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Sample records for phytophthora infestans sporangia

  1. Survival potential of Phytophthora infestans sporangia in relation to meteorological factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of meteorological factors coupled with sporangia survival curves may enhance effective management of potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. We utilized a non-parametric density estimation approach to evaluate the cumulative probability of occurrence of temperature and relat...

  2. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m−3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m−3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network. PMID:26301826

  3. Infection Efficiency of Four Phytophthora infestans Clonal Lineages and DNA-Based Quantification of Sporangia.

    PubMed

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Tremblay, David Mathieu; Gobeil-Richard, Mélanie; Couillard, Julie; Rocheleau, Hélène; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Lévesque, Camile André; Beaulieu, Carole; Carisse, Odile

    2015-01-01

    The presence and abundance of pathogen inoculum is with host resistance and environmental conditions a key factor in epidemic development. Therefore, several spore-sampling devices have been proposed to monitor pathogen inoculum above fields. However, to make spore sampling more reliable as a management tool and to facilitate its adoption, information on infection efficiency and molecular tools for estimating airborne sporangia concentration are needed. Experiments were thus undertaken in a growth chamber to study the infection efficiency of four clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24) by measuring the airborne sporangia concentration and resulting disease intensity. The relationship between the airborne sporangia concentration and the number of lesions per leaf was exponential. For the same concentration, the sporangia of US-23 caused significantly more lesions than the sporangia of the other clonal lineages did. Under optimal conditions, an airborne sporangia concentration of 10 sporangia m-3 for US-23 was sufficient to cause one lesion per leaf, whereas for the other clonal lineages, it took 15 to 25 sporangia m-3 to reach the same disease intensity. However, in terms of diseased leaf area, there was no difference between clonal lineages US-8, US-23 and US-24. Also, a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tool was developed to quantify P. infestans airborne sporangia with detection sensitivity of one sporangium. The specificity of the qPCR assay was rigorously tested for airborne inoculum and was either similar to, or an improvement on, other published PCR assays. This assay allows rapid and reliable detection and quantification of P. infestans airborne sporangia and thereby, facilitates the implementation of spores-sampling network.

  4. GK4, a G-protein-coupled receptor with a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase domain in Phytophthora infestans, is involved in sporangia development and virulence.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Meijer, Harold J G; de Keijzer, Jeroen; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yuanchao; Govers, Francine

    2013-04-01

    For dispersal and host infection plant pathogens largely depend on asexual spores. Pathogenesis and sporulation are complex processes that are governed by cellular signalling networks including G-protein and phospholipid signalling. Oomycetes possess a family of novel proteins called GPCR-PIPKs (GKs) that are composed of a seven-transmembrane spanning (7-TM) domain fused to a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) domain. Based on this domain structure GKs are anticipated to link G-protein and phospholipid signal pathways; however, their functions are currently unknown. Expression analyses of the 12 GK genes in Phytophthora infestans and their orthologues in Phytophthora sojae, revealed differential expression during asexual development. PiGK1 and PiGK4 were fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP) and ectopically expressed in P. infestans. In growing hyphae different subcellular distribution patterns were observed indicating that these two GKs act independently during development. We focused on the functional analyses of PiGK4. Its localization suggested involvement in cell differentiation and elongation and its 7-TM domain showed a canonical GPCR membrane topology. Silencing of GK4 and overexpression of full-length and truncated constructs in P. infestans revealed that PiGK4 is not only involved in spore germination and hyphal elongation but also in sporangia cleavage and infection.

  5. Characterization of Phytophthora infestans resistance to mefenoxam using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, A; Cohen, Y; Shufan, E; Ben-Naim, Y; Mordechai, S; Salman, A; Huleihel, M

    2014-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans) is the causal agent of late blight in potato and tomato. This pathogen devastated the potato crops in Ireland more than a century years ago and is still causing great losses worldwide. Although fungicides controlling P. infestans have been used successfully for almost 100 years, some isolates have developed resistance to most common fungicides. Identification and characterization of these resistant isolates is required for better control of the disease. Current methods that are based on microbiological and molecular techniques are both expensive and time consuming. Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) is an inexpensive and reagent-free technique that provides accurate results in only a few minutes. In this study the infrared absorption spectra of the sporangia of P. infestans were measured to evaluate the potential of FTIR spectroscopy in tandem with multivariate analysis in order to classify those sporangia into those that were resistant and those that were non-resistant to the phenylamide fungicide mefenoxam. Based on individual measurements, our results show that FTIR spectroscopy enables classification of P. infestans isolates into mefenoxam resistant and mefenoxam non-resistant types with specificity of 81.9% and sensitivity of 75.5%. Using average spectra per leaf, it was possible to improve the classification results to 88% sensitivity and 95% specificity.

  6. Myb transcription factors and light regulate sporulation in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qijun; Judelson, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle progression in eukaryotic microbes is often influenced by environment. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, which causes late blight on potato and tomato, sporangia have been reported to form mostly at night. By growing P. infestans under different light regimes at constant temperature and humidity, we show that light contributes to the natural pattern of sporulation by delaying sporulation until the following dark period. However, illumination does not permanently block sporulation or strongly affect the total number of sporangia that ultimately form. Based on measurements of sporulation-induced genes such as those encoding protein kinase Pks1 and Myb transcription factors Myb2R1 and Myb2R3, it appears that most spore-associated transcripts start to rise four to eight hours before sporangia appear. Their mRNA levels oscillate with the light/dark cycle and increase with the amount of sporangia. An exception to this pattern of expression is Myb2R4, which is induced several hours before the other genes and declines after cultures start to sporulate. Transformants over-expressing Myb2R4 produce twice the number of sporangia and ten-fold higher levels of Myb2R1 mRNA than wild-type, and chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Myb2R4 binds the Myb2R1 promoter in vivo. Myb2R4 thus appears to be an early regulator of sporulation. We attempted to silence eight Myb genes by DNA-directed RNAi, but succeeded only with Myb2R3, which resulted in suppressed sporulation. Ectopic expression studies of seven Myb genes revealed that over-expression frequently impaired vegetative growth, and in the case of Myb3R6 interfered with sporangia dormancy. We observed that the degree of silencing induced by a hairpin construct was correlated with its copy number, and ectopic expression was often unstable due to epigenetic silencing and transgene excision.

  7. MiR1918 enhances tomato sensitivity to Phytophthora infestans infection

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yushi; Cui, Jun; Wang, Weichen; Meng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Late blight of tomato is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In our previous work, we identified and characterized a miR1918 in P. infestans (pi-miR1918), and showed that its sequence is similar to the sequence of tomato miR1918 (sly-miR1918). In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana pre-miR159a as a backbone to synthesize pi-miR1918 via PCR and mutagenesis. The artificial pi-miR1918 was used to investigate the role of miR1918 in tomato-P. infestans interaction. Trangenic tomato plants that overexpressed the artificial pi-miR1918 displayed more serious disease symptoms than wild-type tomato plants after infection with P. infestans, as shown by increased number of necrotic cells, lesion sizes and number of sporangia per leaf. The target genes of pi-miR1918 and sly-miR1918 were also predicted for tomato and P. infestans, respectively. qPCR analysis of these targets also performed during tomato-P. infestans interaction. The expression of target gene, RING finger were negatively correlated with miR1918 in the all Lines of transgenic tomato plants. In addition, we used the 5′ RACE to determine the cleavage site of miR1918 to RING finger. These results suggested that miR1918 might be involved in the silencing of target genes, thereby enhancing the susceptibility of tomato to P. infestans infection. PMID:27779242

  8. MiR1918 enhances tomato sensitivity to Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yushi; Cui, Jun; Wang, Weichen; Meng, Jun

    2016-10-25

    Late blight of tomato is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In our previous work, we identified and characterized a miR1918 in P. infestans (pi-miR1918), and showed that its sequence is similar to the sequence of tomato miR1918 (sly-miR1918). In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana pre-miR159a as a backbone to synthesize pi-miR1918 via PCR and mutagenesis. The artificial pi-miR1918 was used to investigate the role of miR1918 in tomato-P. infestans interaction. Trangenic tomato plants that overexpressed the artificial pi-miR1918 displayed more serious disease symptoms than wild-type tomato plants after infection with P. infestans, as shown by increased number of necrotic cells, lesion sizes and number of sporangia per leaf. The target genes of pi-miR1918 and sly-miR1918 were also predicted for tomato and P. infestans, respectively. qPCR analysis of these targets also performed during tomato-P. infestans interaction. The expression of target gene, RING finger were negatively correlated with miR1918 in the all Lines of transgenic tomato plants. In addition, we used the 5' RACE to determine the cleavage site of miR1918 to RING finger. These results suggested that miR1918 might be involved in the silencing of target genes, thereby enhancing the susceptibility of tomato to P. infestans infection.

  9. Characterization of Phytophthora infestans isolates from Jersey, Channel Islands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato production on the island of Jersey, in the English Channel, is dominated by Jersey Royal, a selection of the early cultivar Royal Kidney. Jersey Royal is very susceptible to Phytophthora infestans, the cause of potato late blight, and Jersey’s climate is frequently conducive to infection. Dur...

  10. Validation of a tuber blight (Phytophthora infestans) prediction model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber blight caused by Phytophthora infestans accounts for significant losses in storage. There is limited published quantitative data on predicting tuber blight. We validated a tuber blight prediction model developed in New York with cultivars Allegany, NY 101, and Katahdin using independent...

  11. Variation in Capsidiol Sensitivity between Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici Is Consistent with Their Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Schornack, Sebastian; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Haart, Dave; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Faraldos, Juan A.; Kamoun, Sophien; O’Maille, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants protect themselves against a variety of invading pathogenic organisms via sophisticated defence mechanisms. These responses include deployment of specialized antimicrobial compounds, such as phytoalexins, that rapidly accumulate at pathogen infection sites. However, the extent to which these compounds contribute to species-level resistance and their spectrum of action remain poorly understood. Capsidiol, a defense related phytoalexin, is produced by several solanaceous plants including pepper and tobacco during microbial attack. Interestingly, capsidiol differentially affects growth and germination of the oomycete pathogens Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study we revisited the differential effect of capsidiol on P. infestans and P. capsici, using highly pure capsidiol preparations obtained from yeast engineered to express the capsidiol biosynthetic pathway. Taking advantage of transgenic Phytophthora strains expressing fluorescent markers, we developed a fluorescence-based method to determine the differential effect of capsidiol on Phytophtora growth. Using these assays, we confirm major differences in capsidiol sensitivity between P. infestans and P. capsici and demonstrate that capsidiol alters the growth behaviour of both Phytophthora species. Finally, we report intraspecific variation within P. infestans isolates towards capsidiol tolerance pointing to an arms race between the plant and the pathogens in deployment of defence related phytoalexins. PMID:25203155

  12. Variation in capsidiol sensitivity between Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici is consistent with their host range.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Schornack, Sebastian; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Haart, Dave; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Faraldos, Juan A; Kamoun, Sophien; O'Maille, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    Plants protect themselves against a variety of invading pathogenic organisms via sophisticated defence mechanisms. These responses include deployment of specialized antimicrobial compounds, such as phytoalexins, that rapidly accumulate at pathogen infection sites. However, the extent to which these compounds contribute to species-level resistance and their spectrum of action remain poorly understood. Capsidiol, a defense related phytoalexin, is produced by several solanaceous plants including pepper and tobacco during microbial attack. Interestingly, capsidiol differentially affects growth and germination of the oomycete pathogens Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora capsici, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study we revisited the differential effect of capsidiol on P. infestans and P. capsici, using highly pure capsidiol preparations obtained from yeast engineered to express the capsidiol biosynthetic pathway. Taking advantage of transgenic Phytophthora strains expressing fluorescent markers, we developed a fluorescence-based method to determine the differential effect of capsidiol on Phytophtora growth. Using these assays, we confirm major differences in capsidiol sensitivity between P. infestans and P. capsici and demonstrate that capsidiol alters the growth behaviour of both Phytophthora species. Finally, we report intraspecific variation within P. infestans isolates towards capsidiol tolerance pointing to an arms race between the plant and the pathogens in deployment of defence related phytoalexins.

  13. Five Reasons to Consider Phytophthora infestans a Reemerging Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Fry, W E; Birch, P R J; Judelson, H S; Grünwald, N J; Danies, G; Everts, K L; Gevens, A J; Gugino, B K; Johnson, D A; Johnson, S B; McGrath, M T; Myers, K L; Ristaino, J B; Roberts, P D; Secor, G; Smart, C D

    2015-07-01

    Phytophthora infestans has been a named pathogen for well over 150 years and yet it continues to "emerge", with thousands of articles published each year on it and the late blight disease that it causes. This review explores five attributes of this oomycete pathogen that maintain this constant attention. First, the historical tragedy associated with this disease (Irish potato famine) causes many people to be fascinated with the pathogen. Current technology now enables investigators to answer some questions of historical significance. Second, the devastation caused by the pathogen continues to appear in surprising new locations or with surprising new intensity. Third, populations of P. infestans worldwide are in flux, with changes that have major implications to disease management. Fourth, the genomics revolution has enabled investigators to make tremendous progress in terms of understanding the molecular biology (especially the pathogenicity) of P. infestans. Fifth, there remain many compelling unanswered questions.

  14. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana) and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum), all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, β-tubulin and Avr3a) and one mitochondrial (Cox1) region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a. PMID:21303555

  15. Limited Sexual Reproduction and Quick Turnover in the Population Genetic Structure of Phytophthora infestans in Fujian, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Qin, Chun-Fang; Shang, Li-Ping; Wang, Zong-Hua; Zhan, Jiasui

    2015-05-13

    The mating system plays an important role in the spatiotemporal dynamics of pathogen populations through both its direct and indirect impact on the generation and distribution of genetic variation. Here, we used a combination of microsatellite and phenotypic markers to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of genetic variation in Phytophthora infestans isolates collected from Fujian, China and to determine the role of sexual reproduction in the dynamics. Although the pathogen populations in this region were dominated by self-fertile genotypes, sexual reproduction only occurred occasionally and its contributions to the population genetic structure of P. infestans and epidemics of late blight in the region were limited. Only 49 genotypes were detected among the 534 isolates assayed and the pathogen populations displayed significant heterozygosity excess. Hierarchical analysis revealed that 21.42% of genetic variation was attributed to the difference among sampling years while only 4.45% was attributed to the difference among locations, suggesting temporal factors play a more important role in the population genetic dynamics of P. infestans than spatial factors in this region. We propose that clonal reproduction, combined with founder effects and long distance dispersal of sporangia, is responsible for the observed pattern of spatiotemporal dynamics in P. infestans.

  16. Natural occurrence of Phytophthora infestans on woody nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) in New York

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating pathogen of potato worldwide. Several strains of P.infestans are able to infect other cultivated and weed species of the family Solanaceae and cause symptoms similar to late blight on these hosts. Changes in P. infestans populations have stimu...

  17. The Loricrin-Like Protein (LLP) of Phytophthora infestans Is Required for Oospore Formation and Plant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ting; Wang, Xiao-Wen; Shan, Kun; Sun, Wenxian; Guo, Li-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Loricrin-like protein (LLP) is characterized by a high content of glycine residues and is a major component of plant cell wall. Here, we identified a Phytophthora infestans ortholog of plant LLP, named PiLLP. In P. infestans, PiLLP is strongly expressed in asexual and sexual developmental stages, including in sporangia, zoospores and germinating cysts, and during oospore formation, as well as in the early stages of infection and during hydrogen peroxide stress. Compared with the wild type, the PiLLP-silenced transformants were defective in oospore formation, had slower colony expansion rates, produced less sporangia with lower germination and zoospore-release rates, and were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, Nile red staining, and PiLLP-red fluorescent protein fusions indicated that PiLLP is involved in oogonia formation. The silenced transformants also had severely diminished virulence levels that could be partially restored with diphenyleneiodium treatments. The analysis of catalase activity showed a decrease of catalase activity in silenced transformants. Thus, PiLLP is important for sexual and asexual reproduction, and is required for oxidative stress tolerance and plant infection. PMID:28232841

  18. Efficacy of Fungicide Mixtures for Management of Phytophthora infestans (US-1) on Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicide application strategies (timing, frequency, rates and mixtures) are important for control and resistance management of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. The efficacy of systemic/protectant fungicide consisting of fenamidone + mancozeb, and propamocarb–HCL + mancozeb combination...

  19. Phytophthora infestans specific phosphorylation patterns and new putative control targets.

    PubMed

    Frades, Itziar; Andreasson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this study we applied biomathematical searches of gene regulatory mechanisms to learn more about oomycete biology and to identify new putative targets for pesticides or biological control against Phytophthora infestans. First, oomycete phylum-specific phosphorylation motifs were found by discriminative n-gram analysis. We found 11.600 P. infestans specific n-grams, mapping 642 phosphoproteins. The most abundant group among these related to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. Due to the large number of possible targets found and our hypothesis that multi-level control is a sign of usefulness as targets for intervention, we identified overlapping targets with a second screen. This was performed to identify proteins dually regulated by small RNA and phosphorylation. We found 164 proteins to be regulated by both sRNA and phosphorylation and the dominating functions where phosphatidylinositol signalling/metabolism, endocytosis, and autophagy. Furthermore we performed a similar regulatory study and discriminative n-gram analysis of proteins with no clear orthologs in other species and proteins that are known to be unique to P. infestans such as the RxLR effectors, Crinkler (CRN) proteins and elicitins. We identified CRN proteins with specific phospho-motifs present in all life stages. PITG_12626, PITG_14042 and PITG_23175 are CRN proteins that have species-specific phosphorylation motifs and are subject to dual regulation.

  20. Genome-wide prediction and functional validation of promoter motifs regulating gene expression in spore and infection stages of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sourav; Kagda, Meenakshi; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-03-01

    Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures). Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors.

  1. Understanding the molecular basis of the resistance of Phytophthora infestans to fungicides by functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of resistance to fungicides is a major concern in managing potato late blight disease caused by Phytophthora infestans. The problem is P. infestans is capable of sexual recombination contributing to increased strain variability and high adaptability that hastens the development of resis...

  2. An ephemeral sexual population of Phytophthora infestans in the northeastern United States and Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease, has been reported in North America since the mid-nineteenth century. In the United States the lack of or very limited sexual reproduction has resulted in largely clonal populations of P. infestans. In 2010 and 2011, but not in 2012 or ...

  3. Discovering the next generation of late blight resistance genes – can we battle Phytophthora infestans evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. RB from Solanum bulbocastanum encodes a CC-NB-LRR (CNL) protein that confers partial resistance to most P. infestans isolates through its recognition of the corresponding pathog...

  4. The genome sequence of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans is the most destructive pathogen of potato and a model organism for the oomycetes, a distinct lineage of fungus-like eukaryotes that are related to photosynthetic organisms such as brown algae and diatoms. Here, we report the genome sequence of P. infestans. The ~240 Mb genome...

  5. The effect of relative humidity on germination of Sporangia of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sporangia of three isolates of P. ramorum representing three different clonal lineages were subjected to relative humidity (RH) levels between 80 and 100% for exposure periods ranging from 1 to 24 h at 20°C in darkness. Airtight snap-lid plastic containers (21.5 x 14.5 x 5 cm) were used as humidity ...

  6. Activation of defense against Phytophthora infestans in potato by down-regulation of syntaxin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Landgraf, Ramona; Smolka, Ulrike; Schulze, Sebastian; Heilmann, Mareike; Heilmann, Ingo; Hause, Gerd; Rosahl, Sabine

    2012-03-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans is the causal agent of late blight, the most devastating disease of potato. The importance of vesicle fusion processes and callose deposition for defense of potato against Phytophthora infestans was analyzed. Transgenic plants were generated, which express RNA interference constructs targeted against plasma membrane-localized SYNTAXIN-RELATED 1 (StSYR1) and SOLUBLE N-ETHYLMALEIMIDE-SENSITIVE FACTOR ADAPTOR PROTEIN 33 (StSNAP33), the potato homologs of Arabidopsis AtSYP121 and AtSNAP33, respectively. Phenotypically, transgenic plants grew normally, but showed spontaneous necrosis and chlorosis formation at later stages. In response to infection with Phytophthora infestans, increased resistance of StSYR1-RNAi plants, but not StSNAP33-RNAi plants, was observed. This increased resistance correlated with the constitutive accumulation of salicylic acid and PR1 transcripts. Aberrant callose deposition in Phytophthora infestans-infected StSYR1-RNAi plants coincided with decreased papilla formation at penetration sites. Resistance against the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea was not significantly altered. Infiltration experiments with bacterial solutions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Escherichia coli revealed a hypersensitive phenotype of both types of RNAi lines. The enhanced defense status and the reduced growth of Phytophthora infestans on StSYR1-RNAi plants suggest an involvement of syntaxins in secretory defense responses of potato and, in particular, in the formation of callose-containing papillae.

  7. Aluminum induces cross-resistance of potato to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Drzewiecka, Kinga; Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Abramowski, Dariusz; Izbiańska, Karolina

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cross-resistance allows plants to acquire resistance to a broad range of stresses after previous exposure to one specific factor. Although this stress-response relationship has been known for decades, the sequence of events that underpin cross-resistance remains unknown. Our experiments revealed that susceptible potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Bintje) undergoing aluminum (Al) stress at the root level showed enhanced defense responses correlated with reduced disease symptoms after leaf inoculation with Phytophthora infestans. The protection capacity of Al to subsequent stress was associated with the local accumulation of H2O2 in roots and systemic activation of salicylic acid (SA) and nitric oxide (NO) dependent pathways. The most crucial Al-mediated changes involved coding of NO message in an enhanced S-nitrosothiol formation in leaves tuned with an abundant SNOs accumulation in the main vein of leaves. Al-induced distal NO generation was correlated with the overexpression of PR-2 and PR-3 at both mRNA and protein activity levels. In turn, after contact with a pathogen we observed early up-regulation of SA-mediated defense genes, e.g. PR1, PR-2, PR-3 and PAL, and subsequent disease limitation. Taken together Al exposure induced distal changes in the biochemical stress imprint, facilitating more effective responses to a subsequent pathogen attack.

  8. High genotypic diversity found among population of Phytophthora infestans collected in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Runno-Paurson, Eve; Kiiker, Riinu; Joutsjoki, Tiina; Hannukkala, Asko

    2016-03-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most important diseases of potato worldwide. This is the first study characterising Estonian P. infestans population using the SSR marker genotyping method. 70 P. infestans isolates collected during the growing season in 2004 from eight potato fields in three different regions of Estonia were characterised with nine polymorphic SSR markers. A1 and A2 mating type isolates were detected from every studied field indicating the high potential for sexual reproduction, which raises the genotypic diversity in P. infestans population. Results revealed highly diverse P. infestans population in Estonia resembling the Northern European populations. Most of the multilocus genotypes were detected only once among the collected isolates. Subpopulations collected from different geographical regions of Estonia showed no differentiation from each other but instead formed one highly diverse group.

  9. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern-Andean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop and economic losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato and, more recently, solanaceous fruit...

  10. Tuber blight development in potato cultivars in response to different genotypes of Phytophthora infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most devastating diseases in potatoes, causing significant loses under disease-conducive conditions. Migrations or introduction of new genotypes to a specific region impose a different set of criteria for consideration for potato gr...

  11. Testing taxonomic predictivity of foliar and tuber resistance to Phytophthora infestans in wild relatives of potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease found in potato growing regions worldwide. Long-term management strategies to control late blight include the incorporation of host resistance to predominant strains. However, due to rapid genet...

  12. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and continues to be the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of its elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repe...

  13. The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is a plant pathogen of historical dimension that remains one of the world’s most destructive crop diseases. Ever since its first global outbreak of the 1840s that culminated in the Great Famine in Ireland, late blight has been a majo...

  14. Survival potential of Phytophthora infestans in relation to environmental factors and late blight occurrence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is an important crop globally and late blight (Phytophthora infestans) often results in severe crop loss. The cost for late blight control can be in excess of $210 million in the United States. We utilized a non-parametric density distribution analysis of local temperature (Temp) and relative...

  15. Incidence of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary on potato and tomato in Maine, 2006-2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease globally. In Maine, we recorded late blight on potato and tomato during the 2006-2010 cropping seasons. From 2006 to 2008, over 90% of diseased samples were collected in potato fields from northern and central Aroostook County i...

  16. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite intensive breeding efforts, potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, remains a threat to potato production worldwide because newly evolved pathogen strains have overcome major resistance genes. The Rpi-blb1 gene (also known as RB), from the wild potato Sola...

  17. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  18. Enzimatic Activation Against (Phytophthora Infestans Mont., de Bary) in Solanum Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is assumed that resistance of wild Solanum species to Phytophthora infestans is multigenic on the basis of the exposure of such species to a wide range of pathogenic races of the oomycete. In order to quantify some enzymatic reactions in the host plants to the attack of the pathogen, three resist...

  19. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes.

    PubMed

    Goss, Erica M; Tabima, Javier F; Cooke, David E L; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E; Forbes, Gregory A; Fieland, Valerie J; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-06-17

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan's elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight.

  20. Genomic Characterization of a South American Phytophthora Hybrid Mandates Reassessment of the Geographic Origins of Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Michael D.; Vieira, Filipe G.; Ho, Simon Y.W.; Wales, Nathan; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Ristaino, Jean B.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    As the oomycete pathogen causing potato late blight disease, Phytophthora infestans triggered the famous 19th-century Irish potato famine and remains the leading cause of global commercial potato crop destruction. But the geographic origin of the genotype that caused this devastating initial outbreak remains disputed, as does the New World center of origin of the species itself. Both Mexico and South America have been proposed, generating considerable controversy. Here, we readdress the pathogen’s origins using a genomic data set encompassing 71 globally sourced modern and historical samples of P. infestans and the hybrid species P. andina, a close relative known only from the Andean highlands. Previous studies have suggested that the nuclear DNA lineage behind the initial outbreaks in Europe in 1845 is now extinct. Analysis of P. andina’s phased haplotypes recovered eight haploid genome sequences, four of which represent a previously unknown basal lineage of P. infestans closely related to the famine-era lineage. Our analyses further reveal that clonal lineages of both P. andina and historical P. infestans diverged earlier than modern Mexican lineages, casting doubt on recent claims of a Mexican center of origin. Finally, we use haplotype phasing to demonstrate that basal branches of the clade comprising Mexican samples are occupied by clonal isolates collected from wild Solanum hosts, suggesting that modern Mexican P. infestans diversified on Solanum tuberosum after a host jump from a wild species and that the origins of P. infestans are more complex than was previously thought. PMID:26576850

  1. Genomic Characterization of a South American Phytophthora Hybrid Mandates Reassessment of the Geographic Origins of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael D; Vieira, Filipe G; Ho, Simon Y W; Wales, Nathan; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Ristaino, Jean B; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2016-02-01

    As the oomycete pathogen causing potato late blight disease, Phytophthora infestans triggered the famous 19th-century Irish potato famine and remains the leading cause of global commercial potato crop destruction. But the geographic origin of the genotype that caused this devastating initial outbreak remains disputed, as does the New World center of origin of the species itself. Both Mexico and South America have been proposed, generating considerable controversy. Here, we readdress the pathogen's origins using a genomic data set encompassing 71 globally sourced modern and historical samples of P. infestans and the hybrid species P. andina, a close relative known only from the Andean highlands. Previous studies have suggested that the nuclear DNA lineage behind the initial outbreaks in Europe in 1845 is now extinct. Analysis of P. andina's phased haplotypes recovered eight haploid genome sequences, four of which represent a previously unknown basal lineage of P. infestans closely related to the famine-era lineage. Our analyses further reveal that clonal lineages of both P. andina and historical P. infestans diverged earlier than modern Mexican lineages, casting doubt on recent claims of a Mexican center of origin. Finally, we use haplotype phasing to demonstrate that basal branches of the clade comprising Mexican samples are occupied by clonal isolates collected from wild Solanum hosts, suggesting that modern Mexican P. infestans diversified on Solanum tuberosum after a host jump from a wild species and that the origins of P. infestans are more complex than was previously thought.

  2. SNP-based differentiation of Phytophthora infestans clonal lineages using locked nucleic acid probes and high resolution melt analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of the devastating late blight disease of potato and tomato, exhibits a clonal reproductive lifestyle in North America. Phenotypes such as fungicide sensitivity and host preference are conserved among individuals within clonal lineages, while substantial phenotypic ...

  3. An Andean origin of Phytophthora infestans inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Alpizar, Luis; Carbone, Ignazio; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2007-02-27

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary caused the 19th century Irish Potato Famine. We assessed the genealogical history of P. infestans using sequences from portions of two nuclear genes (beta-tubulin and Ras) and several mitochondrial loci P3, (rpl14, rpl5, tRNA) and P4 (Cox1) from 94 isolates from South, Central, and North America, as well as Ireland. Summary statistics, migration analyses and the genealogy of current populations of P. infestans for both nuclear and mitochondrial loci are consistent with an "out of South America" origin for P. infestans. Mexican populations of P. infestans from the putative center of origin in Toluca Mexico harbored less nucleotide and haplotype diversity than Andean populations. Coalescent-based genealogies of all loci were congruent and demonstrate the existence of two lineages leading to present day haplotypes of P. infestans on potatoes. The oldest lineage associated with isolates from the section Anarrhichomenun including Solanum tetrapetalum from Ecuador was identified as Phytophthora andina and evolved from a common ancestor of P. infestans. Nuclear and mitochondrial haplotypes found in Toluca Mexico were derived from only one of the two lineages, whereas haplotypes from Andean populations in Peru and Ecuador were derived from both lineages. Haplotypes found in populations from the U.S. and Ireland was derived from both ancestral lineages that occur in South America suggesting a common ancestry among these populations. The geographic distribution of mutations on the rooted gene genealogies demonstrate that the oldest mutations in P. infestans originated in South America and are consistent with a South American origin.

  4. Presence of the potato late blight resistance gene RB does not promote adaptive parasitism of phytophthora infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato gene Rpi-blb1, from the wild potato species S. bulbocastanum, confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to determine whether a single strain of P. infestans can adapt to overcome this partial resistance source, we subjected...

  5. Fungicide sensitivity of US genotypes of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary to six oomycete-targeted compounds.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary causes potato late blight, an important and costly disease of potato and tomato crops. The baseline sensitivity of recent clonal lineages of P. infestans was tested for six oomycete-targeted fungicides. Forty five isolates collected between 2004 and 2012 were t...

  6. Presence of the potato late blight resistance gene RB does not promote adaptive parasitism of phytophthora infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene RB is derived from the wild potato species S. bulbocastanum and confers partial resistance to late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In order to investigate whether a single strain of P. infestans can adapt to overcome this partial resistance source, we subject...

  7. Phenotypic variation within a clonal lineage of Phytophthora infestans infecting both tomato and potato in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Blandón-Díaz, J U; Widmark, A-K; Hannukkala, A; Andersson, B; Högberg, N; Yuen, J E

    2012-03-01

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary is a constraint to both potato and tomato crops in Nicaragua. The hypothesis that the Nicaraguan population of P. infestans is genotypically and phenotypically diverse and potentially subdivided based on host association was tested. A collection of isolates was analyzed using genotypic markers (microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA haplotype) and phenotypic markers (mating type, virulence, and fungicide sensitivity). The genotypic analysis revealed no polymorphism in 121 of 132 isolates of P. infestans tested. Only the Ia haplotype and the A2 mating type were detected. Most of the tested isolates were resistant to metalaxyl. The virulence testing showed variation among isolates of P. infestans. No evidence was found of population differentiation among potato and tomato isolates of P. infestans based on the genotypic and phenotypic analysis. We conclude that the Nicaraguan population of P. infestans consists of a single clonal lineage (NI-1) which belongs to the A2 mating type and the Ia mitochondrial DNA haplotype. Moreover, based on the markers used, this population of P. infestans does not resemble the population in countries from which potato seed is imported to Nicaragua or the population in neighboring countries. The data presented here indicate that the NI-1 clonal lineage is the primary pathogen on both potato and tomato, and its success on both host species is unique in a South American context.

  8. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans originated in central Mexico rather than the Andes

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Erica M.; Tabima, Javier F.; Cooke, David E. L.; Restrepo, Silvia; Fry, William E.; Forbes, Gregory A.; Fieland, Valerie J.; Cardenas, Martha; Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is a destructive plant pathogen best known for causing the disease that triggered the Irish potato famine and remains the most costly potato pathogen to manage worldwide. Identification of P. infestan’s elusive center of origin is critical to understanding the mechanisms of repeated global emergence of this pathogen. There are two competing theories, placing the origin in either South America or in central Mexico, both of which are centers of diversity of Solanum host plants. To test these competing hypotheses, we conducted detailed phylogeographic and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, which are suitable approaches to unraveling complex demographic histories. Our analyses used microsatellite markers and sequences of four nuclear genes sampled from populations in the Andes, Mexico, and elsewhere. To infer the ancestral state, we included the closest known relatives Phytophthora phaseoli, Phytophthora mirabilis, and Phytophthora ipomoeae, as well as the interspecific hybrid Phytophthora andina. We did not find support for an Andean origin of P. infestans; rather, the sequence data suggest a Mexican origin. Our findings support the hypothesis that populations found in the Andes are descendants of the Mexican populations and reconcile previous findings of ancestral variation in the Andes. Although centers of origin are well documented as centers of evolution and diversity for numerous crop plants, the number of plant pathogens with a known geographic origin are limited. This work has important implications for our understanding of the coevolution of hosts and pathogens, as well as the harnessing of plant disease resistance to manage late blight. PMID:24889615

  9. A novel class of elicitin-like genes from Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, S; Lindqvist, H; Govers, F

    1997-11-01

    Elicitins are a family of structurally related proteins that induce hypersensitive response in specific plant species. Two Phytophthora infestans cDNAs, inf2A and inf2B, potentially encoding novel elicitin-like proteins, were isolated from a cDNA library made from infected potato tissue. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic analyses of 19 elicitins and elicitin-like proteins from nine Phytophthora spp. and from Pythium vexans suggest that there are at least five distinct classes within the elicitin family.

  10. Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in somatic hybrids of Solanum nigrum L. and diploid potato.

    PubMed

    Zimnoch-Guzowska, E; Lebecka, R; Kryszczuk, A; Maciejewska, U; Szczerbakowa, A; Wielgat, B

    2003-06-01

    In breeding for resistance to late blight, ( Phytophthora infestans Mont. de Bary), an economically important disease affecting potatoes, the search for new sources of durable resistance includes the non-host wild Solanum species. The aim of this work was to evaluate the resistance to P. infestans in the somatic hybrids between S. nigrum L. and diploid potato clone ZEL-1136. Sixteen somatic hybrids, their fusion parents, and three standard potato cultivars were screened for resistance to P. infestans in two types of tests-on whole plants and detached leaves-with two highly aggressive and virulent isolates of P. infestans, US8 and MP322. In the whole plant assay, the foliage of the somatic hybrids showed no symptoms of infection, while the foliage of the potato fusion parent and the standard cultivars was infected with P. infestans. In the detached leaflet assay, the breaking-down of resistance of the S. nigrum L. parent and the variable response of individual hybrid clones were noted. Nine S. nigrum L. (+) ZEL-1136 hybrids showed a resistance that was significantly higher than that of S. nigrum, while six clones expressed a resistance to P. infestans similar to that of S. nigrum. The results confirm the effective transfer of late blight resistance of S. nigrum into its somatic hybrids with potato.

  11. Can silencing of transposons contribute to variation in effector gene expression in Phytophthora infestans?

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen; Vetukuri, Ramesh; Avrova, Anna; Dixelius, Christina

    2012-03-01

    Transposable elements are ubiquitous residents in eukaryotic genomes. Often considered to be genomic parasites, they can lead to dramatic changes in genome organization, gene expression, and gene evolution. The oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has evolved a genome organization where core biology genes are predominantly located in genome regions that have relatively few resident transposons. In contrast, disease effector-encoding genes are most frequently located in rapidly evolving genomic regions that are rich in transposons. P. infestans, as a eukaryote, likely uses RNA silencing to minimize the activity of transposons. We have shown that fusion of a short interspersed element (SINE) to an effector gene in P. infestans leads to the silencing of both the introduced fusion and endogenous homologous sequences. This is also likely to occur naturally in the genome of P. infestans, as transcriptional inactivation of effectors is known to occur, and over half of the translocated "RXLR class" of effectors are located within 2 kb of transposon sequences in the P. infestans genome. In this commentary, we review the diverse transposon inventory of P. infestans, its control by RNA silencing, and consequences for expression modulation of nearby effector genes in this economically important plant pathogen.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA assessment of Phytophthora infestans isolates from potato and tomato in Ethiopia reveals unexpected diversity.

    PubMed

    Shimelash, Daniel; Hussien, Temam; Fininsa, Chemeda; Forbes, Greg; Yuen, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) for P. infestans sampled from 513 foliar lesions of late blight found on potato and tomato in different regions of Ethiopia. Among the four reported mitochondrial haplotypes of Phytophthora infestans, Ia, Ib and IIb were detected in 93 % of the samples analyzed but the vast majority of these were Ia. The remaining 7 % represented a previously unreported haplotype. DNA sequencing of this new haplotype also confirmed a single base nucleotide substitution that resulted in loss of EcoRI restriction site and gain of two additional MspI sites in cox1 and atp1 genes, respectively. There were 28 polymorphic sites among all nucleotide sequences including five reference isolates. Sites with alignment gaps were observed in P4 with one nucleotide deletion in 11 Ethiopian isolates. None of the reference sequence produced frame-shifts, with the exception of the 3-nucleotide deletion in the P4 region by Phytophthora andina, a feature that can be used to distinguish the new Ethiopian isolates from P. andina. While a distinguishing molecular data presented here clearly separated them from P. infestans, 7 % of the isolates that share this feature formed an important component of the late blight pathogen causing disease on Solanum tuberosum in Ethiopia. Thus, these Ethiopian isolates could represent a novel Phytophthora species reported for the first time here.

  13. Salicylic acid is important for basal defense of Solanum tuberosum against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Halim, Vincentius A; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Altmann, Simone; Birschwilks, Mandy; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine

    2007-11-01

    The importance of the signaling compound salicylic acid for basal defense of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) against Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease, was assessed using transgenic NahG potato plants which are unable to accumulate salicylic acid. Although the size of lesions caused by P. infestans was not significantly different in wild-type and transgenic NahG plants, real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed a drastic enhancement of pathogen growth in potato plants depleted of salicylic acid. Increased susceptibility of NahG plants correlated with compromised callose formation and reduced early defense gene expression. NahG plants pretreated with the salicylic acid analog 2,6-dichloro-isonicotinic acid allowed pathogen growth to a similar extent as did wild-type plants, indicating that salicylic acid is an important compound required for basal defense of potato against P. infestans.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of Phytophthora andina, a new species from the highlands of Ecuador that is closely related to the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Alpizar, Luis; Hu, Chia-Hui; Oliva, Ricardo; Forbes, Gregory; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of Phytophthora infestans sensu lato in the Andean highlands of South America were examined. Three clonal lineages (US-1, EC-1, EC-3) and one heterogeneous lineage (EC-2) were found in association with different host species in genus Solanum. The EC-2 lineage includes two mitochondrial (mtDNA) haplotypes, Ia and Ic. Isolates of P. infestans sensu lato EC-2 fit the morphological description of P. infestans but are different from any genotypes of P. infestans described to date. All isolates of P. infestans sensu lato from Ecuador were amplified by a P. infestans specific primer (PINF), and restriction fragment length patterns were identical in isolates amplified with ITS primers 4 and 5. The EC-1 clonal lineage of P. infestans sensu lato from S. andreanum, S. columbianum, S. paucijugum, S. phureja, S. regularifolium, S. tuberosum and S. tuquerense was confirmed to be P. infestans based on sequences of the cytochrome oxidase I (cox I) gene and intron 1 of ras gene. The EC-2 isolates with the Ic haplotype formed a distinct branch in the same clade with P. infestans and P. mirabilis, P. phaseoli and P. ipomoeae for both cox I and ras intron 1 phylogenies and were identified as the newly described species P. andina. Ras intron 1 sequence data suggests that P. andina might have arisen via hybridization between P. infestans and P. mirabilis.

  15. Contrasting Potato Foliage and Tuber Defense Mechanisms against the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Bradeen, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. When inoculated with P. infestans, foliage of nontransformed ‘Russet Burbank’ (WT) develops late blight disease while that of transgenic ‘Russet Burbank’ line SP2211 (+RB) does not. We compared the foliar transcriptome responses of these two lines to P. infestans inoculation using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 515 million paired end RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of 29,970 genes. We also compared the differences and similarities of defense mechanisms against P. infestans in potato foliage and tubers. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins were identified to show similarities and differences in foliage and tuber defense mechanisms. Our results suggest that R gene dosage and shared biochemical pathways (such as ethylene and stress bins) contribute to RB-mediated incompatible potato-P. infestans interactions in both the foliage and tubers. Certain ontology bins such as cell wall and lipid metabolisms are potentially organ-specific. PMID:27441721

  16. Structural and functional profile of the carbohydrate esterase gene complement in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D; McWalters, Jessica; Seyer, Lauren

    2010-12-01

    The plant cell cuticle is the first obstacle for penetration of the host by plant pathogens. To breach this barrier, most pathogenic fungi employ a complex assortment of cell wall-degrading enzymes including carbohydrate esterases, glycoside hydrolases, and polysaccharide lyases. We characterized the full complement of carbohydrate esterase-coding genes in three Phytophthora species and analyzed the expression of cutinase in vitro and in planta; we also determined the cutinase allele distribution in multiple isolates of P. infestans. Our investigations revealed that there are 49, 21, and 37 esterase homologs in the P. infestans, P. ramorum, and P. sojae genomes, respectively, with a considerable number predicted to be extracellular. Four cutinase gene copies were found in both the P. infestans and P. ramorum genomes, while 16 copies were found in P. sojae. Transcriptional analyses of cutinase in P. infestans revealed that its expression level during infection is significantly upregulated at all time points compared to that of the same gene in mycelium grown in vitro. Expression achieves maximum values at 15 hpi, declining at subsequent time points. These results may suggest, therefore, that cutinase most likely plays a role in P. infestans pathogenicity.

  17. bZIP Transcription Factors in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans with Novel DNA-Binding Domains Are Involved in Defense against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs. PMID:23975888

  18. bZIP transcription factors in the oomycete phytophthora infestans with novel DNA-binding domains are involved in defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs.

  19. Arabidopsis late blight: infection of a nonhost plant by Albugo laibachii enables full colonization by Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Khaoula; Cano, Liliana M; Prince, David C; Kemen, Ariane; Yoshida, Kentaro; Dagdas, Yasin F; Etherington, Graham J; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; van Esse, H Peter; Jones, Jonathan D G; Kamoun, Sophien; Schornack, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans causes potato late blight, and as a potato and tomato specialist pathogen, is seemingly poorly adapted to infect plants outside the Solanaceae. Here, we report the unexpected finding that P. infestans can infect Arabidopsis thaliana when another oomycete pathogen, Albugo laibachii, has colonized the host plant. The behaviour and speed of P. infestans infection in Arabidopsis pre-infected with A. laibachii resemble P. infestans infection of susceptible potato plants. Transcriptional profiling of P. infestans genes during infection revealed a significant overlap in the sets of secreted-protein genes that are induced in P. infestans upon colonization of potato and susceptible Arabidopsis, suggesting major similarities in P. infestans gene expression dynamics on the two plant species. Furthermore, we found haustoria of A. laibachii and P. infestans within the same Arabidopsis cells. This Arabidopsis-A. laibachii-P. infestans tripartite interaction opens up various possibilities to dissect the molecular mechanisms of P. infestans infection and the processes occurring in co-infected Arabidopsis cells.

  20. Changes in oxylipin synthesis after Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaves do not correlate with resistance.

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Rojas-Beltran, Jorge; Dupuis, Brice; Delaplace, Pierre; Frettinger, Patrick; Gosset, Virginie; du Jardin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Oxylipins constitute a class of molecules notably involved in host-pathogen interactions. In the potato-Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) De Barry (P. infestans) relationships, the role of colneleic and colnelenic acids, two oxylipins resulting from the consecutive action of lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.12) and divinyl ether synthase (EC 1.-) on respectively linoleic and linolenic acids have been previously reported. In the present paper, five potato cultivars with contrasting resistance to P. infestans were submitted to infection. Lipoxygenase pathway response was studied at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. A Northern blot preliminary study revealed that lipoxygenase (lox1 and lox3) and divinyl ether synthase genes were clearly up-regulated 96h after leaf inoculation with P. infestans. Profiling of free and esterified oxylipins performed 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h after inoculation, showed that esterified oxylipins are mainly produced with 9-derivatives in higher concentrations (esterified forms of colnelenic acid, 9-hydroxy octadecatrienoic acid, 9-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid). Oxylipin accumulation is undetectable 24h after infection, slightly detectable after 48h, reaching highest concentrations after 96h. Cultivars show slightly different oxylipin profiles but the concentration of individual oxylipins differs markedly 96h after infection. No correlation was found between P. infestans resistance levels and oxylipin synthesis rates or concentration. To assess local and systemic effects of colneleic acid application before P. infestans infection, Bintje cultivar was sprayed with colneleic acid 72h before inoculation. Both application modes (local and systemic) resulted in lipoxygenase pathway activation without affecting the resistance level to the pathogen.

  1. The Irish Potato Famine Pathogen Phytophthora infestans Translocates the CRN8 Kinase into Host Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Damme, Mireille; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Cakir, Cahid; Schornack, Sebastian; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, secrete an arsenal of effector proteins that modulate plant innate immunity to enable infection. We describe CRN8, a host-translocated effector of P. infestans that has kinase activity in planta. CRN8 is a modular protein of the CRN effector family. The C-terminus of CRN8 localizes to the host nucleus and triggers cell death when the protein is expressed in planta. Cell death induction by CRN8 is dependent on its localization to the plant nucleus, which requires a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS). The C-terminal sequence of CRN8 has similarity to a serine/threonine RD kinase domain. We demonstrated that CRN8 is a functional RD kinase and that its auto-phosphorylation is dependent on an intact catalytic site. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CRN8 forms a dimer or multimer. Heterologous expression of CRN8 in planta resulted in enhanced virulence by P. infestans. In contrast, in planta expression of the dominant-negative CRN8R469A;D470A resulted in reduced P. infestans infection, further implicating CRN8 in virulence. Overall, our results indicate that similar to animal parasites, plant pathogens also translocate biochemically active kinase effectors inside host cells. PMID:22927814

  2. Toxicity of metalaxyl, azoxystrobin, dimethomorph, cymoxanil, zoxamide and mancozeb to Phytophthora infestans isolates from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Rekanović, Emil; Potočnik, Ivana; Milijašević-Marčić, Svetlana; Stepanović, Miloš; Todorović, Biljana; Mihajlović, Milica

    2012-01-01

    A study of the in vitro sensitivity of 12 isolates of Phytophthora infestans to metalaxyl, azoxystrobin, dimethomorph, cymoxanil, zoxamide and mancozeb, was conducted. The isolates derived from infected potato leaves collected at eight different localities in Serbia during 2005-2007. The widest range of EC(50) values for mycelial growth of the isolates was recorded for metalaxyl. They varied from 0.3 to 3.9 μg mL(-1) and were higher than those expected in a susceptible population of P. infestans. The EC(50) values of the isolates were 0.16-0.30 μg mL(-1) for dimethomorph, 0.27-0.57 μg mL(-1) for cymoxanil, 0.0026-0.0049 μg mL(-1) for zoxamide and 2.9-5.0 μg mL(-1) for mancozeb. The results indicated that according to effective concentration (EC(50)) the 12 isolates of P. infestans were sensitive to azoxystrobin (0.019-0.074 μg mL(-1)), and intermediate resistant to metalaxyl, dimethomorph and cymoxanil. According to resistance factor, all P. infestans isolates were sensitive to dimethomorph, cymoxanil, mancozeb and zoxamide, 58.3% of isolates were sensitive to azoxystrobin and 50% to metalaxyl. Gout's scale indicated that 41.7% isolates were moderately sensitive to azoxystrobin and 50% to metalaxyl.

  3. Screening of novel microorganisms for biosurfactant and biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Sonica; Singh, B P; Lal, Mehi; Ma, Khan; Hussain, Touseef; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kaushik, S K; Kumar, Satish

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, 95 isolates of bacteria were tested for their biosurfactant as well as biocontrol activity against Phytophthora infestans. The results revealed that only 15.8% isolates showed biosurfactant activity. The emulsification index ranged from 0-68% and 24.2% isolates showed positive reaction for biosurfactant properties. In emulsification assay and oil spreading test, 18.95% and 5.26% isolates, respectively scored positive for biosurfactant production. Among all, only five isolates were found effective against P. infestans, for biocontrol properties. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-1 showed 62.22% inhibition zone after 72 hrs while P. aeruginosa-3 showed 46.42%. Forty-eight hrs old culture supernatants were highly effective in food-poisoning test, tuber slice test and detached leaf method against P. infestans. In whole potato plant test, bacterial cell based formulation, culture supernatant and bacterial cell suspension of P. aeruginosa-1 showed 10.42%, 9.94% and 17.96% diseases severity respectively, as against 53.96% in control. This isolate holds promise as biological control agent against P. infestans in field.

