.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelly A; Martin, Lynn B; Wikelski, Martin C

    2005-09-01

    When introduced into new regions, invading organisms leave many native pathogens behind and also encounter evolutionarily novel disease threats. In the presence of predominantly novel pathogens that have not co-evolved to avoid inducing a strong host immune response, costly and potentially dangerous defenses such as the systemic inflammatory response could become more harmful than protective to the host. We therefore hypothesized that introduced populations exhibiting dampened inflammatory responses will tend to be more invasive. To provide initial data to assess this hypothesis, we measured metabolic, locomotor, and reproductive responses to inflammatory challenges in North American populations of the highly invasive house sparrow (Passer domesticus) and its less-invasive relative, the tree sparrow (Passer montanus). In the house sparrow, there was no effect of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) challenge on metabolic rate, and there were no detectable differences in locomotor activity between lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected birds and saline-injected controls. In contrast, tree sparrows injected with PHA had metabolic rates 20-25% lower than controls, and LPS injection resulted in a 35% drop in locomotor activity. In a common garden captive breeding experiment, there was no effect of killed-bacteria injections on reproduction in the house sparrow, while tree sparrows challenged with bacteria decreased egg production by 40% compared to saline-injected controls. These results provide some of the first data correlating variation in immune defenses with invasion success in introduced-vertebrate populations.

  20. A comparative study of physicochemical characteristics and functionalities of pinto bean protein isolate (PBPI) against the soybean protein isolate (SPI) after the extraction optimisation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ee-San; Ying-Yuan, Ngoh; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Optimisation of protein extraction yield from pinto bean was investigated using response surface methodology. The maximum protein yield of 54.8 mg/g was obtained with the optimal conditions of: temperature=25 °C, time=1 h and buffer-to-sample ratio=20 ml/g. PBPI was found to obtain high amount of essential amino acids such as leucine, lysine, and phenylalanine compared to SPI. The predominant proteins of PBPI were vicilin and phytohemagglutinins whereas the predominant proteins of SPI were glycinin and conglycinins. Significantly higher emulsifying capacity was found in PBPI (84.8%) compared to SPI (61.9%). Different isoelectric points were found in both PBPI (4.0-5.5) and SPI (4.0-5.0). Also, it was found that PBPI obtained a much higher denaturation temperature of 110.2 °C compared to SPI (92.5 °C). Other properties such as structural information, gelling capacity, water- and oil-holding capacities, emulsion stability as well as digestibility were also reported.

  1. Apoptosis and cell cycle disturbances induced by coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin on human lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Molina-Guarneros, Juan A; Morales-Fuentes, Jorge; Mandoki, Juan Jose

    2004-03-01

    Coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin have anti-tumour actions in vitro and in vivo. There are no previous reports on the cytostatic and apoptotic actions of coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines. Here we report on: (1) the inhibition of cell proliferation, (2) the phase in which cell cycle arrest occurs, and (3) the induction of apoptosis. Inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The effects on cell cycle phases were determined at 100 microg/ml of coumarin or 7-hydroxycoumarin using propidium iodide and flow cytometry. Higher concentrations were used to study apoptosis, detected by: (1) morphological cell changes, (2) subG1 peak detection and (3) Annexin-V assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin were used as controls. The actions of these compounds depended on drug concentrations and on histological cell type. Coumarin and 7-hydroxycoumarin inhibited cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in all the lung carcinoma cell lines. Apoptosis required large concentrations of the coumarin compounds and was observed in adenocarcinomas. Apoptosis was not associated with intra-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Apoptosis was not observed in squamous lung carcinoma cell lines, but an increase in G1 cell cycle arrest was detected. In PBMC, only large concentrations of the coumarin compounds elicited a cystostatic action. Coumarins in combination with other anti-neoplastic drugs might increase the effectiveness of NSCLC treatments.

  2. Immune responses of a wall lizard to whole-body exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Mina, Despoina; Sagonas, Kostas; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Margaritis, Lukas H; Tsitsilonis, Ourania E; Valakos, Efstratios D

    2016-01-01

    During the last three decades, the number of devices that emit non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at the wireless communication spectrum has rapidly increased and possible effects on living organisms have become a major concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of radiofrequency EMR emitted by a widely used wireless communication device, namely the Digital Enhanced Communication Telephony (DECT) base, on the immune responses of the Aegean wall lizard (Podarcis erhardii). Adult male lizards were exposed 24 h/day for 8 weeks to 1880-1900 MHz DECT base radiation at average electric field intensity of 3.2 V/m. Immune reactivity was assessed using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin swelling and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) tests. Our results revealed a noticeable suppression (approximately 45%) of inflammatory responses in EMR-exposed lizards compared to sham-exposed animals. T cell-mediated responses were marginally affected. Daily radiofrequency EMR exposure seems to affect, at least partially, the immunocompetence of the Aegean wall lizard.

  3. Immunologic findings in workers formerly exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and its congeners.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, D; Berg, P A; Edler, L; Ehrenthal, W; Fenner, D; Flesch-Janys, D; Huber, C; Klein, R; Koitka, C; Lucier, G; Manz, A; Muttray, A; Needham, L; Päpke, O; Pietsch, M; Portier, C; Patterson, D; Prellwitz, W; Rose, D M; Thews, A; Konietzko, J

    1998-01-01

    One hundred ninety-two workers in a German pesticide factory who were exposed to polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and -furans (PCDD/PCDF) were investigated for former and present diseases and laboratory changes of the immune system. Moreover, in a subgroup of 29 highly exposed and 28 control persons, proliferation studies were performed. In addition to assays such as blood count, immunoglobulins, serum electrophoresis, monoclonal bands, surface markers, autoantibodies, and lymphocyte proliferation, two new methods, the rise of tetanus antibody concentration after vaccination and the in vitro resistance of lymphocytes to chromate, were used to diagnose the morphologic and functional state of the immune system. There was no stringent correlation of actual PCDD/PCDF concentrations with the occurrence of infections or with one of the immune parameters. In addition, outcomes of the tetanus vaccination and the chromate resistance test were not correlated with PCDD/PCDF. However, the chromate resistance of lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin of highly exposed persons was significantly lower than that for the control group. These findings indicate that the function of lymphocytes can be stressed and possibly impaired by high exposure to PCDD/PCDF. Images Figure 2 PMID:9599718

  4. In-vitro immunomodulatory and anti-cancerous activities of biotransformed products of Dianabol through Azadirachta indica and its molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant Biotransformation is one of the tools for structural modifications of the organic substrate of low, moderate or high biological value utilizing plant cultured cells, these modifications of organic structures may lead to biologically augmented products and which may be ultimately substantial in cure or improvement of various morbidities and diseases. Results Azadirachta indica A. Juss. suspension culture was employed for the biotransformation of dianabol (1) for the first time, and two metabolites, 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androst-1-en-3-one (2), and 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3-one (3) were obtained. Conclusions Most important aspect of this work was the evaluation of metabolite 2, which strongly and differentially suppressed [not affecting whole blood and human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN)] the phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T-cell proliferation (IC50: <10.33 μM), and also found to inhibit IL-2 production (IC50: 16.89 ± 1.32) unlike metabolite 3 and compound 1. Compound 2 also exhibited anticancer activity against lung cancer cell line; NCI-H460, it moderately inhibited the growth of cancer cells (22.5 ± 4.15 μM). Furthermore, a good correlation between the predicted binding energies of the compounds acquired by the FlexX program and the experimental affinities were speculated upon interacting with IL-2 protein during molecular docking studies. PMID:24764465

  5. Corticosterone suppresses immune activity in territorial Galápagos marine iguanas during reproduction.

    PubMed

    Berger, Silke; Martin, Lynn B; Wikelski, Martin; Romero, L Michael; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Vitousek, Maren N; Rödl, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    Individuals that display elaborate sexually selected characters often show reduced immune function. According to the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis, testosterone (T) is responsible for this result as it drives the development and maintenance of sexual characters and causes immunosuppression. But glucocorticoids also have strong influences on immune function and may also be elevated in reproductively active males. Here, we compared immune activity using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test in three discrete groups of male marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus): territorials, satellites, and bachelors. Males of these three reproductive phenotypes had indistinguishable T concentrations during the height of the breeding season, but their corticosterone (cort) concentrations, body condition and hematocrit were significantly different. Territorial males, the animals with the most elaborate sexual ornaments and behaviors, had lower immune responses and body condition but higher cort concentrations and hematocrit than satellites or bachelors. To test directly cort's immunosuppressive role, we elevated cort by either restraining animals or additionally injecting cort and compared their PHA swelling response with the response of free-roaming animals. Such experimental elevation of cort significantly decreased immune activity in both restrained and cort-injected animals. Our data show that cort can induce immunosuppression, but they do not support the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in its narrow sense because T concentrations were not related to immunosuppression.

  6. Immunologic findings in healthy Haitians in Montreal

    PubMed Central

    Adrien, Alix; Desrosiers, Marcel; Frappier-Davignon, Lise; Spitzer, Walter O.; Dupuy, Jean-Marie

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Haitians, a health status questionnaire was administered and selected studies of immune status done in a randomly chosen sample of 189 healthy adult Haitians living in Montreal. The study group was comparable to a large sample of Haitians in Montreal interviewed in the 1981 census with respect to age, sex, number of persons per household and year of immigration, but the proportion of currently married people in the study was larger (60.8% v. 42.6%). The results in the study group were compared with those in a sample of 189 non-Haitians matched for age, sex and neighbourhood of residence. Persons with known causes of impaired immune function were excluded. The participation rate was 87.5%. The study and control groups both reported few symptoms and chronic health problems and had comparable demographic data, including rate of employment and income. The mean total numbers of lymphocytes, OKT3 and OKT4 (helper) and OKT8 (suppressor) cells were significantly higher in the Haitians than in the controls, though still within normal limits. There was a borderline elevation of the lymphocyte response to phytohemagglutinin in the Haitians. The ratios of helper to suppressor T cells in the two groups were, however, not significantly different. The Haitians, in comparison with non-Haitians living in the same community, had no demonstrable abnormalities of cellular immune function. PMID:3875388

  7. Immunomodulating and Antiprotozoal Effects of Different Extracts of the Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Against Coccidiosis in Broiler.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Muhammad Irfan; Akhtar, Masood; Iqbal, Zafar; Shahid, Muhammad; Awais, Mian Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The culinary-medicinal oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, procured from local sources, was processed for hot water and methanolic extraction. Extracts obtained were subjected to proximate analysis to determine the amount of crude protein, crude fiber, ash, ether, and nitrogen-free extracts. These extracts were evaluated for immunomodulating and antiprotozoal effects against coccidiosis in a broiler. Cellular immune investigation revealed significantly higher (P < 0.05) lymphoproliferative response to phytohemagglutinin-P in groups administered P. ostreatus extracts compared with controls. Humoral immune investigation revealed higher immunoglobulin (total Ig, IgG, and IgM) titers against sheep red blood cells in treated groups compared with controls. However, nonsignificant (P > 0.05) findings were observed in investigations of lymphoid organs. Antiprotozoal studies revealed a significantly higher (P < 0.05) percentage of protection against coccidiosis in groups administered P. ostreatus extracts when compared with controls. Moreover, lesion scoring and oocysts per gram of droppings observed in the control group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) compared with those in groups administered hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus. Results concluded that hot water and methanolic extracts of P. ostreatus had strong immune-enhancing activities. Further, these extracts also had excellent antiprotozoal activities against coccidiosis in a broiler.

  8. Cellular immunity and nutrition in refractory disseminated blastomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    FitzSimons, R. B.; Ferguson, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    In a previously healthy 13-year-old girl with disseminated blastomycosis, immunodeficiency was considered because of lymphopenia and the slow response of her lung disease to therapy with amphotericin B. Cellular immunity was found to be profoundly impaired, with absent delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to several common antigens, a decreased count of thymus-dependent lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and a greatly diminished in-vitro proliferative response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Humoral immunity was intact. Two additional types of therapy were assessed: subcutaneous injection of transfer factor was associated with an unsustained increase in lymphocyte counts and a positive cutaneous response to PHA but no clinical change; parenteral alimentation to ensure an adequate energy intake was associated with rapid clinical improvement, the development of delayed hypersensitivity to four additional antigens, and the return of lymphocyte counts and proliferative response to normal. These findings suggest that increased energy intake rather than transfer factor therapy was responsible for the child's recovery, and they emphasize the importance of adequate nutrition in the maintenance of intact cellular immunity. PMID:99221

  9. Antigen-specific secretion of IFNγ and CXCL10 in whole blood assay detects Mycobacterium leprae infection but does not discriminate asymptomatic infection from symptomatic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Freitas, Aline Araújo; Pontes, Maria Araci Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Osório Maroccolo; Costa, Maurício Barcelos; Castilho, Mirian Lane Oliveira Rodrigues; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2017-04-01

    To advance toward a whole blood assay (WBA)-based test capable of facilitating the diagnosis of paucibacillary (PB) leprosy, we evaluated a prototype in-tube WBA using combinations of Mycobacterium leprae antigens. Blood was collected from newly diagnosed untreated PB (n=38), multibacillary (MB) (n=30), healthy household contacts (HHC) of MB (n=27), and endemic controls (n=61) residing in Goiânia and Fortaleza, Brazil. Blood was incubated with M. leprae cell sonicate, recombinant proteins (46f+LID-1; ML0276+LID-1), or controls (phosphate-buffered saline, phytohemagglutinin, M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative). Antigen-specific IFNγ production was observed in 71-84% and 55% of PB and HHC, respectively. Antigen-specific CXCL10 levels were similarly assessed to determine if, unlike IFNγ, CXCL10 could differentiate PB from HHC with repeated exposure/asymptomatic M. leprae infection. The CXCL10 levels induced in response to M. leprae antigens could not, however, differentiate PB from HHC. Despite these limitations, the WBAs reported here still represent important tools for assessing M. leprae infection rates and evaluating the impact of control measures.

  10. Cytokine production and lymphocyte proliferation in patients with Nocardia brasiliensis actinomycetoma.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Tovar, Luis J; Mondragón-González, Rafael; Vega-López, Francisco; Dockrell, Hazel M; Hay, Roderick; López-Martínez, Rubén; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Padilla-Desgarennes, Carmen; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2004-11-01

    IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-12 concentrations in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures and the in vitro proliferation of PBMC were studied in 25 patients with actinomycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis and in 10 healthy controls from endemic zones. Cell cultures were stimulated by a N. brasiliensis crude cytoplasmic antigen (NB) and five semi-purified protein fractions (NB2, NB4, NB6, NB8, and NB10) separated by isoelectric. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were used as control antigens. Skin tests were performed by injecting 0.1 ml of candidin and PPD intradermally (ID). Patients showed a poor response to tuberculin, while their response to candidin was more than two fold greater than that observed in the controls. Cell proliferation showed no statistically significant differences in either group. IFN-gamma production was higher in the healthy controls than in the patients, whereas TNF-alpha secretion was slightly higher in the patients' cultures. IL-4 was detected in the patients' cultures but not in the controls. IL-10 and IL-12 were present at low concentrations in both groups. These results suggest that patients with actinomycetoma show normal antigen recognition, but with low IFN-gamma production, and higher concentrations of IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-alpha in the patients' PBMC cultures, indicating that they probably have a Th2 type of immune response.

  11. Factors influencing the removal of thymine glycol from DNA in gamma-irradiated human cells.

    PubMed

    Weinfeld, M; Xing, J Z; Lee, J; Leadon, S A; Cooper, P K; Le, X C

    2001-01-01

    The toxic and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation are believed to be caused by damage to cellular DNA. We have made use of a novel immunoassay for thymine glycol to examine the removal of this lesion from the DNA of irradiated human cells. Because of the sensitivity of the assay, we have been able to keep the radiation doses at or below the standard clinical dose of 2 Gy. Our initial observations indicated that although removal of thymine glycol is > 80% complete by 4 h post-irradiation with 2 Gy, there is a lag of 30-60 min before repair commences. However, if cells are irradiated with 0.25 Gy 4 h prior to the 2-Gy dose, removal of the thymine glycols commences immediately after the second irradiation, suggesting that repair of thymine glycol is inducible. Our current studies are directed at two aspects of the repair process, (1) factors involved in the repair process leading up to and including glycosylase-mediated removal of thymine glycol and (2) the control of the inducible response. We have observed that mutation of the XPG gene drastically reduced the level and rate of global removal of thymine glycol (induced by 2-Gy irradiation), and there was no evidence for an inducible response. Similar results were seen with a Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) cell line. We have also examined repair in quiescent and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes. Both show similar kinetics for the rate of removal of thymine glycol under induced and noninduced conditions.

  12. The RNA-binding protein TIAR is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during Fas-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J L; Tian, Q; Kedersha, N; Robertson, M; Anderson, P

    1995-02-28

    We have determined the structure, intracellular localization, and tissue distribution of TIAR, a TIA-1-related RNA-binding protein. Two related isoforms of TIAR, migrating at 42 and 50 kDa, are expressed in primate cells. Unlike TIA-1, which is found in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes, TIAR is concentrated in the nucleus of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Because TIAR can trigger DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes, it is a candidate effector of apoptotic cell death. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that the expression and intracellular localization of TIAR change dramatically during Fas-mediated apoptosis. TIAR moves from the nucleus to the cytoplasm within 30 min of Fas ligation. Redistribution of TIAR precedes the onset of DNA fragmentation and is not a nonspecific consequence of nuclear disintegration. Cytoplasmic redistribution of TIAR is not observed during cellular activation triggered by mitogens such as concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. Our results suggest that cytoplasmic redistribution of TIAR may be a general feature of the apoptotic program.

  13. The genes for nicein/kalinin 125- and 100-kDa subunits, candidates for junctional epidermiolysis bullosa, map to chromosomes 1q32 and 1q25-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Vailly, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Meneguzzi, G.; Szepetowski, P.; Pedeutour, F. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Burgeson, R. )

    1994-05-01

    Expression of nicein is specifically hampered in the severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive genodermatosis characterized by blister formation of integument believed to be due to defects in hemidesmosomes. Nicein genes are therefore the prime candidates for involvement in JEB. To map the gene encoding the 125-kDa subunit of nicein, the authors used the cDNA Kal5.5C coding for the amino-terminal domain of the protein. In situ hybridization was carried out on chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. In 100 metaphases examined, 153 silver grains were found associated with chromosomes; 45 (29%) of these were located on chromosome 1, and 33 (73%) of these 45 grains mapped to region 1q32.1-q41 with a maximum in band 1q32. To confirm the regional localization of the genes for nicein subunits of 100 and 125 kDa, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on normal lymphocytes from two unrelated normal males and fibroblast cell lines GM00257 (karyotype 46,XX, t(1;2)(1q32;2p23)) and GM004088 (46,XY,t(1;4)(q32;p16)). It was thus confirmed that the genes for nicein 125- and 100-kDa subunits are localized at 1q32 and 1q25-q31, respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes do not contain a sizable amount of preexistent DNA single-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.; Mullaart, E.; van der Schans, G.P.; Vijg, J.

    1989-02-01

    Sedimentation of nucleoids through neutral sucrose density gradients has shown that nucleoids isolated from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) sediment faster than nucleoids derived from quiescent lymphocytes, which was attributed to rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) present in the resting cells. We isolated PBL from donors and determined the amount of SSB in nonradiolabeled, untreated resting and PHA-stimulated cells by applying the alkaline filter elution technique. Calibration was based on dose-dependent induction of SSB by /sup 60/Co-gamma-radiation. Quiescent cells did not contain a sizable amount of SSB. Mitogen-stimulated cells showed equally low amounts of SSB per cell. The present study indicates that the interpretation of the results obtained with the nucleoid sedimentation technique concerning the supposed rejoining of SSB in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes is incorrect. Other, equally sensitive, techniques such as alkaline filter elution appear to be preferable for studies on DNA damage and repair.

  15. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  16. The repair of oxidized purines in the DNA of human lymphocytes requires an activation involving NF-YA-mediated upregulation of OGG1.

    PubMed

    von der Lippen, Carina; Sahu, Sanjeeb; Seifermann, Marco; Tiwari, Vijay K; Epe, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), which initiates the repair of DNA purine modifications such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), is often regarded as a house keeping protein ubiquitously active in mammalian cells. We have analysed the repair rates of oxidized purines generated by photosensitization in peripheral human lymphocytes and observed that the cells were virtually unable to remove these lesions (less than 10% removal within 24h). However, stimulation of the lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) strongly accelerated the repair so that ∼30% of the lesions were repaired within 4h. Within 24h following PHA stimulation and preceding the induction of cell proliferation, Western blots revealed an approximately 4-fold up-regulation of OGG1. The levels of OGG1 mRNA were 4-fold increased already after 6h. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that the up-regulation of OGG1 was associated with increased binding of the transcription factor NF-YA to the promoter of the OGG1 gene. The binding of NF-YA and subsequent induction of OGG1 was inhibited in the presence of an inhibitor of Jun kinase, indicating an activation of the corresponding signalling pathway as the mechanism underlying this transcriptional up-regulation. Our results reveal a strict control of base excision repair in cells of the human immune system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro T cell function, delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing, and CD4+ T cell subset phenotyping independently predict survival time in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Dolan, M J; Clerici, M; Blatt, S P; Hendrix, C W; Melcher, G P; Boswell, R N; Freeman, T M; Ward, W; Hensley, R; Shearer, G M

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients (n = 335) in the US Air Force HIV Natural History Program were followed for 3 years (mean) after skin testing, immunophenotyping of CD4+ cell subsets, and measurement of in vitro interleukin-2 production after stimulation by phytohemagglutinin, alloantigens, tetanus toxoid, and influenza A virus. The T cell functional assay predicted survival time (P < .001) and time for progression to AIDS (P = .014). Skin testing for tetanus, mumps, and Candida antigen and the total number of positive tests (P < .001 for each) stratified patients for survival time. In a multivariable proportional hazards model, the T cell functional assay (P = .008), the absolute number of CD4+ T cells (P = .001), the percentage of CD4+ CD29+ cells (P = .06), and the number of reactive skin tests (P < .001) predicted survival time. Thus, cellular immune functional tests have significant predictive value for survival time in HIV-1-infected patients independent of CD4+ cell count.

  18. Highly deoxynivalenol contaminated oats and immune function in horses.

    PubMed

    Khol-Parisini, Annabella; Hellweg, Petra; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Saalmüller, Armin; Strasser, Alois; Tichy, Alexander; Zenteke, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of deoxynivalenol (DON) on cellular and humoral immune parameters in horses. A feeding trial using naturally contaminated oats with high (20.2 mg/kg) and low (0.49 mg/kg) levels of DON was conducted. Two groups of five mares were fed 2 kg oats daily with high or low DON levels for two weeks, using a crossover design with a three-week wash-out period. No adverse effects on general health were observed. Only minor diet-related changes in differential blood counts and serum biochemistry were noted. Serum haptoglobin concentration was significantly elevated after feeding DON (p = 0.04). Lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ CD8+, CD2+, CD21+, MHCII+) and lymphocyte proliferation data (concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen) were not different between feeding-groups. It can be concluded that daily DON intakes as high as 6.9 to 9.5 mg/100 kg BW appear to have no major impact on the measured immune response of horses, indicating that this species has a high tolerance for DON.

  19. Biomechanical and allergological characteristics of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic acid) coating for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, Hans; Thomas, Peter; Diehl, Peter; Steinhauser, Erwin; Summer, Burkard; Barnstorf, Sonja; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Stemberger, Axel

    2005-07-01

    A poly(D,L-lactic acid) surface coating (PDLLA) has been developed to optimize interactions at the implant-tissue interface. Mechanical and allergological characteristics were evaluated in the present study to elucidate possible indications and limitations prior to clinical application. Implants of stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys were coated with PDLLA, and mechanical stability was studied during intramedullary implantation into rat and human cadaver bones and during dilation of coronary artery stents. Elongation resistance was examined on AlMgSi alloy specimens. Furthermore, proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of nickel-allergic donors and controls and interleukin-4 and interferon-gamma levels were measured in the presence of coated/uncoated implants and after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin or NiSO4. PDLLA remained stable on the implants with a minimum of 96% of the original coating mass and tolerated lengthening of at least 8%. Further lengthening was followed by microcracking and cohesive failure within the coating. PDLLA exerted no suppressive effect upon spontaneous and pan-T-cell mitogen inducible T-cell proliferation. Furthermore, specific proliferation to nickel in cells of nickel-allergic blood donors and production of interleukin-4 and IFN-gamma were not influenced by the coating. PDLLA coating proved high mechanical stability on different orthopaedic implants and did not influence in vitro T-cell reactivity towards specific biomaterials.

  20. The in vivo and in vitro effects of caffeine on rat immune cells activities: B, T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kantamala, D; Vongsakul, M; Satayavivad, J

    1990-12-01

    The effect of caffeine (naturally occurring plant methylxanthine) on immunological cell activities in Sprague-Dawley rat both in vivo and in vitro was studied. A cytotoxic assay was done to study natural killer (NK) cells and a proliferation assay was performed for T and B cell activities. Three different doses of caffeine i.e., 2, 6 and 18 mg/kg/day were administered chronically to Sprague-Dawley rats to assess the effects in vivo. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and B cell proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) showed significant decreases (P less than 0.05) in rats treated with 6 mg/kg/day, whereas the T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) was significantly increased (P less than 0.05) in the rats treated with 18 mg/kg/day. In vitro, caffeine significantly decreases (P less than 0.05) B and T cell proliferative responses to PWM and PHA-P at added caffeine concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 micrograms/ml. However, no effect was observed on NK cells activity. Furthermore, in vitro, a broader dose range of caffeine (1, 10, 100 and 1,000 micrograms/ml) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of both B and T cell proliferative responses.

  1. Effects of Probiotic and Prebiotic on Average Daily Gain, Fecal Shedding of Escherichia Coli, and Immune System Status in Newborn Female Calves

    PubMed Central

    Roodposhti, Pezhman Mohamadi; Dabiri, Najafgholi

    2012-01-01

    Thirty two Holstein female calves (initial body weight = 40±3.0 kg) were used to investigate the effects of probiotic and prebiotic on average daily gain (ADG), fecal E. coli count, white blood cell count, plasma IgG1 level and cell-mediated immune response to injection of phytohemagglutinin in suckling female calves. Calves were assigned randomly to one of the four treatments, including whole milk without additives (control), whole milk containing probiotic, whole milk containing prebiotic and whole milk containing probiotic and prebiotic (synbiotic). Average daily gain was greater in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic at weeks 6, 7 and 8 (p<0.05). E. coli count was significantly lower in calves fed probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic on d 56 (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between treatments in blood samples and cell-mediated response. This study showed that addition of probiotic, prebiotic and combination of these additives to milk enhanced ADG and reduced fecal E. coli count in preruminant calves. PMID:25049688

  2. Immune Response and Function: Exercise Conditioning Versus Bed-Rest and Spaceflight Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Lawless, D.

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses measured at rest immediately or some hours after exercise training (some with and some without increase in maximal oxygen uptake) gave variable and sometimes conflicting results; therefore, no general conclusions can be drawn. On the other hand, most immune responses were either unchanged (immunoglobulin, T cells, CD4+, and natural killer activity) or decreased (blood properdin, neutrophil phagocytic activity, salivary lysozymes, brain immunoglobulin A and G, and liver B lymphocytes and phytohemagglutinin activity) during prolonged bed rest. Some data suggested that exercise training during bed rest may partially ameliorate the decreased functioning of the immune system. Exercise and change in body position, especially during prolonged bed rest with plasma fluid shifts and diuresis, may induce a change in plasma protein concentration and content, which can influence drug metabolism as well as immune function. Leukocytosis, accompanied by lymphopenia and a depressed lymphocyte response, occurs in astronauts on return to Earth from spaceflight; recovery may depend on time of exposure to microgravity. It is clear that the effect of drugs and exercise used as countermeasures for microgravity deconditioning should be evaluated for their effect on an astronaut's immune system to assure optimal health and performance on long-duration space missions.

  3. Psychoimmunoendocrine aspects of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, F; Bellodi, L; Perna, G; Battaglia, M; Sciuto, G; Diaferia, G; Petraglia, F; Panerai, A; Sacerdote, P

    1992-01-01

    Immunological, neuroendocrine and psychological parameters were examined in 14 psychophysically healthy subjects and in 17 panic disorder patients before and after a 30-day course of alprazolam therapy. T lymphocyte proliferation in response to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin, lymphocyte beta-endorphin (beta-EP) concentrations, plasma ACTH, cortisol and beta-EP levels were examined in basal conditions and after corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulation. Cortisol inhibition by dexamethasone (DST) and basal growth hormone (GH) and prolactin levels were also examined. Depression, state or trait anxiety, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia, simple and social phobias, severity and frequency of panic attacks were monitored by rating scales. The immune study did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, or any effect of alprazolam therapy. The hormonal data for the two groups were similar, except for higher than normal basal ACTH and GH plasma levels, lower than normal ratios between the ACTH and cortisol responses to CRH, and blunted DST in some patients. All the impairments improved after alprazolam therapy, in parallel with decreases in anxiety and in severity and frequency of panic attacks.

  4. Detection of sister chromatid exchanges induced by volatile genotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Xu, J.; Stewart, J.; Baciu, P.C.; Ong, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    To test the recently developed method of exposing cells to volatile compounds, phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral lymphocyte cultures were exposed to gaseous methyl bromide, ethylene oxide, and propylene oxide, as well as diesel exhaust. The cultures were placed in sterile dialysis tubing and inserted into enclosed flasks containing additional culture medium. The test compounds (in gaseous state) were diluted with air and bubbled through the flasks for various lengths of time. The cells were then washed and incubated for a total of 75 h. The harvest was performed according to established procedures, and second-division cells were scored for induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). The SCE frequency was more than doubled in the cultures treated with ethylene oxide and propylene oxide; methyl bromide also induced SCEs. Cultures treated with diesel exhaust showed an increase in the SCE frequency in cells from two of four donors tested. These results further substantiate the use of this method for detecting the induction of SCEs by airborne genotoxins.

  5. Mycoplasma-dependent activation of normal mouse lymphocytes: requirement for functional T lymphocytes in the cytotoxicity reaction mediated by Mycoplasma arthritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Aldridge, K E; Sullivan, G J; Ward, J R

    1980-01-01

    Syngeneic and allogeneic target cells were killed in the presence of CBA mouse lymphocytes and viable Mycoplasma arthritidis. Medium supplementation had no effect on the response. Nonviable M. arthritidis was also capable of stimulating lymphocytotoxicity, although to a much lesser extent. Cytotoxicity was shown to be largely dependent upon the lymphocytes, since lymphocytes preincubated with mycoplasmas and treated to remove remaining organisms were highly toxic to target cells, whereas supernatants prepared from lymphocyte/mycoplasma mixtures exhibited minimal effects. A 6-h exposure of lymphocytes to mycoplasmas at a ratio of 100:1 was sufficient for commitment to target cell killing. Functional lymphocytes were required for the reaction, since gamma-irradiated lymphocytes did not develop cytotoxic potential despite the fact that the mycoplasmas replicated equally well in the presence of these and untreated lymphocytes. Furthermore, lymphocytes already activated with mycoplasmas lost cytotoxic potential after disruption. The kinetics and degree of lymphocytotoxicity induced by M. arthritidis and phytohemagglutinin toward 51Cr-labeled syngeneic fibroblasts were similar. Removal of most B cells and other adherent cells by column separation did not abrogate the cytotoxic effect. Lymphocyte suspensions treated with anti-Thy 1 antiserum and complement exhibited a marked decrease in their cytotoxic potential when added to labeled target cells in the presence of M. arthritidis. We conclude that the cytotoxic reaction is dependent upon the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. PMID:6969227

  6. Human plasma enhances the infectivity of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S C; Spouge, J L; Conley, S R; Tsai, W P; Merges, M J; Nara, P L

    1995-01-01

    Physiological microenvironments such as blood, seminal plasma, mucosal secretions, or lymphatic fluids may influence the biology of the virus-host cell and immune interactions for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Relative to media, physiological levels of human plasma were found to enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 primary isolates in both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. Enhancement was observed only when plasma was present during the virus-cell incubation and resulted in a 3- to 30-fold increase in virus titers in all of the four primary isolates tested. Both infectivity and virion binding experiments demonstrated a slow, time-dependent process generally requiring between 1 and 10 h. Human plasma collected in anticoagulants CPDA-1 and heparin, but not EDTA, exhibited this effect at concentrations from 90 to 40%. Furthermore, heat-inactivated plasma resulted in a loss of enhancement in peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not in monocyte-derived macrophages. Physiological concentrations of human plasma appear to recruit additional infectivity, thus increasing the infectious potential of the virus inoculum. PMID:7666510

  7. The inability of human immunodeficiency virus to infect chimpanzee monocytes can be overcome by serial viral passage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, H E; Ehrlich, G D; Baca, L M; Conley, S; Ribas, J; Kalter, D C; Meltzer, M S; Poiesz, B J; Nara, P

    1991-01-01

    Studies of lentivirus infection in ruminants, nonhuman primates, and humans suggest that virus infection of macrophages plays a central role in the disease process. To investigate whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect chimpanzee macrophages, we recovered monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-negative animals and inoculated these and control human monocytes with a panel of four human-passaged monocytotropic virus strains and one chimpanzee-passaged isolate. HIV-1 infected human monocytes synthesized proviral DNA, viral mRNA, p24 antigen, and progeny virions. In contrast, except for the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate, chimpanzee monocytes failed to support HIV-1 replication when cultured under both identical and a variety of other conditions. Proviral DNA was demonstrated only at background levels in these cell cultures by polymerase chain reaction for gag- and env-related sequences. Interestingly, the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate did not replicate in human monocytes; viral p24 antigens and progeny virions were not detected. The same monocytotropic panel of HIV-1 strains replicated in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphoblasts treated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The failure of HIV-1 to infect chimpanzee monocytes, which can be overcome by serial in vivo viral passage, occurs through a block early in the viral life cycle. Images PMID:1674968

  8. Effects of Malnutrition on Children's Immunity to Bacterial Antigens in Northern Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Gaayeb, Lobna; Sarr, Jean B.; Cames, Cecile; Pinçon, Claire; Hanon, Jean-Baptiste; Ndiath, Mamadou O.; Seck, Modou; Herbert, Fabien; Sagna, Andre B.; Schacht, Anne-Marie; Remoue, Franck; Riveau, Gilles; Hermann, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases according to nutritional status, a longitudinal study was conducted in Senegalese children ages 1–9 years old. A linear regression analysis predicted that weight for age was positively associated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) response to tetanus toxoid in children born during the rainy season or at the beginning of the dry season. A relationship between village, time of visits, and levels of antibodies to tetanus showed that environmental factors played a role in modulating humoral immunity to tetanus vaccine over time. Moreover, a whole-blood stimulation assay highlighted that the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to tetanus toxoid was compromised in stunted children. However, the absence of cytokine modulation in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-purified protein derivatives and phytohemagglutinin suggests that the overall ability to produce IFN-γ was preserved in stunted children. Therefore, these results show that nutritional status can specifically alter the efficacy of long-lasting immunity to tetanus. PMID:24445198

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA detection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by polymerase chain reaction: enhanced sensitivity after mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tetali, S K; Oyaizu, N; Paul, M; Pahwa, S

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimulus-induced up-regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could enhance the diagnostic sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PBMC derived from 11 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic adults were cultured with a stimulus of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for 36 h prior to lysing the cells for PCR. In all 11 patients studied, the intensity of PCR-assisted HIV RNA amplification (RNA-PCR) performed on stimulated cells was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than that obtained on unstimulated cells. A comparison of conventional PCR-assisted DNA amplification (DNA-PCR) with that of RNA-PCR was made on seven patients. The sensitivity of DNA-PCR was also increased by prior stimulation of cells, although not to the same extent as was observed for RNA-PCR. The results of our study indicate that the sensitivity of PCR can be significantly enhanced by prior activation of cells with PHA and PMA.

  10. Immunomodulation of musk-moxa-string therapy in patients with scrofula.

    PubMed

    Shen, G X; Su, N; Zhu, H F; Wang, X L; Zhang, Y; Sun, B; Hong, S Y; Liu, G Y

    1990-01-01

    The effects of musk-moxa-string therapy on the immune system in man were investigated in 39 patients with scrofula. Before treatment, the numbers of peripheral blood (PB) CD3+ and DC4+ cells and the ratio CD4+/CD8+ were found to be lower in patients with scrofula than in normal subjects, while those of B cells and DR+ cells were higher. Response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) diminished in patients with scrofula. At month 2-6 of musk-moxa-string therapy the number of PB CD8+ cells showed slight diminution along with significant increases in CD3+ and CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratio in total lymphocytes (P less than 0.001). In vitro a marked increased blastogenic response to mitogen stimulation with PHA was observed in PBMC of patients with scrofula after treatment (P less than 0.001). In contrast, B lymphocytes, monocytes, DR+ cells and blastogenic response to concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen were not influenced by musk-moxa-string therapy.

  11. Psychological, Behavioral, and Immune Changes After a Psychological Intervention: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Farrar, William B.; Golden-Kreutz, Deanna M.; Glaser, Ronald; Emery, Charles F.; Crespin, Timothy R.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Carson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This randomized clinical trial tests the hypothesis that a psychological intervention can reduce emotional distress, improve health behaviors and dose-intensity, and enhance immune responses. Patients and Methods We studied 227 women who were surgically treated for regional breast cancer. Before adjuvant therapy, women completed interviews and questionnaires assessing emotional distress, social adjustment, and health behaviors. A 60-mL blood sample was drawn for immune assays. Patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention group or assessment only group. The intervention was conducted in small patient groups, with one session per week for 4 months. The sessions included strategies to reduce stress, improve mood, alter health behaviors, and maintain adherence to cancer treatment and care. Reassessment occurred after completion of the intervention. Results As predicted, patients receiving the intervention showed significant lowering of anxiety, improvements in perceived social support, improved dietary habits, and reduction in smoking (all P < .05). Analyses of adjuvant chemotherapy dose-intensity revealed significantly more variability (ie, more dispersion in the dose-intensity values) for the assessment arm (P < .05). Immune responses for the intervention patients paralleled their psychological and behavioral improvements. T-cell proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A remained stable or increased for the Intervention patients, whereas both responses declined for Assessment patients; this effect was replicated across three concentrations for each assay (all P < .01). Conclusion These data show a convergence of significant psychological, health behavior, and biologic effects after a psychological intervention for cancer patients. PMID:15337807

  12. Lysis of fresh human solid tumors by autologous lymphocytes activated in vitro with lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, A.; Grimm, E.A.; Zhang, H.Z.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1982-03-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with a variety of cancers, were incubated in vitro with phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and crude or lectin-free T-cell growth factors. The lectin-activated PBL of nine patients were capable of lysing fresh autologous tumor during a 4-hr 51Cr release assay. Multiple metastases from the same patient were equivalently lysed by these activated autologous PBL. No lysis of fresh PBL or lectin-induced lymphoblast cell targets was seen, although tumor, PBL, and lymphoblast cells were shown to be equally lysable using allosensitized cells. The activated cells could be expanded without loss of cytotoxicity in crude or lectin-free T-cell growth factors. The generation of cells lytic to fresh autologous tumor was dependent on the presence of adherent cells, although the lytic cell itself was not adherent. Proliferation was not involved in the induction of lytic cells since equal lysis was induced in irradiated and nonirradiated lymphocytes. Lectin was not required in the lytic assay, and the addition of alpha-methyl-D-mannoside to concanavalin A-activated lymphoid cells did not increase the lysis of fresh tumor cells. Activation by lectin for 3 days appears to be an efficient and convenient method for generating human cells lytic to fresh autologous tumor. These lytic cells may be of value for studies of the cell-mediated lysis of human tumor and possibly for tumor immunotherapy as well.

  13. Immune Response Varies with Rate of Dispersal in Invasive Cane Toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2014-01-01

    What level of immunocompetence should an animal maintain while undertaking long-distance dispersal? Immune function (surveillance and response) might be down-regulated during prolonged physical exertion due to energy depletion, and/or to avoid autoimmune reactions arising from damaged tissue. On the other hand, heightened immune vigilance might be favored if the organism encounters novel pathogens as it enters novel environments. We assessed the links between immune defense and long-distance movement in a population of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Australia. Toads were radio-tracked for seven days to measure their activity levels and were then captured and subjected to a suite of immune assays. Toads that moved further showed decreased bacteria-killing ability in their plasma and decreased phagocytic activity in their whole blood, but a heightened skin-swelling response to phytohemagglutinin. Baseline and post-stress corticosterone levels were unrelated to distance moved. Thus, long-distance movement in cane toads is associated with a dampened response in some systems and enhanced response in another. This pattern suggests that sustained activity is accompanied by trade-offs among immune components rather than an overall down or up-regulation. The finding that high mobility is accompanied by modification of the immune system has important implications for animal invasions. PMID:24936876

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis alters the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Barrera, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that in vitro infection of human monocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis affected monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Despite the low bacterial load used, M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes had fewer granules, displayed a reduced number of cytoplasmic projections and decreased HLA class II, CD68, CD86 and CD36 expression compared to cells differentiated in the absence of mycobacteria. Infected cells produced less IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-6 and high IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide and purified protein M. tuberculosis-derived. Reduced T-cell proliferative response and IFN-γ secretion in response to phytohemagglutinin and culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis was also observed in infected cells when compared to non-infected ones. The ability of monocytes differentiated in the presence of M. tuberculosis to control mycobacterial growth in response to IFN-γ stimulation was attenuated, as determined by bacterial plate count; however, they had a similar ability to uptake fluorescent M. tuberculosis and latex beads compared to non-infected cells. Recombinant IL-1β partially altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages; however, treating M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes with IL-1RA did not reverse the effects of infection during differentiation. The results indicated that M. tuberculosis infection altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages and affected their ability to respond to innate stimuli and activate T-cells.

  15. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding.

    PubMed

    George, K; Willingham, V; Wu, H; Gridley, D; Nelson, G; Cucinotta, F A

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples.

  16. Postnatal thymus transplantation with immunosuppression as treatment for DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Markert, M Louise; Alexieff, Marilyn J; Li, Jie; Sarzotti, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A; Devlin, Blythe H; Sedlak, Debra A; Sempowski, Gregory D; Hale, Laura P; Rice, Henry E; Mahaffey, Samuel M; Skinner, Michael A

    2004-10-15

    Complete DiGeorge syndrome is a fatal congenital disorder characterized by athymia, hypoparathyroidism, and heart defects. Less than half of patients are 22q11 hemizygous. The goal of this study was to assess if immune suppression followed by postnatal thymus transplantation would lead to T-cell function in 6 infant patients who had host T cells at the time of transplantation. All infants had fewer than 50 recent thymic emigrants (CD3(+)CD45RA(+)CD62L(+)) per cubic millimeter (mm(3)) and all had some proliferative response to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin. Four infants had rash, lymphadenopathy, and oligoclonal populations of T cells in the periphery. Five of 6 patients are alive at the follow-up interval of 15 months to 30 months. The 5 surviving patients developed a mean of 983 host CD3(+) T cells/mm(3) (range, 536/mm(3)-1574/mm(3)), a mean of 437 recent thymic emigrants/mm(3) (range, 196/mm(3)-785/mm(3)), and normal proliferative responses to phytohemaglutinin (follow-up from day 376 to day 873). The TCR repertoire became polyclonal in patients who presented with oligoclonal T cells. All patients had thymopoiesis on allograft biopsy. Postnatal thymus transplantation after treatment with Thymoglobulin shows promise as therapy for infants with complete DiGeorge syndrome who have significant proliferative responses to mitogens or who develop rash, lymphadenopathy, and oligoclonal T cells.