  4. Genotypic diversity and migration patterns of Phytophthora infestans in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Sjöholm, Lina; Andersson, Björn; Högberg, Nils; Widmark, Anna-Karin; Yuen, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    In this study we investigated the genotypic diversity and the migration patterns of Phytophthora infestans in the Nordic countries. Isolates of P. infestans from outbreaks in 43 fields sampled in 2008 were collected using stratified sampling with country, field, and disease foci as the different strata. Microsatellites were used as markers to determine the genotypic variation in the sampled material. The results show a high genotypic variation of P. infestans in the Nordic countries with most of the genotypes found only once among the collected isolates. The major part of the genotypic variation was observed within the fields, with low differentiation between the fields. The observed low association of alleles among loci is consistent with frequent sexual reproduction of P. infestans in the Nordic countries. Coalescence analyses did not support a single common population for the four countries, thus indicating some degree of geographic differentiation. The analyses of migration patterns showed differing levels of gene flow among the Nordic countries. No correlation between migration rates and geographical distance could be seen. This could be explained by different degrees of genetic similarity between the pathogen populations in the different countries.

  5. Profiling the secretome and extracellular proteome of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Mancuso, Francesco M; Espadas, Guadalupe; Seidl, Michael F; Chiva, Cristina; Govers, Francine; Sabidó, Eduard

    2014-08-01

    Oomycetes are filamentous organisms that cause notorious diseases, several of which have a high economic impact. Well known is Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight. Previously, in silico analyses of the genome and transcriptome of P. infestans resulted in the annotation of a large number of genes encoding proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide. This set is collectively referred to as the secretome and comprises proteins involved in, for example, cell wall growth and modification, proteolytic processes, and the promotion of successful invasion of plant cells. So far, proteomic profiling in oomycetes was primarily focused on subcellular, intracellular or cell wall fractions; the extracellular proteome has not been studied systematically. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of the in vivo secretome and extracellular proteome of P. infestans. We have used mass spectrometry to analyze P. infestans proteins present in seven different growth media with mycelial cultures and this resulted in the consistent identification of over two hundred proteins. Gene ontology classification pinpointed proteins involved in cell wall modifications, pathogenesis, defense responses, and proteolytic processes. Moreover, we found members of the RXLR and CRN effector families as well as several proteins lacking an obvious signal peptide. The latter were confirmed to be bona fide extracellular proteins and this suggests that, similar to other organisms, oomycetes exploit non-conventional secretion mechanisms to transfer certain proteins to the extracellular environment.

  6. The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans translocates the CRN8 kinase into host plant cells.

    PubMed

    van Damme, Mireille; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Cakir, Cahid; Schornack, Sebastian; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M E; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, secrete an arsenal of effector proteins that modulate plant innate immunity to enable infection. We describe CRN8, a host-translocated effector of P. infestans that has kinase activity in planta. CRN8 is a modular protein of the CRN effector family. The C-terminus of CRN8 localizes to the host nucleus and triggers cell death when the protein is expressed in planta. Cell death induction by CRN8 is dependent on its localization to the plant nucleus, which requires a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS). The C-terminal sequence of CRN8 has similarity to a serine/threonine RD kinase domain. We demonstrated that CRN8 is a functional RD kinase and that its auto-phosphorylation is dependent on an intact catalytic site. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CRN8 forms a dimer or multimer. Heterologous expression of CRN8 in planta resulted in enhanced virulence by P. infestans. In contrast, in planta expression of the dominant-negative CRN8(R469A;D470A) resulted in reduced P. infestans infection, further implicating CRN8 in virulence. Overall, our results indicate that similar to animal parasites, plant pathogens also translocate biochemically active kinase effectors inside host cells.

  7. Heterokaryotic nuclear conditions and a heterogeneous nuclear population are observed by flow cytometry in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Catal, Mursel; King, Louis; Tumbalam, Pavani; Wiriyajitsomboon, Prissana; Kirk, William W; Adams, Gerard C

    2010-08-01

    A simple and reliable method for preparation of whole nuclei of a common oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, is described for laser flow cytometry. The ease of preparation, the absence of detectable debris and aggregates, and the precision in determinations of DNA content per nucleus improve interpretation and understanding of the genetics of the organism. Phytophthora infestans is the pathogen that causes potato and tomato late blight. The genetic flexibility of P. infestans and other oomycete pathogens has complicated understanding of the mechanisms of variation contributing to shifts in race structure and virulence profiles on important agricultural crops. Significant phenotypic and genotypic changes are being reported in the apparent absence of sexual recombination in the field. Laser flow cytometry with propidium iodide is useful in investigating the nuclear condition of the somatic colony of field strains of P. infestans. The majority of the studied strains contain a single population of nuclei in nonreplicated diplophase. However, mean DNA content per nucleus varies considerably among isolates confirming the heterogeneity of the nuclear population in regard to C-value, for field isolates. Nuclear DNA content varies from 1.75x to 0.75x that of nuclei in a standard strain from central Mexico. Some strains contain two to three populations of nuclei with differing DNA contents in the mycelium and are heterokaryons. Such a range in DNA content suggests DNA-aneuploidy, but direct confirmation of aneuploidy will require microscopy of chromosomes. Heterokaryosis and populations of nuclei of differing DNA content necessarily confound standardized assays used worldwide in crop breeding programs for determination of race profiles and virulence phenotypes of this important pathogen.

  8. Genetic variation within clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans revealed through genotyping-by-sequencing, and implications for late blight epidemiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was performed on 257 Phytophthora infestans isolates belonging to four clonal lineages to study within-lineage diversity. The four lineages used in the study included US-8 (n=28), US-11 (n=27), US-23 (n=166), and US-24 (n=36), with isolates originating from 23 of the U...

  9. Determination of virulence contributions from Phytophthora infestans effectors IPI-O1 and IPI-O4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. Despite decades of intensive breeding efforts, it remains a threat to potato production worldwide, in part because newly evolved pathogen isolates quickly overcome major resista...

  10. Effectiveness of SIMBLIGHT1 and SIMPHYT1 models for predicting Phytophthora infestans in the Northeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate prediction of Phytophthora infestans outbreaks is crucial for effective late blight management. The SIMBLIGHT1, SIMPHYT1, and modified SIMPHYT1 models were assessed for predicting late blight outbreaks relative to the NOBLIGHT model using climatic data from field experiments at Presque Isle...

  11. Assessment of SIMBLIGHT1, SIMPHYT1, and NOBLIGHT models for predicting Phytophthora infestans in the northeastern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate prediction of Phytophthora infestans outbreaks is crucial for effective late blight management. The SIMBLIGHT1, SIMPHYT1, and modified SIMPHYT1 models were assessed for predicting late blight outbreaks relative to the NOBLIGHT model using climatic data from field experiments at Presque Isle...

  12. Effects of Mulch and Potato Hilling on Development of Foliar Blight (Phytophthora infestans) and Control of Tuber Blight Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar and tuber blight caused by Phytophthora infestans accounts for significant losses in potatoes in field and storage, however; limited research has documented the effect of cultural practices on late blight control. Field experiments were conducted for two years on Howard gravely loam soil in N...

  13. Plant-mediated gene silencing restricts growth of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sultana N; Åsman, Anna K M; Corcoran, Pádraic; Fogelqvist, Johan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Dixelius, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Phytophthora infestans is an oomycete that causes severe damage to potato, and is well known for its ability to evolve rapidly in order to overcome resistant potato varieties. An RNA silencing strategy was evaluated here to clarify if small interfering RNA homologous to selected genes in P. infestans could be targeted from the plant host to reduce the magnitude of the infection. As a proof-of-concept, a hairpin RNA (hp-RNA) construct using the GFP marker gene was designed and introduced in potato. At 72 hpi, a 55-fold reduction of the signal intensity of a corresponding GFP expressing P. infestans strain on leaf samples of transgenic plants, compared with wild-type potato, was detected. This suggests that an RNA interference construct in the potato host could be processed and target a transcript of the pathogen. Three genes important in the infection process of P. infestans, PiGPB1, PiCESA2, and PiPEC, together with PiGAPDH taking part in basic cell maintenance were subsequently tested using an analogous transgenic strategy. Out of these gene candidates, the hp-PiGPB1 targeting the G protein β-subunit (PiGPB1) important for pathogenicity resulted in most restricted disease progress. Further, Illumina sequencing of inoculated transgenic potato leaves revealed sRNAs of 24/25 nt size homologous to the PiGPB1 gene in the transgenic plants indicating post-transcriptional silencing of the target gene. The work demonstrates that a host-induced gene-silencing approach is functional against P. infestans but is highly dependent on target gene for a successful outcome. This finding broadens the arsenal of control strategies to this important plant disease.

  14. Signatures of selection and host-adapted gene expression of the Phytophthora infestans RNA silencing suppressor PSR2.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Sophie; von Dahlen, Janina K; Uhlmann, Constanze; Schnake, Anika; Kloesges, Thorsten; Rose, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is a devastating pathogen in agricultural systems. Recently, an RNA silencing suppressor (PSR2, 'Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2') has been described in P. infestans. PSR2 has been shown to increase the virulence of Phytophthora pathogens on their hosts. This gene is one of the few effectors present in many economically important Phytophthora species. In this study, we investigated: (i) the evolutionary history of PSR2 within and between species of Phytophthora; and (ii) the interaction between sequence variation, gene expression and virulence. In P. infestans, the highest PiPSR2 expression was correlated with decreased symptom expression. The highest gene expression was observed in the biotrophic phase of the pathogen, suggesting that PSR2 is important during early infection. Protein sequence conservation was negatively correlated with host range, suggesting host range as a driver of PSR2 evolution. Within species, we detected elevated amino acid variation, as observed for other effectors; however, the frequency spectrum of the mutations was inconsistent with strong balancing selection. This evolutionary pattern may be related to the conservation of the host target(s) of PSR2 and the absence of known corresponding R genes. In summary, our study indicates that PSR2 is a conserved effector that acts as a master switch to modify plant gene regulation early during infection for the pathogen's benefit. The conservation of PSR2 and its important role in virulence make it a promising target for pathogen management.

  15. Auto-aggregation in zoospores of Phytophthora infestans: the cooperative roles of bioconvection and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Savory, Andrew I M; Grenville-Briggs, Laura J; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Davidson, Fordyce A

    2014-05-06

    Phytophthora infestans is a highly destructive plant pathogen. It was the cause of the infamous Irish potato famine in the nineteenth century and remains to this day a significant global problem with associated costs estimated at $3 billion annually. Key to the success of this pathogen is the dispersal of free-swimming cells called zoospores. A poorly understood aspect of zoospore behaviour is auto-aggregation--the spontaneous formation of large-scale patterns in cell density. Current competing hypotheses suggest that these patterns are formed by one of two distinct mechanisms: chemotaxis and bioconvection. In this paper, we present mathematical and experimental results that together provide strong evidence that auto-aggregation can only result from a combination of these mechanisms, each having a distinct, time-separated role. A better understanding of the underlying infection mechanisms of P. infestans and potentially other Phytophthora species will in the longer term lead to advances in preventative treatment and thus potentially significant savings in socio-economic costs.

  16. Effect of Flumorph on F-Actin Dynamics in the Potato Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Kots, Kiki; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine; Meijer, Harold J G

    2015-04-01

    Oomycetes are fungal-like pathogens that cause notorious diseases. Protecting crops against oomycetes requires regular spraying with chemicals, many with an unknown mode of action. In the 1990s, flumorph was identified as a novel crop protection agent. It was shown to inhibit the growth of oomycete pathogens including Phytophthora spp., presumably by targeting actin. We recently generated transgenic Phytophthora infestans strains that express Lifeact-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), which enabled us to monitor the actin cytoskeleton during hyphal growth. For analyzing effects of oomicides on the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, the P. infestans Lifeact-eGFP strain is an excellent tool. Here, we confirm that flumorph is an oomicide with growth inhibitory activity. Microscopic analyses showed that low flumorph concentrations provoked hyphal tip swellings accompanied by accumulation of actin plaques in the apex, a feature reminiscent of tips of nongrowing hyphae. At higher concentrations, swelling was more pronounced and accompanied by an increase in hyphal bursting events. However, in hyphae that remained intact, actin filaments were indistinguishable from those in nontreated, nongrowing hyphae. In contrast, in hyphae treated with the actin depolymerizing drug latrunculin B, no hyphal bursting was observed but the actin filaments were completely disrupted. This difference demonstrates that actin is not the primary target of flumorph.

  17. A gene encoding a protein elicitor of Phytophthora infestans is down-regulated during infection of potato.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, S; van West, P; de Jong, A J; de Groot, K E; Vleeshouwers, V G; Govers, F

    1997-01-01

    Most species of the genus Phytophthora produce 10-kDa extracellular protein elicitors, collectively termed elicitins. Elicitins induce hypersensitive response in a restricted number of plants, particularly in the genus Nicotiana within the Solanaceae family. A cDNA encoding INF1, the major secreted elicitin of Phytophthora infestans, a pathogen of solanaceous plants, was isolated and characterized. The expression of the corresponding inf1 gene during the disease cycle of P. infestans was analyzed. inf1 was shown to be expressed in mycelium grown in various culture media, whereas it was not expressed in sporangiospores, zoospores, cysts, and germinating cysts. In planta, during infection of potato, particularly during the biotrophic stage, expression of inf1 was down-regulated compared to in vitro. The highest levels of expression of inf1 were observed in in vitro grown mycelium and in late stages of infection when profuse sporulation and leaf necrosis occur. The potential role of INF1 as an elicitor in interactions between P. infestans and Solanum species was investigated. Nineteen lines, representing nine solanaceous species with various levels of resistance to P. infestans, were tested for response to an Escherichia coli expressed INF1. Within the genus Solanum, resistance to P. infestans did not appear to be mediated by a defense response elicited by INF1. However, INF1 recognition could be a component of nonhost resistance of tobacco to P. infestans.

  18. A potato pathogenesis-related protein gene, StPRp27, contributes to race-nonspecific resistance against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolei; Tian, Zhendong; Liu, Jun; van der Vossen, Edwin A G; Xie, Conghua

    2012-02-01

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans is the most important disease of potato. Many efforts have been made to understand molecular mechanism of the durable resistance to address the challenge raised by rapid evolution of the pathogen. A pathogenesis related protein (PR) gene StPRp27 was previously isolated from the potato leaves challenged by P. infestans. The sequence analysis and expression pattern reveal that StPRp27 may be associated with resistance to P. infestans. In present research, transient expression of StPRp27 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced resistance to P. infestans isolates 99189 and PY23 indicating its potential contribution to the disease resistance. These findings were also confirmed by over-expression of StPRp27 in potato cv. E-potato 3, which significantly slowed down the development of the disease after inoculation with a mixture of P. infestans races. Further, silencing of StPRp27 homologous genes in N. benthamiana harboring dominant Phytophthora resistance gene Rpi-blb1 or Rpi-blb2 showed no effects on the resistance triggered by these R genes. Our results suggest that StPRp27 contributes to a race-nonspecific resistance against P. infestans by inhibiting the disease development and has a potential use in selection and breeding for durable resistance to late blight.

  19. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish potato famine pathogen, P. infestans.

    PubMed

    Goss, Erica M; Cardenas, Martha E; Myers, Kevin; Forbes, Gregory A; Fry, William E; Restrepo, Silvia; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging plant pathogens have largely been a consequence of the movement of pathogens to new geographic regions. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathogens is hybridization between individuals of different species or subspecies, which may allow rapid evolution and adaptation to new hosts or environments. Hybrid plant pathogens have traditionally been difficult to detect or confirm, but the increasing ease of cloning and sequencing PCR products now makes the identification of species that consistently have genes or alleles with phylogenetically divergent origins relatively straightforward. We investigated the genetic origin of Phytophthora andina, an increasingly common pathogen of Andean crops Solanum betaceum, S. muricatum, S. quitoense, and several wild Solanum spp. It has been hypothesized that P. andina is a hybrid between the potato late blight pathogen P. infestans and another Phytophthora species. We tested this hypothesis by cloning four nuclear loci to obtain haplotypes and using these loci to infer the phylogenetic relationships of P. andina to P. infestans and other related species. Sequencing of cloned PCR products in every case revealed two distinct haplotypes for each locus in P. andina, such that each isolate had one allele derived from a P. infestans parent and a second divergent allele derived from an unknown species that is closely related but distinct from P. infestans, P. mirabilis, and P. ipomoeae. To the best of our knowledge, the unknown parent has not yet been collected. We also observed sequence polymorphism among P. andina isolates at three of the four loci, many of which segregate between previously described P. andina clonal lineages. These results provide strong support that P. andina emerged via hybridization between P. infestans and another unknown Phytophthora species also belonging to Phytophthora clade 1c.

  20. Phytophthora infestans effector AVRblb2 prevents secretion of a plant immune protease at the haustorial interface

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Schornack, Sebastian; Win, Joe; Shindo, Takayuki; Ilyas, Muhammad; Oliva, Ricardo; Cano, Liliana M.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Huitema, Edgar; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2011-01-01

    In response to pathogen attack, plant cells secrete antimicrobial molecules at the site of infection. However, how plant pathogens interfere with defense-related focal secretion remains poorly known. Here we show that the host-translocated RXLR-type effector protein AVRblb2 of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans focally accumulates around haustoria, specialized infection structures that form inside plant cells, and promotes virulence by interfering with the execution of host defenses. AVRblb2 significantly enhances susceptibility of host plants to P. infestans by targeting the host papain-like cysteine protease C14 and specifically preventing its secretion into the apoplast. Plants altered in C14 expression were significantly affected in susceptibility to P. infestans in a manner consistent with a positive role of C14 in plant immunity. Our findings point to a unique counterdefense strategy that plant pathogens use to neutralize secreted host defense proteases. Effectors, such as AVRblb2, can be used as molecular probes to dissect focal immune responses at pathogen penetration sites. PMID:22143776

  1. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-01-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15 : 1, 9 : 7 or 3 : 1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability. PMID:24889686

  2. Multiple recognition of RXLR effectors is associated with nonhost resistance of pepper against Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Shin-Young; Oh, Sang-Keun; Yeom, Seon-In; Kim, Saet-Byul; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kamoun, Sophien; Choi, Doil

    2014-08-01

    Nonhost resistance (NHR) is a plant immune response to resist most pathogens. The molecular basis of NHR is poorly understood, but recognition of pathogen effectors by immune receptors, a response known as effector-triggered immunity, has been proposed as a component of NHR. We performed transient expression of 54 Phytophthora infestansRXLR effectors in pepper (Capsicum annuum) accessions. We used optimized heterologous expression methods and analyzed the inheritance of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions. Pepper showed a localized cell death response upon inoculation with P. infestans, suggesting that recognition of effectors may contribute to NHR in this system. Pepper accessions recognized as many as 36 effectors. Among the effectors, PexRD8 and Avrblb2 induced cell death in a broad range of pepper accessions. Segregation of effector-induced cell death in an F2 population derived from a cross between two pepper accessions fit 15:1, 9:7 or 3:1 ratios, depending on the effector. Our genetic data suggest that a single or two independent/complementary dominant genes are involved in the recognition of RXLR effectors. Multiple loci recognizing a series of effectors may underpin NHR of pepper to P. infestans and confer resistance durability.

  3. Prediction and validation of potential pathogenic microRNAs involved in Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Juanjuan; Luan, Yushi; Wang, Weichen; Zhai, Junmiao

    2014-03-01

    Being one kind of approximately 22nt long small RNA, miRNA has shown its roles in host-pathogen interaction, providing one possible way for pathogen infection. Though Phytophthora infestans is a major pathogen that causes devastating late blight of potato, tomato and so on, so far there have not been any systematic researches on miRNAs and even pathogenic miRNAs in P. infestans. Here, for the first time we comprehensively predicted and identified pathogenic miRNAs that may exist in P. infestans. First, a total of 128 putative miRNAs belonging to 66 miRNA family were identified by bioinformatic approaches. Then, 33 vital pathogenic miRNAs were screened by constructing miRNA-miRNA relationship networks. Finally, four potential pathogenic miRNAs were chosen for detection, two of which are chosen for validation. The expression quantity of pi-miR466 and pi-miR1918 changed dramatically during incubation of tomato leaves, implying that they are potential pathogenic miRNAs.

  4. Methanol extract of mycelia from Phytophthora infestans-induced resistance in potato.

    PubMed

    Monjil, Mohammad Shahjahan; Nozawa, Takeshi; Shibata, Yusuke; Takemoto, Daigo; Ojika, Makoto; Kawakita, Kazuhito

    2015-03-01

    Plants recognize certain microbial compounds as elicitors in their active defence mechanisms. It has been shown that a series of defence reactions are induced in potato plant cells after treatment with water-soluble hyphal wall components prepared from Phytophthora infestans. In this study, a methanol extract from mycelia of P. infestans (MEM), which contains lipophilic compounds, was used as another elicitor for the induction of the defence reactions in potato. MEM elicitor induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially O2(-) and H2O2 production, and nitric oxide (NO) generation in potato leaves and suspension-cultured cells. Hypersensitive cell death was detected in potato leaves within 6-8 h after MEM elicitor treatment. The accumulation of phytoalexins was detected by MEM elicitor treatment in potato tubers. In potato suspension-cultured cells, several defence-related genes were induced by MEM elicitors, namely Strboh, Sthsr203J, StPVS3, StPR1, and StNR5, which regulate various defence-related functions. Enhanced resistance against P. infestans was found in MEM-treated potato plants. These results suggested that MEM elicitor is recognized by host and enhances defence activities to produce substances inhibitory to pathogens.

  5. Metalaxyl Resistance in Phytophthora infestans: Assessing Role of RPA190 Gene and Diversity Within Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Matson, Michael E H; Small, Ian M; Fry, William E; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-12-01

    Prior work has shown that the inheritance of resistance to metalaxyl, an oomycete-specific fungicide, is complex and may involve multiple genes. Recent research indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene encoding RPA190, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I, confers resistance to metalaxyl (or mefenoxam) in some isolates of the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Using both DNA sequencing and high resolution melt assays for distinguishing RPA190 alleles, we show here that the SNP is absent from certain resistant isolates of P. infestans from North America, Europe, and Mexico. The SNP is present in some members of the US-23 and US-24 clonal lineages, but these tend to be fairly sensitive to the fungicide based on artificial media and field test data. Diversity in the level of sensitivity, RPA190 genotype, and RPA190 copy number was observed in these lineages but were uncorrelated. Controlled laboratory crosses demonstrated that RPA190 did not cosegregate with metalaxyl resistance from a Mexican and British isolate. We conclude that while metalaxyl may be used to control many contemporary strains of P. infestans, an assay based on RPA190 will not be sufficient to diagnose the sensitivity levels of isolates.

  6. Transcriptional dynamics of Phytophthora infestans during sequential stages of hemibiotrophic infection of tomato.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Ponnala, Lalit; Lee, Sang Jik; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    Hemibiotrophic plant pathogens, such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, employ a biphasic infection strategy, initially behaving as biotrophs, where minimal symptoms are exhibited by the plant, and subsequently as necrotrophs, feeding on dead plant tissue. The regulation of this transition and the breadth of molecular mechanisms that modulate plant defences are not well understood, although effector proteins secreted by the pathogen are thought to play a key role. We examined the transcriptional dynamics of P. infestans in a compatible interaction with its host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) at three infection stages: biotrophy; the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy; and necrotrophy. The expression data suggest a tight temporal regulation of many pathways associated with the suppression of plant defence mechanisms and pathogenicity, including the induction of putative cytoplasmic and apoplastic effectors. Twelve of these were experimentally evaluated to determine their ability to suppress necrosis caused by the P. infestans necrosis-inducing protein PiNPP1.1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. Four effectors suppressed necrosis, suggesting that they might prolong the biotrophic phase. This study suggests that a complex regulation of effector expression modulates the outcome of the interaction.

  7. De novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    García-Bayona, Leonor; Garavito, Manuel F; Lozano, Gabriel L; Vasquez, Juan J; Myers, Kevin; Fry, William E; Bernal, Adriana; Zimmermann, Barbara H; Restrepo, Silvia

    2014-03-10

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of the tomato and potato late blight, generates important economic and environmental losses worldwide. As current control strategies are becoming less effective, there is a need for studies on oomycete metabolism to help identify promising and more effective targets for chemical control. The pyrimidine pathways are attractive metabolic targets to combat tumors, virus and parasitic diseases but have not yet been studied in Phytophthora. Pyrimidines are involved in several critical cellular processes and play structural, metabolic and regulatory functions. Here, we used genomic and transcriptomic information to survey the pyrimidine metabolism during the P. infestans life cycle. After assessing the putative gene machinery for pyrimidine salvage and de novo synthesis, we inferred genealogies for each enzymatic domain in the latter pathway, which displayed a mosaic origin. The last two enzymes of the pathway, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase and orotidine-5-monophosphate decarboxylase, are fused in a multi-domain enzyme and are duplicated in some P. infestans strains. Two splice variants of the third gene (dihydroorotase) were identified, one of them encoding a premature stop codon generating a non-functional truncated protein. Relative expression profiles of pyrimidine biosynthesis genes were evaluated by qRT-PCR during infection in Solanum phureja. The third and fifth genes involved in this pathway showed high up-regulation during biotrophic stages and down-regulation during necrotrophy, whereas the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase gene involved in pyrimidine salvage showed the inverse behavior. These findings suggest the importance of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis during the fast replicative early infection stages and highlight the dynamics of the metabolism associated with the hemibiotrophic life style of pathogen.

  8. Inoculation of Transgenic Resistant Potato by Phytophthora infestans Affects Host Plant Choice of a Generalist Moth.

    PubMed

    Abreha, Kibrom B; Alexandersson, Erik; Vossen, Jack H; Anderson, Peter; Andreasson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen attack and the plant's response to this attack affect herbivore oviposition preference and larval performance. Introduction of major resistance genes against Phytophthora infestans (Rpi-genes), the cause of the devastating late blight disease, from wild Solanum species into potato changes the plant-pathogen interaction dynamics completely, but little is known about the effects on non-target organisms. Thus, we examined the effect of P. infestans itself and introduction of an Rpi-gene into the crop on host plant preference of the generalist insect herbivore, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In two choice bioassays, S. littoralis preferred to oviposit on P. infestans-inoculated plants of both the susceptible potato (cv. Desiree) and an isogenic resistant clone (A01-22: cv. Desiree transformed with Rpi-blb1), when compared to uninoculated plants of the same genotype. Both cv. Desiree and clone A01-22 were equally preferred for oviposition by S. littoralis when uninoculated plants were used, while cv. Desiree received more eggs compared to the resistant clone when both were inoculated with the pathogen. No significant difference in larval and pupal weight was found between S. littoralis larvae reared on leaves of the susceptible potato plants inoculated or uninoculated with P. infestans. Thus, the herbivore's host plant preference in this system was not directly associated with larval performance. The results indicate that the Rpi-blb1 based resistance in itself does not influence insect behavior, but that herbivore oviposition preference is affected by a change in the plant-microbe interaction.

  9. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Andreeva, Kalina; Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies.

  10. Alteration of secondary metabolites' profiles in potato leaves in response to weakly and highly aggressive isolates of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria A; Adam, Lorne R; Daayf, Fouad

    2012-08-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the cause of late blight, a devastating disease in potato and tomato. Many of the mechanisms underlying P. infestans pathogenesis and defense responses in potato are still unclear. We investigated the effects of P. infestans on the changes in the accumulation of secondary metabolites in potato cultivars using whole plants. Four preformed flavonoids and one terpenoid compound produced in potato tissues were differentially affected by the P. infestans inoculation. In Russet Burbank, the accumulation of catechin and rutin was suppressed by both P. infestans isolates US-11 and US-8, while the flavanone P3 was associated with susceptibility to this pathogen. On the other hand, catechin, flavonol-glycoside P2, and an unidentified terpenoid (T1), may be involved in the defense of cultivar Defender to both tested P. infestans isolates, providing new evidence that different preformed flavonoids and terpenoids in potato may play important roles in its defense or susceptibility to P. infestans. These results add to the pool of data showing the involvement of other phenolics and terpenes in potato resistance to microbial pathogens.

  11. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636 Alters Phytophthora infestans Growth and Late Blight Development.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher K; Arseneault, Tanya; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, one of the most devastating diseases affecting potato production. Alternative approaches for controlling late blight are being increasingly sought due to increasing environmental concerns over the use of chemical pesticides and the increasing resistance of P. infestans to fungicides. Our research group has isolated a new strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (LBUM636) of biocontrol interest producing the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). Wild-type LBUM636 was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of Phytophthora infestans in in vitro confrontational assays whereas its isogenic mutant (phzC-; not producing PCA) only slightly altered the pathogen's growth. Wild-type LBUM636 but not the phzC- mutant also completely repressed disease symptom development on tubers. A pot experiment revealed that wild-type LBUM636 can significantly reduce P. infestans populations in the rhizosphere and in the roots of potato plants, as well as reduce in planta disease symptoms due to PCA production. The expression of eight common plant defense-related genes (ChtA, PR-1b, PR-2, PR-5, LOX, PIN2, PAL-2, and ERF3) was quantified in tubers, roots, and leaves by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and revealed that the biocontrol observed was not associated with the induction of a plant defense response by LBUM636. Instead, a direct interaction between P. infestans and LBUM636 is required and PCA production appears to be a key factor for LBUM636's biocontrol ability.

  12. A Galpha subunit controls zoospore motility and virulence in the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Latijnhouwers, Maita; Ligterink, Wilco; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; van West, Pieter; Govers, Francine

    2004-02-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein pathway is a ubiquitous eukaryotic signalling module that is known to regulate growth and differentiation in many plant pathogens. We previously identified Pigpa1, a gene encoding a G-protein alpha subunit from the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. P. infestans belongs to the class oomycetes, a group of organisms in which signal transduction processes have not yet been studied at the molecular level. To elucidate the function of Pigpa1, PiGPA1-deficient mutants were obtained by homology-dependent gene silencing. The Pigpa1-silenced mutants produced zoospores that turned six to eight times more frequently, causing them to swim only short distances compared with wild type. Attraction to the surface, a phenomenon known as negative geotaxis, was impaired in the mutant zoospores, as well as autoaggregation and chemotaxis towards glutamic and aspartic acid. Zoospore production was reduced by 20-45% in different Pigpa1-silenced mutants. Transformants expressing constitutively active forms of PiGPA1, containing amino acid substitutions (R177H and Q203L), showed no obvious phenotypic differences from the wild-type strain. Infection efficiencies on potato leaves ranged from 3% to 14% in the Pigpa1-silenced mutants, compared with 77% in wild type, showing that virulence is severely impaired. The results prove that PiGPA1 is crucial for zoospore motility and for pathogenicity in an important oomycete plant pathogen.

  13. The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kentaro; Schuenemann, Verena J; Cano, Liliana M; Pais, Marina; Mishra, Bagdevi; Sharma, Rahul; Lanz, Chirsta; Martin, Frank N; Kamoun, Sophien; Krause, Johannes; Thines, Marco; Weigel, Detlef; Burbano, Hernán A

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of potato late blight, is infamous for having triggered the Irish Great Famine in the 1840s. Until the late 1970s, P. infestans diversity outside of its Mexican center of origin was low, and one scenario held that a single strain, US-1, had dominated the global population for 150 years; this was later challenged based on DNA analysis of historical herbarium specimens. We have compared the genomes of 11 herbarium and 15 modern strains. We conclude that the 19th century epidemic was caused by a unique genotype, HERB-1, that persisted for over 50 years. HERB-1 is distinct from all examined modern strains, but it is a close relative of US-1, which replaced it outside of Mexico in the 20th century. We propose that HERB-1 and US-1 emerged from a metapopulation that was established in the early 1800s outside of the species' center of diversity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00731.001 PMID:23741619

  14. Genetic and Physical Variability at the Mating Type Locus of the Oomycete, Phytophthora Infestans

    PubMed Central

    Judelson, H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Mating type in the oomyceteous fungus, Phytophthora infestans, is determined by a single locus. In a previous study of a few isolates, the locus segregated in a manner genetically consistent with its linkage to a system of balanced lethal loci. To determine the prevalence of this phenomenon within P. infestans, genetic analyses were performed using isolates representative of the diversity within the species that had been selected by DNA fingerprinting using probes linked to mating type. Non-Mendelian segregation of the mating type locus was observed in crosses performed with each isolate. An unusual group of isolates was identified in which the mating type determinants had been rearranged within the genome; these strains also produced an aberrantly large number of self-fertile progeny. Curiously, in all isolates, markers linked to the mating type locus appeared prone to duplication, transposition, deletion, or other rearrangement. This was not observed for loci unlinked to mating type. Data from the crosses and analyses of marker variation were used to erect models to explain the bases of mating type determination and of the unusual segregation of the chromosomal region containing the mating type locus. PMID:8913745

  15. Differential recognition of Phytophthora infestans races in potato R4 breeding lines.

    PubMed

    van Poppel, Pieter M J A; Huigen, Dirk Jan; Govers, Francine

    2009-10-01

    Introgression breeding has resulted in several potato lines that are resistant to late blight, a devastating plant disease caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. The traditional differential set consists of potato lines with 11 late blight resistance specificities, referred to as R1 to R11. With the exception of the R4 locus, all the resistance loci in these lines have been genetically mapped or positioned in resistance (R) gene clusters. In this study, we show that potato lines that are defined to carry R4 do not necessarily recognize the same P. infestans strains. Field isolates appeared to be avirulent on either the R4 differential developed by Mastenbroek or the one developed by Black but not on both. Previously, we identified the avirulence gene PiAvr4, which is a member of the RXLR effector family. In planta expression of PiAvr4 revealed that recognition of PiAvr4 is strictly confined to the Mastenbroek R4 differential. Segregation of the trait in two independent F1 progenies showed that late blight resistance in this differential is determined by a single dominant gene, now referred to as R4Ma.

  16. Diversity in and evidence for selection on the mitochondrial genome of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Gavino, Pia D; Fry, William E

    2002-01-01

    Two extant nomenclature systems were reconciled to relate six mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes of Phytophthora infestans, the oomycete pathogen causing late blight disease on potato and tomato. Carter's haplotypes I-a and I-b were included in Goodwin's haplotype A, while Carter's haplotypes II-a and II-b were included in Goodwin's haplotype B. In addition, haplotypes E and F were included in Carter's haplotype I-b. The mutational differences separating the various haplotypes were determined, and we propose that either haplotype I-b(A) or haplotype I-a(A) is the putative ancestral mtDNA of P. infestans, because either can center all the other haplotypes in a logical stepwise network of mutational changes. The occurrence of the six haplotypes in 548 isolates worldwide was determined. Haplotypes I-a and II-a were associated with diverse genotypes worldwide. As previously suggested, haplotype I-b was found only in the US-1 clonal lineage and its variants (n = 99 isolates from 16 countries on 5 continents), and haplotype II-b was limited to the US-6 clonal lineage and its derivatives (n = 36). In a confirmation of a previous suggestion, the randomly mating population in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico (n = 78) was monomorphic for mtDNA haplotype I-a(A). We hypothesize that selection there may be driving the dominance of that single mtDNA haplotype.

  17. Population Structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley Region of Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, N J; Flier, W G; Sturbaum, A K; Garay-Serrano, E; van den Bosch, T B; Smart, C D; Matuszak, J M; Lozoya-Saldaña, H; Turkensteen, L J; Fry, W E

    2001-09-01

    ABSTRACT We tested the hypothesis that the population of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca valley region is genetically differentiated according to habitat. Isolates were sampled in three habitats from (i) wild Solanum spp. (WILD), (ii) land-race varieties in low-input production systems (RURAL), and (iii) modern cultivars in high-input agriculture (VALLEY). Isolates were sampled in 1988-89 (n= 179) and in 1997-98 (n= 389). In both sampling periods, the greatest genetic diversity was observed in RURAL and VALLEY habitats. Based on the Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and Peptidase allozymes, the subpopulations from the three habitats were significantly differentiated in both sampling periods. In contrast to allozyme data for 1997-98, no differences were found among the three subpopulations for sensitivity to metalaxyl. Two groups of isolates identical for allozyme and mating type were further investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting; 65% of one group and 85% of another group were demonstrated to be unique. The genetic diversity data and the chronology of disease occurrence during the season are consistent with the hypothesis that populations of P. infestans on wild Solanum populations are derived from populations on cultivated potatoes in the central highlands of Mexico near Toluca.

  18. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heterotrophic Phytophthora infestans. We first present a comprehensive reconstruction of a likely sterol synthesis pathway for S. parasitica, causative agent of the disease saprolegniasis in fish. This pathway shows multiple potential routes of sterol synthesis, and draws on several avenues of new evidence: bioinformatic mining for genes with sterol-related functions, expression analysis of these genes, and analysis of the sterol profiles in mycelium grown in different media. Additionally, we explore the extent to which P. infestans, which causes the late blight in potato, can modify exogenously provided sterols. We consider whether the two very different approaches to sterol acquisition taken by these pathogens represent any specific survival advantages or potential drug targets.

  19. Comparative analysis of sterol acquisition in the oomycetes Saprolegnia parasitica and Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Paul; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Ekengren, Sophia; McKee, Lauren S.; Bulone, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The oomycete class includes pathogens of animals and plants which are responsible for some of the most significant global losses in agriculture and aquaculture. There is a need to replace traditional chemical means of controlling oomycete growth with more targeted approaches, and the inhibition of sterol synthesis is one promising area. To better direct these efforts, we have studied sterol acquisition in two model organisms: the sterol-autotrophic Saprolegnia parasitica, and the sterol-heterotrophic Phytophthora infestans. We first present a comprehensive reconstruction of a likely sterol synthesis pathway for S. parasitica, causative agent of the disease saprolegniasis in fish. This pathway shows multiple potential routes of sterol synthesis, and draws on several avenues of new evidence: bioinformatic mining for genes with sterol-related functions, expression analysis of these genes, and analysis of the sterol profiles in mycelium grown in different media. Additionally, we explore the extent to which P. infestans, which causes the late blight in potato, can modify exogenously provided sterols. We consider whether the two very different approaches to sterol acquisition taken by these pathogens represent any specific survival advantages or potential drug targets. PMID:28152045

  20. The rise and fall of the Phytophthora infestans lineage that triggered the Irish potato famine.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kentaro; Schuenemann, Verena J; Cano, Liliana M; Pais, Marina; Mishra, Bagdevi; Sharma, Rahul; Lanz, Chirsta; Martin, Frank N; Kamoun, Sophien; Krause, Johannes; Thines, Marco; Weigel, Detlef; Burbano, Hernán A

    2013-05-28

    Phytophthora infestans, the cause of potato late blight, is infamous for having triggered the Irish Great Famine in the 1840s. Until the late 1970s, P. infestans diversity outside of its Mexican center of origin was low, and one scenario held that a single strain, US-1, had dominated the global population for 150 years; this was later challenged based on DNA analysis of historical herbarium specimens. We have compared the genomes of 11 herbarium and 15 modern strains. We conclude that the 19th century epidemic was caused by a unique genotype, HERB-1, that persisted for over 50 years. HERB-1 is distinct from all examined modern strains, but it is a close relative of US-1, which replaced it outside of Mexico in the 20th century. We propose that HERB-1 and US-1 emerged from a metapopulation that was established in the early 1800s outside of the species' center of diversity. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00731.001.

  1. Historic Late Blight Outbreaks Caused by a Widespread Dominant Lineage of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary.

    PubMed

    Saville, Amanda C; Martin, Michael D; Ristaino, Jean B

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, was responsible for the Irish potato famine of the 1840s. Initial disease outbreaks occurred in the US in 1843, two years prior to European outbreaks. We examined the evolutionary relationships and source of the 19th-century outbreaks using herbarium specimens of P. infestans from historic (1846-1970) and more recent isolates (1992-2014) of the pathogen. The same unique SSR multilocus genotype, named here as FAM-1, caused widespread outbreaks in both US and Europe. The FAM-1 lineage shared allelic diversity and grouped with the oldest specimens collected in Colombia and Central America. The FAM-1 lineage of P. infestans formed a genetic group that was distinct from more recent aggressive lineages found in the US. The US-1 lineage formed a second, mid-20th century group. Recent modern US lineages and the oldest Mexican lineages formed a genetic group with recent Mexican lineages, suggesting a Mexican origin of recent US lineages. A survey of mitochondrial haplotypes in a larger set of global herbarium specimens documented the more frequent occurrence of the HERB-1 (type Ia) mitochondrial haplotype in archival collections from 1866-75 and 1906-1915 and the rise of the Ib mitochondrial lineage (US-1) between 1946-1955. The FAM-1 SSR lineage survived for almost 100 years in the US, was geographically widespread, and was displaced first in the mid-20th century by the US-1 lineage and then by distinct new aggressive lineages that migrated from Mexico.

  2. Effector genomics accelerates discovery and functional profiling of potato disease resistance and phytophthora infestans avirulence genes.

    PubMed

    Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Rietman, Hendrik; Krenek, Pavel; Champouret, Nicolas; Young, Carolyn; Oh, Sang-Keun; Wang, Miqia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Vosman, Ben; Visser, Richard G F; Jacobsen, Evert; Govers, Francine; Kamoun, Sophien; Van der Vossen, Edwin A G

    2008-08-06

    Potato is the world's fourth largest food crop yet it continues to endure late blight, a devastating disease caused by the Irish famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Breeding broad-spectrum disease resistance (R) genes into potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the best strategy for genetically managing late blight but current approaches are slow and inefficient. We used a repertoire of effector genes predicted computationally from the P. infestans genome to accelerate the identification, functional characterization, and cloning of potentially broad-spectrum R genes. An initial set of 54 effectors containing a signal peptide and a RXLR motif was profiled for activation of innate immunity (avirulence or Avr activity) on wild Solanum species and tentative Avr candidates were identified. The RXLR effector family IpiO induced hypersensitive responses (HR) in S. stoloniferum, S. papita and the more distantly related S. bulbocastanum, the source of the R gene Rpi-blb1. Genetic studies with S. stoloniferum showed cosegregation of resistance to P. infestans and response to IpiO. Transient co-expression of IpiO with Rpi-blb1 in a heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana system identified IpiO as Avr-blb1. A candidate gene approach led to the rapid cloning of S. stoloniferum Rpi-sto1 and S. papita Rpi-pta1, which are functionally equivalent to Rpi-blb1. Our findings indicate that effector genomics enables discovery and functional profiling of late blight R genes and Avr genes at an unprecedented rate and promises to accelerate the engineering of late blight resistant potato varieties.

  3. Effector Genomics Accelerates Discovery and Functional Profiling of Potato Disease Resistance and Phytophthora Infestans Avirulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G. A. A.; Rietman, Hendrik; Krenek, Pavel; Champouret, Nicolas; Young, Carolyn; Oh, Sang-Keun; Wang, Miqia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Vosman, Ben; Visser, Richard G. F.; Jacobsen, Evert; Govers, Francine; Kamoun, Sophien; Van der Vossen, Edwin A. G.

    2008-01-01

    Potato is the world's fourth largest food crop yet it continues to endure late blight, a devastating disease caused by the Irish famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Breeding broad-spectrum disease resistance (R) genes into potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the best strategy for genetically managing late blight but current approaches are slow and inefficient. We used a repertoire of effector genes predicted computationally from the P. infestans genome to accelerate the identification, functional characterization, and cloning of potentially broad-spectrum R genes. An initial set of 54 effectors containing a signal peptide and a RXLR motif was profiled for activation of innate immunity (avirulence or Avr activity) on wild Solanum species and tentative Avr candidates were identified. The RXLR effector family IpiO induced hypersensitive responses (HR) in S. stoloniferum, S. papita and the more distantly related S. bulbocastanum, the source of the R gene Rpi-blb1. Genetic studies with S. stoloniferum showed cosegregation of resistance to P. infestans and response to IpiO. Transient co-expression of IpiO with Rpi-blb1 in a heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana system identified IpiO as Avr-blb1. A candidate gene approach led to the rapid cloning of S. stoloniferum Rpi-sto1 and S. papita Rpi-pta1, which are functionally equivalent to Rpi-blb1. Our findings indicate that effector genomics enables discovery and functional profiling of late blight R genes and Avr genes at an unprecedented rate and promises to accelerate the engineering of late blight resistant potato varieties. PMID:18682852

  4. Species tree estimation for the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and close relatives.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jaime E; Coffey, Michael D; Martin, Frank N

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of a group of organisms, an accurate estimate of the species phylogeny must be known. Traditionally, gene trees have served as a proxy for the species tree, although it was acknowledged early on that these trees represented different evolutionary processes. Discordances among gene trees and between the gene trees and the species tree are also expected in closely related species that have rapidly diverged, due to processes such as the incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphisms. Recently, methods have been developed for the explicit estimation of species trees, using information from multilocus gene trees while accommodating heterogeneity among them. Here we have used three distinct approaches to estimate the species tree for five Phytophthora pathogens, including P. infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and tomato. Our concatenation-based "supergene" approach was unable to resolve relationships even with data from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and from multiple isolates per species. Our multispecies coalescent approach using both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods was able to estimate a moderately supported species tree showing a close relationship among P. infestans, P. andina, and P. ipomoeae. The topology of the species tree was also identical to the dominant phylogenetic history estimated in our third approach, Bayesian concordance analysis. Our results support previous suggestions that P. andina is a hybrid species, with P. infestans representing one parental lineage. The other parental lineage is not known, but represents an independent evolutionary lineage more closely related to P. ipomoeae. While all five species likely originated in the New World, further study is needed to determine when and under what conditions this hybridization event may have occurred.

  5. An ephemeral sexual population of Phytophthora infestans in the Northeastern United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Danies, Giovanna; Myers, Kevin; Mideros, María F; Restrepo, Silvia; Martin, Frank N; Cooke, David E L; Smart, Christine D; Ristaino, Jean B; Seaman, Abby J; Gugino, Beth K; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Fry, William E

    2014-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease, has been reported in North America since the mid-nineteenth century. In the United States the lack of or very limited sexual reproduction has resulted in largely clonal populations of P. infestans. In 2010 and 2011, but not in 2012 or 2013, 20 rare and diverse genotypes of P. infestans were detected in a region that centered around central New York State. The ratio of A1 to A2 mating types among these genotypes was close to the 50∶50 ratio expected for sexual recombination. These genotypes were diverse at the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase locus, differed in their microsatellite profiles, showed different banding patterns in a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay using a moderately repetitive and highly polymorphic probe (RG57), were polymorphic for four different nuclear genes and differed in their sensitivity to the systemic fungicide mefenoxam. The null hypothesis of linkage equilibrium was not rejected, which suggests the population could be sexual. These new genotypes were monomorphic in their mitochondrial haplotype that was the same as US-22. Through parentage exclusion testing using microsatellite data and sequences of four nuclear genes, recent dominant lineages US-8, US-11, US-23, and US-24 were excluded as possible parents for these genotypes. Further analyses indicated that US-22 could not be eliminated as a possible parent for 14 of the 20 genotypes. We conclude that US-22 could be a parent of some, but not all, of the new genotypes found in 2010 and 2011. There were at least two other parents for this population and the genotypic characteristics of the other parents were identified.

  6. Historic Late Blight Outbreaks Caused by a Widespread Dominant Lineage of Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, was responsible for the Irish potato famine of the 1840s. Initial disease outbreaks occurred in the US in 1843, two years prior to European outbreaks. We examined the evolutionary relationships and source of the 19th-century outbreaks using herbarium specimens of P. infestans from historic (1846–1970) and more recent isolates (1992–2014) of the pathogen. The same unique SSR multilocus genotype, named here as FAM-1, caused widespread outbreaks in both US and Europe. The FAM-1 lineage shared allelic diversity and grouped with the oldest specimens collected in Colombia and Central America. The FAM-1 lineage of P. infestans formed a genetic group that was distinct from more recent aggressive lineages found in the US. The US-1 lineage formed a second, mid-20th century group. Recent modern US lineages and the oldest Mexican lineages formed a genetic group with recent Mexican lineages, suggesting a Mexican origin of recent US lineages. A survey of mitochondrial haplotypes in a larger set of global herbarium specimens documented the more frequent occurrence of the HERB-1 (type Ia) mitochondrial haplotype in archival collections from 1866–75 and 1906–1915 and the rise of the Ib mitochondrial lineage (US-1) between 1946–1955. The FAM-1 SSR lineage survived for almost 100 years in the US, was geographically widespread, and was displaced first in the mid-20th century by the US-1 lineage and then by distinct new aggressive lineages that migrated from Mexico. PMID:28030580

  7. Interspecific somatic hybrids Solanum villosum (+) S. tuberosum, resistant to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Tarwacka, Justyna; Polkowska-Kowalczyk, Lidia; Kolano, Bożena; Śliwka, Jadwiga; Wielgat, Bernard

    2013-11-15

    The interspecific somatic hybrids 4x S. villosum (+) 2x S. tuberosum clone DG 81-68 (VT hybrids) were obtained and characterized molecularly and cytogenetically. The morphology of fusion-derived plants was intermediate in relation to the parental species. The expected ploidy level of the regenerants was 6x for the VT hybrids, but the real ploidy of the hybrids varied, with some of them being euploids, and others - aneuploids. The hybridity of the regenerants was verified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Despite the variation in ploidy, the RAPD patterns of the hybrids were mostly uniform, suggesting similarity of the genotypes of the VT clones. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis discriminated between the chromosomes of both parental genomes in VT somatic hybrids and also confirmed their hybridity. The resistance of VT somatic hybrids to Phytophthora infestans was evaluated and all of the hybrids proved to be highly resistant. In search of the mechanisms involved in resistance of the Solanum species to P. infestans, the biochemical reactions occurring early after elicitor treatment were studied. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as one of the earliest reactions induced by pathogens or their elicitors, was examined in the resistant wild species S. villosum, susceptible S. tuberosum clone DG 81-68 and in the VT hybrid, resistant to P. infestans. After treatment of the leaves with elicitor, the relative increase in ROS production was higher in leaves of the susceptible potato clone than in the resistant plants of S. villosum and the somatic hybrid.