  17. CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV-infected patients express multiple negative immune checkpoints following stimulation with HCV peptides.

    PubMed

    Barathan, Muttiah; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Chang, Li Yen; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Krishnan, Jayalakshmi; Sigamani, Panneer; Saeidi, Alireza; Ram, M Ravishankar; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie; Shankar, Esaki M

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are key to successful viral clearance in HCV disease. Accumulation of exhausted HCV-specific T cells during chronic infection results in considerable loss of protective functional immune responses. The role of T-cell exhaustion in chronic HCV disease remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the frequency of HCV peptide-stimulated T cells expressing negative immune checkpoints (PD-1, CTLA-4, TRAIL, TIM-3 and BTLA) by flow cytometry, and measured the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines secreted by T cells by a commercial Multi-Analyte ELISArray™ following in vitro stimulation of T cells using HCV peptides and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of chronic HCV (CHC) patients showed significant increase of CTLA-4. Furthermore, HCV peptide-stimulated CD4+ T cells of CHC patients also displayed relatively higher levels of PD-1 and TRAIL, whereas TIM-3 was up-regulated on HCV peptide-stimulated CD8+ T cells. Whereas the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 were significantly increased, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 were markedly decreased in the T cell cultures of CHC patients. Chronic HCV infection results in functional exhaustion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells likely contributing to viral persistence.

  18. The effect of Jeo Dang-Tang on cytokines production in the patients with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kang, Sei-Young; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Sang-Gwan; Lee, Sung-Geun; Sung, Kang-Keyng; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2003-11-01

    The herbal formulation "Jeo Dang-Tang" (JDT) has long been used for various cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little has scientific investigation been carried out. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of JDT on the production of various cytokines in the patients with cerebral infarction (CI). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the patients with CI were cultured for 24h in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The amount of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-1beta, in culture supernatant, was significantly increased in the JDT, LPS or PHA treated cells compared to unstimulated cells (P < 0.05). We also show that increased IL-4, and IL-10 level by LPS or PHA was significantly inhibited by JDT in a dose-dependent manner. Maximal inhibition rate of IL-4 and IL-10 production by JDT was 45 +/- 2% and 51 +/- 5% for LPS-stimulated cell and 41.5 +/- 3% and 70.8 +/- 2% for PHA-stimulated cells, respectively (P < 0.05). On the other hand, JDT significantly increased the LPS or PHA-induced TGF-beta1 production (P < 0.05). These data suggest that JDT has a regulatory effect on the cytokines production, which might explain its beneficial effect in the treatment of CI.

  19. Ocular toxoplasmosis in immunosuppressed nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, G.N.; O'Connor, G.R.; Diaz, R.F.; Minasi, P.; Wara, W.M.

    1988-06-01

    To investigate the role of cellular immunodeficiency in recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis, six Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) with healed toxoplasmic lesions of the retina were immunosuppressed by total lymphoid irradiation. Three months prior to irradiation 30,000 Toxoplasma gondii organisms of the Beverley strain had been inoculated onto the macula of eye in each monkey via a pars plana approach. Toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis developed in each animal, and lesions were allowed to heal without treatment. During total lymphoid irradiation animals received 2000 centigrays (cGy) over a 7-week period. Irradiation resulted in an immediate drop in total lymphocyte counts and decreased ability to stimulate lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin. Weekly ophthalmoscopic examinations following irradiation failed to show evidence of recurrent ocular disease despite persistent immunodeficiency. Four months after irradiation live organisms were reinoculated onto the nasal retina of the same eye in each animal. Retinochoroidal lesions identical to those seen in primary disease developed in five of six animals. Toxoplasma organisms therefore were able to proliferate in ocular tissue following the administration of immunosuppressive therapy. This study fails to support the hypothesis that cellular immunodeficiency alone will initiate recurrent toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis. Results suggest that reactivation of disease from encysted organisms involves factors other than suppression of Toxoplasma proliferation. If reactivation occurs by other mechanisms, however, cellular immunodeficiency then may allow development of extensive disease.

  20. The use of an interferon-gamma release assay as a biomarker of response to anti-TNF-alpha treatment.

    PubMed

    Cacciapaglia, Fabio; Buzzulini, Francesca; Arcarese, Luisa; Ferraro, Elisabetta; Afeltra, Antonella

    2014-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a central role in the immune system functioning and in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF-α inhibition has been demonstrated effective to treat RA; however, response to anti-TNF-α therapies is heterogeneous, with roughly one-third of patients not achieving disease control. Identification of a biological marker to assess the effectiveness of TNF-α inhibition may help to discriminate patients with a reduced response to anti-TNF-α agents. The aim of this study was to assess whether anti-TNF-α treatment was able to modify the cytokine network interfering with interferon gamma (INFγ) release after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from RA patients, according to disease activity. We found that RA patients with active disease had low release of INFγ after PHA stimulation, but anti-TNF-α agents were able to modify INFγ production. In anti-TNF-α responders, we observed a higher release of INFγ, achieving levels comparable with those seen in healthy subjects. The ability of PBMCs from RA patients to release INFγ may serve as a biomarker of disease activity and response to anti-TNF-α. Larger studies are needed to validate these data. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Characterization of. alpha. -amylase-inhibitor, a lectin-like protein in the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains a glycoprotein that inhibits the activity of mammalian and insect {alpha}-amylases but not of plant {alpha}-amylases. It is therefore classified as an antifeedant or seed defense protein. In P. vulgaris cv Greensleeves, {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is present in embryonic axes and cotyledons, but not in other organs of the plant. The protein is synthesized during the same time period that phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin are made and also accumulates in the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). All the glycoforms have complex glycans that are resistant to removal by endoglycosidase H, indicating transport of the protein through the Golgi apparatus. The two different polypeptides correspond to the N-terminal and C-terminal halves of a lectin-like protein encoded by an already identified gene or a gene closely related to it. The primary translation product of {alpha}Al is a polypeptide of M{sub r} 28,000. Immunologically cross-reacting glycopolypeptides of M{sub r} 30,000 to 35,000 are present in the endoplasmic reticulum, while the smaller polypeptides (M{sub r} 15,000-19,000) accumulate in protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies). Together these data indicate that {alpha}Al is a typical bean lectin-type protein that is synthesized on the rough endoplasmic reticulum, modified in the Golgi, and transported to the protein storage vacuoles.

  2. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has the same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.

  3. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    SciTech Connect

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  4. Immune response, not immune maintenance, is energetically costly in wild white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Derting, Terry L; Compton, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the cost of immune function is essential for more accurate characterization of energy budgets of animals and better understanding of the role of immunity in the evolution of life-history strategies. We examined the energetic cost of maintaining a normally functioning immune system and mounting a mild immune response in wild male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). To evaluate the cost of maintaining immunocompetence, we compared resting and daily metabolic rates (RMR; DMR) and masses of body organs of mice whose immune systems were suppressed by cyclophosphamide with those of control mice. To evaluate the cost of mounting an immune response, we measured RMR, DMR, and organ masses in mice whose humoral and cell-mediated immune responses had been stimulated by injections of sheep red blood cells and phytohemagglutinin, respectively. Immunosuppression resulted in a significant reduction in circulating leukocytes, by 225%, but no significant effect on metabolic rates or organ masses. Immunochallenged animals showed no significant differences in metabolic rates compared with control animals but did exhibit significantly smaller dry masses of the small intestine and testes, by 74% and 22%, respectively. We concluded that the cost of maintaining the immune system was minimal. In contrast, there was a significant energetic cost of mounting an immune response that, depending on its magnitude, can be met through reductions in energy allocation to other physiological systems.

  5. Monitoring of chimerism using fluorescence in situ hybridization in a child with severe combined immune deficiency following bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Wenger, S.L.; Chen, X.O.; Katz, A.J. |

    1994-09-01

    A boy with severe combined immunodeficiency received a bone marrow transplant from his sister when he was approximately 3 years of age. His peripheral blood karyotype at age 3 and 4 years was 46,XX (20 cells analyzed). Because of a decline in antibody production at 19 years of age, the patient`s peripheral blood was analyzed again for suspected chimerism. His karyotype in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated culture was 46,XX in 49 cells and 46,XY in one cell. Both metaphase and interphase cells were examined for sex chromosome constitution using X and Y dual-color alpha-satellite probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results for metaphase cells showed 1/50 XY cells, but 38% of interphase cells showed the presence of both X and Y centromere. Pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures grew poorly and were therefore analyzed using FISH only: 81% of interphase cells were 46,XX. The discrepancy between metaphase and interphase in the PHA-stimulated cultures most likely represents a failure of this boy`s own XY T-cells to be stimulated.

  6. Abnormal immune responses of Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T H; Litwin, S D; German, J

    1975-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome is a rare autosmal recessive disorder, first characterized by growth retardation and asum-sensitive facial telangiectasia and more recently demonstarted to have increased chromosome instability, a predisposition to malignancy, and increased susecptibitily to infection. The present report ocncern the immune function of Bloom's syndrom lymphoctes in vitro. Four affected homozgotes and five heterozygotes were studied. An abnormal serum concentartion of at least one class of immunoglobin was present in three out of four homozgotes. Affected homozgotes were shown capable of both a humoral and cellular response after antigenic challenge, the responses in general being weak but detectable. Blood lymphocytes from Bloom's syndrome individuals were cultured in impaired proliferavite response and synthesized less immunoglobulin at the end of 5 days than did normal controls. In contrast, they had a normal proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin except at highest concentrations of the mitogen. In the mixed lymphocte culture, Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes proved to be poor responder cells but normal stimulator cells. Lmyphoctes from the heterozgotes produced normal responses in these three systems. Distrubed immunity appears to be on of several major consequences of homozygosity for the Bloom's syndrome gene. Although the explanation for this pleiotropism is at present obscure, the idea was advanced that the aberrant immune function is, along with the major clincial feature-small body size, amanifestation of defect in cellular proliferation. PMID:124745

  7. Carotenoid-based coloration, condition, and immune responsiveness in the nestlings of a sexually dimorphic bird of prey.

    PubMed

    Sternalski, Audrey; Mougeot, François; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Bretagnolle, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In many birds, nestlings exhibit brightly colored traits that are pigmented by carotenoids. Carotenoids are diet limited and also serve important health-related physiological functions. The proximate mechanisms behind the expression of these carotenoid-pigmented traits are still poorly known, especially in nestlings with sexual size dimorphism. In these nestlings, intrabrood competition levels and growth strategies likely differ between sexes, and this may in turn influence carotenoid allocation rules. We used dietary carotenoid supplementation to test whether wild marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus) nestlings were carotenoid limited and whether carotenoid allocation strategies varied between sexes, which differ in their size and growth strategies. When supplemented, nestlings used the supplemental carotenoids to increase their coloration independently of their sex. We showed that the condition dependence of the carotenoid level and the response to an immune challenge (phytohemagglutinin test) differed between sexes, possibly because sexual size dimorphism influences growth strategies and/or intrabrood competition levels and access to different types of food. In this species, which often feeds on mammals, a trade-off likely exists between food quantity (energy) and quality (carotenoid content). Finally, carotenoid-based coloration expressed in marsh harrier nestlings appeared to be indicative of immune responsiveness rather than condition, therefore potentially advertising to parents nestling quality or value rather than nutritional need.

  8. [Agonists of µ- and δ-Opioid Receptors in the Regulation of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ Production by Peripheral Blood Cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Tendryakova, S P

    2015-01-01

    It was found that β-endorphin stimulates the PHA (phytohemagglutinin)-induced production of interleukin-4 and has no affect on the production of interferon-gamma in unfractionated leukocytic suspension. In the culture of purified CD4+ T cells, β-endorphin does not affect the concentration of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ, but stimulates the production of IL-4 and inhibits the production of IFN-γ when adding monocytes to the culture. Selective δ-agonist DADLE enhances the PHA-induced production of IL-4 in unfractionated leukocytic suspension and in CD4+ lymphocytes+monocytes system. The synthesis of IFN-γ by purified CD4+ lymphocytes is not afected by the presence of DADLE, DAGO ad Deltorphin II; but when adding monocytes to the culture, the synthesis rate decreases. β-endorphin and selective μ-agonist DAGO enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulated neutrophils. The production of IFN-γ in CD8+ lymphocytes is not affected by β-endorphin. Thus, opioid peptides have a predominantly Th2 polarizing effect, which is monocyte-mediated, hindering the development of cell response by inhibiting IFN-γ, and stimulating the production of I L-4 by activating δ-receptor. On the other hand, neutrophils can enhance the production of IFN-γ by stimulating μ-receptor.

  9. Development of an immune function assay by measuring intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels in mitogen-stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Hadi; Najafi, Alireza; Khoshroo, Mohammad; Tajik, Nader

    2016-01-01

    We developed an immune function assay for monitoring CD4+ T cells activity based on changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (iATP) levels after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation. Blood samples were obtained from 40 healthy subjects and 30 RTRs and incubated with 5 µg/mL of PHA for 15-18 hr at 37°C and 5% CO2. Afterward, the CD4+ T cells were separated by antibody-coated magnetic beads and lysed. Then, iATP content in unstimulated and stimulated conditions was measured by luciferin-luciferase reaction using a log-log standard curve. The iATP levels showed significant increase in CD4+ T cells in both healthy persons (mean: 550 ± 142 ng/mL vs. 109 ± 54 ng/mL) and RTRs (mean: 394 ± 160 ng/mL vs. 52 ± 37 ng/mL) after PHA stimulation (P < 0.001). However, the iATP production in RTRs was significantly lower than that in healthy individuals; both prior to and after stimulation with PHA (P < 0.001). No gender-specific difference in iATP production was observed between women and men subjects. This rapid and low-cost assay reflects the degree of immune cell function through assessment of CD4+ T cells activation. Thus, it can be used for evaluation of immune system status in immunodeficient individuals as well as in immunosuppressed transplant recipients who needs drug adjustment.

  10. Isolation and characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Shalini; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; George, Elizabeth; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of placenta tissue as a reliable and efficient source for generating mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). METHODS: MSC were generated from human placenta tissue by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation. The placenta MSC (PLC-MSC) were characterized for expression of cell surface markers, embryonic stem cell (ECS) gene expression and their differentiation ability into adipocytes and osteocytes. The immunosuppressive properties of PLC-MSC on resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated allogenic T cells were assessed by means of cell proliferation via incorporation of tritium thymidine (3H-TdR). RESULTS: The generated PLC-MSC appeared as spindle-shaped cells, expressed common MSC surface markers and ESC transcriptional factors. They also differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages when induced. However, continuous cultivation up to passage 15 caused changes in morphological appearance and cellular senescence, although the stem cell nature of their protein expression was unchanged. In terms of their immunosuppressive properties, PLC-MSC were unable to stimulate resting T cell proliferation; they inhibited the PHA stimulated T cells in a dose dependent manner through cell to cell contact. In our study, MSC generated from human placenta exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers; MSC-like gene expression pattern and MSC-like differentiation potential were comparable to other sources of MSC. CONCLUSION: We suggest that placenta tissues can serve as an alternative source of MSC for future experimental and clinical studies. PMID:22993662

  11. Bioreactor validation and biocompatibility of Ag/poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) hydrogel nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Zeljka; Radosavljević, Aleksandra; Kačarević-Popović, Zorica; Stojkovska, Jasmina; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana; Matić, Ivana Z; Juranić, Zorica D; Obradovic, Bojana; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna

    2013-05-01

    Silver/poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (Ag/PVP) nanocomposites containing Ag nanoparticles at different concentrations were synthesized using γ-irradiation. Cytotoxicity of the obtained nanocomposites was determined by MTT assay in monolayer cultures of normal human immunocompetent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that were either non-stimulated or stimulated to proliferate by mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA), as well as in human cervix adenocarcinoma cell (HeLa) cultures. Silver release kinetics and mechanical properties of nanocomposites were investigated under bioreactor conditions in the simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37°C. The release of silver was monitored under static conditions, and in two types of bioreactors: perfusion bioreactors and a bioreactor with dynamic compression coupled with SBF perfusion simulating in vivo conditions in articular cartilage. Ag/PVP nanocomposites exhibited slight cytotoxic effects against PBMC at the estimated concentration of 0.4 μmol dm(-3), with negligible variations observed amongst different cell cultures investigated. Studies of the silver release kinetics indicated internal diffusion as the rate limiting step, determined by statistically comparable results obtained at all investigated conditions. However, silver release rate was slightly higher in the bioreactor with dynamic compression coupled with SBF perfusion as compared to the other two systems indicating the influence of dynamic compression. Modelling of silver release kinetics revealed potentials for optimization of Ag/PVP nanocomposites for particular applications as wound dressings or soft tissue implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of aflatoxin on performance, hematology, and clinical immunology in lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, A; Hernández, M; Verde, M T; Sanz, M

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four female lambs were intoxicated with a diet contaminated with 2 ppm aflatoxin for a period of 37 d. Twelve lambs were maintained as the control group. After this period, the lambs were left for 35 d without aflatoxin in their feed. Performance, hematology and clinical immunology were examined in the intoxicated lambs. A non-significant decrease in body weight was observed in the intoxicated lambs during the intoxication period, whereas a significant decrease (P<0.001) in average daily gain was noted on the last day of intoxication and during the clearance period. No significant differences were observed in erythrocyte count, white blood cell count or differential leukocyte count between the groups. Bacteriostatic activity of the serum was lower in the intoxicated lambs, however, there was no effect on serum opsonic activity. Phagocytosis by the neutrophils was higher during the intoxication period and the levels of IgG were elevated in the intoxicated lambs. In vivo cellular immunity was assessed by intradermal injection of phytohemagglutinin; the response was lower during intoxication period. These results indicate that a lowering in the average daily gain was the most sensitive indicator of aflatoxicosis in lambs, and that the immune response was altered, which could render the animals more susceptible to infectious diseases. PMID:10680657

  13. Selective Regulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected CD4+ Lymphocytes by a Synthetic Immunomodulator Leads to Potent Virus Suppression In Vitro and in hu-PBL-SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, George M.; Darcissac, Edith C. A.; Castéran, Nathalie; Amiel, Corinne; Cocude, Cécile; Truong, Marie-José; Dewulf, Joëlle; Capron, André; Mouton, Yves

    2001-01-01

    We have previously observed that the synthetic immunomodulator Murabutide inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication at multiple levels in macrophages and dendritic cells. The present study was designed to profile the activity of Murabutide on CD8-depleted phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected subjects and on the outcome of HIV-1 infection in severe combined immunodeficiency mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID mice). Maintaining cultures of CD8-depleted blasts from 36 patients in the presence of Murabutide produced dramatically reduced levels of viral p24 protein in the supernatants. This activity correlated with reduced viral transcripts and proviral DNA, was evident in cultures harboring R5, X4-R5, or X4 HIV-1 isolates, was not linked to inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis, and did not correlate with β-chemokine release. Moreover, c-myc mRNA expression was down-regulated in Murabutide-treated cells, suggesting potential interference of the immunomodulator with the nuclear transport of viral preintegration complexes. On the other hand, daily treatment of HIV-1-infected hu-PBL-SCID mice with Murabutide significantly reduced the viral loads in plasma and the proviral DNA content in human peritoneal cells. These results are the first to demonstrate that a clinically acceptable synthetic immunomodulator with an ability to enhance the host's nonspecific immune defense mechanisms against infections can directly regulate cellular factors in infected lymphocytes, leading to controlled HIV-1 replication. PMID:11435574

  14. Outcome of asbestos exposure (lung fibrosis and antinuclear antibodies) with respect to skin reactivity: an 8-year longitudinal study

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, A.; Garncarek, D.; Tomeczko, J.; Ciechanowski, G.; Bisikiewicz, R.

    1986-10-01

    Two hundred seventy asbestos workers were examined during an 8-year period. During this time five consecutive surveys were completed. Skin tests with streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD), tuberculin (PPD), and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were performed in the middle of this period. The results of these tests were related to X-ray chest film results and the appearance of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). In all surveys, except the first, X-ray films with small irregular opacities with a profusion greater than or equal to1/1 belonged more frequently to asbestos workers who did not respond to SK-SD or PHA. Thirty-one cases of asbestosis were diagnosed at that time, 23 of them became asbestotic after the skin tests were performed. Asbestotic cases contributed more frequently to the group with energy as compared to asbestos workers lacking asbestosis. Furthermore, asbestosis was correlated with lack of response to second strength of SK-SD in males and PHA in both sexes. Lack of response to these activators was predictive of asbestosis. Asbestos workers with ANA frequently displayed a lack of response to the first strength of SK-SD, PPD, and PHA. This was partly due to the presence of asbestotic cases in the group. However, low responders to all these activators were found frequently in the group with ANA independent of the presence of asbestosis.

  15. Development of a human T-cell hybridoma secreting separate B-cell growth and differentiation factors.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, J L; Falkoff, R J; Fauci, A S

    1984-01-01

    A cloned human T-cell hybridoma (7D5) secreting B-cell growth factor (BCGF) and B-cell differentiation factor (BCDF) was established. Supernatant from this hybrid was capable of maintaining proliferation in anti-IgM-activated normal human B cells. In addition, the hybridoma supernatant induced differentiation and antibody secretion in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I-stimulated B cells. No interleukin 2 was present in supernatant from this hybridoma. Molecular size of the hybridoma-derived BCGF and BCDF was determined by gel filtration chromatography. BCGF activity was present in the 20-kDa fractions, and BCDF activity eluted in the 30- to 35-kDa fractions. The isoelectric points of the factors, determined by chromatofocusing, were 6.6 for BCGF and 5.9 for BCDF. Finally, absorption experiments were performed using specific target cells. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-cell blasts did not remove either BCGF or BCDF activity. Anti-IgM-activated B cells absorbed BCGF but not BCDF. In contrast, CESS cells removed BCDF but not BCGF. Thus, a human T-cell hybridoma secreting two distinct B-cell lymphokines was developed. Further immunochemical and functional studies of these immunoregulatory molecules should greatly enhance our understanding of the regulation of human B-cell function in normal and disease states. PMID:6609362

  16. Development of a human T-cell hybridoma secreting separate B-cell growth and differentiation factors.

    PubMed

    Butler, J L; Falkoff, R J; Fauci, A S

    1984-04-01

    A cloned human T-cell hybridoma (7D5) secreting B-cell growth factor (BCGF) and B-cell differentiation factor (BCDF) was established. Supernatant from this hybrid was capable of maintaining proliferation in anti-IgM-activated normal human B cells. In addition, the hybridoma supernatant induced differentiation and antibody secretion in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I-stimulated B cells. No interleukin 2 was present in supernatant from this hybridoma. Molecular size of the hybridoma-derived BCGF and BCDF was determined by gel filtration chromatography. BCGF activity was present in the 20-kDa fractions, and BCDF activity eluted in the 30- to 35-kDa fractions. The isoelectric points of the factors, determined by chromatofocusing, were 6.6 for BCGF and 5.9 for BCDF. Finally, absorption experiments were performed using specific target cells. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-cell blasts did not remove either BCGF or BCDF activity. Anti-IgM-activated B cells absorbed BCGF but not BCDF. In contrast, CESS cells removed BCDF but not BCGF. Thus, a human T-cell hybridoma secreting two distinct B-cell lymphokines was developed. Further immunochemical and functional studies of these immunoregulatory molecules should greatly enhance our understanding of the regulation of human B-cell function in normal and disease states.

  17. Comparison of the immunosuppressive effect of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) vs conventional immunosuppression (CI) in renal cadaveric allotransplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Vanrenterghem, Y.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Michielsen, P.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-02-01

    Beginning in November 1981, eight patients with end stage diabetic nephropathy underwent renal cadaveric transplantation after TLI. Transplantation was done between 2 to 11 days after the end of a fractionated TLI to a total dose of 20 to 30 Gy. During the same observation period, 60 nondiabetic patients with end stage renal disease of different origin also received a cadaveric kidney graft, with a conventional regimen of immunosuppression that consists of anti-lymphocyte-globulin, tapering high doses of prednisone, and azathioprine. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-, concanavalin A (con A)-, and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced blastogenesis, as well as the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) decreased progressively during the first months after conventional immunosuppression to 50% of the pretransplantation level, and remained there for the first year after transplantation. These tests were much more impaired after TLI and again no recovery occurred during the first year. In the clinic, the more profound immunosuppression in TLI patients was more frequently associated with viral infections (cytomegalovirus and herpes zoster). The incidence of rejections, however, was somewhat less frequent in the TLI-treated group and occurred significantly later. After TLI, the mean cumulative dose of steroids needed for kidney transplantation during the first year after transplantation could be substantially reduced.

  18. Parasite infection negatively affects PHA-triggered inflammation in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Julieta L; Cutrera, Ana P; Zenuto, Roxana R

    2016-02-01

    Magnitude and effectiveness of immune responses vary greatly between and within species. Among factors reported to determine this variation, parasitism is a critical one, although controversial effects of parasites over immunological indices have been reported. Information regarding immune strategies in species with different life histories is crucial to better understand the role of immune defenses in an ecological and evolutionary context. Here, we examine the influence of the parasite community on immune responsiveness of a solitary subterranean rodent, Ctenomys talarum. To do this, we assessed the impact of the natural parasite community and the experimental infection with Eimeria sp. on the phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-response, as well as other immune, condition, nutrition, and stress parameters. PHA-triggered inflammation was similarly impaired by Eimeria sp. infection alone or co-occurring with a number of gastrointestinal nematodes. None of the other physiological parameters studied were affected by parasitism. This indicates that parasitism is a general key factor modulating immune responsiveness of the host, and in particular for C. talarum, it could explain the great inter-individual variation previously observed in the PHA-response. Thus, our results highlight the importance of taking the parasite community into account in ecoimmunological studies, particularly when using immunological indices.

  19. Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit (CD298): association with alpha subunit and expression on peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Chiampanichayakul, S; Khunkaewla, P; Pata, S; Kasinrerk, W

    2006-12-01

    Beta3 subunit is described as one of the Na, K ATPase subunits. Recently, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb), termed P-3E10. This mAb was shown to react with the Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit or CD298. By immunofluorescence analysis using mAb P-3E10, it was found that all peripheral blood leukocytes express Na, K ATPase beta3. The presence of beta3 subunit on leukocytes is not in a quantitative polymorphic manner. Upon phytohemagglutinin or phorbol myristate acetate activation, the expression level of the Na, K ATPase beta3 subunit on activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not altered in comparison with those of unstimulated cells. Red blood cells (RBCs) of healthy donors showed negative reactivity with mAb P-3E10. However, more than 80% of thalassemic RBCs showed positive reactivity. By immunoprecipitation, moreover, a protein band of 55-65 kDa was precipitated from normal RBC membrane using mAb P-3E10. These results evidenced that the beta3 subunit of Na, K ATPase is expressed on RBC membrane but the epitope recognized by mAb P-3E10 is hidden in normal RBCs. Furthermore, we showed the association of beta3 subunit and alpha subunit of Na, K ATPase. This information is important for further understanding of the functional roles of this molecule.

  20. Proteomic analysis of common bean seed with storage protein deficiency reveals up-regulation of sulfur-rich proteins and starch and raffinose metabolic enzymes, and down-regulation of the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Marsolais, Frédéric; Pajak, Agnieszka; Yin, Fuqiang; Taylor, Meghan; Gabriel, Michelle; Merino, Diana M; Ma, Vanessa; Kameka, Alexander; Vijayan, Perumal; Pham, Hai; Huang, Shangzhi; Rivoal, Jean; Bett, Kirstin; Hernández-Sebastià, Cinta; Liu, Qiang; Bertrand, Annick; Chapman, Ralph

    2010-06-16

    A deficiency in major seed storage proteins is associated with a nearly two-fold increase in sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Their mature seed proteome was compared by an approach combining label-free quantification by spectral counting, 2-DE, and analysis of selective extracts. Lack of phaseolin, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin was mainly compensated by increases in legumin, alpha-amylase inhibitors and mannose lectin FRIL. Along with legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were major contributors to the elevated sulfur amino acid content. Coordinate induction of granule-bound starch synthase I, starch synthase II-2 and starch branching enzyme were associated with minor alteration of starch composition, whereas increased levels of UDP-glucose 4-epimerase were correlated with a 30% increase in raffinose content. Induction of cell division cycle protein 48 and ubiquitin suggested enhanced ER-associated degradation. This was not associated with a classical unfolded protein response as the levels of ER HSC70-cognate binding protein were actually reduced in the mutant. Repression of rab1 GTPase was consistent with decreased traffic through the secretory pathway. Collectively, these results have implications for the nutritional quality of common bean, and provide information on the pleiotropic phenotype associated with storage protein deficiency in a dicotyledonous seed.

  1. Long-term cytogenetic effects of antineoplastic treatment in relation to secondary leukemia.

    PubMed

    Genuardi, M; Zollino, M; Serra, A; Leone, G; Mancini, R; Mango, G; Neri, G

    1988-07-15

    Chromosome translocations are consistently present in leukemias and lymphomas and are likely to represent primary events in the development of these neoplasias. A study of conditions that predispose to leukemia could shed some light on the origin of these translocations and therefore help in clarifying their exact role in the process of neoplastic transformation. Based on this assumption, we studied a group of individuals treated with radiochemotherapy for previous lymphoma and who were at increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia. The group comprised 14 Hodgkin's disease patients, 11 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, and 13 controls. The patients were in remission and had been off therapy for at least 6 months. Chromosomes were studied from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocytes and from bone marrow cells by the direct method and after short-term cultures (72 hours). The latter were also exposed to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Metaphases were scored for chromosome breaks, gaps, and other rearrangements. The percentage of gaps and breaks was significantly higher in patients than in controls. The difference was induced by BrdU and was apparent in bone marrow cells, but not in peripheral lymphocytes. We conclude that individuals exposed to the action of mutagenic agents (radiochemotherapy) have an increased chromosome instability that could be related to their increased risk of developing a secondary leukemia.

  2. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  3. Effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Wang, Xue-Ming; Jiang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Li, Na; Wei, Zhen-Zhen; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Ya-Jiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the changes of X-box binding protein 1 splicing (XBP1s) and inflammatory cytokine expression in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). METHODS: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were performed to detect the forms of XBP1s and the expression of interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-γ, and IL-17α. Differences between patients with UC and normal subjects were then determined. RESULTS: Mononuclear cells of the peripheral blood of normal subjects and UC patients with were stimulated with no drugs (control), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), thapsigargin (TG), or both PHA and TG. XBP1s in patients with UC exhibited splicing, which was greater with co-stimulation than single stimulation. Co-stimulation increased the expression level of IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-17α. CONCLUSION: The T lymphocytes of both normal subjects and patients with UC responded to ERS by activating the XBP1s-mediated signalling pathway, upregulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and increasing the occurrence of inflammation. The mononuclear cells in the peripheral blood of patients with UC were more sensitive to ERS than those in the peripheral blood of normal subjects. PMID:26900298

  4. Extraction and Purification of a Lectin from Red Kidney Bean and Preliminary Immune Function Studies of the Lectin and Four Chinese Herbal Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yufang; Hou, Yubao; Yanyan, Liu; Qin, Guang; Li, Jichang

    2010-01-01

    Reversed micelles were used to extract lectin from red kidney beans and factors affecting reverse micellar systems (pH value, ionic strength and extraction time) were studied. The optimal conditions were extraction at pH 4–6, back extraction at pH 9–11, ion strength at 0.15 M NaCl, extraction for 4–6 minutes and back extraction for 8 minutes. The reverse micellar system was compared with traditional extraction methods and demonstrated to be a time-saving method for the extraction of red kidney bean lectin. Mitogenic activity of the lectin was reasonably good compared with commercial phytohemagglutinin (extracted from Phaseolus vulgaris) Mitogenic properties of the lectin were enhanced when four Chinese herbal polysaccharides were applied concurrently, among which 50 μg/mL Astragalus mongholicus polysaccharides (APS) with 12.5 μg/mL red kidney bean lectin yielded the highest mitogenic activity and 100 mg/kg/bw APS with 12.5 mg/kg/bw red kidney bean lectin elevated mouse nonspecific immunity. PMID:20976304

  5. Increased production of inflammatory cytokines in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Mueller, Claudius; Dickson, Cindy; Kirsch, Wolff

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that chronic inflammation plays a pathogenic role in both the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have screened for cytokines differentially produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and mild AD subjects who had progressed from MCI using a commercially available cytokine array. Following determination of expressed cytokines, we quantified levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 using flow cytometry. We have found a significant increase in the levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 produced by PBMCs stimulated for 24 h with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in MCI subjects compared to healthy elderly controls. However, in PBMCs stimulated for 48 h with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lower TNF-alpha/IL-10, IL-6/IL-10, and IL-8/IL-10 ratios were seen in MCI subjects. There were no differences in plasma levels of IL-8 between aged controls, MCI, and mild AD, and the levels of circulating IL-6 and IL-10 were below detection limits. Our data indicate that changes in cytokine production by PBMCs may be detected early in MCI, and an alteration of the immune response may precede clinical AD.

  6. Localization of the kappa opioid receptor gene to human chromosome band 8q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kazuki; Takeda, Jun; Bell, G.I.; Espinosa, R.; Le Beau, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Using the cloned mouse kappa opioid receptor cDNA clone as a probe, screened a human genomic library and isolated a clone containing part of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1), designated [lambda]hSR4-1. To determine the chromosomal localization of OPRK1, [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA was labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of bio-11-dUTP and hybridized to human metaphase cells prepared from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes as described previously. Hybridization of the OPRK1-specific probe [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA to normal human metaphase chromosomes resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 8. Specific labeling of 8q11 was observed on all 4 (6 cells), 3 (9 cells), 2 (9 cells), or 1 (1 cell) chromatid of the chromosome 8 homologs in 25 cells examined. Of 72 signals observed, 70 were located at 8q11. 1 signal was located at 7q11 and at 12p11. In most cells, the signal on 8q was located at 8q11.2. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Chromosomal localization of the [delta] opioid receptor gene to human 1p34. 3-36. 1 and mouse 4D bands by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Befort, K.; Kieffer, B. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. )

    1994-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the precise localization of this gene in the murine as well as human genome by in situ hybridization. Southern analysis, using the noncoding part of the cDNA as a probe (NotI-BamHI fragment, 1040 bp) under high-stringency conditions, shows the existence of a single-copy gene in the murine genome. In a similar analysis performed on human genomic DNA, the coding part of the cDNA (PstI-NotI fragment, 976 bp) clearly detected a single gene in the human genome (not shown). The authors therefore used these two probes for the chromosomal localization of the murine gene and its human counterpart, respectively. Chromosome spread preparations from concanavalin A (mouse) or phytohemagglutinin (human)-stimulated lymphocytes were hybridized with tritium-labeled cDNAs, exposed for 15 days, and developed, as described previously. For the murine assignment, a total of 100 metaphase cells were examined, and 149 silver grains were found. Forty-two grains were associated with chromosome 4, and 73.8% of them mapped to the D1-D3 region of the chromosome. In the 120 metaphase human cells analyzed, 197 silver grains were found, 25.8% of which were located on chromosome 1. The distribution of grains allowed mapping of the human [delta] opioid receptor gene to the p34.3-p36.1 region of the short arm with a maximum in the p35 band.

  8. Interference of cephalosporins with immune response: effects of cefonicid on human T-helper cells.

    PubMed

    Villa, M L; Armelloni, S; Ferrario, E; Ottaviani, F; Clerici, M

    1991-01-01

    To determine the immunosuppressive effect(s) of cephalosporin cefonicid (CEFO) on human T-helper cells (Th), we exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to various concentrations of CEFO during in vitro stimulation with a panel of T-lymphocyte stimulators that activate different Th/antigen presenting cell (APC) pathways. We evaluated the proliferation and IL-2 production induced by influenza virus (FLU), allogeneic lymphocytes (ALLO), xenogeneic mouse splenocytes (XENO) or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The proliferative responses to FLU and XENO were much more depressed by CEFO than those to ALLO or PHA. After 7 days of culture with the highest dose of CEFO tested (200 mg/l) the stimulation index (stimulated/unstimulated culture) was near to 0 in FLU and XENO treated cultures, indicating that the response against these antigens was completely abrogated. The responses to ALLO and PHA were also impaired, but not abrogated (stimulation index greater than 1). Since FLU and XENO utilize the CD4+ Th/self-APC pathway our data suggested that this pathway was extremely sensitive to CEFO-induced inhibition both when the response requires memory Th cells (FLU) and virgin Th cells (XENO). The incubation with CEFO (200 mg/l) reduced the IL-2 production by XENO, FLU and ALLO to less than 20% of control cultures, while paradoxically increases to 120% the production by PHA.

  9. Mononuclear cell modulation of connective tissue function: suppression of fibroblast growth by stimulation of endogenous prostaglandin production.

    PubMed Central

    Korn, J H; Halushka, P V; LeRoy, E C

    1980-01-01

    The role of immune cell products in modulating connective tissue metabolism was investigated. Supernates of both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human mononuclear cell cultures suppressed fibroblast proliferation (up to 90%) and concomintantly stimulated fibroblast prostaglandin E(PGE) synthesis (20- to 70-fold). The growth suppression was, at least in part, a secondary result of the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis; growth suppression (a) paralled the increased fibroblast PGE synthesis, (b) was reversed by addition of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis (indomethacin, meclofenamate, and eicostaetraynoic acid), and (c) was reproduced by addition of exogenous PGE2 to fibroblast cultures. The prostaglandin-stimulatory, growth-suppressive activity was a product of non-T-lymphocyte, adherent cells and was present within 6 h of mononuclear cell culture. The activity was heat (56 degrees C) and trypsin sensitive, nondialyzable, and appeared in the 12,000-20,000 mol wt fractions by Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The activity in supernates of mononuclear cell cultures was removed by incubation with fibroblasts but not by similar incubation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells release a factor(s) which modulates fibroblast proliferation by altering prostaglandin metabolism. PMID:7356693

  10. State-dependent physiological maintenance in a long-lived ectotherm, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta).

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa; Warner, Daniel A; McGaugh, Suzanne; Di Terlizzi, Roberta; Bronikowski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Energy allocation among somatic maintenance, reproduction and growth varies not only among species, but among individuals according to states such as age, sex and season. Little research has been conducted on the somatic (physiological) maintenance of long-lived organisms, particularly ectotherms such as reptiles. In this study, we examined sex differences and age- and season-related variation in immune function and DNA repair efficiency in a long-lived reptile, the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta). Immune components tended to be depressed during hibernation, in winter, compared with autumn or spring. Increased heterophil count during hibernation provided the only support for winter immunoenhancement. In juvenile and adult turtles, we found little evidence for senescence in physiological maintenance, consistent with predictions for long-lived organisms. Among immune components, swelling in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and control injection increased with age, whereas basophil count decreased with age. Hatchling turtles had reduced basophil counts and natural antibodies, indicative of an immature immune system, but demonstrated higher DNA repair efficiency than older turtles. Reproductively mature turtles had reduced lymphocytes compared with juvenile turtles in the spring, presumably driven by a trade-off between maintenance and reproduction. Sex had little influence on physiological maintenance. These results suggest that components of physiological maintenance are modulated differentially according to individual state and highlight the need for more research on the multiple components of physiological maintenance in animals of variable states.

  11. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects of cynaropicrin, a sesquiterpene lactone, from Saussurea lappa.

    PubMed

    Cho, J Y; Baik, K U; Jung, J H; Park, M H

    2000-06-23

    We investigated in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of cynaropicrin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Saussurea lappa, on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) release, and lymphocyte proliferation. Cynaropicrin strongly inhibited TNF-alpha release from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophage, RAW264.7 cells, and differentiated human macrophage, U937 cells, proved to produce notable amount of TNF-alpha. It also potently attenuated the accumulation of NO released from lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the immunosuppressive effects of the compound on lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogenic stimuli were examined. Cynaropicrin also dose-dependently suppressed the proliferation of lymphocytes from splenocytes and interleukin-2-sensitive cytotoxic T lymphocyte, CTLL-2 cells, stimulated by lipopolysaccharide, concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. However, treatment with sulphydryl compound, L-cysteine, abrogated all these inhibitory effects. These results suggest that cynaropicrin may participate in the inflammatory response by inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators and the proliferation of lymphocytes and its inhibitory effect is mediated through conjugation with sulphydryl groups of target protein(s).

  12. Immune Response and Function: Exercise Conditioning Versus Bed-Rest and Spaceflight Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Lawless, D.

    1994-01-01

    Immune responses measured at rest immediately or some hours after exercise training (some with and some without increase in maximal oxygen uptake) gave variable and sometimes conflicting results; therefore, no general conclusions can be drawn. On the other hand, most immune responses were either unchanged (immunoglobulin, T cells, CD4+, and natural killer activity) or decreased (blood properdin, neutrophil phagocytic activity, salivary lysozymes, brain immunoglobulin A and G, and liver B lymphocytes and phytohemagglutinin activity) during prolonged bed rest. Some data suggested that exercise training during bed rest may partially ameliorate the decreased functioning of the immune system. Exercise and change in body position, especially during prolonged bed rest with plasma fluid shifts and diuresis, may induce a change in plasma protein concentration and content, which can influence drug metabolism as well as immune function. Leukocytosis, accompanied by lymphopenia and a depressed lymphocyte response, occurs in astronauts on return to Earth from spaceflight; recovery may depend on time of exposure to microgravity. It is clear that the effect of drugs and exercise used as countermeasures for microgravity deconditioning should be evaluated for their effect on an astronaut's immune system to assure optimal health and performance on long-duration space missions.

  13. Wrestlers’ immune cells produce higher interleukin-6 and lower interleukin-12 and interleukin-13 in response to in vitro mitogen activation

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Alireza; Omidi, Mostafa; Hemmatfar, Ahmad; Salehi, Iraj; Bazmamoun, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Although recent investigations have shown chronic inflammation and inflammation-associated diseases might be ameliorated by exercise; little is known about the relation between exercise training with anti/pro-inflammatory cytokines. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted to compare interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon gamma (IFN-γ ) levels in serum, and their in vitro production by whole blood (WB) cells and by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to mitogens lipopolysaccharide and phytohemagglutinin. Twelve elite wrestlers with history of three times per week exercise training for about 9.5 years, and thirteen healthy silent controls were recruited. To analysis the cytokines by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the blood samples were taken 24 hr after the last training session from the wrestlers. Results: Serum analysis for IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13 and IFN-γ indicated no statistical difference between the two groups. Meanwhile, 48 hr in vitro activation of WB and PBMCs by the mitogens revealed that IL-6 production was elevated in both WB and PBMCs. Whereas, IL-12 and IL-13 were decreased in supernatant of PBMCs and WB cells cultures, respectively. Conclusion: It seems that wrestling cause immune system cells to produce anti-inflammatory myokine IL-6 and decrease production of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 and IL-13. PMID:25691935

  14. Inhibition of lymphocyte activation by extracts and fractions of Kalanchoe, Alternanthera, Paullinia and Mikania species.

    PubMed

    Moraes, V L; Santos, L F; Castro, S B; Loureiro, L H; Lima, O A; Souza, M L; Yien, L M; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Costa, S S

    1994-12-01

    Aqueous or ethanol extracts obtained from the leaves of Mikania glomerata (Asteraceae) and different species of Kalanchoe (Crassulaceae) or Alternanthera (Amaranthaceae) and from seeds of Paullinia cupana (Sapindaceae) blocked the capacity of human lymphocytes to proliferate in vitro. In all cases, a proliferative response induced by cocultivation of lymphocytes with phytohemagglutinin was inhibited even after depletion of phagocytic mononuclear cells by adherence. A flavonoid-enriched fraction from K. pinnata and an ethyl acetate fraction from A. tenella were 10 to 20-fold, respectively, more potent in inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation than their original crude extracts. In contrast, these fractions had no inhibitory action on human natural killer activity. Lymphocyte suppression by the extracts was not due to a cytotoxic effect. Pre-incubation with the highest extract concentrations did not affect the capacity of lymphocytes to proliferate, after removal of extracts from the medium. These results indicate a direct action of the extracts on lymphocytes. They also suggest that these medicinal plants may contain potential immunosuppressive substances that selectively act on activation steps of the cells of the immune system. Copyright © 1994 Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells during hepatosplenic Schistosoma mansoni infections.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, H M; Demian, S R; Heshmat, M G; Ismail, N S; El-Sayed, Laila H

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important regulator of host responses during infection with a variety of intra- and extra-cellular pathogens. The present work aimed at assessment of in vitro spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced apoptosis in mononuclear cells isolated from patients with hepatosplenic form of S. mansoni infections. Cell death data were correlated to the degree of lymphoproliferative responses to PHA as well as to the serum anti-schistosomal antibody titers. A markedly significant increase in PHA-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes isolated from S. mansoni-infected patients was seen when compared to the corresponding healthy controls. However, a slight difference was recorded between the two studied groups regarding the spontaneous apoptosis. This was accompanied with a significant impairment of in vitro PHA-induced lymphoproliferation of T cells from S. mansoni patients. Data of the present study supports the hypothesis that activation-induced cell death (AICD) is a potentially contributing factor in T helper (Th) cell regulation during chronic stages of schistosomiasis, which represents a critically determinant factor in the host-parasite interaction and might influence the destiny of parasitic infections either towards establishment of chronic infection or towards host death.

  16. Transferrin receptor function in hereditary hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.H.; Kushner, J.P.; Ray, F.A.; Kaplan, J.

    1984-02-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-diferric transferrin to cultured skin fibroblasts and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes was studied in cells derived from individuals homozygous for hereditary hemochromatosis and from normal individuals. Receptors with a high affinity for diferric transferrin were present on all cells. Transferrin receptor number decreased by more than 50% when fibroblasts from both normal and hemochromatotic subjects were maintained in iron-supplemented medium. The number of transferrin receptors expressed by normal and hemochromatotic lymphocytes after mitogen stimulation in iron-supplemented media was less than 50% that of lymphocytes which were mitogen stimulated in standard medium. No change in the affinity of the receptors of diferric transferrin was seen in cells maintained in iron-supplemented medium. Competition experiments in the presence of deferoxamine suggested that the transferrin receptors of fibroblasts and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes have a 70- to 100-fold higher affinity for diferric transferrin than for apotransferrin. No differences in the properties of transferrin receptors were found between patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and normal individuals. Although transferrin binding decreases when cells are exposed to high levels of iron in the medium, the failure to totally abolish transferrin binding to the receptor suggests that the concentration of diferric transferrin to which cells are exposed may be a major determinant of cellular iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis.

  17. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic difference in the proliferative response to T mitogens between Hi/PHA and Lo/PHA lymphocytes is independent of accessory cell function.

    PubMed

    Stiffel, C; Liacopoulos-Briot, M; Decreusefond, C; Parlebas, J

    1987-01-01

    The role of the macrophage as accessory cell in the proliferative response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was studied in two lines of mice genetically selected for high and low responsiveness to T mitogens. Adherent cell depletion of lymph node cells abrogated the low (Lo)/PHA response, but only partially inhibited the high (Hi)/PHA response. Addition of peritoneal cells provided either by Hi/PHA or by Lo/PHA mice equally restored Hi/PHA responsiveness but had only a slight reconstituting effect on the inhibited Lo/PHA response. Equivalent enhancement or suppression of proliferation of untreated lymph node cells was obtained by the addition of increasing percentages of each of the two peritoneal cell populations. However, the maximum level of the Lo/PHA response never reached that of Hi/PHA cells. These data indicate that the bidirectional selective breeding has not modified the potentialities of the macrophages as accessory cells but has resulted in an impaired response of Lo/PHA lymphocytes to the signals delivered either by accessory cells or by T mitogens.

  19. Characterization of lymphocyte transformation induced by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Berger, N A; Skinner, A M

    1974-04-01

    Lymphocyte cultures from all normal human adults are stimulated by zinc ions to increase DNA and RNA synthesis and undergo blast transformation. Optimal stimulation occurs at 0.1 mM Zn(++). Examination of the effects of other divalent cations reveals that 0.01 mM Hg(++) also stimulates lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Ca(++) and Mg(++) do not affect DNA synthesis in this culture system, while Mn(++), Co(++), Cd(++), Cu(++), and Ni(++) at concentrations of 10(-7)-10(-3) M are inhibitory. DNA and RNA synthesis and blast transformation begin to increase after cultures are incubated for 2-3 days with Zn(++) and these processes reach a maximum rate after 6 days. The increase in Zn(++)-stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis is prevented by rendering cells incapable of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis with actinomycin D or by blocking protein synthesis with cycloheximide or puromycin. Zn(++)-stimulated DNA synthesis is also partially inhibited by 5'-AMP and chloramphenicol. Zn(++) must be present for the entire 6-day culture period to produce maximum stimulation of DNA synthesis. In contrast to its ability to independently stimulate DNA synthesis, 0.1 mM Zn(++) inhibits DNA synthesis in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes and L1210 lymphoblasts.

  20. Distemper virus infection in ferrets: an animal model of measles-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, C A; Bergman, A G; O'Connor, R P

    1982-01-01

    Distemper virus is very similar antigenically to measles virus, and the disease produced in ferrets by distemper is a systemic illness quite similar to measles infection in humans. Using an attenuated strain of distemper virus, we produced a mild systemic illness in ferrets and were able to study the effects of the viral infection on cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Beginning on day 5 after viral inoculation and continuing to day 30, infected ferrets showed a marked lymphopenia, with a reduction in total numbers of all lymphocyte subpopulations studied. Transformation of circulating lymphocytes to the mitogens phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen was suppressed on day 5, reached a nadir by days 8 to 11, and returned toward normal by days 23 to 30 after viral inoculation. Production of macrophage migration inhibitory factor by splenic macrophages was diminished during distemper infection. In contrast to marked suppression of these in vitro assays for CMI, delayed hypersensitivity skin test responses were only slightly diminished in animals infected with distemper virus. This model should prove useful in exploring the mechanisms of measles induced immunosuppression. PMID:7044625

  1. Effects of selenium supplementation on immune parameters in gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Duchateau, J; Siderova, V; Huygen, K; Famaey, J P; Carpentier, Y A

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between some parameters of the immune response and selenium were investigated in five patients receiving home parenteral nutrition for short-bowel syndrome. They were first submitted to a relative depletion by providing 20 micrograms selenium/day as L-selenomethionine for 1 mo. Then, daily selenium intake was raised to 200 micrograms for 2-4 mo. On entering the study, the patients presented a relatively good health status, and immunological parameters were at the lowest limit of the normal range. Four patients rapidly responded to the 200-micrograms supplementation by a continuous increase in their plasma selenium levels, whereas the fifth patient showed a moderate and late increase. At the end of the trial, there was an improvement in the lymphocyte response to pokeweed and phytohemagglutinin mitogens in four patients and to CD3 in three patients. The response to two of three antigens (Candidin, Varidase) tested was also enhanced in the same patients, but the response to the third antigen (tetanus toxoid) was uniformly low in all patients. The only patient showing essentially no immune improvement after selenium supplementation was the one with a low and delayed increase in plasma selenium. This study supports a role for selenium in the maintenance of an optimal immune response in humans.

  2. Assessment of the immunotoxic potential of the fungicide dinocap in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Luebke, R.W.; Riddle, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The immunotoxic potential of dinocap was evaluated in female C57BL/6J mice following in vivo and in vitro exposure to the fungicide. In in vivo studies, groups of mice were dosed with technical grade dinocap at dosages ranging from 12.5 to 50 mg/kg/d and selected immune functions examined. Twelve days of dosing with dinocap at 25 mg/kg/d resulted in decreased thymus weights and cellularity, and increased spleen weights. Lymphoproliferative responses to concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) were reduced in thymocytes from mice dosed at 25 mg/kg/d dinocap. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to P815 mastocytoma cells was enhanced in mice exposed for 7 days to 25 mg/kg/d dinocap. In vitro studies using murine thymocytes cultured with dinocap (10 ug/ml for 72 hr) resulted in suppression of the proliferative response to Con A and PHA. These results suggest that dinocap is immunotoxic in the mouse, causing effects on T lymphocytes.

  3. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    SciTech Connect

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  5. Immunostimulatory Effects of the Anionic Alkali Mineral Complex BARODON on Equine Lymphocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Koo, HyeCheong; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Woo Kyung; Park, Young Kyung; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, So Hyun; Kim, Jun Man; Yoo, Byung Woo; Choi, Soo Il; Davis, William C.; Park, Yong Ho

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the anionic alkali mineral complex BARODON has an immunoenhancing effect on pigs as an adjuvant and as a nonspecific immunostimulant. Likewise, the equine immune system has been defined with various monoclonal antibodies specific to equine leukocyte differentiation antigens to determine the possibility of enhancing equine resistance to respiratory diseases and promoting other immunostimulatory effects with the application of BARODON. Compared with the control group, after 3 weeks of treatment, BARODON-treated groups showed higher proportions of cells (P < 0.05) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II and CD2, CD4+, CD4+ CD25+, CD8+, and CD8+ CD25+ T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and surface immunoglobulin M+ B lymphocytes in peripheral blood, as well as enhanced cell proliferative responses with phytohemagglutinin and increased phagocytic activity against Streptococcus equi and Staphylococcus aureus strains with high antibiotic resistance, the bacteria frequently identified as etiologic agents of equine respiratory diseases at the Seoul Race Park in Seoul, Korea. This study shows that BARODON may act as an immunostimulator and can be an effective alternative to antimicrobial feed additives for nonspecific improvements in equine immune responses, particularly against respiratory diseases. PMID:16943344

  6. Effects of NO/sub 2/ on immune responses in pulmonary lymph of sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.

    1982-08-01

    Sheep in which the efferent duct of the caudal mediastinal lymph node was cannulated were exposed to 5 ppm NO/sub 2/, 1.5 h/d for 10 or 11 d. Immune responses were assessed by measuring the daily output of hemolytic plaque-forming cells (PFC) in pulmonary lymph, following intrabronchial immunization with horse red blood cells (HRBC) and phytohemagglutinin- (PHA) induced transformation of blood and pulmonary lymph lymphocytes. Sheep immunized 2 d after termination of NO/sub 2/ exposure had reduced outputs of PFC as compared to those seen in sheep challenged 4 d after NO/sub 2/ exposure. Animals immunized 4 d after NO/sub 2/ exposure had outputs similar to those of air control sheep.A reduction of 38-87% in the transformation index of both blood and pulmonary lymph lymphocytes was observed in sheep exposed to NO/sub 2/. These results suggest that intermittent, short-term exposure to 5 ppm NO/sub 2/ may temporarily alter pulmonary immune responsiveness.

  7. The graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. I. T helper cell immunodeficiency associated with graft-versus-host-induced thymic epithelial cell damage

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1984-03-01

    The injection of parental A strain lymphoid cells into adrenalectomized CBAxA F1 (BAF1) mice induced a chronic graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction resulting in T cell and B cell immunosuppression as well as thymic epithelial cell injury, but not stress-related thymic involution. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice undergoing a GVH reaction were studied for their ability to reconstitute T helper cell (TH) function and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogen responses in thymectomized, irradiated, BAF1 mice reconstituted with normal syngeneic bone marrow (ATxBM). Thymocytes from BAF1 mice early after the induction of a GVH reaction (days 10-12) were as effective as normal thymocytes in reconstituting TH and mitogen responses. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice 40 or more days after the induction of a GVH reaction did not reconstitute either the TH function or PHA and Con A responses in ATxBM mice. The inability to reconstitute ATxBM mice was not due to the presence of suppressor cells contained in the thymocyte inoculum. It is proposed that GVH-induced thymic epithelial cell injury blocks or arrests normal T cell differentiation, resulting in a population of thymocytes that lack the potential to become competent T helper cells or mitogen-responsive cells when transferred into ATxBM mice. This thymic functional defect results in a permanent TH immunodeficiency in mice experiencing a chronic GVH reaction.

  8. Cytokine response patterns, exposure to viruses, and respiratory infections in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Christopher C; Gern, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Shult, Peter A; Rosenthal, Louis A; Mikus, Lance D; Kirk, Carol J; Roberg, Kathy A; Anderson, Elizabeth L; Tisler, Christopher J; DaSilva, Douglas F; Hiemke, Heidi J; Gentile, Kevin; Gangnon, Ronald E; Lemanske, Robert F

    2004-07-15

    Daycare attendance and siblings are associated with viral-induced wheezing in children. Preexisting immunologic factors may influence the expression of viral infections in infancy, and in turn, recurrent infections may influence the development of immune responses. A total of 285 children were enrolled in the Childhood Origins of Asthma Project at birth and followed for at least 1 year. Cord blood and 1-year mononuclear cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin, and cytokine-response profiles were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nasal lavage was performed for moderate to severe respiratory illnesses. Daycare attendance and/or siblings significantly increased the likelihood of contracting respiratory syncytial virus (1.5-1.6-fold increase) and rhinovirus (1.8-2.1-fold increase), and increased the risk of rhinovirus-induced wheezing (14-18% vs. 2%, p = 0.011). Cord blood IFN-gamma responses were inversely related to the frequency of viral respiratory infections (r(s) = -0.11, p = 0.05), and more significant for subjects with high exposure to other children (r(s) = -0.27, p = 0.028). The interval change in infantile IFN-gamma responses correlated positively with the frequency of viral infections in infancy (r(s) = 0.12, p = 0.047). These data suggest that neonatal IFN-gamma responses may influence antiviral activity, or may represent a marker of antiviral immunity maturation. Conversely, the frequency of viral infections in infancy can influence IFN-gamma responses.

  9. Carrier detection in xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Kraemer, K.H.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    We were able to detect clinically normal carriers of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) genes with coded samples of either peripheral blood lymphocytes or skin fibroblasts, using a cytogenetic assay shown previously to detect individuals with cancer-prone genetic disorders. Metaphase cells of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated T-lymphocytes from eight individuals who are obligate heterozygotes for XP were compared with those from nine normal controls at 1.3, 2.3, and 3.3 h after x-irradiation (58 R) during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Lymphocytes from the XP heterozygotes had twofold higher frequencies of chromatid breaks or chromatid gaps than normal (P less than 10(-5)) when fixed at 2.3 or 3.3 h after irradiation. Lymphocytes from six XP homozygotes had frequencies of breaks and gaps threefold higher than normal. Skin fibroblasts from an additional obligate XP heterozygote, when fixed approximately 2 h after x-irradiation (68 R), had a twofold higher frequency of chromatid breaks and a fourfold higher frequency of gaps than fibroblasts from a normal control. This frequency of aberrations in cells from the XP heterozygote was approximately half that observed in the XP homozygote. The elevated frequencies of chromatid breaks and gaps after G2 phase x-irradiation may provide the basis of a test for identifying carriers of the XP gene(s) within known XP families.

  10. Effect of renutrition on the proliferation kinetics of PHA stimulated lymphocytes from malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R; Campos, C; Gómez, J L; Espinoza, M; Ramos-Motilla, M; Betancourt, M

    1995-04-01

    The fraction of lymphocytes that responded to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation and initiated cellular proliferation (stimulation index or SI) was determined in groups of healthy and severely malnourished children. SI was determined again in the latter group after a period of nutritional recovery. The proportion of interphasic cells showing PHA response was assessed adding bromodeoxyuridine to the culture, so proliferative nuclei appear big and stain light blue, with dispersed granular chromatin and apparent nucleoli, while non-proliferative nuclei look small, stain red, and have compact and homogeneous chromatin. In mitotic nuclei, differential staining of sister chromatids made it possible to distinguish cells that had gone through one, two and three or more proliferation cycles. Based on the data obtained from interphase nuclei and mitosis, the SI was estimated at 48 and 72 h of culture. SI were higher in lymphocytes from healthy children than in those from children with severe malnutrition, even after the period of nutritional recovery. However, the SI was significantly higher in lymphocytes from malnourished children after nutritional recovery. Although in these children more cells are stimulated, there seems to be still damage that causes a cycling delay.

  11. Stimulatory response of neutrophils from periodontitis patients with periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Restaíno, C G; Chaparro, A; Valenzuela, M A; Kettlun, A M; Vernal, R; Silva, A; Puente, J; Jaque, M P; León, R; Gamonal, J

    2007-09-01

    Neutrophils play a crucial role in the defense of invading bacteria by releasing biologically active molecules. The response of peripheral blood neutrophils was studied in periodontitis-affected patients and in healthy controls towards stimulation to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) extracts. Peripheral venous blood was drawn from 23 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis (probing depth >or=5 mm, attachment loss >or=3 mm), and 30 healthy volunteers. Neutrophil response followed by metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion was assayed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, on both whole blood and purified neutrophils. In addition to periodontal pathogen extracts, known stimulating agents were tested, such as Escherichia coli-lipopolysaccharide (LPS), phytohemagglutinin, and zymosan A. Neutrophil response, expressed as a secretion ratio under stimulated and non-stimulated conditions, measured in whole blood, showed no differences between periodontitis and healthy controls. Instead, in purified neutrophils from patients, MMP-9 exhibited a significantly higher secretion ratio with LPS and Pg (1.5- to 2-fold), whereas IL-8 showed a larger increase in secretion ratio (3- to 7-fold) in the presence of Pg, Aa, LPS, and zymosan A. Peripheral neutrophils of periodontitis-affected patients are more reactive as suggested by their significantly higher response toward periodontal pathogen extracts and other stimulating agents.

  12. Effects of macrocyclic trichothecene mycotoxins on the murine immune system

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The macrocyclic trichothecenes are a unique group of toxins which have some antileukemic properties. In the first study, verrucarin A and roridin A were examined. Both mycotoxins were administered intraperitoneally at an equitoxic dose of 0.35 mg/kg to CD-1 mice. Lymphocyte proliferation was studied after animals were dosed with verrucarin A. After day 2, no differences in {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation were observed using concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On day 4, DNA synthesis induced by Con A, PHA, and PWM increased significantly. On day 7, PHA stimulation increased above controls while Con A, PWM, and LPS responses were not significantly different. In contrast, roridin A decreased PHA stimulation only on day 7. In the second study the mycotoxins roritoxin B, myrotoxin B, roridin A, verrucarin A, 16-hydroxyverrucarin A, verrucarin J, baccharinoid B12, roridin D, roridin E, baccharinoid B4, and baccharinoid B5 were investigated. In the third study lymphocytes were cultured with each of the mycotoxins for 48 hr to assess their lethality.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells inhibit lymphocyte proliferation by mitogens and alloantigens by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmusson, Ida . E-mail: Ida.Rasmusson@labmed.ki.se; Ringden, Olle; Sundberg, Berit; Le Blanc, Katarina

    2005-04-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immuno-modulatory properties. They inhibit T-cell proliferation to mitogens and alloantigens in vitro and prolong skin graft survival in vivo. We found that MSCs inhibited the proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that MSCs exert an inhibitory effect downstream of the receptor level. We analyzed cytokine profiles of PBLs co-cultured with MSCs. MSCs increased interleukin (IL)-2 and soluble IL-2 receptor in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLCs), while IL-2 and IL-2R decreased in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBL cultures. MSCs inhibited IL-2 induced proliferation, without absorbing IL-2. IL-10 levels increased in MLCs co-cultured with 10% MSCs, while the levels were not affected in PHA cultures. In MLCs inhibited by MSCs, antibodies against IL-10 further suppressed proliferation but had no effect in PHA cultures. Addition of indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin-synthesis, restored part of the inhibition by MSCs in PHA cultures. However, indomethacin did not affect MSC-induced inhibition in MLCs. To conclude, our data indicate that MSC-induced suppression is a complex mechanism affecting IL-2 and IL-10 signaling and may function differently, depending on T-cell stimuli. Prostaglandins are important in the inhibition by MSCs when the T cells were activated by PHA, but not alloantigens.

  14. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  15. Interleukin-4 receptors on human blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zuber, C.E.; Galizzi, J.P.; Harada, N.; Durand, I.; Banchereau, J. )

    1990-09-01

    We have studied regulation of the expression of the interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) on human blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using both 125I-IL-4 binding assay and flow cytometric analysis of biotinylated IL-4 (B-IL-4) binding. PBMC express approximately 300 high-affinity IL-4R per cell (Kd = 25-100 pM). Activation of PBMC for 60-80 hr by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin A (Con A) results in a 2- to 4.5-fold increase of IL-4R number without alteration of IL-4R affinity for IL-4. Binding of B-IL-4 showed that IL-4R expression is upregulated on virtually all PHA-stimulated PBMC, whereas it mostly concerns larger cells among Con A-activated PBMC. Reculture of PHA-blasts with 1 nM IL-4 further upregulates IL-4R expression to a level approximately 10-fold higher than observed on freshly isolated PBMC. Interestingly, IL-4 is able to reinduce high IL-4R levels on cells that have been deprived of IL-4 for 20 hr and IL-2 is almost as efficient. Finally, SDS-PAGE analysis of IL-4-binding molecules on unstimulated, PHA- and PHA/IL-4-activated PBMC revealed the same three peptides of MW 140-130, 80-75, and 70-65 kDa, as shown on human cell lines.

  16. Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Imbalance Modifies NK Cytotoxicity, Lymphocytes B and Lymphoprolipheration in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Partearroyo, Teresa; Úbeda, Natalia; Montero, Ana; Achón, María; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    Different vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations could exacerbate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate different dietary folic acid and vitamin B12 levels on the immune response in aged rats. Male Sprague Dawley aged rats were assigned to three folic acid groups (deficient, control, supplemented) each in absence of vitamin B12 for 30 days. Several parameters of innate and acquired immune responses were measured. Serum and hepatic folate levels increased according to folic acid dietary level, while vitamin B12 levels decreased. There was a significant decrease in natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen for the vitamin B12 deficient diet and folic acid control diet groups. Significant changes in CD45 lymphocyte subsets were also observed according to dietary imbalance. Lymphoproliferative response to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin did not differ significantly between groups. The spleen response to lipopolysaccharide increased significantly, but was unmodified for the other organs. An imbalance between dietary vitamin B12 and folic acid concentrations alters some immunological parameters in aged rats. Therefore, the ratio between folate and vitamin B12 could be as important as their absolute dietary concentrations. PMID:24288024

  17. Adhesion of human leukocytes to biomaterials: an in vitro study using alkanethiolate monolayers with different chemically functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Judite N; Barbosa, Mário A; Aguas, Artur P

    2003-06-15

    The adhesion of human leukocytes to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined surface chemistry was investigated in vitro. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear leukocytes were isolated from human blood by centrifugation techniques. The effect on adhesion of cell activation produced by pre-incubation of leukocytes with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was also studied. Gold substrates were modified by treatment with alkanethiols with three different terminal chemical groups: COOH, OH, and CH(3). After incubation with the two subpopulations of leukocytes, the monolayers were washed, treated with fixative, stained with a Giemsa method, and observed by light microscopy to quantify the number of attached leukocytes. Comparative quantification of the density of leukocyte adhesion to the three types of self-assembled monolayers was determined. The hydrophobic surface expressing CH(3) was found to be the one that induced the highest adhesion density of leukocytes, both of PMN and mononuclear cells. In vitro activation of both mononuclear and PMN leukocytes further increased cell adhesion to the chemically defined monolayers that were used. This enhancement was higher for PHA-activated than for PMA-stimulated mononuclear cells, whereas PMA treatment of neutrophils resulted in a higher rate of adhesion of these cells than PHA stimulation.

  18. Costs of mounting an immune response during pregnancy in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Meylan, Sandrine; Richard, Murielle; Bauer, Sophie; Haussy, Claudy; Miles, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Immune defenses are of great benefit to hosts, but reducing the impact of infection by mounting an immune response also entails costs. However, the physiological mechanisms that generate the costs of an immune response remain poorly understood. Moreover, the majority of studies investigating the consequences of an immune challenge in vertebrates have been conducted on mammals and birds. The aim of this study is to investigate the physiological costs of mounting an immune response during gestation in an ectothermic species. Indeed, because ectothermic species are unable to internally regulate their body temperature, the apportionment of resources to homeostatic activities in ectothermic species can differ from that in endothermic species. We conducted this study on the common lizard Zootoca vivipara. We investigated the costs of mounting an immune response by injecting females with sheep red blood cells and quantified the consequences to reproductive performance (litter mass and success) and physiological performance (standard metabolic rate, endurance, and phytohemagglutinin response). In addition, we measured basking behavior. Our analyses revealed that mounting an immune response affected litter mass, physiological performance, and basking behavior. Moreover, we demonstrated that the modulation of an immune challenge is impacted by intrinsic factors, such as body size and condition.

  19. Constitutional t(5;7)(q11;p15) rearranged to acquire monosomy 7q and trisomy 1q in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome transforming to acute myelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ganly, Peter; McDonald, Margaret; Spearing, Ruth; Morris, Christine M

    2004-03-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and a t(5;7)(q11.2;p15) in her bone marrow cells. Subsequent analysis of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts showed that the translocation was constitutional. Disruption of chromosome bands 5q11.2 and 7p15 has been described recurrently in MDS and acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and, although the age of onset was not earlier than usual, it is nonetheless possible that genes interrupted by this translocation may been a predisposing factor for her condition. With progression to AML, a further rearrangement of the constitutional der(7)t(5;7) occurred, involving chromosome arm 1q. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome paints showed that the result of the second rearrangement, a t(1;7)(q32.1;q32), was observed, leading to trisomy of the segment 1q32.1 approximately qter and monosomy of the segment 7q32.1 approximately qter. The acquired imbalances, particularly loss of 7q, are commonly associated with MDS/AML and a poor prognosis; however, this patient remained in remission after treatment for more than two years before AML relapse, perhaps because the affected regions fall outside of the critical regions of imbalance.

  20. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  1. Two Kinds of Protein Glycosylation in a Cell-Free Preparation from Developing Cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris12

    PubMed Central

    Davies, H. Maelor; Delmer, Deborah P.

    1981-01-01

    Membrane preparations from developing cotyledons of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transferred radioactive mannose from GDP-mannose (U-[14C]mannose) to endogenous acceptor proteins. The transfer was inhibited by the antibiotic tunicamycin, suggesting the involvement of lipidoligosaccharide intermediates typical of the pathway for glycosylation of asparagine residues. This was supported by the similarity of the linkage types of radioactive mannose in lipid-oligosaccharide and glycoprotein products; both contained labeled 2-linked mannose, 3,6-linked and terminal mannose typical of glycoprotein “core” oligosaccharides. As expected for “core” glycosylation, the transfer of labeled N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from UDP-GlcNAc (6-[3H]GLcNAc) to 4-linkage in endogenous glycoproteins could also be demonstrated. However, most of the radioactive GlcNAc was incorporated into terminal linkage, in a reaction insensitive to tunicamycin. The proteins receiving “core” oligosaccharide in vitro were heterogeneous in size, in contrast to those receiving most of the GlcNAc (which chiefly comprised the seed reserve-proteins phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin). It is suggested that following “core” glycosylation, single GlcNAc residues are attached terminally to the oligosaccharides of these seed proteins, without the involvement of lipid-linked intermediates. Phaseolin from mature seeds does not possess a significant amount of terminal GlcNAc and so it is possible that these residues are subsequently removed in a processing event. PMID:16661903

  2. Vitamin C supplementation does not alter the immune response to 2.5 hours of running.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Henson, D A; Butterworth, D E; Warren, B J; Davis, J M; Fagoaga, O R; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S L

    1997-09-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to determine the influence of vitamin C supplementation on the immune response to 2.5 hr of high-intensity running. Twelve experienced marathon runners (VO2 max 51.6 +/- 1.5 ml.kg-1.min-1, age 40.5 +/- 2.0 years) were randomized into vitamin C (1,000 mg/day for 8 days) or placebo groups. On the test day, subjects ran at 75-80% VO2 max for 2.5 hr, with five blood samples taken before and for 6 hr after. Blood samples were analyzed for cortisol and catecholamines; leukocyte subsets; interleukin-6; natural killer cell activity; lymphocyte proliferation as induced by concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen; and granulocyte phagocytosis and activated oxidative burst. Compared with placebo, vitamin C supplementation had no significant effect on the pattern of change in any of these hormonal or immune measures following 2.5 hr of intensive running.

  3. Immunomodulation and enhancement of antitumor activity by co-administration of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and thymidine.

    PubMed

    Poo, W J; Guo, X; Haslund, B; Mozdziesz, D E

    1997-03-07

    The antitumor activity of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) has been shown previously to be enhanced markedly by the co-administration of pyrimidine deoxyribonucleosides (Lin and Prusoff, Cancer Res 47: 394-397, 1987). In the present study, we examined the cellular mechanisms underlying the augmentation effect of thymidine, one of the pyrimidine deoxyribonucleosides. It was found that thymidine did not increase the cytotoxicity of BCNU for B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro. Instead, thymidine appeared to produce modulatory actions on the immune system of the tumor-bearing mice. More than 40% of the BCNU/ thymidine-cured mice specifically rejected secondary rechallenge with the B16/F10 tumor. Furthermore, these cured mice developed extensive depigmentation of their natural black hair, suggesting immune reactions to normal melanocytes. When spleen cells from normal mice were treated with BCNU alone, their response to T-cell mitogen phytohemagglutinin was suppressed markedly. This suppression was ablated by co-administration of BCNU with thymidine. Such BCNU/thymidine treatment also augmented the activity of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cells in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhanced antitumor activity of combined BCNU and thymidine may result from the action of thymidine on the immune effector mechanisms, which facilitate the development of antitumor immune responses in the presence of immunosuppression induced by BCNU.

  4. Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce T Lymphocyte Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest by Expression of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuying; Xu, Zhuo; Bai, Jinping; Yang, Shuyuan; Zhao, Shuli; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that human mesenchymal stem cells are able to inhibit T lymphocyte activation; however, the discrepancy among different sources of MSCs is not well documented. In this study, we have compared the MSCs from bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), placenta (PL), and umbilical cord (UC) to determine which one displayed the most efficient immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation. Among them we found that hUC-MSC has the strongest effects on inhibiting T cell proliferation and is chosen to do the further study. We observed that T lymphocyte spontaneously released abundant IFN-γ. And IFN-γ secreted by T lymphocyte could induce the expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) in hUC-MSCs. IDO was previously reported to induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in S phase. When cocultured with hUC-MSCs, T lymphocyte expression of caspase 3 was significantly increased, while Bcl2 and CDK4 mRNA expression decreased dramatically. Addition of 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT), an IDO inhibitor, restored T lymphocyte proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and induced resumption of the cell cycle. In addition, the changes in caspase 3, CDK4, and Bcl2 expression were reversed by 1-MT. These findings demonstrate that hUC-MSCs induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by expressing abundant IDO and provide an explanation for some of the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs. PMID:27418932

  5. Effects of exposure to factor concentrates containing donations from identified AIDS patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, J.; Holman, R.C.; Dixon, G.; Lawrence, D.N.; Bozeman, L.H.; Chorba, T.L.; Tregillus, L.; Evatt, B.L.

    1986-10-03

    The authors recipients of eight lots of factors VII and IX voluntarily withdrawn from distribution because one donor was known to have subsequently developed the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome with a nonexposed cohort matched by age, sex, and factor use. The factor VIII recipient cohorts did not differ in prevalence of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), T-cell subset numbers, T-helper to T-suppressor ratios, or immunogloubulin levels. Exposed individuals had higher levels of immune complexes by C1q binding and staphylococcal binding assays and lower responses to phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A. However, only the staphylococcal binding assay values were outside the normal range for our laboratory. Factor IX recipient cohorts did not differ in HIV antibody prevalence or any immune tests. Although exposed and nonexposed individuals did not differ from each other in a clinically meaningful fashion at initial testing, both the exposed and nonexposed cohorts had high rats of HIV seroprevalence. Market withdrawals were clearly insufficient means of limiting the spread of HIV in hemophilic patients; however, the currently available methods of donor screening and viral inactivation of blood products will prevent continued exposed within this population.

  6. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Corbin, S.A.; Saunders, J.; Tandy, N.P.

    1989-06-01

    Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.

  7. Immunoglobulin levels in dogs after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Halliwell, R.E.; Johnson, P.M.; Fey, T.A.; McDonough, C.M.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of total-body irradiation (TBI) and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation on serum immunoglobulin subclasses was determined in a dog model. Only IgG1 levels decreased after low-dose (+/- 4.5 Gy) TBI, but levels of all immunoglobulin classes fell after high-dose TBI (8.5 GyX1 or 2X6.0 Gy). After autologous bone marrow transplantation IgM levels were the first and IgE levels were the last to return to normal. After successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation prolonged low IgM and IgE levels were found but IgA levels increased rapidly to over 150% of pretreatment values. A comparison of dogs with or without clinical signs or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), revealed no differences in IgM levels. Dogs with GVHD had higher IgA but lower IgE levels. Dogs that rejected their allogeneic bone marrow cells showed significant early rises in IgE and IgA levels in comparison with dogs with GVHD. These results differ from the observations made on Ig levels in human bone marrow transplant patients. No significant differences in phytohemagglutinin stimulation tests were found between dogs with or without GVHD or dogs receiving an autologous transplant for the first four months after TBI and transplantation. An early primary or secondary involvement of humoral immunity in GVHD and graft rejection in dogs is postulated.

  8. In vitro immune functions in thiamine-replete and -depleted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the impacts of in vivo thiamine deficiency on lake trout leukocyte function measured in vitro. When compared outside the context of individual-specific thiamine concentrations no significant differences were observed in leukocyte bactericidal activity or in concanavalin A (Con A), and phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) stimulated leukocyte proliferation. Placing immune functions into context with the ratio of in vivo liver thiamine monophosphate (TMP – biologically inactive form) to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP – biologically active form) proved to be the best indicator of thiamine depletion impacts as determined using regression modeling. These observed relationships indicated differential effects on the immune measures with bactericidal activity exhibiting an inverse relationship with TMP to TPP ratios, Con A stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting a positive relationship with TMP to TPP ratios and PHA-P stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting no significant relationships. In addition, these relationships showed considerable complexity which included the consistent observation of a thiamine-replete subgroup with characteristics similar to those seen in the leukocytes from thiamine-depleted fish. When considered together, our observations indicate that lake trout leukocytes experience cell-type specific impacts as well as an altered physiologic environment when confronted with a thiamine-limited state.

  9. Suppressed PHA activation of T lymphocytes in simulated microgravity is restored by direct activation of protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing clinostatic rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity, we found phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness to be almost completely diminished. Activation marker expression was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, cytokine secretion profiles suggested that monocytes are not as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness because placing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. However, activation of purified T cells with cross-linked CD2/CD28 and CD3/CD28 antibody pairs was completely suppressed in the RWV, suggesting a defect in signal transduction. Activation of purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture. Furthermore, sub-mitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  10. Bereavement is associated with time-dependent decrements in cellular immune function in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus type 1-seropositive homosexual men.

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, K; Feaster, D J; Tuttle, R; Blaney, N T; Kumar, M; Baum, M K; Shapshak, P; Fletcher, M A

    1996-01-01

    Seventy-nine human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive homosexual men participating in a longitudinal study of HIV-1 infection were assessed twice, 6 months apart, to investigate associations between bereavement and cellular immune function. Subjects were assessed by using a theory-driven model comprising life stressors, social support and coping style, and control variables. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity was decreased among the bereaved at both times. Lymphocyte proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin was decreased among the bereaved at the second time point but not at the first. These functional immune decrements are associated with increased neuroendocrine responses of the sympathetic adrenomeduallary system as well as the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Implications for differential neuroendocrine responses over time are discussed. Active coping style was independently and positively related to both immune measures. The results imply that a bereavement support group intervention merits investigation for an effect on immunological measures and clinical progression of HIV-1 infection as well as grief resolution. PMID:8770514

  11. NFκB and glucocorticoid receptor activity in steroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Charlotte; Dhanda, Ashwin; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Dimambro, Alexandra; Lightman, Stafford; Dayan, Colin

    2012-02-01

    Resistance to the anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of steroids is an important clinical problem that complicates the treatment of approximately 30% of patients with conditions for which steroids are normally first-line therapy. Previous studies have shown that steroid-resistant (SR) patients have more severe disease and higher levels of inflammatory cytokine production than steroid-sensitive (SS) patients, but the molecular mechanisms for this remain poorly understood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers were tested for steroid resistance by their in vitro response to the anti-proliferative effects of dexamethasone. The SR cohort had high baseline levels of NFκB DNA binding activity, equivalent to that in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated SS cells. In SR cells, dexamethasone exposure, but not PHA, increased binding of the p65 NFκB subunit to the κB promoter element. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was not detected at either the κB promoter element or the glucocorticoid response element (GRE), suggesting that it does not translocate to the nucleus in these cells. Conversely, in SS cells, baseline p65 DNA binding activity was low and significantly increased by PHA, but not by dexamethasone. Unlike in SR cells, GR was detected at the κB element and at the GRE. These findings suggest that in SR patients, steroids may be harmful by increasing NFκB activity which would exacerbate disease by increasing transcription of inflammatory cytokines.

  12. [Resting metabolic rate, stress, testosterone, and induced immune response in "spring" and "fall" males of Campbell dwarf hamsters. Rearing under the long day conditions].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    We have studied morphological and physiological traits of even-young males of Campbell dwarf hamsters (Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905) born at the end of summer ("fall males") and at the end of winter ("spring males") in a vivarium with constant 14-hour day length (14D:10N). After removal from parental cages at the age of one month, males were kept in isolation under the same light conditions. The results obained signify the statistical difference between "fall" and "spring" males in resting metabolic rate, morphological traits associated with sexual activity, some endocrine and immunologic characteristics. Spring males had higher resting metabolic rate, higher body mass in the middle of experiment, bigger testes, seminal vesicles, higher concentration of testosterone in blood and more intensive T-cell immune response to the intracutaneous injection of phytohemagglutinin. They did not differ significantly in basal level of blood cortisole and antibodies production in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antigen challenge, but possessed lower adrenocortical response to the social stressor and adrenocorticotropic hormone. GLM analysis showed that cortisol level in blood after 10 min encounter of males in the open arena, and resting metabolic rate were the only factors significantly influenced humoral immune response to SRBC. When intensity of T-cell immune response was considered as dependent variable, season turned out to be the only factor in the final model that caused a significant effect.

  13. Electrophoretic detection of protein p53 in human leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paponov, V.D.; Kupsik, E.G.; Shcheglova, E.G.; Yarullin, N.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have found an acid-soluble protein with mol. wt. of about 53 kD in peripheral blood leukocytes of persons with Down's syndrome. It was present in different quantities in all 20 patients tested, but was virtually not discovered in 12 healthy blood donors. This paper determines the possible identity of this protein with protein p53 from mouse ascites carcinoma by comparing their electrophoretic mobilities, because the accuracy of electrophoretic determination of the molecular weight of proteins is not sufficient to identify them. The paper also describes experiments to detect a protein with electrophoretic mobility identical with that of a protein in the leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome in leukocytes of patients with leukemia. To discover if protein p53 is involved in cell proliferation, the protein composition of leukocytes from healthy blood donors, cultured in the presence and absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA), was compared. Increased incorporation of H 3-thymidine by leukocytes of patients with Down's syndrome is explained by the presence of a population of immature leukocytes actively synthesizing DNA in the peripheral blood of these patients, and this can also explain the presence of protein p53 in the leukocytes of these patients.

  14. Single Channel Properties and Regulated Expression of Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ (Crac) Channels in Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fomina, Alla F.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Kozak, J. Ashot; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Although the crucial role of Ca2+ influx in lymphocyte activation has been well documented, little is known about the properties or expression levels of Ca2+ channels in normal human T lymphocytes. The use of Na+ as the permeant ion in divalent-free solution permitted Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel activation, kinetic properties, and functional expression levels to be investigated with single channel resolution in resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated human T cells. Passive Ca2+ store depletion resulted in the opening of 41-pS CRAC channels characterized by high open probabilities, voltage-dependent block by extracellular Ca2+ in the micromolar range, selective Ca2+ permeation in the millimolar range, and inactivation that depended upon intracellular Mg2+ ions. The number of CRAC channels per cell increased greatly from ∼15 in resting T cells to ∼140 in activated T cells. Treatment with the phorbol ester PMA also increased CRAC channel expression to ∼60 channels per cell, whereas the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (1 μM) suppressed the PHA-induced increase in functional channel expression. Capacitative Ca2+ influx induced by thapsigargin was also significantly enhanced in activated T cells. We conclude that a surprisingly low number of CRAC channels are sufficient to mediate Ca2+ influx in human resting T cells, and that the expression of CRAC channels increases ∼10-fold during activation, resulting in enhanced Ca2+ signaling. PMID:10995447

  15. Healthy aging is associated with unaltered production of immunoreactive growth hormone but impaired neuroimmunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Luz, Clarice; Collaziol, Diego; Preissler, Thales; da Cruz, Ivana M; Glock, Luiz; Bauer, Moisés E

    2006-01-01

    Both endocrine and immune systems are continuously remodeled during aging. Here, we investigated to what extent adrenal and somatosenescence are associated reciprocal changes in the immune system during strictly healthy aging. Forty-six elderly subjects and 33 young adults were recruited according to the health criteria of the SENIEUR protocol. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide or phytohemagglutinin to assess the production of immunoreactive growth hormone (GH). Peripheral sensitivity to steroids was assessed in vitro by dexamethasone-, cortisol- or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA)-induced inhibition of T-cell proliferation. DHEA and GH levels were measured by radioimmunoassays. Healthy elderly had lower salivary DHEA and serum GH levels (somatosenescence). They presented reduced T-cell sensitivity to dexamethasone but similar cellular sensitivities to cortisol and DHEA. Their cells produced similar levels of immunoreactive GH compared to the cells of young adults. These data indicate that healthy aging is associated with adrenal and somatosenescence as well as impaired neuroendocrine immunoregulation at the level of the lymphocyte. In addition, somatosenescence may not be associated with a reciprocal decline in immunoreactive GH. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Modification of immune competence by parasitic infections. I. Responses to mitogens and antigens in mice treated with Trichinella spiralis extract.