  8. Species Tree Estimation for the Late Blight Pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and Close Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jaime E.; Coffey, Michael D.; Martin, Frank N.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the evolutionary history of a group of organisms, an accurate estimate of the species phylogeny must be known. Traditionally, gene trees have served as a proxy for the species tree, although it was acknowledged early on that these trees represented different evolutionary processes. Discordances among gene trees and between the gene trees and the species tree are also expected in closely related species that have rapidly diverged, due to processes such as the incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphisms. Recently, methods have been developed for the explicit estimation of species trees, using information from multilocus gene trees while accommodating heterogeneity among them. Here we have used three distinct approaches to estimate the species tree for five Phytophthora pathogens, including P. infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease in potato and tomato. Our concatenation-based “supergene” approach was unable to resolve relationships even with data from both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and from multiple isolates per species. Our multispecies coalescent approach using both Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods was able to estimate a moderately supported species tree showing a close relationship among P. infestans, P. andina, and P. ipomoeae. The topology of the species tree was also identical to the dominant phylogenetic history estimated in our third approach, Bayesian concordance analysis. Our results support previous suggestions that P. andina is a hybrid species, with P. infestans representing one parental lineage. The other parental lineage is not known, but represents an independent evolutionary lineage more closely related to P. ipomoeae. While all five species likely originated in the New World, further study is needed to determine when and under what conditions this hybridization event may have occurred. PMID:22615869

  9. Trade-offs and evolution of thermal adaptation in the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Na; Zhu, Wen; Wu, E-Jiao; Yang, Ce; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J; Jin, Li-Ping; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-08-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental parameters with crucial impacts on nearly all biological processes. Due to anthropogenic activity, average air temperatures are expected to increase by a few degrees in coming decades, accompanied by an increased occurrence of extreme temperature events. Such global trends are likely to have various major impacts on human society through their influence on natural ecosystems, food production and biotic interactions, including diseases. In this study, we used a combination of statistical genetics, experimental evolution and common garden experiments to investigate the evolutionary potential for thermal adaptation in the potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and infer its likely response to changing temperatures. We found a trade-off associated with thermal adaptation to heterogeneous environments in P. infestans, with the degree of the trade-off peaking approximately at the pathogen's optimum growth temperature. A genetic trade-off in thermal adaptation was also evidenced by the negative association between a strain's growth rate and its thermal range for growth, and warm climates selecting for a low pathogen growth rate. We also found a mirror effect of phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation on growth rate. At below the optimum, phenotypic plasticity enhances pathogen's growth rate but nature selects for slower growing genotypes when temperature increases. At above the optimum, phenotypic plasticity reduces pathogen's growth rate but natural selection favours for faster growing genotypes when temperature increases further. We conclude from these findings that the growth rate of P. infestans will only be marginally affected by global warming.

  10. Effect of Temperature on Growth and Sporulation of US-22, US-23, and US-24 Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Seidl Johnson, Anna C; Frost, Kenneth E; Rouse, Douglas I; Gevens, Amanda J

    2015-04-01

    Epidemics of late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, have been studied by plant pathologists and regarded with great concern by potato and tomato growers since the Irish potato famine in the 1840s. P. infestans populations have continued to evolve, with unique clonal lineages arising which differ in pathogen fitness and pathogenicity, potentially impacting epidemiology. In 2012 and 2013, the US-23 clonal lineage predominated late blight epidemics in most U.S. potato and tomato production regions, including Wisconsin. This lineage was unknown prior to 2009. For isolates of three recently identified clonal lineages of P. infestans (US-22, US-23, and US-24), sporulation rates were experimentally determined on potato and tomato foliage and the effect of temperature on lesion growth rate on tomato was investigated. The US-22 and US-23 isolates had greater lesion growth rates on tomato than US-24 isolates. Sporulation rates for all isolates were greater on potato than tomato, and the US-23 isolates had greater sporulation rates on both tomato and potato than the US-22 and US-24 isolates. Experimentally determined correlates of fitness were input to the LATEBLIGHT model and epidemics were simulated using archived Wisconsin weather data from four growing seasons (2009 to 2012) to investigate the effect of isolates of these new lineages on late blight epidemiology. The fast lesion growth rates of US-22 and US-23 isolates resulted in severe epidemics in all years tested, particularly in 2011. The greater sporulation rates of P. infestans on potato resulted in simulated epidemics that progressed faster than epidemics simulated for tomato; the high sporulation rates of US-23 isolates resulted in simulated epidemics more severe than simulated epidemics of isolates of the US-22 and US-24 isolates and EC-1 clonal lineages on potato and tomato. Additionally, US-23 isolates consistently caused severe simulated epidemics when lesion growth rate and sporulation

  11. Persistence of the mitochondrial lineage responsible for the Irish potato famine in extant new world phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Martin, Michael D; Ho, Simon Y W; Wales, Nathan; Ristaino, Jean B; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2014-06-01

    The plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans emerged in Europe in 1845, triggering the Irish potato famine and massive European potato crop losses that continued until effective fungicides were widely employed in the 20th century. Today the pathogen is ubiquitous, with more aggressive and virulent strains surfacing in recent decades. Recently, complete P. infestans mitogenome sequences from 19th-century herbarium specimens were shown to belong to a unique lineage (HERB-1) predicted to be rare or extinct in modern times. We report 44 additional P. infestans mitogenomes: four from 19th-century Europe, three from 1950s UK, and 37 from modern populations across the New World. We use phylogenetic analyses to identify the HERB-1 lineage in modern populations from both Mexico and South America, and to demonstrate distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were present in 19th-century Europe, with this lineage initially diversifying 75 years before the first reports of potato late blight.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in Phytophthora infestans: new haplotypes are identified and re-defined by PCR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Qi, Ming-Xing; Qin, Yu-Xuan; Zhu, Jie-Hua; Gui, Xiu-Mei; Tao, Bu; Xu, Xiao-Hu; Zhang, Fu-Guang

    2013-11-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) are particularly useful for monitoring specific pathogen populations like Phytophthora infestans. Basically type I and II of P. infestans mt-DNA were categorized by means of polymorphism lengths caused by an ~2 kb insertion, which can be detected via restriction enzyme digestion. In addition genome sequencing of haplotype Ib has been used as a simple Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to indirectly identify type I and II alterations through EcoR I restriction enzyme DNA fragment patterns of the genomic P4 area. However, with the common method, wrong mt-DNA typing occurs due to an EcoR I recognition site mutation in the P4 genomic area. Genome sequencing of the four haplotypes (Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb) allowed us to thoroughly examine mt-DNA polymorphisms and we indentified two hypervariable regions (HVRs) named HVRi and HVRii. The HVRi length polymorphism caused by a 2 kb insertion/deletion was utilized to identify mt-DNA types I and II, while another length polymorphism in the HVRii region is caused by a variable number of tandem repeats (n = 1, 2, or 3) of a 36 bp sized DNA stretch and was further used to determine mt-DNA sub-types, which were described as R(n = 1, 2, or 3). Finally, the P. infestans mt-DNA haplotypes were re-defined as IR(1) or IIR(2) according to PCR derived HVRi and HVRii length polymorphisms. Twenty-three isolates were chosen to verify the feasibility of our new approach for identifying mt-DNA haplotypes and a total of five haplotypes (IR(1), IR(2), IR(3), IIR(2) and IIR(3)) were identified. Additionally, we found that six isolates determined as type I by our method were mistakenly identified as type II by the PCR-RFLP technique. In conclusion, we propose a simple and rapid PCR method for identification of mt-DNA haplotypes based on sequence analyses of the mitochondrial P. infestans genome.

  13. Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector PexRD2 Interacts with Host MAPKKKε to Suppress Plant Immune Signaling[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    King, Stuart R.F.; McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C.; Armstrong, Miles R.; Bukharova, Tatyana; Sukarta, Octavina; Win, Joe; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R.J.; Banfield, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are key players in plant immune signaling pathways, transducing the perception of invading pathogens into effective defense responses. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, deliver RXLR effector proteins to plant cells to modulate host immune signaling and promote colonization. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these effectors act in plant cells is limited. Here, we report that the P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with the kinase domain of MAPKKKε, a positive regulator of cell death associated with plant immunity. Expression of PexRD2 or silencing MAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans. We show that PexRD2 perturbs signaling pathways triggered by or dependent on MAPKKKε. By contrast, homologs of PexRD2 from P. infestans had reduced or no interaction with MAPKKKε and did not promote disease susceptibility. Structure-led mutagenesis identified PexRD2 variants that do not interact with MAPKKKε and fail to support enhanced pathogen growth or perturb MAPKKKε signaling pathways. Our findings provide evidence that P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 has evolved to interact with a specific host MAPKKK to perturb plant immunity–related signaling. PMID:24632534

  14. Phytophthora infestans isolates lacking class I ipiO variants are virulent on Rpi-blb1 potato.

    PubMed

    Champouret, Nicolas; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Rietman, Hendrik; van der Lee, Theo; Maliepaard, Chris; Heupink, Anika; van de Vondervoort, Peter J I; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G F; van der Vossen, Edwin A G; Govers, Francine; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A

    2009-12-01

    A strategy to control the devastating late blight disease is providing potato cultivars with genes that are effective in resistance to a broad spectrum of Phytophthora infestans isolates. Thus far, most late blight resistance (R) genes that were introgressed in potato were quickly defeated. In contrast, the Rpi-blb1 gene originating from Solanum bulbocastanum has performed as an exclusive broad-spectrum R gene for many years. Recently, the RXLR effector family ipiO was identified to contain Avr-blb1. Monitoring the genetic diversity of the ipiO family in a large set of isolates of P. infestans and related species resulted in 16 ipiO variants in three distinct classes. Class I and class II but not class III ipiO variants induce cell death when coinfiltrated with Rpi-blb1 in Nicotiana benthamiana. Class I is highly diverse and is represented in all analyzed P. infestans isolates except two Mexican P. infestans isolates, and these were found virulent on Rpi-blb1 plants. In its C-terminal domain, IPI-O contains a W motif that is essential for triggering Rpi-blb1-mediated cell death and is under positive selection. This study shows that profiling the variation of Avr-blb1 within a P. infestans population is instrumental for predicting the effectiveness of Rpi-blb1-mediated resistance in potato.

  15. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen.

  16. Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with host MAPKKK ε to suppress plant immune signaling.

    PubMed

    King, Stuart R F; McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C; Armstrong, Miles R; Bukharova, Tatyana; Sukarta, Octavina; Win, Joe; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R J; Banfield, Mark J

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are key players in plant immune signaling pathways, transducing the perception of invading pathogens into effective defense responses. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, deliver RXLR effector proteins to plant cells to modulate host immune signaling and promote colonization. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these effectors act in plant cells is limited. Here, we report that the P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with the kinase domain of MAPKKKε, a positive regulator of cell death associated with plant immunity. Expression of PexRD2 or silencing MAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans. We show that PexRD2 perturbs signaling pathways triggered by or dependent on MAPKKKε. By contrast, homologs of PexRD2 from P. infestans had reduced or no interaction with MAPKKKε and did not promote disease susceptibility. Structure-led mutagenesis identified PexRD2 variants that do not interact with MAPKKKε and fail to support enhanced pathogen growth or perturb MAPKKKε signaling pathways. Our findings provide evidence that P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 has evolved to interact with a specific host MAPKKK to perturb plant immunity-related signaling.

  17. Production of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in potato tuber during the necrotrophic phase of hemibiotrophic pathogen Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2012-12-05

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hydroxyl radical (HO) in the potato tuber during the necrotrophic phase of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Phytophthora infestans infection. Using 3,3-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) imaging technique, the formation of H(2)O(2) was demonstrated in P. infestans-infected potato tuber. For the first time, HO formation was demonstrated in P. infestans-infected potato tuber using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. An enhancement in spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission indicated the extent of lipid peroxidation in the P. infestans-infected potato tuber. The data presented in this study reveal that the formation of H(2)O(2) and HO in the P. infestans-infected potato tuber is associated with lipid peroxidation. It is proposed here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non-invasive indicator of the oxidative processes in the quality control at food industry.

  18. Pseudomonas strains naturally associated with potato plants produce volatiles with high potential for inhibition of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Lukas; Bönisch, Denise; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Bailly, Aurélien; Schulz, Stefan; Weisskopf, Laure

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria emit volatile organic compounds with a wide range of effects on bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. The antifungal potential of bacterial volatiles has been investigated with a broad span of phytopathogenic organisms, yet the reaction of oomycetes to these volatile signals is largely unknown. For instance, the response of the late blight-causing agent and most devastating oomycete pathogen worldwide, Phytophthora infestans, to bacterial volatiles has not been assessed so far. In this work, we analyzed this response and compared it to that of selected fungal and bacterial potato pathogens, using newly isolated, potato-associated bacterial strains as volatile emitters. P. infestans was highly susceptible to bacterial volatiles, while fungal and bacterial pathogens were less sensitive. Cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains were the most active, leading to complete growth inhibition, yet noncyanogenic ones also produced antioomycete volatiles. Headspace analysis of the emitted volatiles revealed 1-undecene as a compound produced by strains inducing volatile-mediated P. infestans growth inhibition. Supplying pure 1-undecene to P. infestans significantly reduced mycelial growth, sporangium formation, germination, and zoospore release in a dose-dependent manner. This work demonstrates the high sensitivity of P. infestans to bacterial volatiles and opens new perspectives for sustainable control of this devastating pathogen.

  19. Silencing of DS2 aminoacylase-like genes confirms basal resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahito; Nishihara, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is a potential host to several plant pathogens, and immature leaves of N. benthamiana are susceptible to Phytophthora infestans. In contrast, mature leaves of N. benthamiana are weakly susceptible and show basal resistance to P. infestans. We screened a gene-silenced mature plant showing high resistance to P. infestans, designated as DS2 (Disease suppression 2). The deduced amino acid sequence of cDNA responsible for DS2 encoded a putative aminoacylase. Growth of P. infestans decreased in DS2 plants. Trypan blue staining revealed inhibited hyphae growth of P. infestans with an increased number of dead cells under the penetration site in DS2 plants. Consistent with growth inhibition of P. infestans, defense responses such as reactive oxygen generation and expression of a salicylic acid-dependent PR-1a increased markedly in DS2 plants compared with that of control plants. DS2 phenotype was compromised in NahG plants, suggesting DS2 phenotype depends on the salicylic acid signaling pathway. Accelerated defense response was observed in DS2 plants elicited by INF1 elicitin as well as by NbMEK2(DD), which is the constitutive active form of NbMEK2, and act as a downstream regulator of INF1 perception. On the other hand, INF1- and NbMEK2(DD)-induced defense responses were prevented by DS2-overexpressing transgenic tobacco. These results suggest that DS2 negatively regulates plant defense responses against P. infestans via NbMEK2 and SA-dependent signaling pathway in N. benthamiana.

  20. Population Structure of the Late Blight Pathogen Phytophthora infestans in a Potato Germplasm Nursery in Two Consecutive Years.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuee; Yin, Junliang; Sun, Jieping; Ma, Hongmei; Ma, Yunfang; Quan, Junli; Shan, Weixing

    2015-06-01

    As the causal agent of late blight on potato, Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens worldwide and widely known as the Irish potato famine pathogen. Understanding the genetic structure of P. infestans populations is important both for breeding and deployment of resistant varieties and for development of disease control strategies. Here, we investigate the population genetic structure of P. infestans in a potato germplasm nursery in northwestern China. In total, 279 isolates were recovered from 63 potato varieties or lines in 2010 and 2011, and were genotyped by mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and a set of nine simple-sequence repeat markers. Selected isolates were further examined for virulence on a set of differential lines containing each resistance (R) gene (R1 to R11). The overall P. infestans population was characterized as having a low level of genetic diversity and resistance to metalaxyl, and containing a high percentage of individuals that virulent to all 11 R genes. Both A1 and A2 mating types as well as self-fertile P. infestans isolates were present but there was no evidence of sexual reproduction. The low level of genetic differentiation in P. infestans populations is probably due to the action of relatively high levels of migration as supported by analysis of molecular variance (P < 0.01). Migration and asexual reproduction were the predominant mechanisms influencing the P. infestans population structure in the germplasm nursery. Therefore, it is important to ensure the production of pathogen-free potato seed tubers to aid sustainable production of potato in northwestern China.

  1. The Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 enhances resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Solanaceous plants.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; Han, Miao; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Song, Wei; Weide, Rob; Guo, Li-Yun; van der Vossen, Edwin A G; Govers, Francine

    2014-01-01

    Late blight caused by the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans is known as one of the most destructive potato diseases. Plant breeders tend to employ NB-LRR-based resistance for introducing genetically controlled late blight resistance in their breeding lines. However, P. infestans is able to rapidly escape this type of resistance, and hence, NB-LRR-based resistance in potato cultivars is often not durable. Previously, we identified a novel type of Phytophthora resistance in Arabidopsis. This resistance is mediated by the cell surface receptor LecRK-I.9, which belongs to the family of L-type lectin receptor kinases. In this study, we report that expression of the Arabidopsis LecRK-I.9 gene in potato and Nicotiana benthamiana results in significantly enhanced late blight resistance. Transcriptional profiling showed strong reduction in salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defence gene expression in LecRK-I.9 transgenic potato lines (TPLs). In contrast, transcripts of two protease inhibitor genes accumulated to extreme high levels, suggesting that LecRK-I.9-mediated late blight resistance is relying on a defence response that includes activation of protease inhibitors. These results demonstrate that the functionality of LecRK-I.9 in Phytophthora resistance is maintained after interfamily transfer to potato and N. benthamiana and suggest that this novel type of LecRK-based resistance can be exploited in breeding strategies to improve durable late blight resistance in Solanaceous crops.

  2. Actin dynamics in Phytophthora infestans; rapidly reorganizing cables and immobile, long-lived plaques.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Hua, Chenlei; Kots, Kiki; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2014-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic but well-organized intracellular framework that is essential for proper functioning of eukaryotic cells. Here, we use the actin binding peptide Lifeact to investigate the in vivo actin cytoskeleton dynamics in the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Lifeact-eGFP labelled thick and thin actin bundles and actin filament plaques allowing visualization of actin dynamics. All actin structures in the hyphae were cortically localized. In growing hyphae actin filament cables were axially oriented in the sub-apical region whereas in the extreme apex in growing hyphae, waves of fine F-actin polymerization were observed. Upon growth termination, actin filament plaques appeared in the hyphal tip. The distance between a hyphal tip and the first actin filament plaque correlated strongly with hyphal growth velocity. The actin filament plaques were nearly immobile with average lifetimes exceeding 1 h, relatively long when compared to the lifetime of actin patches known in other eukaryotes. Plaque assembly required ∼30 s while disassembly was accomplished in ∼10 s. Remarkably, plaque disassembly was not accompanied with internalization and the formation of endocytic vesicles. These findings suggest that the functions of actin plaques in oomycetes differ from those of actin patches present in other organisms.

  3. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Boevink, Petra C.; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R.; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c–1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  4. Estimating the level of susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans in potato genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Jonathan E; Forbes, Gregory A

    2009-06-01

    Resistance and susceptibility are closely related terms but differ in their underlying assumptions and measurement. Standardized methods for determining the level of resistance and susceptibility in potato to Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight, have traditionally been semiquantitative and are not based on a true interval scale, thus making their use in most mathematical and statistical operations inappropriate. Recently, researchers have attempted to develop interval scales using regression analysis of the direct or transformed area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC). In this article, a similar approach is described based on the relative AUDPC (RAUDPC) of one or two reference cultivars and tested using a data set of field trials involving cultivars with varying levels of susceptibility evaluated in different environments in several countries. The coefficient of variation (CV) among trials of the AUDPC was reduced when the RAUDPC was used and even more so when the RAUDPC was made relative to the RAUDPC of cv. Bintje (RaRAUDPC), which was present in all trials. The RaRAUDPC was used in regression models to estimate scale values for eight potato cultivars in 13 to 15 locations (depending on cultivar). The CVs of scale values measuring variation among sites were similar to those of the RaRAUDPC. Using two cultivars gave a slight improvement in CV, which was statistically significant. The scale developed here has ascending numbers for increasing susceptibility, is simple, and can be constructed as a ratio measure, which permitted the calculation of mean, variance, and CV.

  5. A culture filtrate of Phytophthora infestans primes defense reaction in potato cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Val, F; Desender, S; Bernard, K; Potin, P; Hamelin, G; Andrivon, D

    2008-06-01

    Priming of defense reactions by an elicitor results in an enhanced ability of the plant to respond to subsequent pathogen challenges. We previously showed that application of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to potato cell suspensions causes apoplastic acidification, but does not stimulate lipoxygenase (LOX) activity. Here, we tested the ability of various elicitors to prime and elicit defense reactions in potato cell suspensions. Adding 20 microg ml(1) LPS, laminarin, harpin N, or a concentrated culture filtrate (CCF) of Phytophthora infestans to cell cultures 18 h before a second elicitation with LPS did not alter the intensity of apoplastic acidification compared with a single LPS application. Conversely, high concentrations (200 or 400 microg ml(1)) of LPS, laminarin, and harpin N activated LOX in cells pretreated with 1 microg ml(1) CCF, but not in cells pretreated with LPS, laminarin, or harpin N. LOX response was maximal in pretreated cells of potato cv. Bintje when the second elicitation occurred 18 to 24 h after CCF application. These results showed that LOX activation is primed in potato cells by CCF, but not by LPS, harpin N, or laminarin. Finally, bioassays showed a slightly greater reduction of rot weight in half tubers treated with CCF followed by LPS before inoculation with Pectobacterium atrosepticum than in half tubers treated with either preparation alone, indicating a priming effect of CCF on both LOX induction and disease suppression.

  6. BABA-primed defense responses to Phytophthora infestans in the next vegetative progeny of potato

    PubMed Central

    Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Abramowski, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The transcript of the PR1 gene accumulation as an informative marker of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) was analyzed in β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) primed potato in the short-lasting (3 days) and long-lasting (28 days) time periods after induction and in the vegetative descendants of primed plants derived from tubers and from in vitro seedlings. BABA pretreatment resulted either in minimal or no PR1 gene expression, but sequential treatment with BABA followed by virulent Phytophthora infestans provided data on the imprint of post-stress information and its duration until fertilization, in the form of an enhanced PR1 transcript accumulation and a transient increase of basal resistance to the late blight disease. The primed state for defense of the susceptible potato cultivar was transmitted to its vegetative progeny as a potentiated PR1 mRNA accumulation following challenge inoculation. However, variation was observed between vegetative accessions of the BABA-primed potato genotype in responsiveness to disease. In contrast to plants derived from tubers, potato propagated through in vitro seedlings largely lost inducible resistance traits, although itretained primed PR1 gene expression. PMID:26528308

  7. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R J

    2016-01-29

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c-1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease.

  8. Testing Taxonomic Predictivity of Foliar and Tuber Resistance to Phytophthora infestans in Wild Relatives of Potato.

    PubMed

    Khiutti, A; Spooner, D M; Jansky, S H; Halterman, D A

    2015-09-01

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete phytopathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease found in potato-growing regions worldwide. Long-term management strategies to control late blight include the incorporation of host resistance to predominant strains. However, due to rapid genetic changes within pathogen populations, rapid and recurring identification and integration of novel host resistance traits is necessary. Wild relatives of potato offer a rich source of desirable traits, including late blight resistance, but screening methods can be time intensive. We tested the ability of taxonomy, ploidy, crossing group, breeding system, and geography to predict the presence of foliar and tuber late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp. Significant variation for resistance to both tuber and foliar late blight was found within and among species but there was no discernable predictive power based on taxonomic series, clade, ploidy, breeding system, elevation, or geographic location. We observed a moderate but significant correlation between tuber and foliar resistance within species. Although previously uncharacterized sources of both foliar and tuber resistance were identified, our study does not support an assumption that taxonomic or geographic data can be used to predict sources of late blight resistance in wild Solanum spp.

  9. Time-course investigation of Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaf from three cultivars by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Mia Kruse Guldstrand; Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Potato late blight is one the most important crop diseases worldwide. Even though potato has been studied for many years, the potato disease late blight still has a vast negative effect on the potato production [1], [2], [3]. Late blight is caused by the pathogen Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans), which initiates infection through leaves. However, the biological activities during different stages of infection are poorly described, and could enable novel or improved ways of defeating late blight infection [4]. Therefore, we investigated the interactions between P. infestans (mixed strain culture) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). Three commercially available field potato cultivars of different resistance to late blight infection; Kuras (moderate), Sarpo Mira (highly resistant) and Bintje (very susceptable) were grown under controlled green house conditions and inoculated with a diversity of P. infestans populations. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to investigate the infection with P. infestans in a time-course study over 258 h. Several key issues limits proteome analysis of potato leaf tissue [5], [6], [7]. Firstly, the immense complexity of the plant proteome, which is further complicated by the presence of highly abundant proteins, such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Secondly, plant leaf and potato, in particular, contain abundant levels amounts of phenols and polyphenols, which hinder or completely prevent a successful protein extraction. Hitherto, protein profiling of potato leaf tissues have been limited to few proteome studies and only 1484 proteins have been extracted and comprehensively described [5], [8], [9]. We here present the detailed methods and raw data by optimized gel-enhanced label free quantitative approach. The methodology enabled us to detect and quantify between 3248 and 3529 unique proteins from each cultivar, and up to 758 P. infestans derived proteins. The complete dataset is available via Proteome

  10. Selection for Fungicide Resistance Within a Growing Season in Field Populations of Phytophthora infestans at the Center of Origin.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Niklaus J; Sturbaum, Anne K; Montes, Gaspar Romero; Serrano, Edith Garay; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT The central highlands of Mexico should provide an optimal testing ground for evaluating the potential threat of selection for resistance to fungicides in the population of Phytophthora infestans. We evaluated the hypotheses that exposure to the fungicides azoxystrobin, cymoxanil, dimethomorph, fluazinam, mancozeb, metalaxyl, and propamocarb hydrochloride would lead to (i) a shift in the sensitivity distributions (i.e., selection) and (ii) a lower genotypic diversity of the population. We compared populations from unsprayed plots with populations that had been exposed to several applications of each of the fungicides within a single field season. This study provides novel baseline data and shows that the Toluca valley P. infestans population has a wide range of sensitivities to the fungicides fluazinam, cymoxanil, dimethomorph, metalaxyl, and propamocarb. Directional selection toward resistance combined with a reduction in genetic diversity of the P. infestans population was observed only for the fungicide metalaxyl. The results obtained provide direct experimental support for continuing vigilance regarding further introductions of exotic strains of P. infestans into the United States.

  11. The dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase gene BCE2 participates in basal resistance against Phytophthora infestans in potato and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyang; Sun, Chunlian; Jiang, Rui; He, Qin; Yang, Yu; Tian, Zhejuan; Tian, Zhendong; Xie, Conghua

    2014-07-01

    Dihydrolipoyl acyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.12), a branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase E2 subunit (BCE2), catalyzes the transfer of the acyl group from the lipoyl moiety to coenzyme A. However, the role of BCE2 responding to biotic stress in plant is not clear. In this study, we cloned and characterized a BCE2 gene from potato, namely StBCE2, which was previously suggested to be involved in Phytophthora infestans-potato interaction. We found that the expression of StBCE2 was strongly induced by both P. infestans isolate HB09-14-2 and salicylic acid. Besides, when the homolog of StBCE2 in Nicotiana benthamiana named NbBCE2 was silenced, plants showed increased susceptibility to P. infestans and reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Furthermore, we found that a marker gene NbrbohB involved in the production of reactive oxygen species, was also suppressed in NbBCE2-silenced plants. However, silencing of NbBCE2 had no significant effect on the hypersensitive responses trigged by INF1, R3a-AVR3a(KI) pair or Rpi-vnt1.1-AVR-vnt1.1 pair. Our results suggest that BCE2 is associated with the basal resistance to P. infestans by regulating H2O2 production.

  12. Production of Phytophthora infestans-resistant potato (Solanum tuberosum) utilising Ensifer adhaerens OV14.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Toni; Doohan, Fiona; Mullins, Ewen

    2012-06-01

    Based on the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation commodity crop improvement through genetic engineering is the fastest adopted crop technology in the world (James 2010). However, the complexity of the Agrobacterium patent landscape remains a challenge for non-patent holders who wish to generate novel varieties for a commercial purpose. The potential of non-Agrobacterium strains (Transbacter(™)) to modify a plant genome has previously been described. However, they are unlikely to be widely used without significant adjustments in transformation protocols in order to improve their gene transfer efficiencies. In this study we set out to identify alternative bacteria species that could (a) utilize vir genes for genetic transformation and (b) substitute for A. tumefaciens in existing transformation protocols, without a prerequisite for protocol modifications. To this end we isolated a collection (n=751) of plant-associated bacteria from the rhizosphere of commercially grown crops. Based on various screens, including plant transformation with the open-source vector pCAMBIA5105, we identified a strain of the bacterium Ensifer adhaerens with the capacity to transform both Arabidopsis thaliana (0.12%) and potato (mean transformation frequency 35.1%). Thereafter, Ensifer adhaerens was used to generate blight- (causative organism Phytophthora infestans) resistant potato using the Solanum bulbocastanum 'resistance to blight' (RB) gene. Resistant genotypes were confirmed by associated molecular analysis and resistant phenotypes demonstrated by the development of hypersensitive lesions on inoculated leaf tissue post-pathogen inoculation. These data confirm the potential of Ensifer-mediated transformation (EMT) as a novel platform for the high frequency generation of transgenic potato.

  13. Effects of latrunculin B on the actin cytoskeleton and hyphal growth in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Ketelaar, Tijs; Meijer, Harold J G; Spiekerman, Marjolein; Weide, Rob; Govers, Francine

    2012-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is conserved in all eukaryotes, but its functions vary among different organisms. In oomycetes, the function of the actin cytoskeleton has received relatively little attention. We have performed a bioinformatics study and show that oomycete actin genes fall within a distinct clade that is divergent from plant, fungal and vertebrate actin genes. To obtain a better understanding of the functions of the actin cytoskeleton in hyphal growth of oomycetes, we studied the actin organization in Phytophthora infestans hyphae and the consequences of treatment with the actin depolymerising drug latrunculin B (latB). This revealed that latB treatment causes a concentration dependent inhibition of colony expansion and aberrant hyphal growth. The most obvious aberrations observed upon treatment with 0.1 μM latB were increased hyphal branching and irregular tube diameters whereas at higher concentrations latB (0.5 and 1 μM) tips of expanding hyphae changed into balloon-like shapes. This aberrant growth correlated with changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. In untreated hyphae, staining with fluorescently tagged phalloidin revealed two populations of actin filaments: long, axially oriented actin filament cables and cortical actin filament plaques. Two hyphal subtypes were recognized, one containing only plaques and the other containing both cables and plaques. In the latter, some hyphae had an apical zone without actin filament plaques. Upon latB treatment, the proportion of hyphae without actin filament cables increased and there were more hyphae with a short apical zone without actin filament plaques. In general, actin filament plaques were more resilient against actin depolymerisation than actin filament cables. Besides disturbing hyphal growth and actin organization, actin depolymerisation also affected the positioning of nuclei. In the presence of latB, the distance between nuclei and the hyphal tip decreased, suggesting that the actin

  14. Diverse mechanisms shape the evolution of virulence factors in the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans sampled from China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, E-Jiao; Yang, Li-Na; Zhu, Wen; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of virulence in plant pathogens is still poorly understood but the knowledge is important for the effective use of plant resistance and sustainable disease management. Spatial population dynamics of virulence, race and SSR markers in 140 genotypes sampled from seven geographic locations in China were compared to infer the mechanisms driving the evolution of virulence in Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans). All virulence types and a full spectrum of race complexity, ranging from the race able to infect the universally susceptible cultivar only to all differentials, were detected. Eight and two virulence factors were under diversifying and constraining selection respectively while no natural selection was detected in one of the virulence types. Further analyses revealed excesses in simple and complex races but deficiency in intermediate race and negative associations of annual mean temperature at the site from which pathogen isolates were collected with frequency of virulence to differentials and race complexity in the pathogen populations. These results suggest that host selection may interact with other factors such as climatic conditions in determining the evolutionary trajectory of virulence and race structure in P. infestans and global warming may slow down the emergence of new virulence in the pathogen. PMID:27193142

  15. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight. PMID:26853908

  16. The combined nitrate reductase and nitrite-dependent route of NO synthesis in potato immunity to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Izbiańska, Karolina

    2016-11-01

    In contrast to the in-depth knowledge concerning nitric oxide (NO) function, our understanding of NO synthesis in plants is still very limited. In view of the above, this paper provides a step by step presentation of the reductive pathway for endogenous NO generation involving nitrate reductase (NR) activity and nitrite implication in potato defense to Phytophthora infestans. A biphasic character of NO emission, peaking mainly at 3 and then at 24 hpi, was detected during the hypersensitive response (HR). In avr P. infestans potato leaves enhanced NR gene and protein expression was tuned with the depletion of nitrate contents and the increase in nitrite supply at 3 hpi. In the same time period a temporary down-regulation of nitrite reductase (NiR) and activity was found. The study for the link between NO signaling and HR revealed an up-regulation of used markers of effective defense, i.e. Nonexpressor of PR genes (NPR1), thioredoxins (Thx) and PR1, at early time-points (1-3 hpi) upon inoculation. In contrast to the resistant response, in the susceptible one a late overexpression (24-48 hpi) of NPR1 and PR1 mRNA levels was observed. Presented data confirmed the importance of nitrite processed by NR in NO generation in inoculated potato leaves. However, based on the pharmacological approach the potential formation of NO from nitrite bypassing the NR activity during HR response to P. infestans has also been discussed.

  17. Normoergic NO-dependent changes, triggered by a SAR inducer in potato, create more potent defense responses to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Janus, Łukasz; Milczarek, Grzegorz; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Abramowski, Dariusz; Billert, Hanna; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta

    2013-10-01

    In our experimental approach we examined how potato leaves exposed to a chemical agent might induce nitric oxide (NO) dependent biochemical modifications for future mobilization of an effective resistance to Phytophthora infestans. After potato leaf treatment with one of the following SAR inducers, i.e. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA), 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or Laminarin, we observed enhanced NO generation concomitant with biochemical changes related to a slight superoxide anion (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation dependent on minimal NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities, respectively. These rather normoergic changes, linked to the NO message, were mediated by the temporary down-regulation of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). In turn, after challenge inoculation signal amplification promoted potato resistance manifested in the up-regulation of GSNOR activity tuned with the depletion of the SNO pool, which was observed by our team earlier (Floryszak-Wieczorek et al., 2012). Moreover, hyperergic defense responses related to an early and rapid O2(-)and H2O2 overproduction together with a temporary increase in NADPH oxidase and peroxidase activities were noted. BABA treatment was the most effective against P. infestans resulting in the enhanced activity of β-1,3-glucanase and callose deposition. Our results indicate that NO-mediated biochemical modifications might play an important role in creating more potent defense responses of potato to a subsequent P. infestans attack.

  18. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-02-08

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight.

  19. Characterization of three novel desaturases involved in the delta-6 desaturation pathways for polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis from Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Qin; Qing, Xiaohe; Dobson, Gary; Li, Xinzheng; Qi, Baoxiu

    2013-09-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the causative agent of potato blight that resulted in the great famine in Ireland in the nineteenth century. This microbe can release large amounts of the C20 very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids arachidonic acid (ARA; 20:4Δ(5, 8, 11, 14)) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5Δ(5, 8, 11, 14, 17)) upon invasion that is known to elicit a hypersensitive response to their host plant. In order to identify enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of these fatty acids, we blasted the recently fully sequenced P. infestans genome and identified three novel putatively encoding desaturase sequences. These were subsequently functionally characterized by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and confirmed that they encode desaturases with Δ12, Δ6 and Δ5 activity, designated here as PinDes12, PinDes6 and PinDes5, respectively. This, together with the combined fatty acid profiles and a previously identified Δ6 elongase activity, implies that the ARA and EPA are biosynthesized predominantly via the Δ6 desaturation pathways in P. infestans. Elucidation of ARA and EPA biosynthetic mechanism may provide new routes to combating this potato blight microbe directly or by means of conferring resistance to important crops.

  20. Phytophthora infestans Argonaute 1 binds microRNA and small RNAs from effector genes and transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Åsman, Anna K M; Fogelqvist, Johan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Dixelius, Christina

    2016-08-01

    Phytophthora spp. encode large sets of effector proteins and distinct populations of small RNAs (sRNAs). Recent evidence has suggested that pathogen-derived sRNAs can modulate the expression of plant defense genes. Here, we studied the sRNA classes and functions associated with Phytophthora infestans Argonaute (Ago) proteins. sRNAs were co-immunoprecipitated with three PiAgo proteins and deep sequenced. Twenty- to twenty-two-nucleotide (nt) sRNAs were identified as the main interaction partners of PiAgo1 and high enrichment of 24-26-nt sRNAs was seen in the PiAgo4-bound sample. The frequencies and sizes of transposable element (TE)-derived sRNAs in the different PiAgo libraries suggested diversified roles of the PiAgo proteins in the control of different TE classes. We further provide evidence for the involvement of PiAgo1 in the P. infestans microRNA (miRNA) pathway. Protein-coding genes are probably regulated by the shared action of PiAgo1 and PiAgo5, as demonstrated by analysis of differential expression. An abundance of sRNAs from genes encoding host cell death-inducing Crinkler (CRN) effectors was bound to PiAgo1, implicating this protein in the regulation of the expanded CRN gene family. The data suggest that PiAgo1 plays an essential role in gene regulation and that at least two RNA silencing pathways regulate TEs in the plant-pathogenic oomycete P. infestans.

  1. Cellular responses of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans to cyclic lipopeptide surfactants and their dependence on G proteins.

    PubMed

    van de Mortel, Judith E; Tran, Ha; Govers, Francine; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2009-08-01

    Oomycete pathogens cause major yield losses for many crop plants, and their control depends heavily on agrochemicals. Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) were recently discovered as a new class of natural compounds with strong activities against oomycetes. The CLP massetolide A (Mass A), produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens, has zoosporicidal activity, induces systemic resistance, and reduces late blight in tomato. To gain further insight into the modes of action of CLPs, the effects of Mass A on pore formation, mycelial growth, sporangium formation, and zoospore behavior were investigated, as was the involvement of G proteins in the sensitivity of Phytophthora infestans to Mass A. The results showed that Mass A induced the formation of transmembrane pores with an estimated size of between 1.2 and 1.8 nm. Dose-response experiments revealed that zoospores were the most sensitive to Mass A, followed by mycelium and cysts. Mass A significantly reduced sporangium formation and caused increased branching and swelling of hyphae. At relatively low concentrations, Mass A induced encystment of zoospores. It had no effect on the chemotactic response of zoospores but did adversely affect zoospore autoaggregation. A loss-of-function transformant of P. infestans lacking the G-protein alpha subunit was more sensitive to Mass A, whereas a gain-of-function transformant required a higher Mass A concentration to interfere with zoospore aggregation. Results indicate that Mass A disturbs various developmental stages in the life cycle of P. infestans and suggest that the cellular responses of P. infestans to this CLP are, in part, dependent on G-protein signaling.

  2. Quantitative resistance of potato to Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Phytophthora infestans: integrating PAMP-triggered response and pathogen growth.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Alexander; Hamelin, Gaëlle; Andrivon, Didier; Val, Florence

    2011-01-01

    While the mechanisms underlying quantitative resistance of plants to pathogens are still not fully elucidated, the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs)-triggered response model suggests that such resistance depends on a dynamic interplay between the plant and the pathogen. In this model, the pathogens themselves or elicitors they produce would induce general defense pathways, which in turn limit pathogen growth and host colonisation. It therefore suggests that quantitative resistance is directly linked to a common set of general host defense mechanisms, but experimental evidence is still inconclusive. We tested the PAMP-triggered model using two pathogens (Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Phytophthora infestans) differing by their infectious processes and five potato cultivars spanning a range of resistance levels to each pathogen. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, used as a defense marker, and accumulation of phenolics were measured in tuber slices challenged with lipopolysaccharides from P. atrosepticum or a concentrated culture filtrate from P. infestans. PAL activity increased following treatment with the filtrate but not with lipopolysaccharides, and varied among cultivars. It was positively related to tuber resistance to P. atrosepticum, but negatively related to tuber resistance to P. infestans. It was also positively related to the accumulation of total phenolics. Chlorogenic acid, the main phenolic accumulated, inhibited growth of both pathogens in vitro, showing that PAL induction caused active defense against each of them. Tuber slices in which PAL activity had been induced before inoculation showed increased resistance to P. atrosepticum, but not to P. infestans. Our results show that inducing a general defense mechanism does not necessarily result in quantitative resistance. As such, they invalidate the hypothesis that the PAMP-triggered model alone can explain quantitative resistance. We thus designed a more complex model

  3. Quantitative Resistance of Potato to Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Phytophthora infestans: Integrating PAMP-Triggered Response and Pathogen Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kröner, Alexander; Hamelin, Gaëlle; Andrivon, Didier; Val, Florence

    2011-01-01

    While the mechanisms underlying quantitative resistance of plants to pathogens are still not fully elucidated, the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs)-triggered response model suggests that such resistance depends on a dynamic interplay between the plant and the pathogen. In this model, the pathogens themselves or elicitors they produce would induce general defense pathways, which in turn limit pathogen growth and host colonisation. It therefore suggests that quantitative resistance is directly linked to a common set of general host defense mechanisms, but experimental evidence is still inconclusive. We tested the PAMP-triggered model using two pathogens (Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Phytophthora infestans) differing by their infectious processes and five potato cultivars spanning a range of resistance levels to each pathogen. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, used as a defense marker, and accumulation of phenolics were measured in tuber slices challenged with lipopolysaccharides from P. atrosepticum or a concentrated culture filtrate from P. infestans. PAL activity increased following treatment with the filtrate but not with lipopolysaccharides, and varied among cultivars. It was positively related to tuber resistance to P. atrosepticum, but negatively related to tuber resistance to P. infestans. It was also positively related to the accumulation of total phenolics. Chlorogenic acid, the main phenolic accumulated, inhibited growth of both pathogens in vitro, showing that PAL induction caused active defense against each of them. Tuber slices in which PAL activity had been induced before inoculation showed increased resistance to P. atrosepticum, but not to P. infestans. Our results show that inducing a general defense mechanism does not necessarily result in quantitative resistance. As such, they invalidate the hypothesis that the PAMP-triggered model alone can explain quantitative resistance. We thus designed a more complex model

  4. The Potato ERF Transcription Factor StERF3 Negatively Regulates Resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Salt Tolerance in Potato.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhendong; He, Qin; Wang, Haixia; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Shao, Fang; Xie, Conghua

    2015-05-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are unique to the plant kingdom and play crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic stresses. We show here that a potato StERF3, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif in its C-terminal region, negatively regulates resistance to Phytophthora infestans and salt tolerance in potato. The StERF3 promoter responds to induction by salicylic acid, ABA ethylene and NaCl, as well as P. infestans, the causal agent of potato late blight disease. StERF3 could bind to the GCC box element of the HIS3 promoter and activate transcription of HIS3 in yeast cells. Importantly, silencing of StERF3 in potato produced an enhanced foliage resistance to P. infestans and elevated plant tolerance to NaCl stress accompanied by the activation of defense-related genes (PR1, NPR1 and WRKY1). In contrast, StERF3-overexpressing plants showed reduced expression of these defense-related genes and enhanced susceptibility to P. infestans, suggesting that StERF3 functions as a negative regulator of downstream defense- and/or stress-related genes in potato. StERF3 is localized to the nucleus. Interestingly, yeast two-hybrid assay and a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) test clarified that StERF3 could interact with other proteins in the cytoplasm which may lead to its re-localization between the nucleus and cytoplasm, revealing a novel means of StERF3 regulation. Taken together, these data provide new insights into the mechanism underlying how StERF3 negatively regulates late blight resistance and abiotic tolerance in potato and may have a potential use in engineering late blight resistance in potato.

  5. The Cell Death Triggered by the Nuclear Localized RxLR Effector PITG_22798 from Phytophthora infestans Is Suppressed by the Effector AVR3b.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Yajuan; Zhou, Jing; Du, Juan; Hou, Juan; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Haixia; Tian, Zhendong; Xie, Conghua

    2017-02-14

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, potentially secrete many RxLR effector proteins into plant cells to modulate plant immune responses and promote colonization. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these RxLR effectors suppress plant immune responses are largely unknown. Here we describe an RxLR effector PITG_22798 (Gene accession: XM_002998349) that was upregulated during early infection of potato by P. infestans. By employment of agroinfiltration, we observed that PITG_22798 triggers cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. Confocal microscopic examination showed that PITG_22798-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) located in the host nucleus when expressed transiently in N. benthamiana leaves. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) domain of PITG_22798 is important for nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activity. Sequence alignment and transient expression showed that PITG_22798 from diverse P. infestans isolates are conserved, and transient expression of PITG_22798 enhances P. infestans colonization of N. benthamiana leaves, which suggests that PITG_22798 contributes to P. infestans infection. PITG_22798-triggered cell death is dependent on SGT1-mediated signaling and is suppressed by the P. infestans avirulence effector 3b (AVR3b). The present research provides a clue for further investigation of how P. infestans effector PITG_22798 associates with and modulates host immunity.

  6. The Cell Death Triggered by the Nuclear Localized RxLR Effector PITG_22798 from Phytophthora infestans Is Suppressed by the Effector AVR3b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Yajuan; Zhou, Jing; Du, Juan; Hou, Juan; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Haixia; Tian, Zhendong; Xie, Conghua

    2017-01-01

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, potentially secrete many RxLR effector proteins into plant cells to modulate plant immune responses and promote colonization. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these RxLR effectors suppress plant immune responses are largely unknown. Here we describe an RxLR effector PITG_22798 (Gene accession: XM_002998349) that was upregulated during early infection of potato by P. infestans. By employment of agroinfiltration, we observed that PITG_22798 triggers cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. Confocal microscopic examination showed that PITG_22798-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) located in the host nucleus when expressed transiently in N. benthamiana leaves. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) domain of PITG_22798 is important for nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activity. Sequence alignment and transient expression showed that PITG_22798 from diverse P. infestans isolates are conserved, and transient expression of PITG_22798 enhances P. infestans colonization of N. benthamiana leaves, which suggests that PITG_22798 contributes to P. infestans infection. PITG_22798-triggered cell death is dependent on SGT1-mediated signaling and is suppressed by the P. infestans avirulence effector 3b (AVR3b). The present research provides a clue for further investigation of how P. infestans effector PITG_22798 associates with and modulates host immunity. PMID:28216607

  7. Mutations in the EDR1 Gene Alter the Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Phytophthora infestans and the Bacterial PAMPs flg22 and elf18.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Katrin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Naumann, Kai; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Scheel, Dierk; Rosahl, Sabine; Westphal, Lore

    2015-02-01

    Mechanistically, nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against the oomycete Phytophthora infestans is not well understood. Besides PEN2 and PEN3, which contribute to penetration resistance, no further components have been identified so far. In an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutant screen, we mutagenized pen2-1 and screened for mutants with an altered response to infection by P. infestans. One of the mutants obtained, enhanced response to Phytophthora infestans6 (erp6), was analyzed. Whole-genome sequencing of erp6 revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of the kinase domain of At1g08720, which encodes the putative MAPKKK ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1). We demonstrate that three independent lines with knock-out alleles of edr1 mount an enhanced response to P. infestans inoculation, mediated by increased salicylic acid signaling and callose deposition. Moreover, we show that the single amino acid substitution in erp6 causes the loss of in vitro autophosphorylation activity of EDR1. Furthermore, growth inhibition experiments suggest a so-far-unknown involvement of EDR1 in the response to the pathogen-associated molecular patterns flg22 and elf18. We conclude that EDR1 contributes to the defense response of A. thaliana against P. infestans. Our data position EDR1 as a negative regulator in postinvasive nonhost resistance.