    PubMed

    Barriga, O O

    1978-08-01

    Spleen cells from mice pretreated with a Trichinella spiralis extract (TsE-mice) showed severe depression of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to concanavalin A (Con A), slight depression to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and normal response to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) as compared to saline-pretreated controls. Mice pretreated with bovine serum albumin (BSA-mice) revealed greatly reduced responses to LPS, somewhat reduced response to Con A, and normal responses to PHA and to PPD. Only TsE-mice showed significant reduction in the number of rosette-forming cells and of direct and indirect plaque-forming cells (DPFC and IPFC). BSA-mice exhibited some reduction of the DPFC only. Direct hemagglutinating (HA) titers were equivalent in the 3 groups after immunization with sheep erythrocytes but facilitated HA titers were depressed in TsE-mice. The total number and the number of viable cells were similar in the spleens of all animals. TsE treatment causes a reduction in the number of T1 lymphocytes and an inhibition of the late differentiation of B cells in the spleen. Suppressor T-cells apparently play a major but not exclusive role in T. spiralis-induced nonspecific immunodepression.

  17. Serial circulating immune complex levels and mitogen responses during progressive tumor growth in WF rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrick, M L; Steele, G; Ross, D S; Lahey, S J; Deasy, J M; Rayner, A A; Harte, P J; Wilson, R E; Munroe, A E; King, V P

    1983-06-01

    Inbred male WF rats were given im injections of one of two antigenically and histologically distinct syngeneic tumor isografts, adenocarcinoma DMH-W 163 or spontaneous renal cell carcinoma SPK. Serum and peripheral blood lymphocytes were harvested from tumor-bearing and normal age-matched controls before and after isograft challenge at weekly intervals. Serial circulating immune complex (CIC) levels were quantitated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) insolubilization. T-cell mitogen responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) were followed serially. Tumor growth was measured at least weekly. PEG-CIC values rose early after tumor injection, increased with tumor growth, and declined in some animals just before death. Mitogen response to PHA was significantly decreased in isografted tumor-bearing rats, particularly at later stages of tumor development, compared to normal uninoculated controls. Responses to Con A were variable, and suppression was not always seen in tumor bearers. In animals that did not have progressive tumor growth after isograft injection, PEG-CIC levels did not change and responses to PHA were not suppressed. Patterns of CIC change and responses to PHA were not affected by differences in tumor histology or growth rates. Thus serial CIC levels measured by the PEG assay correlate with tumor growth and precede nonspecific suppression of T-cell mitogenic response in these animal tumor models.

  18. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  19. Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) Effects on Psychoimmunological Factors of Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans.

    PubMed

    Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Arefnasab, Zahra; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Babamahmoodie, Farhang; Alipour, Ahmad; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Riazi Rad, Farhad; Khaze, Vahid; Darabi, Haideh

    2015-02-01

    Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) as a new therapeutic technique in energy psychology has positive effects on psychological and physiological symptoms, and quality of life. In this research we studied the effect of this treatment on immunological factors. This study tested whether 8-week group sessions of EFT (compared to a wait-list control group) with emphasis on patient's respiratory, psychological and immunological problems in chemically pulmonary injured veterans (N=28) can affect on immunological and psychological factors. Mixed effect linear models indicated that EFT improved mental health (F=79.24, p=0) and health-related quality of life (F=13.89, p=0.001), decreased somatic symptoms (F=5.81, p=0.02), anxiety/insomnia (F=24.03, p<0.001), social dysfunction (F=21.59, p<0.001), frequency and severity of respiratory symptoms (F=20.38, p<0.001), and increased lymphocyte proliferation with nonspecific mitogens Concanavalin A (Con A) (F=14.32, p=0.001) and Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) (F=12.35, p=0.002), and peripheral blood IL-17 (F=9.11, p=0.006). This study provides an initial indication that EFT may be a new therapeutic approach for improving psychological and immunological factors.

  20. Studies on T-cell colony formation in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Y; Sugimoto, M; Ishiyama, T; Horie, S; Abe, S; Hirose, S; Okuda, T

    1989-12-01

    In order to study the possibility of abnormal differentiation and proliferation of T-cell precursors in chronic renal failure (CRF), we studied T-cell colony formation in CRF patients. The two-step monolayer method, with phytohemagglutinin-P as the inducer, was used for T-cell colony formation. In our results, colony formation was markedly reduced in CRF patients in comparison with normal controls, with about half of the former showing no colony growth. All cases showed a significant increase in colony numbers with in vitro plasmapheresis (the replacement of autologous plasma in the culture system with normal AB plasma). A significant increase in colony numbers was also seen with the addition of exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2). The addition of IL-2 in the presence of normal plasma, in particular, induced an increase in colony numbers to near the levels in normal subjects. These results suggest that T-cell precursors exist in near normal numbers in CRF patients and that there are uremic inhibitors in the plasma. A reduced production of IL-2 is also indicated. These factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency in CRF patients.

  1. Possible role of natural cytotoxic activity in the pathogenesis of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Schattner, A; Handzel, Z T; Levin, S; Bentwich, Z

    1989-01-01

    In an attempt to assess the role of immune cytotoxic activity in the sequence of events leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), natural cytotoxic activity was studied in 17 asymptomatic homosexual males, seropositive for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies, as compared to 16 of their seronegative counterparts and to 14 control healthy heterosexual individuals. Cell (contact)-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) as well as cytotoxin (CTX) production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated, HeLa tumor cell-stimulated, and unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were determined using HeLa cell monolayer cultures, sensitized with cycloheximide, as targets. The CMC was markedly enhanced in the seropositive group (28 +/- 21 (mean +/- SD) lytic units/10(6) PBMC) as compared to the seronegative group (17 +/- 7; P less than 0.005) and to the heterosexual group (13 +/- 6; P less than 0.05). Likewise, CTX production by unstimulated PBMC from seropositive homosexuals (19 +/- 26 units/ml) was higher than that observed in the other groups (both 4 +/- 4 units/ml; P less than 0.05). CTX production by PHA-stimulated, LPS-stimulated, and HeLa cell-stimulated PBMC was significantly enhanced in both the seropositive and seronegative groups in comparison to the normal heterosexual controls. These results suggest that increased cytotoxic activity may be present in homosexuals prior to their exposure to HIV, and may be further enhanced after HIV infection.

  2. Immunosuppressive effects of Centipeda periodontii: selective cytotoxicity for lymphocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Shenker, B J; Berthold, P; Dougherty, P; Porter, K K

    1987-01-01

    We have examined soluble sonic extracts prepared from several strains of Centipeda periodontii for their ability to alter human lymphocyte function. These organisms were isolated from subgingival plaque of patients with periodontal disease. We found that sonicates from several, but not all, strains of C. periodontii caused a dose-dependent inhibition of lymphocyte responsiveness to concanavalin A, phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and formalinized Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibition was associated with a concomitant decrease in cell viability assessed by trypan blue exclusion, 51Cr release, and electron microscopy. The maximal number of dead cells was observed 20 to 24 h after exposure to the sonic extract. Susceptible cells include human lymphocytes (both B and T), monocytes, and erythrocytes, whereas polymorphonuclear cells, murine L-929 fibroblasts, and sheep erythrocytes were not affected. Preliminary characterization of the cytotoxic activity indicates that it is heat labile and trypsin sensitive and has an Mr of 60,000. It has been proposed that impaired host defense may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. The data presented in this paper suggest that immunosuppression (local or systemic or both) could be initiated by C. periodontii. This immunosuppression may alter the nature and consequences of host-parasite interactions, thereby enhancing the pathogenicity of C. periodontii itself or some other opportunistic organism. Images PMID:3653981

  3. Regulatory effect of monocytes on T cell proliferative responses to oral microbial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Stashenko, P

    1982-01-01

    Mononuclear cell preparations isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation from human peripheral blood were found to vary considerably in the number of monocytes they contained (mean, 20.3%; range, 13 to 33%). The regulatory role of monocytes in T cell proliferative responses to sonic extracts of a panel of oral microorganisms was therefore investigated. T cells were fractionated by anti-immunoglobulin chromatography and depleted of monocytes by treatment with a monoclonal anti-human Ia-like (DR locus antigen) antibody and complement. Purified populations of monocytes were obtained by extensive adherence procedures. The resultant cell populations were greater than 95% pure, as judged by indirect immunofluorescence on a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Monocyte-depleted T cells failed to respond by proliferation to the nonoral antigen tetanus toxoid, as well as to any oral microorganism, but retained responsiveness to phytohemagglutinin. Readdition of monocytes in final concentrations of from 5 to 15% resulted in the restoration of maximal T cell proliferation. Monocytes in greater numbers suppressed T cell responses to all sonic extracts tested. PMID:6984019

  4. Human cadaver multipotent stromal/stem cells isolated from arteries stored in liquid nitrogen for 5 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regenerative medicine challenges researchers to find noncontroversial, safe and abundant stem cell sources. In this context, harvesting from asystolic donors could represent an innovative and unlimited reservoir of different stem cells. In this study, cadaveric vascular tissues were established as an alternative source of human cadaver mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hC-MSCs). We reported the successful cell isolation from postmortem arterial segments stored in a tissue-banking facility for at least 5 years. Methods After thawing, hC-MSCs were isolated with a high efficiency (12 × 106) and characterized with flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, molecular and ultrastructural approaches. Results In early passages, hC-MSCs were clonogenic, highly proliferative and expressed mesenchymal (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, HLA-G), stemness (Stro-1, Oct-4, Notch-1), pericyte (CD146, PDGFR-β, NG2) and neuronal (Nestin) markers; hematopoietic and vascular markers were negative. These cells had colony and spheroid-forming abilities, multipotency for their potential to differentiate in multiple mesengenic lineages and immunosuppressive activity to counteract proliferation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood mononuclear cells. Conclusions The efficient procurement of stem cells from cadaveric sources, as postmortem vascular tissues, demonstrates that such cells can survive to prolonged ischemic insult, anoxia, freezing and dehydration injuries, thus paving the way for a scientific revolution where cadaver stromal/stem cells could effectively treat patients demanding cell therapies. PMID:24429026

  5. In vitro immune functions in thiamine-replete and -depleted lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Christopher A; Honeyfield, Dale C; Densmore, Christine L; Iwanowicz, Luke R

    2014-05-01

    In this study we examined the impacts of in vivo thiamine deficiency on lake trout leukocyte function measured in vitro. When compared outside the context of individual-specific thiamine concentrations no significant differences were observed in leukocyte bactericidal activity or in concanavalin A (Con A), and phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) stimulated leukocyte proliferation. Placing immune functions into context with the ratio of in vivo liver thiamine monophosphate (TMP--biologically inactive form) to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP--biologically active form) proved to be the best indicator of thiamine depletion impacts as determined using regression modeling. These observed relationships indicated differential effects on the immune measures with bactericidal activity exhibiting an inverse relationship with TMP to TPP ratios, Con A stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting a positive relationship with TMP to TPP ratios and PHA-P stimulated mitogenesis exhibiting no significant relationships. In addition, these relationships showed considerable complexity which included the consistent observation of a thiamine-replete subgroup with characteristics similar to those seen in the leukocytes from thiamine-depleted fish. When considered together, our observations indicate that lake trout leukocytes experience cell-type specific impacts as well as an altered physiologic environment when confronted with a thiamine-limited state. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Stimulators and inhibitors of lymphocyte DNA synthesis in supernatants from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vesole, D H; Goust, J M; Fett, J W; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-09-01

    Some T and B lymphoid cell lines (LCL) were found to secrete into their supernatants a substance able to stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. This substance produced an increase in [3H]thymidine uptake by mononuclear cells when added to unstimulated cultures (mitogenic effect) or when added to cultures stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM) (potentiating effect). When complete supernatants were used, the potentiating effect was sometimes masked by an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. Fractionation on Sephadex G-100 separated these two activities. The stimulatory substance eluted at a m.w. range of 15,000 to 30,000, and the inhibitor eluted with the albumin peak. B cells with or without monocytes were the most sensitive to the mitogenic effect, whereas T cells were unaffected. Responses to PHA and PWM were potentiated when T cells were present, but the maximum effect was observed when the proportion of T cells was less than 50%. The stimulatory material may be similar to lymphocyte mitogenic factor and may function as a T cell-replacing factor in B cell stimulation.

  7. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-08-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response.

  8. Immunomodulating properties of dimethylglycine in humans.

    PubMed

    Graber, C D; Goust, J M; Glassman, A D; Kendall, R; Loadholt, C B

    1981-01-01

    Dimethylglycine (DMG), a tertiary amino acid, has had wide acceptance as a nonfuel nutrient; presumably it enhances oxygen utilization by tissue and complexes free radicals. Its potential as an immunoadjuvant has also been suggested by a study of an analog of DMG, calcium pangamate. A double-blind study in 20 human volunteers showed a fourfold increase in antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in those receiving DMG orally as compared with controls (P less than 0.01). Production of leukocyte inhibitory factor in response to concanavalin A was similar in the two groups, but those taking DMG tablets had a significantly highr mean response of leukocyte inhibition factor to streptokinase-streptodornase (P less than 0.001). The in vitro responses of lymphocytes from patients with diabetes and those with sickle cell disease to phytohemagglutinin, convanavalin A, and pokeweed mitogen were increased almost threefold after addition of DMA. These results suggest that DMG enhances both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in humans.

  9. Food Restriction Affects Inflammatory Response and Nutritional State in Tuco-tucos (Ctenomys talarum).

    PubMed

    Merlo, Julieta Leticia; Cutrera, Ana Paula; Zenuto, Roxana Rita

    2016-12-01

    Insufficient or unbalanced food intake typically has a negative impact on immune responses. The understanding of this effect is, however, hampered by the effect that food has on general condition, which, in turn, affects immunity, and the interaction among general condition, immunocompetence, and concurrent infections. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of food restriction and methionine supplementation on immunity in tuco-tucos (Ctenomys talarum). Effects of diet manipulations on nutritional state, inflammatory response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and other immune parameters (bacterial killing capacity, natural antibodies, and leukocyte profile) were evaluated. Health and stress parameters and endoparasite loads were assessed to understand more deeply potential effects of treatments on immune status. Individuals under food restriction presented an altered nutritional state as well as increased stress levels (higher N: L ratios) compared with individuals fed ad libitum, and a marked reduction in the inflammatory response to PHA. Supplementation with methionine did not affect any of the parameters analyzed. Endoparasite loads were not affected by treatments. Our results support the idea that food insufficiency can modulate the individual's immune responsiveness through the lack of adequate essential nutrients, metabolic fuel and energetic reserves, or by a detrimental effect of the stress caused by nutrient limitation. We show that the response to PHA previously reported as nonenergetically costly for C. talarum, implies a nutritional cost; an opposite pattern to that previously found for the adaptive antibody response to sheep red blood cells in the same species.

  10. Recovery of immune competence following sublethal X irradiation of young and old mice: a model for studying age-related loss of immunologic homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.; Perkins, E.H.; Makinodan, T.

    1982-01-01

    Age-related alteration in lymphohematopoietic homeostasis was assessed kinetically by determining immunologic and stem-cell regenerating capacities of young (5-7 months), middle-aged (13 months), and old (23-24 months) C3H and C57BL/6 mice following their exposure to 500 R. Immunologic activities were based on the ability of spleen cells to respond to sheep erythrocytes, phytohemagglutinin, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Stem-cell activity was based on the ability of splenic and bone marrow cells to form colonies in vivo. Reflective of age-related homeostatic imbalance was alteration in the (a) time of recovery, (b) rate of regeneration, and (c) capacity of the regenerating system to overshoot the preirradition steady-state level. Most of the immunologic parameters showed a delay in the time of recovery in old mice. In contrast, the time of recovery of stem cells in old mice was equal to or faster than that in young mice. Furthermore, the magnitude of regeneration of stem cells was greater in old than young mice. These results suggest that recovery of immunologic activities in old mice is delayed partly because of the inability of their stem cells to rapidly generate immunocompetent progenies.

  11. A potent mitogenic lectin from the mycelia of a phytopathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia bataticola, with complex sugar specificity and cytotoxic effect on human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja N; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Sundaram, Palaniswamy M; Naik, Ramachandra S; Pujari, Radha; Shastry, Padma; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2010-04-01

    A lectin with strong mitogenic activity towards human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cytotoxic effect on human ovarian cancer cells has been purified from the mycelium of a phytopathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia bataticola, using ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-Sepharose. The lectin, termed RBL, is a tetramer of 11-kDa subunits and has unique amino acid sequence at its blocked N-terminus. The purified RBL was blood group nonspecific and its hemagglutination activity was inhibited by mucin (porcine stomach), fetuin (fetal calf serum) and asialofetuin. Glycan array analysis revealed high affinity binding of RBL towards N-glycans and also the glycoproteins containing complex N-glycan chains. Interestingly, the lectin showed high affinity for glycans which are part of ovarian cancer marker CA125, a high molecular weight mucin containing high mannose and complex bisecting type N-linked glycans as well core 1 and 2 type O-glycans. RBL bound to human PBMCs eliciting strong mitogenic response, which could be blocked by mucin, fetuin and asialofetuin demonstrating the carbohydrate-mediated interaction with the cells. Analysis of the kinetics of binding of RBL to PBMCs revealed a delayed mitogenic response indicating a different signaling pathway compared to phytohemagglutinin-L. RBL had a significant cytotoxic effect on human ovarian cancer cell line, PA-1.

  12. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polysaccharide Isolated from Zizyphus jujuba (紅棗 Hóng Zǎo) Inhibits Interleukin-2 Production in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bo-Yang; Kuo, Yuh-Chi; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Zizyphus jujuba (紅棗 Hóng Zǎo), a traditional Chinese herb widely used in many Asian countries, has been shown to possess vital biological activities such as anti-cancer activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of deproteinated polysaccharide (DP) isolated from Z. jujuba. The DP isolated from Z. jujuba consisted of two polysaccharide fractions and their molecular weights (MWs) were found to be 143,108 and 67,633 Da, respectively. The DP could significantly decrease interleukin (IL)-2 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated Jurkat T cells in a dose-dependent manner after 48 h of incubation, with the inhibition being 47.5%, 61.2%, and 81.7% for DP concentrations of 0.75, 1.75, and 2.5 mg/ml, respectively. Thus, our study showed that DP isolated from Z. jujuba may possess anti-inflammatory activity as it could significantly reduce IL-2 production in activated Jurkat T cells. PMID:24860737

  14. The Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Receptor Apj Supports the Entry of Primary T-Cell-Line-Tropic and Dualtropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael; Konkel, Miriam; Martin, Kathleen; Sun, Ying; Marcon, Luisa; Cayabyab, Mark; Berman, Michael; Dorf, Martin E.; Gerard, Norma; Gerard, Craig; Sodroski, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters target cells by sequential binding to CD4 and specific seven-transmembrane-segment (7TMS) coreceptors. Viruses use the chemokine receptor CCR5 as a coreceptor in the early, asymptomatic stages of HIV-1 infection but can adapt to the use of other receptors such as CXCR4 and CCR3 as the infection proceeds. Here we identify one such coreceptor, Apj, which supported the efficient entry of several primary T-cell-line tropic (T-tropic) and dualtropic HIV-1 isolates and the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac316. Another 7TMS protein, CCR9, supported the less efficient entry of one primary T-tropic isolate. mRNAs for both receptors were present in phytohemagglutinin- and interleukin-2-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Apj and CCR9 share with other coreceptors for HIV-1 and SIV an N-terminal region rich in aromatic and acidic residues. These results highlight properties common to 7TMS proteins that can function as HIV-1 coreceptors, and they may contribute to an understanding of viral evolution in infected individuals. PMID:9621075

  15. Lymphocyte Activation Dynamics Is Shaped by Hereditary Components at Chromosome Region 17q12-q21

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Sureda, Amado; Rubio-Moscardo, Fanny; Olvera, Alex; Argilaguet, Jordi; Kiefer, Kerstin; Mothe, Beatriz; Meyerhans, Andreas; Brander, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the chromosome region 17q12-q21 are risk factors for asthma. Particularly, there are cis-regulatory haplotypes within this region that regulate differentially the expression levels of ORMDL3, GSDMB and ZPBP2 genes. Remarkably, ORMDL3 has been shown to modulate lymphocyte activation parameters in a heterologous expression system. In this context, it has been shown that Th2 and Th17 cytokine production is affected by SNPs in this region. Therefore, we aim to assess the impact of hereditary components within region 17q12-q21 on the activation profile of human T lymphocytes, focusing on the haplotype formed by allelic variants of SNPs rs7216389 and rs12936231. We measured calcium influx and activation markers, as well as the proliferation rate upon T cell activation. Haplotype-dependent differences in mRNA expression levels of IL-2 and INF-γ were observed at early times after activation. In addition, the allelic variants of these SNPs impacted on the extent of calcium influx in resting lymphocytes and altered proliferation rates in a dose dependent manner. As a result, the asthma risk haplotype carriers showed a lower threshold of saturation during activation. Finally, we confirmed differences in activation marker expression by flow cytometry using phytohemagglutinin, a strong polyclonal stimulus. Altogether, our data suggest that the genetic component of pro-inflammatory pathologies present in this chromosome region could be explained by different T lymphocyte activation dynamics depending on individual allelic heredity. PMID:27835674

  16. Demonstration of a Herpes Group Virus in Cultures of Peripheral Leukocytes from Patients with Infectious Mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Volker; Henle, Gertrude; Henle, Werner; Kohn, Gertrude

    1968-01-01

    Cultures were initiated with peripheral leukocytes from individuals: (i) in the acute stage of infectious mononucleosis (IM); (ii) with past histories of IM; and (iii) without histories of IM and without antibodies to EB virus (EBV). In confirmation of other reports, the first group of cultures developed readily and rapidly into lines of blastoid cells. Cellular replication commenced in 24 of 25 attempts within 17 to 28 days, regardless of the technique employed; i.e., initial seeding of the leukocytes with or without addition of phytohemagglutinin onto monolayers of human diploid cells (WI-38) or direct establishment of suspension cultures. EBV was detected in all cultures by immunofluorescence and also by electron microscopy when tested. Furthermore, the nine cultures which were examined cytogenetically revealed the C-group (#10) chromosomal marker previously found in cultured Burkitt tumor cells. These findings supported the earlier conclusion that EBV is related to, if not identical with, the causative agent of IM. Cultures of the second group commenced growth only within 30 to 60 days in five of seven attempts, depending apparently upon the early presence of WI-38 cells. These cultures also revealed the presence of EBV and, in the three examined, the C-group chromosomal marker. Leukocytes of the third group, seeded onto WI-38 monolayers, failed to become established in four attempts. The possible implications of these findings are discussed. Images PMID:4881369

  17. Variable effects of yolk androgens on growth, survival, and immunity in eastern bluebird nestlings.

    PubMed

    Navara, Kristen J; Hill, Geoffrey E; Mendonca, Mary T

    2005-01-01

    Female birds allocate androgens differentially within and among clutches, and it has been suggested that this is a strategy to maximize reproductive success. Only a few studies, however, have examined the effects of yolk testosterone (T) on the growth and development of nestlings, and none have reported on the immunological effects of yolk T nor have they examined several different effects in the same nestlings. To examine the effects of yolk T on nestling eastern bluebirds, we administered two doses of exogenous T to bluebird eggs and measured the growth and immunological responsiveness in the resulting nestlings. We found that yolk T is detrimental to developing embryos, with hatching success decreasing with increasing doses of yolk T. Moderate doses of yolk T stimulated skeletal growth during the embryonic period, while high doses of yolk T resulted in nestlings that weighed more and were more mature at fledging but had a compromised T-cell immune response to phytohemagglutinin. These data suggest that the alteration of reproductive success through the allocation of yolk T is a complicated phenomenon that involves the integration of several physiological effects.

  18. Predominance of a bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus salivarius component of a five-strain probiotic in the porcine ileum and effects on host immune phenotype.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Maria C; Gardiner, Gillian E; Hart, Orla M; Lawlor, Peadar G; Daly, Mairead; Lynch, Brendan; Richert, Brian T; Radcliffe, Scott; Giblin, Linda; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Relative predominance of each of five probiotic strains was investigated in the ileum of weaned pigs, compared with that in feces, when administered in combination at c. 5 x 10(9) CFU day(-1) for 28 days. Probiotic was excreted at 10(6)-10(9) CFU g(-1) feces, while ileal survival ranged from 10(2) to 10(6) CFU g(-1) digesta. In contrast to the feces, where Lactobacillus murinus DPC6002 predominated, the bacteriocin-producing Lactobacillus salivarus DPC6005 dominated over coadministered strains both in the ileum digesta and in mucosa. Probiotic administration did not alter counts of culturable fecal Lactobacillus or Enterobacteriaceae but higher ileal Enterobacteriaceae were observed in the ileal digesta of probiotic-fed pigs (P<0.05). We observed decreased CD25 induction on T cells and monocytes (P<0.01) and decreased CTLA-4 induction (P<0.05) by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin on CD4 T cells from the probiotic group. Probiotic treatment also increased the proportion of CD4+ CD8+ T cells within the peripheral T-cell population and increased ileal IL-8 mRNA expression (P<0.05). In conclusion, superior ileal survival of L. salivarius compared with the other coadministered probiotics may be due to a competitive advantage conferred by its bacteriocin. The findings also suggest that the five-strain combination may function as a probiotic, at least in part, via immunomodulation.

  19. Probiotics in milk replacer influence lamb immune function and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Santillo, A; Annicchiarico, G; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A; Albenzio, M

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of milk replacer (MR) containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and a mix of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum on lamb immune response and on lamb meat quality. A 6-week-trial was conducted on 40 male Comisana lambs, divided into four groups, fed maternal milk (MM), MR, MR with L. acidophilus supplementation (MRL) and MR with a mix (1 : 1) of B. animalis subsp. lactis and B. longum subsp. longum supplementations (MRB). Lambs fed MR containing a mix of bifidobacteria showed the highest in vivo cellular immune response to phytohemagglutinin, whereas MM and MRB showed the highest antibody response to ovalbumin. At day 11 of the trial, MRL displayed the highest value of Interleukin-10; differences disappeared among groups subsequently. Blood cholesterol levels in lambs fed MR containing L. acidophilus was almost halved compared with that found in MM and MR groups. Meat from artificially reared lambs was characterized by trans-11 18:1 and total conjugated 18:2n-6, whereas meat from the dam-suckled lambs was characterized by 14:0, cis-9 14:1 and 16:0. Polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio was higher in meat of MR, MRL and MRB than in MM lambs. Meat from artificially reared lamb fed MR containing probiotics showed an improved fatty acid profile for human diet.

  20. Spontaneous and mitomycin-C-induced micronuclei in human lymphocytes exposed to extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scarfi, M.R.; Bersani, F.; Cossarizza, A.; Monti, D.; Castellani, G.; Cadossi, R.; Franceschetti, G.; Franceschi, C. )

    1991-04-15

    The cytokinesis block micronucleus method, a very sensitive cytogenetic assay, was used to ascertain the possible genotoxic effects of extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic fields in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes cultures from 16 healthy donors. Four conditions were studied: lymphocytes not exposed to the field (control cultures); lymphocytes exposed to the field; lymphocytes treated with mitomycin-C and not exposed to the field; and lymphocytes treated with mitomycin-C and exposed to the field. Mitomycin-C-treated cultures were used as control for the micronucleus method, because it is known that mitomycin-C is a potent genotoxic agent, capable of inducing micronuclei. The frequency of micronuclei in field-exposed cultures was similar to the spontaneous frequency observed in control unexposed-cultures. Moreover, the exposure to pulsed magnetic fields did not affect the frequency of micronuclei induced by mitomycin-C, suggesting that, in the experimental conditions used, this kind of field neither affected the integrity of chromosomes nor interfered with the genotoxic activity of mitomycin-C.

  1. Mitogen induced proliferative responses of lymphocytes from spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Faisal, M; Marzouk, M S; Smith, C L; Huggett, R J

    1991-01-01

    The marine fish spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, was collected from five sites in the lower Chesapeake Bay system representing a gradient of sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations. The proliferative responses to mitogens by anterior kidney lymphocytes were assessed using [3H]-thymidine uptake by replicating DNA. The data shows two different mitogen-dependent lymphocytic responses as the sediment PAH levels increase at the sampling sites; a suppression of the response to the T cell mitogens, concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin, and a sharp augmentation of the response to B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as well as to poke weed mitogen and peanut agglutinin. The magnitude of the lymphoproliferative responses correlated strongly with the total sediment PAH concentrations (r2 greater than 0.8). A similar correlation was also observed with 15 selected individual PAH compounds regardless of their molecular weights. By maintaining the fish in clean York River water for up to 24 weeks, it was possible to reverse the augmented proliferative responses to LPS of fish from all sampling sites and to increase the reduced responses to Con A, in fish from three sites, and partially in two sites where sediments were highly contaminated with PAH. These results suggest that the proliferative responses of fish lymphocytes to mitogens may be a potentially sensitive biomarker of exposure to, and effects of xenobiotics.

  2. MC1R-dependent, melanin-based colour polymorphism is associated with cell-mediated response in the Eleonora's falcon.

    PubMed

    Gangoso, L; Grande, J M; Ducrest, A-L; Figuerola, J; Bortolotti, G R; Andrés, J A; Roulin, A

    2011-09-01

    Colour polymorphism in vertebrates is usually under genetic control and may be associated with variation in physiological traits. The melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) has been involved repeatedly in melanin-based pigmentation but it was thought to have few other physiological effects. However, recent pharmacological studies suggest that MC1R could regulate the aspects of immunity. We investigated whether variation at Mc1r underpins plumage colouration in the Eleonora's falcon. We also examined whether nestlings of the different morphs differed in their inflammatory response induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Variation in colouration was due to a deletion of four amino acids at the Mc1r gene. Cellular immune response was morph specific. In males, but not in females, dark nestling mounted a lower PHA response than pale ones. Although correlative, our results raise the neglected possibility that MC1R has pleiotropic effects, suggesting a potential role of immune capacity and pathogen pressure on the maintenance of colour polymorphism in this species.

  3. Ecological immunology in a fluctuating environment: an integrative analysis of tree swallow nestling immune defense

    PubMed Central

    Pigeon, Gabriel; Bélisle, Marc; Garant, Dany; Cohen, Alan A; Pelletier, Fanie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary ecologists have long been interested by the link between different immune defenses and fitness. Given the importance of a proper immune defense for survival, it is important to understand how its numerous components are affected by environmental heterogeneity. Previous studies targeting this question have rarely considered more than two immune markers. In this study, we measured seven immune markers (response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), hemolysis capacity, hemagglutination capacity, plasma bactericidal capacity, percentage of lymphocytes, percentage of heterophils, and percentage of eosinophils) in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nestlings raised in two types of agro-ecosystems of contrasted quality and over 2 years. First, we assessed the effect of environmental heterogeneity (spatial and temporal) on the strength and direction of correlations between immune measures. Second, we investigated the effect of an immune score integrating information from several immune markers on individual performance (including growth, mass at fledging and parasite burden). Both a multivariate and a pair-wise approach showed variation in relationships between immune measures across years and habitats. We also found a weak association between the integrated score of nestling immune function and individual performance, but only under certain environmental conditions. We conclude that the ecological context can strongly affect the interpretation of immune defenses in the wild. Given that spatiotemporal variations are likely to affect individual immune defenses, great caution should be used when generalizing conclusions to other study systems. PMID:23610646

  4. Comparative evaluation of the CD4+CD8+ and CD4+CD8- lymphocytes in the immune response to porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J; Garfias, Y; Nieto, A; Mercado, C; Montaño, L F; Zenteno, E

    2001-05-30

    The porcine immune system is unique in the expression of CD4+CD8+ (double-positive, DP) lymphocytes. These cells have been associated with immunological memory due to their gradual increase with age, the expression of memory phenotype and their ability to respond to recall viral antigen. This work analyzes the biological function of CD4+CD8- and CD4+CD8+ lymphocytes in the immune response to porcine rubulavirus (PRv). CD4+CD8- cells isolated from pigs 3 weeks after infection with porcine rubulavirus proliferated in response to homologous virus and generated lymphoblasts which were predominantly of the CD4+CD8+ phenotype, whereas stimulation with mitogen induced proliferation but did not switch the phenotype. CD4+CD8- lymphocytes isolated after 10 weeks of infection proliferated in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) but did not proliferate in response to homologous virus and did not change their phenotype, whereas CD4+CD8+ lymphocytes proliferated in response to PHA and to viral antigen. The cytokine profile of both lymphocyte populations showed the presence of IL-2 and IL-10 transcripts, quantitation demonstrated that CD4+CD8+ cells expressed mainly IL-10, whereas CD4+CD8- lymphocytes expressed primarily IL-2. Our results show that CD4+CD8- lymphocytes in the early phase of porcine rubulavirus infection can be converted to double-positive cells expressing IL-10 in an antigen-dependent manner, and that CD4+CD8- T-cells late in infection do not acquire CD8.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection protects against a Tc1-to-Tc2 shift in CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Gulzar, Naveed; Diker, Bilge; Balasubramanian, Sowmya; Jiang, Janina Q; Copeland, Karen F T

    2011-11-01

    Despite the reports of dysfunction of the lytic abilities of CD8(+) T cells during human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) disease progression, the effects of infection on the noncytolytic functions of CD8(+) T cells have not been well characterized to date. We examined the effect of HIV-1 infection on the cytokine and chemokine responses of peripheral blood-derived CD8(+) T cells in an in vitro system. Activation of HIV-1-infected CD8(+) T cells with phytohemagglutinin resulted in a 4- to 8-fold increase in the production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-1β, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, and interleukin (IL)-16. Treatment of activated HIV-1-infected CD8(+) T cells with anti-CD3 monoclonal (M) antibody (Ab) and IL-15 induced strong production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Treatment of cells with anti-IL-12 MAb and IL-4 to induce a Tc1-to-Tc2 shift resulted in no change in viral production levels or IFN-γ production within the HIV-1-infected CD8(+) T cell population. Initiation of a Tc2-to-Tc1 shift resulted in a 6-fold increase in HIV-1 replication and 2- to 3-fold higher levels of IFN-γ, demonstrating that infection can protect against a Tc1-to-Tc2 shift in CD8(+) T cells.

  6. Sequential Changes in Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Herpes Simplex Virus After Recurrent Herpetic Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shillitoe, E. J.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Lehner, T.

    1977-01-01

    Lymphocyte responses to herpes simplex virus (HSV) were studied in 23 patients with recurrent herpes labialis and in 19 control subjects. Lymphocytes of seropositive, but not seronegative, controls responded to HSV by thymidine incorporation, and the supernatant fluids inhibited the migration of guinea pig macrophages. Lymphocytes from patients with a recurrent herpetic lesion responded to HSV by significantly greater thymidine incorporation than seropositive controls, but supernatants did not show an increased macrophage migration inhibition response. During the 28 days after the onset of a lesion, the thymidine incorporation to HSV fell to the level of the seropositive controls, and supernatants then induced an increased inhibition of macrophage migration. Lymphocyte responses to Candida albicans, purified protein derivative, or phytohemagglutinin did not fluctuate according to the presence of a lesion and did not differ from those of the controls. Lymphocyte responses to HSV were unaffected by culture in the presence of serum from seronegative or seropositive controls, or from patients with or without a herpetic lesion. It is suggested that in patients with recurrent herpes labialis a periodic defect of the migration inhibition response might have allowed the recurrent infection to develop, and that the increased thymidine incorporation stimulated by HSV in vitro is a result of antigenic stimulation from the lesion. PMID:198372

  7. Replication and persistence of measles virus in defined subpopulations of human leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, B S; Lampert, P W; Oldstone, M B

    1975-01-01

    Replication of Edmonston strain measles virus was studied in several human lymphoblast lines, as well as in defined subpopulations of circulating human leukocytes. It was found that measles virus can productively infect T cells, B cells, and monocytes from human blood. These conclusions were derived from infectious center studies on segregated cell populations, as well as from ultrastructural analyses on cells labeled with specific markers. In contrast, mature polymorphonuclear cells failed to synthesize measles virus nucleocapsids even after infection at a relatively high multiplicity of infection. Measles virus replicated more efficiently in lymphocytes stimulated with mitogens than in unstimulated cells. However, both phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen had a negligible stimulatory effect on viral synthesis in purified populations of monocytes. In all instances the efficiency of measles virus replication by monocytes was appreciably less than that of mitogenically stimulated lymphocytes or of continuously culture lymphoblasts. Under standard conditions of infection, all of the surveyed lymphoblast lines produced equivalent amounts of measles virus regardless of the major histocompatibility (HL-A) haplotype. Hence, no evidence was found that the HL-A3,7 haplotype conferred either an advantage or disadvantage with respect to measles virus synthesis in an immunologically neutral environment. A persistent infection with measles virus could be established in both T and B lymphoblasts. The release of infectious virus from such persistently infected cells was stable over a period of several weeks and was approximately 100-fold less than peak viral titers obtained in each respective line after acute infection. Images PMID:1081602

  8. Chronic stress and environmental enrichment as opposite factors affecting the immune response in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Nazar, F N; Marin, R H

    2011-03-01

    Procedures in the commercial production of animals involve stressful situations which lessen the animal's welfare. This study on Japanese quail evaluated whether an environmental enrichment manipulation can affect avian immune responses and if combined with a chronic stressor exposure can help to counteract the negative effects of stress on the immune system. Potential gender effects were also considered. After hatch, half of the birds were housed in non-enriched boxes and half were housed in environmentally enriched boxes. From day 33 to 42 of age, all birds within half of the non-enriched and enriched boxes remained undisturbed while the other half were daily exposed to a 15 min restraint stressor (chronic stressor). The inflammatory response (lymphoproliferation after phytohemagglutinin-p), percentage of lymphocytes, heterophil/lymphocyte (H/L) ratio and primary antibody response against sheep red blood cells were assessed. The chronic stressor application and the enrichment procedure, respectively, either increased or reduced the four immunological parameters evaluated and always in opposite directions. Males consistently showed lower antibody titres than females and presented the highest H/L ratio in response to the stressor when reared in the non-enriched environment. The findings indicate that submitting these animals to an enriched environment can be effectively used to improve their immune response and to reduce the detrimental effects of a stressor exposure.

  9. [Microheterogeneity of alpha-fetoprotein in the amniotic fluid--developmental changes in the molecular structure of carbohydrate chain].

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, T

    1991-01-01

    By means of lectin affinity crossed-line immunoelectrophoresis, microheterogeneity of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was studied in 41 amniotic fluid samples between 41 to 287 days of gestation. Microheterogeneity was assessed by the structural differences in the carbohydrate chain identified by the specific binding between oligosaccharide molecule(s) and certain lectins such as concanavalin A, Lens culinaris hemagglutinin, phytohemagglutinin E or Ricinus communis agglutinin I. It was found that four carbohydrate chains were identifiable at an early stage of gestation; (1) mannose (Man).core type, (2) bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) type, (3) fucose (Fuc) type, and fucosyl-bisecting GlcNAc type. A carbohydrate chain with both bisecting GlcNAc and Fuc was found only at an early stage of of gestation. A carbohydrate chain with either bisecting GlcNAc or Fuc also decreased with fetal growth, and AFP at the end stage of gestation was composed mainly of Man.core type carbohydrate chain. The addition or removal of the oligosaccharide molecule takes place at the Goldi complex subjected to various modifications by the glycosylation enzyme, and the present findings indicate that a certain enzyme (s) for the processing of oligosaccharide differs according to the developmental change in AFP-producing sites or the maturation of AFP-producing cells, and such is responsible for the different AFP carbohydrate chains in the amniotic fluid at different gestational stages.

  10. Differential sensitivity of T lymphocytes and hematopoietic precursor cells to photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light.

    PubMed

    Mabed, Mohamed; Coffe, Christian; Racadot, Evelyne; Angonin, Regis; Pavey, Jean-Jaques; Tiberghien, Pierre; Herve, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combination of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) has immunomodulatory effects and might abolish both graft-vs-host and host-vs-graft reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we have confirmed the sensitivity of T lymphocytes to 8-MOP treatment plus UV-A exposure as evidenced by the abrogation of the alloreactivity in mixed lymphocyte cultures as well as the inhibition of the response to phytohemagglutinin A. However, the clonogenic capacity of the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors was inhibited with UV-A doses lower than the doses needed to inhibit T-lymphocytes alloreactivity. Moreover, long-term bone marrow cultures showed that 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment had detrimental effects on the more immature bone marrow stem cells. These data were confirmed when murine bone marrow graft was treated with 8-MOP, exposed to UV-A, then transplanted into semiallogeneic recipient mice. The treated cells could not maintain their clonogenic capacity in vivo resulting in death of all animals. Taken together, these data show that ex vivo 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment of the marrow graft cannot be used to prevent post-bone marrow transplantation alloreactivity.

  11. Nicotine inhibits the in vitro production of interleukin 2 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Madretsma, G S; Donze, G J; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Wilson, J H; Zijlstra, F J

    1996-10-01

    Smoking protects against ulcerative colitis (UC), and treatment with nicotine patches has a beneficial symptomatic effect in patients with UC. To find an explanation for this response to nicotine in UC, we assessed the effects of nicotine on cytokine production by mononuclear cells (MNC). MNC were isolated from peripheral blood from healthy volunteers. Non-adherent MNC were preincubated with varying concentrations of nicotine or prednisolone for 24 h followed by addition of phytohemagglutinin (10 micrograms/ml). The concentrations of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in the supernatants were determined by ELISA. Nicotine as well as prednisolone caused a significant inhibition of IL-2 and TNF alpha production. The maximum inhibition caused by nicotine was about 50% of that caused by prednisolone and was reached at concentrations equivalent to nicotine levels measured in plasma of smokers. These results indicate that nicotine exerts its immunoregulatory role through modulation of the cytokine production by non-adherent mononuclear cells.

  12. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response.

  13. Improvements in Immune Function and Activation with 48-Week Darunavir/Ritonavir-Based Therapy: GRACE Substudy.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, Christos; Gilbert, Louise; Lewis, Trevor; Hatzakis, George; Falcon, Ron; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective. During the course of HIV infection, progressive immune deficiency occurs. The aim of this prospective substudy was to evaluate the recovery of functional immunity in a subset of patients from the GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) study treated with a DRV/r-based regimen. Methods. The recovery of functional immunity with a darunavir/ritonavir-based regimen was assessed in a subset of treatment-experienced, HIV-1 infected patients from the GRACE study. Results. 19/32 patients (59%) enrolled in the substudy were virologically suppressed (<50 copies/mL). In these patients, median (range) CD4+ cell count increased from 222 (2, 398) cells/mm(3) at baseline to 398 (119, 812) cells/mm(3) at Week 48. CD8+% decreased significantly from baseline to Week 48 (P = .03). Proliferation of CD4+ lymphocytes in response to CD3+/CD28+, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweed was significantly increased (P < .01) by Week 12. Proliferation in response to Candida and tetanus was significantly increased by Week 48 (P < .01 and P = .014, resp.). Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-2 in CD4+ cells was significantly increased by Week 12 (P = .046) and Week 48 (P < .01), respectively. Conclusions. Darunavir/ritonavir-based therapy demonstrated improvements in CD4+ cell recovery and association with progressive functional immune recovery over 48 weeks. This trial is registered with NCT00381303.

  14. Improvements in Immune Function and Activation with 48-Week Darunavir/Ritonavir-Based Therapy: GRACE Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, Christos; Gilbert, Louise; Lewis, Trevor; Hatzakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective. During the course of HIV infection, progressive immune deficiency occurs. The aim of this prospective substudy was to evaluate the recovery of functional immunity in a subset of patients from the GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) study treated with a DRV/r-based regimen. Methods. The recovery of functional immunity with a darunavir/ritonavir-based regimen was assessed in a subset of treatment-experienced, HIV-1 infected patients from the GRACE study. Results. 19/32 patients (59%) enrolled in the substudy were virologically suppressed (<50 copies/mL). In these patients, median (range) CD4+ cell count increased from 222 (2, 398) cells/mm3 at baseline to 398 (119, 812) cells/mm3 at Week 48. CD8+% decreased significantly from baseline to Week 48 (P = .03). Proliferation of CD4+ lymphocytes in response to CD3+/CD28+, phytohemagglutinin, and pokeweed was significantly increased (P < .01) by Week 12. Proliferation in response to Candida and tetanus was significantly increased by Week 48 (P < .01 and P = .014, resp.). Staphylococcal enterotoxin B-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-2 in CD4+ cells was significantly increased by Week 12 (P = .046) and Week 48 (P < .01), respectively. Conclusions. Darunavir/ritonavir-based therapy demonstrated improvements in CD4+ cell recovery and association with progressive functional immune recovery over 48 weeks. This trial is registered with NCT00381303. PMID:24396625

  15. Effects of a Spirulina-based dietary supplement on cytokine production from allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Mao, T K; Van de Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    2005-01-01

    Spirulina represents a blue-green alga that is widely produced and commercialized as a dietary supplement for modulating immune functions, as well as ameliorating a variety of diseases. We have previously shown that the in vitro culture of Spirulina with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) modulated the production of cytokines. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of a Spirulina-based dietary supplement (Earthrise Nutritionals, Inc., Irvine, CA) on patients with allergic rhinitis by assessing the production of cytokines [interleukin (IL)-4, interferon (IFN)-gamma, and IL-2] critical in regulating immunoglobulin E-mediated allergy. In a randomized double-blinded crossover study versus placebo, allergic individuals were fed daily with either placebo or Spirulina, at 1,000 mg or 2,000 mg, for 12 weeks. PBMCs isolated before and after the Spirulina feeding were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) prior to determining the levels of cytokine from cell culture supernatants. Although Spirulina seemed to be ineffective at modulating the secretion of Th1 cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-2), we discovered that Spirulina, administered at 2,000 mg/day, significantly reduced IL-4 levels by 32% from PHA-stimulated cells. These results indicate that Spirulina can modulate the Th profile in patients with allergic rhinitis by suppressing the differentiation of Th2 cells mediated, in part, by inhibiting the production of IL-4. To our knowledge, this is the first human feeding study that demonstrates the protective effects of Spirulina towards allergic rhinitis.

  16. Effect of spirulina on the secretion of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, T K; VAN DE Water, J; Gershwin, M E

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory activity of Spirulina, a bluegreen alga used as a food supplement. The effects of Spirulina on the secretion of three cytokines from unstimulated and stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were examined. In resting PBMC, Spirulina stimulated secretion of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-gamma to nearly 2.0, 3.3, and 13.6 times basal levels, respectively. Spirulina induced levels of IFN-gamma (229 +/- 104 pg/ml) that were comparable to those seen after phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation (476 +/- 121 pg/ml). However, it was much less mitogenic than PHA (13.1 +/- 6.9 pg/ml) with respect to the induction of IL-4 secretion (0.34 +/- 0.1 pg/ml). In PHA-stimulated cells, Spirulina enhanced secretion of IL-1beta, IL-4, and IFN-beta by 2.9, 4.0., and 1.6 times, respectively. Although Spirulina stimulates several cytokines, it is clearly more effective in the generation of a Thl-type response. This in vitro study offers additional data for consideration of the potential therapeutic benefits of Spirulina.

  17. The resistance of activated T-cells from SLE patients to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Budagyan, V M; Bulanova, E G; Sharova, N I; Nikonova, M F; Stanislav, M L; Yarylin, A A

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show the differential sensitivity of phytohemagglutinine (PHA) activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cell line of epithelial origin. T-cells from SLE patients were mainly resistant to the apoptotic action of the stromal cells, while normal T-lymphocytes readily died via apoptosis. Gel electrophoresis revealed a DNA fragmentation pattern characteristic of apoptosis after 18 h of coculture. The simultaneous measurement of [3H]-thymidine uptake showed that the proliferative response of T-cells from SLE patients was significantly decreased compared to their normal counterparts. Such difference may account for the distinct result of interactions between the stromal and lymphoid cells, leading to the subsequent survival of T-lymphocytes from SLE patients. Nevertheless pretreatment of normal activated T-lymphocytes with anti-Fas mAbs, which have the capacity to substantially inhibit signaling through this receptor resulted in abolition of this form of programmed cell death. Thus, the precise role of Fas receptor and its ligand in this in vitro test system needs further investigation.

  18. Occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields and its effect on human immune parameters.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, H; Neubauer, G; Garn, H; Duftschmid, K; Winker, N; Brusl, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study recorded a considerable excess of recommended exposure limits in the vicinity of shortwave diathermy devices used for medical treatment of patients. Different kinds of field probes were used to measure electric and magnetic field strength and the whole body exposure of medical personnel operating shortwave, decimeter wave and microwave units was calculated. To investigate the influence of chronic exposure on the immune system of operators, blood was sampled from physiotherapists working at the above mentioned devices. Eighteen exposed and thirteen control persons, matched by sex and age, were examined. Total leucocyte and lymphocyte counts were performed and leucocytic subpopulations determined by flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies against surface antigens. In addition, to quantify subpopulations of immunocompetent cells, the activity of lymphocytes was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated by mitogen phytohemagglutinin and their proliferation measured by a flow cytometric method. No statistically significant differences between the control and exposed persons were found. In both study groups all immune parameters were within normal ranges.

  19. [In vitro immunosuppressive effect of low density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    González, M; Sanz, I; Rojas, N; Silva, V; Kirsten, L; Bustamante, M

    1999-11-01

    Immune cells participate in the formation of atheromatous plate, however little is known about the effects of native or oxidatively modified lipoproteins on these cells. To study the effects of lipoproteins on in vitro mononuclear cell proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 10 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (aged 52 +/- 9 years old with a disease duration of 8.2 +/- 5.7 years and a mean glycosilated hemoglobin of 9.3 +/- 2.2%) and 10 non diabetic healthy controls (aged 50.3 +/- 7.1 years old). These were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) alone or in the presence of native LDLS, malondialdehyde modified LDLs or glycated LDLs. Proliferation was measured as 3H-thymidine incorporation and expressed as Stimulation Index (SI). SI of patients and healthy subjects, after PHA stimulation were similar: (57.5 +/- 29.8 and 61.1 +/- 23.5) respectively LDLs did not induce proliferation in neither group. Native LDLs produced a 98% inhibition of PHA induced proliferation. Malondialdehyde modified and glycated LDLs caused a 50% inhibition. The suppressive effect was maintained when lipoproteins were incorporated to culture media 60 min prior or after PHA stimulation. Lipoproteins inhibit in vitro PHA induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation both in diabetic and in non diabetic subjects.

  20. Stimulation and suppression of cell-mediated immunity by endosporulation antigens of Coccidioides immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Brass, C; Levine, H B; Stevens, D A

    1982-01-01

    The culture filtrate of Coccidioides immitis induced to replicate in its parasitic phase in vitro, termed endosporulation antigens (EA), was assayed for ability to stimulate human lymphocyte blastogenesis in vitro. Stimulation of lymphocytes from skin test-positive healthy subjects by EA was comparable to stimulation by spherulin at optimal dilutions, but EA are 500 times more potent when compared on the basis of weight. Both preparations slightly stimulated lymphocytes from skin test-negative subjects. Heating or dialysis of EA enhanced the effect on skin test-positive subjects, but concentration depressed it. Concentrated EA also depressed nonspecific stimulation caused by phytohemagglutinin. Dialysis of concentrated EA reduced the ability to depress responses. EA from an avirulent strain of C. immitis were as stimulatory as EA from a virulent strain, but concentrating the former did not produce as much depression as concentrating the latter did. A survey of subjects with an optimal dose of EA in lymphocyte transformation showed that EA could separate skin test-positive from -negative subjects as well as spherulin could. The survey also showed that a delta cpm (the difference of incorporated counts of tritiated thymidine per minute in the presence or absence of the reagent) of 10,000 is useful for this separation. These results also indicate the presence of suppressive substances in EA which are only partially dialyzable and which were significantly more prominent in a preparation from the virulent strain. PMID:7056572

  1. Enhanced response to the induction of sister chromatid exchange by gamma radiation in neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hafez, M.; Abd el-Nabi, S.M.; el-Wehedi, G.; Al-Tonbary, Y.

    1986-05-15

    The study included 8 unrelated patients with neurofibromatosis, and 10 unrelated normal and healthy persons as controls. Whole blood samples were divided into plastic T flasks and exposed at room temperature to gamma rays. The radiation dose was 36 rad/minute, and the doses delivered were 0, 75, 150 and 300 rad. The lymphocytes were cultured in (RPMI) 1640 tissue culture medium and autologous serum (20%). Phytohemagglutinin and bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu) (10 microM) were added at initiation of culture and harvesting was done 64 to 68 hours after culture initiation. Slides were coded, differential staining was done, and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and aberrations (gaps, breaks, dicentrics, fragments and minutes) were counted. In the controls no significant increase in frequency of SCE has been found (P greater than 0.5). In the patients, the frequencies significantly increased with the increase of dose of irradiation (P less than 0.001). Furthermore, after irradiation, the incidence of gaps, breaks, and dicentrics were significantly increased in patients compared with controls. Moreover, the incidence increased with the increase in the dose of radiation. The results are discussed with a conclusion that the results add to the indication of a genetic predisposition to develop cancer in neurofibromatosis patients.

  2. Functional, biochemical, and histological biomarkers for immunocompetence in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Grasman, K.A.; Scanlon, P.F.; Fox, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the effects of environmental contaminants on immune function and related biochemical and histological biomarkers in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) from the Great Lakes. An epidemiological analysis strongly supported the hypothesis that suppression of T-cell-mediated immunity was associated with high perinatal exposure to persistent organochlorines (primarily PCBs). Suppression of T cell function (measured by the phytohemagglutinin skin test) was most severe in colonies in Lake Ontario and Saginaw Bay for both species and in western Lake Erie (1992) for herring gulls. In herring gull chicks, the mass of the thymus decreased as liver EROD increased. Both species exhibited biologically significant differences among sites in anti-SRBC antibody titers, but there were few associations with organochlorines. In Caspian terns and, to a lesser degree, in herring gulls, plasma retinol decreased as organochlorines increased. In both species, plasma thyroxine concentrations differed significantly among sites, but there were no apparent associations with contaminants. Although thyroxine and retinol often are associated with immune function in laboratory studies, there were few consistent relationships between these variables and T-cell- and antibody-mediated immunity in this field study. These biochemical variables may be poor surrogate biomarkers for immune function in wild birds, although they are important indicators for other physiological systems. The histology of the thymus, bursa of Fabricius, and spleen were examined for developmental and functional abnormalities and the presence of infections.

  3. Organochlorine-induced immunosuppression in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Grasman, K.A.; Scanlon, P.F.; Fox, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation studied the effects of environmental contaminants on immune function in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes and evaluated the use of immunological tests as biomarkers for contaminant exposure in wild birds. During 1991--1994, specific immune functions and general hematological parameters were measured in herring gull (Larus argentatus) and Caspian tern (Stema caspia) chicks. Study sites were chosen across a wide range of organochlorine contamination caused primarily by PCBs. In herring gull adults, the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio decreased as liver EROD, an index of contaminant exposure, increased, In herring gull chicks, thymus mass decreased as EROD increased. At highly contaminated sites, gull and tern chicks showed a marked reduction in T cell-mediated immunity as measured by the phytohemagglutinin skin test. The thymic atrophy and T cell suppression were consistent with documented effects of PCBs in laboratory animals during development and growth. In both species, chicks exhibited biologically significant differences in antibody production among sites, but any relationships to contaminants or other factors remain unclear. In laboratory animals, PCBs exhibit variable effects on antibody production. Structural and functional parameters related to the immune system are useful biomarkers for assessing the effects of contaminants on wild birds.

  4. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP) expression on T cells and on a natural-killer-cell sub-population.

    PubMed

    Moller, M J; Kammerer, R; Grunert, F; von Kleist, S

    1996-03-15

    Human T and natural-killer (NK) cells, that are thought to be the major cytotoxic effector-cell populations in the defence against neoplastic cells, were isolated from blood and decidua in order to analyze their expression of carcinoembronic-antigen-(CEA)-family-member proteins. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP,CD66a) was the only member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family detected. While freshly isolated T-cells expressed low amounts of BGP, freshly isolated NK cells were negative. After in vitro stimulation for 3 days, T cells up-regulated their BGP expression and a sub-group of NK cells (CD16- CD56+), known to predominate in decidua revealed de novo expression of BGP. In contrast, stimulated CD16+ CD56+ NK cells, which occur exclusively in the blood, remained negative. The expression of BGP could be shown on the protein level by using a panel of 12 well-defined MAbs and on the transcription level in rt-PCR and subsequent oligonucleotide hybridization. Interestingly, rIL-2-stimulated T cells expressed 3-fold higher levels of BGP compared with those seen after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA, on the other hand, induced a higher expression of HLA-DR, an activation marker of T cells. The differential regulation implies a distinct function of BGP and HLA-DR.

  5. Effect of soluble products from lectin-stimulated lymphocytes on the growth, adhesiveness, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis of cultured synovial fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T P; Wood, A

    1981-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells exposed to concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin secrete a soluble factor that arrests the growth of human synovial fibroblastic cells in culture. Once the growth-inhibitory effect is initiated it cannot be reversed by washing the fibroblastic cells, by refeeding with nonconditioned fresh serum-containing medium, by trypsinization, EDTA treatment, or a combination of these procedures. Media from nonstimulated mononuclear cells, fibroblastic cells, or the lectins themselves do not contain similar inhibitory activity that can be detected by the present culture systems. This lectin-dependent, growth-inhibitory activity does not have a cytotoxic effect on the fibroblasts but increases their adhesiveness to plastic or glass surfaces, and the cells tend to assume a less fibroblastic morphology. The growth-inhibitory activity is stable in the cold and is nondialyzable or ultrafilterable, but the activity is rapidly lost at temperature between 60 degrees and 70 degrees C and at pH 2.0. The growth-arrested cells secrete more glycosaminoglycan per cell in the medium and synthesize more cell surface glycosaminoglycan than the controls. However, the increased glycosaminoglycan synthesis cannot be explained as being entirely secondary to a cell density effect as it is also observed when adjustments are made for the differences in growth rates. PMID:7276172

  6. Suppression of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Experimental African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Wallace, John H.

    1974-01-01

    Adult New Zealand white rabbits were experimentally infected with a parasitic African hemoflagellate, Trypanosoma congolense, and were subsequently tested for in vivo and in vitro aspects of cell-mediated immune function. Chronically infected rabbits were sensitized to mycobacterial protein and skin-tested with purified protein derivative; all infected animals demonstrated much milder skin-test responses to antigen than control groups. Similarly, peripheral blood lymphocyte responses in vitro to purified protein derivative and, as well, to phytohemagglutinin were markedly suppressed. Supernatant fluids of antigen-stimulated lymph node cell cultures from T. congolense-infected rabbits failed to demonstrate migration inhibitory factor activity but did possess normal levels of blastogenic factor activity. An active infection was necessary for demonstration of suppressed immune responses, and components present in infected rabbit serum were apparently not responsible for the observed abnormalities. Suppression of T-lymphocyte subpopulations may well explain the occurrence of numerous immunological aberrations arising during human and animal infections with the African trypanosomes. PMID:4854532

  7. Arthritis of mice induced by Mycoplasma pulmonis: humoral antibody and lymphocyte responses of CBA mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Golightly-Rowland, L; Ward, J R

    1975-01-01

    Peak arthritis occurred 14 days after intravenous injection of Mycoplasma pulmonis and persisted in some mice at low levels for 84 days. A marked lymphocytosis occurred during the first week of infection with only a slight increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complement-fixing antibodies appeared in low titer 3 days after infection and moderate levels persisted for 84 days. The metabolic-inhibiting and mycoplasmacidal antibody responses were absent or minimal. M. pulmonis appeared to be mitogenic for mouse lymphocytes as evidenced by (i) increased uptake of [3H]thymidine for normal lymphocytes exposed to various concentrations of nonviable M. pulmonis antigen, and (ii) a 13-fold increase in [3H]thymidine uptake in lymphocytes taken from mice 3 days after infection with M. pulmonis in the absence of added antigen. Lymphocytes taken from infected mice transformed significantly more at all time periods than control lymphocytes when exposed to M. pulmonis antigen. This response was maximal at 3 days and minimal at 21 to 35 days after infection. Lymphocytes sensitized to M. pulmonis did not transform when exposed to M. arthritidis antigen or vice versa. M. pulmonis infection had no effect upon the mitogenic responses of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin or lipopolysaccharide. There was no statistically significant correlation between persistence of arthritis and degree of humor antibody or lymphocyte responses. However, persisting arthritis was associated with a higher incidence of mycoplasma isolations. PMID:1193724

  8. Inhibition of Local Immune Responses by the Frog-Killing Fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Fites, J. Scott; Reinert, Laura K.; Chappell, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibians are suffering unprecedented global declines. A leading cause is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Chytridiomycosis is a skin disease which disrupts transport of essential ions leading to death. Soluble factors produced by B. dendrobatidis impair amphibian and mammalian lymphocytes in vitro, but previous studies have not shown the effects of these inhibitory factors in vivo. To demonstrate in vivo inhibition of immunity by B. dendrobatidis, a modified delayed-type-hypersensitivity (DTH) protocol was developed to induce innate and adaptive inflammatory swelling in the feet of Xenopus laevis by injection of killed bacteria or phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Compared to previous protocols for PHA injection in amphibians, this method induced up to 20-fold greater inflammatory swelling. Using this new protocol, we measured DTH responses induced by killed bacteria or PHA in the presence of B. dendrobatidis supernatants. Swelling induced by single injection of PHA or killed bacteria was not significantly affected by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. However, swelling caused by a secondary injection of PHA, was significantly reduced by B. dendrobatidis supernatants. As previously described in vitro, factors from B. dendrobatidis appear to inhibit lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory swelling but not swelling caused by an inducer of innate leukocytes. This suggests that B. dendrobatidis is capable of inhibiting lymphocytes in a localized response to prevent adaptive immune responses in the skin. The modified protocol used to induce inflammatory swelling in the present study may be more effective than previous methods to investigate amphibian immune competence, particularly in nonmodel species. PMID:25156734

  9. Correlation between the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 and the levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ji; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Bin; Wu, Song

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ratio of the transcription factors T-bet/GATA-3 in patients with allergic asthma. Forty-seven individuals with allergic asthma and 47 healthy control individuals provided 5 ml of anticoagulated peripheral venous blood. Lymphocytes in peripheral blood were isolated by Ficoll and treated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) at a final concentration of 100 mg/l for 48 h. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) levels were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the mRNA levels of both T-bet and GATA-3 were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). IFN-γ levels in the lymphocytes of asthmatic patients were lower than those of the control group (P<0.05) and were positively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. By contrast, IL-4 levels were significantly higher in asthmatic patients than in the control group (P<0.01) and were negatively correlated with the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3. In conclusion, the ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 can be used as an objective indicator of immune imbalance in patients with allergic asthma.

  10. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  11. The Effect of Long-Term Exercise on the Production of Osteoclastogenic and Antiosteoclastogenic Cytokines by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and on Serum Markers of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Rhesa; Chi, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that the mechanical stresses associated with physical activity augment bone mineral density and improve bone quality, our understanding of how exercise modulates bone homeostasis at the molecular level is lacking. In a before and after trial involving 43 healthy adults, we measured the effect of six months of supervised exercise training on the spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-induced production of osteoclastogenic cytokines (interleukin-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α), antiosteoclastogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor-β1 and interleukins 4 and 10), pleiotropic cytokines with variable effects on osteoclastogenesis (interferon-γ, interleukin-6), and T cell growth and differentiation factors (interleukins 2 and 12) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We also measured lymphocyte phenotypes and serum markers of bone formation (osteocalcin), bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of Type I collagen), and bone homeostasis (25 (OH) vitamin D, estradiol, testosterone, parathyroid hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1). A combination of aerobic, resistance, and flexibility exercises done on average of 2.5 hours a week attenuated the production of osteoclastogenic cytokines and enhanced the production of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. These changes were accompanied by a 16% reduction in collagen degradation products and a 9.8% increase in osteocalcin levels. We conclude that long-term moderate intensity exercise exerts a favorable effect on bone resorption by changing the balance between blood mononuclear cells producing osteoclastogenic cytokines and those producing antiosteoclastogenic cytokines. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT02765945. PMID:27642534

  12. Medicinal plant extracts modulate respiratory burst and proliferation activity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulfon, Chiara; Galeotti, Marco; Volpatti, Donatella

    2017-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of Aloe vera, Curcuma longa, Echinacea purpurea, Lavandula officinalis, Origanum vulgare, Panax ginseng, and Rheum officinale extracts on leukocytes purified from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) head kidney. The cells were cultured in a medium containing increasing doses of extracts; afterwards, they were tested for reactive oxygen species production after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and proliferation in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (PHA-P). After a 2-h exposure, the extracts of L. officinalis, O. vulgare, and R. officinale strongly reduced the oxidative burst activity of PMA-stimulated leukocytes, in a dose-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.05). A. vera, C. longa, E. purpurea, and P. ginseng extracts reduced this response with lower efficacy and especially at lower concentrations. On the contrary, the highest concentration of ginseng extract stimulated the respiratory burst of leukocytes compared to untreated control cells. After a 72-h exposure, the extracts of L. officinalis, R. officinale, C. longa, E. purpurea, and P. ginseng had a clear dose-dependent stimulatory effect on leukocyte proliferation (P ≤ 0.05). The results suggest that these medicinal plants can be considered as reliable sources of new antioxidants or immunostimulants to be used in aquaculture.

  13. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm 2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples.

  14. Study of cytogenetic abnormalities in G-CSF stimulated peripheral blood cells and non-stimulated bone marrow cells of patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lozynskyy, R Y; Lozynska, M R; Hontar, Y V; Huleyuk, N L; Maslyak, Z V; Novak, V L

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to improve cytogenetic diagnostics and monitoring of myelofibrosis and to reveal the spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities in patients from Ukraine. A total of 42 patients (23 females and 19 males) with myelofibrosis was studied using different cytogenetic methods. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was added by the new method during cultivation of peripheral blood (PB) cells from 31 patients for specific stimulation of mitotic divisions. Two patients underwent examination by fluorescent in situ hybridization method. In cell cultures of PB stimulated in vitro with G-CSF and in non-stimulated bone marrow chromosome abnormalities were found in 19 (45.2%) of all the patients. The spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities of bone marrow and PB was the same in all of the patients. Aspiration of bone marrow was unsuccessful due to significant fibrosis in 10 (29.4%) of 34 patients. The study by fluorescent in situ hybridization method confirmed cytogenetic abnormalities revealed by G-method and discovered additional possibly normal subclone. Cytogenetic study of PB using in vitro G-CSF as a specific stimulant of mitosis instead of phytohemagglutinin revealed significant variety of chromosomal abnormalities in Ukrainian patients with myelofibrosis. This method could be a less invasive alternative to cytogenetic examination of bone marrow in the subgroup of patients with considerable fibrosis and consecutive changes. The usage of fluorescent in situ hybridization method supplemented karyotyping by G-banding method.

  15. New immunosuppressive cyclomyrsinol diterpenes from Euphorbia kopetdaghi Prokh.

    PubMed

    Ghanadian, Syed Mustafa; Ayatollahi, Abdul Majid; Mesaik, M Ahmed; Abdalla, Omer Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Aceton: chloroform (1:2) extracts of the aerial parts of Euphorbia kopetdaghi Prokh. (Euphorbiaceae) were investigated for its diterpenoids and afforded three new five-membered ring, pentacyclic myrisinane polyester comprised of 3,5,10-O-triacetyl-8-O-isobutanoyl-14-O-benzoylcyclomyrsinol (1), 3,5,10,14-O-tetraacetyl-8-O-(2'-methyl butanoyl)-cyclomyrsinol (2) and 3,5,10,14-O-tetracetyl-8-O-isobutanoylcyclomyrsinol (3). The structures were elucidated based on (13)C- and (1)H-NMR as well as 2D-NMR, IR and different MS spectra and the immunomodulation activity for compound 1 was evaluated through lymphocyte proliferation assay, IL-2 assay, oxidative burst of phagocytic leukocytes and through their cytotoxicity on two cell lines. Compound 1 showed significant suppressive activity against phytohemagglutinin-activated T-cell proliferation with an IC(50) of 1.83 µg mL(-1), IL-2 suppressive activity with an IC(50) of 19.0 µg mL(-1) and oxidative burst suppressive activity with an IC(50) of 1.6 µg mL(-1) and ignorable cytotoxic effect on the CC-1 rat hepatocyte and 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblast cell-lines.

  16. Successful treatment for West syndrome with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Inaba, Yuji; Fukuyama, Tetsuhiro; Kurata, Takashi; Niimi, Taemi; Saito, Shoji; Shiba, Naoko; Nishimura, Takafumi; Shigemura, Tomonari; Nakazawa, Yozo; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Sakashita, Kazuo; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Ichikawa, Motoki; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Several immune mechanisms are suspected in the unknown etiology of West syndrome (WS). We report a male infant who suffered from WS and X-linked T-B+NK- severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) with a missense mutation of the IL2RG gene (c.202G>A, p.Glu68Lys). He promptly began vitamin B6 and valproic acid treatment, but infantile spasms (IS) and hypsarrhythmia persisted. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and the change to topiramate (TPM) at 7 months of age resulted in the rapid resolution of IS. The CD4/8 ratio in his peripheral blood increased from 0.04-0.09 to 0.20-1.95 following unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT). In vitro lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagglutinin or concanavalin A and the ability of B lymphocytes to produce antibodies improved as well. Electroencephalogram findings became normal 1 month after UCBT. Thus, we consider that T-cell dysfunction and/or impairments in T-B cell interactions due to X-SCID may have played important roles in the onset of WS. Immune-modulating therapies along with the administration of TPM effectively treated this severe epileptic syndrome in our patient.

  17. Clonal origin of human erythro-eosinophilic colonies in culture.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, T; Spicer, S S; Ogawa, M

    1982-04-01

    We have observed the presence of erythropoietic bursts containing eosinophils and their precursors in methylcellulose culture of human peripheral blood and marrow nucleated cells in the presence of erythropoietin and medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes (PHA-LCM). It was possible to identify these bursts (colonies) in situ in methylcellulose culture on the basis of their unique red and black colors. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the constituent erythroid and eosinophilic cells lay intermixed with each other, and through close intercellular connections formed compact colonies and bursts consisting of several sub-colonies. Differential counts of individual erythro-eosinophil colonies (EEo colonies) revealed only a small percentage of blast cells in most of the colonies. Replating experiments of single EEo colonies yielded only eosinophilic colonies and clusters and erythroid colonies. The clonal nature of the EEo colonies was documented by analysis of Y-chromatin-positive cells in individual EEo colonies derived from cocultures of male and female peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Comparison of conditioned media indicated that PHA-LCM is the best stimulator for EEo colonies. These studies suggest that the differentiation capabilities of the progenitors for EEo colonies are restricted to erythroid and eosinophilic differentiation.

  18. Effect of elevated growth hormone concentrations on the phenotype and functions of human lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kotzmann, H; Köller, M; Czernin, S; Clodi, M; Svoboda, T; Riedl, M; Boltz-Nitulescu, G; Zielinski, C C; Luger, A

    1994-12-01

    Over the past decades, strong evidence has accumulated that growth hormone (GH) has immunostimulatory properties. Therefore, an investigation was conducted on 10 acromegalic patients and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to determine whether plasma GH concentrations correlate with changes in several immune parameters, including serum concentrations of immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte transformation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), natural killer (NK) cell activity as well as phagocytic and metabolic burst activity. While NK cell activity, serum concentrations of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM, IgA) and metabolic burst activity were within the normal range in both groups, a significantly enhanced phagocytic activity was observed in the acromegalic patients. Surface markers on T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8), B lymphocytes (CD19) and NK cells (CD16/56) were normal in both groups; however, in the acromegalic subjects, CD4+ and CD8+ cells showed a significant higher expression of transferrin receptors (CD71), indicating enhanced T-cell activity. The lymphocyte transformation response to PHA at the highest concentration tested showed a tendency to be elevated in acromegalics; however, the difference failed to be significant. Long-lasting and pronounced elevation of GH in acromegaly induces significantly enhanced phagocytic activity, but only negligible changes in most patients in lymphocyte phenotype and in the lymphocyte response to PHA.

  19. Steroidal Alkaloids as an Emerging Therapeutic Alternative for Investigation of Their Immunosuppressive and Hepatoprotective Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Naeem U.; Ahmad, Bashir; Ali, Safdar; Adhikari, Achyut; Ali, Amjad; Jahan, Azra; Ali, Abid; Ali, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    The compounds, sarcovagine-D, alkaloid-C, and holaphylline isolated from Sarcococca saligna were found to possess immunosuppressive activities. These compounds were characterized for in vitro inhibition on human T-cells proliferation and IL-2 production. The compounds showed significant immunosuppressive effect on IL-2 production as well as on phytohemagglutinin stimulated T-cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner. Of all the tested compounds holaphylline was found to be less toxic and safe. These compounds were then evaluated for their in vivo hepatoprotective potential against CCl4, in which alkaloid-C and holaphylline showed markedly reduced liver inflammation and biochemical parameter (ALT, AST, and ALP) of liver injury. The decrease in the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzyme (SOD) was significantly prevented by holaphylline, likewise gradually the levels of MDA and GSH were also normalized compared to silymarin. The CCl4 induced inflammation and necrosis around the central vein of liver was reduced by sarcovagine-D, alkaloid-C and holaphylline, to 8%, 4% to 1% respectively as assessed by histopathology, thus having better hepatoprotective effect compared to positive control. Steroidal alkaloids attenuated the inflammation of liver around the injured central vein region by down regulating the CCl4 induced activation of hepatic macrophages as well as their number respectively. Therefore, the in vitro and in vivo results suggest that steroidal alkaloids from S. saligna could be excellent immunosuppressive and hepatoprotective agents. PMID:28377714

  20. Genotoxic effect of formocresol pulp therapy of deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Lucas Leite, Ana Catarina Gaioso; Rosenblatt, Aronita; da Silva Calixto, Merilane; da Silva, Cirlene Maria; Santos, Neide

    2012-08-30

    To investigate whether formocresol, in Buckley's original formulation, used for pulp therapy of deciduous teeth, can have a genotoxic effect. Genotoxicity was tested in lymphocyte cultures from the peripheral blood of children aged 5-10y, in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. This was a case-control study. The sample comprised 40 children who had primary teeth with non-vital pulps. Two venous blood samples (6-8ml) were collected from each child, the first prior to pulp therapy (control group) and the second 24h after pulp therapy (experimental group). Lymphocyte cultures were grown in 78% RPMI 1640 medium, 20% fetal bovine serum, 2% phytohemagglutinin. The lymphocytes were assessed for chromosomal aberrations; each sample involved analysis of 100 metaphases. There was a statistically significant difference between the control and treated groups for the isochromatid gap (p<0.001), chromatid break (p<0.009), isochromatid break (p<0.046), other chromosomal alterations (p<0.001), and for total aberrations. In view of these results, caution in the use of formocresol in pediatric dentistry is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-04-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents.

  2. Age-associated chromosome 21 loss in Down syndrome: possible relevance to mosaicism and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Percy, M E; Markovic, V D; Dalton, A J; McLachlan, D R; Berg, J M; Rusk, A C; Somerville, M J; Chodakowski, B; Andrews, D F

    1993-03-01

    We previously observed low level mosaicism (2-4% normal cells) in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in 29% of a small group of elderly persons with Down syndrome (DS). An analysis of cytogenetic data on 154 trisomy 21 cases (age 1 day to 68 years) showed that the proportion of diploid cells in such cultures significantly increased (P < 0.005) with advancing age. Thus, the "occult" mosaicism in PBL of the elderly persons with DS is likely due to the accumulation of cells that have lost a chromosome 21. A consequence of chromosome 21 loss could be uniparental disomy of the 2n cells, a factor that might have significant biological consequences if some chromosome 21 genes are imprinted. Loss of a chromosome 21 from trisomic cells might result in tissue-specific mosaicism and "classical" mosaicism in different age groups. Chromosome 21 loss might also be relevant to the development of Alzheimer-type dementia in DS and in the general population.

  3. The in vitro effects of artificial and natural sweeteners on the immune system using whole blood culture assays.

    PubMed

    Rahiman, F; Pool, E J

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of commercially available artificial (aspartame, saccharin, sucralose) and natural sweeteners (brown sugar, white sugar, molasses) on the immune system. Human whole blood cultures were incubated with various sweeteners and stimulated in vitro with either phytohemagglutinin or endotoxin. Harvested supernatants were screened for cytotoxicity and cytokine release. Results showed that none of the artificial or natural sweeteners proved to be cytotoxic, indicating that no cell death was induced in vitro. The natural sweetener, sugar cane molasses (10 ug/mL), enhanced levels of the inflammatory biomarker IL-6 while all artificial sweeteners (10 ug/mL) revealed a suppressive effect on IL-6 secretion (P < 0.001). Exposure of blood cells to sucralose-containing sweeteners under stimulatory conditions reduced levels of the biomarker of humoral immunity, Interleukin-10 (P < 0.001). The cumulative suppression of Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-10 levels induced by sucralose may contribute to the inability in mounting an effective humoral response when posed with an exogenous threat.

  4. Chlorinated dibenzo-P-dioxins and dibenzofurans and the human immune system (2) In vitro proliferation of lymphocytes from workers with quantified moderately-increased body burdens

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, R.; Maskow, L.; Delgado, I.

    1995-11-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation responses were studied in workers with moderately increased body burdens of 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and other polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and other polyclorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), calculated as International Toxicity Equivalencies [I-TE]. Mitogens (pokeweed mitogen [PWM], phytohemagglutinine [PHA], concanavalin A [Con A], as well as anti-human monoclonal antibody against CD3 were used as proliferation stimulators in vitro. Additionally, the feasibility of using the lymphocyte response to tetanus toxoid was assessed, and the response to this recall-antigen was included in this trial. No decrease in the capacity of {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation was observed with any of the proliferation stimulators in the group of volunteers with the increased TCDD-body burden when compared with volunteers exhibiting TCDD-concentrations in blood flat within the reference range. Regression analysis revealed a slight trend towards an increase for {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation during the stimulation with PHA only. It can be concluded from our data that moderates increases in the TCDD- or I-TE-body burdens do not induce any medically significant changes in the capacity for proliferation of lymphocytes, measured as {sub 3}H=thymidine incorporation. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The immunosuppressive effect of Gamisanghyulyunbueum through inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor activation in MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Na, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Hong-Joon; Moon, Goo; Shin, Tae-Yong; Yang, Deok-Chun; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2005-07-01

    Gamisanghyulyunbueum (GSHYBE) has been used clinically to treat skin related disease in South Korea. We investigated GSHYBE-mediated changes in downstream T cell signal transduction. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, we have studied many of the major pathways in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cell. We show that among the mitogen-activated protein kinase family activation of phosphorylation of extra cellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, p44/42) and p38, but not c-jun NH2-terminal kinase is inhibited. In activated MOLT-4 cells, the nuclear localization of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc) was blocked by GSHYBE (1 mg/ml). Also, degradation of inhibitor kappaB-alpha and transactivation by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)/Rel A were impaired by GSHYBE (1 mg/ml). Furthermore, interlukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and Interferen (IFN)-gamma secretion by PHA activated MOLT-4 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were significantly diminishes following GSHYBE treatment (1 mg/ml). Also, oral administration of GSHYBE inhibited IL-2 secretion in skin allergic reaction. In conclusion, our data indicate that GSHYBE treatment of T cells inhibits ERK1/2 and p38 activation and nuclear translocation of NFATc, NF-kappaB, resulting in diminished secretion of IL-2.

  6. Central stimulation of hormone release and the proliferative response of lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1995-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may communicate with the immune system by direct innervation of lymphoid organs and/or by neurotransmitters and changes in neuroendocrine functioning and hormone release. The consequences of selective transient changes in circulating hormones on immune functioning in humans have not yet been studied. To address this problem, the authors evaluated the lymphoproliferative responses to optimal and suboptimal concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) under selective enhancement of circulating growth hormone, prolactin, or norepinephrine. The authors failed to demonstrate any effect of elevated growth hormone levels after clonidine challenge on the lymphoproliferative response to mitogens. Similarly, the results did not show any effect of elevated prolactin concentrations induced by domperidone administration on the immune test. Exposure of volunteers to cold resulted in elevation of plasma norepinephrine levels without changes in growth hormone, epinephrine, or cortisol secretion. Cold exposure induced elevation of plasma norepinephrine and reduction of the lymphoproliferative response to the suboptimal dosage of PHA. The reduction was significant 180 and 240 min after exposure. These results are indicative of a relationship between norepinephrine and immunity.

  7. Suppressed PHA activation of T lymphocytes in simulated microgravity is restored by direct activation of protein kinase C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D.; Pellis, N. R.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing clinostatic rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactors that simulate aspects of microgravity, we found phytohemagglutinin (PHA) responsiveness to be almost completely diminished. Activation marker expression was significantly reduced in RWV cultures. Furthermore, cytokine secretion profiles suggested that monocytes are not as adversely affected by simulated microgravity as T cells. Reduced cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions may play a role in the loss of PHA responsiveness because placing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) within small collagen beads did partially restore PHA responsiveness. However, activation of purified T cells with cross-linked CD2/CD28 and CD3/CD28 antibody pairs was completely suppressed in the RWV, suggesting a defect in signal transduction. Activation of purified T cells with PMA and ionomycin was unaffected by RWV culture. Furthermore, sub-mitogenic doses of PMA alone but not ionomycin alone restored PHA responsiveness of PBMC in RWV culture. Thus our data indicate that during polyclonal activation the signaling pathways upstream of PKC activation are sensitive to simulated microgravity.

  8. PHA-induced inflammation is not energetically costly in the subterranean rodent Ctenomys talarum (tuco-tucos).

    PubMed

    Merlo, Julieta L; Cutrera, Ana P; Luna, Facundo; Zenuto, Roxana R

    2014-09-01

    Immune activity has been proposed to be associated with substantial costs, due to trade-offs with other functions or activities that share common resources and contribute to an animal's fitness. However, direct estimates of the cost of mounting an immune response are few and have been performed mainly in birds. Thus, further work is needed to clarify the relative costs of different components of the immune system and the role of environmental and life-history traits in modulating the costs of resistance. Within the components of immunity, inflammation is considered to be associated with a larger energetic expenditure. Here, we evaluated the energetic cost of the inflammatory response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in a wild population of a subterranean rodent, Ctenomys talarum, and the trade-offs between immune activity and reproduction. C. talarum develops an inflammatory response to PHA, but contrary to our predictions, this response was not associated with an increase in oxygen consumption regardless of reproductive status or sex. Our study shows that an immune challenge may not always result in a detectable energetic cost. We discuss the possibility that other currencies could be underlying the cost, such as micro-or macronutrients requirements, autoimmunity or oxidative stress.

  9. Immunostimulatory acivity of Calophyllum brasiliense, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Matayba elaeagnoides demonstrated by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Philippi, Marina Elisa; Duarte, Bruna Momm; Da Silva, Carolina Vieira; De Souza, Michel Thomaz; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Bueno, Edneia Casagranda

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of methanol extracts of three Brazilian medicinal plants on in vitro proliferation of human mononuclear cells. Lymphoproliferation assay was carried out by incubating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) with extracts of Calophyllum brasiliense (roots), Ipomoea pes-caprae (whole plant) and Matayba elaeagnoides (bark), both at 10, 50, 100 and 200 microg/mL, alone or with phytohemagglutinin (PHA, 5 microg/mL), in 96-well microplates at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2, for 72 h. The quantification of cell proliferation assay was performed by blue tetrazolium (MTT) reduction with reading at 540 nm. Cells incubated with only the culture medium were used as negative control for cell proliferation, while the positive control consisted of cells and PHA. The results suggest that the extracts of all three studied plants induce T lymphocyte proliferation. I. pes-caprae showed immunostimulatory activity three times higher than the C. brasiliense extract, while that of the M. elaeagnoides extract was 1.5 times higher. The results demonstrate immunostimulatory effects of these three plants, therefore the continuity of these studies is recommended, in order to determine the active principles.

  10. Cell kinetic effects of incorporated /sup 3/H-thymidine on proliferating human lymphocytes: flow cytometric analysis using the DNA/nuclear protein method

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, A.; Moulis, H.; Greenstein, D.B.; Block, N.L.; Irvin, G.L. 3d.

    1985-09-01

    Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes incorporating high concentrations of /sup 3/H-thymidine accumulate in G2 and show a consequent reduction in the number of cells entering M (division delay). The simultaneous flow cytometric analysis of DNA content (propidium iodide fluorescence) and nuclear protein content (fluorescein isothiocyanate fluorescence) allows for the accurate quantitation of these events; G2 and M are separated in the bivariate distributions. A good correlation was observed between mitotic indices, quantitated by manually counting mitotic cells, and integration of the M area in DNA/nuclear protein histograms. Moreover, significant differences in G2 nuclear protein levels were found between untreated and /sup 3/H-thymidine-treated lymphocytes. In order to characterize this effect, G2 was empirically divided into low nuclear protein (G2A) and high nuclear protein (G2B) compartments. /sup 3/H-thymidine caused an initial accumulation of lymphocytes in G2A, followed within 3-6 h by a gradual movement of some cells into G2B, with a subsequent accumulation of cells in G2B. The results suggest that the distribution of cells in G2 (G2A and G2B), the average nuclear protein content of G2B cells, and the proportion of cells in M are parameters that when used in combination provide a unique description of radiobiological effects.

  11. Effect of interleukin-2 on cell proliferation, sister-chromatid exchange induction, and nuclear stress protein phosphorylation in PHA-stimulated Fischer 344 rat spleen lymphocytes: Modulation by 2-mercaptoethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, S.M.; Aidoo, A.; Domon, O.E.; McGarrity, L.J.; Kodell, R.L.; Schol, H.M.; Hinson, W.G.; Pipkin, J.L.; Casciano, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of interleukin-2 (IL-2) on cell proliferation, sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency, and the phosphorylation of nuclear stress proteins was evaluated in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated spleen lymphocytes isolated from Fischer 344 rats. In addition, the ability of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) to modulate the induction of these biological responses was characterized. Cell proliferation, as measured by the mitotic index, increased significantly. The average generation time (AGT) did not respond to IL-2 in a concentration-dependent manner and decreased significantly. The number of SCE increased significantly from control frequencies, to frequencies of 18.5 to 21.5 SCE per cell as the concentration of IL-2 in the culture medium increased to 50 half-maximal units per ml. A reduction in SCE frequency was observed when cells were cultured with 20 {mu}M 2-ME and IL-2 compared to IL-2 alone. Three nuclear proteins, with relative molecular masses of approximately 13,000-18,000, 20,000, and 80,000, were phosphorylated in IL-2-exposed G{sub 1}-phase nuclei. Elicitation of these nuclear proteins in IL-2-exposed cells was not affected by exposure to 2-ME.