  8. Functionally Redundant RXLR Effectors from Phytophthora infestans Act at Different Steps to Suppress Early flg22-Triggered Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fraiture, Malou; Liu, Xiaoyu; Boevink, Petra C.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Chen, Ying; Kandel, Kabindra; Sessa, Guido; Birch, Paul R. J.; Brunner, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs), such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs), the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI), significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc) in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the molecular

  9. Functionally redundant RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans act at different steps to suppress early flg22-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzi; McLellan, Hazel; Fraiture, Malou; Liu, Xiaoyu; Boevink, Petra C; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Chen, Ying; Kandel, Kabindra; Sessa, Guido; Birch, Paul R J; Brunner, Frédéric

    2014-04-01

    Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs), such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs), the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI), significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc) in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the molecular

  10. Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector AVR1 Interacts with Exocyst Component Sec5 to Manipulate Plant Immunity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yu; Mpina, Mohamed H.; Birch, Paul R.J.; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans secretes numerous RXLR effectors that modulate host defense and thereby pave the way for successful invasion. Here, we show that the RXLR effector AVR1 is a virulence factor that promotes colonization and suppresses callose deposition, a hallmark of basal defense. To identify host targets of AVR1, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and selected Sec5 as a candidate. Sec5 is a subunit of the exocyst, a protein complex that is involved in vesicle trafficking. AVR1-like (A-L), a close homolog of AVR1, also acts as a virulence factor, but unlike AVR1, A-L does not suppress CRINKLER2 (CRN2)-induced cell death or interact with Sec5. Compared with AVR1, A-L is shorter and lacks the carboxyl-terminal tail, the T-region that is crucial for CRN2-induced cell death suppression and Sec5 interaction. In planta analyses revealed that AVR1 and Sec5 are in close proximity, and coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction. Sec5 is required for secretion of the pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 and callose deposition and also plays a role in CRN2-induced cell death. Our findings show that P. infestans manipulates an exocyst subunit and thereby potentially disturbs vesicle trafficking, a cellular process that is important for basal defense. This is a novel strategy that oomycete pathogens exploit to modulate host defense. PMID:26336092

  11. Evidence for Small RNAs Homologous to Effector-Encoding Genes and Transposable Elements in the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R.; Åsman, Anna K. M.; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Jahan, Sultana N.; Reimegård, Johan; Fogelqvist, Johan; Savenkov, Eugene; Söderbom, Fredrik; Avrova, Anna O.; Whisson, Stephen C.; Dixelius, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the oomycete pathogen responsible for the devastating late blight disease on potato and tomato. There is presently an intense research focus on the role(s) of effectors in promoting late blight disease development. However, little is known about how they are regulated, or how diversity in their expression may be generated among different isolates. Here we present data from investigation of RNA silencing processes, characterized by non-coding small RNA molecules (sRNA) of 19–40 nt. From deep sequencing of sRNAs we have identified sRNAs matching numerous RxLR and Crinkler (CRN) effector protein genes in two isolates differing in pathogenicity. Effector gene-derived sRNAs were present in both isolates, but exhibited marked differences in abundance, especially for CRN effectors. Small RNAs in P. infestans grouped into three clear size classes of 21, 25/26 and 32 nt. Small RNAs from all size classes mapped to RxLR effector genes, but notably 21 nt sRNAs were the predominant size class mapping to CRN effector genes. Some effector genes, such as PiAvr3a, to which sRNAs were found, also exhibited differences in transcript accumulation between the two isolates. The P. infestans genome is rich in transposable elements, and the majority of sRNAs of all size classes mapped to these sequences, predominantly to long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. RNA silencing of Dicer and Argonaute genes provided evidence that generation of 21 nt sRNAs is Dicer-dependent, while accumulation of longer sRNAs was impacted by silencing of Argonaute genes. Additionally, we identified six microRNA (miRNA) candidates from our sequencing data, their precursor sequences from the genome sequence, and target mRNAs. These miRNA candidates have features characteristic of both plant and metazoan miRNAs. PMID:23272103

  12. Sequence diversity in the large subunit of RNA polymerase I contributes to Mefenoxam insensitivity in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Sierotzki, Helge; Scalliet, Gabriel; Birch, Paul R J; Cooke, David E L; Csukai, Michael; Whisson, Stephen C

    2014-09-01

    Phenylamide fungicides have been widely used for the control of oomycete-incited plant diseases for over 30 years. Insensitivity to this chemical class of fungicide was recorded early in its usage history, but the precise protein(s) conditioning insensitivity has proven difficult to determine. To determine the genetic basis of insensitivity and to inform strategies for the cloning of the gene(s) responsible, genetic crosses were established between Mefenoxam sensitive and intermediate insensitive isolates of Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen. F1 progeny showed the expected semi-dominant phenotypes for Mefenoxam insensitivity and suggested the involvement of multiple loci, complicating the positional cloning of the gene(s) conditioning insensitivity to Mefenoxam. Instead, a candidate gene strategy was used, based on previous observations that the primary effect of phenylamide compounds is to inhibit ribosomal RNA synthesis. The subunits of RNA polymerase I (RNApolI) were sequenced from sensitive and insensitive isolates and F1 progeny. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific to insensitive field isolates were identified in the gene encoding the large subunit of RNApolI. In a survey of field isolates, SNP T1145A (Y382F) showed an 86% association with Mefenoxam insensitivity. Isolates not showing this association belonged predominantly to one P. infestans genotype. The transfer of the 'insensitive' allele of RPA190 to a sensitive isolate yielded transgenic lines that were insensitive to Mefenoxam. These results demonstrate that sequence variation in RPA190 contributes to insensitivity to Mefenoxam in P. infestans.

  13. Multiple QTL for Horticultural Traits and Quantitative Resistance to Phytophthora infestans Linked on Solanum habrochaites Chromosome 11

    PubMed Central

    Haggard, J. Erron; Johnson, Emily B.; St. Clair, Dina A.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, a Phytophthora infestans resistance QTL from Solanum habrochaites chromosome 11 was introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Fine mapping of this resistance QTL using near-isogenic lines (NILs) revealed some co-located QTL with undesirable effects on plant size, canopy density, and fruit size traits. Subsequently, higher-resolution mapping with sub-NILs detected multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 9.4-cM region of chromosome 11. In our present study, these same sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over 2 years. The horticultural trait QTL originally detected by fine mapping each fractionated into two or more QTL at higher resolution. A total of 34 QTL were detected across all traits, with 14% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions (QTL × E). QTL for many traits were co-located, suggesting either pleiotropic effects or tight linkage among genes controlling these traits. Recombination in the pericentromeric region of the introgression between markers TG147 and At4g10050 was suppressed to approximately 29.7 Mbp per cM, relative to the genomewide average of 750 kbp per cM. The genetic architecture of many of the horticultural and P. infestans resistance traits that mapped within this chromosome 11 S. habrochaites region is complex. Complicating factors included fractionation of QTL, pleiotropy or tight linkage of QTL for multiple traits, pericentromeric chromosomal location(s), and/or QTL × E. High-resolution mapping of QTL in this region would be needed to determine which specific target QTL could be useful in breeding cultivated tomato. PMID:25504736

  14. A Recent Expansion of the RXLR Effector Gene Avrblb2 Is Maintained in Global Populations of Phytophthora infestans Indicating Different Contributions to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Ricardo F; Cano, Liliana M; Raffaele, Sylvain; Win, Joe; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Belhaj, Khaoula; Oh, Sang-Keun; Thines, Marco; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-08-01

    The introgression of disease resistance (R) genes encoding immunoreceptors with broad-spectrum recognition into cultivated potato appears to be the most promising approach to achieve sustainable management of late blight caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Rpi-blb2 from Solanum bulbocastanum shows great potential for use in agriculture based on preliminary potato disease trials. Rpi-blb2 confers immunity by recognizing the P. infestans avirulence effector protein AVRblb2 after it is translocated inside the plant cell. This effector belongs to the RXLR class of effectors and is under strong positive selection. Structure-function analyses revealed a key polymorphic amino acid (position 69) in AVRblb2 effector that is critical for activation of Rpi-blb2. In this study, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the Avrblb2 gene family and further characterized its genetic structure in worldwide populations. Our data indicate that Avrblb2 evolved as a single-copy gene in a putative ancestral species of P. infestans and has recently expanded in the Phytophthora spp. that infect solanaceous hosts. As a consequence, at least four variants of AVRblb2 arose in P. infestans. One of these variants, with a Phe residue at position 69, evades recognition by the cognate resistance gene. Surprisingly, all Avrblb2 variants are maintained in pathogen populations. This suggests a potential benefit for the pathogen in preserving duplicated versions of AVRblb2, possibly because the variants may have different contributions to pathogen fitness in a diversified solanaceous host environment.

  15. The Plant Membrane-Associated REMORIN1.3 Accumulates in Discrete Perihaustorial Domains and Enhances Susceptibility to Phytophthora infestans1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Richardson, Annis; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Mongrand, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous pathogens such as the oomycete Phytophthora infestans infect plants by developing specialized structures termed haustoria inside the host cells. Haustoria are thought to enable the secretion of effector proteins into the plant cells. Haustorium biogenesis, therefore, is critical for pathogen accommodation in the host tissue. Haustoria are enveloped by a specialized host-derived membrane, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), which is distinct from the plant plasma membrane. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of the EHM are unknown. Remarkably, several plasma membrane-localized proteins are excluded from the EHM, but the remorin REM1.3 accumulates around P. infestans haustoria. Here, we used overexpression, colocalization with reporter proteins, and superresolution microscopy in cells infected by P. infestans to reveal discrete EHM domains labeled by REM1.3 and the P. infestans effector AVRblb2. Moreover, SYNAPTOTAGMIN1, another previously identified perihaustorial protein, localized to subdomains that are mainly not labeled by REM1.3 and AVRblb2. Functional characterization of REM1.3 revealed that it is a susceptibility factor that promotes infection by P. infestans. This activity, and REM1.3 recruitment to the EHM, require the REM1.3 membrane-binding domain. Our results implicate REM1.3 membrane microdomains in plant susceptibility to an oomycete pathogen. PMID:24808104

  16. Host Protein BSL1 Associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune Receptor R2 to Mediate Disease Resistance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G.O.; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Birch, Paul R.J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor. PMID:22885736

  17. The Full-Size ABCG Transporters Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 Function in Pre- and Postinvasion Defense against Phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yusuke; Ojika, Makoto; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Jones, David A; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Takemoto, Daigo

    2016-05-01

    The sesquiterpenoid capsidiol is the major phytoalexin produced by Nicotiana and Capsicum species. Capsidiol is produced in plant tissues attacked by pathogens and plays a major role in postinvasion defense by inhibiting pathogen growth. Using virus-induced gene silencing-based screening, we identified two Nicotiana benthamiana (wild tobacco) genes encoding functionally redundant full-size ABCG (PDR-type) transporters, Nb-ABCG1/PDR1 and Nb-ABCG2/PDR2, which are essential for resistance to the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans Silencing of Nb-ABCG1/2 compromised secretion of capsidiol, revealing Nb-ABCG1/2 as probable exporters of capsidiol. Accumulation of plasma membrane-localized Nb-ABCG1 and Nb-ABCG2 was observed at the site of pathogen penetration. Silencing of EAS (encoding 5-epi-aristolochene synthase), a gene for capsidiol biosynthesis, reduced resistance to P. infestans, but penetration by P. infestans was not affected. By contrast, Nb-ABCG1/2-silenced plants showed reduced penetration defense, indicating that Nb-ABCG1/2 are involved in preinvasion defense against P. infestans Plastidic GGPPS1 (geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase) was also found to be required for preinvasion defense, thereby suggesting that plastid-produced diterpene(s) are the antimicrobial compounds active in preinvasion defense. These findings suggest that N. benthamiana ABCG1/2 are involved in the export of both antimicrobial diterpene(s) for preinvasion defense and capsidiol for postinvasion defense against P. infestans.

  18. Spatial Analysis of Phytophthora infestans Genotypes and Late Blight Severity on Tomato and Potato in the Del Fuerte Valley Using Geostatistics and Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Garcia, R; Orum, T V; Felix-Gastelum, R; Trinidad-Correa, R; Vanetten, H D; Nelson, M R

    2001-12-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic structure of Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of potato and tomato late blight, was analyzed spatially in a mixed potato and tomato production area in the Del Fuerte Valley, Sinaloa, Mexico. Isolates of P. infestans were characterized by mating type, allozyme analysis at the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and peptidase loci, restriction fragment length polymorphism with probe RG57, metalaxyl sensitivity, and aggressiveness to tomato and potato. Spatial patterns of P. infestans genotypes were analyzed by geographical information systems and geo-statistics during the seasons of 1994-95, 1995-96, and 1996-97. Spatial analysis of the genetic structure of P. infestans indicates that geographic substructuring of this pathogen occurs in this area. Maps displaying the probabilities of occurrence of mating types and genotypes of P. infestans, and of disease severity at a regional scale, were presented. Some genotypes that exhibited differences in epidemiologically important features such as metalaxyl sensitivity and aggressiveness to tomato and potato had a restricted spread and were localized in isolated areas. Analysis of late blight severity showed recurring patterns, such as the earliest onset of the disease in the area where both potato and tomato were growing, strengthening the hypothesis that infected potato tubers are the main source of primary inoculum. The information that geostatistical analysis provides might help improve management programs for late blight in the Del Fuerte Valley.

  19. Establishment of the straightforward electro-transformation system for Phytophthora infestans and its comparison with the improved PEG/CaCl₂ transformation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Zhu, Xiangyuan; Cui, Haichen; Ojika, Makoto; Wang, Ruigang; Liu, Huirong

    2015-05-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the most devastating pathogen of potato. For the biology study of P. infestans at the molecular level, one of the difficulties is the technique for the genetic transformation. In this study, the straightforward electro-transformation system was established for P. infestans with a green fluorescent protein expression vector and compared with the improved PEG/CaCl2 mediated protoplast transformation system. The results showed that the straightforward electro-transformation could work in P. infestans and 32 positive transformants were obtained per about 1.10×10(6) zoospores. The transformants per μg of vector DNA were 1.08. The transformation efficiency of the straightforward electro-transformation was approximately 2 times higher than that of the improved PEG/CaCl2 mediated protoplast transformation (17 positive transformants per about 1.05×10(6) protoplasts, 0.58 transformants per μg of vector DNA) according to the reported procedures. Furthermore, compared with the improved PEG/CaCl2 transformation, the straightforward electroporation is simpler and requires less starting materials and operating time from collecting material to obtaining the resistant transformants. Our work will lay a foundation for the biology study of P. infestans in the future.

  20. Host-mediated gene silencing of a single effector gene from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans imparts partial resistance to late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Sanju, Suman; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Thakur, Aditi; Shukla, Pradeep K; Srivastava, Nidhi; Pattanayak, Debasis; Sharma, Sanjeev; Singh, B P

    2015-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has proved a powerful genetic tool for silencing genes in plants. Host-induced gene silencing of pathogen genes has provided a gene knockout strategy for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The RXLR effector Avr3a gene is largely responsible for virulence of oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In this study, we attempted to silence the Avr3a gene of P. infestans through RNAi technology. The P. infestans inoculation resulted in lower disease progression and a reduction in pathogen load, as demonstrated by disease scoring and quantification of pathogen biomass in terms of Pi08 repetitive elements, respectively. Transgenic plants induced moderate silencing of Avr3a, and the presence and/or expression of small interfering RNAs, as determined through Northern hybridization, indicated siRNA targeted against Avr3a conferred moderate resistance to P. infestans. The single effector gene did not provide complete resistance against P. infestans. Although the Avr3a effector gene could confer moderate resistance, for complete resistance, the cumulative effect of effector genes in addition to Avr3a needs to be considered. In this study, we demonstrated that host-induced RNAi is an effective strategy for functional genomics in oomycetes.

  1. Host protein BSL1 associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune receptor R2 to mediate disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Birch, Paul R J; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor.

  2. Insights into organ-specific pathogen defense responses in plants: RNA-seq analysis of potato tuber-Phytophthora infestans interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans can attack both potato foliage and tubers. Although interaction transcriptome dynamics between potato foliage and various pathogens have been reported, no transcriptome study has focused specifically upon how potato tubers respond to pathogen infection. When inoculated with P. infestans, tubers of nontransformed ‘Russet Burbank’ (WT) potato develop late blight disease while those of transgenic ‘Russet Burbank’ line SP2211 (+RB), which expresses the potato late blight resistance gene RB (Rpi-blb1), do not. We compared transcriptome responses to P. infestans inoculation in tubers of these two lines. Results We demonstrated the practicality of RNA-seq to study tetraploid potato and present the first RNA-seq study of potato tuber diseases. A total of 483 million paired end Illumina RNA-seq reads were generated, representing the transcription of around 30,000 potato genes. Differentially expressed genes, gene groups and ontology bins that exhibited differences between the WT and +RB lines were identified. P. infestans transcripts, including those of known effectors, were also identified. Conclusion Faster and stronger activation of defense related genes, gene groups and ontology bins correlate with successful tuber resistance against P. infestans. Our results suggest that the hypersensitive response is likely a general form of resistance against the hemibiotrophic P. infestans—even in potato tubers, organs that develop below ground. PMID:23702331

  3. Silencing of the PiAvr3a effector-encoding gene from Phytophthora infestans by transcriptional fusion to a short interspersed element.

    PubMed

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Tian, Zhendong; Avrova, Anna O; Savenkov, Eugene I; Dixelius, Christina; Whisson, Stephen C

    2011-12-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the notorious oomycete causing late blight of potato and tomato. A large proportion of the P. infestans genome is composed of transposable elements, the activity of which may be controlled by RNA silencing. Accumulation of small RNAs is one of the hallmarks of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate the presence of small RNAs corresponding to the sequence of a short interspersed retrotransposable element (SINE) suggesting that small RNAs might be involved in silencing of SINEs in P. infestans. This notion was exploited to develop novel tools for gene silencing in P. infestans by engineering transcriptional fusions of the PiAvr3a gene, encoding an RXLR avirulence effector, to the infSINEm retroelement. Transgenic P. infestans lines expressing either 5'-infSINEm::PiAvr3a-3' or 5'-PiAvr3a::SINEm-3' chimeric transcripts initially exhibited partial silencing of PiAvr3a. Over time, PiAvr3a either recovered wild type transcript levels in some lines, or became fully silenced in others. Introduction of an inverted repeat construct was also successful in yielding P. infestans transgenic lines silenced for PiAvr3a. In contrast, constructs expressing antisense or aberrant RNA transcripts failed to initiate silencing of PiAvr3a. Lines exhibiting the most effective silencing of PiAvr3a were either weakly or non-pathogenic on susceptible potato cv. Bintje. This study expands the repertoire of reverse genetics tools available for P. infestans research, and provides insights into a possible mode of variation in effector expression through spread of silencing from adjacent retroelements.

  4. First Report of Haplotype I-b of Phytophthora infestans in central Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Central Mexico is considered a center of genetic diversity for P. infestans based on a range of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Surprisingly, while mtDNA haplotypes I-a, II-a and II-b have been reported from central Mexico, haplotype I-b has not been found in central Mexico. Therefore a mo...

  5. Influence of day-length and isolates of Phytophthora infestans on field resistance to late blight of potato.

    PubMed

    Mihovilovich, E; Munive, S; Bonierbale, M

    2010-04-01

    Main and interaction effects of day-length and pathogen isolate on the reaction and expression of field resistance to Phytophthora infestans were analyzed in a sample of standard clones for partial resistance to potato late blight, and in the BCT mapping population derived from a backcross of Solanum berthaultii to Solanum tuberosum. Detached leaves from plants grown in field plots exposed to short- and long day-length conditions were independently inoculated with two P. infestans isolates and incubated in chambers under short- and long photoperiods, respectively. Lesion growth rate (LGR) was used for resistance assessment. Analysis of variance revealed a significant contribution of genotype x isolate x day-length interaction to variation in LGR indicating that field resistance of genotypes to foliar late blight under a given day-length depended on the infecting isolate. An allele segregating from S. berthaultii with opposite effects on foliar resistance to late blight under long- and short day-lengths, respectively, was identified at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that mapped on chromosome 1. This allele was associated with positive (decreased resistance) and negative (increased resistance) additive effects on LGR, under short- and long day-length conditions, respectively. Disease progress on whole plants inoculated with the same isolate under field conditions validated the direction of its effect in short day-length regimes. The present study suggests the occurrence of an isolate-specific QTL that displays interaction with isolate behavior under contrasting environments, such as those with different day-lengths. This study highlights the importance of exposing genotypes to a highly variable population of the pathogen under contrasting environments when stability to late blight resistance is to be assessed or marker-assisted selection is attempted for the manipulation of quantitative resistance to late blight.

  6. Genetic Variation within Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans Revealed through Genotyping-By-Sequencing, and Implications for Late Blight Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Zachariah R.; Everts, Kathryne L.; Fry, William E.; Gevens, Amanda J.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Gugino, Beth K.; Johnson, Dennis A.; Johnson, Steven B.; Judelson, Howard S.; Knaus, Brian J.; McGrath, Margaret T.; Myers, Kevin L.; Ristaino, Jean B.; Roberts, Pamela D.; Secor, Gary A.; Smart, Christine D.

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was performed on 257 Phytophthora infestans isolates belonging to four clonal lineages to study within-lineage diversity. The four lineages used in the study were US-8 (n = 28), US-11 (n = 27), US-23 (n = 166), and US-24 (n = 36), with isolates originating from 23 of the United States and Ontario, Canada. The majority of isolates were collected between 2010 and 2014 (94%), with the remaining isolates collected from 1994 to 2009, and 2015. Between 3,774 and 5,070 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified within each lineage and were used to investigate relationships among individuals. K-means hierarchical clustering revealed three clusters within lineage US-23, with US-23 isolates clustering more by collection year than by geographic origin. K-means hierarchical clustering did not reveal significant clustering within the smaller US-8, US-11, and US-24 data sets. Neighbor-joining (NJ) trees were also constructed for each lineage. All four NJ trees revealed evidence for pathogen dispersal and overwintering within regions, as well as long-distance pathogen transport across regions. In the US-23 NJ tree, grouping by year was more prominent than grouping by region, which indicates the importance of long-distance pathogen transport as a source of initial late blight inoculum. Our results support previous studies that found significant genetic diversity within clonal lineages of P. infestans and show that GBS offers sufficiently high resolution to detect sub-structuring within clonal populations. PMID:27812174

  7. An RxLR effector from Phytophthora infestans prevents re-localisation of two plant NAC transcription factors from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C; Armstrong, Miles R; Pritchard, Leighton; Gomez, Sonia; Morales, Juan; Whisson, Stephen C; Beynon, Jim L; Birch, Paul R J

    2013-01-01

    The potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans secretes an array of effector proteins thought to act in its hosts by disarming defences and promoting pathogen colonisation. However, little is known about the host targets of these effectors and how they are manipulated by the pathogen. This work describes the identification of two putative membrane-associated NAC transcription factors (TF) as the host targets of the RxLR effector PITG_03192 (Pi03192). The effector interacts with NAC Targeted by Phytophthora (NTP) 1 and NTP2 at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, where these proteins are localised. Transcripts of NTP1 and NTP2 rapidly accumulate following treatment with culture filtrate (CF) from in vitro grown P. infestans, which acts as a mixture of Phytophthora PAMPs and elicitors, but significantly decrease during P. infestans infection, indicating that pathogen activity may prevent their up-regulation. Silencing of NTP1 or NTP2 in the model host plant Nicotiana benthamiana increases susceptibility to P. infestans, whereas silencing of Pi03192 in P. infestans reduces pathogenicity. Transient expression of Pi03192 in planta restores pathogenicity of the Pi03192-silenced line. Moreover, colonisation by the Pi03192-silenced line is significantly enhanced on N. benthamiana plants in which either NTP1 or NTP2 have been silenced. StNTP1 and StNTP2 proteins are released from the ER membrane following treatment with P. infestans CF and accumulate in the nucleus, after which they are rapidly turned over by the 26S proteasome. In contrast, treatment with the defined PAMP flg22 fails to up-regulate NTP1 and NTP2, or promote re-localisation of their protein products to the nucleus, indicating that these events follow perception of a component of CF that appears to be independent of the FLS2/flg22 pathway. Importantly, Pi03192 prevents CF-triggered re-localisation of StNTP1 and StNTP2 from the ER into the nucleus, revealing a novel effector mode-of-action to

  8. DL-beta-aminobutyric acid-induced resistance of potato against Phytophthora infestans requires salicylic acid but not oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Altmann, Simone; Rosahl, Sabine

    2010-05-01

    Inducing systemic resistance responses in crop plants is a promising alternative way of disease management. To understand the underlying signaling events leading to induced resistance, functional analyses of plants defective in defined signaling pathway steps are required. We used potato, one of the economically most-important crop plants worldwide, to examine systemic resistance against the devastating late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans, induced by treatment with dl-beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA). Transgenic plants impaired in either the 9-lipoxygenase pathway, which produces defense-related compounds, or the 13-lipoxygenase pathway, which generates jasmonic acid-derived signals, expressed wild-type levels of BABA-induced resistance. Plants incapable of accumulating salicylic acid (SA), on the other hand, failed to mount this type of induced resistance. Consistently, treatment of these plants with the SA analog 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid restored BABA-induced resistance. Together, these results demonstrate the indispensability of a functional SA pathway for systemic resistance in potato induced by BABA.

  9. Phytophthora infestans field isolates from Gansu province, China are genetically highly diverse and show a high frequency of self fertility.

    PubMed

    Han, Miao; Liu, Gang; Li, Ji-Ping; Govers, Francine; Zhu, Xiao-Qiong; Shen, Chong-Yao; Guo, Li-Yun

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 85 isolates of Phytophthora infestans collected in 2007 from Gansu province in China was determined and compared with 21 isolates collected before 2004. Among them, 70 belonged to the A1 mating type and 15 were self-fertile (SF). The mitochondrial DNA haplotypes revealed both Ia (25%) and IIa (75%) haplotypes. Metalaxyl resistance occurred with high frequency (54%) in Gansu. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) genotyping revealed 26 genotypes (13 from the Tianshui region) among the 85 isolates, and 18 genotypes among the 21 isolates collected before 2004, without overlap in genotypes detected in the two groups. Cluster analysis showed clear subdivisions within the different mating type isolates. Among Gansu's isolates, Nei's and Shannon's diversity indices were highest in isolates collected in Tianshui where both A1 and SF isolates were found. Analysis of molecular variance of isolates from Gansu indicated that 51% and 49% of the variance was explained by within-area and among-area variance, respectively. The results suggest that the occurrence of SF isolates increases the risk of sexual reproduction, the formation of oospore as initial inocula in the field, and affects the genotypic diversity in the population.

  10. Four potato (Solanum tuberosum) ABCG transporters and their expression in response to abiotic factors and Phytophthora infestans infection.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Michelina; Ambrosino, Patrizia; Lanzuise, Stefania; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Lorito, Matteo; Scala, Felice

    2011-12-15

    Pleiotropic drug resistant (PDR/ABCG) genes are involved in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, we cloned, from Solanum tuberosum, four PDR/ABCG transporter genes named StPDR1, StPDR2, StPDR3 and StPDR4, which were differentially expressed in plant tissues and cell cultures. A number of different chemically unrelated compounds were found to regulate the transcript levels of the four genes in cultured cells. In particular, StPDR2 was highly up-regulated in the presence of Botrytis cinerea cell walls, NaCl, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sclareol and α-solanin and biological compounds. The expression of the genes was also investigated by real time RT-PCR during infection by Phytophthora infestans. StPDR1 and StPDR2 were up-regulated about 13- and 37-fold at 48 h post-infection (hpi), StPDR3 was expressed (4-5-fold) at 24 and 48 hpi and then rapidly decreased, while StPDR4 RNA accumulation was stimulated (about 4-fold) at 12 and 24 hpi, decreased at 48 hpi and increased again at 96 hpi. We discuss the role of StPDR1-4 genes in response to pathogens and abiotic stresses.

  11. Analysis of the tomato leaf transcriptome during successive hemibiotrophic stages of a compatible interaction with the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Zuluaga, Andrea P; Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Fei, Zhangjun; Matas, Antonio J; Patev, Sean; Fry, William E; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2016-01-01

    The infection of plants by hemibiotrophic pathogens involves a complex and highly regulated transition from an initial biotrophic, asymptomatic stage to a later necrotrophic state, characterized by cell death. Little is known about how this transition is regulated, and there are conflicting views regarding the significance of the plant hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in the different phases of infection. To provide a broad view of the hemibiotrophic infection process from the plant perspective, we surveyed the transcriptome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) during a compatible interaction with the hemibiotrophic oomycete Phytophthora infestans during three infection stages: biotrophic, the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy, and the necrotrophic phase. Nearly 10 000 genes corresponding to proteins in approximately 400 biochemical pathways showed differential transcript abundance during the three infection stages, revealing a major reorganization of plant metabolism, including major changes in source-sink relations, as well as secondary metabolites. In addition, more than 100 putative resistance genes and pattern recognition receptor genes were induced, and both JA and SA levels and associated signalling pathways showed dynamic changes during the infection time course. The biotrophic phase was characterized by the induction of many defence systems, which were either insufficient, evaded or suppressed by the pathogen.

  12. Nicotiana benthamiana calreticulin 3a is required for the ethylene-mediated production of phytoalexins and disease resistance against oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Mizuki; Shibata, Yusuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Mizutani, Aki; Mori, Hitoshi; Wang, Ping; Ojika, Makoto; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Takemoto, Daigo

    2013-08-01

    Mature Nicotiana benthamiana shows strong resistance to the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. By screening using virus-induced random gene silencing, we isolated a gene for plant-specific calreticulin NbCRT3a as a required gene for resistance of N. benthamiana against P. infestans. NbCRT3a encodes an endoplasmic reticulum quality-control (ERQC) chaperone for the maturation of glycoproteins, including glycosylated cell-surface receptors. NbCRT3a-silenced plants showed no detectable growth defects but resistance to P. infestans was significantly compromised. Defense responses induced by the treatment with INF1 (a secretory protein of P. infestans), such as production of reactive oxygen species and accumulation of phytoalexins, were suppressed in NbCRT3a-silenced N. benthamiana. Expression of an ethylene-regulated gene for phytoalexin biosynthesis, NbEAS, was reduced in NbCRT3a-silenced plants, whereas the expression of salicylic acid-regulated NbPR-1a was not affected. Consistently, induction of ethylene production by INF1 was suppressed in NbCRT3a-silenced plants. Resistance reactions induced by a hyphal wall components elicitor prepared from P. infestans were also impaired in NbCRT3a-silenced plants. However, cell death induced by active mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (NbMEK2(DD)) was not affected by the silencing of NbCRT3a. Thus, NbCRT3a is required for the initiation of resistance reactions of N. benthamiana in response to elicitor molecules derived from P. infestans.

  13. Comparative transcriptome analysis between resistant and susceptible tomato allows the identification of lncRNA16397 conferring resistance to Phytophthora infestans by co-expressing glutaredoxin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jun; Luan, Yushi; Jiang, Ning; Bao, Hang; Meng, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The rapid development of omics sequencing technology has facilitated the identification of thousands of long non-coding (lnc)RNAs in plant species, but the role of lncRNAs in plant-pathogen interactions remains largely unexplored. We used comparative transcriptome analysis of Phytophthora infestans-resistant and -susceptible tomatoes to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and lncRNAs (DELs), and examine lncRNA-mRNA networks. A total of 1037 DEGs and 688 DELs were identified between P. infestans-resistant and -susceptible tomatoes. The co-localization networks, including 128 DEGs and 127 DELs, were performed. We found that lncRNA16397 acted as an antisense transcript of SlGRX22 to regulate its expression, and also induced SlGRX21 expression when lncRNA16397 was overexpressed. In addition, disease symptoms and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in tomatoes overexpressing lncRNA16397 and SpGRX were fewer and lower than those in wild-type after P. infestans infection. This result suggests that tomato lncRNA16397 induces SlGRX expression to reduce ROS accumulation and alleviate cell membrane injury, resulting in enhanced resistance to P. infestans. Our results provide insight into lncRNAs involved in the response of tomato to P. infestans infection, demonstrate that the lncRNA16397-GRXs network is an important component of the P. infestans network in tomato, and provide candidates for breeding to enhance biotic stress-resistance in tomato.

  14. Specific detection and quantification of virulent/avirulent Phytophthora infestans isolates using a real-time PCR assay that targets polymorphisms of the Avr3a gene.

    PubMed

    Clément, J A J; Baldwin, T K; Magalon, H; Glais, I; Gracianne, C; Andrivon, D; Jacquot, E

    2013-05-01

    Molecular tools that allow intraspecific quantification and discrimination of pathogen isolates are useful to assess fitness of competitors during mixed infections. However, methods that were developed for quantifying Phytophthora infestans are only specific at the species level. Here, we reported a TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay allowing, according to the specificity of the used probes, an accurate quantification of different proportions of two genetically distinct clones of P. infestans in mixed fractions. Indeed, in addition to a primer specific to P. infestans, two primers and two TaqMan(®) probes that target single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the Avr3a/avr3a virulence gene sequence were designed. The reliability of the method was tested on serially diluted fractions containing plasmid DNA with either the Avr3a or the avr3a sequences at concentrations ranging from 10(2) to 10(8)  copies per μl. Based on its specificity, sensitivity and repeatability, the proposed assay allowed a quantification of the targeted DNA sequence in fractions with a Avr3a/avr3a ratio in the range 1/99 to 99/1. The reliability of the test was also checked for counting zoospores. Applications for future research in P. infestans/host quantitative interactions were also discussed.

  15. U-box E3 ubiquitin ligase PUB17 acts in the nucleus to promote specific immune pathways triggered by Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    He, Qin; McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C; Sadanandom, Ari; Xie, Conghua; Birch, Paul R J; Tian, Zhendong

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitination regulates many processes in plants, including immunity. The E3 ubiquitin ligase PUB17 is a positive regulator of programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by resistance proteins CF4/9 in tomato. Its role in immunity to the potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, was investigated here. Silencing StPUB17 in potato by RNAi and NbPUB17 in Nicotiana benthamiana by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) each enhanced P. infestans leaf colonization. PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) transcriptional responses activated by flg22, and CF4/Avr4-mediated PCD were attenuated by silencing PUB17. However, silencing PUB17 did not compromise PCD triggered by P. infestans PAMP INF1, or co-expression of R3a/AVR3a, demonstrating that not all PTI- and PCD-associated responses require PUB17. PUB17 localizes to the plant nucleus and especially in the nucleolus. Transient over-expression of a dominant-negative StPUB17(V314I,V316I) mutant, which retained nucleolar localization, suppressed CF4-mediated cell death and enhanced P. infestans colonization. Exclusion of the StPUB17(V314I,V316I) mutant from the nucleus abolished its dominant-negative activity, demonstrating that StPUB17 functions in the nucleus. PUB17 is a positive regulator of immunity to late blight that acts in the nucleus to promote specific PTI and PCD pathways.

  16. Quantitative label-free phosphoproteomics of six different life stages of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans reveals abundant phosphorylation of members of the CRN effector family.

    PubMed

    Resjö, Svante; Ali, Ashfaq; Meijer, Harold J G; Seidl, Michael F; Snel, Berend; Sandin, Marianne; Levander, Fredrik; Govers, Francine; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-04-04

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans is the causal agent of late blight in potato and tomato. Since the underlying processes that govern pathogenicity and development in P. infestans are largely unknown, we have performed a large-scale phosphoproteomics study of six different P. infestans life stages. We have obtained quantitative data for 2922 phosphopeptides and compared their abundance. Life-stage-specific phosphopeptides include ATP-binding cassette transporters and a kinase that only occurs in appressoria. In an extended data set, we identified 2179 phosphorylation sites and deduced 22 phosphomotifs. Several of the phosphomotifs matched consensus sequences of kinases that occur in P. infestans but not Arabidopsis. In addition, we detected tyrosine phosphopeptides that are potential targets of kinases resembling mammalian tyrosine kinases. Among the phosphorylated proteins are members of the RXLR and Crinkler effector families. The latter are phosphorylated in several life stages and at multiple positions, in sites that are conserved between different members of the Crinkler family. This indicates that proteins in the Crinkler family have functions beyond their putative role as (necrosis-inducing) effectors. This phosphoproteomics data will be instrumental for studies on oomycetes and host-oomycete interactions. The data sets have been deposited to ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD000433).

  17. Alteration of pathogenicity-linked life-history traits by resistance of its host Solanum tuberosum impacts sexual reproduction of the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Clément, J A J; Magalon, H; Pellé, R; Marquer, B; Andrivon, D

    2010-12-01

    Although sexual reproduction implies a cost, it represents an evolutionary advantage for the adaptation and survival of facultative sexual pathogens. Understanding the maintenance of sex in pathogens requires to analyse how host resistance will impact their sexual reproduction through the alteration of their life-history traits. We explored this experimentally using potato (Solanum tuberosum) and one of its pathogens, the heterothallic oomycete Phytophthora infestans. Sexual reproduction was highest on hosts favouring asexual multiplication of the pathogen, suggesting similar nutritional requirements for both sexual and asexual sporulation. Sexual reproduction was also highest on hosts decreasing the latent period, probably because of a trade-off between growth and reproduction. Distinguishing host effects on each pathogenic trait remains however uneasy, as most life-history traits linked to pathogenicity were not independent of each other. We argue that sexual reproduction of P. infestans is an adaptation to survive when the host is susceptible and rapidly destroyed.

  18. A novel approach to locate Phytophthora infestans resistance genes on the potato genetic map.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Mirjam M J; Vosman, Ben; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Visser, Richard G F; Henken, Betty; van den Berg, Ronald G

    2010-02-01

    Mapping resistance genes is usually accomplished by phenotyping a segregating population for the resistance trait and genotyping it using a large number of markers. Most resistance genes are of the NBS-LRR type, of which an increasing number is sequenced. These genes and their analogs (RGAs) are often organized in clusters. Clusters tend to be rather homogenous, viz. containing genes that show high sequence similarity with each other. From many of these clusters the map position is known. In this study we present and test a novel method to quickly identify to which cluster a new resistance gene belongs and to produce markers that can be used for introgression breeding. We used NBS profiling to identify markers in bulked DNA samples prepared from resistant and susceptible genotypes of small segregating populations. Markers co-segregating with resistance can be tested on individual plants and directly used for breeding. To identify the resistance gene cluster a gene belongs to, the fragments were sequenced and the sequences analyzed using bioinformatics tools. Putative map positions arising from this analysis were validated using markers mapped in the segregating population. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated with a number of populations derived from wild Solanum species segregating for P. infestans resistance. Newly identified P. infestans resistance genes originating from S. verrucosum, S. schenckii, and S. capsicibaccatum could be mapped to potato chromosomes 6, 4, and 11, respectively.

  19. Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Genetic Structure of Phytophthora infestans from Tomato and Potato in the Del Fuerte Valley.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Garcia, R; Trinidad-Correa, R; Felix-Gastelum, R; Orum, T V; Wasmann, C C; Nelson, M R

    2000-11-01

    ABSTRACT The temporal and spatial patterns of Phytophthora infestans population genetic structure were analyzed in the Del Fuerte Valley, Sinaloa, Mexico, during the crop seasons of 1994 to 1995, 1995 to 1996, and 1996 to 1997 by geographical information systems. Isolates of P. infestans were obtained from infected tissue of tomato and potato collected from two areas: (i) where both potatoes and tomatoes are grown, and (ii) where only tomatoes are grown. The isolates were characterized by mating type, allozymes at the glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and peptidase loci, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fingerprint with probe RG57, metalaxyl sensitivity, and aggressiveness to tomato and potato. The results suggest presence of an asexual population with frequent immigrations from outside the valley. There was a shift of mating type in the population from predominantly A2 to completely A1 in this period. The co-occurrence of mating types was restricted to very few fields in the area around Los Mochis where tomato and potato crops are grown. Genotype variation based on allozyme analysis and mating type was low with only one genotype affecting both crops each year. The genotypes affecting both crops were the only genotypes highly aggressive to both tomato and potato in laboratory aggressiveness tests and the only genotypes widespread on both the tomato and potato crops in the valley each year. These predominant genotypes were highly resistant to the fungicide metalaxyl. Data on metalaxyl sensitivity indicate that allozyme analysis can discriminate between sensitive and resistant isolates in the Del Fuerte Valley. RFLP analysis with the probe RG57 gives further discrimination of genotypes within an allozyme genotype. In the 1995 to 1996 season, four different RFLP genotypes were found within an allozyme genotype. However, there were five other dilocus allozyme genotypes that could not be further split by RFLP analysis in 1995 to 1996 and 1996 to 1997 seasons

  20. Genomic analyses of dominant U.S. clonal lineages of Phytophthora infestans reveals a shared common ancestry for clonal lineages US11 and US18 and a lack of recently shared ancestry among all other U.S. lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The populations of the potato and tomato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, in the US are well known for emerging repeatedly as novel clonal lineages. These successions of dominant clones have historically been named US1-US24, in order of appearance, since their first characterization usi...

  1. Polyethylene mulch modifies greenhouse microclimate and reduces infection of phytophthora infestans in tomato and Pseudoperonospora cubensis in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Shtienberg, D; Elad, Y; Bornstein, M; Ziv, G; Grava, A; Cohen, S

    2010-01-01

    The individual and joint effects of covering the soil with polyethylene mulch before planting and fungicides commonly used by organic growers on tomato late blight (caused by Phytophthora infestans) were studied in three experiments conducted from 2002 to 2005. Application of fungicides resulted in inconsistent and insufficient late blight suppression (control efficacy +/- standard error of 34.5 +/- 14.3%) but the polyethylene mulch resulted in consistent, effective, and highly significant suppression (control efficacy of 83.6 +/- 5.5%) of the disease. The combined effect of the two measures was additive. In a second set of three experiments carried out between 2004 and 2006, it was found that the type of polyethylene mulch used (bicolor aluminized, clear, or black) did not affect the efficacy of late blight suppression (control efficacy of 60.1 to 95.8%) and the differences in the effects among the different polyethylene mulches used were insignificant. Next, the ability of the mulch to suppress cucumber downy mildew (caused by Pseudoperonospora cubensis) was studied in four experiments carried out between 2006 and 2008. The mulch effectively suppressed cucumber downy mildew but the effect was less substantial (control efficacy of 34.9 +/- 4.8%) than that achieved for tomato late blight. The disease-suppressing effect of mulch appeared to come from a reduction in leaf wetness duration, because mulching led to reductions in both the frequency of nights when dew formed and the number of dew hours per night when it formed. Mulching also reduced relative humidity in the canopy, which may have reduced sporulation.

  2. A quantitative Real Time PCR based method for the detection of Phytophthora infestans causing Late blight of potato, in infested soil.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Touseef; Singh, Bir Pal; Anwar, Firoz

    2014-09-01

    A fast and simple polymerase chain reaction method has been developed for detection of Phytophthora infestans oospores, the causal agent of Late blight of Potato in soil. The method involves the disruption of oospores by grinding dry soil, using abrasive properties, in the presence of glass powder and skimmed milk powder within a short time. The latter prevents loss of DNA by adsorption to soil particles or by degradation and reduces the co-extraction of PCR inhibitors with the DNA. After phenol/chloroform extraction; the DNA is suitable for direct PCR amplification without a precipitation step. This amplification leads to detection of pathogen in infested soils before planting of crop. The real-time PCR assay we describe is highly sensitive and specific, and has several advantages over conventional PCR assays used for P. infestans detection to confirm positive inoculum level in potato seeds and elsewhere. With increasing amounts of standard DNA templates, the respective threshold cycle (Ct) values were determined and a linear relationship was established between these Ct values and the logarithm of initial template amounts. The method is rapid, cost efficient, and when combined with suitable internal controls can be applied to the detection and quantification of P. infestans oospores on a large-scale basis.

  3. Phytophthora infestans-triggered response of growth- and defense-related genes in potato cultivars with different levels of resistance under the influence of nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Ros, Barbara; Mohler, Volker; Wenzel, Gerhard; Thümmler, Fritz

    2008-06-01

    The effects of high and low N concentrations on the Solanum tuberosum-Phytophthora infestans interaction were studied in the potato cultivars Bettina, New York 121, Indira and Arkula, which exhibited different levels of resistance. Aboveground biomass and Chl and N content were significantly higher in all cultivars grown in higher N environments, while C:N ratios were lower, confirming successful application of N. High availability of N significantly increased susceptibility of three of the four potato cultivars, and amounts of pathogen within the infected leaflets determined in a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction reflected this. Differential gene expression of P. infestans-induced and -repressed genes derived from three subtracted cDNA libraries at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-inoculation was studied in parallel. P. infestans attack led to an induction of defense-related and at the same time repression of growth-related potato genes mainly encoding photosynthetic genes. High N supply led to higher transcript abundance of photosynthetic genes such as Chl a/b-binding protein and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. N-dependent suppression of defense-related compounds in absence of the pathogen was not observed. Better N nutrition appeared to allow the plants to invest more resources in defense reactions.

  4. Identification and cloning of differentially expressed genes involved in the interaction between potato and Phytophthora infestans using a subtractive hybridization and cDNA-AFLP combinational approach.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria Antonia; Daayf, Fouad

    2010-05-01

    Using a subtractive hybridization (SH)/cDNA-AFLP combinational approach, differentially expressed genes involved in the potato-Phytophthora infestans interaction were identified. These included genes potentially controlling pathogenesis or avr genes in P. infestans as well as those potentially involved in potato resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Forty-one differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), resulting from the interaction, were cloned and sequenced. Two TDFs, suggested as potential pathogenicity factors, have sequence similarity to N-succinyl diaminopimelate aminotransferase and a transcriptional regulator, TetR family gene, respectively. Two other TDFs, suggested as potential avr genes, have sequence similarity to an EST sequence from Avr4/Cf-4/Avr9/Cf-9 and a P. infestans avirulence-associated gene, respectively. Genes' expression and origin were confirmed using Southern blots, Northern blots and qRT-PCR. I.e., potential resistance gene DL81 was induced at 12 hpi in the moderately resistant cultivar, whereas it was down-regulated as early as 6 hpi in the susceptible cultivar. On the other hand, DL21 was induced at 6 hpi (3.38-fold) in response to the highly aggressive isolate (US8) and strongly up-regulated thereafter (25.13-fold at 120 hpi.), whereas it was only slightly up-regulated in response to the weakly aggressive isolate US11 (3.82-fold at 96 hpi), suggesting its potential involvement as a susceptibility gene.

  5. Mandipropamid targets the cellulose synthase-like PiCesA3 to inhibit cell wall biosynthesis in the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Blum, Mathias; Boehler, Martine; Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Csukai, Michael; Kraus, Sabrina; Moulin, Florence; Scalliet, Gabriel; Avrova, Anna O; Whisson, Stephen C; Fonne-Pfister, Raymonde

    2010-03-01

    Oomycete plant pathogens cause a wide variety of economically and environmentally important plant diseases. Mandipropamid (MPD) is a carboxylic acid amide (CAA) effective against downy mildews, such as Plasmopara viticola on grapes and potato late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans. Historically, the identification of the mode of action of oomycete-specific control agents has been problematic. Here, we describe how a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques has been utilized to identify the molecular target of MPD in P. infestans. Phytophthora infestans germinating cysts treated with MPD produced swelling symptoms typical of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, and these effects were reversible after washing with H(2)O. Uptake studies with (14)C-labelled MPD showed that this oomycete control agent acts on the cell wall and does not enter the cell. Furthermore, (14)C glucose incorporation into cellulose was perturbed in the presence of MPD which, taken together, suggests that the inhibition of cellulose synthesis is the primary effect of MPD. Laboratory mutants, insensitive to MPD, were raised by ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutagenesis, and gene sequence analysis of cellulose synthase genes in these mutants revealed two point mutations in the PiCesA3 gene, known to be involved in cellulose synthesis. Both mutations in the PiCesA3 gene result in a change to the same amino acid (glycine-1105) in the protein. The transformation and expression of a mutated PiCesA3 allele was carried out in a sensitive wild-type isolate to demonstrate that the mutations in PiCesA3 were responsible for the MPD insensitivity phenotype.

  6. In Planta Expression Screens of Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effectors Reveal Diverse Phenotypes, Including Activation of the Solanum bulbocastanum Disease Resistance Protein Rpi-blb2[W

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Young, Carolyn; Lee, Minkyoung; Oliva, Ricardo; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Cano, Liliana M.; Win, Joe; Bos, Jorunn I.B.; Liu, Hsin-Yin; van Damme, Mireille; Morgan, William; Choi, Doil; Van der Vossen, Edwin A.G.; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2009-01-01

    The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans is predicted to secrete hundreds of effector proteins. To address the challenge of assigning biological functions to computationally predicted effector genes, we combined allele mining with high-throughput in planta expression. We developed a library of 62 infection-ready P. infestans RXLR effector clones, obtained using primer pairs corresponding to 32 genes and assigned activities to several of these genes. This approach revealed that 16 of the 62 examined effectors cause phenotypes when expressed inside plant cells. Besides the well-studied AVR3a effector, two additional effectors, PexRD8 and PexRD3645-1, suppressed the hypersensitive cell death triggered by the elicitin INF1, another secreted protein of P. infestans. One effector, PexRD2, promoted cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana and other solanaceous plants. Finally, two families of effectors induced hypersensitive cell death specifically in the presence of the Solanum bulbocastanum late blight resistance genes Rpi-blb1 and Rpi-blb2, thereby exhibiting the activities expected for Avrblb1 and Avrblb2. The AVRblb2 family was then studied in more detail and found to be highly variable and under diversifying selection in P. infestans. Structure-function experiments indicated that a 34–amino acid region in the C-terminal half of AVRblb2 is sufficient for triggering Rpi-blb2 hypersensitivity and that a single positively selected AVRblb2 residue is critical for recognition by Rpi-blb2. PMID:19794118

  7. The Population Structure of Phytophthora infestans from the Toluca Valley of Central Mexico Suggests Genetic Differentiation Between Populations from Cultivated Potato and Wild Solanum spp.

    PubMed

    Flier, Wilbert G; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Kroon, Laurens P N M; Sturbaum, Anne K; van den Bosch, Trudy B M; Garay-Serrano, Edith; Lozoya-Saldaña, Hector; Fry, William E; Turkensteen, Lod J

    2003-04-01

    ABSTRACT The population structure of Phytophthora infestans in the Toluca Valley of central Mexico was assessed using 170 isolates collected from cultivated potatoes and the native wild Solanum spp., S. demissum and S. xendinense. All isolates were analyzed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) multi-locus fingerprint genotype. Isolate samples were monomorphic for mtDNA haplotype because all isolates tested were of the Ia haplotype. A total of 158 multilocus AFLP genotypes were identified among the 170 P. infestans isolates included in this study. P. infestans populations sampled in the Toluca Valley in 1997 were highly variable and almost every single isolate represented a unique genotype based on the analysis of 165 AFLP marker loci. Populations of P. infestans collected from the commercial potato-growing region in the valley, the subsistence potato production area along the slopes of the Nevado de Toluca, and the native Solanum spp. on the forested slopes of the volcano showed a high degree of genetic diversity. The number of polymorphic loci varied from 20.0 to 62.4% for isolates collected from the field station and wild Solanum spp. On average, 81.8% (135) of the AFLP loci were polymorphic. Hetero-zygosity varied between 7.7 and 19.4%. Significant differentiation was found at the population level between strains originating from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum spp. (P = 0.001 to 0.022). Private alleles were observed in individual isolates collected from all three populations, with numbers of unique dominant alleles varying from 9 to 16 for isolates collected from commercial potato crops and native Solanum spp., respectively. Four AFLP markers were exclusively found present in isolates collected from S. demissum. Indirect estimation of gene flow between populations indicated restricted gene flow between both P. infestans populations from cultivated potatoes and wild Solanum hosts. There was no evidence

  8. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of the tomato and potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To design and validate a colorimetric loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of P. infestans DNA. Methods and Results: Two sets of LAMP primers were designed and evaluated for their sensitivity and specificity for P. infestans. ITSII primers targeted a portion of the ...

  9. Monitoring of possible horizontal gene transfer from transgenic potatoes to soil microorganisms in the potato fields and the emergence of variants in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Moon, Jae Sun; Kim, Jung Kyu; Yoo, Ran Hee; Choi, Won Sik; Lee, Eun Na; Lee, Sang Han; Kim, Sung Uk

    2010-06-01

    To examine the possibility of horizontal gene transfer between transgenic potatoes and microorganisms in potato fields, the gene flow from transgenic potatoes containing nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) gene to microorganisms in soils was investigated. The soil samples collected from the potato fields from March to October in 2007 were examined by PCR, Southern hybridization, and AFLP fingerprinting. The NDPK2 gene from soil genomic DNAs was not detected by both PCR and Southern hybridization, indicating that gene-transfer did not occur in the potato fields. In addition, no discrepancy was found in pathogenicity and noticeable changes for the appearance of variants of Phytophthora infestans in each generation when serial inoculations and the analysis of genomic DNAs by AFLP was conducted. Thus, these data suggest that transgenic potatoes do not give significant impacts on the communities of soil microorganisms and the emergence of variants although continued research efforts may be necessary to make a decisive conclusion.

  10. Modification of primary and secondary metabolism of potato plants by nitrogen application differentially affects resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Mittelstrass, K; Treutter, D; Plessl, M; Heller, W; Elstner, E F; Heiser, I

    2006-09-01

    Potato plants ( SOLANUM TUBEROSUM L. cv. Indira) were grown at two levels of N supply in the greenhouse. Plants supplied with 0.8 g N per plant (high N variant) showed significantly increased biomass as compared to plants without additional N fertilisation (low N variant). C/N ratio was lower and protein content was higher in leaves of the high N variant. The concentration of chlorogenic acids and flavonols was significantly lower in leaves from the high N variant. Whereas resistance to ALTERNARIA SOLANI increased when plants were supplied with additional nitrogen, these plants were more susceptible to PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS. After infection with both pathogens, we found a strong induction of p-coumaroylnoradrenaline and p-coumaroyloctopamine, which are identified for the first time in potato leaves and are discussed as resistance factors of other solanaceous plants.

  11. Increased frequency of self-fertile isolates in Phytophthora infestans may attribute to their higher fitness relative to the A1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wen; Shen, Lin-Lin; Fang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Jia-Feng; Sun, Dan-Li; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of population dynamics of mating types is important for better understanding pathogen’s evolutionary potential and sustainable management of natural and chemical resources such as host resistances and fungicides. In this study, 2250 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from 61 fields across China were assayed for spatiotemporal dynamics of mating type frequency. Self-fertile isolates dominated in ~50% of populations and all but one cropping region with an average frequency of 0.64 while no A2 isolates were detected. Analyses of 140 genotypes consisting of 82 self-fertile and 58 A1 isolates indicated that on average self-fertile isolates grew faster, demonstrated higher aggressiveness and were more tolerant to fungicides than A1 isolates; Furthermore, pattern of association between virulence complexity (defined as the number of differential cultivars on which an isolate can induce disease) and frequency was different in the two mating types. In A1 isolates, virulence complexity was negatively correlated (r = −0.515, p = 0.043) with frequency but this correlation was positive (r = 0.532, p = 0.037) in self-fertile isolates. Our results indicate a quick increase of self-fertile isolates possibly attributable to their higher fitness relative to A1 mating type counterpart in the field populations of P. infestans in China. PMID:27384813

  12. Detection of the virulent form of AVR3a from Phytophthora infestans following artificial evolution of potato resistance gene R3a.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sean; Stevens, Laura J; Boevink, Petra C; Engelhardt, Stefan; Alexander, Colin J; Harrower, Brian; Champouret, Nicolas; McGeachy, Kara; Van Weymers, Pauline S M; Chen, Xinwei; Birch, Paul R J; Hein, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Engineering resistance genes to gain effector recognition is emerging as an important step in attaining broad, durable resistance. We engineered potato resistance gene R3a to gain recognition of the virulent AVR3aEM effector form of Phytophthora infestans. Random mutagenesis, gene shuffling and site-directed mutagenesis of R3a were conducted to produce R3a* variants with gain of recognition towards AVR3aEM. Programmed cell death following gain of recognition was enhanced in iterative rounds of artificial evolution and neared levels observed for recognition of AVR3aKI by R3a. We demonstrated that R3a*-mediated recognition responses, like for R3a, are dependent on SGT1 and HSP90. In addition, this gain of response is associated with re-localisation of R3a* variants from the cytoplasm to late endosomes when co-expressed with either AVR3aKI or AVR3aEM a mechanism that was previously only seen for R3a upon co-infiltration with AVR3aKI. Similarly, AVR3aEM specifically re-localised to the same vesicles upon recognition by R3a* variants, but not with R3a. R3a and R3a* provide resistance to P. infestans isolates expressing AVR3aKI but not those homozygous for AVR3aEM.

  13. Tomato I2 Immune Receptor Can Be Engineered to Confer Partial Resistance to the Oomycete Phytophthora infestans in Addition to the Fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulou, Artemis; Steele, John F C; Segretin, Maria Eugenia; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Zhou, Ji; Robatzek, Silke; Banfield, Mark J; Pais, Marina; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-12-01

    Plants and animals rely on immune receptors, known as nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing proteins, to defend against invading pathogens and activate immune responses. How NLR receptors respond to pathogens is inadequately understood. We previously reported single-residue mutations that expand the response of the potato immune receptor R3a to AVR3a(EM), a stealthy effector from the late blight oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. I2, another NLR that mediates resistance to the will-causing fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, is the tomato ortholog of R3a. We transferred previously identified R3a mutations to I2 to assess the degree to which the resulting I2 mutants have an altered response. We discovered that wild-type I2 protein responds weakly to AVR3a. One mutant in the N-terminal coiled-coil domain, I2(I141N), appeared sensitized and displayed markedly increased response to AVR3a. Remarkably, I2(I141N) conferred partial resistance to P. infestans. Further, I2(I141N) has an expanded response spectrum to F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici effectors compared with the wild-type I2 protein. Our results suggest that synthetic immune receptors can be engineered to confer resistance to phylogenetically divergent pathogens and indicate that knowledge gathered for one NLR could be exploited to improve NLR from other plant species.

  14. Identification of three elicitins and a galactan-based complex polysaccharide from a concentrated culture filtrate of Phytophthora infestans efficient against Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Saubeau, Guillaume; Gaillard, Fanny; Legentil, Laurent; Nugier-Chauvin, Caroline; Ferrières, Vincent; Andrivon, Didier; Val, Florence

    2014-09-26

    The induction of plant immunity by Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) constitutes a powerful strategy for crop protection. PAMPs indeed induce general defense responses in plants and thus increase plant resistance to pathogens. Phytophthora infestans culture filtrates (CCFs) are known to induce defense responses and decrease the severity of soft rot due to Pectobacterium atrosepticum in potato tubers. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the active compounds from P. infestans filtrate. The filtrate was fractionated by gel filtration, and the protection effects against P. atrosepticum and the ability to induce PAL activity were tested for each fraction. The fraction active in protection (F1) also induced PAL activity, as did the whole filtrate. Three elicitins (INF1, INF4 and INF5) were identified in F1b, subfraction of F1, by MALDI-TOF-MS and MS/MS analyses. However, deproteinized F1b still showed biological activity against the bacterium, revealing the presence of an additional active compound. GC-MS analyses of the deproteinized fraction highlighted the presence of a galactan-based complex polysaccharide. These experiments demonstrate that the biological activity of the CCF against P. atrosepticum results from a combined action of three elicitins and a complex polysaccharide, probably through the activation of general defense responses.

  15. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I. B.; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways. PMID:26348328

  16. Utilizing “Omic” Technologies to Identify and Prioritize Novel Sources of Resistance to the Oomycete Pathogen Phytophthora infestans in Potato Germplasm Collections

    PubMed Central

    Van Weymers, Pauline S. M.; Baker, Katie; Chen, Xinwei; Harrower, Brian; Cooke, David E. L.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Birch, Paul R. J.; Thilliez, Gaëtan J. A.; Lees, Alison K.; Lynott, James S.; Armstrong, Miles R.; McKenzie, Gaynor; Bryan, Glenn J.; Hein, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The greatest threat to potato production world-wide is late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. A screen of 126 wild diploid Solanum accessions from the Commonwealth Potato Collection (CPC) with P. infestans isolates belonging to the genotype 13-A2 identified resistances in the species S. bulbocastanum, S. capsicibaccatum, S. microdontum, S. mochiquense, S. okadae, S. pinnatisectum, S. polyadenium, S. tarijense, and S. verrucosum. Effector-omics, allele mining, and diagnostic RenSeq (dRenSeq) were utilized to investigate the nature of resistances in S. okadae accessions. dRenSeq in resistant S. okadae accessions 7129, 7625, 3762, and a bulk of 20 resistant progeny confirmed the presence of full-length Rpi-vnt1.1 under stringent mapping conditions and corroborated allele mining results in the accessions 7129 and 7625 as well as Avr-vnt1 recognition in transient expression assays. In contrast, susceptible S. okadae accession 3761 and a bulk of 20 susceptible progeny lacked sequence homology in the 5′ end compared to the functional Rpi-vnt1.1 gene. Further evaluation of S. okadae accessions with P. infestans isolates that have a broad spectrum of virulence demonstrated that, although S. okadae accessions 7129, 7625, and 7629 contain functional Rpi-vnt1.1, they also carry a novel resistance gene. We provide evidence that existing germplasm collections are important sources of novel resistances and that “omic” technologies such as dRenSeq-based genomics and effector-omics are efficacious tools to rapidly explore the diversity within these collections. PMID:27303410

  17. Phytophthora infestans RXLR-WY Effector AVR3a Associates with Dynamin-Related Protein 2 Required for Endocytosis of the Plant Pattern Recognition Receptor FLS2.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Schwizer, Simon; Sklenar, Jan; Yoshida, Kentaro; Petre, Benjamin; Bos, Jorunn I B; Schornack, Sebastian; Jones, Alexandra M E; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Kamoun, Sophien

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens utilize effectors to suppress basal plant defense known as PTI (Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity). However, our knowledge of PTI suppression by filamentous plant pathogens, i.e. fungi and oomycetes, remains fragmentary. Previous work revealed that the co-receptor BAK1/SERK3 contributes to basal immunity against the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Moreover BAK1/SERK3 is required for the cell death induced by P. infestans elicitin INF1, a protein with characteristics of PAMPs. The P. infestans host-translocated RXLR-WY effector AVR3a is known to supress INF1-mediated cell death by binding the plant E3 ligase CMPG1. In contrast, AVR3aKI-Y147del, a deletion mutant of the C-terminal tyrosine of AVR3a, fails to bind CMPG1 and does not suppress INF1-mediated cell death. Here, we studied the extent to which AVR3a and its variants perturb additional BAK1/SERK3-dependent PTI responses in N. benthamiana using the elicitor/receptor pair flg22/FLS2 as a model. We found that all tested variants of AVR3a suppress defense responses triggered by flg22 and reduce internalization of activated FLS2. Moreover, we discovered that AVR3a associates with the Dynamin-Related Protein 2 (DRP2), a plant GTPase implicated in receptor-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, silencing of DRP2 impaired ligand-induced FLS2 internalization but did not affect internalization of the growth receptor BRI1. Our results suggest that AVR3a associates with a key cellular trafficking and membrane-remodeling complex involved in immune receptor-mediated endocytosis. We conclude that AVR3a is a multifunctional effector that can suppress BAK1/SERK3-mediated immunity through at least two different pathways.

  18. Gene Expression and Silencing Studies in Phytophthora infestans Reveal Infection-Specific Nutrient Transporters and a Role for the Nitrate Reductase Pathway in Plant Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ah-Fong, Audrey M. V.; Davis, Carol; Andreeva, Kalina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2016-01-01

    To help learn how phytopathogens feed from their hosts, genes for nutrient transporters from the hemibiotrophic potato and tomato pest Phytophthora infestans were annotated. This identified 453 genes from 19 families. Comparisons with a necrotrophic oomycete, Pythium ultimum var. ultimum, and a hemibiotrophic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, revealed diversity in the size of some families although a similar fraction of genes encoded transporters. RNA-seq of infected potato tubers, tomato leaves, and several artificial media revealed that 56 and 207 transporters from P. infestans were significantly up- or down-regulated, respectively, during early infection timepoints of leaves or tubers versus media. About 17 were up-regulated >4-fold in both leaves and tubers compared to media and expressed primarily in the biotrophic stage. The transcription pattern of many genes was host-organ specific. For example, the mRNA level of a nitrate transporter (NRT) was about 100-fold higher during mid-infection in leaves, which are nitrate-rich, than in tubers and three types of artificial media, which are nitrate-poor. The NRT gene is physically linked with genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), which mobilize nitrate into ammonium and amino acids. All three genes were coregulated. For example, the three genes were expressed primarily at mid-stage infection timepoints in both potato and tomato leaves, but showed little expression in potato tubers. Transformants down-regulated for all three genes were generated by DNA-directed RNAi, with silencing spreading from the NR target to the flanking NRT and NiR genes. The silenced strains were nonpathogenic on leaves but colonized tubers. We propose that the nitrate assimilation genes play roles both in obtaining nitrogen for amino acid biosynthesis and protecting P. infestans from natural or fertilization-induced nitrate and nitrite toxicity. PMID:27936244

  19. Phytophthora infestans effector AVR3a is essential for virulence and manipulates plant immunity by stabilizing host E3 ligase CMPG1.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Armstrong, Miles R; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Boevink, Petra C; Hein, Ingo; Taylor, Rosalind M; Zhendong, Tian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Harrower, Brian; Dixelius, Christina; Bryan, Glenn; Sadanandom, Ari; Whisson, Stephen C; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R J

    2010-05-25

    Fungal and oomycete plant pathogens translocate effector proteins into host cells to establish infection. However, virulence targets and modes of action of their effectors are unknown. Effector AVR3a from potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans is translocated into host cells and occurs in two forms: AVR3a(KI), which is detected by potato resistance protein R3a, strongly suppresses infestin 1 (INF1)-triggered cell death (ICD), whereas AVR3a(EM), which evades recognition by R3a, weakly suppresses host ICD. Here we show that AVR3a interacts with and stabilizes host U-box E3 ligase CMPG1, which is required for ICD. In contrast, AVR3a(KI/Y147del), a mutant with a deleted C-terminal tyrosine residue that fails to suppress ICD, cannot interact with or stabilize CMPG1. CMPG1 is stabilized by the inhibitors MG132 and epoxomicin, indicating that it is degraded by the 26S proteasome. CMPG1 is degraded during ICD. However, it is stabilized by mutations in the U-box that prevent its E3 ligase activity. In stabilizing CMPG1, AVR3a thus modifies its normal activity. Remarkably, given the potential for hundreds of effector genes in the P. infestans genome, silencing Avr3a compromises P. infestans pathogenicity, suggesting that AVR3a is essential for virulence. Interestingly, Avr3a silencing can be complemented by in planta expression of Avr3a(KI) or Avr3a(EM) but not the Avr3a(KI/Y147del) mutant. Our data provide genetic evidence that AVR3a is an essential virulence factor that targets and stabilizes the plant E3 ligase CMPG1, potentially to prevent host cell death during the biotrophic phase of infection.

  20. Knowing your Phytophthora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora pathogens are known as some of the most important plant killers known to man. Two particularly notorious killers include the Irish potato famine pathogen P. infestans affecting potato and tomato and the sudden oak death P. ramorum affecting woody ornamentals and trees. Phytophthora path...

  1. Targeted and Untargeted Approaches Unravel Novel Candidate Genes and Diagnostic SNPs for Quantitative Resistance of the Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Phytophthora infestans Causing the Late Blight Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Gómez, José M.; Muktar, Meki Shehabu; Paulo, Maria João; Steinemann, Sebastian; Li, Jinquan; Draffehn, Astrid; Hofmann, Andrea; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhardt; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, which can completely destroy the crop. Therefore, for the past 160 years, late blight has been the most important potato disease worldwide. The identification of cultivars with high and durable field resistance to P. infestans is an objective of most potato breeding programs. This type of resistance is polygenic and therefore quantitative. Its evaluation requires multi-year and location trials. Furthermore, quantitative resistance to late blight correlates with late plant maturity, a negative agricultural trait. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of quantitative resistance to late blight not compromised by late maturity is very limited. It is however essential for developing diagnostic DNA markers that facilitate the efficient combination of superior resistance alleles in improved cultivars. We used association genetics in a population of 184 tetraploid potato cultivars in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with maturity corrected resistance (MCR) to late blight. The population was genotyped for almost 9000 SNPs from three different sources. The first source was candidate genes specifically selected for their function in the jasmonate pathway. The second source was novel candidate genes selected based on comparative transcript profiling (RNA-Seq) of groups of genotypes with contrasting levels of quantitative resistance to P. infestans. The third source was the first generation 8.3k SolCAP SNP genotyping array available in potato for genome wide association studies (GWAS). Twenty seven SNPs from all three sources showed robust association with MCR. Some of those were located in genes that are strong candidates for directly controlling quantitative resistance, based on functional annotation. Most important were: a lipoxygenase (jasmonate pathway), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (mevalonate pathway), a P450 protein (terpene biosynthesis

  2. Selection of candidate genes involved in the defense mechanisms of Phytophthora infestans against fungicides by EST analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary research using a functional genomics approach was conducted to gain insights on how P. infestans responds to fungicides and the possible implications of these responses on its ability to adapt to such selection pressure. Two isolates with subtle differences in mefenoxam resistance were e...

  3. Selection and validation of potato candidate genes for maturity corrected resistance to Phytophthora infestans based on differential expression combined with SNP association and linkage mapping

    PubMed Central

    Muktar, Meki S.; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Late blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary, is one of the most important bottlenecks of potato production worldwide. Cultivars with high levels of durable, race unspecific, quantitative resistance are part of a solution to this problem. However, breeding for quantitative resistance is hampered by the correlation between resistance and late plant maturity, which is an undesirable agricultural attribute. The objectives of our research are (i) the identification of genes that condition quantitative resistance to P. infestans not compromised by late plant maturity and (ii) the discovery of diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to be used as molecular tools to increase efficiency and precision of resistance breeding. Twenty two novel candidate genes were selected based on comparative transcript profiling by SuperSAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) in groups of plants with contrasting levels of maturity corrected resistance (MCR). Reproducibility of differential expression was tested by quantitative real time PCR and allele specific pyrosequencing in four new sets of genotype pools with contrasting late blight resistance levels, at three infection time points and in three independent infection experiments. Reproducibility of expression patterns ranged from 28 to 97%. Association mapping in a panel of 184 tetraploid cultivars identified SNPs in five candidate genes that were associated with MCR. These SNPs can be used in marker-assisted resistance breeding. Linkage mapping in two half-sib families (n = 111) identified SNPs in three candidate genes that were linked with MCR. The differentially expressed genes that showed association and/or linkage with MCR putatively function in phytosterol synthesis, fatty acid synthesis, asparagine synthesis, chlorophyll synthesis, cell wall modification, and in the response to pathogen elicitors. PMID:26442110

  4. An ancient R gene from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum confers broad-spectrum resistance to Phytophthora infestans in cultivated potato and tomato.

    PubMed

    van der Vossen, Edwin; Sikkema, Anne; Hekkert, Bas te Lintel; Gros, Jack; Stevens, Patricia; Muskens, Marielle; Wouters, Doret; Pereira, Andy; Stiekema, Willem; Allefs, Sjefke

    2003-12-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease for potato cultivation. Here, we describe the positional cloning of the Rpi-blb1 gene from the wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum known for its high levels of resistance to late blight. The Rpi-blb1 locus, which confers full resistance to complex isolates of P. infestans and for which race specificity has not yet been demonstrated, was mapped in an intraspecific S. bulbocastanum population on chromosome 8, 0.3 cM from marker CT88. Molecular analysis of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone spanning the Rpi-blb1 locus identified a cluster of four candidate resistance gene analogues of the coiled coil, nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR) class of plant resistance (R) genes. One of these candidate genes, designated the Rpi-blb1 gene, was able to complement the susceptible phenotype in a S. tuberosum and tomato background, demonstrating the potential of interspecific transfer of broad-spectrum late blight resistance to cultivated Solanaceae from sexually incompatible host species. Paired comparisons of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions between different regions of Rpi-blb1 paralogues revealed high levels of synonymous divergence, also in the LRR region. Although amino acid diversity between Rpi-blb1 homologues is centred on the putative solvent exposed residues of the LRRs, the majority of nucleotide differences in this region have not resulted in an amino acid change, suggesting conservation of function. These data suggest that Rpi-blb1 is relatively old and may be subject to balancing selection.

  5. Novel core promoter elements in the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans and their influence on expression detected by genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The core promoter is the region flanking the transcription start site (TSS) that directs formation of the pre-initiation complex. Core promoters have been studied intensively in mammals and yeast, but not in more diverse eukaryotes. Here we investigate core promoters in oomycetes, a group within the Stramenopile kingdom that includes important plant and animal pathogens. Prior studies of a small collection of genes proposed that oomycete core promoters contain a 16 to 19 nt motif bearing an Initiator-like sequence (INR) flanked by a novel sequence named FPR, but this has not been extended to whole-genome analysis. Results We used expectation maximization to find over-represented motifs near TSSs of Phytophthora infestans, the potato blight pathogen. The motifs corresponded to INR, FPR, and a new element found about 25 nt downstream of the TSS called DPEP. TATA boxes were not detected. Assays of DPEP function by mutagenesis were consistent with its role as a core motif. Genome-wide searches found a well-conserved combined INR+FPR in only about 13% of genes after correcting for false discovery, which contradicted prior reports that INR and FPR are found together in most genes. INR or FPR were found alone near TSSs in 18% and 7% of genes, respectively. Promoters lacking the motifs had pyrimidine-rich regions near the TSS. The combined INR+FPR motif was linked to higher than average mRNA levels, developmentally-regulated transcription, and functions related to plant infection, while DPEP and FPR were over-represented in constitutively-expressed genes. The INR, FPR, and combined INR+FPR motifs were detected in other oomycetes including Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, Phytophthora sojae, Pythium ultimum, and Saprolegnia parasitica, while DPEP was found in all but S. parasitica. Only INR seemed present in a non-oomycete stramenopile. Conclusions The absence of a TATA box and presence of novel motifs show that the oomycete core promoter is diverged from that of

  6. Mapping the R10 and R11 genes for resistance to late blight (Phytophthora infestans) present in the potato (Solanum tuberosum) R-gene differentials of black.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, John E; Bryan, Glenn J; Lees, Alison K; McLean, Karen; Solomon-Blackburn, Ruth M

    2006-02-01

    The R10 and R11 late blight differentials of Black (tetraploid clones 3681ad1 and 5008ab6) were crossed with the susceptible potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivar Maris Piper and the progeny were assessed for blight resistance in a whole plant glasshouse test using race 1,2,3,4,6,7 of Phytophthora infestans. The disease scores for the R10 population displayed a continuous distribution whereas the progeny in the R11 population could be categorised as resistant or susceptible. A bulk segregant analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism assays was done on the ten most resistant and ten most susceptible progeny in each population and two closely linked markers were found to be associated with resistance. R11 mapped to 8.5 cM from marker PAG/MAAG_172.3 and R10 mapped as a quantitative trait locus in which marker PAC/MATC_264.1 explained 56.9% of the variation in disease scores. The results were consistent with R10 and R11 being allelic versions of genes at the R3 locus on chromosome 11. The implications are discussed for mapping R-genes which fail to give complete immunity to a pathogen.

  7. Development of a bipartite ecdysone-responsive gene switch for the oomycete Phytophthora infestans and its use to manipulate transcription during axenic culture and plant infection.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression systems have been proven to be useful tools for the elucidation of gene function in many taxa. Here, we report the development of the first useful inducible promoter system for an oomycete, based on an ecdysone receptor (EcR) and the ecdysone analogue methoxyfenozide. In Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, a monopartite transactivator containing the VP16 activation domain from herpes simplex virus, the GAL4 DNA-binding domain from yeast and the EcR receptor domain from the spruce budworm enabled high levels of expression of a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, but unacceptable basal activity in the absence of the methoxyfenozide inducer. Greatly improved performance was obtained using a bipartite system in which transcription is activated by a heterodimer between a chimera of VP16 and the migratory locust retinoid X receptor, and a separate EcR-DNA-binding domain chimera. Transformants were obtained that exhibited >100-fold activation of the reporter by methoxyfenozide, with low basal levels of expression and induced activity approaching that of the strong ham34 promoter. Performance varied between transformants, probably as a result of position effects. The addition of methoxyfenozide enabled strong induction during hyphal growth, zoosporogenesis and colonization of tomato. No significant effects of the inducer or transactivators on growth, development or pathogenicity were observed. The technology should therefore be a useful addition to the arsenal of methods for the study of oomycete plant pathogens.

  8. In vitro translocation experiments with RxLR-reporter fusion proteins of Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae and AVR3a from Phytophthora infestans fail to demonstrate specific autonomous uptake in plant and animal cells.

    PubMed

    Wawra, Stephan; Djamei, Armin; Albert, Isabell; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Kahmann, Regine; van West, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    Plant-pathogenic oomycetes have a large set of secreted effectors that can be translocated into their host cells during infection. One group of these effectors are the RxLR effectors for which it has been shown, in a few cases, that the RxLR motif is important for their translocation. It has been suggested that the RxLR-leader sequences alone are enough to translocate the respective effectors into eukaryotic cells through binding to surface-exposed phosphoinositol-3-phosphate. These conclusions were primary based on translocation experiments conducted with recombinant fusion proteins whereby the RxLR leader of RxLR effectors (i.e., Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae) were fused to the green fluorescent protein reporter-protein. However, we failed to observe specific cellular uptake for a comparable fusion protein where the RxLR leader of the P. infestans AVR3a was fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein. Therefore, we reexamined the ability of the reported P. sojae AVR1b RxLR leader to enter eukaryotic cells. Different relevant experiments were performed in three independent laboratories, using fluorescent reporter fusion constructs of AVR3a and Avr1b proteins in a side-by-side comparative study on plant tissue and human and animal cells. We report that we were unable to obtain conclusive evidence for specific RxLR-mediated translocation.

  9. Spontaneous generation and disease causation: Anton de Bary's experiments with Phytophthora infestans and late blight of potato.

    PubMed

    Matta, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Anton de Bary is best known for his elucidation of the life cycle of Phytopthora infestans, the causal organism of late blight of potato and the crop losses that caused famine in nineteenth-century Europe. But while practitioner histories often claim this accomplishment as a founding moment of modern plant pathology, closer examination of de Bary's experiments and his published work suggest that his primary motiviation for pursing this research was based in developmental biology, not agriculture. De Bary shied away from making any recommendations for agricultural practice, and instead focused nearly exclusively on spontaneous generation and fungal development - both concepts promoted through prize questions posted by the Académie des Sciences in the 1850s and 1860s. De Bary's submission to the Académie's 1859 Alhumbert prize question illustrates his own contributions to debates about spontaneous generation and demonstrates the practical applications of seemingly philosophical questions - such as the origin of life.

  10. Curdlan β-1,3-glucooligosaccharides induce the defense responses against Phytophthora infestans infection of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1) leaf cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Lu, Guangxing; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO) has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1). The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H₂O₂ and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually.

  11. Enhanced resistance to Phytophthora infestans and Alternaria solani in leaves and tubers, respectively, of potato plants with decreased activity of the plastidic ATP/ADP transporter.

    PubMed

    Conrath, Uwe; Linke, Christoph; Jeblick, Wolfgang; Geigenberger, Peter; Quick, W Paul; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2003-05-01

    Recently, it has been reported that tubers of transgenic potato ( Solanum tuberosum L.) plants with decreased activity of the plastidic ATP/ADP transporter (AATP1) contain less starch, despite having an increased glucose level [P. Geigenberger et al. (2001) Plant Physiol 125:1667-1678]. The metabolic alterations correlated with enhanced resistance to the bacterium Erwinia carotovora. Here it is shown that transgenic potato tubers, possessing less starch yet increased glucose levels due to the expression of a cytoplasm-localized yeast invertase, exhibit drastic susceptibility to E. carotovora. In addition, it is demonstrated that AATP1 anti-sense tubers show an increased capacity to ward off the pathogenic fungus Alternaria solani. In contrast to AATP1 anti-sense tubers, the corresponding leaf tissue does not show changes in carbohydrate accumulation. However, upon elicitor treatment, AATP1 anti-sense leaves possess an increased capacity to release H(2)O(2) and activate various defence-related genes, reactions that are associated with substantially delayed appearance of disease symptoms caused by Phytophthora infestans. Grafting experiments between AATP1 anti-sense plants and wild-type plants indicate the presence of a signal that is generated in AATP1 rootstocks and primes wild-type scions for potentiated activation of cellular defence responses in leaves. Together, the results suggest that (i) the enhanced pathogen tolerance of AATP1 anti-sense tubers is not due to "high sugar resistance", (ii) the increased disease resistance of AATP1 anti-sense tubers is effective against different types of pathogen and (iii) a systemic signal induced by antisensing the plastidic ATP/ADP transporter in potato tubers confers increased resistance to pathogens.

  12. Interaction between the moss Physcomitrella patens and Phytophthora: a novel pathosystem for live-cell imaging of subcellular defence.

    PubMed

    Overdijk, Elysa J R; DE Keijzer, Jeroen; DE Groot, Deborah; Schoina, Charikleia; Bouwmeester, Klaas; Ketelaar, Tijs; Govers, Francine

    2016-08-01

    Live-cell imaging of plant-pathogen interactions is often hampered by the tissue complexity and multicell layered nature of the host. Here, we established a novel pathosystem with the moss Physcomitrella patens as host for Phytophthora. The tip-growing protonema cells of this moss are ideal for visualizing interactions with the pathogen over time using high-resolution microscopy. We tested four Phytophthora species for their ability to infect P. patens and showed that P. sojae and P. palmivora were only rarely capable to infect P. patens. In contrast, P. infestans and P. capsici frequently and successfully penetrated moss protonemal cells, showed intracellular hyphal growth and formed sporangia. Next to these successful invasions, many penetration attempts failed. Here the pathogen was blocked by a barrier of cell wall material deposited in papilla-like structures, a defence response that is common in higher plants. Another common response is the upregulation of defence-related genes upon infection and also in moss we observed this upregulation in tissues infected with Phytophthora. For more advanced analyses of the novel pathosystem we developed a special set-up that allowed live-cell imaging of subcellular defence processes by high-resolution microscopy. With this set-up, we revealed that Phytophthora infection of moss induces repositioning of the nucleus, accumulation of cytoplasm and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but not of microtubules.

  13. Scenario approach for assessing the utility of dispersal information in decision support for aerially spread plant pathogens, applied to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Skelsey, P; Rossing, W A H; Kessel, G J T; van der Werf, W

    2009-07-01

    Opportunities exist to improve decision support systems through the use of dispersal information gained from epidemiological research. However, dispersal and demographic information is often fragmentary in plant pathology, and this uncertainty creates a risk of inappropriate action whenever such information is used as a basis for decision making. In this article, a scenario-based simulation approach is used to evaluate crop and economic risks and benefits in the use of dispersal information for decision making using the potato late blight pathosystem (Phytophthora infestans-Solanum tuberosum) as a case study. A recently validated spatiotemporal potato late blight model was coupled to submodels for crop growth, tuber dry matter production, and fungicide efficacy. The yield response of a range of management scenarios to a single influx of primary inoculum (the initial spore load) was calculated. Damage curves (relative yield loss versus initial spore load) from a range of combinations of varietal susceptibility and fungicide treatments were used to classify the various management scenarios as either sensitive to initial spore load or tolerant to initial spore load, thus identifying where a high degree of accuracy would be required in dispersal information for appropriate decision making, and where a greater degree of uncertainty could be tolerated. General epidemics, resulting from spatially homogeneous initial spore loads, responded more strongly to the size of the initial spore load than focal epidemics, resulting from an initial spot infection. Susceptible cultivars responded with sizeable yield losses even at low levels of initial spore load, regardless of the fungicide management regime used. These results indicated that, for susceptible cultivars (late cultivars in particular), the degree of accuracy that would be required in dispersal information for appropriate decision making is unlikely to be practically attainable. The results also indicated that, contrary

  14. Parasporal bodies of Bacillus laterosporus sporangia.

    PubMed

    Montaldi, F A; Roth, I L

    1990-04-01

    Intact colonies of Bacillus laterosporus examined by thin-section transmission electron microscopy revealed sporangia in various stages of development and degeneration as the endospores matured. The sporangia formed a surface layer of hexagonally arranged subunits. The variety of parasporal bodies raised questions of developmental and ecologic utility.

  15. Reassessment of QTLs for Late Blight Resistance in the Tomato Accession L3708 Using a Restriction Site Associated DNA (RAD) Linkage Map and Highly Aggressive Isolates of Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ai-Lin; Liu, Chu-Yin; Chen, Chien-Hua; Wang, Jaw-Fen; Liao, Yu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hui; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Hwu, Kae-Kang; Chen, Kai-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Tomato late blight caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary is a major threat to tomato production in cool and wet environments. Intensified outbreaks of late blight have been observed globally from the 1980s, and are associated with migration of new and more aggressive populations of P. infestans in the field. The objective of this study was to reassess late blight resistance in the wild tomato accession L3708 (Solanum pimpinellifolium L.) against pathogens of different aggressiveness. An F2:3 genetic mapping population was developed using L3708 as the paternal parent. Two isolates of P. infestans, Pi39A and Pi733, were used for inoculation. Pi733 is a highly aggressive genotype that defeats three known late blight resistance genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-5t in tomato. In contrast, Pi39A is a less aggressive genotype that defeats only Ph-1. Restriction site Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) technology was used to massively sequence 90 bp nucleotides adjacent to both sides of PstI restriction enzyme cutting sites in the genome for all individuals in the genetic mapping population. The RAD-seq data were used to construct a genetic linkage map containing 440 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified a new disease-resistant QTL specific to Pi733 on chromosome 2. The Ph-3 gene located on chromosome 9 could be detected whichever isolates were used. This study demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of RAD-Seq technology for conducting a QTL mapping experiment using an F2:3 mapping population, which allowed the identification of a new late blight resistant QTL in tomato. PMID:24788810

  16. Reassessment of QTLs for late blight resistance in the tomato accession L3708 using a restriction site associated DNA (RAD) linkage map and highly aggressive isolates of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ai-Lin; Liu, Chu-Yin; Chen, Chien-Hua; Wang, Jaw-Fen; Liao, Yu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hui; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Hwu, Kae-Kang; Chen, Kai-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Tomato late blight caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary is a major threat to tomato production in cool and wet environments. Intensified outbreaks of late blight have been observed globally from the 1980s, and are associated with migration of new and more aggressive populations of P. infestans in the field. The objective of this study was to reassess late blight resistance in the wild tomato accession L3708 (Solanum pimpinellifolium L.) against pathogens of different aggressiveness. An F2:3 genetic mapping population was developed using L3708 as the paternal parent. Two isolates of P. infestans, Pi39A and Pi733, were used for inoculation. Pi733 is a highly aggressive genotype that defeats three known late blight resistance genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-5t in tomato. In contrast, Pi39A is a less aggressive genotype that defeats only Ph-1. Restriction site Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) technology was used to massively sequence 90 bp nucleotides adjacent to both sides of PstI restriction enzyme cutting sites in the genome for all individuals in the genetic mapping population. The RAD-seq data were used to construct a genetic linkage map containing 440 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified a new disease-resistant QTL specific to Pi733 on chromosome 2. The Ph-3 gene located on chromosome 9 could be detected whichever isolates were used. This study demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of RAD-Seq technology for conducting a QTL mapping experiment using an F2:3 mapping population, which allowed the identification of a new late blight resistant QTL in tomato.

  17. Infectivity and sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum on northern red oak and chestnut oak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Branches from northern red and chestnut oak seedlings were dip-inoculated with 5,000 sporangia per milliliter of Phytophthora ramorum and incubated at 100 percent relative humidity in dew chambers for 6 days. Three plants were then used to assess sporangia production, while the other three plants w...

  18. Sporulation capacity of Phytophthora ramorum on northern red oak and chestnut oak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Branches from six 2 to 3-year old northern red and chestnut oak seedlings were dip-inoculated with ca. 5,000 sporangia per milliliter of Phytophthora ramorum isolate Pr-6 and incubated at 100 percent relative humidity in dew chambers for 6 days. Three plants were then used to assess sporangia produ...

  19. Temperature effects on the onset of sporulation by Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron Cunningham’s White

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of temperature and moist period on the onset of sporangia production by Phytophthora ramorum on Rhododendron ‘Cunningham’s White’ was examined with misted detached leaves held in humid chambers. Following wound-inoculation with sporangia, leaves were preincubated at 20°C for either 24 or...

  20. Phytophthora infestans in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter is specific to late blight in the United States and will include a review and discussion of the history of late blight on potato and tomato crops, changes in grower attitudes towards late blight, present status of the disease in the US, methods for identification, management, and c...

  1. Interspecific hybridization between the cultivated potato Solanum tuberosum subspecies tuberosum L. and the wild species S. circaeifolium subsp. circaeifolium Bitter exhibiting resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and Globodera pallida (Stone) Behrens : 2. Sexual hybrids.

    PubMed

    Louwes, K M; Hoekstra, R; Mattheij, W M

    1992-07-01

    Crossability between the diploid species S. circaeifolium subsp. circaeifolium (crc) and other diploid species, primarily diploid S. tuberosum subsp. tuberosum (tbr-2x), was studied. Forty-seven hybrids were obtained from crosses between crc as female parent and tbr-2x and some other species from series Tuberosa as male parents. Of these hybrids 17% were diploids; the other 83% were triploids, probably carrying two genomes of crc. Female fertility was sufficient to obtain offspring from backcrosses with the cultivated parent. Pollen stainability of the f1 varied, and micro-pollen as well as unreduced pollen occurred. During meiosis of the diploids and triploids a rather high proportion of univalents was found, and in the triploids on average two or three trivalents per cell were found. All hybrids were resistant to Globodera pallida pathotypes 2 and 3, and 75% of the tested genotypes were highly resistant to Phytophthora infestans. Solanidine, tomatidine, tomatidenol, and demissidine glycosides were found in tubers of the hybrids. Comparisons with somatic hybrids between crc and tbr-2x are made. It is concluded that crc is a valuable Solanum species that can and should be included in potato breeding programs.

  2. Factors Affecting Onset of Sporulation in Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To elucidate the sporulation potential of the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, on rhododendron, we conducted a series of experiments looking at the relationship between moisture period, lesion size, and onset of sporangia production. Inoculations were performed using P. ramorum isol...

  3. Differential induction and suppression of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes in response to Phytophthora infestans and to its elicitor arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, D; Ward, B L; Bostock, R M

    1992-01-01

    Induction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is essential for the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins and steroid derivatives in Solanaceous plants following stresses imposed by wounding and pathogen infection. To better understand this complex step in stress-responsive isoprenoid synthesis, we isolated three classes of cDNAS encoding HMGR (hmg1, hmg2, and hmg3) from a potato tuber library using a probe derived from an Arabidopsis HMGR cDNA. The potato cDNAs had extensive homology in portions of the protein coding regions but had low homology in the 3' untranslated regions. RNA gel blot analyses using gene-specific probes showed that hmg1 was strongly induced in tuber tissue by wounding, but the wound induction was strongly suppressed by treatment of the tissue with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid or by inoculation with an incompatible or compatible race of the fungal pathogen Phytophtora infestans. The hmg2 and hmg3 mRNAs also accumulated in response to wounding, but in contrast to hmg1, these mRNAs were strongly enhanced by arachidonic acid or inoculation. Inoculation with a compatible race of P. infestans resulted in similar patterns in HMGR gene expression of hmg2 and hmg3 except that the magnitude and rate of the changes in mRNA levels were reduced relative to the incompatible interaction. The differential regulation of members of the HMGR gene family may explain in part the previously reported changes in HMGR enzyme activities following wounding and elicitor treatment. The suppression of hmg1 and the enhancement of hmg2 and hmg3 transcript levels following elicitor treatment or inoculation with the incompatible race parallel the suppression in steroid and stimulation of sesquiterpenoid accumulations observed in earlier investigations. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that there are discrete organizational channels for sterol and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in potato and other Solanaceous species. PMID

  4. Susceptibility of some common Eastern forest understory plant species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the susceptibility of 25 plant species (21 genera, 14 families), which comprise a portion of the understory in forests of the Eastern US, to infection by Phytophthora ramorum. We also assessed the degree to which P. ramorum is able to form sporangia and chlamydospores on these hosts. ...

  5. Phytophthora siskiyouensis, a new species from soil, water, myrtlewood (Umbellularia californica) and tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) in southwestern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Reeser, Paul W; Hansen, Everett M; Sutton, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    An unknown Phytophthora species was recovered in southwestern Oregon from rhododendron and tanoak leaf baits used for monitoring streams and soils for the presence of Phytophthora ramorum, from a blighted shoot of myrtlewood and from tanoak bark cankers. Isolates of this species yielded ITS-DNA sequences that differed substantially from other Phytophthora sequences in GenBank. Morphological features also differed from available descriptions of known Phytophthora species. Based on the combination of unique morphology and unique ITS sequences a new species is proposed. The new species, Phytophthora siskiyouensis, is homothallic with globose to subglobose oogonia, which may be terminal, sessile or laterally intercalary. Antheridia are capitate and mostly paragynous but sometimes amphigynous. Oospores are mostly aplerotic. Sporangia are variable but commonly ovoid to reniform, with apical, subapical or lateral semipapillae (occasionally more than one). Sporangia are terminal, subterminal or occasionally intercalary on unbranched sporangiophores, with basal, subbasal or lateral attachment. Sporangia are weakly deciduous, with variable length pedicels. This combination of characters clearly separates Phytophthora siskiyouensis from other known Phytophthora species.

  6. New role for Cdc14 phosphatase: localization to basal bodies in the oomycete phytophthora and its evolutionary coinheritance with eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Ah-Fong, Audrey M V; Judelson, Howard S

    2011-02-14

    Cdc14 protein phosphatases are well known for regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle, particularly during mitosis. Here we reveal a distinctly new role for Cdc14 based on studies of the microbial eukaryote Phytophthora infestans, the Irish potato famine agent. While Cdc14 is transcribed constitutively in yeast and animal cells, the P. infestans ortholog is expressed exclusively in spore stages of the life cycle and not in vegetative hyphae where the bulk of mitosis takes place. PiCdc14 expression is first detected in nuclei at sporulation, and during zoospore formation the protein accumulates at the basal body, which is the site from which flagella develop. The association of PiCdc14 with basal bodies was supported by co-localization studies with the DIP13 basal body protein and flagellar β-tubulin, and by demonstrating the enrichment of PiCdc14 in purified flagella-basal body complexes. Overexpressing PiCdc14 did not cause defects in growth or mitosis in hyphae, but interfered with cytoplasmic partitioning during zoosporogenesis. This cytokinetic defect might relate to its ability to bind microtubules, which was shown using an in vitro cosedimentation assay. The use of gene silencing to reveal the precise function of PiCdc14 in flagella is not possible since we showed previously that silencing prevents the formation of the precursor stage, sporangia. Nevertheless, the association of Cdc14 with flagella and basal bodies is consistent with their phylogenetic distribution in eukaryotes, as species that lack the ability to produce flagella generally also lack Cdc14. An ancestral role of Cdc14 in the flagellar stage of eukaryotes is thereby proposed.

  7. Effects of inoculum density and wounding on stem infection of three Eastern U.S. forest species by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedlings of three Eastern US forest species (red maple, northern red oak, and chestnut oak) were inoculated by applying Phytophthora ramorum sporangia to stems at different inoculum densities with and without wounding. Disease occurred in all treatments involving wounds, and no disease was observe...

  8. A unique species in Phytophthora clade 10, Phytophthora intercalaris sp. nov., recovered from stream and irrigation water in the eastern USA

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Y.; Brazee, N. J.; Loyd, A. L.; Hong, C. X.

    2016-01-01

    A novel species of the genus Phytophthora was recovered during surveys of stream and nursery irrigation water in Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia in the USA. The novel species is heterothallic, and all examined isolates were A1 mating type. It produced rare ornamented oogonia and amphigynous antheridia when paired with A2 mating type testers of Phytophthora cinnamomi and Phytophthora cryptogea. Sporangia of this novel species were non-papillate and non-caducous. Thin-walled intercalary chlamydospores were abundant in hemp seed agar and carrot agar, while they were produced only rarely in aged cultures grown in clarified V8 juice agar. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region and the β-tubulin and mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase 1 (cox1) genes indicated that the novel species is phylogenetically close to Phytophthora gallica in Phytophthora clade 10. The novel species has morphological and molecular features that are distinct from those of other species in Phytophthora clade 10. It is formally described here as Phytophthora intercalaris sp. nov. Description of this unique clade-10 species is important for understanding the phylogeny and evolution of Phytophthora clade 10. PMID:26620125

  9. Defining species boundaries in the genus Phytophthora: the case of Phytophthora andina. A response to “Phytophthora andina sp. nov., a newly identified heterothallic pathogen of solanaceous hosts in the Andean highlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The newly described species Phytophthora andina is a relative of the potato late blight pathogen P. infestans. The formal P. andina species description is based on three types of evidence. First, the fact that these Ecuadorian isolates were found causing disease on different wild Solanum spp. that a...

  10. Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently emerged plant pathogen and causal agent of one of the most destructive and devastating diseases currently affecting US horticulture and forests. Formally described in 2001, P. ramorum is a filamentous, diploid protozoan that is one of 117 currently recognized Phyto...

  11. Two new Phytophthora species from South African Eucalyptus plantations.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Bongani; Burgess, Treena I; Coutinho, Teresa A; Wingfield, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    A recent study to determine the cause of collar and root rot disease outbreaks of cold tolerant Eucalyptus species in South Africa resulted in the isolation of two putative new Phytophthora species. Based on phylogenetic comparisons using the ITS and beta-tubulin gene regions, these species were shown to be distinct from known species. These differences were also supported by robust morphological characteristics. The names, Phytophthora frigida sp. nov. and Phytophthora alticola sp. nov. are thus provided for these taxa, which are phylogenetically closely related to species within the ITS clade 2 (P. citricola, P. tropicali and P.multivesiculata) and 4 (P. arecae and P. megakarya), respectively. Phytophthora frigida is heterothallic, and produces stellate to rosaceous growth patterns on growth medium, corraloid hyphae, sporangia with a variety of distorted shapes and has the ability to grow at low temperatures. Phytophthora alticola is homothallic and has a slower growth rate in culture. Both P. frigida and P. alticola are pathogenic to Eucalyptus dunnii. In pathogenicity tests, they were, however, less pathogenic than P. cinnamomi, which is a well-known pathogen of Eucalyptus in South Africa.

  12. Genome sequences of Phytophthora enable translational plant disease management and accelerate research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole and partial genome sequences are becoming available at an ever-increasing pace. For many plant pathogen systems, we are moving into the era of genome resequencing. The first Phytophthora genomes, P. ramorum and P. sojae, became available in 2004, followed shortly by P. infestans in 2006. Ava...

  13. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal evolutionary relationships of the Phytophthora 1c clade species.