  12. Assaying the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a mitogen of immature cells in fetal blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Borrell, A; Jou, J M; Besón, I; Soler, A; Carrió, A; Margarit, E; Caballín, R; Ballesta, F; Fortuny, A

    1999-01-01

    Based on the presence of immature cells in fetal blood, and in an attempt to shorten the cytogenetic reporting time, three simultaneous one-day culture regimes were established in 23 fetal blood samples: (a) the standard phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocytes culture, (b) a culture using the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an alternative mitogen, and (c) an unstimulated culture. Diagnostic success rates achieved by these three methods were as follows: 43 per cent (95 per cent CI: 23-64) (GM-CSF), 30 per cent (95 per cent CI: 12-49) (PHA) and 9 per cent (unstimulated). These three regimes were also assayed in three-day cultures giving 100 per cent diagnostic success rate for the PHA and GM-CSF, and 62 per cent (95 per cent CI: 41-83) for the unstimulated. A moderate correlation was found between the initial concentration of cultured erythroblasts and the metaphase count in one-day GM-CSF-stimulated (r=0.43, p=0.01) and unstimulated (r=0.35, p=0.05) cultures, suggesting that erythroblasts may be in part responsible for the mitotic index observed in these two regime cultures. In conclusion, our experience suggests that immature cells in fetal blood may be successfully cultured for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Immune interferon and leukocyte-conditioned medium induce normal and leukemic myeloid cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human leukocytes contains a factor that can induce promyelocytic cell lines and certain acute myelogenous leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway. In this report, we show that immature myeloid cells from normal bone marrow or the peripheral blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia can be induced to differentiate to monocyte-like cells by immune gamma interferon (IFN gamma). We have identified IFN gamma as the predominant differentiation factor contained in the conditioned medium. Purified or recombinant IFN gamma, but not various preparations of IFN alpha or beta, can induce monocytic differentiation in myeloid cells. In cultures containing conditioned medium, the cells fail to continue myeloid maturation, and are induced to express monocyte markers and functions, such as monocyte-specific surface antigens, HLA-DR antigens, Fc receptors for monomeric immunoglobulins, nonspecific esterase, and the ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Even myeloid cells as mature as metamyelocytes or band cells can be induced by IFN gamma to undergo monocyte differentiation, but monocyte-specific or HLA-DR antigens are not induced in mature neutrophils. These findings reveal a previously unknown, specific function of human IFN gamma and offer new insights to the regulation of monocyte recruitment and differentiation during a virus infection or immune response. PMID:6417261

  14. Membranes replace irradiated blast cells as growth requirement for leukemic blast progenitors in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, N.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1985-11-01

    The blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) may be considered as a renewal population, maintained by blast stem cells capable of both self-renewal and the generation of progeny with reduced or absent proliferative potential. This growth requires that two conditions be met: first, the cultures must contain growth factors in media conditioned either by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mononuclear leukocytes (PHA-LCM), or by cells of the continuous bladder carcinoma line HTB9 (HTB9-CM). Second, the cell density must be maintained at 10(6) blasts/ml; this may be achieved by adding irradiated cells to smaller numbers of intact blasts. The authors are concerned with the mechanism of the feeding function. They present evidence that (a) cell-cell contact is required. (b) Blasts are heterogeneous in respect to their capacity to support growth. (c) Fractions containing membranes from blast cells will substitute for intact cells in promoting the generation of new blast progenitors in culture. (d) This membrane function may be specific for AML blasts, since membranes from blasts of lymphoblastic leukemia or normal marrow cells were inactive.

  15. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  16. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 polymorphism interaction with spirulina immunomodulatory effects in healthy Korean elderly: A 16 week, double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jung

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Spirulina is a known a functional food related to lipid profiles, immune functions, and antioxidant capacity. Circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) level is associated with inflammation markers. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the MCP-1 promoter region -2518 have been identified and shown to affect gene transcription. Gene variation may also impact functional food supplementary effects. The current study investigated the interaction of MCP-1 -2518 polymorphism with spirulina supplements on anti-inflammatory capacity in Korean elderly. SUBJECTS/METHODS After genotyping, healthy elderly subjects (n = 78) were included in a randomized, double blind, and placebo controlled study. Baseline characteristic, body composition, and dietary intake were measured twice (baseline vs. week 16). For 16 weeks, subjects consumed 8 g either spirulina or placebo daily. Plasma MCP-1, interleukin (IL) -2, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, complement (C) 3, immunoglobulin (Ig) G, and Ig A concentrations and lymphocyte proliferation rate (LPR) were analyzed as inflammatory markers. RESULTS In the placebo group with A/A genotype, MCP-1 level was significantly increased, but the spirulina group with A/A genotype was unchanged. IL-2 was significantly increased only in subjects with spirulina supplementation. TNF-α was significantly reduced in subjects with the G carrier. C3 was significantly increased in the placebo group, particularly when A/A increased more than G, but not when spirulina was ingested. LPR was significantly different only in subjects with A/A genotype; there was a significant increase in phytohemagglutinin and lipopolysaccharide induced LPR in the spirulina group. CONCLUSION In healthy Korean elderly, spirulina supplementation may influence different inflammatory markers by the MCP-1 genotype. These results may be useful for customized dietary guidelines to improve immune function in Koreans. PMID:28765775

  17. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  18. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials.

  19. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells.

  20. Transport of proteins to the plant vacuole is not by bulk flow through the secretory system, and requires positive sorting information.

    PubMed

    Dorel, C; Voelker, T A; Herman, E M; Chrispeels, M J

    1989-02-01

    Plant cells, like other eukaryotic cells, use the secretory pathway to target proteins to the vacuolar/lysosomal compartment and to the extracellular space. We wished to determine whether the presence of a hydrophobic signal peptide would result in the transport of a reporter protein to vacuoles by bulk flow; to investigate this question, we expressed a chimeric gene in transgenic tobacco. The chimeric gene, Phalb, used for this study consists of the 1,188-bp 5' upstream sequence and the hydrophobic signal sequence of a vacuolar seed protein phytohemagglutinin, and the coding sequence of a cytosolic seed albumin (PA2). The chimeric protein PHALB cross-reacted with antibodies to PA2 and was found in the seeds of the transgenic plants (approximately 0.7% of total protein), but not in the leaves, roots, or flowers. Immunoblot analyses of seed extracts revealed four glycosylated polypeptides ranging in molecular weight from 29,000 to 32,000. The four polypeptides are glycoforms of a single polypeptide of Mr 27,000, and the heterogeneity is due to the presence of high mannose and endoglycosidase H-resistant glycans. The PHALB products reacted with an antiserum specific for complex plant glycans indicating that the glycans had been modified in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation of glycerol extracts of mature seeds showed that only small amounts of PHALB accumulated in the protein storage vacuoles of the tobacco seeds. In homogenates made in an isotonic medium, very little PHALB was associated with the organelle fraction containing the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus; most of it was in the soluble fraction. We conclude that PHALB passed through the Golgi apparatus, but did not arrive in the vacuoles. Transport to vacuoles is not by a bulk-flow mechanism, once proteins have entered the secretory system, and requires information beyond that provided by a hydrophobic signal peptide.

  1. 6-Substituted 9-fluoroquino[3,2-b]benzo[1,4]thiazines display strong antiproliferative and antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Małgorzata; Pluta, Krystian; Zimecki, Michał; Morak-Młodawska, Beata; Artym, Jolanta; Kocięba, Maja

    2015-01-07

    6-Substituted 9-fluoroquino[3,2-b]benzo[1,4]thiazines - a new type of tetracyclic azaphenothiazines-were obtained from of 6H-9-fluoroquinobenzothiazine by the introduction of appropriate substituents to the thiazine nitrogen atom (alkyl, aminoalkyl, amidoalkyl, sulfonamidoalkyl and nitrogen half-mustard groups). The compounds displayed differential cytotoxic as well as antiproliferative actions against human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin A (PHA). In addition, they suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production by whole blood human cell cultures. Two compounds (4 and 15, with the propargyl and methanesulfonamidopropyl groups) were selected for further experiments because of lack of cytotoxicity and strong antiproliferative actions. Compound 4 showed strong suppressive actions on growth of L1210, SW948, A-431 and CX-1 tumor cell lines which were close to those of cisplatin, the reference drug (e.g. GI50 of 2.28 μg/mL vs. 1.86 μg/mL for L1210 cells). Further, the compound appeared to be equally effective as cyclosporine A (CsA) in the inhibition of human two-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The compound did not significantly inhibit interleukin 2 (IL-2)-induced growth of CTLL-2 cell line. In addition, inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis by indomethacin or block of PG receptors did not interfere with the inhibitory effect of the compound on PHA-induced cell proliferation. Therefore, it is likely that the compound acts by inhibiting cell cycle as proposed for other phenothiazines. Further studies are required for the elucidation of the mechanism of action and therapeutic utility of these compounds in more advanced in vivo models.

  2. Monitoring of intracellular adenosine triphosphate in CD4(+) T cells to predict the occurrence of cytomegalovirus disease in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jacoiste Asín, María Asunción; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; López-Medrano, Francisco; Aquilino, Carolina; González, Esther; Ruiz-Merlo, Tamara; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; San Juan, Rafael; Paz-Artal, Estela; Andrés, Amado; Aguado, José Maria

    2016-10-01

    The measurement of intracellular concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (iATP) in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CD4(+) T cells constitutes a surrogate marker for post-transplant cell-mediated immunity (CMI). This assay has shown suboptimal accuracy for predicting infection after kidney transplantation (KT). We hypothesize that its predictive capacity depends on the specific contribution of the CMI to host-pathogen interactions. We assessed iATP levels in 100 KT recipients at baseline and months 1, 3, and 6 (363 measurements). No association was found between iATP at month 1 and the risk for overall or bacterial infection, although such association was evident for cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [per 50-unit increment]: 0.83; P-value = 0.048). There were no significant differences in mean iATP between stable patients (319.4 ng/ml) and those developing overall (304.1 ng/ml) or bacterial infection (346.9 ng/ml) over the 45 days following monitoring. However, iATP was significantly lower in patients who developed CMV disease (223.5 ng/ml; P-values <0.002). The optimal cutoff (265 ng/ml) for predicting CMV disease in patients not receiving antiviral prophylaxis yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of 85.7%, 68.3%, 15.2%, and 98.6%, respectively. In conclusion, a non-pathogen-specific monitoring of CMI by means of iATP informs the risk of CMV disease in KT recipients.

  3. Immunomodulatory and cytotoxic effects of Nigella sativa and thymoquinone on rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    Three different concentrations of Nigella sativa (N. sativa) ethanolic extract, thymoquinone (TQ), dexamethasone, and saline were examined to see whether they had any effects on cell viability, proliferation, and interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion in non-stimulated, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concavaline A (Con A)-stimulated splenocytes. In PHA and Con A-stimulated splenocytes, cell viability and proliferation were increased and Con A shifted cytokine profile towards Th2 balance. Dexamethasone treatment showed a suppression in viability, IFNγ and IL-4 secretion in non-stimulated and stimulated splenocytes. Extract and TQ reduced the viability and inhibited the proliferation of stimulated and non-stimulated splenocytes concentration-dependently. Higher concentrations of N. sativa (1000 mg/ml) and TQ (5 and 10 mg/ml) reduced the secretion of IL-4 in stimulated cells. Two higher concentrations of N. sativa had decreased IFNγ secretion in both stimulated and non-stimulated cells. In non-stimulated cells, only the highest and in Con A-stimulated cells, all TQ concentrations had inhibited IFNγ secretion. The highest concentration of N. sativa increased IFNγ/IL-4 ratio in both stimulated and non-stimulated cells while higher concentrations of TQ only had the same effect on stimulated cells. N. sativa and TQ showed cytotoxic inhibitory effect on rat splenocytes and on Th1/Th2 cytokines concentration-dependently. Higher concentrations of extract and TQ increased cytokines balance in Th1/Th2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of In Ovo exposure to an organochlorine mixture extracted from double crested cormorant eggs (Phalacrocorax auritus) and PCB 126 on immune function of juvenile chickens.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, E T; Wiley, F; Grasman, K A; Tillitt, D E; Sikarskie, J G; Bowerman, W W

    2007-11-01

    Organochlorine (OC) contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been associated with immune modulation in wild fish-eating birds from the Great Lakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune function of juvenile chickens after in ovo exposure to PCB 126 or an environmentally relevant OC mixture extracted from eggs of double crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA. Fertile white leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected before incubation with 0.55-1.79 ng TCDD equivalents (TEQ)/egg PCB 126 and 1.2-4.9 ng TEQs/egg of cormorant egg extract into the air cell in two separate experiments. After hatching, the immune function was tested using in vivo phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response in 11-day-old chicks, antibody titers to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in 28-day-old chicks, and, at necropsy, thymus and bursal mass and cellularity. PCB 126 decreased antibody titers at all doses and decreased the thymus and bursa index but not cellularity at 1.79 ng TEQ/egg. The cormorant egg extract caused no significant alterations in immune function even though it has been demonstrated as immunotoxic in chicken embryos. However, twofold to threefold increases in total anti-SRBC titers in 28-day-old chicks exposed to 1.2 or 2.4 ng TEQ/egg of cormorant extract were similar to elevations in anti-SRBC titer observed in Caspian tern (Sterna caspia) chicks from a highly OC-contaminated site in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. Posthatch exposure to OC through fish consumption in addition to in ovo OC exposure might be associated with the immune modulation reported in wild birds. Chicks in this study might have begun to compensate for embryonic immunotoxicity by the ages at which we studied them.

  5. Immunological and reproductive health assessment in herring gulls and black-crowned night herons in the Hudson–Raritan Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grasman, Keith A.; Echols, Kathy R.; May, Thomas M.; Peterman, Paul H.; Gale, Robert W.; Orazio, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown inexplicable declines in breeding waterbirds within western New York/New Jersey Harbor between 1996 and 2002 and elevated polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs. The present study assessed associations between immune function, prefledgling survival, and selected organochlorine compounds and metals in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) in lower New York Harbor during 2003. In pipping gull embryos, lymphoid cells were counted in the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (sites of T and B lymphocyte maturation, respectively). The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response assessed T cell function in gull and heron chicks. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured in vitro in adult and prefledgling gulls. Reference data came from the Great Lakes and Bay of Fundy. Survival of prefledgling gulls was poor, with only 0.68 and 0.5 chicks per nest surviving to three and four weeks after hatch, respectively. Developing lymphoid cells were reduced 51% in the thymus and 42% in the bursa of gull embryos from New York Harbor. In vitro lymphocyte assays demonstrated reduced spontaneous proliferation, reduced T cell mitogen-induced proliferation, and increased B cell mitogen-induced proliferation in gull chicks from New York Harbor. The PHA skin response was suppressed 70 to 80% in gull and heron chicks. Strong negative correlations (r = –0.95 to –0.98) between the PHA response and dioxins and PCBs in gull livers was strong evidence suggesting that these chemicals contribute significantly to immunosuppression in New York Harbor waterbirds.

  6. In vitro studies of axillary lymph node cells in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsakraklides, E; Tsakraklides, V; Ashikari, H; Rosen, P P; Siegal, F P; Robbins, G F; Good, R A

    1975-03-01

    A total of 170 axillary lymph nodes were obtained from fresh mastectomy specimens from 81 women with breast cancer. Lymph node cells were tested in vitro for T and B cells by the rosette technique and immunofluorescence microscopy and for functional capacity by response to the mitogens phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A. T cells showed a wide range of relative values: 32-80 percent, with a mean of 63.5 percent. B cells defined by the presence of surface immunoglobulins ranged from 14 to 61 percent (mean, 35.8 percent); those defined by the presence of C3 receptors, from 8 to 54 percent (mean, 24.9 percent); and those defined by the presence of IgG-specific (Fc) receptors, from 10 to 45 percent (mean, 27.5 percent). Cells with the C3 and Fc receptors constituted approximately two-thirds of the cells not binding spontaneously to sheep red blood cells (non-SRBC-R), whereas virtually all non-SRBC-R stained for surface immunoglobulins. The proportion of T and B cells and the response to mitogens varied widely among nodes and among patients. Differences were significant between values observed in young and old patients, nodes with and those without metastatic disease, and lymph nodes with different morphology. Lymph nodes from patients over 60 years old showed a higher proportion of B cells and a lower proportion of T cells than did those from patients 45 years of age or younger. Lymph nodes with disease metastic to them also showed a higher percent of B cells and a lower percent of T cells than the nodes that did not have metastatic disease. Lymph nodes with lymphocyte predominance showed a relatively high proportion of T lymphocytes, a high PHA response, and a low content of B lymphocytes. By contrast, lymph nodes with germinal-center predominance showed a relatively low content of T cells, a low PHA response, and a relatively high proportion of B lymphocytes.

  7. Improvement in clinical signs and cellular immunity of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis using the immunomodulator P-MAPA.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Maria Emília B; Neto, Luiz Silveira; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Munari, Danísio Prado; Andrade, Mariana Macedo C; Somenzari, Marcos Arruda; Ciarlini, Paulo César; de Lima, V M F

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the immunotherapeutic potential of the protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride immuno-modulator (P-MAPA) on canine visceral leishmaniasis. Twenty mongrel dogs presenting clinical symptoms compatible with leishmaniasis and diagnosis confirmed by the detection of anti-leishmania antibodies were studied. Ten dogs received 15 doses of the immunomodulator (2.0 mg/kg) intramuscularly, and 10 received saline as a placebo. Skin and peripheral blood samples were collected following administration of the immunomodulator. The groups were followed to observe for clinical signals of remission; parasite load in the skin biopsies using real-time PCR, the cytokines IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated in vitro with either total promastigote antigen or phytohemagglutinin measured by capture ELISA, and changes in CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell subpopulations evaluated by flow cytometry. Comparison between the groups showed that treatment with the immunomodulator promoted improvement in clinical signs and a significant reduction in parasite load in the skin. In peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures, supernatants showed a decrease in IL-10 levels and an increase in IL-2 and IFN-γ. An increase in CD8⁺ T cells was observed in peripheral blood. In addition, the in vitro leishmanicidal action of P-MAPA was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and no leishmanicidal activity was detected. These findings suggest that P-MAPA has potential as an immunotherapeutic drug in canine visceral leishmaniasis, since it assists in reestablishing partial immunocompetence of infected dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Space Missions on the Human Immune System: A Meta-Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Barger, L. K.; Baldini, F.; Huff, D.

    1995-01-01

    Future spaceflight will require travelers to spend ever-increasing periods of time in microgravity. Optimal functioning of the immune system is of paramount importance for the health and performance of these travelers. A meta-analysis statistical procedure was used to analyze immune system data from crew members in United States and Soviet space missions from 8.5 to 140 days duration between 1968 and 1985. Ten immunological parameters (immunoglobulins A, G, M, D, white blood cell (WBC) count, number of lymphocytes, percent total lymphocytes, percent B lymphocytes, percent T lymphocytes, and lymphocyte reactivity to mitogen) were investigated using multifactorial, repeated measure analysis of variance. With the preflight level set at 100, WBC count increased to 154 +/- 14% (mean +/- SE; p less than or equal to 0.05) immediately after flight; there was a decrease in lymphocyte count (83 +/- 4%; p less than or equal to 0.05) and percent of total lymphocytes (69 +/- 1%; p less than or equal to 0.05) immediately after flight, with reduction in RNA synthesis to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) to 51 +/- 21% (p less than or equal to 0.05) and DNA synthesis to PHA to 61 +/- 8% (p less than or equal to 0.05) at the first postflight measurement. Thus, some cellular immunological functions are decreased significantly following spaceflight. More data are needed on astronauts' age, aerobic power output, and parameters of their exercise training program to determine if these immune system responses are due solely to microgravity exposure or perhaps to some other aspect of spaceflight.

  9. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee. PMID:20565807

  10. Toxicity Assessment of Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Widely Consumed by Tunisian Population.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ismail, Hanen; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed at assessing the content and the functional properties of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in different varieties of beans widely consumed in Tunisia through soaking, cooking, autoclaving, germination, and their combinations. This study was carried out on three varieties of white beans grown in different localities of Tunisia, namely Twila, Coco, and Beldia, as well as on imported and local canned beans. All bean samples underwent biochemical and immunological evaluation by employing several techniques such as indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), hemagglutinating assay, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biochemical and immunological analyses indicated that raw dry beans contained a considerable amount of proteins and PHAs. ELISA demonstrated that soaking, either in plain water or in alkaline solution, caused an increase in the concentration of PHA. A slight increase of PHA was produced equally by germination during 4 days in all bean varieties. Cooking or autoclaving of presoaked beans resulted in a complete disappearance of PHA. ELISA test also proved that both imported and local canned beans contained fingerprints of PHA. Hemagglutination assays showed that not only cooked and autoclaved presoaked beans lacked the ability to agglutinate red blood cells but also autoclaved unsoaked beans did. In agar gel immunodiffusion using rabbit anti-PHA serum, raw, soaked, cooked unsoaked, and sprouted beans gave precipitin arc reactions, indicating that PHA existed in immunoreactive form in the tested seeds. SDS-PAGE electrophoretograms showed protein isolates of Twila and Beldia beans to have different profiles through soaking, cooking, and autoclaving processes. This work revealed that the combination of soaking and cooking/autoclaving was the best way in reducing PHA content and its activity in all bean varieties when compared with germination.

  11. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90–100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  12. Selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, R; Kuroda, H; Komatsu, H; Hosokawa, Y; Kagami, Y; Ogura, M; Nakamura, S; Kodera, Y; Morishima, Y; Ueda, R; Seto, M

    1999-09-01

    Three D-type cyclins, cyclin D1, D2 and D3, belong to the G1 cyclin, which regulates the G1/S transition of the cell cycle, and feature highly homologous amino acid sequences. The cyclin D1 gene was found to be transcriptionally activated in B-lymphoid malignancies with t(11;14), but available information is limited regarding expression of cyclin D2 and D3 in hematopoietic malignancies. We examined the expressions of three D-type cyclins to investigate how these homologous genes are differentially used. Northern blot hybridization with densitometric analyses was performed to examine 64 cell lines and 159 patients with various hematopoietic malignancies. Among lymphoid malignancies, cyclin D1 overexpression was exclusively detected in B cell malignancies accompanied by a genetic event consisting of 11q13 chromosomal translocation, consisting of 13 of 19 (68%) patients with mantle cell lymphoma, two of 11 (18%) with B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and one of six (17%) with multiple myeloma. The cyclin D2 expression was significantly higher in T cell malignancies than in B cell malignancies (P = 0.003 for cell lines and P < 0.0001 for patient samples, respectively). In the T cell malignancies, cyclin D2 overexpression was predominantly recognized in those with mature phenotype. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expression was upregulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of normal T-lymphocytes, suggesting that this simply represents the proliferation status of mature T cells. Although cyclin D3 was ubiquitously expressed, its expression was reduced in lymphoid malignancies with cyclin D1 or D2 overexpression. In myeloid leukemias, although three D-type type cyclins were differentially expressed, no preference for particular D-type cyclins was found. This selective usage of D-type cyclins in lymphoid malignancies suggests an existence of a regulatory mechanism among three D-type cyclins.

  13. Adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields: resistance to ionizing radiation-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Sannino, Anna; Zeni, Olga; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Gialanella, Giancarlo; Grossi, Gianfranco; Manti, Lorenzo; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary investigation was to assess whether human peripheral blood lymphocytes which have been pre-exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields exhibit an adaptive response (AR) by resisting the induction of genetic damage from subsequent exposure to ionizing radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from four healthy donors were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 24 h and then exposed for 20 h to 1950 MHz radiofrequency fields (RF, adaptive dose, AD) at an average specific absorption rate of 0.3 W/kg. At 48 h, the cells were subjected to a challenge dose (CD) of 1.0 or 1.5 Gy X-irradiation (XR, challenge dose, CD). After a 72 h total culture period, cells were collected to examine the incidence of micronuclei (MN). There was a significant decrease in the number of MN in lymphocytes exposed to RF + XR (AD + CD) as compared with those subjected to XR alone (CD). These observations thus suggested a RF-induced AR and induction of resistance to subsequent damage from XR. There was variability between the donors in RF-induced AR. The data reported in our earlier investigations also indicated a similar induction of AR in human blood lymphocytes that had been pre-exposed to RF (AD) and subsequently treated with a chemical mutagen, mitomycin C (CD). Since XR and mitomycin-C induce different kinds of lesions in cellular DNA, further studies are required to understand the mechanism(s) involved in the RF-induced adaptive response. PMID:23979077

  14. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune function and hematology in American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fallacara, Dawn M.; Halbrook, Richard S.; French, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-nine adult male American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were assigned to one of three diet formulations including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 μg/g (dry wt) methylmercury (MeHg). Kestrels received their diets daily for 13 weeks to assess the effects of dietary MeHg on immunocompetence. Immunotoxic endpoints included assessment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and primary and secondary antibody-mediated immune responses (IR) via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. Select hematology and histology parameters were evaluated to corroborate the results of functional assays and to assess immunosuppression of T and B cell-dependent components in spleen tissue. Kestrels in the 0.6 and 3.9 μg/g MeHg groups exhibited suppression of CMI, including lower PHA stimulation indexes (p = 0.019) and a 42 to 45% depletion of T cell-dependent splenic lymphoid tissue (p = 0.006). Kestrels in the 0.6 μg/g group exhibited suppression of the primary IR to SRBCs (p = 0.014). MeHg did not have a noticeable effect on the secondary IR (p = 0.166). Elevation of absolute heterophil counts (p p p = 0.003) was apparent in the 3.9 μg/g group at week 12. Heterophilia, or the excess of heterophils in peripheral blood above normal ranges, was apparent in seven of 17 (41%) kestrels in the 3.9 μg/g group and was indicative of an acute inflammatory response or physiological stress. This study revealed that adult kestrels were more sensitive to immunotoxic effects of MeHg at environmentally relevant dietary concentrations than they were to reproductive effects as previously reported.

  15. Lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha inhibits T cell proliferation and expression of eosinophil-activating cytokines.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, G; Smith, J K; Srikanth, S; Chi, D S; Kalbfleisch, J H; Huang, S K

    1996-10-01

    T cell-derived cytokines, such as interleukin-5 (IL-5) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activate eosinophils, whereas other cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-13, determine eosinophil recruitment. Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), a leukocyte-derived cytokine, has been shown to have beneficial effects in eosinophil-mediated disorders, such as the hypereosinophilic syndrome and a murine model of allergic asthma, where it inhibited eosinophil recruitment. We tested the hypothesis that IFN-alpha acted in eosinophil-mediated disorders by modulating T cell cytokine expression. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or human ragweed-specific TH1 (2B8) and TH2 (2D2) T cell clones were cultured in the presence of 5 micrograms/ml of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or 25 micrograms/ml of antigen Amb a 1 (short ragweed allergen), respectively, and lymphoblastoid IFN-alpha (varying from 0 to 10,000 U/ml). We assessed T cell proliferation by [3H]thymidine incorporation and production of IL-5 and GM-CSF by ELISA. Expression of cytokine transcripts was analyzed by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR). IFN-alpha induced a dose-dependent suppression of T cell proliferation of both PBMC (p < 0.001) and the T cell clones (p < 0.001). IFN-alpha inhibited gene expression of IL-5, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and IL-13 in PBMC. Furthermore, IFN-alpha significantly inhibited mitogen-induced and antigen-induced production of IL-5 and GM-CSF. IFN-alpha may benefit eosinophil-mediated disorders by inhibiting T cell function and production of cytokines active on human eosinophils.

  16. Functional inactivation of lymphocytes by methylene blue with visible light.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Mo, Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Xun; Wu, Xiaofei; Jia, Yao; Huang, Yuwen

    2015-10-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic white blood cells (WBCs) may cause adverse reactions in immunocompromised recipients, including transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), which is often fatal and incurable. In this study, the in vitro effect of methylene blue with visible light (MB + L) treatment on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production was measured to investigate whether MB + L can be used to prevent immune reactions that result from transfused lymphocytes. WBCs and 3 μM of MB were mixed and transferred into medical PVC bags, which were then exposed to visible light. Gamma irradiation was conducted as a parallel positive control. The cells without treatment were used as untreated group. All the groups were tested for the ability of cell proliferation and cytokine production upon stimulation. After incubation with mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or plate-bound anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, the proliferation of MB + L/gamma-irradiation treated lymphocytes was significantly inhibited (P < 0.01) as compared to the untreated ones; the proliferation inhibitive rate of the MB + L group was even higher than that of gamma-irradiated cells (73.77% ± 28.75% vs. 44.72% ± 38.20%). MB + L treated cells incubated up to 7 days with PHA also showed no significant proliferation. The levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1β present in the supernatant of MB + L treated lymphocytes upon stimulation were significantly lower than those of untreated lymphocytes. These results demonstrated that MB + L treatment functionally and irreversibly inactivated lymphocytes by inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and the production of cytokines. MB + L treatment might be a promising method for the prevention of adverse immune responses caused by WBCs.

  17. Effects of Neuromedin S on the Proliferation of Splenic Lymphocytes and the Cytokine Secretion by Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophages in Pigs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, R; Wang, Q; Qi, B; Huang, Y; Yang, G

    2016-09-01

    Neuromedin S (NMS), a 36-amino acid neuropeptide, has been found to be involved in the regulation of the endocrine activity. It has been also detected in immune tissues in mammals, what suggests that NMS may play an important role in the regulation of immune response. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the presence of NMS receptor 1 (NMU1R) and effect of NMS in pig splenic lymphocytes (SPLs) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). The presence of NMU1R in pig SPLs and PAMs was respectively confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and immunocytochemical methods. Furthermore, SPL proliferation was analyzed using the 3-(4,5)-dimethyl-thiahiazo-(-2-yl)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) method. Additionally, the secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in PAMs was all measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. In the present study, the results of RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that NMU1R mRNA and protein were both expressed in pig SPLs and PAMs, and the immunocytochemical investigations further revealed that the positive signal of NMU1R immunoreactivity was observed in plasma membranes of both SPLs and PAMs. In the in vitro study, we found that at concentrations of 0.001-1000 nM NMS alone or combined with lipopolysaccharide or phytohemagglutinin significantly increased SPL proliferation. Application of ELISA method showed that NMS could induce the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in PAMs. These results suggest that NMS can act as a potently positive pro-inflammatory factor and immunomodulatory agent that affects the immune response of immune cells by combining with its receptor NMU1R.

  18. Transcriptomic Characterization of Innate and Acquired Immune Responses in Red-Legged Partridges (Alectoris rufa): A Resource for Immunoecology and Robustness Selection

    PubMed Central

    Sevane, Natalia; Cañon, Javier; Gil, Ignacio; Dunner, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Present and future challenges for wild partridge populations include the resistance against possible disease transmission after restocking with captive-reared individuals, and the need to cope with the stress prompted by new dynamic and challenging scenarios. Selection of individuals with the best immune ability may be a good strategy to improve general immunity, and hence adaptation to stress. In this study, non-infectious challenges with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and sheep red blood cells allowed the classification of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) according to their overall immune responses (IR). Skin from the area of injection of PHA and spleen, both from animals showing extreme high and low IR, were selected to investigate the transcriptional profiles underlying the different ability to cope with pathogens and external aggressions. RNA-seq yielded 97 million raw reads from eight sequencing libraries and approximately 84% of the processed reads were mapped to the reference chicken genome. Differential expression analysis identified 1488 up- and 107 down-regulated loci in individuals with high IR versus low IR. Partridges displaying higher innate IR show an enhanced activation of host defence gene pathways complemented with a tightly controlled desensitization that facilitates the return to cellular homeostasis. These findings indicate that the immune system ability to respond to aggressions (either diseases or stress produced by environmental changes) involves extensive transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations, and expand our understanding on the molecular mechanisms of the avian immune system, opening the possibility of improving disease resistance or robustness using genome assisted selection (GAS) approaches for increased IR in partridges by using genes such as AVN or BF2 as markers. This study provides the first transcriptome sequencing data of the Alectoris genus, a resource for molecular ecology that enables integration of genomic tools

  19. Optimized immobilization of lectins using self-assembled monolayers on polysilicon encoded materials for cell tagging.

    PubMed

    Penon, Oriol; Siapkas, Dimitrios; Novo, Sergi; Durán, Sara; Oncins, Gerard; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Barrios, Lleonard; Nogués, Carme; Duch, Marta; Plaza, José Antonio; Pérez-García, Lluïsa

    2014-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been used for the preparation of functional microtools consisting of encoded polysilicon barcodes biofunctionalized with proteins of the lectin family. These hybrid microtools exploit the lectins ability for recognizing specific carbohydrates of the cell membrane to give an efficient system for cell tagging. This work describes how the control of the methodology for SAM formation on polysilicon surfaces followed by lectin immobilization has a crucial influence on the microtool biofunction. Several parameters (silanization time, silane molar concentration, type of solvent or deposition methodology) have been studied to establish optimal function. Furthermore, silanes incorporating different terminal groups, such as aldehyde, activated ester or epoxide groups were tested in order to analyze their chemical coupling with the biomolecules, as well as their influence on the biofunctionality of the immobilized protein. Two different lectins - wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) - were immobilized, because they have different and specific cell recognition behaviour and exhibit different cell toxicity. In this way we can assess the effect of intrinsic bulk toxicity with that of the cell compatibility once immobilized as well as the importance of cell affinity. A variety of nanometrical techniques were used to characterize the active surfaces, and lectin immobilization was quantified using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis) and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS). Once the best protocol was found, WGA and PHA were immobilized on polysilicon coded barcodes, and these microtools showed excellent cell tagging on living mouse embryos when WGA was used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrophobic sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals doped with lanthanide ions: assessment of in vitro toxicity to human blood lymphocytes and phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kuricova, Miroslava; Liskova, Aurelia; Bartusova, Maria; Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dusinska, Maria; Horvathova, Mira; Jahnova, Eva; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela; Rollerova, Eva; Podhorodecki, Artur; Tulinska, Jana

    2014-11-01

    In vitro immunotoxicity of hydrophobic sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals (NCs) doped with lanthanide ions was examined in this study. Although there is already a significant amount of optical and structural data on NaYF4 NCs, data on safety assessment are missing. Therefore, peripheral whole blood from human volunteers was used to evaluate the effect of 25 and 30 nm hydrophobic NaYF4 NCs dissolved in cyclohexane (CH) on lymphocytes, and of 10 nm NaYF4 NCs on phagocytes. In the concentration range 0.12-75 µg cm(-2) (0.17-106 µg ml(-1) ), both 25 and 30nm NaYF4 NCs did not induce cytotoxicity when measured as incorporation of [(3) H]-thymidine into DNA. Assessment of lymphocyte function showed significant suppression of the proliferative activity of T-lymphocytes and T-dependent B-cell response in peripheral blood cultures (n = 7) stimulated in vitro with mitogens phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed (PWM) (PHA > PWM). No clear dose-response effect was observed. Phagocytic activity and respiratory burst of leukocytes (n = 5-8) were generally less affected. A dose-dependent suppression of phagocytic activity of granulocytes in cultures treated with 25 nm NCs was observed (vs. medium control). A decrease in phagocytic activity of monocytes was found in cells exposed to higher doses of 10 and 30 nm NCs. The respiratory burst of phagocytes was significantly decreased by exposure to the middle dose of 30 nm NCs only. In conclusion, our results demonstrate immunotoxic effects of hydrophobic NaYF4 NCs doped with lanthanide ions to lymphocytes and to lesser extent to phagocytes. Further research needs to be done, particularly faze transfer of hydrophobic NCs to hydrophilic ones, to eliminate the solvent effect.

  1. Limited Immunogenicity of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cartilages

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Takeshi; Yamashita, Akihiro; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage does not spontaneously heal and could ultimately result in a loss of joint function. Damaged cartilage can be repaired with cell/tissue sources that are transplanted, however, autologous chondrocytes are limited in number as a cell source. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a relatively new and abundant cell source and can be made from the patient, but at a considerable cost. Because cartilage is immunoprivileged tissue, allogeneic cartilages have been transplanted effectively without matching for human leukocyte antigen (HLA), but are difficult to acquire due to scarcity of donors. In this study, we examined the immunogenicity of human iPSC-derived cartilages (hiPS-Carts) in vitro to evaluate whether allogeneic hiPS-Carts can be a new cell/tissue source. The cells in hiPS-Carts expressed limited amounts of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (HLA-ABC) and MHC class II (HLA-DRDQDP). Treatment with interferon γ (IFNγ) induced the expression of MHC class I, but not MHC class II in hiPS-Carts. A mixed lymphocyte reaction assay showed that hiPS-Carts stimulated the proliferation of neither T cells nor the activation of NK cells. Furthermore, hiPS-Carts suppressed the proliferation of T cells stimulated with interleukin 2 and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Together with previously reported findings, these results suggest that hiPS-Carts are no more antigenic than human cartilage. Additionally, in combination with the fact that iPSCs are unlimitedly expandable and thus can supply unlimited amounts of iPS-Carts from even one iPSC line, they suggest that allogeneic hiPS-Carts are a candidate source for transplantation to treat articular cartilage damage. PMID:27762664

  2. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  3. Cocoa procyanidins and human cytokine transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Mao, T; Van De Water, J; Keen, C L; Schmitz, H H; Gershwin, M E

    2000-08-01

    We examined whether cocoa, in its isolated procyanidin fractions (monomer through decamer), would modulate cytokine production at the levels of transcription and protein secretion in both resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In resting cells, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-4 gene expression from cocoa-treated cells varied markedly among the subjects tested. However, at the protein level, the larger fractions (pentamer through decamer) stimulated a dramatic increase in IL-1beta concentration (up to ninefold) with increasing degree of polymerization. Similarly, these larger fractions augmented IL-4 concentration by as much as 2 pg/ml, whereas the control displayed levels nearly undetectable. In the presence of PHA, gene expression also seemed to be most affected by the larger procyanidin fractions. The pentameric through decameric fractions increased IL-1 beta expression by 7-19% compared with PHA control, whereas the hexameric through decameric fractions significantly inhibited PHA-induced IL-4 transcription in the range of 71-86%. This observation at the transcription level for IL-1 beta was reflected at the protein level in PHA-stimulated PBMC. Significant reductions in mitogen-induced IL-4 production were also seen at the protein level with the hexamer, heptamer and octamer. Individual oligomeric cocoa fractions were unstimulatory for IL-2 in resting PBMC. However, when induced with PHA, the pentamer, hexamer and heptamer fractions caused a 61-73% inhibition in IL-2 gene expression. This study offers additional data for the consideration of the health benefits of dietary polyphenols from a wide variety of foods, including those benefits associated specifically with cocoa and chocolate consumption.

  4. Immune accessory functions of human endothelial cells are modulated by overexpression of B7-H1 (PDL1).

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Pober, Jordan S

    2006-08-01

    B7-H1 (PDL1) is a B7-related protein that inhibits T-cell responses. Human endothelial cells (EC), which can support polyclonal stimulation (by anti-CD3 or Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)) or direct alloantigen stimulation of T cells, basally express B7-H1 and increase expression in response to IFN-gamma or coculture with allogeneic T cells. Previous studies have suggested that endogenous B7-H1 on EC reduces T-cell responses. We engineered overexpression of B7-H1 in EC (B7H1-EC) to evaluate whether this manipulation could reduce T-cell responses even further. Compared with green fluorescent protein-transduced EC (GFP-EC), B7H1-EC support less anti-CD3 or PHA-induced proliferation of CD4+ memory T cells; naive CD4+ T-cell or CD8+ T-cell responses were less inhibited. The effect of transduced B7H1-EC was more apparent when the EC were fixed prior to coculture, a manipulation that reduces the strength of costimulation and prevents upregulation of the endogenous B7-H1 molecule. T-cell activation markers, including CD25, CD62L, CD152 (CTLA-4), and CD154 (CD40L), were not altered by EC overexpression of B7-H1, whereas there was a reduction in CD69. B7-H1 reduced secretion of IL-2 and IL-10 by memory T cells. B7H1-EC were less able to stimulate allogeneic proliferation of CD4+ memory T cells than control EC. These data suggest that B7-H1 overexpression may be a useful approach for reducing allogeneic CD4+ memory T-cell responses to EC.

  5. Growth and differentiation of circulating hemopoietic stem cells with atomic bomb irradiation-induced chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, T.; Honda, T.; Otake, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of atomic bomb irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells were studied cytogenetically using single colonies derived from hemopoietic progenitor cells. The subjects studied were 21 healthy atomic bomb survivors (10 males and 11 females) in the high dose exposure group (100+ rad) with a known high incidence (10% or more) of radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in their peripheral blood lymphocytes (stimulated with phytohemagglutinin), and 11 nonexposed healthy controls (5 males and 6 females). Colony formation by circulating granulocyte-macrophage (GM-CFC) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells was made by the methylcellulose method using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Chromosome specimens were prepared from single colonies by our micromethod. The total number of colonies analyzed in the exposed group was 131 for GM-CFC and 75 for BFU-E. Chromosome abnormalities were observed in 15 (11.5%) and 9 (12.0%) colonies, respectively. In the control group, the total number of colonies analyzed was 61 for GM-CFC and 41 for BFU-E. None of these colonies showed chromosome abnormalities. The difference in incidence of chromosome abnormalities was highly significant by an exact test; p = 0.003 for GM-CFC and 0.017 for BFU-E. The karyotypes of chromosome abnormalities obtained from the colonies in the exposed group were mostly translocations, but deletion and marker chromosomes were also observed. In two individuals, such karyotypic abnormalities as observed in the peripheral lymphocytes were also seen in the myeloid progenitor cells. This finding suggests that atomic bomb irradiation produced a chromosome aberration on multipotent hemopoietic stem cells common to myeloid and lymphoid lineages.