    PubMed

    Lassiter, Erica S; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Zeng, Qiandong; Saville, Amanda C; Olarte, Rodrigo A; Carbone, Ignazio; Hu, Chia-Hui; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Samaniego, Jose A; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Ristaino, Jean B

    2015-11-01

    Phytophthora infestans is one of the most destructive plant pathogens of potato and tomato globally. The pathogen is closely related to four other Phytophthora species in the 1c clade including P. phaseoli, P. ipomoeae, P. mirabilis and P. andina that are important pathogens of other wild and domesticated hosts. P. andina is an interspecific hybrid between P. infestans and an unknown Phytophthora species. We have sequenced mitochondrial genomes of the sister species of P. infestans and examined the evolutionary relationships within the clade. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the P. phaseoli mitochondrial lineage is basal within the clade. P. mirabilis and P. ipomoeae are sister lineages and share a common ancestor with the Ic mitochondrial lineage of P. andina. These lineages in turn are sister to the P. infestans and P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineages. The P. andina Ic lineage diverged much earlier than the P. andina Ia mitochondrial lineage and P. infestans. The presence of two mitochondrial lineages in P. andina supports the hybrid nature of this species. The ancestral state of the P. andina Ic lineage in the tree and its occurrence only in the Andean regions of Ecuador, Colombia and Peru suggests that the origin of this species hybrid in nature may occur there.

  14. The R(Pi-mcd1) locus from Solanum microdontum involved in resistance to Phytophthora infestans, causing a delay in infection, maps on potato chromosome 4 in a cluster of NBS-LRR genes.

    PubMed

    Tan, M Y Adillah; Hutten, Ronald C B; Celis, Carolina; Park, Tae-Ho; Niks, Rients E; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J

    2008-07-01

    The distinction between field resistance and resistance based on resistance (R) genes has been proven valid for many plant-pathogen interactions. This distinction does not seem to be valid for the interaction between potato and late blight. In this study, a locus involved in late blight resistance, derived from Solanum microdontum, provides additional evidence for this lack of distinction. The resistance is associated with a hypersensitive response and results in a delay of infection of approximately 1 to 2 weeks. Both a quantitative as well as a qualitative genetic approach were used, based on data from a field assay. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified a QTL on chromosome 4 after correction of the resistance data for plant maturity. A qualitative genetic analysis resulted in the positioning of this locus on the short arm of chromosome 4 in between amplified fragment length polymorphism marker pCTmACG_310 and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers TG339 and T0703. This position coincides with a conserved Phytophthora R gene cluster which includes R2, R(2-like), R(Pi-blb3), and R(Pi-abpt). This implies that R(Pi-mcd1) is the fifth R gene of this nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat cluster. The implications of our results on R-gene-based and field resistance are discussed.

  15. Phytophthora Species, New Threats to the Plant Health in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Ik-Hwa; Choi, Woobong

    2014-01-01

    Given the lack of a resistant genetic pool in host plants, the introduction of exotic invasive pathogens can result in epidemics that affect a specific ecosystem and economy. Plant quarantine, which is designed to protect endemic plant resources, is a highly invaluable safeguard that should keep biosecurity with increasing international trade and global transportation. A total of 34 species of plant pathogens including Phytophthora infestans were documented as introduced from other countries into Korea from 1900 to 2010. The genus Phytophthora, classified in oomycetes, includes more than 120 species that are mostly recognized worldwide as highly invasive plant pathogens. After 2000, over 50 new species of Phytophthora were identified internationally as plant pathogens occurring in crops and forest trees. In Korea, Phytophthora is also one of the most serious plant pathogens. To date, 22 species (about one-fifth of known species) of the genus have been identified and reported as plant pathogens in the country. The likelihood of new exotic Phytophthora species being introduced into Korea continues to increase, thus necessitating intensive plant quarantine inspections. As new potential threats to plant health in Korea, six Phytophthora species, namely, P. alni, P. inundata, P. kernoviae, P. pinifolia, P. quercina, and P. ramorum, are discussed in this review with focus on history, disease, biology, management, and plant quarantine issues. PMID:25506298

  16. An LRR receptor kinase regulates growth, development and pathogenesis in Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Asma; Li, Qi; Shen, Danyu; Chen, Linlin; He, Feng; Wang, Rongbo; Zhang, Meixiang; Mafurah, Joseph Juma; Khan, Sajid Aleem; Dou, Daolong

    2017-05-01

    Leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) domain containing kinase proteins (LRR-RK) perform various functions in eukaryotic organisms. However, their functions in Oomycetes are still largely unknown. Here, we identified an LRR-RK (PcLRR-RK1) gene and characterized its functions in Phytophthora capsici, a model oomycete specie and a major plant destroyer of solanaceous and cucurbitaceous vegetable crops. We showed that PcLRR-RK1-silenced P. capsici transformants exhibited reduced growth and produced highly branched fluffy hyphae. The shape and size of sporangia were also altered along with the reduced production of number of sporangia and zoospores. Moreover, silencing of the gene affected the cyst germination and penetration of germ tube into the host tissues, and led to the reduced virulence of P. capsici. Thus, we suggest that PcLRR-RK1 was essentially required for zoospores development, and successful infection of the P. capsici.

  17. Phytophthora multivora sp. nov., a new species recovered from declining Eucalyptus, Banksia, Agonis and other plant species in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Scott, P M; Burgess, T I; Barber, P A; Shearer, B L; Stukely, M J C; Hardy, G E St J; Jung, T

    2009-06-01

    A new Phytophthora species, isolated from rhizosphere soil of declining or dead trees of Eucalyptus gomphocephala, E. marginata, Agonis flexuosa, and another 13 plant species, and from fine roots of E. marginata and collar lesions of Banksia attenuata in Western Australia, is described as Phytophthora multivora sp. nov. It is homothallic and produces semipapillate sporangia, smooth-walled oogonia containing thick-walled oospores, and paragynous antheridia. Although morphologically similar to P. citricola, phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and cox1 gene regions demonstrate that P. multivora is unique. Phytophthora multivora is pathogenic to bark and cambium of E. gomphocephala and E. marginata and is believed to be involved in the decline syndrome of both eucalypt species within the tuart woodland in south-west Western Australia.

  18. Occurrence and characterization of a Phytophthora sp. pathogenic to asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Saude, C; Hurtado-Gonzales, O P; Lamour, K H; Hausbeck, M K

    2008-10-01

    A homothallic Phytophthora sp. was recovered from asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) spears, storage roots, crowns, and stems in northwest and central Michigan in 2004 and 2005. Isolates (n = 131) produced ovoid, nonpapillate, noncaducous sporangia 45 microm long x 26 microm wide and amphigynous oospores of 25 to 30 microm diameter. Mycelial growth was optimum at 25 degrees C with no growth at 5 and 30 degrees C. All isolates were sensitive to 100 ppm mefenoxam. Pathogenicity studies confirmed the ability of the isolates to infect asparagus as well as cucurbits. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis of 99 isolates revealed identical fingerprints, with 12 clearly resolved fragments present and no clearly resolved polymorphic fragments, suggesting a single clonal lineage. The internal transcribed spacer regions of representative isolates were homologous with a Phytophthora sp. isolated from diseased asparagus in France and a Phytophthora sp. from agave in Australia. Phylogenetic analysis supports the conclusion that the Phytophthora sp. isolated from asparagus in Michigan is a distinct species, and has been named Phytophthora asparagi.

  19. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZymes present in the Phytophthora infestans, Ph. ramorum, Ph. sojae and Pythium ultimum genomes compared to growth of these species on a range of different carbon sources. Growth on these carbon sources indicates that the size of enzyme families involved in degradation of cell-wall related substrates like cellulose, xylan and pectin is not always a good predictor of growth on these substrates. While a capacity to degrade xylan and cellulose exists the products are not fully saccharified and used as a carbon source. The Phytophthora genomes encode larger CAZyme sets when compared to Py. ultimum, and encode putative cutinases, GH12 xyloglucanases and GH10 xylanases that are missing in the Py. ultimum genome. Phytophthora spp. also encode a larger number of enzyme families and genes involved in pectin degradation. No loss or gain of complete enzyme families was found between the Phytophthora genomes, but there are some marked differences in the size of some enzyme families.

  20. Five reasons to consider Phytophthora infestans a reemerging pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Late blight disease of potato and tomato (and several other Solanaceous plants) has emerged and re-emerged so many times, that it might be logical to conclude that nothing new could be said about this disease. And yet, much continues to be said (and written). In the year 2007, a search for Phyto...

  1. Sources of inoculum for Phytophthora ramorum in a redwood forest.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J M; Patterson, H A; Rizzo, D M

    2008-08-01

    ABSTRACT Sources of inoculum were investigated for dominant hosts of Phytophthora ramorum in a redwood forest. Infected trunks, twigs, and/or leaves of bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus), and redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) were tested in the laboratory for sporangia production. Sporangia occurred on all plant tissues with the highest percentage on bay laurel leaves and tanoak twigs. To further compare these two species, field measurements of inoculum production and infection were conducted during the rainy seasons of 2003-04 and 2004-05. Inoculum levels in throughfall rainwater and from individual infections were significantly higher for bay laurel as opposed to tanoak for both seasons. Both measurements of inoculum production from bay laurel were significantly greater during 2004-05 when rainfall extended longer into the spring, while inoculum quantities for tanoak were not significantly different between the 2 years. Tanoak twigs were more likely to be infected than bay laurel leaves in 2003-04, and equally likely to be infected in 2004-05. These results indicate that the majority of P. ramorum inoculum in redwood forest is produced from infections on bay laurel leaves. Years with extended rains pose an elevated risk for tanoak because inoculum levels are higher and infectious periods continue into late spring.

  2. Exploring Type I and Type II Errors Using Rhizopus Sporangia Diameter Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Burns, Gerard; Freud, Brian; Fenning, Stacy; Hoffman, Rosemary; Sabapathi, Durai

    2000-01-01

    Presents exercises in which students can explore Type I and Type II errors using sporangia diameter measurements as a means of differentiating between two species. Examines the influence of sample size and significance level on the outcome of the analysis. (SAH)

  3. Phenotypic diversification by gene silencing in Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Asman, Anna Km; Jahan, Sultana N; Avrova, Anna O; Whisson, Stephen C; Dixelius, Christina

    2013-11-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have enabled generation of unprecedented information on genome content and organization. Eukaryote genomes in particular may contain large populations of transposable elements (TEs) and other repeated sequences. Active TEs can result in insertional mutations, altered transcription levels and ectopic recombination of DNA. The genome of the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, contains vast numbers of TE sequences. There are also hundreds of predicted disease-promoting effector proteins, predominantly located in TE-rich genomic regions. Expansion of effector gene families is also a genomic signature of related oomycetes such as P. sojae. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) from P. infestans has identified sRNAs derived from all families of transposons, highlighting the importance of RNA silencing for maintaining these genomic invaders in an inactive form. Small RNAs were also identified from specific effector encoding genes, possibly leading to RNA silencing of these genes and variation in pathogenicity and virulence toward plant resistance genes. Similar findings have also recently been made for the distantly related species, P. sojae. Small RNA "hotspots" originating from arrays of amplified gene sequences, or from genes displaying overlapping antisense transcription, were also identified in P. infestans. These findings suggest a major role for RNA silencing processes in the adaptability and diversification of these economically important plant pathogens. Here we review the latest progress and understanding of gene silencing in oomycetes with emphasis on transposable elements and sRNA-associated events.

  4. The inclusion of downy mildews in a multi-locus-dataset and its reanalysis reveals a high degree of paraphyly in Phytophthora.

    PubMed

    Runge, Fabian; Telle, Sabine; Ploch, Sebastian; Savory, Elizabeth; Day, Brad; Sharma, Rahul; Thines, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Pathogens belonging to the Oomycota, a group of heterokont, fungal-like organisms, are amongst the most notorious pathogens in agriculture. In particular, the obligate biotrophic downy mildews and the hemibiotrophic members of the genus Phytophthora are responsible for a huge variety of destructive diseases, including sudden oak death caused by P. ramorum, potato late blight caused by P. infestans, cucurbit downy mildew caused by Pseudoperonospora cubensis, and grape downy mildew caused by Plasmopara viticola. About 800 species of downy mildews and roughly 100 species of Phytophthora are currently accepted, and recent studies have revealed that these groups are closely related. However, the degree to which Phytophthora is paraphyletic and where exactly the downy mildews insert into this genus in relation to other clades could not be inferred with certainty to date. Here we present a molecular phylogeny encompassing all clades of Phytophthora as represented in a multi-locus dataset and two representatives of the monophyletic downy mildews from divergent genera. Our results demonstrate that Phytophthora is at least six times paraphyletic with respect to the downy mildews. The downy mildew representatives are consistently nested within clade 4 (contains Phytophthora palmivora), which is placed sister to clade 1 (contains Phytophthora infestans). This finding would either necessitate placing all downy mildews and Phytopthora species in a single genus, either under the oldest generic name Peronospora or by conservation the later name Phytophthora, or the description of at least six new genera within Phytophthora. The complications of both options are discussed, and it is concluded that the latter is preferable, as it warrants fewer name changes and is more practical.

  5. Phytophthora kernoviae sp. nov., an invasive pathogen causing bleeding stem lesions on forest trees and foliar necrosis of ornamentals in the UK.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Clive M; Beales, Paul A; Kirk, Susan A; Denman, Sandra; Rose, Joan

    2005-08-01

    A new Phytophthora pathogen of trees and shrubs, previously informally designated Phytophthora taxon C, is formally named here as P. kernoviae. P. kernoviae was discovered in late 2003 during surveys of woodlands in Cornwall, south-west England, for the presence of another invasive pathogen, P. ramorum. P. kernoviae is self-fertile (homothallic), having plerotic oogonia, often with distinctly tapered stalks and amphigynous antheridia. It produces papillate sporangia, sometimes markedly asymmetric with medium length pedicels. Its optimum temperature for growth is ca 18 degrees C and upper limit ca 26 degrees. Currently, P. kernoviae is especially noted for causing bleeding stem lesions on mature Fagus sylvatica and foliar and stem necrosis of Rhododendron ponticum. P. kernoviae is the latest of several invasive tree Phytophthoras recently identified in the UK. Its geographical origins and the possible plant health risk it poses are discussed.

  6. Phytophthora captiosa sp. nov. and P. fallax sp. nov. causing crown dieback of Eucalyptus in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dick, Margaret A; Dobbie, Kiryn; Cooke, David E L; Brasier, Clive M

    2006-04-01

    A locally severe crown disease of exotic plantation Eucalyptus trees has been recorded periodically in New Zealand since 1986. Symptoms include leaf spots, petiole infection and twig and small branch lesions. Outbreaks of disease are episodic and individual trees may show marked variation in crown symptoms ranging from unaffected to total defoliation. Two previously unknown species of Phytophthora are associated with the disease. These are described and formally designated here as P. captiosa, from Eucalyptus botryoides and E. saligna; and P. fallax, from E. delegatensis, E. fastigata, E. nitens and E. regnans. Both P. captiosa and P. fallax have non-papillate, non-caducous sporangia and both are self-fertile. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of ITS rDNA sequence data indicates they are closely related to each other but evolutionarily distant from the majority of described Phytophthora taxa. They share a common ancestor with another assemblage of Phytophthora lineages that includes P. insolita, P. macrochlamydospora and P. richardiae. Sporulation of P. captiosa and P. fallax has not been observed in the field. The mode of infection and spread of these non-caducous Phytophthora species in the eucalypt tree canopy remains unknown. This issue, and the possible geographic origins of these two Phytophthora species are discussed.

  7. Temporal Dynamics of Phytophthora Blight on Bell Pepper in Relation to the Mechanisms of Dispersal of Primary Inoculum of Phytophthora capsici in Soil.

    PubMed

    Sujkowski, L S; Parra, G R; Gumpertz, M L; Ristaino, J B

    2000-02-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of components of primary inoculum dispersal in soil on the temporal dynamics of Phytophthora blight epidemics in bell pepper was evaluated in field and growth-chamber experiments. Phytophthora capsici may potentially be dispersed by one of several mechanisms in the soil, including inoculum movement to roots, root growth to inoculum, and root-to-root spread. Individual components of primary inoculum dispersal were manipulated in field plots by introducing (i) sporangia and mycelia directly in soil so that all three mechanisms of dispersal were possible, (ii) a plant with sporulating lesions on the soil surface in a plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube so inoculum movement to roots was possible, (iii) a wax-encased peat pot containing sporangia and mycelia in soil so root growth to inoculum was possible, (iv) a wax-encased peat pot containing infected roots in soil so root-to-root spread was possible, (v) noninfested V8 vermiculite media into soil directly as a control, or (vi) wax-encased noninfested soil as a control. In 1995 and 1996, final incidence of disease was highest in plots where sporangia and mycelia were buried directly in soil and all mechanisms of dispersal were operative (60 and 32%) and where infected plants were placed in PVC tubes on the soil surface and inoculum movement to roots occurred with rainfall (89 and 23%). Disease onset was delayed in 1995 and 1996, and final incidence was lower in plants in plots where wax-encased sporangia (6 and 22%) or wax-encased infected roots (22%) were buried in soil and root growth to inoculum or root-to-root spread occurred. Incidence of root infections was higher over time in plots where inoculum moved to roots or all mechanisms of dispersal were possible. In growth-chamber studies, ultimately all plants became diseased regardless of the dispersal mechanism of primary inoculum, but disease onset was delayed when plant roots had to grow through a wax layer to inoculum or infected roots in

  8. Phytophthora morindae, a new species causing black flag disease on noni (Morinda citrifolia L) in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Scot C; Abad, Z Gloria

    2010-01-01

    A homothallic, papillate Phytophthora species causing foliar and fruit blight of noni (Morinda citrifolia var. citrifolia) in Hawaii was identified. The asexual phase of this species is characterized by the production of umbellate sporangiophores and papillate sporangia that are ellipsoid and obpyriform with conspicuously tapered bases and possess caducous, medium to long pedicels. The sexual phase is characterized by the production of oogonia with tapered bases, small amphigynous antheridia and thick-walled, plerotic oospores. The morphology of the taxon does not match any of the valid 95 Phytophthora species described to date. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region (ITS) and the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) of this taxon and those from other Phytophthora species from GenBank and the Phytophthora database indicates that the new taxon is most closely related to species in ITS clade 10, including P. kernoviae, P. boehmeriae and the recently described P. gallica. The most closely related species is P. kernoviae, an invasive plant pathogen causing bleeding stem lesions on forest trees (beech, Fagus sylvatica) and foliar necrosis of ornamentals (rhododendron, pieris and magnolia) in the UK, and isolated in New Zealand from necrotic cherimoya shoots and fruits and soil. Although the morphological characters of the sexual phase of P. morindae and P. kernoviae are similar, the umbellate sporangiophores produced by the new taxon marks the main morphological distinction. In this paper we describe the morphological characteristics, the phylogenetic relationships and pathogenicity characteristics that support the description of this taxon as a new species with the proposed name Phytophthora morindae sp. nov.

  9. Genetic determinants of the defense response of resistant and susceptible pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars infected with Phytophthora capsici (Oomycetes; Pythiaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-L; Li, D-W; Gong, Z-H; Wang, J-E; Yin, Y-X; Ji, J-J

    2013-09-13

    Based on culture isolation and morphological observation blight-infected pepper plants in Shaanxi Province, China, we identified the pathogen causing pepper phytophthora blight as Phytophthora capsici. Varieties that differed in resistance (CM334, PBC602, and B27) were inoculated with this pathogen. The root activity of resistant CM334 variety was the highest while that of susceptible B27 variety was the lowest. Also, significant differences in the activity of POD, PAL, and β-1,3-glucanase were found; there was a positive correlation between disease resistance and activity of these three enzymes. We inhibited mycelial growth and sporangia formation of P. capsici using crude β-1,3-glucanase and PAL enzymes isolated from the resistant variety CM334 after it had been inoculated with P. capsici. These two enzymes had a synergistic effect on inhibition of P. capsici mycelial growth and sporangia formation. Expression of the defensive genes CaPO1, CaBGLU, CaBPR1, and CaRGA in the three varieties was higher in the leaves than in the roots. All three genes were upregulated in infected leaves and roots of the pepper plants, always expressing at higher levels in the resistant cultivar than in the susceptible cultivar, suggesting that the differences in resistance among the pepper genotypes involve differences in the timing and magnitude of the defense response.

  10. EST mining and functional expression assays identify extracellular effector proteins from the plant pathogen Phytophthora.

    PubMed

    Torto, Trudy A; Li, Shuang; Styer, Allison; Huitema, Edgar; Testa, Antonino; Gow, Neil A R; van West, Pieter; Kamoun, Sophien

    2003-07-01

    Plant pathogenic microbes have the remarkable ability to manipulate biochemical, physiological, and morphological processes in their host plants. These manipulations are achieved through a diverse array of effector molecules that can either promote infection or trigger defense responses. We describe a general functional genomics approach aimed at identifying extracellular effector proteins from plant pathogenic microorganisms by combining data mining of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with virus-based high-throughput functional expression assays in plants. PexFinder, an algorithm for automated identification of extracellular proteins from EST data sets, was developed and applied to 2147 ESTs from the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. The program identified 261 ESTs (12.2%) corresponding to a set of 142 nonredundant Pex (Phytophthora extracellular protein) cDNAs. Of these, 78 (55%) Pex cDNAs were novel with no significant matches in public databases. Validation of PexFinder was performed using proteomic analysis of secreted protein of P. infestans. To identify which of the Pex cDNAs encode effector proteins that manipulate plant processes, high-throughput functional expression assays in plants were performed on 63 of the identified cDNAs using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens binary vector carrying the potato virus X (PVX) genome. This led to the discovery of two novel necrosis-inducing cDNAs, crn1 and crn2, encoding extracellular proteins that belong to a large and complex protein family in Phytophthora. Further characterization of the crn genes indicated that they are both expressed in P. infestans during colonization of the host plant tomato and that crn2 induced defense-response genes in tomato. Our results indicate that combining data mining using PexFinder with PVX-based functional assays can facilitate the discovery of novel pathogen effector proteins. In principle, this strategy can be applied to a variety of eukaryotic plant pathogens, including

  11. Fighting phytophthora in blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is a ubiquitous soilborne pathogen associated with root rot in many woody perennial plant species, including highbush blueberry (Vaccinium sp.). To identify genotypes with resistance to the pathogen, cultivars and advanced selections of highbush blueberry were grown in a...

  12. [Sporangia ontogeny and sporogenesis of the lycopodium Huperzia brevifolia (Lycopodiaceae) from the high mountains of Colombia].

    PubMed

    Barón, Edgar Javier Rincón; Landazábal, Leidy Vivivana Gélvez; Ballesteros, Helkin Giovany Forero; Prieto, Dagoberto Arrieta; Hleap, José Sergio

    2009-12-01

    Huperzia brevifolia is one of the dominant species of the genus Huperzia living in paramos and superparamos from the Colombian Andes. A detailed study of the sporangium's ontogeny and sporogenesis was carried out using specimens collected at 4200m above sea level, in Parque Natural Nacional El Cocuy, Colombia. Small pieces of caulinar axis bearing sporangia were fixed, dehydrated, paraffin embedded, sectioned in a rotatory microtome, and stained using the common Safranin O-Fast Green technique; handmade cross sections were also made, stained with aqueous Toluidine Blue (TBO). The sporangia develops basipetally, a condition that allows observation of all the developmental stages taking place throughout the caulinar axis of adult plants. Each sporangium originates from a group of epidermal cells, axilar to the microphylls. These cells undergo active mitosis, and produce new external and internal cellular groups. The sporangium wall and the tapetum originate from the external group of cells, while the internal cellular group leads to the sporogenous tissue. Meiosis occur in the sporocytes and produce simultaneous types tetrads, each one giving rise four trilete spores, with foveolate ornamentation. During the sporangium ripening, the outermost layer of the wall develops anticlinally, and inner periclinal thickenings and the innermost one perform as a secretory tapetum, which persists until the spores are completely mature. All other cellular layers colapse.

  13. The phytophthora genome initiative database: informatics and analysis for distributed pathogenomic research.

    PubMed

    Waugh, M; Hraber, P; Weller, J; Wu, Y; Chen, G; Inman, J; Kiphart, D; Sobral, B

    2000-01-01

    The Phytophthora Genome Initiative (PGI) is a distributed collaboration to study the genome and evolution of a particularly destructive group of plant pathogenic oomycete, with the goal of understanding the mechanisms of infection and resistance. NCGR provides informatics support for the collaboration as well as a centralized data repository. In the pilot phase of the project, several investigators prepared Phytophthora infestans and Phytophthora sojae EST and Phytophthora sojae BAC libraries and sent them to another laboratory for sequencing. Data from sequencing reactions were transferred to NCGR for analysis and curation. An analysis pipeline transforms raw data by performing simple analyses (i.e., vector removal and similarity searching) that are stored and can be retrieved by investigators using a web browser. Here we describe the database and access tools, provide an overview of the data therein and outline future plans. This resource has provided a unique opportunity for the distributed, collaborative study of a genus from which relatively little sequence data are available. Results may lead to insight into how better to control these pathogens. The homepage of PGI can be accessed at http:www.ncgr.org/pgi, with database access through the database access hyperlink.

  14. Draft genome sequences of Phytophthora kernoviae and Phytophthora ramorum lineage EU2 from Scotland.

    PubMed

    Sambles, Christine; Schlenzig, Alexandra; O'Neill, Paul; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2015-12-01

    Newly discovered Phytophthora species include invasive pathogens that threaten trees and shrubs. We present draft genome assemblies for three isolates of Phytophthora kernoviae and one isolate of the EU2 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum, collected from outbreak sites in Scotland.

  15. Growth and sporulation of Phytophthora ramorum in vitro in response to temperature and light.

    PubMed

    Englander, Larry; Browning, Marsha; Tooley, Paul W

    2006-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, recently found in the US, is causing concern for hardwood forests and the nursery industry. In an effort to identify some of the environmental limitations to growth and sporulation we undertook a laboratory study of four US and three European (EU) isolates. On V8 media, isolates grew when incubated at 2-28 C and produced chlamydospores at 8-28 C. Sporangia were produced at all temperatures tested: 10-30 C for US isolates and 6-26 C for EU isolates. Optimal temperatures were 16-26 C for growth, 14-26 C for chlamydospore production and 16-22 C for sporangia production. US isolates grew less and produced fewer spores when exposed to increasing doses of near-UV radiation (50-300 microW/cm(2)) and visible radiation (250-1500 microW/cm(2)). EU isolates were exposed to 300 microW/cm(2) near-UV only, which significantly reduced growth of one of three isolates and had no significant effect on spore production. In our studies P. ramorum tolerated a broad range of temperature and light conditions, which suggests that it is capable of establishment in a wide geographic area.

  16. Effects of microgravity on the susceptibility of soybean to Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Nedukha, O M; Leach, J E; Ryba-White, M; Hilaire, E; Guikema, J; Kordyum, E L

    1998-07-01

    The study of pathogenicity of higher plants under conditions of microgravity is of great importance for the future production of food in space. Previous work suggests that microgravity affects both microbes and plants. Bacterial numbers increased after 17 days in an algae-bacterium association on the biosatellite "Kosmos-1887". This was speculated to result from an increase in the multiplication rate of the bacteria. Sporangia of both Actinomices brevis, in the shuttles "Soyuz-19" and "Appolon", and Phycomyces blakes, in biosatellite "Kosmos-936", formed after 10 days in microgravity. Sporangia did not form in the ground controls in the same time suggesting that the rate of fungal development is enhanced in microgravity. Plant responses to pathogens in microgravity have not been studied, however, microgravity profoundly impacts plant cell development, cytology, and physiology. In microgravity, developing cell walls are thinner and contain less lignin than ground-grown plants. The demonstrated effects of microgravity on both plants and microbes lead us to hypothesize that plants may be more susceptible to pathogens under conditions of microgravity. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of microgravity on the susceptibility of soybean to the fungal root rot pathogen, Phytophthora sojae.

  17. Stromata, sporangiomata and chlamydosori of Phytophthora ramorum on inoculated Mediterranean woody plants.

    PubMed

    Moralejo, Eduardo; Puig, Miquel; García, José A; Descals, Enrique

    2006-11-01

    Three types of multihyphal structures, stromata, sporangiomata and chlamydosori, are described for the plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Their morphology, morphogenesis and position on the host organ were observed by dissecting, compound and scanning electron microscopy. Stromata were consistently formed one to two weeks after zoospore inoculation of detached leaves and fruits of an assortment of Mediterranean sclerophyll shrubs. Stroma initials appeared subcuticularly or subepidermally and developed as small hyphal aggregates by repeated branching, budding, swelling and interweaving, eventually forming a prosenchyma. They always emerged through the adaxial side of the leaf by rupture of the overlying host tissue. Occasionally sporangia and chlamydosori (packed clusters of chlamydospores) were formed on the stromata. Sporangiomata bore short sporangiophores and clusters of 20-100 sporangia and resembled sporodochia of the mitosporic fungi. The biological significance of these multihyphal structures is discussed. Some epidemiological aspects were also studied: several understorey species of the holm oak (Quercus ilex) woodland were susceptible to in vitro infection with three isolates of P. ramorum originally collected from different ornamental hosts. The risk of spread to this ecosystem is evaluated.

  18. Phytophthora sojae: Diversity among and within Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean production is increasing around the world and, to no surprise, so are the reports of soybean diseases caused by Phytophthora sojae, including Phytophthora seed, root, and stem rot. Phytophthora sojae is a diploid oomycete, which is homothallic and is limited to primarily one host: the soybe...

  19. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish famine pathogen, P. infestans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global movement of plant pathogens threatens natural ecosystems, food security, and commercial interests. Introduction of a plant pathogen to new geographic regions has been the primary mechanism by which new pathogens have emerged. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathoge...

  20. Survey and analysis of microsatellites from transcript sequences in Phytophthora species: frequency, distribution, and potential as markers for the genus

    PubMed Central

    Garnica, Diana P; Pinzón, Andrés M; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Bernal, Adriana J; Barreto, Emiliano; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Restrepo, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Background Members of the genus Phytophthora are notorious pathogens with world-wide distribution. The most devastating species include P. infestans, P. ramorum and P. sojae. In order to develop molecular methods for routinely characterizing their populations and to gain a better insight into the organization and evolution of their genomes, we used an in silico approach to survey and compare simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in transcript sequences from these three species. We compared the occurrence, relative abundance, relative density and cross-species transferability of the SSRs in these oomycetes. Results The number of SSRs in oomycetes transcribed sequences is low and long SSRs are rare. The in silico transferability of SSRs among the Phytophthora species was analyzed for all sets generated, and primers were selected on the basis of similarity as possible candidates for transferability to other Phytophthora species. Sequences encoding putative pathogenicity factors from all three Phytophthora species were also surveyed for presence of SSRs. However, no correlation between gene function and SSR abundance was observed. The SSR survey results, and the primer pairs designed for all SSRs from the three species, were deposited in a public database. Conclusion In all cases the most common SSRs were trinucleotide repeat units with low repeat numbers. A proportion (7.5%) of primers could be transferred with 90% similarity between at least two species of Phytophthora. This information represents a valuable source of molecular markers for use in population genetics, genetic mapping and strain fingerprinting studies of oomycetes, and illustrates how genomic databases can be exploited to generate data-mining filters for SSRs before experimental validation. PMID:17007642

  1. Phytophthora megakarya and P. palmivora, Causal Agents of Black Pod Rot, Induce Similar Plant Defense Responses Late during Infection of Susceptible Cacao Pods

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shahin S.; Shao, Jonathan; Lary, David J.; Strem, Mary D.; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Bailey, Bryan A.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora megakarya (Pmeg) and Phytophthora palmivora (Ppal) cause black pod rot of Theobroma cacao L. (cacao). Of these two clade 4 species, Pmeg is more virulent and is displacing Ppal in many cacao production areas in Africa. Symptoms and species specific sporangia production were compared when the two species were co-inoculated onto pod pieces in staggered 24 h time intervals. Pmeg sporangia were predominantly recovered from pod pieces with unwounded surfaces even when inoculated 24 h after Ppal. On wounded surfaces, sporangia of Ppal were predominantly recovered if the two species were simultaneously applied or Ppal was applied first but not if Pmeg was applied first. Pmeg demonstrated an advantage over Ppal when infecting un-wounded surfaces while Ppal had the advantage when infecting wounded surfaces. RNA-Seq was carried out on RNA isolated from control and Pmeg and Ppal infected pod pieces 3 days post inoculation to assess their abilities to alter/suppress cacao defense. Expression of 4,482 and 5,264 cacao genes was altered after Pmeg and Ppal infection, respectively, with most genes responding to both species. Neural network self-organizing map analyses separated the cacao RNA-Seq gene expression profiles into 24 classes, 6 of which were largely induced in response to infection. Using KEGG analysis, subsets of genes composing interrelated pathways leading to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthesis and action, plant defense signal transduction, and endocytosis showed induction in response to infection. A large subset of genes encoding putative Pr-proteins also showed differential expression in response to infection. A subset of 36 cacao genes was used to validate the RNA-Seq expression data and compare infection induced gene expression patterns in leaves and wounded and unwounded pod husks. Expression patterns between RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR were generally reproducible. The level and timing of altered gene expression was

  2. Phytophthora boodjera sp. nov., a damping-off pathogen in production nurseries and from urban and natural landscapes, with an update on the status of P. alticola.

    PubMed

    Simamora, Agnes V; Stukely, Mike J C; Hardy, Giles E StJ; Burgess, Treena I

    2015-12-01

    A new homothallic Phytophthora species, isolated in Western Australia (WA), is described as Phytophthora boodjera sp. nov. It produces persistent, papillate sporangia, oogonia with thick-walled oospores, and paragynous antheridia. Although morphologically similar to P. arenaria, phylogenetic analyses of the ITS, cox1, HSP90, β-tubulin and enolase gene regions revealed P. boodjera as a new species. In addition, P. boodjera has a higher optimal temperature for growth and a faster growth rate. Phytophthora boodjera has only recently been found in Western Australia and has mostly been isolated from dead and dying Eucalyptus seedlings in nurseries and from urban tree plantings, and occasionally from disturbed natural ecosystems. It is found in association with declining and dying Agonis flexuosa, Banksia media, B. grandis, Corymbia calophylla, Eucalyptus spp,. and Xanthorrhoea preissii. The status of P. alticola was also reviewed. The loss of all isolates associated with the original description except one; discrepancies in both sequence data and morphology of the remaining isolate with that presented the original description, and inconclusive holotype material places the status of this species in doubt.

  3. Managing Phytophthora Disease with Fungicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici ranks as a top threat to production of Cucurbitaceae, Solanaceae and most recently Fabaceae vegetables. Available and effective fungicides for disease management are limited and populations of P. capsici in many growing areas have become insensitive to mefenoxam. Efficacy of f...

  4. The Anti-Phytophthora Effect of Selected Potato-Associated Pseudomonas Strains: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Anouk; De Vrieze, Mout; Bönisch, Denise; Gloor, Ramona; Musa, Tomke; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Bailly, Aurélien; Weisskopf, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late blight is controlled by repeated applications of copper-based products, which negatively impact the environment. To find alternative solutions for late blight management, we have previously isolated a large collection of bacteria from the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potatoes. Here we report the antagonistic potential of these strains when co-cultivated with P. infestans as well as with other potato pathogens. We then focused on three Pseudomonas strains and compared their protective impact against late blight to that of well-known biocontrol strains in planta using a high-throughput leaf disk assay with automated picture analysis. When sprayed on the leaves of potatoes in the greenhouse, the strains were able to survive for at least 15 days. Under field conditions, populations decreased faster but all tested strains could still be retrieved after 8 days. The most active strain in vitro, P. chlororaphis R47, was also the best protectant on leaf disks from plants grown in the greenhouse experiment, but its protection potential could not be verified in the field due to unfavorable infection conditions. However, its protective effect against P. infestans in planta, its survival in the phyllosphere as well as its ability to colonize the potato rhizosphere in very high population densities, suggest a potential for field application, e.g., in the form of tuber treatment or leaf spray. PMID:26640460

  5. Draft genome sequences of Phytophthora kernoviae and Phytophthora ramorum lineage EU2 from Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Sambles, Christine; Schlenzig, Alexandra; O'Neill, Paul; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Newly discovered Phytophthora species include invasive pathogens that threaten trees and shrubs. We present draft genome assemblies for three isolates of Phytophthora kernoviae and one isolate of the EU2 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum, collected from outbreak sites in Scotland. PMID:26697371

  6. Phytophthora inundata sp. nov., a part heterothallic pathogen of trees and shrubs in wet or flooded soils.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Clive M; Sanchez-Hernandez, Esperanza; Kirk, Susan A

    2003-04-01

    A Phytophthora pathogen of trees and shrubs previously designated Phytophthora sp. O-group is formally named as P. inundata sp. nov. P. inundata falls within the P. gonapodyides-P. megasperma major ITS Clade 6, its present nearest known relative being P. humicola. It has non-papillate sporangia, fairly large oogonia (average ca 40 microns) with thick walled oospores, amphigynous antheridia, a distinctive colony type, a high optimum temperature for growth of 28-30 degrees C, fast growth at the optimum, and a high upper temperature limit for growth of ca 35-37 degrees. A study of the breeding system of eight P. inundata isolates showed them to be classically heterothallic with A1 and A2 compatibility types. However some P. inundata A1 x A2 combinations failed to mate even though the same isolates mated successfully with P. drechsleri testers. Others were 'silent' A1s or A2s, unable to produce their own gametangia but able to induce gametangial formation in the opposite sexual compatibility type of another species. This indicates a partial breakdown of the sexual mechanism in the species. Two isolates (one A1 and one A2) were unpredictably and chimaerically self-fertile, suggesting A1 + A2 chromosomal heteroploidy. The association of P. inundata with ponds and rivers and with root and collar roots of trees and shrubs after flooding is discussed.

  7. Phytophthora niederhauserii sp. nov., a polyphagous species associated with ornamentals, fruit trees and native plants in 13 countries.

    PubMed

    Abad, Z Gloria; Abad, Jorge A; Cacciola, Santa Olga; Pane, Antonella; Faedda, Roberto; Moralejo, Eduardo; Pérez-Sierra, Ana; Abad-Campos, Paloma; Alvarez-Bernaola, Luis A; Bakonyi, József; Józsa, András; Herrero, Maria Luz; Burgess, Treena I; Cunnington, James H; Smith, Ian W; Balci, Yilmaz; Blomquist, Cheryl; Henricot, Béatrice; Denton, Geoffrey; Spies, Chris; Mcleod, Adele; Belbahri, Lassaad; Cooke, David; Kageyama, Koji; Uematsu, Seiji; Kurbetli, Ilker; Değirmenci, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    A non-papillate, heterothallic Phytophthora species first isolated in 2001 and subsequently from symptomatic roots, crowns and stems of 33 plant species in 25 unrelated botanical families from 13 countries is formally described here as a new species. Symptoms on various hosts included crown and stem rot, chlorosis, wilting, leaf blight, cankers and gumming. This species was isolated from Australia, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom and United States in association with shrubs and herbaceous ornamentals grown mainly in greenhouses. The most prevalent hosts are English ivy (Hedera helix) and Cistus (Cistus salvifolius). The association of the species with acorn banksia (Banksia prionotes) plants in natural ecosystems in Australia, in affected vineyards (Vitis vinifera) in South Africa and almond (Prunus dulcis) trees in Spain and Turkey in addition to infection of shrubs and herbaceous ornamentals in a broad range of unrelated families are a sign of a wide ecological adaptation of the species and its potential threat to agricultural and natural ecosystems. The morphology of the persistent non-papillate ellipsoid sporangia, unique toruloid lobate hyphal swellings and amphigynous antheridia does not match any of the described species. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of the ITS rDNA, EF-1α, and β-tub supported that this organism is a hitherto unknown species. It is closely related to species in ITS clade 7b with the most closely related species being P. sojae. The name Phytophthora niederhauserii has been used in previous studies without the formal description of the holotype. This name is validated in this manuscript with the formal description of Phytophthora niederhauserii Z.G. Abad et J.A. Abad, sp. nov. The name is coined to honor Dr John S. Niederhauser, a notable plant pathologist and the 1990 World Food Prize laureate.

  8. A novel method for efficient and abundant production of Phytophthora brassicae zoospores on Brussels sprout leaf discs

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; Govers, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Background Phytophthora species are notorious oomycete pathogens that cause diseases on a wide range of plants. Our understanding how these pathogens are able to infect their host plants will benefit greatly from information obtained from model systems representative for plant-Phytophthora interactions. One attractive model system is the interaction between Arabidopsis and Phytophthora brassicae. Under laboratory conditions, Arabidopsis can be easily infected with mycelial plugs as inoculum. In the disease cycle, however, sporangia or zoospores are the infectious propagules. Since the current P. brassicae zoospore isolation methods are generally regarded as inefficient, we aimed at developing an alternative method for obtaining high concentrations of P. brassicae zoospores. Results P. brassicae isolates were tested for pathogenicity on Brussels sprout plants (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera). Microscopic examination of leaves, stems and roots infected with a GFP-tagged transformant of P. brassicae clearly demonstrated the susceptibility of the various tissues. Leaf discs were cut from infected Brussels sprout leaves, transferred to microwell plates and submerged in small amounts of water. In the leaf discs the hyphae proliferated and abundant formation of zoosporangia was observed. Upon maturation the zoosporangia released zoospores in high amounts and zoospore production continued during a period of at least four weeks. The zoospores were shown to be infectious on Brussels sprouts and Arabidopsis. Conclusion The in vitro leaf disc method established from P. brassicae infected Brussels sprout leaves facilitates convenient and high-throughput production of infectious zoospores and is thus suitable to drive small and large scale inoculation experiments. The system has the advantage that zoospores are produced continuously over a period of at least one month. PMID:19698127

  9. Screening Phytophthora rubi for fungicide resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results from the survey for fungicide resistance in Phytophthora were reported at the 2016 Washington Small Fruit Conference. Phytophthora was isolated from diseased plants in 28 red raspberry fields and tested against mefenoxam, the active ingredient of Ridomil. Most isolates were ident...

  10. Detection, Distribution, Sporulation, and Survival of Phytophthora ramorum in a California Redwood-Tanoak Forest Soil.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, E J; Lynch, S C; Rizzo, D M

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT Recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soils throughout sudden oak death-affected regions of California illustrates that soil may serve as an inoculum reservoir, but the role of soil inoculum in the disease cycle is unknown. This study addresses the efficacy of soil baiting, seasonal pathogen distribution under several epidemiologically important host species, summer survival and chlamydospore production in soil, and the impact of soil drying on pathogen survival. The efficacy of rhododendron leaves and pears as baits for detection of soilborne propagules were compared. Natural inoculum associated with bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus), and redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) were determined by monthly baiting. Summer survival and chlamydospore production were assessed in infected rhododendron leaf disks incubated under bay laurel, tanoak, and redwood at either the surface, the litter/soil interface, or in soil. Rhododendron leaf baits were superior to pear baits for sporangia detection, but neither bait detected chlamydospores. Most inoculum was associated with bay laurel and recovery was higher in soil than litter. Soil-incubated inoculum exhibited over 60% survival at the end of summer and also supported elevated chlamydospore production. P. ramorum survives and produces chlamydospores in forest soils over summer, providing a possible inoculum reservoir at the onset of the fall disease cycle.

  11. Comparison of the two pathogenic systems: Bremia Lactucae on Lactuca, and Phytophthora infestans on Solarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oomycetes are the largest group of heterotrophic Stramenopiles, physically resembling fungi. However, biochemical analyses and comparison of sequences of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes suggest that Oomycetes share little taxonomic affinity to fungi, but are more closely related to heterokont alga...

  12. Using effectors of Phytophthora infestans to teach pathogenesis: Our attempt to provide a more comprehensive education

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The topic of pathogenesis mechanisms (R/avirulence genes, effectors, and hypersensitive response) has proved challenging for students in our introductory plant pathology course. An apparent gap exists in the curriculum between this introductory course and higher level plant-microbe interaction cours...

  13. Species tree estimation for the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, and close relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the evolutionary history of a group of organisms, an accurate estimate of the species phylogeny must be known. Traditionally, gene trees have served as a proxy for the species tree, although it was acknowledged early on that these trees represented different evolutionary process...

  14. Evolution of the cutinase gene family: evidence for lateral gene transfer of a candidate Phytophthora virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Belbahri, Lassaad; Calmin, Gautier; Mauch, Felix; Andersson, Jan O

    2008-01-31

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) can facilitate the acquisition of new functions in recipient lineages, which may enable them to colonize new environments. Several recent publications have shown that gene transfer between prokaryotes and eukaryotes occurs with appreciable frequency. Here we present a study of interdomain gene transfer of cutinases -- well documented virulence factors in fungi -- between eukaryotic plant pathogens Phytophthora species and prokaryotic bacterial lineages. Two putative cutinase genes were cloned from Phytophthora brassicae and Northern blotting experiments showed that these genes are expressed early during the infection of the host Arabidopsis thaliana and induced during cyst germination of the pathogen. Analysis of the gene organisation of this gene family in Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae showed three and ten copies in tight succession within a region of 5 and 25 kb, respectively, probably indicating a recent expansion in Phytophthora lineages by gene duplications. Bioinformatic analyses identified orthologues only in three genera of Actinobacteria, and in two distantly related eukaryotic groups: oomycetes and fungi. Together with phylogenetic analyses this limited distribution of the gene in the tree of life strongly support a scenario where cutinase genes originated after the origin of land plants in a microbial lineage living in proximity of plants and subsequently were transferred between distantly related plant-degrading microbes. More precisely, a cutinase gene was likely acquired by an ancestor of P. brassicae, P. sojae, P. infestans and P. ramorum, possibly from an actinobacterial source, suggesting that gene transfer might be an important mechanism in the evolution of their virulence. These findings could indeed provide an interesting model system to study acquisition of virulence factors in these important plant pathogens.

  15. Dual RNA-Sequencing of Eucalyptus nitens during Phytophthora cinnamomi Challenge Reveals Pathogen and Host Factors Influencing Compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Febé E.; Shuey, Louise S.; Naidoo, Sitha; Mamni, Thandekile; Berger, Dave K.; Myburg, Alexander A.; van den Berg, Noëlani; Naidoo, Sanushka

    2016-01-01

    Damage caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands remains an important concern on forest tree species. The pathogen causes root and collar rot, stem cankers, and dieback of various economically important Eucalyptus spp. In South Africa, susceptible cold tolerant Eucalyptus plantations have been affected by various Phytophthora spp. with P. cinnamomi considered one of the most virulent. The molecular basis of this compatible interaction is poorly understood. In this study, susceptible Eucalyptus nitens plants were stem inoculated with P. cinnamomi and tissue was harvested five days post inoculation. Dual RNA-sequencing, a technique which allows the concurrent detection of both pathogen and host transcripts during infection, was performed. Approximately 1% of the reads mapped to the draft genome of P. cinnamomi while 78% of the reads mapped to the Eucalyptus grandis genome. The highest expressed P. cinnamomi gene in planta was a putative crinkler effector (CRN1). Phylogenetic analysis indicated the high similarity of this P. cinnamomi CRN1 to that of Phytophthora infestans. Some CRN effectors are known to target host nuclei to suppress defense. In the host, over 1400 genes were significantly differentially expressed in comparison to mock inoculated trees, including suites of pathogenesis related (PR) genes. In particular, a PR-9 peroxidase gene with a high similarity to a Carica papaya PR-9 ortholog previously shown to be suppressed upon infection by Phytophthora palmivora was down-regulated two-fold. This PR-9 gene may represent a cross-species effector target during P. cinnamomi infection. This study identified pathogenicity factors, potential manipulation targets, and attempted host defense mechanisms activated by E. nitens that contributed to the susceptible outcome of the interaction. PMID:26973660

  16. The necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein gene family of Phytophthora capsici is involved in pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici is one of the most important pathogens limiting vegetable production worldwide. Necrosis-inducing Phytophthora protein (NPP), ocurring in phylogenetically distant organisms, is phytotoxic for dicotyledonous plants, but the mechanism of action has not been established. A gene fam...

  17. Pathogenic diversity of Phytophthora sojae and breeding strategies to develop Phytophthora-resistant soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora stem and root rot disease, caused by Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), and has been increasing in several soybean-producing areas around the world. This disease induces serious limitations on soybean production, with yield l...

  18. New Discoveries of Sylvatic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Throughout the Bolivian Chaco

    PubMed Central

    Waleckx, Etienne; Depickère, Stéphanie; Salas, Renata; Aliaga, Claudia; Monje, Marcelo; Calle, Hiber; Buitrago, Rosio; Noireau, François; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Sylvatic populations of Triatoma infestans might be involved in the recolonization of human dwellings. We report here the discoveries of new T. infestans sylvatic foci in the Bolivian Chaco. Eighty-one triatomines were caught, 38 of which were identified as T. infestans. Triatoma sordida and Panstrongylus geniculatus were the other species collected. One T. infestans and one T. sordida were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi TcI; one T. infestans was infected with TcII. These discoveries add to the debate on the geographic distribution of sylvatic T. infestans populations, the geographic origin of the species, and the epidemiological role of these populations. PMID:22403316

  19. Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly; Jiang, Rays; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt; McDonald, Hayes; Medina, Monica; Morris, Paul; Putnam, Nik; Rash, Sam; Salamov, Asaf; Smith, Brian; Smith, Joe; Terry, Astrid; Torto, Trudy; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Daniel; Boore, Jeffrey

    2005-12-01

    The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.

  20. Impregnated Netting Slows Infestation by Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L.; Waller, Lance A.; Richards, Jean M.; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G. Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A.; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2008-01-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13–0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease. PMID:18840739

  1. Triatoma infestans in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gajate, P; Pietrokovsky, S; Abramo Orrego, L; Pérez, O; Monte, A; Belmonte, J; Wisnivesky-Colli, C

    2001-05-01

    The Health Administration Agencies of many municipalities in Greater Buenos Aires (GBA) receive frequent reports on triatomines in houses. The aim of this work was to identify and describe the dispersal foci of Triatoma infestans in an urban neighborhood of GBA, and contribute to the knowledge of the epidemiological situation in the region. In June 1998, potentially infested places were entomologically evaluated. T. infestans was only detected in a hen building for egg production, which housed approximately 6,000 birds. A total of 2,930 insects were collected. Density was about 9 triatomines/m(2). The proportions of fifth instar nymphs and adults were significantly higher than those of the other stages (p<0.001). The number of triatomines collected largely exceeded the highest domestic infestation found in one house from rural endemic areas of Argentina. Though triatomines were negative for Trypanosoma cruzi, they could acquire the parasite by coming in contact with infected people living in GBA. Besides, the numerous and widely distributed places housing hens and chickens, would favor the settlement of the vector. Together, both facts may constitute a risk of parasitic vectorial transmission. It is recommended to intensify systematic activities of vector search and case detection in GBA.

  2. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  3. Linkage relationships among multiple QTL for horticultural traits and late blight (P. infestans) resistance on chromosome 5 introgressed from wild tomato Solanum habrochaites.

    PubMed

    Haggard, J Erron; Johnson, Emily B; St Clair, Dina A

    2013-12-09

    When the allele of a wild species at a quantitative trait locus (QTL) conferring a desirable trait is introduced into cultivated species, undesirable effects on other traits may occur. These negative phenotypic effects may result from the presence of wild alleles at other closely linked loci that are transferred along with the desired QTL allele (i.e., linkage drag) and/or from pleiotropic effects of the desired allele. Previously, a QTL for resistance to Phytophthora infestans on chromosome 5 of Solanum habrochaites was mapped and introgressed into cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). Near-isogenic lines (NILs) were generated and used for fine-mapping of this resistance QTL, which revealed coincident or linked QTL with undesirable effects on yield, maturity, fruit size, and plant architecture traits. Subsequent higher-resolution mapping with chromosome 5 sub-NILs revealed the presence of multiple P. infestans resistance QTL within this 12.3 cM region. In our present study, these sub-NILs were also evaluated for 17 horticultural traits, including yield, maturity, fruit size and shape, fruit quality, and plant architecture traits in replicated field experiments over the course of two years. Each previously detected single horticultural trait QTL fractionated into two or more QTL. A total of 41 QTL were detected across all traits, with ∼30% exhibiting significant QTL × environment interactions. Colocation of QTL for multiple traits suggests either pleiotropy or tightly linked genes control these traits. The complex genetic architecture of horticultural and P. infestans resistance trait QTL within this S. habrochaites region of chromosome 5 presents challenges and opportunities for breeding efforts in cultivated tomato.

  4. The lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a novel Phytophthora resistance component and a potential host target for a RXLR effector.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-03-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process.

  5. The Lectin Receptor Kinase LecRK-I.9 Is a Novel Phytophthora Resistance Component and a Potential Host Target for a RXLR Effector

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process. PMID:21483488

  6. Bud Rot Caused by Phytophthora palmivora: A Destructive Emerging Disease of Oil Palm.

    PubMed

    Torres, G A; Sarria, G A; Martinez, G; Varon, F; Drenth, A; Guest, D I

    2016-04-01

    Oomycetes from the genus Phytophthora are among the most important plant pathogens in agriculture. Epidemics caused by P. infestans precipitated the great Irish famine and had a major impact on society and human history. In the tropics, P. palmivora is a pathogen of many plant species including cacao (Theobroma cacao), citrus (Citrus sp.), durian (Durio zibethines), jackfruit (Artrocarpus heterophyllus), rubber (Hevea brasiliensis), and several palm species including coconut (Cocos nucifera), and the African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) as determined recently. The first localized epidemics of bud rot in oil palm in Colombia were reported in 1964. However, recent epidemics of bud rot have destroyed more than 70,000 ha of oil palm in the Western and Central oil palm growing regions of Colombia. The agricultural, social, and economic implications of these outbreaks have been significant in Colombia. Identification of the pathogen after 100 years of investigating the disease in the world enabled further understanding of infection, expression of a range of symptoms, and epidemiology of the disease. This review examines the identification of P. palmivora as the cause of bud rot in Colombia, its epidemiology, and discusses the importance of P. palmivora as a major threat to oil palm plantings globally.

  7. Mitochondrial genome sequences and comparative genomics ofPhytophthora ramorum and P. sojae

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Frank N.; Douda, Bensasson; Tyler, Brett M.; Boore,Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of theoomycetes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were determined during thecourse of their complete nuclear genome sequencing (Tyler, et al. 2006).Both are circular, with sizes of 39,314 bp for P. ramorum and 42,975 bpfor P. sojae. Each contains a total of 37 identifiable protein-encodinggenes, 25 or 26 tRNAs (P. sojae and P. ramorum, respectively)specifying19 amino acids, and a variable number of ORFs (7 for P. ramorum and 12for P. sojae) which are potentially additional functional genes.Non-coding regions comprise approximately 11.5 percent and 18.4 percentof the genomes of P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively. Relative to P.sojae, there is an inverted repeat of 1,150 bp in P. ramorum thatincludes an unassigned unique ORF, a tRNA gene, and adjacent non-codingsequences, but otherwise the gene order in both species is identical.Comparisons of these genomes with published sequences of the P. infestansmitochondrial genome reveals a number of similarities, but the gene orderin P. infestans differs in two adjacent locations due to inversions.Sequence alignments of the three genomes indicated sequence conservationranging from 75 to 85 percent and that specific regions were morevariable than others.

  8. High affinity recognition of a Phytophthora protein by Arabidopsis via an RGD motif.

    PubMed

    Senchou, V; Weide, R; Carrasco, A; Bouyssou, H; Pont-Lezica, R; Govers, F; Canut, H

    2004-02-01

    The RGD tripeptide sequence, a cell adhesion motif present in several extracellular matrix proteins of mammalians, is involved in numerous plant processes. In plant-pathogen interactions, the RGD motif is believed to reduce plant defence responses by disrupting adhesions between the cell wall and plasma membrane. Photoaffinity cross-linking of [125I]-azido-RGD heptapeptide in the presence of purified plasma membrane vesicles of Arabidopsis thaliana led to label incorporation into a single protein with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa. Incorporation could be prevented by excess RGD peptides, but also by the IPI-O protein, an RGD-containing protein secreted by the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Hydrophobic cluster analysis revealed that the RGD motif of IPI-O (positions 53-56) is readily accessible for interactions. Single amino acid mutations in the RGD motif in IPI-O (of Asp56 into Glu or Ala) resulted in the loss of protection of the 80-kDa protein from labelling. Thus, the interaction between the two proteins is mediated through RGD recognition and the 80-kDa RGD-binding protein has the characteristics of a receptor for IPI-O. The IPI-O protein also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions in plasmolysed A. thaliana cells, whereas IPI-O proteins mutated in the RGD motif (D56A and D56E) did not.

  9. Sporulation on plant roots by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum has been shown to infect the roots of many of the pathogen’s foliar hosts. Methods of detecting inoculum in runoff and of quantifying root colonization were tested using Viburnum tinus, Camellia oleifera, Quercus prinus, Umbellularia californica, and Epilobium ciliatum. Plants...

  10. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H; McDonald, W Hayes; Savidor, Alon

    2006-01-01

    Genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, suggest a photosynthetic past and reveal recent massive expansion and diversification of potential pathogenicity gene families. Abstract: Draft genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, have been determined. O mycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin support a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known o mycete avirulence genes.

  11. A Circadian Rhythm-Regulated Tomato Gene Is Induced by Arachidonic Acid and Phythophthora infestans Infection1[W

    PubMed Central

    Weyman, Philip D.; Pan, Zhiqiang; Feng, Qin; Gilchrist, David G.; Bostock, Richard M.

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA clone of unknown function, DEA1, was isolated from arachidonic acid-treated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves by differential display PCR. The gene, DEA1, is expressed in response to the programmed cell death-inducing arachidonic acid within 8 h following treatment of a tomato leaflet, 16 h prior to the development of visible cell death. DEA1 transcript levels were also affected by the late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans. To gain further insight into the transcriptional regulation of DEA1, the promoter region was cloned by inverse PCR and was found to contain putative stress-, signaling-, and circadian-response elements. DEA1 is highly expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, but not in flowers. Leaf expression of DEA1 is regulated by circadian rhythms during long days with the peak occurring at midday and the low point midway through the dark period. During short days, the rhythm is lost and DEA1 expression becomes constitutive. The predicted DEA1 protein has a conserved domain shared by the eight-cysteine motif superfamily of protease inhibitors, α-amylase inhibitors, seed storage proteins, and lipid transfer proteins. A DEA1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized to the plasma membrane in protoplasts and plasmolysis experiments, suggesting that the native protein is associated with the plasmalemma in intact cells. PMID:16361525

  12. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathy, Sucheta; Zhang, Xuemin; Dehal, Paramvir; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Aerts, Andrea; Arredondo, Felipe D.; Baxter, Laura; Bensasson, Douda; Beynon, JIm L.; Chapman, Jarrod; Damasceno, Cynthia M. B.; Dorrance, Anne E.; Dou, Daolong; Dickerman, Allan W.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Gordon, Stuart G.; Govers, Francine; Grunwald, NIklaus J.; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly L.; Jones, Richard W.; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt H.; Lee, Mi-Kyung; McDonald, W. Hayes; Medina, Monica; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Nordberg, Erik K.; Maclean, Donald J.; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D.; Morris, Paul F.; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Putnam, Nicholas J.; Rash, Sam; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Sakihama, Yasuko; Salamov, Asaf A.; Savidor, Alon; Scheuring, Chantel F.; Smith, Brian M.; Sobral, Bruno W. S.; Terry, Astrid; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy A.; Win, Joe; Xu, Zhanyou; Zhang, Hongbin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-04-17

    Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin supports a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known oömycete avirulence genes.

  13. Biological activity of Schinus molle on Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A A; Werdin González, J O; Sánchez Chopa, C

    2006-07-01

    Hexanic extracts from leaves and fruits of Schinus molle were tested for repellent and insecticidal properties against first instar nymphs and eggs of Triatoma infestans, the vector of Chagas' disease. Leaf and fruit extracts were highly repellent for first nymphs. Fruit extracts had also ovicidal activity.

  14. Neuropeptidomics in Triatoma infestans. Comparative transcriptomic analysis among triatomines.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Lucila; Sierra, Ivana; Sterkel, Marcos; Francini, Flavio; Ons, Sheila

    2016-12-18

    Chagas' disease, affecting up to 6-7 million people worldwide, is transmitted to humans through the feces of triatomine kissing bugs. From these, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis are important vectors distributed throughout the Latin American subcontinent. Resistance to pyrethroids has been developed by some triatomine populations, especially T. infestans, obstructing their control. Given their role in the regulation of physiological processes, neuroendocrine-derived factors have been proposed as a source of molecular targets for new-generation insecticides. However, the involvement of neuropeptides in insecticide metabolism and resistance in insects has been poorly studied. In the present work, the sequences of 20 neuropeptide precursor genes in T. infestans, 16 in T. dimidiata, and 13 in T. pallidipennis detected in transcriptomic databases are reported, and a comparative analysis in triatomines is presented. A total of 59 neuropeptides were validated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in brain and nervous ganglia from T. infestans, revealing the existence of differential post-translational modifications, extended and truncated forms. The results suggest a high sequence conservation in some neuropeptide systems in triatomines, whereas remarkable differences occur in several others within the core domains. Comparisons of the basal expression levels for several neuropeptide precursor genes between pyrethroid sensitive and resistant population of T. infestans are also presented here, in order to introduce a proof of concept to test the involvement of neuropeptides in insecticide resistance. From the precursors tested, NVP and ITG peptides are significantly higher expressed in the resistant population. To our knowledge, this is the first report to associate differential neuropeptide expression with insecticide resistance. The information provided here contributes to creating conditions to widely

  15. Phytophthora root rot resistance in soybean E00003

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR), caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae, is a devastating disease in soybean production. Using resistant cultivars has been suggested as the best solution for disease management. Michigan elite soybean E00003 is resistant to P. sojae and has been used as a PRR resist...

  16. New chromosomal evidence for the origin of Triatoma infestans populations from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, N P; Alevi, K C C; Rosa, J A; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-08-26

    In this study, the karyometry of different Triatoma infestans populations from different states of Brazil was analyzed and compared with those of a population from Cochabamba. No significant differences were found between the population from Cochabamba and those from Brazil. These results are consistent with the origin of the T. infestans populations of Brazil by a founder effect from Cochabamba. Moreover, these findings also confirm that a founder effect occurred during the dispersal of T. infestans populations in different Brazilian states.

  17. The effect of pyramiding Phytophthora infestans resistance genes R Pi-mcd1 and R Pi-ber in potato.

    PubMed

    Tan, M Y Adillah; Hutten, Ronald C B; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J

    2010-06-01

    Despite efforts to control late blight in potatoes by introducing R(pi)-genes from wild species into cultivated potato, there are still concerns regarding the durability and level of resistance. Pyramiding R(pi)-genes can be a solution to increase both durability and level of resistance. In this study, two resistance genes, R(Pi-mcd1) and R(Pi-ber), introgressed from the wild tuber-bearing potato species Solanum microdontum and S. berthaultii were combined in a diploid S. tuberosum population. Individual genotypes from this population were classified after four groups, carrying no R(pi)-gene, with only R (Pi-mcd1), with only R(Pi-ber), and a group with the pyramided R(Pi-mcd1) and R (Pi-ber) by means of tightly linked molecular markers. The levels of resistance between the groups were compared in a field experiment in 2007. The group with R(Pi-mcd1) showed a significant delay to reach 50% infection of the leaf area of 3 days. The group with R ( Pi-ber ) showed a delay of 3 weeks. The resistance level in the pyramid group suggested an additive effect of R (Pi-mcd1) with R(Pi-ber). This suggests that potato breeding can benefit from combining individual R(pi)-genes, irrespective of the weak effect of R(Pi-mcd1) or the strong effect of R(Pi-ber).

  18. Genome sequences of six Phytophthora species associated with forests in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Studholme, D J; McDougal, R L; Sambles, C; Hansen, E; Hardy, G; Grant, M; Ganley, R J; Williams, N M

    2016-03-01

    In New Zealand there has been a long association of Phytophthora diseases in forests, nurseries, remnant plantings and horticultural crops. However, new Phytophthora diseases of trees have recently emerged. Genome sequencing has been performed for 12 Phytophthora isolates, from six species: Phytophthora pluvialis, Phytophthora kernoviae, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora agathidicida, Phytophthora multivora and Phytophthora taxon Totara. These sequences will enable comparative analyses to identify potential virulence strategies and ultimately facilitate better control strategies. This Whole Genome Shotgun data have been deposited in DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession numbers LGTT00000000, LGTU00000000, JPWV00000000, JPWU00000000, LGSK00000000, LGSJ00000000, LGTR00000000, LGTS00000000, LGSM00000000, LGSL00000000, LGSO00000000, and LGSN00000000.

  19. Genome sequences of six Phytophthora species associated with forests in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, D.J.; McDougal, R.L.; Sambles, C.; Hansen, E.; Hardy, G.; Grant, M.; Ganley, R.J.; Williams, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    In New Zealand there has been a long association of Phytophthora diseases in forests, nurseries, remnant plantings and horticultural crops. However, new Phytophthora diseases of trees have recently emerged. Genome sequencing has been performed for 12 Phytophthora isolates, from six species: Phytophthora pluvialis, Phytophthora kernoviae, Phytophthora cinnamomi, Phytophthora agathidicida, Phytophthora multivora and Phytophthora taxon Totara. These sequences will enable comparative analyses to identify potential virulence strategies and ultimately facilitate better control strategies. This Whole Genome Shotgun data have been deposited in DDBJ/ENA/GenBank under the accession numbers LGTT00000000, LGTU00000000, JPWV00000000, JPWU00000000, LGSK00000000, LGSJ00000000, LGTR00000000, LGTS00000000, LGSM00000000, LGSL00000000, LGSO00000000, and LGSN00000000. PMID:26981359

  20. Secondary Kill Effect of Deltamethrin on Triatoma infestans

    PubMed Central

    MALONEY, KATHLEEN M.; ANCCA-JUAREZ, JENNY; SALAZAR, RENZO; BORRINI-MAYORI, KATTY; PAMO-TITO, DANITZA; KEATING, JOSEPH A.; LEVY, MICHAEL Z.

    2012-01-01

    Control of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, relies on the application of pyrethroid insecticides, especially deltamethrin. We performed laboratory studies to determine whether a T. infestans nymph that comes into contact with a deltamethrin-treated surface horizontally transfers the insecticide to subsequent triatomines. We found that a triatomine that walks on a deltamethrin-treated surface for a short period of time has the ability to transport the insecticide in concentrations sufficient to kill other triatomines with which it comes into contact. The effect was limited to high-density environments, and mortality as a result of secondary exposure was greater among second-instar nymphs compared with fifth-instar nymphs. Our results suggest that deltamethrin could be killing triatomines through both direct and indirect contact, although it remains unclear whether the phenomenon occurs in natural conditions. PMID:21845956

  1. Microgeographical study of insecticide resistance in Triatoma infestans from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Germano, Mónica D; Picollo, María Inés; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón A

    2013-12-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America where it is currently estimated that 90 million people are at risk of acquiring the infection. Chemical control with pyrethroid insecticides has been effective to reduce disease transmission in several areas of the Southern Cone, although insecticide resistance has evolved and diminished the campaigns' results. Considering previous reports on the different levels of resistance between Triatoma infestans from different geographical areas, the objective of this work was to determine if T. infestans populations are toxicologically structured within localities. Response to the insecticide was measured and compared between houses of two Argentine localities. Different toxicity of deltamethrin was detected between dwellings of Chaco province, accounting for both susceptible and resistant houses within the same locality. However no difference was found among houses of Salta province. The results obtained in this work suggest that geographical structure is present not only at the between localities level, but also at the microgeograhical level.

  2. Periurban Trypanosoma cruzi–infected Triatoma infestans, Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Waller, Lance A.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Benzaquen, Eleazar Cordova; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2006-01-01

    In Arequipa, Peru, vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease by Triatoma infestans has become an urban problem. We conducted an entomologic survey in a periurban community of Arequipa to identify risk factors for triatomine infestation and determinants of vector population densities. Of 374 households surveyed, triatomines were collected from 194 (52%), and Trypanosoma cruzi–carrying triatomines were collected from 72 (19.3%). Guinea pig pens were more likely than other animal enclosures to be infested and harbored 2.38× as many triatomines. Stacked brick and adobe enclosures were more likely to have triatomines, while wire mesh enclosures were protected against infestation. In human dwellings, only fully stuccoed rooms were protected against infestation. Spatially, households with triatomines were scattered, while households with T. cruzi–infected triatomines were clustered. Keeping small animals in wire mesh cages could facilitate control of T. infestans in this densely populated urban environment. PMID:17073082

  3. Periurban Trypanosoma cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans, Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Zachary; Bowman, Natalie M; Kawai, Vivian; Waller, Lance A; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Cordova Benzaquen, Eleazar; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2006-09-01

    In Arequipa, Peru, vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease by Triatoma infestans has become an urban problem. We conducted an entomologic survey in a periurban community of Arequipa to identify risk factors for triatomine infestation and determinants of vector population densities. Of 374 households surveyed, triatomines were collected from 194 (52%), and Trypanosoma cruzi-carrying triatomines were collected from 72 (19.3%). Guinea pig pens were more likely than other animal enclosures to be infested and harbored 2.38x as many triatomines. Stacked brick and adobe enclosures were more likely to have triatomines, while wire mesh enclosures were protected against infestation. In human dwellings, only fully stuccoed rooms were protected against infestation. Spatially, households with triatomines were scattered, while households with T. cruzi-infected triatomines were clustered. Keeping small animals in wire mesh cages could facilitate control of T. infestans in this densely populated urban environment.

  4. Transmission of Phytophthora ramorum in Mixed-Evergreen Forest in California.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jennifer M; Wickland, Allison C; Patterson, Heather A; Falk, Kristen R; Rizzo, David M

    2005-05-01

    ABSTRACT During 2001 to 2003, the transmission biology of Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death, was studied in mixedevergreen forest, a common forest type in northern, coastal California. Investigation of the sources of spore production focused on coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) and bay laurel (Umbellularia californica), dominant hosts that comprised 39.7 and 46.2% of the individuals at the study site, respectively. All tests for inoculum production from the surface of infected coast live oak bark or exudates from cankers were negative. In contrast, sporangia and chlamydospores were produced on the surface of infected bay laurel leaves. Mean number of zoospores produced from infected bay laurel leaves under natural field conditions during rainstorms was 1,173.0 +/- SE 301.48, and ranged as high as 5,200 spores/leaf. P. ramorum was recovered from rainwater, soil, litter, and streamwater during the mid- to late rainy season in all 3 years of the study. P. ramorum was not recovered from sporadic summer rains or soil and litter during the hot, dry summer months. Concentrations of inoculum in rainwater varied significantly from year to year and increased as the rainy season progressed for the two complete seasons that were studied. Potential dispersal distances were investigated for rainwater, soil, and streamwater. In rainwater, inoculum moved 5 and 10 m from the inoculum source. For soil, transmission of inoculum was demonstrated from infested soil to bay laurel green leaf litter, and from bay laurel green leaf litter to aerial leaves of bay laurel seedlings. One-third to one-half of the hikers tested at the study site during the rainy season also were carrying infested soil on their shoes. In streamwater, P. ramorum was recovered from an unforested site in pasture 1 km downstream of forest with inoculum sources. In total, these studies provide details on the production and spread of P. ramorum inoculum in mixed-evergreen forest to aid

  5. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  6. Wild Triatoma infestans, a potential threat that needs to be monitored.

    PubMed

    Noireau, François

    2009-07-01

    The current persistence of Triatoma infestans, and therefore of Chagas disease transmission, in the Andean valleys of Bolivia and the Gran Chaco (precisely where wild populations of the vector are widespread), indicates a possible relationship between these two occurrences. This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge regarding wild T. infestans in Bolivia. The different morphs of the wild vector, their known distributions and some traits of their biology and ecology are presented. Particularly interesting is the considerable behavioural and chromatic plasticity that is displayed by wild T. infestans. According to the biogeographic region, different morphs of the vector occur in rupicolous habitats (common form and Mataral morph in Andean wild T. infestans) or arboreal ones ('dark morph' populations from the Chaco). The high genetic variability found at the microgeographical scale in Andean wild T. infestans favours the hypothesis that the Andes were the centre of origin and dispersal of T. infestans throughout South America. The relevant question regarding the origin of domestic populations is also addressed. Finally, current considerations of the epidemiological significance of wild T. infestans are discussed in the context of recent discoveries. Even if several observations support the epidemiological risk represented by wild T. infestans, the climatic and environmental conditions of their distribution areas would not favour the continued flow of triatomines between sylvatic refuges and domestic environments.

  7. Sylvatic Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae, Triatominae) in the Andean valleys of Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Mirko Rojas; Emperaire, Laure; Piccinali, Romina V; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Torrico, Faustino; Jansen, Ana Maria; Noireau, François

    2007-04-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in the Southern Cone countries. Wild populations of T. infestans appear widespread throughout the Andean valleys of Bolivia. In Cotapachi (2750 m asl), all sorts of rocky outcrops, regardless of their size, provided good refuges for T. infestans. Of the 1120 ecotopes investigated, 330 (29.5%) contained triatomines and 92% of the collected insects were nymphal instars. In the cold season, triatomine densities were similar in small and large outcrops. During the hot season, bug densities were higher in the larger outcrops, particularly in those located in peridomestic sites. T. infestans populations apparently produced one generation per year. Over half the sampled bugs were positive for T. cruzi infection. At Mataral (1750 m asl), a site located in the inter-Andean Chaco, a new morph of T. infestans was detected in a sylvatic environment.

  8. BABA and Phytophthora nicotianae Induce Resistance to Phytophthora capsici in Chile Pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Holguin, Omar; Dungan, Barry; Schaub, Tanner; Sanogo, Soumaila; Goldberg, Natalie; Randall, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance in plants is a systemic response to certain microorganisms or chemicals that enhances basal defense responses during subsequent plant infection by pathogens. Inoculation of chile pepper with zoospores of non-host Phytophthora nicotianae or the chemical elicitor beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) significantly inhibited foliar blight caused by Phytophthora capsici. Tissue extract analyses by GC/MS identified conserved change in certain metabolite concentrations following P. nicotianae or BABA treatment. Induced chile pepper plants had reduced concentrations of sucrose and TCA cycle intermediates and increased concentrations of specific hexose-phosphates, hexose-disaccharides and amino acids. Galactose, which increased significantly in induced chile pepper plants, was shown to inhibit growth of P. capsici in a plate assay. PMID:26020237

  9. Phytophthora Resistance of Soybean Germplasm with High Potential for Asian Soybean Rust Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple disease resistance is an important component of production agriculture. Major challenges include resistance to Phytophthora root rot caused by evolving Phytophthora sojae races and the recently introduced invasive Asian soybean rust (ASBR) caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi. The diseases cause...

  10. Evaluation of Actigard and Fungicides for Managing Phytophthora Fruit Rot of Watermelon, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora fruit rot caused by Phytophthora capsici is an emerging disease in most watermelon producing regions of Southeast U.S., and has been considered as a top research priority by the National Watermelon Association (NWA). Managing Phytophthora fruit rot can be difficult because of the l...

  11. First finding of melanic sylvatic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) colonies in the Argentine Chaco.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, L A; Piccinali, R V; Berkunsky, I; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E

    2009-09-01

    Triatoma infestans (Klug), the most important vector of Chagas disease in southern South America, is a highly domiciliated species with well-known sylvatic foci only in the Bolivian Andean valleys and in the Bolivian Chaco, where melanic insects designated as "dark morphs" were found. After the tentative identification of two melanic bugs collected from parrot nests in a forest reserve in the Argentine Chaco as T. infestans, we conducted an intensive search there using mouse-baited sticky traps in summer 2006 and 2007. Four live T. infestans bugs were collected in trees without parrot nests in 288 trap-nights, whereas no bug was collected from inside trees with active parrot nests in 51 trap-nights. To increase bug captures, hollow tree trunks that recently had had Amazona aestiva (Berlepsch) and Aratinga acuticaudata (Vieillot) parrot nests were treated with insecticide fumigant canisters exhibiting strong knockdown power. Four (22%) of 18 trees were positive for T. infestans with a dark phenotype. A fragment of the mitochondrial gene COI of 8 of the 14 triatomine bugs collected was successfully sequenced and confirmed as T. infestans. Most of the bugs were captured from Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco (Schlechter) hollow tree trunks harboring parrot nests. All of the T. infestans collected from the nearest house located at 10 km from the sylvatic foci displayed normal chromatic characters. The repeated finding of T. infestans in sylvatic habitats, albeit at very low density, shows that this species is capable of maintaining viable sylvatic foci in the absence of human hosts and immigration from domestic populations. These are the first confirmed findings of sylvatic T. infestans colonies in Argentina and of dark morphs in the Argentine Chaco.

  12. First Finding of Melanic Sylvatic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Colonies in the Argentine Chaco

    PubMed Central

    CEBALLOS, L. A.; PICCINALI, R. V.; BERKUNSKY, I.; KITRON, U.; GÜRTLER, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    Triatoma infestans (Klug), the most important vector of Chagas disease in southern South America, is a highly domiciliated species with well-known sylvatic foci only in the Bolivian Andean valleys and in the Bolivian Chaco, where melanic insects designated as “dark morphs” were found. After the tentative identification of two melanic bugs collected from parrot nests in a forest reserve in the Argentine Chaco as T. infestans, we conducted an intensive search there using mouse-baited sticky traps in summer 2006 and 2007. Four live T. infestans bugs were collected in trees without parrot nests in 288 trap-nights, whereas no bug was collected from inside trees with active parrot nests in 51 trap-nights. To increase bug captures, hollow tree trunks that recently had had Amazona aestiva (Berlepsch) and Aratinga acuticaudata (Vieillot) parrot nests were treated with insecticide fumigant canisters exhibiting strong knockdown power. Four (22%) of 18 trees were positive for T. infestans with a dark phenotype. A fragment of the mitochondrial gene COI of 8 of the 14 triatomine bugs collected was successfully sequenced and confirmed as T. infestans. Most of the bugs were captured from Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco (Schlechter) hollow tree trunks harboring parrot nests. All of the T. infestans collected from the nearest house located at 10 km from the sylvatic foci displayed normal chromatic characters. The repeated finding of T. infestans in sylvatic habitats, albeit at very low density, shows that this species is capable of maintaining viable sylvatic foci in the absence of human hosts and immigration from domestic populations. These are the first confirmed findings of sylvatic T. infestans colonies in Argentina and of dark morphs in the Argentine Chaco. PMID:19769054

  13. Active dispersal of natural populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in rural northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2004-07-01

    An empirical model of flight initiation coupled with data from a longitudinal study predicted that the flight dispersal of Triatoma infestans from peridomestic sites was more likely to occur in late summer. To partially test this prediction, we operated 11-12 black light traps from 1945 to 2200 hours in March 2003 in two villages in northern Argentina. All peridomestic sites around the light traps were later inspected to assess the relative abundance and nutritional status of T. infestans at each site. Traps were located 19-94 m from the nearest infested site. A total of 2 female, 10 male, and 3 fifth-instar nymphs of T. infestans; 4 adult Triatoma garciabesi; and 1 Triatoma guasayana fifth-instar nymph were collected in 64 trap nights. Nearly two-thirds of the bugs arrived to the traps during the first hour after sunset, when ambient temperatures were 22-28 degrees C; 80% of adults were unfed. The number of T. infestans that flew to the traps was significantly and negatively associated with wind speed, and the number of males positively associated with the abundance of adult T. infestans in peridomestic sites within 200 m around each light trap. This is the first successful application of light traps for collecting dispersing nymphal and adult T. infestans on a village-wide scale. We attribute this success to the placement of traps with consideration to spatial infestation patterns and seasonal variation in nutritional status of peridomestic triatomine populations.

  14. Active Dispersal of Natural Populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Rural Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, GONZALO M.; CEBALLOS, LEONARDO A.; KITRON, URIEL; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2005-01-01

    An empirical model of flight initiation coupled with data from a longitudinal study predicted that the flight dispersal of Triatoma infestans from peridomestic sites was more likely to occur in late summer. To partially test this prediction, we operated 11–12 black light traps from 1945 to 2200 hours in March 2003 in two villages in northern Argentina. All peridomestic sites around the light traps were later inspected to assess the relative abundance and nutritional status of T. infestans at each site. Traps were located 19–94 m from the nearest infested site. A total of 2 female, 10 male, and 3 fifth-instar nymphs of T. infestans; 4 adult Triatoma garciabesi; and 1 Triatoma guasayana fifth-instar nymph were collected in 64 trap nights. Nearly two-thirds of the bugs arrived to the traps during the first hour after sunset, when ambient temperatures were 22–28°C; 80% of adults were unfed. The number of T. infestans that flew to the traps was significantly and negatively associated with wind speed, and the number of males positively associated with the abundance of adult T. infestans in peridomestic sites within 200 m around each light trap. This is the first successful application of light traps for collecting dispersing nymphal and adult T. infestans on a village-wide scale. We attribute this success to the placement of traps with consideration to spatial infestation patterns and seasonal variation in nutritional status of peridomestic triatomine populations. PMID:15311452

  15. Molecular phylogeography of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Rosas, A R; Segura, E L; García, B A

    2011-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas' disease in South America between latitudes 10°S and 46°S. A multilocus microsatellite data set of 836 individuals from 27 populations of T. infestans, from all its range of distribution in Argentina, was analyzed. Our results favor the hypothesis of two independent migration events of colonization in Argentina and secondary contacts. The majority of the populations of the western provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja, San Juan and the west of Cordoba province, had almost no shared ancestry with the rest of the populations analyzed. Probably those populations, belonging to localities close to the Andean region, could have been established by the dispersal line of T. infestans that would have arrived to Argentina through the Andes, whereas most of the rest of the populations analyzed may have derived from the dispersal line of T. infestans in non-Andean lowlands. Among them, those from the provinces of Formosa, Chaco, Santiago del Estero and Santa Fe shared different percentages of ancestry and presented lower degree of genetic differentiation. The migratory movement linked to regional economies and possibly associated with passive dispersal, would allow a higher genetic exchange among these populations of T. infestans. This study, using microsatellite markers, provides a new approach for evaluating the validity of the different hypotheses concerning the evolutionary history of this species. Two major lineages of T. infestans, an Andean and non-Andean, are suggested. PMID:21224874

  16. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Erica A.; Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Levy, Michael Z.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment have had devastating ecologic and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here we show that populations of Tria. Infestans in geographically distinct districts within and around this urban center share a common recent evolutionary history although current gene flow is restricted even between proximal sites. The population structure among the Tria. Infestans in different districts is not correlated with the geographic distance between districts. These data suggest that migration among the districts is mediated by factors beyond the short-range migratory capabilities of Tria. Infestans and that human movement has played a significant role in the structuring of the Tria. Infestans population in the region. Rapid urbanization across southern South America will continue to create suitable environments for Tria. Infestans and knowledge of its urban dispersal patterns may play a fundamental role in mitigating human disease risk. PMID:24103030

  17. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface.

    PubMed

    Foley, Erica A; Khatchikian, Camilo E; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R; Levy, Michael Z; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-10-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment has had devastating ecological and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here, we show that populations of Tria. infestans in geographically distinct districts within and around this urban centre share a common recent evolutionary history although current gene flow is restricted even between proximal sites. The population structure among the Tria. infestans in different districts is not correlated with the geographical distance between districts. These data suggest that migration among the districts is mediated by factors beyond the short-range migratory capabilities of Tria. infestans and that human movement has played a significant role in the structuring of the Tria. infestans population in the region. Rapid urbanization across southern South America will continue to create suitable environments for Tria. infestans, and knowledge of its urban dispersal patterns may play a fundamental role in mitigating human disease risk.

  18. A molecular method to assess Phytophthora diversity in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Scibetta, Silvia; Schena, Leonardo; Chimento, Antonio; Cacciola, Santa O; Cooke, David E L

    2012-03-01

    Current molecular detection methods for the genus Phytophthora are specific to a few key species rather than the whole genus and this is a recognized weakness of protocols for ecological studies and international plant health legislation. In the present study a molecular approach was developed to detect Phytophthora species in soil and water samples using novel sets of genus-specific primers designed against the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Two different rDNA primer sets were tested: one assay amplified a long product including the ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 regions (LP) and the other a shorter product including the ITS1 only (SP). Both assays specifically amplified products from Phytophthora species without cross-reaction with the related Pythium s. lato, however the SP assay proved the more sensitive and reliable. The method was validated using woodland soil and stream water from Invergowrie, Scotland. On-site use of a knapsack sprayer and in-line water filters proved more rapid and effective than centrifugation at sampling Phytophthora propagules. A total of 15 different Phytophthora phylotypes were identified which clustered within the reported ITS-clades 1, 2, 3, 6, 7 and 8. The range and type of the sequences detected varied from sample to sample and up to three and five different Phytophthora phylotypes were detected within a single sample of soil or water, respectively. The most frequently detected sequences were related to members of ITS-clade 6 (i.e. P. gonapodyides-like). The new method proved very effective at discriminating multiple species in a given sample and can also detect as yet unknown species. The reported primers and methods will prove valuable for ecological studies, biosecurity and commercial plant, soil or water (e.g. irrigation water) testing as well as the wider metagenomic sampling of this fascinating component of microbial pathogen diversity.

  19. Assessing the efficacy of pre-harvest, chlorine-based sanitizers against human pathogen indicator microorganisms and Phytophthora capsici in non-recycled surface irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Lewis Ivey, M L; Miller, S A

    2013-09-01

    Many factors must be considered in order to develop and implement treatment systems to improve the microbial quality of surface water and prevent the accidental introduction of plant and human pathogens into vegetable crops. The efficacy of chlorine gas (Cl2(g)) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) injection systems in combination with rapid sand filtration (RSF) was evaluated in killing fecal indicator microorganisms in irrigation water in a vegetable-intensive production area. The efficacy of ClO2 and Cl2(g) was variable throughout the distribution systems and coliform bacteria never dropped below levels required by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for recreational waters. Sampling date and sampling point had a significant effect on the abundance of coliforms in Cl2(g)- and ClO2-treated water. Sampling date and sampling point also had a significant effect on the abundance of generic Escherichia coli in Cl2(g) treated water but only sampling point was significant in ClO2 treated water. Although the waterborne plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici was detected in five different sources of surface irrigation water using baiting and P. capsici-specific PCR, in vitro studies indicated that ClO2 at concentrations similar to those used to treat irrigation water did not reduce mycelial growth or direct germination of P. capsici sporangia and reduced zoospore populations by less than 50%. This study concludes that injection of ClO2 and Cl2(g) into surface water prior to rapid sand filtration is inadequate in reducing fecal indicator microorganism populations and ClO2 ineffectively kills infectious propagules of P. capsici. Additional research is needed to design a system that effectively targets and significantly reduces both plant and human pathogens that are present in surface irrigation water. A model for a multiple barrier approach to treating surface water for irrigation is proposed.

  20. Reinfestation Sources for Chagas Disease Vector, Triatoma infestans, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Kitron, Uriel

    2006-01-01

    Reinfestation by Triatoma infestans after insecticide spraying has caused elimination efforts in the dry Chaco region to fail repeatedly. The sources and spatial extent that need to be considered to understand the reinfestation pattern and to plan a comprehensive control program were studied in 2 adjacent rural communities in northwestern Argentina from 1993 to 1997. The effects of external, residual, and primary sources on the reinfestation pattern were evaluated by using geographic information systems, satellite imagery, spatial statistics, and 5-year retrospective data for 1,881 sites. The reinfestation process depended on primary internal sources and on surrounding infested communities. In the dry Chaco, successfully reducing the risk for reinfestation in a community depends on treating all communities and isolated sites within 1,500 m of the target community. In addition, during the surveillance phase, spraying all sites within 500 m of new foci will delay reinfestation. PMID:16836826

  1. Biosynthesis of Antibiotic Leucinostatins in Bio-control Fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum and Their Inhibition on Phytophthora Revealed by Genome Mining

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erfeng; Mao, Zhenchuan; Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Yin, Wen-Bing; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum of Ophiocordycipitaceae is one of the most promising and commercialized agents for controlling plant parasitic nematodes, as well as other insects and plant pathogens. However, how the fungus functions at the molecular level remains unknown. Here, we sequenced two isolates (PLBJ-1 and PLFJ-1) of P. lilacinum from different places Beijing and Fujian. Genomic analysis showed high synteny of the two isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis indicated they were most related to the insect pathogen Tolypocladium inflatum. A comparison with other species revealed that this fungus was enriched in carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), proteases and pathogenesis related genes. Whole genome search revealed a rich repertoire of secondary metabolites (SMs) encoding genes. The non-ribosomal peptide synthetase LcsA, which is comprised of ten C-A-PCP modules, was identified as the core biosynthetic gene of lipopeptide leucinostatins, which was specific to P. lilacinum and T. ophioglossoides, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, gene expression level was analyzed when PLBJ-1 was grown in leucinostatin-inducing and non-inducing medium, and 20 genes involved in the biosynthesis of leucionostatins were identified. Disruption mutants allowed us to propose a putative biosynthetic pathway of leucinostatin A. Moreover, overexpression of the transcription factor lcsF increased the production (1.5-fold) of leucinostatins A and B compared to wild type. Bioassays explored a new bioactivity of leucinostatins and P. lilacinum: inhibiting the growth of Phytophthora infestans and P. capsici. These results contribute to our understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of leucinostatins and may allow us to utilize P. lilacinum better as bio-control agent. PMID:27416025

  2. Chronobiological basis of thermopreference in the haematophagous bug Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Minoli, Sebastián A; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2003-10-01

    The chronobiological basis of the daily dynamics of thermopreference was tested in adults of Triatoma infestans, continuously registering the preferred temperature of insects released over a temperature gradient for 13 days. We found that the thermopreference in T. infestans is a dynamic process that depends on the time of the day and the post-feeding time. When submitted to a 12:12 h light/darkness cycle (L/D), the preferred temperature reached the highest and the lowest values at the end of the light and dark phases, respectively. This daily rhythm persisted under constant conditions of illumination (D/D and L/L), suggesting the existence of an internal oscillator controlling this behaviour. Statistical analysis revealed that the thermopreference of insects kept under L/D exhibited a ca. 24 h periodicity, while insects kept in D/D and L/L showed free-running periods of tau((D/D))=23.35 and tau((L/L))=27.35 h, respectively. The persistence of a cyclic pattern of thermopreference under constant conditions, and free-running periods, close to, but different from 24 h, demonstrate the existence of an endogenous control of the thermopreference in this species. The biological relevance of these results is discussed in the light of the hypothesis that both the length of time elapsed since feeding and the time of the day modify thermopreference in these bugs. The gradual decline in preferred temperature following feeding may be associated with energy conservation during starvation. The rhythmic modulation of thermopreference may be associated with the daily rhythm of locomotion activity shown by these bugs.

  3. Survival of Phytophthora ramorum chlamydospores at high and low temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum causes Sudden Oak Death, a destructive disease that imacts forest species, as well as, nursery crops in the U.S. and elsewhere. Chlamydospores were produced as described by Colburn and Shishkoff (Phytopathology 96:S25). Samples (5cc) of chlamydospores in sand inoculum were pl...

  4. Phytophthora ramorum causes cryptic bole cankers in Canyon line Oak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unusual mortality of large canyon live oaks was observed in natural stands in San Mateo, California starting in 2007. A survey of affected stands showed that symptomatic trees were spatially associated with California bay, the primary source of Phytophthora ramorum spores in this forest type. Trunk ...

  5. Susceptibility of sprouted oak acorns to Phytophthora ramorum zoospores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently emerged pathogen, having established in Europe and several western U.S. states, including California and Oregon. It has a wide host range and is a threat to forest ecology and the nursery industry. In California, coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) is a major host...

  6. Susceptibility of highbush blueberry cultivars to Phytophthora root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is a ubiquitous soilborne pathogen associated with root rot in many woody perennial plant species, including highbush blueberry (Vaccinium sp.). To identify genotypes with resistance to the pathogen, cultivars and advanced selections of highbush blueberry were grown in a...

  7. Can Epiphytes reduce disease symptoms caused by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf infection of ornamental species by Phytophthora ramorum has a significant impact on the spread of this disease. Fungicides have had limited effects on controlling this disease. With increasing concerns that repeated fungicide applications will exasperate the potential for fungicide resistance...

  8. Phenotypic differences among three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three major clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum present in North America and Europe named NA1, NA2, and EU1. Twenty-three isolates representing all three lineages were evaluated for phenotype including (i) aggressiveness on detached Rhododendron leaves and (ii) growth rate at minimum, ...

  9. PATHOGENIC PHYTOPHTHORA SPECIES IN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY IRRIGATION WATER SOURCES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface sources of irrigation water including the Kings River and three canals were assayed for Phytophthora spp. at six locations in the San Joaquin Valley within 30 km of Hanford, CA. Four nylon-mesh bags, each containing three firm, green pear fruits (separated by Styrofoam blocks) as bait for Ph...

  10. The Effect of Potassium Nitrate on the Reduction of Phytophthora Stem Rot Disease of Soybeans, the Growth Rate and Zoospore Release of Phytophthora Sojae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of potassium nitrate (KNO3) application on Phytophthora stem rot disease reduction of Glycine max (L.) Merr. cvs. Chusei-Hikarikuro and Sachiyutaka, and fungal growth and zoospore release of a Phytophthora sojae isolate were investigated under laboratory conditions. The application of 4-...

  11. Seasonal variations in active dispersal of natural populations of Triatoma infestans in rural north-western Argentina

    PubMed Central

    VAZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, G. M.; CEBALLOS, L.A.; MARCET, P. L.; CECERE, M. C.; CARDINAL, M. V.; KITRON, U.; GÜRTLER, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    The flight dispersal of Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) is one of the main mechanisms determining community re-infestation after control interventions. An empirical model of flight initiation coupled with data from a longitudinal study predicted that the flight dispersal of T. infestans would peak in summer. To test this prediction, longitudinal light trap collections were conducted during 3-8 nights in March (late summer), July (winter) and November (spring) 2003, and in March 2004 in a rural community in north-west Argentina. Following each light-trapping collection date, all peridomestic sites around light traps were inspected to assess the relative abundance and nutritional status of T. infestans at each site. A total of 21 adult and five nymph T. infestans, six Triatoma guasayana Wygodzinsky & Abalos, and nine Triatoma garciabesi Carcavallo et al. were collected in 96 light-trapping nights, whereas 696 T. infestans were collected from the peridomestic sites that surrounded the light traps. The arrival of T. infestans in the light traps occurred in 64% of catch stations and peaked in the summer surveys (10-14 bugs) compared with spring and winter surveys. When winds were < 5 km/h, the arrival of adult T. infestans at the light traps was significantly associated with maximum temperature and relative humidity. This is the first field report of seasonal variations in the flight dispersal activity of T. infestans. PMID:17044877

  12. Seasonal variations in active dispersal of natural populations of Triatoma infestans in rural north-western Argentina.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Prokopec, G M; Ceballos, L A; Marcet, P L; Cecere, M C; Cardinal, M V; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E

    2006-09-01

    The flight dispersal of Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) is one of the main mechanisms determining community re-infestation after control interventions. An empirical model of flight initiation coupled with data from a longitudinal study predicted that the flight dispersal of T. infestans would peak in summer. To test this prediction, longitudinal light trap collections were conducted during 3-8 nights in March (late summer), July (winter) and November (spring) 2003, and in March 2004 in a rural community in north-west Argentina. Following each light-trapping collection date, all peridomestic sites around light traps were inspected to assess the relative abundance and nutritional status of T. infestans at each site. A total of 21 adult and five nymph T. infestans, six Triatoma guasayana Wygodzinsky & Abalos, and nine Triatoma garciabesi Carcavallo et al. were collected in 96 light-trapping nights, whereas 696 T. infestans were collected from the peridomestic sites that surrounded the light traps. The arrival of T. infestans in the light traps occurred in 64% of catch stations and peaked in the summer surveys (10-14 bugs) compared with spring and winter surveys. When winds were < 5 km/h, the arrival of adult T. infestans at the light traps was significantly associated with maximum temperature and relative humidity. This is the first field report of seasonal variations in the flight dispersal activity of T. infestans.

  13. First report of widespread wild populations of Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae, Triatominae) in the valleys of La Paz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Rosio; Waleckx, Etienne; Bosseno, Marie-France; Zoveda, Faustine; Vidaurre, Pablo; Salas, Renata; Mamani, Elio; Noireau, François; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2010-04-01

    Wild populations of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the Southern Cone countries, may be involved in reinfestation of human dwellings, limiting the success of vector-control campaigns in Bolivia. Knowledge of the distribution of these populations remains incomplete. We report here the detection of T. infestans wild populations in large areas in the department of La Paz, Bolivia. Among 18 sylvatic areas investigated, 17 were positive with T. infestans specimens. The infection rate of captured T. infestans with Trypanosoma cruzi was 85.7% in adult specimens. These results expand the geographical distribution of wild populations of T. infestans; it may be distributed throughout the Inter-Andean Dry Forest eco-region of Bolivia. The current information allows us to propose the hypothesis that a sylvatic origin of the reinfestation is located in the valleys of La Paz.

  14. Differential Pattern of Infection of Sylvatic Nymphs and Domiciliary Adults of Triatoma infestans with Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, Antonella; Segovia, Verónica; García, Alejandro; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo; Acuna-Retamar, Mariana; Torres-Pérez, Fernando; Cattan, Pedro E.

    2012-01-01

    In Chile, the main vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma infestans, is under control after insecticide spraying. However, it has been found colonizing wild habitats. This study evaluated Trypanosoma cruzi infection of sylvatic and domiciliary T. infestans and identified their parasite genotypes. The sample studied was composed mainly of T. infestans sylvatic nymphs and domiciliary adults from a semi-urban area with human dwellings under vector control surveillance. Results showed prevalences of 57.7% in nymphs and 68.6% in adults. Hybridization tests showed a major T. cruzi lineage (TcI) circulating in sylvatic (93.3%) and domiciliary (100%) T. infestans. TcII, TcV, and TcVI were also detected, mainly in nymphs, suggesting differential adaptation of T. cruzi lineages among instars. We also discuss the origin of domiciliary individuals of T. infestans and the risk of human infection by triatomines of sylvatic foci that invade houses despite vector control programs. PMID:22802439

  15. Molecular Population Genetics and Evolution of the Chagas’ Disease Vector Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    García, Beatriz A.; de Rosas, Alicia R. Pérez; Blariza, María J.; Grosso, Carla G.; Fernández, Cintia J.; Stroppa, María M.