  6. Immunobiological activity and antiviral regulation efforts of Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8α during NGVEV and GPV infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Zhao, Qiurong; Qi, Yulin; Liu, Fei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    The CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are involved in the clearance of viruses. However, the functional characterization of goose CD8α is still unclear. The immunobiological characterization of goose CD8α in goose spleen mononuclear cells (MNCs) was examined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). It was shown that CD8α mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by in vitro treatment of MNCs with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) in a dose-dependent way, but lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) did not have this same effect. Moreover, the time-course effect of CD8α expression in response to mitogens (PHA, ConA, and poly I:C) was evaluated in MNCs. A significant increase in the transcriptional levels of CD8α was detected in new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV)-infected goose MNCs at 48 h postinfection (PI) and in goose parvovirus (GPV)-infected MNCs at 72 h PI. Also, the number of CD8α+ cells was significantly increased during viral infection from 72 h on. The seminal changes in mRNA profiles of antiviral cytokines (IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IL-18) were observed and were significantly increased during late phases of NGVEV and GPV infection. Accordingly, our data not only contribute to the understanding of the immune characteristics of goose CD8α, but they also provide new insight into the innate antiviral immunity of geese. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Human peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express Th1-like cytokine mRNA and proteins following in vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated Brucella abortus.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, M B; Golding, H; Betts, M; Yamauchi, A; Bloom, E T; Butler, L E; Stevan, L; Golding, B

    1995-01-01

    Defining the pattern of lymphokine production associated with Brucella abortus is critical for advancing the development of B. abortus as a vaccine carrier. In the present study we investigated the ability of heat-inactivated B. abortus or lipopolysaccharide from B. abortus to induce lymphokine production from purified human T cells in vitro. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, and IL-5 induction was assayed by mRNA-specific PCR and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and bioassay for protein production. Following depletion of monocytes and B cells, B. abortus increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 mRNA expression in purified T cells compared with expression in unstimulated cells. In contrast, no IL-5 mRNA expression and only transient low-level IL-4 mRNA expression and no IL-4 protein secretion were detected. Phytohemagglutinin or phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin induced mRNA and protein for all these cytokines. Similar results were obtained with LPS purified from B. abortus. Removal of NK cells did not reduce lymphokine production, and enriched NK cells did not express IFN-gamma mRNA or secrete IFN-gamma protein in response to B. abortus, indicating that NK cells were not the responding population. Both CD4+ and CD8+ populations produced IFN-gamma and IL-2 in response to B. abortus. Preincubation of resting T cells with B. abortus or LPS from B. abortus for 7 days induced their differentiation into Th1-like cells as judged by their subsequent lymphokine response to phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin. These results suggest that B. abortus can induce differentiation of Th0 into Th1-type cells. PMID:7790090

  8. Exogenous surfactant restores lung function but not peripheral immunosuppression in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, Harriet A; Lachmann, Burkhard; Haitsma, Jack J; Zijlstra, Jitske; Heijnen, Cobi J; Jansen, Nicolaas J; van Vught, Adrianus J

    2006-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that mechanical ventilation can result in increased pulmonary inflammation and suppressed peripheral leukocyte function. In the present study the effect of surfactant therapy on pulmonary inflammation and peripheral immune function in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats was assessed. Surfactant deficiency was induced by repeated lung lavage, treated rats with surfactant or left them untreated, and ventilated the rats during 2 hours. Nonventilated rats served as healthy control group. Expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were measured in total lung homogenates. Outside the lung phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-10 production, and natural killer activity were measured in splenocytes. After 2 hours of mechanical ventilation, expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 increased significantly in the lungs of surfactant-deficient rats. Outside the lung, mitogen-induced proliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-10 reduced significantly. Only natural killer cell activity remained unaffected. Surfactant treatment significantly improved lung function, but could not prevent increased pulmonary expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 and decreased peripheral mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in vitro. In conclusion, 2 hours of mechanical ventilation resulted in increased lung inflammation and partial peripheral leukocyte suppression in surfactant-deficient rats. Surfactant therapy ameliorated lung function but could not prevent or restore peripheral immunosuppression. The authors postulate that peripheral immunosuppression may occur in ventilated surfactant deficient patients, which may enhance susceptibility for infections.

  9. Inhibitory effects of cadmium on peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine release are reversed by zinc and selenium salts.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, Paolo; Di Giampaolo, Luca; Qiao, Niu; Reale, Marcella; Castellani, Maria Luisa; Lucci, Isabella; Travaglini, Paola; Kouri, Mary; Verna, Nicola; Volpe, Anna Rita; Carmignani, Marco; Paganelli, Roberto; Di Gioacchino, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) exert regulatory activities on immune functions, while cadmium (Cd) is an immunotoxic agent. The object of this study was to detect effects of 10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6) M Cd sulphate, Zn sulphate, and sodium selenite, and their combinations on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production. Only 10(-5) M Zn sulphate significantly enhanced spontaneous PBMC proliferation, which was unaffected by the other salts. At 10(-4) and 10(-5) M, Cd sulphate exerted a dose-response inhibitory action on phytohemagglutinin- (PHA-) stimulated PBMC proliferation and cytokine release, while 10(-4) M and 10(-5) M Zn sulphate and 10(-5) M sodium selenite induced a stimulatory effect on both proliferation and cytokine release; 10(-4) M sodium selenite enhanced only the PBMC proliferation; at 10(-6) M, none of the salts changed the PHA-stimulated immune activity. Moreover, 10(-4) and 10(-5) M Zn and 10(-5) M Se strongly upregulated IFN-gamma (a Th1 cytokine) release, even in presence of 10(-5) M Cd, and reduced the inhibitory effects of Cd on PBMC proliferation and TNF-alpha release. This study confirms that Zn and Se both strongly enhance cytokine release induced by mitogenic stimulation, showing also that Zn acts with a broader range of concentrations than Se. This suggests that dietary excess of Se may not have beneficial effects.

  10. Influences of DTC and zinc supplementation on the cellular response restoration in restrained mice.

    PubMed

    Obminska-Mrukowicz, Bozena; Szczypka, Marianna

    2005-03-01

    The studies were conducted on Balb/c mice exposed to restraint stress twice for 12 h at 24 h intervals. Prior to restraint stress the mice were treated with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) i.p. at a dose of 20 mg/kg five times at 48 h intervals. DTC was used per se or with zinc ions interaction, by adding zinc sulfate to drinking water at a dose of 72 microgram/mouse daily. The results obtained in the study show that restraint stress causes involution of lymphatic organs, decreased the percentage of immature (CD4+CD8+) and, mature (CD4+) thymocytes and CD4+), CD8+ and CD19+ splenocytes and proliferative response of thymocytes stimulated in vitro with concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The restraint stress decreased also interleukin-1 (IL-1) production by murine intraperitoneal macrophages stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli. Pretreatment with DTC counteracted restraint stress-induced immunosuppression, which is expressed as partial normalisation of the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes and IL-1 production, accelerated regeneration of thymus and spleen, shorter suppressive action of restraint stress on the percentage of CD4+CD8+thymocytes and in total normalisation of the CD4+thymocytes and splenocytes. DTC administered prior to restraint stress augmented the proliferative response of thymocytes to two mitogens. The immunocorrecting action of DTC is enhanced by zinc supplementation, expressed in the increased percentage of CD4+thymocytes and splenocytes, CD19+splenocytes, proliferative activity of thymocytes stimulated with PHA and IL-1 production. The obtained results show that DTC administration can be supplemented with zinc in order to restore the immune system impaired by stress.

  11. In vitro evaluation of the effects of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on IL-2 production in human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Kristin; Peden-Adams, Margie M.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), have been shown to alter various immune functions suggesting they are immunotoxic. This study assessed the effects of PFOS and PFOA on interleukin (IL)-2 production in the human Jurkat T-cell line and PFOS in healthy human primary T cells. Jurkat cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), anti CD-3/anti CD-28, or anti CD-3, and dosed with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 75, or 100 μg ml−1 PFOS or 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, or 10 μg ml−1 PFOA. Jurkat cells stimulated with PHA/PMA or anti CD-3 exhibited decreased IL-2 production beginning at 50 μg PFOS ml−1 and 5 μg PFOS ml−1 respectively, but stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 resulted in no changes compared with the control. Addition of the PPAR-alpha antagonist GW6471 to PFOS-dosed cells stimulated with PHA/PMA resulted in decreases in IL-2 production starting at 50 μg PFOS ml−1, which suggests PFOS affected T-cell IL-2 production via PPAR-alpha-independent mechanisms. Exposure to PFOA, PFOA + GW6471, or PFOS + PFOA in Jurkat cells resulted in no significant differences in IL-2 production. In vitro dosing studies using healthy primary human CD4+ T cells were consistent with the Jurkat results. These data demonstrated that PFOA did not impact IL-2 production, but PFOS suppressed IL-2 production in both a human cell line and human primary cells at dose levels within the high end of the human exposure range. A decrease in IL-2 production is characteristic of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and should be further investigated. PMID:25056757

  12. In vitro evaluation of the effects of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on IL-2 production in human T-cells.

    PubMed

    Midgett, Kristin; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L

    2015-05-01

    Perfluorinated compounds, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), have been shown to alter various immune functions suggesting they are immunotoxic. This study assessed the effects of PFOS and PFOA on interleukin (IL)-2 production in the human Jurkat T-cell line and PFOS in healthy human primary T cells. Jurkat cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), anti CD-3/anti CD-28, or anti CD-3, and dosed with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 75, or 100 µg ml(-1) PFOS or 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, or 10 µg ml(-1) PFOA. Jurkat cells stimulated with PHA/PMA or anti CD-3 exhibited decreased IL-2 production beginning at 50 µg PFOS ml(-1) and 5 µg PFOS ml(-1) respectively, but stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 resulted in no changes compared with the control. Addition of the PPAR-alpha antagonist GW6471 to PFOS-dosed cells stimulated with PHA/PMA resulted in decreases in IL-2 production starting at 50 µg PFOS ml(-1), which suggests PFOS affected T-cell IL-2 production via PPAR-alpha-independent mechanisms. Exposure to PFOA, PFOA + GW6471, or PFOS + PFOA in Jurkat cells resulted in no significant differences in IL-2 production. In vitro dosing studies using healthy primary human CD4+ T cells were consistent with the Jurkat results. These data demonstrated that PFOA did not impact IL-2 production, but PFOS suppressed IL-2 production in both a human cell line and human primary cells at dose levels within the high end of the human exposure range. A decrease in IL-2 production is characteristic of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and should be further investigated. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. l-Arginine-Dependent Epigenetic Regulation of Interleukin-10, but Not Transforming Growth Factor-β, Production by Neonatal Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tsai, Ching-Chang; Chang, Ling-Sai; Huang, Hsin-Chun; Cheng, Hsin-Hsin; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yang, Kuender D.; Hsu, Te-Yao

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of diseases in humans, including trauma, certain cancers, and infection, are known to be associated with l-arginine deficiency. In addition, l-arginine must be supplemented by diet during pregnancy to aid fetal development. In conditions of l-arginine depletion, T cell proliferation is impaired. We have previously shown that neonatal blood has lower l-arginine levels than adult blood, which is associated with poor neonatal lymphocyte proliferation, and that l-arginine enhances neonatal lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin (IL)-2-independent pathway. In this study, we have further investigated how exogenous l-arginine enhances neonatal regulatory T-cells (Tregs) function in relation to IL-10 production under epigenetic regulation. Results showed that cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) produced higher levels of IL-10 than adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by phytohemagglutinin stimulation but not by anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation. Addition of exogenous l-arginine had no effect on transforming growth factor-β production by PBMCs or CBMCs, but enhanced IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs. Further studies showed that IL-10 promoter DNA hypomethylation, rather than histone modification, corresponded to the l-arginine-induced increase in IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that l-arginine modulates neonatal Tregs through the regulation of IL-10 promoter DNA methylation. l-arginine supplementation may correct the Treg function in newborns with l-arginine deficiency. PMID:28487700

  14. Cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to radiofrequency radiation at a cellular telephone frequency (835.62 MHz, FDMA).

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Leal, B Z; Meltz, M L; Pickard, W F; Bisht, K S; Roti Roti JL; Straube, W L; Moros, E G

    2001-01-01

    Freshly collected peripheral blood samples from four healthy human volunteers were diluted with RPMI 1640 tissue culture medium and exposed in sterile T-75 tissue culture flasks in vitro for 24 h to 835.62 MHz radiofrequency (RF) radiation, a frequency employed for customer-to-base station transmission of cellular telephone communications. An analog signal was used, and the access technology was frequency division multiple access (FDMA, continuous wave). A nominal net forward power of 68 W was used, and the nominal power density at the center of the exposure flask was 860 W/m(2). The mean specific absorption rate in the exposure flask was 4.4 or 5.0 W/kg. Aliquots of diluted blood that were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.50 Gy of gamma radiation were used as negative or positive controls. Immediately after the exposures, the lymphocytes were stimulated with a mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and cultured for 48 or 72 h to determine the extent of genetic damage, as assessed from the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei. The extent of alteration in the kinetics of cell proliferation was determined from the mitotic indices in 48-h cultures and from the incidence of binucleate cells in 72-h cultures. The data indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation- and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to mitotic indices, incidence of exchange aberrations, excess fragments, binucleate cells, and micronuclei. In contrast, the response of the lymphocytes exposed to gamma radiation was significantly different from both RF-radiation- and sham-exposed cells for all of these indices. Thus, under the experimental conditions tested, there is no evidence for the induction of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro for 24 h to 835.62 MHz RF radiation at SARs of 4.4 or 5.0 W/kg.

  15. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the immune function of juvenile common loons (Gavia immer)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Grasman, K.A.; Hines, R.K.; Meyer, M.W.; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, A.; Spalding, M.G.; Gray, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a dose-response laboratory study to quantify the level of exposure to dietary Hg, delivered as methylmercury chloride (CH3HgCl), that is associated with suppressed immune function in captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks. We used the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin test to assess T-lymphocyte function and the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination test to measure antibody-mediated immunity. The PHA stimulation index among chicks receiving dietary Hg treatment did not differ significantly from those of chicks on the control diet (p = 0.15). Total antibody (immunoglobulin [Ig] M [primary antibody] + IgG [secondary response]) production to the SRBC antigen in chicks treated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg), however, was suppressed (p = 0.04) relative to chicks on control diets. Analysis indicated suppression of total Ig production (p = 0.025 with comparisonwise ?? level = 0.017) between control and 0.4 ??g Hg/g wet food intake treatment groups. Furthermore, the control group exhibited a higher degree of variability in antibody response compared to the Hg groups, suggesting that in addition to reducing the mean response, Hg treatment reduced the normal variation attributable to other biological factors. We observed bursal lymphoid depletion in chicks receiving the 1.2 ??g Hg/g treatment (p = 0.017) and a marginally significant effect (p = 0.025) in chicks receiving the 0.4 ??g Hg/g diet. These findings suggest that common loon chick immune systems may be compromised at an ecologically relevant dietary exposure concentration (0.4 ??g Hg/g wet wt food intake). We also found that chicks hatched from eggs collected from low-pH lakes exhibited higher levels of lymphoid depletion in bursa tissue relative to chicks hatched from eggs collected from neutral-pH lakes. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  16. A phase II trial of dasatinib in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated previously with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Twardowski, Przemyslaw W.; Beumer, Jan H.; Chen, C.S.; Kraft, Andrew S.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Ye, Wei; Christner, Susan M.; Lilly, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for efficacious therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after disease progression on docetaxel. The SRC tyrosine kinase and its related family members may be important drivers of prostate cancer and can be inhibited by dasatinib. mCRPC patients, after one previous chemotherapy, started dasatinib at 70mg twice daily, amended to 100mg daily. The primary endpoint was the disease control (DC) rate, defined as complete response (CR), partial response (PR), or stable disease (SD) in prostate specific antigen (PSA), RECIST, bone scan, and FACT-P score. Up to 41 patients were to be accrued (two-stage design, 21+20) to rule out a null-hypothesized effect of 5 versus 20% (α=0.05, β=0.1). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, toxicity, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic correlatives. Of 38 patients, 27 were evaluable for response or toxicity. The median duration of therapy was 55 days (6–284). Five patients showed DC after 8 weeks of therapy (18.5% DC, 95% CI: 6.3–38.1%). One PR (3.7% response rate, 95% CI: 0.1–19.0%) was observed in a patient treated for 284 days. Twelve patients (43%) discontinued treatment for toxicity. Dasatinib induced a decrease in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CSF2, CD40L, GZMB, and IL-2 mRNAs in blood cells, indicating target engagement. Decreases in plasma IL-6 and bone alkaline phosphatase, and in urinary N-telopeptide, were associated with DC. Dasatinib has definite but limited activity in advanced mCRPC, and was poorly tolerated. The observation of a patient with prolonged, objective, clinically significant benefit warrants molecular profiling to select the appropriate patient population. PMID:23652277

  17. Behavioral/Lifestyle and Immunologic Factors Associated with HPV Infection among Women Older Than 45 Years

    PubMed Central

    González, Paula; Hildesheim, Allan; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Porras, Carolina; Wacholder, Sholom; Piñeres, Alfonso García; Pinto, Ligia A.; Burk, Robert D.; Herrero, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) detection increases after menopause, but its determinants need clarification. Methods In a case–control study nested within a 10,049 women cohort, we evaluated women 45 to 75 years old who acquired HPV infection and were HPV positive 5 to 6 years after enrollment (N = 252), and HPV-negative women as matched controls (N = 265). Detailed sexual behavior and cellular immune response were investigated. Odds ratios (OR) and attributable fractions were estimated. Results Women with 2+ lifetime partners had 1.7-fold (95% CI = 1.1–2.7) higher risk than monogamous women, with similar findings if their partners had other partners. Women with 2+ partners after last HPV-negative result had the highest risk (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2–12.4 compared with 0–1 partners). Weaker immune response to HPV-16 virus-like particles increased risk (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.1–2.7 comparing lowest to highest tertile). Among women with no sexual activity in the period before HPV appearance, reduced immune response to phytohemagglutinin was the only determinant (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 0.94–8.8). Twenty-one percent of infections were explained by recent sexual behavior, 21% by past sexual behavior, and 12% by reduced immune response. Conclusions New infections among older women may result from sexual activity of women and/or their partners or reappearance of past (latent) infections possibly related to weakened immune response. Impact HPV infections among older women are associated with current and past sexual exposures and possibly with immune senescence. The risk of cancer from these infections is likely to be low but could not be fully evaluated in the context of this study. PMID:20952561

  18. Cysteamine treatment restores the in vitro ability to differentiate along the osteoblastic lineage of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow of a cystinotic patient.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Antonella; Taranta, Anna; Biagini, Simone; Starc, Nadia; Pitisci, Angela; Bellomo, Francesco; Cirillo, Valentina; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Emma, Francesco

    2015-05-07

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations of the CTNS gene, which encodes for a lysosomal cystine/H(+) symporter. In mice, inactivation of the CTNS gene causes intralysosomal cystine accumulation and progressive organ damage that can be reversed, at least in part, by infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Little is known on the mesenchymal compartment of cystinotic patients. The aim of the study was to test the phenotypical and functional properties of cystinotic MSCs (Cys-MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) aspirate of a patient with nephropathic cystinosis. Morphology, proliferative capacity (measured as population doublings), immunophenotype (by flow-cytometry) and immunomodulatory properties (as phytohemagglutinin-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation) were analyzed. The osteogenic differentiation potential of Cys-MSCs was evaluated by histological staining (alkaline phosphatase activity, Alzarin Red and von Kossa staining) spectrophotometry and Quantitative Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction for osteigenic markers in the presence and in the absence of cysteamine. Cys-MSCs were compared with those isolated and expanded ex vivo from three healthy donors (HD-MSCs). Despite a slightly lower proliferative capacity, Cys-MSCs displayed a characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and similar immunephenotype as HD-MSCs. Cys-MSCs and HD-MSCs prevented proliferation of PHA-stimulated allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells to the same extent. After in vitro induction into osteoblasts, Cys-MSCs showed reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium depositions and expression of ALP and collagen type 1. When Cys-MSCs were treated in vitro with increasing doses of cysteamine (50-100-200 μM/L) during the differentiation assay, recovery of Cys-MSCs differentiation capacity into osteoblasts was observed. No difference in adipogenic differentiation was found between Cys-MSCs and HD-MSCs. Our results

  19. Molybdate modulates mitogen and cyclosporin responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2011-07-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential component of key physiological systems in animals, plants and microorganisms. The molybdate oxoanion MoO(4)(2-) has been demonstrated to cause diverse yet poorly understood biochemical and pharmacological effects, such as non-specific inhibition of phosphatases and stabilization of steroid receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of molybdate on the activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) ex vivo and its potential interaction with the widely used immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA). Lymphocyte activation was evaluated by performing multiple experiments determining blastogenesis in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 5 healthy volunteers, following stimulation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), in the absence or presence of 0.05-10 mM sodium molybdate or/and 2.5-30 μg/mL CsA. Blastogenesis was assessed by a morphometric assay based on the relative proportions of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and cells with aberrant morphology after PHA-induced activation. Molybdate concentrations up to 1 mM showed no effect on lymphocyte blastogenesis, while higher concentrations exerted immunosuppressive actions on cultured hPBLs. Co-administration of 0.1 mM sodium molybdate with CsA, at doses up to 20 μg/mL, induced no alteration in the response of cultured hPBLs to CsA. However, molybdate potentiated the immunosuppressive action of higher CsA concentrations, implying a likely dose-related synergistic interaction of the two agents in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes. These observations are indicative of the possible biological importance of molybdate oxoanions in the modulation of hPBL activation that may have pharmacological consequences during the therapeutic application of immunomodulatory drugs.

  20. Seasonal influence on mitogen and cyclosporin responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas K; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2013-06-01

    The immune response and lymphocyte activation in particular are affected by environmental factors. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate variability in lymphocyte activation according to seasonal changes. This study focused on the effects of season on the ex vivo mitogen-induced activation of lymphocytes from peripheral blood of healthy humans living in a temperate climate, as well as the ex vivo lymphocyte activation of rabbits living under constant laboratory conditions. The possible impact of season on the action of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA) on lymphocyte activation was investigated in both species. Cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from human donors (n=13, 22-63years of age) and from animals housed under 12:12hour light:dark cycle were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in the absence or presence of 10 and 25μg/mL CsA. Lymphocyte activation was assessed by morphometric analysis under a light microscope. Percentages of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and aberrant cells reflecting cytotoxicity were determined. Human lymphocytes demonstrated a significant decrease in response to PHA during the winter months, in comparison to the rest of the year. In contrast, the peripheral blood lymphocytes of rabbits housed under constant conditions did not demonstrate similar variations in response to PHA stimulation. The immunosuppressive action of cyclosporin A on this experimental model was unaffected by the observed seasonal variation in mitogen response in humans. These findings may guide research towards the identification of factors associated with the seasonality of the immune response and its potential influence on therapeutic interventions.

  1. African infants’ CCL3 gene copies influence perinatal HIV transmission in the absence of maternal nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Louise; Schramm, Diana B.; Donninger, Samantha; Meddows-Taylor, Stephen; Coovadia, Ashraf H.; Sherman, Gayle G.; Gray, Glenda E.; Tiemessen, Caroline T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Individuals with more copies of CCL3L1 (CCR5 ligand) than their population median have been found to be less susceptible to HIV infection. We investigated whether maternal or infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers are associated with perinatal HIV transmission when single-dose nevirapine is given for prevention. Method A nested case–control study was undertaken combining data from four cohorts including 849 HIV-infected mothers and their infants followed prospectively in Johannesburg, South Africa. Access to antiretroviral drugs for the prevention of perinatal transmission differed across the cohorts. Maternal and infant CCL3L1 gene copy numbers per diploid genome (pdg) were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction for 79 out of 83 transmitting pairs (~10% transmission rate) and 235 randomly selected non-transmitting pairs. Results Higher numbers of infant, but not maternal, CCL3L1 gene copies were associated with reduced HIV transmission (P=0.004) overall, but the association was attenuated if mothers took single-dose nevirapine or if the maternal viral load was low. Maternal nevirapine was also associated with reduced spontaneously released CCL3 (P=0.007) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated CCL3 (P=0.005) production in cord blood mononuclear cells from uninfected infants. Conclusion We observed a strong association between higher infant CCL3L1 gene copies and reduced susceptibility to HIV in the absence of maternal nevirapine. We also observed a reduction in newborn CCL3 production with nevirapine exposure. Taken together, we hypothesize that nevirapine may have direct or indirect effects that partly modify the role of the CCR5 ligand CCL3 in HIV transmission, obscuring the relationship between this genetic marker and perinatal HIV transmission. PMID:17690574

  2. Stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) exposed to nonpersistent pesticides and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene in apple orchards of southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Gregory J; Martin, Pamela A; Bishop, Christine A; Boermans, Herman J

    2004-12-01

    To determine the relative effects of pesticides in current use and persistent residues of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), we examined endocrine and immune responses in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) and eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) chicks from pesticide-sprayed apple orchards and reference sites in southern Ontario, Canada, during 2000 to 2001. Nests were exposed to as many as seven individual pesticide applications and up to five mixtures of pesticides during the egg-incubation and chick-rearing stage. Eggs collected from sprayed orchards contained higher p,p'-DDE concentrations than eggs from reference sites. In 16-d-old tree swallows, no significant differences were found in body mass, basal corticosterone concentration, or the corticosterone stress response following a 10-min restraint of chicks sampled from sprayed orchards and reference sites. Challenge with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), however, produced a higher level of corticosterone secretion in tree swallow chicks from sprayed orchards relative to chicks from reference sites. Multiple regression analysis revealed no correlation between corticosterone concentrations and exposure to pesticide sprays or p,p'-DDE in tree swallow chicks. In contrast, bluebird chicks from sprayed orchards were less responsive to challenge with ACTH and a significant negative association was found between the response to ACTH challenge and p,p'-DDE concentration in eggs. The phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced cutaneous basophil hypersensitivity response was similar between exposure groups in both tree swallow and bluebird nestlings. Examination of immune organs revealed that tree swallow chicks from sprayed orchards had significantly greater thymic lymphocyte density and cortical/ medullary ratios and significant splenic B-cell hyperplasia relative to reference chicks. Our results indicate that modulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in songbird chicks tested are most associated

  3. Toxic effects of dietary methylmercury on immune system development in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fallacara, Dawn M.; Halbrook, Richard S.; French, John B.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on immune system development in captive-reared nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) to determine whether T cell–mediated and antibody-mediated adaptive immunity are targets for MeHg toxicity at environmentally relevant concentrations. Nestlings received various diets, including 0 (control), 0.6, and 3.9 μg/g (dry wt) MeHg for up to 18 d posthatch. Immunotoxicity endpoints included cell-mediated immunity (CMI) using the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin-swelling assay and antibody-mediated immune response via the sheep red blood cell (SRBC) hemagglutination assay. T cell– and B cell–dependent histological parameters in the spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius were correlated with the functional assays. For nestlings in the 0.6 and 3.9 μg/g MeHg groups, CMI was suppressed by 73 and 62%, respectively, at 11 d of age. Results of this functional assay were correlated with T cell–dependent components of the spleen and thymus. Dose-dependent lymphoid depletion in spleen tissue directly affected the proliferation of T-lymphocyte populations, insofar as lower stimulation indexes from the PHA assay occurred in nestlings with lower proportions of splenic white pulp and higher THg concentrations. Nestlings in the 3.9 μg/g group also exhibited lymphoid depletion and a lack of macrophage activity in the thymus. Methylmercury did not have a noticeable effect on antibody-mediated immune function or B cell–dependent histological correlates. We conclude that T cell–mediated immunosuppression is the primary target of MeHg toward adaptive immunity in developing kestrels. This study provides evidence that environmentally relevant concentrations of MeHg may compromise immunocompetence in a developing terrestrial predator and raises concern regarding the long-term health effects of kestrels that were exposed to dietary MeHg during early avian development.

  4. Effect of in ovo exposure to an organochlorine mixture extracted from double crested cormorant eggs (Phalacrocorax auritus) and PCB 126 on immune function of juvenile chickens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, E.T.; Wiley, F.; Grasman, K.A.; Tillitt, D.E.; Sikarskie, J.G.; Bowerman, W.W.

    2007-01-01

    Organochlorine (OC) contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been associated with immune modulation in wild fish-eating birds from the Great Lakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immune function of juvenile chickens after in ovo exposure to PCB 126 or an environmentally relevant OC mixture extracted from eggs of double crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) from Green Bay, Lake Michigan, USA. Fertile white leghorn chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs were injected before incubation with 0.55-1.79 ng TCDD equivalents (TEQ)/egg PCB 126 and 1.2-4.9 ng TEQs/egg of cormorant egg extract into the air cell in two separate experiments. After hatching, the immune function was tested using in vivo phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response in 11-day-old chicks, antibody titers to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in 28-day-old chicks, and, at necropsy, thymus and bursal mass and cellularity. PCB 126 decreased antibody titers at all doses and decreased the thymus and bursa index but not cellularity at 1.79 ng TEQ/egg. The cormorant egg extract caused no significant alterations in immune function even though it has been demonstrated as immunotoxic in chicken embryos. However, twofold to threefold increases in total anti-SRBC titers in 28-day-old chicks exposed to 1.2 or 2.4 ng TEQ/egg of cormorant extract were similar to elevations in anti-SRBC titer observed in Caspian tern (Sterna caspia) chicks from a highly OC-contaminated site in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron. Posthatch exposure to OC through fish consumption in addition to in ovo OC exposure might be associated with the immune modulation reported in wild birds. Chicks in this study might have begun to compensate for embryonic immunotoxicity by the ages at which we studied them. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Effects of Sustained Sleep Restriction on Mitogen-Stimulated Cytokines, Chemokines and T Helper 1/ T Helper 2 Balance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, John; Rehman, Javaid-ur; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Ekman, Rolf; Miller, Gregory E.; Höglund, Caroline Olgart; Lekander, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that acute sleep deprivation disrupts cellular immune responses by shifting T helper (Th) cell activity towards a Th2 cytokine profile. Since little is known about more long-term effects, we investigated how five days of sleep restriction would affect pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, Th1- and Th2 cytokine secretion. Methods Nine healthy males participated in an experimental sleep protocol with two baseline sleep-wake cycles (sleep 23.00 – 07.00 h) followed by 5 days with restricted sleep (03.00 – 07.00 h). On the second baseline day and on the fifth day with restricted sleep, samples were drawn every third hour for determination of cytokines/chemokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) -1β, IL-2, IL-4 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)) after in vitro stimulation of whole blood samples with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Also leukocyte numbers, mononuclear cells and cortisol were analysed. Results 5-days of sleep restriction affected PHA-induced immune responses in several ways. There was a general decrease of IL-2 production (p<.05). A shift in Th1/Th2 cytokine balance was also evident, as determined by a decrease in IL2/IL4 ratio. No other main effects of restricted sleep were shown. Two significant interactions showed that restricted sleep resulted in increased TNF-α and MCP-1 in the late evening and early night hours (p’s<.05). In addition, all variables varied across the 24 h day. Conclusions 5-days of sleep restriction is characterized by a shift towards Th2 activity (i.e. lower 1L-2/IL-4 ratio) which is similar to the effects of acute sleep deprivation and psychological stress. This may have implications for people suffering from conditions characterized by excessive Th2 activity like in allergic disease, such as asthma, for whom restricted sleep could have negative consequences. PMID:24349251

  6. Healthy CD4+ T lymphocytes are not affected by targeted therapies against the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Alberto M.; Zauli, Giorgio; Ultimo, Simona; McCubrey, James A.; Gonelli, Arianna; Marisi, Giorgia; Ulivi, Paola; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M.

    2016-01-01

    An attractive molecular target for novel anti-cancer therapies is the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which is commonly deregulated in many types of cancer. Nevertheless, the effects of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors on T lymphocytes, a key component of immune responses, have been seldom explored. In this study we investigated the effects on human CD4+ T-cells of a panel of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors: BGT226, Torin-2, MK-2206, and ZSTK474. We also assessed their efficacy against two acute leukemia T cell lines. T lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin. Inhibitor effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, while cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assays. In addition, the activation status of the pathway as well as induction of autophagy were analyzed by Western blotting. Quiescent healthy T lymphocytes were unaffected by the drugs whereas mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes as well as leukemic cell lines displayed a cell cycle block, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and dephosphorylation of key components of the signaling pathway. Autophagy was also induced in proliferating lymphocytes and in JURKAT and MOLT-4 cell lines. When autophagy was inhibited by 3-methyladenine or Bafilomycin A1, drug cytotoxicity was increased, indicating that autophagy is a protective mechanism. Therefore, our findings suggest that PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors preserve lymphocyte viability. This is a valuable result to be taken into account when selecting drugs for targeted cancer therapy in order to minimize detrimental effects on immune function. PMID:27494886

  7. Thyroid hormone suppression and cell-mediated immunomodulation in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) exposed to PCBs.

    PubMed

    Smits, J E; Fernie, K J; Bortolotti, G R; Marchant, T A

    2002-10-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants can induce physiological changes in animals through various mechanisms. One manifestation of subclinical toxicity from polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure is the disruption of normal immune function described in numerous species, including American kestrels (Falco sparverius). In 1998, 152 mature male and female kestrels were fed either a mixture of Aroclor 1248:1254:1260 (approximately 7 mg/kg kestrel/day) through their food items, or control diets. Offspring produced by 50 breeding pairs (thus, half received in ovo PCB exposure only) were also studied. Total and differential white blood cell counts, the phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response, as well as thyroid hormone levels were tested in vivo in nonbreeding adults (1998 only) and nestlings (1998 and 1999). In 1999, nestlings came from three parental groups; adults exposed in 1998, birds produced by PCB-exposed parents, and unexposed birds. In 1998, directly exposed males but not females had increased total white blood cell counts driven by lymphocytosis, plus a decreased heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio relative to controls. PCB-exposed birds had a significantly greater response to PHA than did controls, with sex as a significant factor and plasma triiodothyonine (T(3)) as a significant covariate. Levels of T(3) were significantly depressed in PCB-exposed birds of both sexes. The 1999 nestlings (F1 generation with respect to PCB exposure) did not show any effect of parental treatment group on the PHA skin response, yet T(3) remained as a significant covariate. Immunological effects are discussed in light of the antibody-mediated immunotoxicity found in the same birds and reported previously.

  8. Effects of food restriction in military training on T-lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Kramer, T R; Moore, R J; Shippee, R L; Friedl, K E; Martinez-Lopez, L; Chan, M M; Askew, E W

    1997-03-01

    In a stress model which included food restriction, we examined the effects of physically rigorous military training and increased caloric intake on T-lymphocyte responses and lymphocyte subsets. T-lymphocyte proliferation and release of soluble receptor for interleukin-2 (slL-2R) in vitro were measured in two separate training classes of male U.S. Army ranger course (RC) trainees at the start and during the RC. Trainees in group 1 (n = 55) and 2(n = 50), respectively, had mean (+/- SD) energy intakes of 11.8 +/- 7.0 and 13.6 +/- 6.7 MJ/d, averaged total daily energy expenditures of 16.7 and 17.6 MJ/d, and experienced body weight losses of 15.]% and 12.6%. Both groups showed decreases T-lymphocyte responses in vitro: proliferation to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and tetanus toxoid (TT), and released slL-2R to PHA. Group 2 with an intended 15% increase in energy during the RC over group 1 showed 22% and 26% less severe suppressions of T-lymphocyte proliferation and released slL-2R, respectively, in vitro. Group 2 also showed that short-term (9 days) removal of the food restriction stressor allowed for corrected body weight, total lymphocyte and T-lymphocyte subset counts but not suppressed T-lymphocyte responses in vitro. These results demonstrate that soldiers in physically rigorous military training are at risk of suppressed T-lymphocyte immunocompetence, and this is greater if they also experience inadequate energy intake.

  9. Seed-Specific Stable Expression of the α-AI1 Inhibitor in Coffee Grains and the In Vivo Implications for the Development of the Coffee Berry Borer.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Érika V S; Bezerra, Caroline A; Romero, Juan V; Valencia, Jorge W A; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Pimenta, Lucas M; Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Silva, Maria C M; Meneguim, Ana M; Sá, Maria Eugênia L; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Fernandez, Diana; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F

    Genetic transformation of coffee (Coffea spp.), the second most traded commodity worldwide, is an alternative approach to introducing features that cannot be introgressed by traditional crossings. The transgenic stability, heritability and quantitative and spatial expression patterns of the seed-specific promoter phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) from Phaseolus vulgaris were characterized in genetically modified C. arabica expressing the α-amylase inhibitor-1 (α-AI1) gene. The α-AI1 inhibitor shows considerable activity toward digestive enzymes of the coffee berry borer (CBB) Hypothenemus hampei. This insect pest expends its life cycle almost entirely in coffee berries. Transgene containment in the fruit is important to meeting food and environmental safety requirements for releasing genetically modified (GM) crops. PCR analysis of T2 coffee plants showed a Mendelian single-copy segregation pattern. Ectopic transgene expression was only detected in coffee grains, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR analysis of different plant tissues. An intense immunocytochemical signal associated with α-AI1 protein expression was localized to endospermic cells. In addition, a delay in the larval development of CBB was observed after challenging transgenic coffee seeds with the insect. These results indicate that the PHA-L promoter might be a useful tool in coffee for the seed-specific expression of genes related to coffee bean productivity, quality and pest protection. The biotechnological applicability of the α-AI1 gene for controlling CBB is also discussed. This work is the first report showing a seed-specific transgene expression in coffee plants.

  10. [Immunological studies on patients with mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    Greiding, L; Mathov, E; Casalá, A; Borda, J M; Slazer, M; Núñez, J; Antonowicz, E

    1975-01-01

    Recently, much has been published on the immunological status of patients affected with various lymphomas. In the particular case of Mycosis fungoide, there was no general agreement on the immunological status of the corresponding patients. In fact, López Borrasca et al, found severe depression of cellular immunity in such patients. On the contrary, Blaylock and Clendenning found very little change in cellular immunity, but a very high serum-IgA. We want to offer our experience on this problem with the immunological survey of four patients with the Alibert-Bazin-form of Mycosis fungoide. The following tests were performed on each patient: a) Intracutaneous test with candidina, PPD and other bacterial antigens. b) Sensitization to a concentrate solution of dinitrochlorobencene (DNCB). c) Lymphocyte Transformation Test (LTT), with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen. d) Quantitative determination of IgG, IgM, IgA and beta1C, with the radial immunodiffusion technique (Mancini et al.). e) Agar immunoelectrophoresis. The following results were obtained: 1) The cellular immunity was markedly depressed in the four patients when any of a, b or c-test was performed. 2) All the patients showed very high levels of serum IgA, 150% higher than control. The reason for this is unknown. On the contrary, IgG in serum was less elevated and IgM and beta1C serum levels were normal. 3) No monoclonal bands were found in any case (immunoelectrophoresis). 4) No definite conclusions could be reached due to the limited number of cases, but the uniformity of results should encourage to carry this work further.

  11. Effects of soybean oil emulsion and eicosapentaenoic acid on stress response and immune function after a severely stressful operation.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, K; Tashiro, T; Yamamori, H; Takagi, K; Morishima, Y; Sugiura, T; Otsubo, Y; Hayashi, N; Itabashi, T; Sano, W; Toyoda, Y; Nitta, H; Nakajima, N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of soybean oil emulsion and oral or enteral administration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on stress response, cytokine production, protein metabolism, and immune function after surgery for esophageal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been reported that safflower oil, rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA), affects the survival rate of septic animals and decreases the immune function. It has also been reported that the administration of fish oil, in contrast, reduces these stress responses and stress-induced immunosuppression. In humans, the effects of soybean oil emulsion and the administration of EPA on stress response and immune function after surgery have not been established. METHODS: Patients who underwent esophagectomy with thoracotomy were divided into three groups. Seven patients were fed by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with soybean oil emulsion, which accounted for 20% of total calories. Seven patients were given oral or enteral administration of 1.8 g/day EPA, in addition to TPN with soybean oil emulsion. Nine patients served as the control group; these patients received fat-free TPN. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein, concanavalin A (con A)- or phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, natural killer cell activity, and stress hormones were measured. RESULTS: The postoperative level of serum IL-6 was significantly higher in the group receiving soybean oil emulsion than in the fat-free group. Oral or enteral supplementation of EPA with soybean oil emulsion significantly reduced the level of serum IL-6 compared with the patients receiving soybean oil emulsion. Con A- or PHA-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation decreased significantly on postoperative day 7 in all groups of patients. The supplementation of EPA with soybean oil emulsion significantly improved the lymphocyte proliferation and natural killer cell activity on postoperative day 21 compared with the group

  12. Rapid and selective apoptosis in human leukemic cells induced by Aplidine through a Fas/CD95- and mitochondrial-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; An, Feiyun; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2003-04-01

    Aplidine is a promising antitumor agent derived from the Mediterranean tunicate Aplidium albicans. We have found that Aplidine at nM concentrations (10-100 nM) induced apoptosis in human leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cell cultures from leukemic patients. Inhibition of the Fas (CD95)/Fas ligand (CD95L) signaling pathway with an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody partially inhibited Aplidine-induced apoptosis. L929 cells were resistant to Aplidine action but underwent apoptosis after transfection with human Fas cDNA. Aplidine induced a rapid and sustained c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation, and pretreatment with curcumin or SP600125 inhibited Aplidine-induced c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase activation and apoptosis. However, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 kinase signaling pathways did not affect Aplidine-induced apoptosis. Aplidine induced caspase-3 activation, and caspase inhibition prevented Aplidine-induced apoptosis. Aplidine failed to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, defective in caspase-3, additionally implicating caspase-3 in its proapoptotic action. Aplidine also triggered an early release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and overexpression of bcl-2 by gene transfer abrogated mitochondrial cytochrome c release and apoptosis. Aplidine rapidly induced cleavage of Bid, a mediator that connects the Fas/CD95 cell death receptor to the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Primary cultures of normal human cells, including hepatocytes and resting peripheral blood lymphocytes, were spared or weakly affected after Aplidine treatment. Nevertheless, mitogen (phytohemagglutinin/interleukin-2)-activated T lymphocytes resulted sensitively to the apoptotic action of Aplidine. Thus, Aplidine is an extremely potent and rapid apoptotic inducer on leukemic cells that triggers Fas/CD95- and mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling routes, and shows a rather selective apoptotic action on cancer cells and activated T cells.

  13. The Role of In Vitro-Induced Lymphocyte Apoptosis in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Correlation with Different Markers of Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Holznagel, Edgar; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Allenspach, Karin; Huettner, Silke; Forster, Ursula; Niederer, Eva; Joller, Helen; Willett, Brian J.; Hummel, Urs; Rossi, Giovanni L.; Schüpbach, Jörg; Lutz, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection is characterized by a progressive decline in the number of peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes, which finally leads to AIDS. This T-cell decline correlates with the degree of in vitro-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. However, such a correlation has not yet been described in feline AIDS, caused by feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. We therefore investigated the intensity of in vitro-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes from cats experimentally infected with a Swiss isolate of FIV for 1 year and for 6 years and from a number of long-term FIV-infected cats which were coinfected with feline leukemia virus. Purified peripheral blood lymphocytes were either cultured overnight under nonstimulating conditions or stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 for 60 h. Under stimulating conditions, the isolates from the infected cats showed significantly higher relative counts of apoptotic cells than did those from noninfected controls (1-year-infected cats, P = 0.01; 6-year-infected cats, P = 0.006). The frequency of in vitro-induced apoptosis was inversely correlated with the CD4+ cell count (P = 0.002), bright CD8+ cell count (P = 0.009), and CD4/CD8 ratio (P = 0.01) and directly correlated with the percentage of bright major histocompatibility complex class II-positive peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.004). However, we found no correlation between in vitro-induced apoptosis and the viral load in serum samples. Coinfection with feline leukemia virus enhanced the degree of in vitro-induced apoptosis compared with that in FIV monoinfected cats. We concluded that the degree of in vitro-induced apoptosis was closely related to FIV-mediated T-cell depletion and lymphocyte activation and could be used as an additional marker for disease progression in FIV infection. PMID:9765447

  14. Lymphocyte Redox Imbalance and Reduced Proliferation after a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Costa, Karine Beatriz; Ottone, Vinícius de Oliveira; Magalhães, Flávio de Castro; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro; Rocha-Vieira, Etel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether an acute session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is sufficient to alter lymphocyte function and redox status. Sixteen young healthy men underwent a HIIT session on a cycloergometer, consisting of eight bouts of 1 min at 90-100% of peak power, with 75 seconds of active recovery at 30 W between bouts. Venous blood was collected before, immediately after, and 30 minutes after the HIIT session. In response to Staphylococcus aureus superantigen B (SEB) stimulation, lymphocyte proliferation decreased and the IL-2 concentration increased after the HIIT session. However, the HIIT session had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation or IL-2 response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation. The HIIT session also induced lymphocyte redox imbalance, characterized by an increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a decrease in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase. Lymphocyte viability was not affected by the HIIT session. The frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ T helper and B lymphocytes in response to superantigen stimulation were lower after exercise, suggesting that superantigen-induced lymphocyte activation was reduced by HIIT. However, HIIT also led to a reduction in the frequency of CD4+ and CD19+ cells, so the frequencies of CD25+ and CD69+ cells within the CD4 and CD19 cell populations were not affected by HIIT. These data indicate that the reduced lymphocyte proliferation observed after HIIT is not due to reduced early lymphocyte activation by superantigen. Our findings show that an acute HIIT session promotes lymphocyte redox imbalance and reduces lymphocyte proliferation in response to superantigenic, but not to mitogenic stimulation. This observation cannot be explained by alteration of the early lymphocyte activation response to superantigen. The manner in which lymphocyte function modulation by an acute HIIT session can affect individual immunity and susceptibility to infection is important

  15. IN VITRO TESTING OF AN ANTI-CD40 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, CLONE 2C10, IN PRIMATES AND PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whayoung; Satyananda, Vikas; Iwase, Hayato; Tanaka, Takayuki; Miyagawa, Yuko; Long, Cassandra; Ayares, David; Cooper, David KC; Hara, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The CD40/CD154 and CD28/B7 pathways are important in allo- and xeno-transplantation. Owing to the thrombotic complications of anti-CD154mAb, anti-CD40mAb has emerged as a promising inhibitor of costimulation. Various clones of anti-CD40mAb have been developed against primate species, e.g., clone 2C10 against rhesus monkeys. We have compared the in vitro efficacy of 2C10 to prevent a T cell response in primates and pigs. Methods The binding of 2C10 to antigen-presenting cells (PBMCs [B cells]) of humans, rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, baboons, and pigs was measured by flow cytometry, and was also tested indirectly by a blocking assay. The functional capacity of 2C10 was tested by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) with polyclonal stimulation by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and also with wild-type pig aortic endothelial cells (pAECs) as stimulators. Results There was a significant reduction in binding of 2C10 to baboon PBMCs compared to rhesus, cynomolgus, and human PBMCs, and minimal binding to pig PBMCs. The blocking assay confirmed that the binding of 2C10 was significantly lower to baboon PBMCs when compared to the other primate species tested. The functional assay with PHA showed significantly reduced inhibition of PBMC proliferation in humans, cynomolgus monkeys, and baboons compared to rhesus monkeys, which was confirmed on MLR with pAECs. Conclusions Since both the binding and functional activity of 2C10 in the baboon is lower than in rhesus monkeys, in vivo treatment using 2C10 in the baboon might require a higher dose or more frequent administration in comparison to rhesus monkeys. It may also be beneficial to develop species-specific clones of anti-CD40mAb. PMID:26458513

  16. Defective production of interleukin-1 beta in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Restoration by proper glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Kousathana, Foteini; Georgitsi, Marianna; Lambadiari, Vaia; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimitriadis, George; Mouktaroudi, Maria

    2017-02-01

    The underlying immune defect of susceptibility in diabetes mellitus type 2 to infections remains unknown. The qualitative changes in cytokine biosynthesis by circulating mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its modulation by glycemic control were investigated. PBMCs were isolated from 39 patients and 25 controls. They were stimulated with purified ligands and heat-killed bacteria in the absence/presence of glucose and NLPR3 inflammasome ligands. Experiments were repeated after 3 and 6months. Cytokine production was measured in cell supernatants; pro-interleukin(IL)-1 β was measured in cell lysates. Gene expression of IL-1β and activity of caspase-1 were measured as well. Adequate release of interleukin (IL)-1β was found in 42.9% of patients compared to 90% of controls (p: 0.0001). This was related with down-regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome since gene expression of IL-1β remained unaltered whereas both the ratio of IL-1β to the intracellular pro-IL-1β and the activity of caspase-1 was lower in patients than controls. Addition of glucose did not modify defective IL-1β production. IL-6 production was increased after stimulation with Pam3Cys, phytohemagglutinin and C. albicans. After proper glycemic control, release of IL-1β was increased and of IL-6 decreased; cells of patients with improved glycemic control responded better to LPS stimulation under increased concentrations of glucose. It is concluded that diabetes type 2 is characterized by defective production of IL-1β from circulating monocytes due to impaired activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased production of the anti-inflammatory IL-6. Defects are restored with proper glycemic control.

  17. Multivariate heredity of melanin-based coloration, body mass and immunity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-Y; Fargallo, J A; Vergara, P; Martínez-Padilla, J

    2013-08-01

    The genetic covariation among different traits may cause the appearance of correlated response to selection on multivariate phenotypes. Genes responsible for the expression of melanin-based color traits are also involved in other important physiological functions such as immunity and metabolism by pleiotropy, suggesting the possibility of multivariate evolution. However, little is known about the relationship between melanin coloration and these functions at the additive genetic level in wild vertebrates. From a multivariate perspective, we simultaneously explored inheritance and selection of melanin coloration, body mass and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-mediated immune response by using long-term data over an 18-year period collected in a wild population of the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus. Pedigree-based quantitative genetic analyses showed negative genetic covariance between melanin-based coloration and body mass in male adults and positive genetic covariance between body mass and PHA-mediated immune response in fledglings as predicted by pleiotropic effects of melanocortin receptor activity. Multiple selection analyses showed an increased fitness in male adults with intermediate phenotypic values for melanin color and body mass. In male fledglings, there was evidence for a disruptive selection on rump gray color, but a stabilizing selection on PHA-mediated immune response. Our results provide an insight into the evolution of multivariate traits genetically related with melanin-based coloration. The differences in multivariate inheritance and selection between male and female kestrels might have resulted in sexual dimorphism in size and color. When pleiotropic effects are present, coloration can evolve through a complex pathway involving correlated response to selection on multivariate traits.

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66,000 M/sub r/ soluble protein in lectin-activated human peripheral blood T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wedner, H.J.; Bass, G.

    1986-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation was studied in human T lymphocytes stimulated with the mitogenic lectins phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A). The T lymphocytes were prepared from the venous blood of normal volunteers, their intracellular ATP pools were labeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, and protein phosphorylation was assayed in the soluble fraction by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When lymphocytes stimulated with PHA or Con A were compared to unstimulated control cells, there was a general increase in protein phosphorylation and the specific phosphorylation of a soluble protein with M/sub r/ = 64.9 to 69 KD and pI = 5.6 to 5.8. Phosphorylation of this protein, designated TPP-66, was observed as early as 2 min after the addition of lectin with a gradual increase in the level of phosphorylation over the next 120 min. In the majority of experiments, there was no phosphorylation seen in the unstimulated lymphocytes: however, in some experiments, there was appreciable phosphorylation, which was seen beginning 60 min after the labeling period. When the TPP-66 spot from stimulated lymphocytes was excised from gels, was eluted, and was subjected to limited base hydrolysis followed by single-dimension high voltage electrophoresis, the major phosphorylated residue migrated with phosphotyrosine. In some experiments, there was phosphorylation of serine residues in both the stimulated and control cells; tyrosine phosphorylation was never seen in the unstimulated cell population. These data suggest that, like other stimulae for cell growth, the induction of lymphocyte growth by lectins is associated with the activation of a tyrosine-specific kinase.

  19. Impact of lithium alone and in combination with antidepressants on cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petersein, Charlotte; Sack, Ulrich; Mergl, Roland; Schönherr, Jeremias; Schmidt, Frank M; Lichtblau, Nicole; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Bauer, Katrin; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important psychopharmacological agent for the treatment of unipolar as well as bipolar affective disorders. Lithium has a number of side effects such as hypothyroidism and aggravation of psoriasis. On the other hand, lithium has pro-inflammatory effects, which appear beneficial in some disorders associated with immunological deficits, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore, immunological characteristics of lithium may be an important consideration in individualized therapeutic decisions. We measured the levels of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-22, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the stimulated blood of thirty healthy subjects supplemented with lithium alone, the antidepressants citalopram, escitalopram or mirtazapine alone, the combination of each antidepressant with lithium, and a no drug control. These drugs were tested under three blood stimulant conditions: murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3 and the 5C3 monoclonal antibody (OKT3/5C3), phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and unstimulated blood. Lithium, alone and in combination with any of the tested antidepressants, led to a consistent increase of IL-1ß, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the unstimulated as well as the stimulated blood. In the OKT3/5C3- and PHA-stimulated blood, IL-17 production was significantly enhanced by lithium. Lithium additionally increased IL-2 concentrations significantly in PHA-stimulated blood. The data support the view that lithium has pro-inflammatory properties. These immunological characteristics may contribute to side effects of lithium, but may also explain its beneficial effects in patients suffering from HIV infection or SLE.

  20. Comparison of F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase chromosome damage induced by high doses of low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Willingham, V.; Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although biophysical models predict a difference in the ratio of interchromosomal to intrachromosomal interarm exchanges (F ratio) for low- and high-LET radiations, few experimental data support this prediction. However, the F ratios in experiments to date have been generated using data on chromosome aberrations in samples collected at the first postirradiation mitosis, which may not be indicative of the aberrations formed in interphase after exposure to high-LET radiations. In the present study, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 2 and 5 Gy of gamma rays and 3 Gy of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions (LET = 140 keV/micrometer), stimulated the cells to grow with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and collected the condensed chromosomes after 48 h of incubation using both chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and the conventional metaphase techniques. The PCC technique used here condenses chromosomes mostly in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. The F ratio was calculated using data on asymmetrical chromosome aberrations in both the PCC and metaphase samples. It was found that the F ratios were similar for the samples irradiated with low- and high-LET radiation and collected at metaphase. However, for irradiated samples assayed by PCC, the F ratio was found to be 8.2 +/- 2.0 for 5 Gy gamma rays and 5.2 +/- 0.9 for 3 Gy iron ions. The distribution of the aberrations indicated that, in the PCC samples irradiated with iron ions, most of the centric rings occurred in spreads containing five or more asymmetrical aberrations. These heavily damaged cells, which were either less likely to reach mitosis or may reach mitosis at a later time, were responsible for the difference in the F ratios generated from interphase and metaphase analysis after exposure to iron ions.

  1. Unaltered immunocompetence in patients with non-disseminated breast cancer at the time of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, C U; Hartmann, D; Landmann, R; Wesp, M; Rosenfelder, G; Stucki, D; Buser, M; Obrecht, J P

    1985-04-15

    Immunologic parameters were examined preoperatively in 104 patients with breast cancer, staged according to the TNM classification and in 95 age-matched healthy women. The immunologic evaluation in the peripheral blood included lymphocyte and monocyte counts, determination of E-rosette-forming T-lymphocytes (SER+) and B-lymphocytes (MER+), T-lymphocyte subsets defined with monoclonal antibodies (Leu-1, Leu-2a, Leu-3a) and with lectin fractionation (soybean agglutinin), lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (ConA), and colony formation of T-lymphocytes in agar (T-lymphocyte colony-forming cells, [TL-CFC]). Two age groups (Group A: 30-50 years; Group B: 51-70 years) and the different tumor stages (Stage I-IV) were analyzed. Patients and controls did not differ in the absolute numbers of lymphocytes, T- and B-cells. In patients of Group B, the absolute number of monocytes was increased slightly in Stage II and III and significantly in Stage IV (P less than 0.05). Similarly, the lymphocyte response to PHA was significantly reduced in Stage IV Group B only (P less than 0.05). ConA-induced lymphocyte proliferation and TL-CFC capacity were not different in patients and controls. In the small number of patients and age-matched controls in whom T-lymphocyte subsets were determined, the absolute numbers of T-cells with helper or suppressor phenotype as defined with Leu-3a, Leu-2a, or lectin fractionation with soybean agglutinin were similar. This study demonstrates that in patients with early breast cancer (Stage I-III), immunocompetence as defined by either functional in vitro studies or surface marker analysis is not significantly altered at the time of diagnosis. In contrast, patients with advanced disease (Stage IV) show a significant increase in the absolute number of monocytes and a depressed PHA responsiveness of mononuclear cells.

  2. Thymus transplantation in complete DiGeorge syndrome: immunologic and safety evaluations in 12 patients.

    PubMed

    Markert, M Louise; Sarzotti, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A; Sempowski, Gregory D; Rhein, Maria E; Hale, Laura P; Le Deist, Francoise; Alexieff, Marilyn J; Li, Jie; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Haynes, Barton F; Rice, Henry E; Skinner, Michael A; Mahaffey, Samuel M; Jaggers, James; Stein, Leonard D; Mill, Michael R

    2003-08-01

    Complete DiGeorge syndrome is a fatal condition in which infants have no detectable thymus function. The optimal treatment for the immune deficiency of complete DiGeorge syndrome has not been determined. Safety and efficacy of thymus transplantation were evaluated in 12 infants with complete DiGeorge syndrome who had less than 20-fold proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin. All but one had fewer than 50 T cells/mm3. Allogeneic postnatal cultured thymus tissue was transplanted. T-cell development was followed by flow cytometry, lymphocyte proliferation assays, and T-cell receptor Vbeta (TCRBV) repertoire evaluation. Of the 12 patients, 7 are at home 15 months to 8.5 years after transplantation. All 7 survivors developed T-cell proliferative responses to mitogens of more than 100 000 counts per minute (cpm). By one year after transplantation, 6 of 7 patients developed antigen-specific proliferative responses. The TCRBV repertoire showed initial oligoclonality that progressed to polyclonality within a year. B-cell function developed in all 3 patients tested after 2 years. Deaths were associated with underlying congenital problems. Risk factors for death included tracheostomy, long-term mechanical ventilation, and cytomegalovirus infection. Adverse events in the first 3 months after transplantation included eosinophilia, rash, lymphadenopathy, development of CD4-CD8- peripheral T cells, elevated serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), and possible pulmonary inflammation. Adverse events related to the immune system occurring more than 3 months after transplantation included thrombocytopenia in one patient and hypothyroidism and alopecia in one other patient. Thymic transplantation is efficacious, well tolerated, and should be considered as treatment for infants with complete DiGeorge syndrome.

  3. Kinetic Measurements Using Flow Cytometry: New Methods for Monitoring Intracellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Balázs; Toldi, Gergely; Kaposi, Ambrus; Vásárhelyi, Barna; Treszl, András

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our work was to establish flow cytometry methods for the characterization of mitochondrial Ca2+ levels, plasma membrane potential, and superoxide generation and to relate kinetics to that of cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels during short-term activation of T-lymphocytes. We monitored the change of fluorescence absorbance of sequentially measured Jurkat cells for 12 min. The cells were stained with the fluorescent dyes Fluo3-AM, Rhod2/AM, di-BA-C4-(5), or dihydroethidium and then were stimulated with increasing doses of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or were treated with rotenone. Double-logistic function was fitted to cytoplasmic Ca2+ signal and mitochondrial Ca2+ levels, whereas logistic function was fitted to plasma membrane potential and superoxide levels. The calculated function parameters were area under the curve (AUC), maximum (Max), time to reach maximum (tmax), slope at the first 50% value of Max (Slope), and ending (End) values, respectively. We found significant dose–response relationship between PHA dose and cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals (AUC, Max, Slope: P<0.05), mitochondrial Ca2+ levels (AUC and Max: P<0.05), and plasma membrane potential (AUC and End values: P<0.05). In rotenone-treated cells, superoxide generation increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05 for AUC and End values, respectively). The present methodology provides an opportunity for monitoring and characterizing mitochondrial Ca2+ levels, plasma membrane potential, and superoxide generation in PHA-activated or rotenone-treated Jurkat cells with flow cytometry. PMID:21919740

  4. Immunological and reproductive health assessment in herring gulls and black-crowned night herons in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Keith A; Echols, Kathy R; May, Thomas M; Peterman, Paul H; Gale, Robert W; Orazio, Carl E

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown inexplicable declines in breeding waterbirds within western New York/New Jersey Harbor between 1996 and 2002 and elevated polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs. The present study assessed associations between immune function, prefledgling survival, and selected organochlorine compounds and metals in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and black-crowned night herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) in lower New York Harbor during 2003. In pipping gull embryos, lymphoid cells were counted in the thymus and bursa of Fabricius (sites of T and B lymphocyte maturation, respectively). The phytohemagglutinin (PHA) skin response assessed T cell function in gull and heron chicks. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured in vitro in adult and prefledgling gulls. Reference data came from the Great Lakes and Bay of Fundy. Survival of prefledgling gulls was poor, with only 0.68 and 0.5 chicks per nest surviving to three and four weeks after hatch, respectively. Developing lymphoid cells were reduced 51% in the thymus and 42% in the bursa of gull embryos from New York Harbor. In vitro lymphocyte assays demonstrated reduced spontaneous proliferation, reduced T cell mitogen-induced proliferation, and increased B cell mitogen-induced proliferation in gull chicks from New York Harbor. The PHA skin response was suppressed 70 to 80% in gull and heron chicks. Strong negative correlations (r = -0.95 to -0.98) between the PHA response and dioxins and PCBs in gull livers was strong evidence suggesting that these chemicals contribute significantly to immunosuppression in New York Harbor waterbirds.

  5. Role of interferon gamma release assay in active TB diagnosis among HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Syed Ahamed Kabeer, Basirudeen; Sikhamani, Rajasekaran; Swaminathan, Sowmya; Perumal, Venkatesan; Paramasivam, Paulkumaran; Raja, Alamelu

    2009-05-28

    A rapid and specific test is urgently needed for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis especially among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. In this study, we assessed the sensitivity of Interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) in active tuberculosis patients who were positive for HIV infection and compared it with that of tuberculin skin test (TST). A total of 105 HIV-TB patients who were naïve for anti tuberculosis and anti retroviral therapy were included for this study out of which 53 (50%) were culture positive. Of 105 tested, QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-G) was positive in 65% (95% CI: 56% to 74%), negative in 18% (95% CI: 11% to 25%) and indeterminate in 17% (95% CI: 10% to 24%) of patients. The sensitivity of QFT-G remained similar in pulmonary TB and extra-pulmonary TB patients. The QFT-G positivity was not affected by low CD4 count, but it often gave indeterminate results especially in individuals with CD4 count < 200 cells/microl. All of the QFT-G indeterminate patients whose sputum culture were positive, showed < or = 0.25 IU/ml of IFN-gamma response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA). TST was performed in all the 105 patients and yielded the sensitivity of 31% (95% CI: 40% to 22%). All the TST positives were QFT-G positives. The sensitivity of TST was decreased, when CD4 cell counts declined. Our study shows neither QFT-G alone or in combination with TST can be used to exclude the suspicion of active TB disease. However, unlike TST, QFT-G yielded fewer false negative results even in individuals with low CD4 count. The low PHA cut-off point for indeterminate results suggested in this study (< or = 0.25 IU/ml) may improve the proportion of valid QFT-G results.

  6. The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on in vitro proliferation of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cell populations derived from allergic and healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Holen, E; Elsayed, S

    1995-03-01

    The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on in vitro proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells, positively selected by immunomagnetic separation, was investigated. The cells were obtained from allergic patients with moderate serum IgE levels and mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, and healthy controls. The different cell subfractions were stimulated with mitogens or specific allergens, as well as cell supernatants from the lymphoblastoid B- (RPMI 8866) and T-hybridoma (166 A2) cell lines. Proliferative responses of T- and B-cell subsets stimulated with mitogens together with recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) or accessory cells (AC) could be inhibited by DSCG. In allergic individuals, significant allergen-specific stimulation could be observed in the CD8-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fractions. Isolated CD4+ T cells, without AC or IL-2, could also be stimulated with specific allergen, but the responses were rather low. DSCG inhibited, concentration dependently, all allergen-induced responses. Interestingly, only atopic derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were stimulated by soluble low-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RII/sCD23) and IgE binding factor (IgEBF), including IgE enhancing factor, present in culture supernatants from RPMI 8866 and 166 A2, respectively. These responses were also inhibited by DSCG. This was in contrast to the amplifying effect of DSCG on spontaneously proliferating RPMI 8866 and 166 A2 cells, cultured in fresh cRPMI 1640 medium without sCD23 and IgE enhancing factor. Our results show that DSCG delivers an inhibitory signal or signals to PBMC subpopulations expressing Fc epsilon RII/sCD23, either upregulated by phytohemagglutinin in normal and atopic cells, or by allergens or sCD23 in atopic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Immunological and clinical observations in diabetic kidney graft recipients pretreated with total-lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Vanrenterghem, Y.; Roels, L.; Ang, K.K.; Bouillon, R.; Lerut, T.; Gruwez, J.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.; Michielsen, P.

    1987-03-01

    In a feasibility study, twenty patients with end-stage diabetic nephropathy were treated with fractionated total-lymphoid irradiation (TLI, mean dose 25 Gy), before transplantation of a first cadaveric kidney. During radiotherapy, only one patient had a serious side effect (bone marrow depression). After transplantation four patients died (one of a myocardial infarction, one of ketoacidosis, and two of infections occurring during treatment of rejection crises). One graft was lost because of chronic rejection. The other 15 patients have a functioning graft (mean follow-up 24 months) and receive low-dose prednisone alone (less than 10 mg/day, n = 11) or in conjunction with cyclosporine (n = 4) as maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. A favorable clinical outcome after TLI (no, or only one, steroid-sensitive rejection crisis) was significantly correlated with a high pre-TLI helper/suppressor lymphocyte ratio, a short interval between TLI and the time of transplantation, and the occurrence of functional suppressor cells early after TLI. The most striking immunological changes provoked by TLI consisted of a long-term depression of the mixed lymphocyte reaction and of the phytohemagglutinin, and Concanavalin A or pokeweed-mitogen-induced blastogenesis. A rapid and complete recovery of the natural killer cell activity was observed after TLI. A permanent inversion of the OKT4+ (T helper/inducer) over OKT8+ (T suppressor/cytotoxic) lymphocyte ratio was provoked by a decrease of the OTK4+ subpopulation, together with a supranormal recovery of the OKT8+ lymphocytes. A majority of the latter lymphocytes did also express the Leu 7 and the Leu 15 phenotype.

  8. The Cell Wall and Membrane of Cryptococcus neoformans Possess a Mitogen for Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Christopher H.; Wood, Cynthia J.; Syme, Rachel M.; Spurrell, Jason C. L.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-lymphocyte activation by the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established. Previous investigations have suggested that C. neoformans contains a mitogen for T lymphocytes, while other investigators have attributed lymphocyte proliferation in vitro to a recall antigen. Because of the potential importance of the mechanism of T-cell activation for our understanding of the immune response to C. neoformans, the present studies were performed to determine whether C. neoformans contains a mitogen for T lymphocytes. C. neoformans stimulates fetal blood lymphocytes to proliferate and stimulates proliferation of CD45RA+ cells from adults, indicating that it stimulates naive T cells. The T-cell response to C. neoformans was dependent upon the presence of accessory cells. However, allogeneic cells were sufficient for accessory cell function, indicating that the response was not major histocompatibility complex restricted. The percentage of T cells in the cell cycle was higher than that with the recall antigen tetanus toxoid but lower than that with the mitogenic lectin phytohemagglutinin A or the superantigen Staphylococcus enterotoxin B. Precursor frequency analysis established that 1 in 7,750 ± 2,270 T cells proliferated in response to the cryptococcal cell wall and membrane. Compared to the case for most mitogens or superantigens, the proliferative response is late and the number of T cells that enter the cell cycle and the precursor frequency are low, indicating that the mitogenic effect is modest. However, the mitogenic effect of C. neoformans should be considered when interpreting the immune response to C. neoformans, since even weak mitogens can have profound effects on host defense. PMID:9916111

  9. Long-Term Fungal Inhibitory Activity of Water-Soluble Extracts of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto and Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria during Bread Storage▿

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo G.; Nigro, Franco; De Angelis, Maria; Arnault, Philip; Gobbetti, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The antifungal activity of proteinaceous compounds from different food matrices was investigated. In initial experiments, water-soluble extracts of wheat sourdoughs, cheeses, and vegetables were screened by agar diffusion assays with Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1 as the indicator fungus. Water-soluble extracts of sourdough fermented with Lactobacillus brevis AM7 and Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto were selected for further study. The crude water-soluble extracts of L. brevis AM7 sourdough and P. vulgaris cv. Pinto had a MIC of 40 mg of peptide/ml and 30.9 mg of protein/ml, respectively. MICs were markedly lower when chemically synthesized peptides or partially purified protein fractions were used. The water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto showed inhibition toward a large number of fungal species isolated from bakeries. Phaseolin alpha-type precursor, phaseolin, and erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin precursor were identified in the water-soluble extract of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto by nano liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. When the antifungal activity was assayed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all three proteins were inhibitory. A mixture of eight peptides was identified from the water-soluble extract of sourdough L. brevis AM7, and five of these exhibited inhibitory activity. Bread was made at the pilot plant scale by sourdough fermentation with L. brevis AM7 and addition of the water-soluble extract (27%, vol/wt; 5 mg of protein/ml) of P. vulgaris cv. Pinto. Slices of bread packed in polyethylene bags did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage at room temperature, a level of protection comparable to that afforded by 0.3% (wt/wt) calcium propionate. PMID:18849463

  10. Immune function is related to adult carotenoid and bile pigment levels, but not to dietary carotenoid access during development, in female mallard ducks.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2013-07-15

    Immune function can be modulated by multiple physiological factors, including nutrition and reproductive state. Because these factors can vary throughout an individual's lifetime as a result of environmental conditions (affecting nutrition) or life-history stage (e.g. entering the adult reproduction stage), we must carefully examine the degree to which developmental versus adult conditions shape performance of the immune system. We investigated how variation in dietary access to carotenoid pigments - a class of molecules with immunostimulatory properties that females deposit into egg yolks - during three different developmental time points affected adult immunological and reproductive traits in female mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). In males and females of other avian species, carotenoid access during development affects carotenoid assimilation ability, adult sexual ornamentation and immune function, while carotenoid access during adulthood can increase immune response and reproductive investment (e.g. egg-laying capacity, biliverdin deposition in eggshells). We failed to detect effects of developmental carotenoid supplementation on adult immune function [phytohemagglutinin-induced cutaneous immune response, antibody production in response to the novel antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), or oxidative burst, assessed by changes in circulating nitric oxide levels], carotenoid-pigmented beak coloration, ovarian development, circulating carotenoid levels or concentration of bile pigments in the gall bladder. However, we did uncover positive relationships between circulating carotenoid levels during adulthood and KLH-specific antibody production, and a negative relationship between biliverdin concentration in bile and KLH-specific antibody production. These results are consistent with the view that adult physiological parameters better predict current immune function than do developmental conditions, and highlight a possible, previously unstudied relationship

  11. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-02-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambdagt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16/sup +/ natural killer cells and CD3/sup +/, CD16/sup -/ T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

  12. Experimental exposure of red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa) to seeds coated with imidacloprid, thiram and difenoconazole.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Antia, Ana; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E; Mougeot, François; Mateo, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pesticide coated seeds are commonly used in agriculture, and may be an important source of food for some birds in times of scarcity, as well as a route of pesticide ingestion. We tested the lethal and sub-lethal effects of treated seed ingestion by the red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa), a game bird of high socio-economic value in Spain. One year-old partridges (n = 42 pairs) were fed for 10 days in spring (prior to breeding) with wheat treated with difenoconazole (fungicide), thiram (fungicide) or imidacloprid (insecticide), using two doses for each pesticide (the one recommended, and its double to represent potential cases of abuse of pesticides). We investigated the direct and indirect effects on the body condition, physiology, immunology, coloration and subsequent reproduction of exposed partridges. For the latter, eggs were collected, measured and incubated and the growth and survival of chicks were monitored. Thiram and imidacloprid at high exposure doses produced mortalities of 41.6 and 58.3 %, respectively. The first death was observed at day 3 for imidacloprid and at day 7 for thiram. Both doses of the three pesticides caused sublethal effects, such as altered biochemical parameters, oxidative stress and reduced carotenoid-based coloration. The high exposure doses of imidacloprid and thiram also produced a decrease in cellular immune response measured by the phytohemagglutinin test in males. Bearing in mind the limitation of the small number of surviving pairs in some treatments, we found that the three pesticides reduced the size of eggs and imidacloprid and difenoconazole also reduced the fertilization rate. In addition, both thiram and imidacloprid reduced chick survival. These experiments highlight that the toxicity of pesticide-treated seeds is a factor to consider in the decline of birds in agricultural environments.

  13. Nutritional quality of legumes, and their role in cardiometabolic risk prevention: a review.

    PubMed

    Bouchenak, Malika; Lamri-Senhadji, Myriem

    2013-03-01

    Legumes (including alfalfa, clover, lupins, green beans and peas, peanuts, soybeans, dry beans, broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, and lentils) represent an important component of the human diet in several areas of the world, especially in the developing countries, where they complement the lack of proteins from cereals, roots, and tubers. In some regions of the world, legume seeds are the only protein supply in the diet. The health benefits of legume consumption have received rising interest from researchers, and their consumption and production extends worldwide. Among European countries, higher legume consumption is observed around the Mediterranean, with per capita daily consumption between 8 and 23 g, while in Northern Europe, the daily consumption is less than 5 g per capita. The physiological effects of different legumes vary significantly. These differences may result from the polysaccharides composition, in particular, the quantity and variety of dietary fibers and starch, protein make-up, and variability in phytochemical content. The majority of legumes contain phytochemicals: bioactive compounds, including enzyme inhibitors, phytohemagglutinins (lectins), phytoestrogens, oligosaccharides, saponins, and phenolic compounds, which play metabolic roles in humans who frequently consume these foods. Dietary intake of phytochemicals may provide health benefits, protecting against numerous diseases or disorders, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation. The synergistic or antagonistic effects of these phytochemical mixtures from food legumes, their interaction with other components of the diet, and the mechanism of their action have remained a challenge with regard to understanding the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. Their mitigating effects and the mechanism of their action need to be further addressed if we are to understand the role of phytochemicals in health and diseases. This review provides an overview

  14. Treatment of NZB/NZW mice with total lymphoid irradiation: long-lasting suppression of disease without generalized immune suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzin, B.L.; Arndt, R.; Okada, S.; Ward, R.; Thach, A.B.; Strober, S.

    1986-05-01

    We used total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; total dose = 3400 rad) to treat the lupus-like renal disease of 6-mo-old female NZB/NZW mice. Similar to our past studies, this treatment resulted in a marked prolongation of survival, decrease in proteinuria, and decrease in serum anti-DNA antibodies compared with untreated littermate controls. Although there was no evidence of disease recurrence in TLI-treated mice until after 12 mo of age, the in vitro proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin by NZB/NZW spleen cells recovered within 6 wk such that responses were greater than control NZB/NZW animals. A similar recovery and overshoot after TLI were evident in the primary antibody response to the T cell-dependent antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Both the total and IgG anti-SRBC antibody responses after TLI were greater than those of untreated NZB/NZW controls, and were comparable with those of untreated non-autoimmune mice. Despite this increased response to mitogens and antigens after TLI, we noted a decrease in spontaneous splenic IgG-secreting cells and a decrease in IgG but not IgM antinuclear antibody production. Nonspecific suppressor cells of the mixed leukocyte response were detectable in the spleens of NZB/NZW mice early after TLI. However, the disappearance of suppressor cells was not associated with recrudescence of disease activity. Furthermore, transfer of large numbers of spleen cells from TLI-treated NZB/NZW mice did not result in disease suppression in untreated age-matched recipients. In summary, treatment of NZB/NZW mice with TLI results in a prolonged remission in autoimmune disease, which is achieved in the absence of generalized immunosuppression.

  15. Nutrition beyond nutrition: plausibility of immunotrophic nutrition for space travel.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, A D; Yamauchi, K; Hales, N W; Ramesh, V; Ramesh, G T; Sundaresan, A; Andrassy, R J; Pellis, N R

    2002-06-01

    Microgravity has adverse effects on the immune system. We examined the effects of supplemental dietary nucleotides on immune function in ground-based in vivo anti-orthostatic tail-suspended (AOS) mice and in vitro (bioreactor-BIO) analogs of microgravity. BALB/c mice were divided into the following three groups: group housed, single isolation, and AOS. Mice were fed either control chow or chow supplemented with RNA or uracil. Immune function was assessed by in vivo popliteal lymph node proliferation (PLN), in vitro PHA-stimulated proliferation of splenocytes and cytokine production. BIO splenocytes were cultured in vitro with/without PHA, a nucleoside-nucleotide mixture (NS/NT) or uridine. The cell proliferation and scanning electron microscopic examination for cells were carried out. PLN response was significantly suppressed in AOS mice (P<0.05) and was restored by RNA and uracil diets. Splenocytes from AOS mice had decreased phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated proliferation, decreased IL-2 and IFN-gamma cytokine levels (P<0.05). These responses were restored by RNA and uracil diets. In BIO cultures, PHA response was suppressed significantly, and uridine and NS/NT restored the proliferative responses. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of cells cultured in BIO revealed cells with pinched, distorted and eroded membranes. Nucleotide supplementation especially uridine restored normal activated cell surface appearance and ruffling. In the microgravity analog environment of AOS and BIO, supplemental nucleotides and especially uracil/uridine have up-regulating and immunoprotective effects with potential as a countermeasure to the observed immune dysfunction in true microgravity.

  16. Differential effects of early- and late-life access to carotenoids on adult immune function and ornamentation in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; McGraw, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conditions early in life can affect an organism's phenotype at adulthood, which may be tuned to perform optimally in conditions that mimic those experienced during development (Environmental Matching hypothesis), or may be generally superior when conditions during development were of higher quality (Silver Spoon hypothesis). Here, we tested these hypotheses by examining how diet during development interacted with diet during adulthood to affect adult sexually selected ornamentation and immune function in male mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Mallards have yellow, carotenoid-pigmented beaks that are used in mate choice, and the degree of beak coloration has been linked to adult immune function. Using a 2 × 2 factorial experimental design, we reared mallards on diets containing either low or high levels of carotenoids (nutrients that cannot be synthesized de novo) throughout the period of growth, and then provided adults with one of these two diets while simultaneously quantifying beak coloration and response to a variety of immune challenges. We found that both developmental and adult carotenoid supplementation increased circulating carotenoid levels during dietary treatment, but that birds that received low-carotenoid diets during development maintained relatively higher circulating carotenoid levels during an adult immune challenge. Individuals that received low levels of carotenoids during development had larger phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced cutaneous immune responses at adulthood; however, dietary treatment during development and adulthood did not affect antibody response to a novel antigen, nitric oxide production, natural antibody levels, hemolytic capacity of the plasma, or beak coloration. However, beak coloration prior to immune challenges positively predicted PHA response, and strong PHA responses were correlated with losses in carotenoid-pigmented coloration. In sum, we did not find consistent support for either the Environmental

  17. DNA-AP sites generation by Etoposide in whole blood cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Etoposide is currently one of the most commonly used antitumor drugs. The mechanisms of action proposed for its antitumor activity are based mainly on its interaction with topoisomerase II. Etoposide effects in transformed cells have been described previously. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of this drug in non-transformed whole blood cells, such as occurs as collateral damage induced by some chemotherapies. Methods To determine etoposide genotoxicity, we employed Comet assay in two alkaline versions. To evaluate single strand breaks and delay repair sites we use pH 12.3 conditions and pH >13 to evidence alkali labile sites. With the purpose to quantified apurinic or apyrimidine (AP) sites we employed a specific restriction enzyme. Etoposide effects were determined on whole blood cells cultured in absence or presence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) treated during 2 and 24 hours of cultured. Results Alkaline (pH > 13) single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay experiments revealed etoposide-induced increases in DNA damage in phytohemaglutinine (PHA)-stimulated blood and non-stimulated blood cells. When the assay was performed at a less alkaline pH, 12.3, we observed DNA damage in PHA-stimulated blood cells consistent with the existence of alkali labile sites (ALSs). In an effort to elucidate the molecular events underlying this result, we applied exonuclease III (Exo III) in conjunction with a SCGE assay, enabling detection of DNA-AP sites along the genome. More DNA AP-sites were revealed by Exo III and ALSs were recognized by the SCGE assay only in the non-stimulated blood cells treated with etoposide. Conclusion Our results indicate that etoposide induces DNA damage specifically at DNA-AP sites in quiescent blood cells. This effect could be involved in the development of secondary malignancies associated with etoposide chemotherapy. PMID:19917085

  18. Analysis of natural killer cells in TAP2-deficient patients: expression of functional triggering receptors and evidence for the existence of inhibitory receptor(s) that prevent lysis of normal autologous cells.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Massimo; Zimmer, Jacques; Castriconi, Roberta; Hanau, Daniel; Donato, Lionel; Bottino, Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; de la Salle, Henri; Moretta, Alessandro

    2002-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by the ability to kill cells that lack HLA class I molecules while sparing autologous normal (HLA class I(+)) cells. However, patients with transporter-associated antigen processing (TAP) deficiency, though displaying strong reductions of HLA class I surface expression, in most instances do not experience NK-mediated autoimmune phenomena. A possible mechanism by which TAP(-/-) NK cells avoid autoreactivity against autologous HLA class I-deficient cells could be based on either quantitative or qualitative defects of surface receptors involved in NK cell triggering. In this study we show that NK cells derived from 2 patients with TAP2(-/-) express normal levels of all known triggering receptors. As revealed by the analysis of polyclonal and clonal NK cells, these receptors display normal functional capabilities and allow the killing of a panel of NK-susceptible targets, including autologous B-LCLs. On the other hand, TAP2(-/-) NK cells were unable to kill either allogeneic (HLA class I(+)) or autologous (HLA class I(-) ) phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts even in the presence of anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibody. These data suggest that TAP2(-/-) NK cells express still unknown inhibitory receptor(s) capable of down-regulating the NK cell cytotoxicity on binding to surface ligand(s) expressed by T cell blasts. Functional analyses, both at the polyclonal and at the clonal level, are consistent with the concept that the putative inhibitory receptor is expressed by virtually all TAP2(-/-) NK cells, whereas it is present only in rare NK cells from healthy persons. Another possibility would be that TAP2(-/-) NK cells are missing a still unidentified triggering receptor involved in NK cell-mediated killing of PHA blasts.

  19. Growth suppression effect of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord on PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Maryam; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Immunosuppressive property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has great attraction in regenerative medicine especially when dealing with tissue damage involving immune reactions. The most attractive tissue sources of MSCs used in clinical applications are bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), and Wharton’s jelly (WJ) of human umbilical cord. The current study has compared immunomodulatory properties of human BM, AT, and WJ-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Three different types of human MSCs were isolated, cultured, and characterized by flow cytometry and differentiation potentials. The MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The proliferation of PBMCs was assessed by flow cytometry of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) stained cells and compared to each other and to the growth of PBMCs in the absence of MSCs. Additionally, the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system. Results: The proliferation of PBMCs reduced to 6.2, 7 and 15.4- fold in cultures with AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. When the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system, it was revealed that AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs caused growth reduction in PBMCs to 3, 8, and 8 -fold, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. Conclusion: These data collectively conclude that the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs, which may mostly carry out through direct cell to cell contact, are different between various sources. Accordingly results of this study may contribute to the application of these cells in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:27081458

  20. Induction and repair of DNA damage measured by the comet assay in human T lymphocytes separated by immunomagnetic cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2014-11-01

    The comet assay is widely used in human biomonitoring to measure DNA damage in whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a marker of exposure to genotoxic agents. Cytogenetic assays with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured T lymphocytes are also frequently performed in human biomonitoring. Cytogenetic effects (micronuclei, chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges) may be induced in vivo but also occur ex vivo during the cultivation of lymphocytes as a consequence of DNA damage present in lymphocytes at the time of sampling. To better understand whether DNA damage measured by the comet assay in PBMC is representative for DNA damage in T cells, we comparatively investigated DNA damage and its repair in PBMC and T cells obtained by immunomagnetic cell sorting. PBMC cultures and T cell cultures were exposed to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action and DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after the end of a 2h exposure and after 18h post-incubation. The mutagens tested were methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), (±)-anti-B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), styrene oxide and potassium bromate. MMS and potassium bromate were also tested by the modified comet assay with formamido pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) protein. The results indicate that the mutagens tested induce DNA damage in PBMC and T cells in the same range of concentrations and removal of induced DNA lesions occurs to a comparable extent. Based on these results, we conclude that the comet assay with PBMC is suited to predict DNA damage and its removal in T cells.

  1. Inhibition of T-cell antigen receptor-mediated transmembrane signaling by protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R T; Ho, S N; Barna, T J; Rusovick, K M; McKean, D J

    1988-01-01

    The murine T-lymphoma cell line LBRM-33 is known to require synergistic signals delivered through the antigen receptor (Ti-CD3) complex, together with interleukin 1 (IL-1), for activation of IL-2 gene expression and IL-2 production. Although 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was capable of replacing IL-1 as an activating stimulus under certain conditions, biologic studies indicated that TPA failed to synergize with Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli under conditions in which IL-1 was clearly active. Acute exposure to TPA and other active phorbol esters resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of the increases in phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration stimulated by phytohemagglutinin or anti-Ti antibodies. TPA treatment induced no direct alteration of phospholipase C enzymatic activities in LBRM-33 cells. In contrast, both Ti-CD3 cross-linkage and TPA rapidly stimulated the phosphorylation of identical CD3 complex polypeptides, presumably via activation of protein kinase C. Exposure of LBRM-33 cells to TPA resulted in a time-dependent, partial down-regulation of surface Ti-CD3 expression. Thus, TPA treatment inhibited the responsiveness of LBRM-33 cells to Ti-CD3-dependent stimuli by inducing an early desensitization of Ti-CD3 receptors, followed by a decrease in membrane receptor expression. These studies indicate that phorbol esters deliver bidirectional signals that both inhibit Ti-CD3-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis and augment IL-2 production in LBRM-33 cells. Images PMID:2977423

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) essential oil on immune cells: mitogen-activated splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yousofi, Alireza; Daneshmandi, Saeed; Soleimani, Neda; Bagheri, Kambiz; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-04-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) has been traditionally used for the treatment of allergy, autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. The present study aims to investigate the suppressive effects of parsley essential oil on mouse splenocytes and macrophages cells. Parsley essential oil was harvested. It was treated on splenocytes and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/mL) activated splenocytes in different concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL); then, proliferation was assayed by methyl tetrazolium (MTT) method. Treatment was also performed on the macrophages and LPS-stimulated macrophages (10 μg/ml) and the nitrite levels were measured using the diazotization method based on the Griess reaction and MTT assay for evaluation of the viability of the macrophages. Proliferation of splenocytes in all the treated groups was suppressed. In PHA-stimulated splenocytes, the suppression was seen in all the examined concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL), while in the unstimulated and LPS-stimulated groups suppression was relatively dose dependent and in high concentration (10 and100 μg/mL).The viability of the macrophages in all groups was the same and in the unstimulated groups; NO suppression was significant in all the concentrations but in LPS-stimulated groups, it was significant in the three higher concentrations (1, 10, and100 μg/mL). The results of this study indicate that parsley essential oil may be able to suppress the cellular and humoral immune response. It can also suppress both NO production and the functions of macrophages as the main innate immune cells. These results may suggest that parsley essential oil is a proper suppressant for different applications.