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma infestans (Klug) is the main vector of Chagas’ disease in the Southern Cone of Latin America between the latitudes 10° S and 46° S. The long-term effectiveness of the control campaigns is greatly dependent upon the vector population structure. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes have been used in a number of T. infestans population genetic analyses. However, the maternally inherited markers as well as nuclear ribosomal DNA analyzed until the present exhibited low or limited levels of variation. Analyses based on microsatellite markers strongly supported the existence of some type of stratification in T. infestans populations and supported the hypothesis of vector population recovery from survivors of the insecticide-treated areas, highlighting the value of population genetic analyses in assessing the effectiveness of Chagas’ disease vector control programmes. Although phylogeographic studies have generally suggested a Bolivian Andean origin of T. infestans, they recovered two reciprocal monophyletic groups of T. infestans and Bolivian populations who were not basal as expected for an ancestral group. In addition, a non-Andean origin could not be excluded by mtDNA genealogies that included sylvatic bugs from Gran Chaco. On the other side, mitochondrial and microsatellite markers supported the hypothesis of two independent migration events of colonization and secondary contacts in southern South America. Since the phylogenetic analyses remain inconclusive, more sequences, not only from mitochondrial genes but also from nuclear genes, need to be examined. PMID:24403850

  16. Population Structure of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in an Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Foley, Erica A.; Barbu, Corentin M.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Naquira, Cesar; Brisson, Dustin; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a vector-borne disease endemic in Latin America. Triatoma infestans, a common vector of this disease, has recently expanded its range into rapidly developing cities of Latin America. We aim to identify the environmental features that affect the colonization and dispersal of T. infestans in an urban environment. We amplified 13 commonly used microsatellites from 180 T. infestans samples collected from a sampled transect in the city of Arequipa, Peru, in 2007 and 2011. We assessed the clustering of subpopulations and the effect of distance, sampling year, and city block location on genetic distance among pairs of insects. Despite evidence of genetic similarity, the majority of city blocks are characterized by one dominant insect genotype, suggesting the existence of barriers to dispersal. Our analyses show that streets represent an important barrier to the colonization and dispersion of T. infestans in Arequipa. The genetic data describe a T. infestans infestation history characterized by persistent local dispersal and occasional long-distance migration events that partially parallels the history of urban development. PMID:25646757

  17. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Khatchikian, Camilo E; Foley, Erica A; Barbu, Corentin M; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R; Naquira, Cesar; Brisson, Dustin; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-02-01

    Chagas disease is a vector-borne disease endemic in Latin America. Triatoma infestans, a common vector of this disease, has recently expanded its range into rapidly developing cities of Latin America. We aim to identify the environmental features that affect the colonization and dispersal of T. infestans in an urban environment. We amplified 13 commonly used microsatellites from 180 T. infestans samples collected from a sampled transect in the city of Arequipa, Peru, in 2007 and 2011. We assessed the clustering of subpopulations and the effect of distance, sampling year, and city block location on genetic distance among pairs of insects. Despite evidence of genetic similarity, the majority of city blocks are characterized by one dominant insect genotype, suggesting the existence of barriers to dispersal. Our analyses show that streets represent an important barrier to the colonization and dispersion of T. infestans in Arequipa. The genetic data describe a T. infestans infestation history characterized by persistent local dispersal and occasional long-distance migration events that partially parallels the history of urban development.

  18. Glucanolytic Actinomycetes Antagonistic to Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi, the Causal Agent of Raspberry Root Rot

    PubMed Central

    Valois, D.; Fayad, K.; Barasubiye, T.; Garon, M.; Dery, C.; Brzezinski, R.; Beaulieu, C.

    1996-01-01

    A collection of about 200 actinomycete strains was screened for the ability to grow on fragmented Phytophthora mycelium and to produce metabolites that inhibit Phytophthora growth. Thirteen strains were selected, and all produced (beta)-1,3-, (beta)-1,4-, and (beta)-1,6-glucanases. These enzymes could hydrolyze glucans from Phytophthora cell walls and cause lysis of Phytophthora cells. These enzymes also degraded other glucan substrates, such as cellulose, laminarin, pustulan, and yeast cell walls. Eleven strains significantly reduced the root rot index when inoculated on raspberry plantlets. PMID:16535313

  19. Potential Role of Elicitins in the Interaction between Phytophthora Species and Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Sophien; Young, Mary; Förster, Helga; Coffey, Michael D.; Tyler, Brett M.

    1994-01-01

    The potential role of extracellular elicitor proteins (elicitins) from Phytophthora species as avirulence factors in the interaction between Phytophthora and tobacco was examined. A survey of 85 Phytophthora isolates representing 14 species indicated that production of elicitin is almost ubiquitous except for isolates of Phytophthora parasitica from tobacco. The production of elicitins by isolates of P. parasitica correlated without exception with low or no virulence on tobacco. Genetic analysis was conducted by using a cross between two isolates of P. parasitica, segregating for production of elicitin and virulence on tobacco. Virulence assays of the progeny on tobacco confirmed the correlation between production of elicitin and low virulence. Images PMID:16349258

  20. [Survival of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834)].

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, W A; Romaña, C A; Ben Fadel, F; Pays, J F; Veron, M; Rouzioux, C

    1992-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main domestic vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic agent of Chagas' disease in South America. We investigated whether Triatoma infestans could shelter the HIV-1 virus. For this purpose, we measured the survival time of the virus in the alimentary tract. Fifth-instar nymphs of the blood-sucking bug were fed through an ad hoc apparatus with venous blood from asymptomatic HIV-1 seropositive patients. We attempted to evidence the virus by cultivating material from the insect gut (wall and content) on lymphocyte co-culture. Retrovirus activity was demonstrated in the culture supernatant by dosing the p24 antigen and the reverse transcriptase activity. The virus has been found alive in the gut content of Triatoma infestans up to the 7th day after the last infectious meal of the insect.

  1. Horizontal transmission of triatoma virus through the fecal-oral route in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Triatomidae).

    PubMed

    Muscio, O; Bonder, M A; La Torre, J L; Scodeller, E A

    2000-03-01

    Feces from Triatoma infestans (Klug) infected with TrV showed a large number of well-preserved viral particles when examined by electron microscopy. No viral particles were observed in suspensions of feces uninfected insects. Fecal suspensions inoculated parenterally into uninfected triatomines killed the insects within 36 h, showing that infective TrV is present in the feces of infected insects. It also is demonstrated that T. infestans becomes infected with TrV while feeding on contaminated chickens, and all the chickens used to feed a colony of triatomines infected with TrV showed high anti-TrV titer in their sera, although no TrV replication could be demonstrated in chickens. Oral infection of T. infestans by contaminated feces probably contributes to virus dispersal in nature. This observation provides the rationale for the potential use of TrV as a biological control agent.

  2. Inoculum density effects on infection of selected Eastern US forest species by Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculum threshold information can be used to better understand the epidemiology of P. ramorum should it become established in the Eastern US. Detached leaves from Quercus prinus, Q. rubra, Acer rubrum, Kalmia latifolia ‘Hoffman’s K’, and Rhododendron ‘Cunningham’s White’ were exposed to sporangia ...

  3. Occurrence of Phytophthora plurivora and other Phytophthora species in oak forests of southern Poland and their association with site conditions and the health status of trees.

    PubMed

    Jankowiak, R; Stępniewska, H; Bilański, P; Kolařík, M

    2014-11-01

    Phytophthora plurivora and other Phytophthora species are known to be serious pathogens of forest trees. Little is known, however, about the presence of P. plurivora in Polish oak forests and their role in oak decline. The aims of this study were to identify P. plurivora in healthy and declining Quercus robur stands in southern Poland and to demonstrate the relationship between different site factors and the occurrence of P. plurivora. In addition, the virulence of P. plurivora and other Phytophthora species was evaluated through inoculations using 2-year-old oak seedlings. Rhizosphere soil was investigated from 39 oak stands representing different healthy tree statuses. The morphology and DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cox1 gene were used for identifications. P. plurivora, an oak fine root pathogen, was isolated from rhizosphere soil samples in 6 out of 39 stands. Additionally, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora polonica and Phytophthora rosacearum-like were also obtained from several stands. The results showed a significant association between the presence of P. plurivora and the health status of oak trees. Similar relationships were also observed for all identified Phytophthora species. In addition, there was evidence for a connection between the presence of all identified Phytophthora species and some site conditions. Phytophthora spp. occurred more frequently in declining stands and in silt loam and sandy loam soils with pH ≥ 3.66. P. plurivora and P. cambivora were the only species capable of killing whole plants, producing extensive necrosis on seedling stems.

  4. Isolation and characterization of the haemolymph lipoproteins of Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Fichera, L E; Brenner, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. Three lipoproteins differing in hydrated densities were isolated by ultracentrifugal procedures from the haemolymph of adult and fasted Triatoma infestans. 2. They are the high density lipoprotein HDL (d = 1.115-1.152) and the two very high density lipoproteins VHDL-I (d = 1.190-1.231) and VHDL-II (d = 1.245-1.260). HDL was the predominant lipoprotein. 3. The total lipid content expressed as % of lipoprotein weight in HDL, VHDL-I an VHDL-II was 30.1, 7.8 ad 2.9% respectively. Diacylglycerols are the predominant lipids of HDL (38.7%) and VHDL-I (27.0%) but only amount of 6.2% in VHDL-II. 4. Triacylglycerols are minor components (about 6.0%) of all fractions. 5. The phospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine), sterols, sterol esters and hydrocarbons were present in all lipoprotein fractions. 6. Phospholipids and hydrocarbons were the most abundant lipids of VHDL-II.

  5. Identification of QTLs related to cocoa resistance to three species of Phytophthora.

    PubMed

    Risterucci, A M; Paulin, D; Ducamp, M; N'Goran, J A K; Lanaud, C

    2003-12-01

    This study aimed to compare the genetic control of cacao resistance to three species of Phytophthora: Phytophthora palmivora, Phytophthora megakarya and Phytophthora capsici. The study was conducted on 151 hybrid progenies created in Côte d'Ivoire and grown in a green-house in Montpellier. Phytophthora resistance was screened by leaf-test inoculation with two different strains per species. Selection of the best individuals for resistance to P. palmivora at a 10% selection rate, would lead to a genetic progress of 47% in the disease evaluation for this species and a genetic progress of 42% and 21% for the two other species. A genetic map with a total length of 682 cM was built with 213 markers, 190 AFLPs and 23 microsatellites. QTLs were identified using composite interval mapping. QTLs were found located in six genomic regions. One of these was detected with five strains belonging to the three Phytophthora species. Two other regions were detected with two or three strains of two different species. Three additional QTLs were detected for only one species of Phytophthora. Each QTL explained between 8 to 12% of the phenotypic variation. For each strain, between 11.5% to 27.5% of the total phenotypic variation could be explained by the QTLs identified. The identification of multiple QTLs involved in resistance to Phytophthora offers the possibility to improve durability of resistance in cocoa by a possible cumulation of many different resistance genes located in different chromosome regions using marker-aided selection.

  6. Amino terminal region of Phytophthora sojae cel12 endoglucanase confers tissue collapse function in Nicotiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora encodes an unusually large number of glycosyl hydrolases (GH), with many large gene families resulting from duplication events. There are ten copies of GH 12 (cel12) present in Phytophthora sojae. This is the only pathogen endoglucanase family to which plants produce an inhibitory pr...

  7. Lack of influence of Meloidogyne incognita on resistance of bell pepper cultivars to Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Mi), and the Phytophthora blight pathogen, Phytophthora capsici (Pc), cause root diseases in bell pepper under natural field conditions. However, the interactions between these two pathogens on different bell pepper genotypes are not clear. Greenhouse e...

  8. Mortality of container-grown blueberry plants inoculated with Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted four studies to evaluate the effect of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates and inoculum delivery methods on root rot development and mortality of container-grown blueberry plants. Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates were obtained from the root zone of symptomatic blueberry plants and identifie...

  9. What Can Availability of the Phytophthora ramorum Genome Do for Us?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomes of Phytophthora ramorum and P. sojae were sequenced in 2004. Two obvious questions arise, What contributions does the availability of a genome sequence make toward understanding the biology of Phytophthora spp.? What are the implications for management of sudden oak death in the...

  10. Novel quantitative trait loci for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 398841

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdmann is one of the most severe soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] diseases in the US. Partial resistance is as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of t...

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci for Partial Resistance to Phytophthora Sojaei in Soybean [Glycine Max (L.) Merr.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot of soybean, caused by the oomycete, Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases to limit soybean production in the US. Although fourteen resistance genes (Rps) to P. sojae have been identified, adaptation of by the pathogen has made many of these ineffe...

  12. Resistance in watermelon rootstocks to crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora crown and fruit rot caused by Phytophthora capsici is becoming an important and emerging disease of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) in south eastern United States. In recent years, the practice of grafting seedless watermelons (triploids) onto rootstocks belonging to other Cucurbitaceae...

  13. Use of RAPD-PCR to isolate a species specific DNA probe for Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, M P; O'Brien, P A

    1993-10-01

    The products of RAPD-PCR amplification of Phytophthora cinnamomi DNA were separated by electrophoresis in agarose. Parallel Southern blots of the gels were hybridized with nick translated DNA from different species of Phytophthora. Fragments that hybridized specifically to P. cinnamomi DNA were identified. These fragments were purified and cloned into pUC18. Their specificity for P. cinnamomi was confirmed.

  14. Effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation and CO2 stress on Phytophthora nicotianae zoospore survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae Breda de Haan was used as a model pathogen to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure, agitation, and aeration with CO2 or breathable air on the survival of Phytophthora zoospores in water. Injecting CO2 into 2 liters of zoospore-infested water for 5 min at 110.4 ml ...

  15. Phytophthora megakarya, a causal agent of black pod rot in Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most parts of the world where Theobroma cacao is grown, Phytophthora palmivora is the major concern for causing black pod rot (BPR). Phytophthora megakarya, on the other hand, occurs only in Africa, but represents a major threat to cacao production, the countries of West Africa being the largest ...

  16. Diversity of Phytophthora Species from Declining Mediterranean Maquis Vegetation, including Two New Species, Phytophthora crassamura and P. ornamentata sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Scanu, Bruno; Linaldeddu, Benedetto T.; Deidda, Antonio; Jung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The Mediterranean basin is recognized as a global biodiversity hotspot accounting for more than 25,000 plant species that represent almost 10% of the world’s vascular flora. In particular, the maquis vegetation on Mediterranean islands and archipelagos constitutes an important resource of the Mediterranean plant diversity due to its high rate of endemism. Since 2009, a severe and widespread dieback and mortality of Quercus ilex trees and several other plant species of the Mediterranean maquis has been observed in the National Park of La Maddalena archipelago (northeast Sardinia, Italy). Infected plants showed severe decline symptoms and a significant reduction of natural regeneration. First studies revealed the involvement of the highly invasive wide-host range pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi and several fungal pathogens. Subsequent detailed research led to a better understanding of these epidemics showing that multiple Phytophthora spp. were involved, some of them unknown to science. In total, nine Phytophthora species were isolated from rhizosphere soil samples collected from around symptomatic trees and shrubs including Asparagus albus, Cistus sp., Juniperus phoenicea, J. oxycedrus, Pistacia lentiscus and Rhamnus alaternus. Based on morphological characters, growth-temperature relations and sequence analysis of the ITS and cox1 gene regions, the isolates were identified as Phytophthora asparagi, P. bilorbang, P. cinnamomi, P. cryptogea, P. gonapodyides, P. melonis, P. syringae and two new Clade 6 taxa which are here described as P. crassamura sp. nov. and P. ornamentata sp. nov. Pathogenicity tests supported their possible involvement in the severe decline that is currently threatening the Mediterranean maquis vegetation in the La Maddalena archipelago. PMID:26649428

  17. Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Marcet, P.L.; Lehmann, T.; Groner, G.; Gürtler, R.E.; Kitron, U.; Dotson, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries, is the principal target of a regional elimination program. A better understanding of its dispersal, sources of reinfestation, and insecticide resistance is key to an effective control program. To address such problems, we identified and characterized 13 microsatellite loci of T. infestans. For each locus, primer sequences and PCR conditions are presented. Allele variability and frequency were analyzed in 59 T. infestans specimens from different rural communities in northwestern Argentina; nine loci were considered suitable for population genetic studies. Departure from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was detected in 10/13 loci with FIS values ranging from 0.04 to 0.91, indicating heterozygote deficit and a possible grade of sub-structure in the sample analyzed. Presence of null alleles in some loci cannot be discarded. The present work provides a promising tool to develop a population genetic study of natural populations of T. infestans in tandem with field studies and analyses of bug dispersal and the reinfestation process. PMID:16376838

  18. Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Marcet, P L; Lehmann, T; Groner, G; Gürtler, R E; Kitron, U; Dotson, E M

    2006-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries, is the principal target of a regional elimination program. A better understanding of its dispersal, sources of reinfestation, and insecticide resistance is key to an effective control program. To address such problems, we identified and characterized 13 microsatellite loci of T. infestans. For each locus, primer sequences and PCR conditions are presented. Allele variability and frequency were analyzed in 59 T. infestans specimens from different rural communities in northwestern Argentina; nine loci were considered suitable for population genetic studies. Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected in 10/13 loci with F(IS) values ranging from 0.04 to 0.91, indicating heterozygote deficit and a possible grade of sub-structure in the sample analyzed. Presence of null alleles in some loci cannot be discarded. The present work provides a promising tool to develop a population genetic study of natural populations of T. infestans in tandem with field studies and analyses of bug dispersal and the reinfestation process.

  19. Demographic effects of deltamethrin resistance in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Germano, M D; Picollo, M I

    2016-12-01

    Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) Klug is the main vector of Chagas disease in Latin America. Resistance to deltamethrin was reported in Argentina and recently associated with reproductive and longevity trade-offs. The objectives of the present study were to describe the demographic consequences of deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans and to establish possible target stages for chemical control in susceptible and resistant colonies. A stage-classified matrix model was constructed based on the average stage length for susceptible, resistant and reciprocal matings' progeny. The differences between colonies were analysed by prospective and retrospective analysis. The life table parameters indicated reduced fecundity, fertility and population growth in resistant insects. The retrospective analysis suggested the latter was associated with lower reproductive output and increased fifth-instar nymph stage length. The prospective analysis suggested that the adult stage should be the main target for insecticide control. Although, fifth-instar nymphs should also be targeted when resistance has been detected. The presented results show demographic effects of deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans. While the older stages could be the main targets for chemical control, this approach is impeded by their higher tolerance to insecticides. It is concluded that the different mode of action insecticides would be more effective than a dose increase for the control of deltamethrin-resistant T. infestans.

  20. Genetic variability and microdistribution of Triatoma infestans genotypes and Trypanosoma cruzi clones in Arequipa region (Peru).

    PubMed

    Brenière, S F; Lopez, J; Vargas, F; Barnabé, C

    1997-01-01

    The genetic variability of Triatoma infestans and Trypanosoma cruzi populations was studied by isoenzyme analysis in two distinct areas of Arequipa province (Peru); one, Santa Rita de Siguas, being an endemic area for Chagas' disease, the second, Arequipa, recently infected. Analysis of T. infestans genetic variability indicates, (i) temporal stability of genotypes found in Santa Rita de Siguas, (ii) high genetic differences between Arequipa and Santa Rita de Siguas populations suggesting minor contact between them, (iii) multiple origin of the T. infestans population in Arequipa, and (iv) poor dispersal capacity of T. infestans: the panmictic unit could be reduce to a house. Parasite isoenzyme analysis was performed in 29 Peruvian stocks of T. cruzi, mainly isolated from bugs taken in a single locality, Santa Rita de Siguas. The results show, (i) a high genetic polymorphism, (ii) nine different multilocus genotypes were detected and clustered in two different clades, (iii) most of the parasite isolates pertained to one of the clade and were genetically similar to those analyzed 12 years before. This sample allowed the study of the mating system of T. cruzi in strict sympathic conditions and gave more strength to the hypothesis of the clonal structure of T. cruzi populations.

  1. Distribution of Pyrethroid Resistant Populations of Triatoma infestans in the Southern Cone of South America

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante Gomez, Marinely; Gonçalves Diotaiuti, Liléia; Gorla, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of studies published during the last 15 years showed the occurrence of insecticide resistance in Triatoma infestans populations. The different toxicological profiles and mechanisms of resistance to insecticides is due to a genetic base and environmental factors, being the insecticide selective pressure the best studied among the last factors. The studies on insecticide resistance on T. infestans did not consider the effect of environmental factors that may influence the distribution of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. To fill this knowledge gap, the present study aims at studying the association between the spatial distribution of pyrethroid resistant populations of T. infestans and environmental variables. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 24 articles reporting on studies that evaluated the susceptibility to pyrethroids of 222 field-collected T. infestans populations were compiled. The relationship between resistance occurrence (according to different criteria) with environmental variables was studied using a generalized linear model. The lethal dose that kills 50% of the evaluated population (LD50) showed a strong linear relationship with the corresponding resistance ratio (RR50). The statistical descriptive analysis of showed that the frequency distribution of the Log (LD50) is bimodal, suggesting the existence of two statistical groups. A significant model including 5 environmental variables shows the geographic distribution of high and low LD50 groups with a particular concentration of the highest LD50 populations over the region identified as the putative center of dispersion of T. infestans. Conclusions/Significance The occurrence of these two groups concentrated over a particular region that coincides with the area where populations of the intermediate cytogenetic group were found might reflect the spatial heterogeneity of the genetic variability of T. infestans, that seems to be the cause of the insecticide resistance in

  2. Genetic variability, phylogenetic relationships and gene flow in Triatoma infestans dark morphs from the Argentinean Chaco.

    PubMed

    Piccinali, R V; Marcet, P L; Ceballos, L A; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E; Dotson, E M

    2011-07-01

    The recent discovery of sylvatic populations of Triatoma infestans outside the Andean Valleys of Bolivia prompted an evolutionary question about the putative ancestral area of origin and dispersal of the species, and an epidemiological question regarding the possible role of these sylvatic populations in the recolonization process of insecticide-treated houses. The finding of a population of sylvatic melanic T. infestans (dark morphs) in the Argentinean dry Chaco at 7 km from a peridomestic bug population of typical coloration gave us the opportunity to test both questions simultaneously by employing phylogenetic and population genetic approaches. For this purpose we analyzed sylvatic and peridomestic bugs using sequence-based mitochondrial and nuclear markers (mtCOI and ITS-1) and microsatellites. Sylvatic bugs were confirmed to be T. infestans and not hybrids, and showed high levels of genetic variability and departures from neutral expectations for mtCOI variation. New ITS-1 and mtCOI haplotypes were recorded, as well as haplotypes shared with peridomestic and/or domestic bugs from previous records. The peridomestic population was invariant for ITS-1 and mtCOI, but showed variability for microsatellites and signatures of a population bottleneck, probably due to a limited number of founders. Phylogenetic analyses were consistent with the presence of ancestral haplotypes in sylvatic bugs. According to F-statistics and assignment methods there was a significant differentiation between sylvatic and peridomestic bugs and gene flow was low and asymmetric, with more bugs moving from the peridomicile to the sylvatic environment. These results support the hypothesis of the Chaco region as the area of origin of T. infestans, and a limited role of sylvatic melanic T. infestans in peridomestic infestation in the Argentinean Chaco.

  3. Genetic variability, phylogenetic relationships and gene flow in Triatoma infestans dark morphs from the Argentinean Chaco

    PubMed Central

    Piccinali, R. V.; Marcet, P. L.; Ceballos, L. A.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R. E.; Dotson, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of sylvatic populations of Triatoma infestans outside the Andean Valleys of Bolivia prompted an evolutionary question about the putative ancestral area of origin and dispersal of the species, and an epidemiological question regarding the possible role of these sylvatic populations in the recolonization process of insecticide-treated houses. The finding of a population of sylvatic melanic T. infestans (dark morphs) in the Argentinean dry Chaco at 7 km from a peridomestic bug population of typical coloration gave us the opportunity to test both questions simultaneously by employing phylogenetic and population genetic approaches. For this purpose we analyzed sylvatic and peridomestic bugs using sequence-based mitochondrial and nuclear markers (mtCOI and ITS-1) and microsatellites. Sylvatic bugs were confirmed to be T. infestans and not hybrids, and showed high levels of genetic variability and departures from neutral expectations for mtCOI variation. New ITS-1 and mtCOI haplotypes were recorded, as well as haplotypes shared with peridomestic and/or domestic bugs from previous records. The peridomestic population was invariant for ITS-1 and mtCOI, but showed variability for microsatellites and signatures of a population bottleneck, probably due to a limited number of founders. Phylogenetic analyses were consistent with the presence of ancestral haplotypes in sylvatic bugs. According to F-statistics and assignment methods there was a significant differentiation between sylvatic and peridomestic bugs and gene flow was low and asymmetric, with more bugs moving from the peridomicile to the sylvatic environment. These results support the hypothesis of the Chaco region as the area of origin of T. infestans, and a limited role of sylvatic melanic T. infestans in peridomestic infestation in the Argentinean Chaco. PMID:21352954

  4. The expansion of Phytophthora clade 8b: three new species associated with winter grown vegetable crops.

    PubMed

    Bertier, L; Brouwer, H; de Cock, A W A M; Cooke, D E L; Olsson, C H B; Höfte, M

    2013-12-01

    Despite its association with important agricultural crops, Phytophthora clade 8b is a poorly studied group of species. The clade currently consists of three officially described species (Phytophthora porri, P. brassicae and P. primulae) that are host-specific pathogens of leek, cabbages and Primula spp., respectively. However, over the past few decades, several other clade 8b-like Phytophthoras have been found on a variety of different host plants that were all grown at low temperatures in winter seasons. In this study, a collection of 30 of these isolates was subjected to a phylogenetic study using two loci (the rDNA ITS region and the mitochondrial cox1 gene). This analysis revealed a clear clustering of isolates according to their host plants. To verify whether these isolates belong to separate species, a detailed morphological study was conducted. On the basis of genetic and morphological differences and host specificity, we now present the official description of three new species in clade 8b: Phytophthora cichorii sp. nov., P. dauci sp. nov. and P. lactucae sp. nov. Two other groups of isolates (Phytophthora taxon castitis and Phytophthora taxon parsley) might also represent new species but the data available at this time are insufficient for an official description. This brings Phytophthora clade 8b to a group of six species that are all host-specific, slow-growing and specifically infect herbaceous crops at low temperatures.

  5. First Report of Colonies of Sylvatic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the Paraguayan Chaco, Using a Trained Dog

    PubMed Central

    Rolón, Miriam; Vega, María Celeste; Román, Fabiola; Gómez, Ana; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta

    2011-01-01

    In the Gran Chaco region, control of Triatoma infestans has been limited by persistent domestic infestations despite the efforts of the Vector Control Services. In Paraguay, this region is the highest endemic area in the country, showing high levels of indoor and outdoor infestation. Although sylvatic T. infestans have been found in the Bolivian and Argentine Chaco, similar searches for sylvatic populations of this species in Paraguay had been unsuccessful over the last 20 years. Here we present a new approach to detecting sylvatic Triatominae, using a trained dog, which has successfully confirmed sylvatic populations of T. infestans and other triatomine species in Paraguay. A total of 22 specimens corresponding to dark morph forms of T. infestans were collected, and 14 were confirmed as T. infestans by the mitochondrial cytochrome B gene analysis. Through this analysis, one of which were previously reported and a second that was a new haplotype. Triatomines were captured from amongst vegetation such as dry branches and hollows trees of different species such Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco, Bulnesia sarmientoi and Stetsonia coryne. The colonies found have been small and without apparent infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. During the study, Triatoma sordida and Triatoma guasayana have also been found in ecotopes close to those of T. infestans. PMID:21572522

  6. Phytophthora Species in Rivers and Streams of the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Sanogo, Soumalia; Goldberg, Natalie P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phytophthora species were isolated from rivers and streams in the southwestern United States by leaf baiting and identified by sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The major waterways examined included the Rio Grande River, Gila River, Colorado River, and San Juan River. The most prevalent species identified in rivers and streams were Phytophthora lacustris and P. riparia, both members of Phytophthora ITS clade 6. P. gonapodyides, P. cinnamomi, and an uncharacterized Phytophthora species in clade 9 were also recovered. In addition, six isolates recovered from the Rio Grande River were shown to be hybrids of P. lacustris × P. riparia. Pathogenicity assays using P. riparia and P. lacustris failed to produce any disease symptoms on commonly grown crops in the southwestern United States. Inoculation of Capsicum annuum with P. riparia was shown to inhibit disease symptom development when subsequently challenged with P. capsici, a pathogenic Phytophthora species. IMPORTANCE Many Phytophthora species are significant plant pathogens causing disease on a large variety of crops worldwide. Closer examinations of streams, rivers, and forest soils have also identified numerous Phytophthora species that do not appear to be phytopathogens and likely act as early saprophytes in aquatic and saturated environments. To date, the Phytophthora species composition in rivers and streams of the southwestern United States has not been evaluated. This article details a study to determine the identity and prevalence of Phytophthora species in rivers and streams located in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. Isolated species were evaluated for pathogenicity on crop plants and for their potential to act as biological control agents. PMID:27235435

  7. Host Adaptation and Speciation through Hybridization and Polyploidy in Phytophthora

    PubMed Central

    Bertier, Lien; Leus, Leen; D’hondt, Liesbet; de Cock, Arthur W. A. M.; Höfte, Monica

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that interspecific hybridization is a common event in phytophthora evolution. Yet, the fundamental processes underlying interspecific hybridization and the consequences for its ecological fitness and distribution are not well understood. We studied hybridization events in phytophthora clade 8b. This is a cold-tolerant group of plant pathogenic oomycetes in which six host-specific species have been described that mostly attack winter-grown vegetables. Hybrid characterization was done by sequencing and cloning of two nuclear (ITS and Ypt1) and two mitochondrial loci (Cox1 and Nadh1) combined with DNA content estimation using flow cytometry. Three different mtDNA haplotypes were recovered among the presumed hybrid isolates, dividing the hybrids into three types, with different parental species involved. In the nuclear genes, additivity, i.e. the presence of two alleles coming from different parents, was detected. Hybrid isolates showed large variations in DNA content, which was positively correlated with the additivity in nuclear loci, indicating allopolyploid hybridization followed by a process of diploidization. Moreover, indications of homeologous recombination were found in the hybrids by cloning ITS products. The hybrid isolates have been isolated from a range of hosts that have not been reported previously for clade 8b species, indicating that they have novel pathogenic potential. Next to this, DNA content measurements of the non-hybrid clade 8b species suggest that polyploidy is a common feature of this clade. We hypothesize that interspecific hybridization and polyploidy are two linked phenomena in phytophthora, and that these processes might play an important and ongoing role in the evolution of this genus. PMID:24386473

  8. Antifungal Effect of Plant Essential Oils on Controlling Phytophthora Species

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Jahanshir; Farhang, Vahid; Javadi, Taimoor; Nazemi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, antifungal activity of essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum and two fungicides Mancozeb and Metalaxyl-Mancozeb in six different concentrations were investigated for controlling three species of Phytophthora, including P. capsici, P. drechsleri and P. melonis on pepper, cucumber and melon under in vitro and greenhouse conditions, respectively. Under the in vitro condition, the median effective concen- tration (EC50) values (ppm) of plant essential oils and fungicides were measured. In greenhouse, soil infested with Phytophthora species was treated by adding 50 ml of essential oils and fungicides (100 ppm). Disease severity was determined after 28 days. Among two tested plant essential oils, C. citratus had the lowest EC50 values for inhibition of the mycelial growth of P. capsici (31.473), P. melonis (33.097) and P. drechsleri (69.112), respectively. The mean EC50 values for Metalaxyl-Mancozeb on these pathogens were 20.87, 20.06 and 17.70, respectively. Chemical analysis of plant essential oils by GC-MS showed that, among 42 compounds identified from C. citratus, two compounds β-geranial (α-citral) (39.16%) and z-citral (30.95%) were the most abundant. Under the greenhouse condition, Metalaxyl-Mancozeb caused the greatest reduction in disease severity, 84.2%, 86.8% and 92.1% on melon, cucumber, and pepper, respectively. The C. citratus essential oil reduced disease severity from 47.4% to 60.5% compared to the untreated control (p≤0.05). Essential oils of O. basilicum had the lowest effects on the pathogens under in vitro and greenhouse conditions. These results show that essential oils may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from Phytophthora diseases. PMID:26889111

  9. Molecular cloning, functional characterization and expression of potato (Solanum tuberosum) 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 1 (StDXS1) in response to Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Henriquez, Maria Antonia; Soliman, Atta; Li, Genyi; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Ayele, Belay T; Daayf, Fouad

    2016-02-01

    1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the initial step of the plastidial 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (DOXP-MEP) pathway involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this study, we cloned the complete cDNA of potato DXS gene that was designated StDXS1. StDXS1 cDNA encodes for 719 amino acid residues, with MW of 77.8 kDa, and is present in one copy in the potato genome. Phylogenetic analysis and protein sequence alignments assigned StDXS1 to a group with DXS homologues from closely related species and exhibited homodomain identity with known DXS proteins from other plant species. Late blight symptoms occurred in parallel with a reduction in StDXS1 transcript levels, which may be associated with the levels of isoprenoids that contribute to plant protection against pathogens. Subcellular localization indicated that StDXS1 targets the chloroplasts where isoprenoids are synthesized. Arabidopsis expressing StDXS1 showed a higher accumulation of carotenoids and chlorophyll as compared to wild type controls. Lower levels of ABA and GA were detected in the transgenic DXS lines as compared to control plants, which reflected on higher germination rates of the transgenic DXS lines. No changes were detected in JA or SA contents. Selected downstream genes in the DOXP-MEP pathway, especially GGPPS genes, were up-regulated in the transgenic lines.

  10. Slow sand filters effectively reduce Phytophthora after a pathogen switch from Fusarium and a simulated pump failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric; Oki, Lorence R

    2013-09-15

    Slow sand filtration has been shown to effectively reduce Phytophthora zoospores in irrigation water. This experiment tested the reduction of Phytophthora colony forming units (CFUs) by slow sand filtration systems after switching the pathogen contaminating plant leachate from Fusarium to Phytophthora and the resilience of the system to a short period without water, as might be caused by a pump failure. The slow sand filtration system greatly reduced Phytophthora CFUs and transmission after switching the pathogens. In addition, Phytophthora reduction by the slow sand filter was equally effective before and after the simulated pump failure. Reduction of Fusarium was not seen by the SSFs, before or after the simulated pump failure. The results suggest that slow sand filters are effective at reducing larger organisms, such as Phytophthora zoospores, even after a pump failure or a change in pathogens.

  11. Elicitins from Phytophthora and basic resistance in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L M

    1995-01-01

    Elicitins are a family of small proteins secreted by species of Phytophthora. They are thought to be major determinants of the resistance response of tobacco against these oomycetes, since purified elicitins, alone and at low concentrations, can induce vigorous defense responses in tobacco (i.e., hypersensitive cell death and resistance against subsequent pathogen attack), and in vitro elicitin production by Phytophthora isolates is strongly negatively correlated with their pathogenicity on tobacco plants. A number of elicitins have been purified and their amino acid sequences have been determined and found to be conserved. A three-dimensional structure for elicitin is emerging from nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Two structural classes, alpha and beta, are distinguished by their biological effects when applied to decapitated stems or petioles; the beta class causes more necrosis on leaves and provides better subsequent protection against pathogen attack. However, both these classes of elicitins will similarly cause necrosis when each is, instead, directly infiltrated into tobacco leaf panels. Effects of elicitins on tobacco cells include rapid electrolyte leakage, changes in protein phosphorylation and amounts of active oxygen species, and later production of ethylene and capsidiol. The sites of initial interaction with tobacco cells are unknown, but the interaction appears to induce general defense-related responses. PMID:7753775

  12. 40 CFR 180.1057 - Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions.... Phytophthora palmivora is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on the raw agricultural...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1057 - Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions.... Phytophthora palmivora is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on the raw agricultural...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1057 - Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions.... Phytophthora palmivora is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on the raw agricultural...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1057 - Phytophthora palmivora; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions.... Phytophthora palmivora is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on the raw agricultural...

  16. Rapid isothermal detection of Phytophthora species on plant samples using recombinase polymerase amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently several isothermal amplification techniques have been developed that are extremely tolerant towards inhibitors present in many plant extracts. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays for the genus Phytophthora have been developed which provide a simple and rapid method to macerate...

  17. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many Phytophthora species are destructive plant pathogens imposing severe threats to both natural and agricultural vegetation. Effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of such diseases. DNA array hybridization technique is ...

  18. Daily Variations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms Expression in Triatoma infestans Flight Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, María M.; Carriazo, Carlota S.; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M.; Garcia, Beatríz A.

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease, is a blood-sucking insect. Flight dispersal of adults is the most important mechanism for reinfestation of houses after insecticide spraying. Flight muscles have two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) isoforms: GPDH-1 is involved in flight metabolism and GPDH-2 provides lipid precursors. In this study, we explored the profile of GPDH expression in females and males adult flight muscles under light/dark cycle, constant light, and constant dark conditions. Under constant dark conditions, GPDH-1 flight muscles of T. infestans showed a rhythmic pattern of transcription synchronous with a rhythmic profile of activity suggesting regulation by the endogenous circadian clock. Otherwise, the GPDH-2 expression analysis showed no regulation by the endogenous clock, but showed that an external factor, such as the dark/light period, was necessary for synchronization of GPDH-2 transcription and activity. PMID:24914000

  19. Genetic transformation of a Corynebacterial symbiont from the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Durvasula, Ravi V; Sundaram, Ranjini K; Kirsch, Philipp; Hurwitz, Ivy; Crawford, Carl V; Dotson, Ellen; Beard, Charles B

    2008-05-01

    Insect-borne diseases have experienced a troubling resurgence in recent years. Emergence of resistance to pesticides greatly hampers control efforts. Paratransgenesis, or the genetic transformation of bacterial symbionts of disease vectors, is an alternative to traditional approaches. Previously, we developed paratransgenic lines of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas disease in Central America. Here, we report identification of a Corynebacterial species as a symbiont of Triatoma infestans, a leading vector of Chagas disease in South America. We have modified this bacterium to produce an immunologically active single chain antibody fragment, termed rDB3. This study establishes the basis for generating paratransgenic T. infestans as a strategy for control of Chagas disease.

  20. Characterization of Guinea Pig Antibody Responses to Salivary Proteins of Triatoma infestans for the Development of a Triatomine Exposure Marker

    PubMed Central

    Dorňáková, Veronika; Salazar-Sanchez, Renzo; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Carrion-Navarro, Oscar; Levy, Michael Z.; Schaub, Günter A.; Schwarz, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Salivary proteins of Triatoma infestans elicit humoral immune responses in their vertebrate hosts. These immune responses indicate exposure to triatomines and thus can be a useful epidemiological tool to estimate triatomine infestation. In the present study, we analyzed antibody responses of guinea pigs to salivary antigens of different developmental stages of four T. infestans strains originating from domestic and/or peridomestic habitats in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru. We aimed to identify developmental stage- and strain-specific salivary antigens as potential markers of T. infestans exposure. Methodology and Principal Findings In SDS-PAGE analysis of salivary proteins of T. infestans the banding pattern differed between developmental stages and strains of triatomines. Phenograms constructed from the salivary profiles separated nymphal instars, especially the 5th instar, from adults. To analyze the influence of stage- and strain-specific differences in T. infestans saliva on the antibody response of guinea pigs, twenty-one guinea pigs were exposed to 5th instar nymphs and/or adults of different T. infestans strains. Western blot analyses using sera of exposed guinea pigs revealed stage- and strain-specific variations in the humoral response of animals. In total, 27 and 17 different salivary proteins reacted with guinea pig sera using IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Despite all variations of recognized salivary antigens, an antigen of 35 kDa reacted with sera of almost all challenged guinea pigs. Conclusion Salivary antigens are increasingly considered as an epidemiological tool to measure exposure to hematophagous arthropods, but developmental stage- and strain-specific variations in the saliva composition and the respective differences of immunogenicity are often neglected. Thus, the development of a triatomine exposure marker for surveillance studies after triatomine control campaigns requires detailed investigations. Our study resulted

  1. Temporal dynamics of flight muscle development in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Juan M; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2009-09-01

    Triatoma infestans Klug is dimorphic for flight muscles. This dimorphism may affect flight dispersal, reinfestation patterns, and transmission risk. To understand the contributions of genes and environment to morph determination, it is first necessary to characterize the temporal dynamics of flight muscle development. Field-collected T. infestans adults were dissected 20 or 100 d after collection, and those collected as nymphs were dissected at approximately 4, 15, or 44 d after the imaginal molt. The occurrence of flight muscles was additionally assessed by minimally invasive, repeated observations through the scutum of live bugs. Overall, 33.5% of 179 males and 7.8% of 179 females had no flight muscles. Neither dissections nor repeated observations evidenced changes in morph type during adult life, suggesting that the occurrence of flight muscles is mostly irreversible within the time span of observations and is determined before or during final ecdysis. Flight muscles were detectable at 4 d after emergence and achieved complete development within 4-15 d after emergence. The repeated observation of thoracic contents through the scutum showed very high sensitivity and specificity and apparently had minor effects on mortality. In another bug population located 360 km away, 16.4% of 177 males and 6.7% of 149 females had no flight muscles. Current results show that the sex-biased flight muscle dimorphism is a regionally widespread character in T. infestans. This character should be considered in field population studies that seek to measure reinfestation risk and dispersal in T. infestans and other Triatominae.

  2. Evolutionary and dispersal history of Triatoma infestans, main vector of Chagas disease, by chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Francisco; Ferreiro, María J; Pita, Sebastián; Calleros, Lucía; Pérez, Ruben; Basmadjián, Yester; Guevara, Yenny; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-10-01

    Chagas disease, one of the most important vector-borne diseases in the Americas, is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted to humans by insects of the subfamily Triatominae. An effective control of this disease depends on elimination of vectors through spraying with insecticides. Genetic research can help insect control programs by identifying and characterizing vector populations. In southern Latin America, Triatoma infestans is the main vector and presents two distinct lineages, known as Andean and non-Andean chromosomal groups, that are highly differentiated by the amount of heterochromatin and genome size. Analyses with nuclear and mitochondrial sequences are not conclusive about resolving the origin and spread of T. infestans. The present paper includes the analyses of karyotypes, heterochromatin distribution and chromosomal mapping of the major ribosomal cluster (45S rDNA) to specimens throughout the distribution range of this species, including pyrethroid-resistant populations. A total of 417 specimens from seven different countries were analyzed. We show an unusual wide rDNA variability related to number and chromosomal position of the ribosomal genes, never before reported in species with holocentric chromosomes. Considering the chromosomal groups previously described, the ribosomal patterns are associated with a particular geographic distribution. Our results reveal that the differentiation process between both T. infestans chromosomal groups has involved significant genomic reorganization of essential coding sequences, besides the changes in heterochromatin and genomic size previously reported. The chromosomal markers also allowed us to detect the existence of a hybrid zone occupied by individuals derived from crosses between both chromosomal groups. Our genetic studies support the hypothesis of an Andean origin for T. infestans, and suggest that pyrethroid-resistant populations from the Argentinean-Bolivian border are most likely the result of

  3. Phenotypic plasticity in response to food source in Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1834) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae: Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Nattero, Julieta; Malerba, Romina; Rodríguez, Claudia S; Crocco, Liliana

    2013-10-01

    In the Gran Chaco region of Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay, vector transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is still a severe problem because, among other causes, houses are reinfested with Triatoma infestans, the main vector of T. cruzi in southern South America. A better understanding of adaptation and evolution of T. infestans populations may contribute to the selection of appropriate vector control strategies in this region. Phenotypic plasticity is essential to understand development and maintenance of morphological variation. An experimental phenotypic plasticity study was conducted to assess if blood meal source induced head shape and size variation during development in T. infestans. Eighteen full-sib families were assigned to one of two food sources (pigeon and guinea pig) to examine the effect of food source on head shape and size in all nymph instars and adults. Data were analyzed using geometric morphometric tools and phenotypic plasticity analyses. Significant differences in head shape and size were observed between adults fed on different food sources. Allometric effects at the adult stage were observed. Head size showed significant food source × family interaction for fifth-instar nymphs and adults. For head size, significant differences between food sources were observed at stages and in ontogenetic trajectory. Phenotypic plasticity expression was found for head shape and size in adults; indeed, bugs fed on guinea pigs exhibited greater changes in head shape and larger heads than those fed on pigeon. Full-sib families exhibited different patterns of phenotypic expression in response to food source. Food source × family interaction may indicate that the observed variation in phenotypic plasticity may contribute to changes in head morphometry. These results may contribute to the selection of an appropriate control strategy for T. infestans in the Gran Chaco region, since they provide evidences of morphological

  4. Real-Time Fluorescent Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora pseudosyringae Using Mitochondrial Gene Regions.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Paul W; Martin, Frank N; Carras, Marie M; Frederick, Reid D

    2006-04-01

    ABSTRACT A real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum was developed based on mitochondrial DNA sequence with an ABI Prism 7700 (TaqMan) Sequence Detection System. Primers and probes were also developed for detecting P. pseudosyringae, a newly described species that causes symptoms similar to P. ramorum on certain hosts. The species-specific primer-probe systems were combined in a multiplex assay with a plant primer-probe system to allow plant DNA present in extracted samples to serve as a positive control in each reaction. The lower limit of detection of P. ramorum DNA was 1 fg of genomic DNA, lower than for many other described PCR procedures for detecting Phytophthora species. The assay was also used in a three-way multiplex format to simultaneously detect P. ramorum, P. pseudosyringae, and plant DNA in a single tube. P. ramorum was detected down to a 10(-5) dilution of extracted tissue of artificially infected rhododendron 'Cunningham's White', and the amount of pathogen DNA present in the infected tissue was estimated using a standard curve. The multiplex assay was also used to detect P. ramorum in infected California field samples from several hosts determined to contain the pathogen by other methods. The real-time PCR assay we describe is highly sensitive and specific, and has several advantages over conventional PCR assays used for P. ramorum detection to confirm positive P. ramorum finds in nurseries and elsewhere.

  5. Spatial structuring of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) populations from northwestern Argentina using wing geometric morphometry.

    PubMed

    Schachter-Broide, Judith; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2004-07-01

    Wing geometric morphometry was used to study the spatial structuring of populations of Triatoma infestans from different villages, ecotopes, and sites within a village in northwestern Argentina. A total of 308 male and 197 female wings of T. infestans collected from peridomestic and domestic ecotopes in March 2000 was analyzed. On average, female bugs had a significantly larger wing size than males. Triatomines collected from domiciles or structures associated with chickens had larger wings than bugs collected from goat or pig corrals. The wing size of bugs did not differ significantly between villages. Discriminant analyses of wing shape showed significant divergence between villages, ecotopes, and individual collection sites. The study of metric variation of males between sites belonging to the same ecotope also revealed significant heterogeneity. Indeed, within the same section of the village the difference between two goat corrals was sometimes greater than that between neighboring goat and pig corrals. Thus, morphometric heterogeneity within villages may be the result not only of ecotope and host associations, but also of physical isolation between subunits. The strong structuring of T. infestans populations in the study area indicates that recolonization could be traced back to a small geographic source.

  6. Spatial Structuring of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) Populations from Northwestern Argentina Using Wing Geometric Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    SCHACHTER-BROIDE, JUDITH; DUJARDIN, JEAN-PIERRE; KITRON, URIEL; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2005-01-01

    Wing geometric morphometry was used to study the spatial structuring of populations of Triatoma infestans from different villages, ecotopes, and sites within a village in northwestern Argentina. A total of 308 male and 197 female wings of T. infestans collected from peridomestic and domestic ecotopes in March 2000 was analyzed. On average, female bugs had a significantly larger wing size than males. Triatomines collected from domiciles or structures associated with chickens had larger wings than bugs collected from goat or pig corrals. The wing size of bugs did not differ significantly between villages. Discriminant analyses of wing shape showed significant divergence between villages, ecotopes, and individual collection sites. The study of metric variation of males between sites belonging to the same ecotope also revealed significant heterogeneity. Indeed, within the same section of the village the difference between two goat corrals was sometimes greater than that between neighboring goat and pig corrals. Thus, morphometric heterogeneity within villages may be the result not only of ecotope and host associations, but also of physical isolation between subunits. The strong structuring of T. infestans populations in the study area indicates that recolonization could be traced back to a small geographic source. PMID:15311455

  7. Flight initiation of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) under natural climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Juan M; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2006-03-01

    Flight dispersal of Triatoma infestans Klug is probably the most important mechanism for house reinfestation at a village scale after residual spraying with insecticides. The aim of the current study was to estimate the flight initiation probability of field-collected T. infestans and to assess how this probability was affected by sex, adult age, partial bloodmeal, and the presence of a host inaccessible for feeding. Four experimental series, each consisting of three to six consecutive nights and repeated measurements of flight initiation on each individually marked bug, were carried out in experimental huts inside closed cages under natural climatic conditions. We demonstrate that flight initiation probability of T. infestans is much higher than previously reported, responds to temperature in a sigmoid manner, and is higher in females than males, and that the frequency distribution of the number of flights per individual is highly aggregated in female and male bugs. The age of adults had strong effects on flight initiation, whereas the presence of an inaccessible host and a partial bloodmeal exerted no significant effects in models controlling for the effects of bug weight-to-length ratio. The high flight potential found is consistent with the rapid changes in reinfestation patterns observed in the field. The present estimates of flight probabilities and the identification of factors modifying them provide essential knowledge for modeling reinfestation patterns and for improving control strategies of T.

  8. Genetic structure of Triatoma infestans populations in rural communities of Santiago del Estero, northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Marcet, P L; Mora, M S; Cutrera, A P; Jones, L; Gürtler, R E; Kitron, U; Dotson, E M

    2008-12-01

    To gain an understanding of the genetic structure and dispersal dynamics of Triatoma infestans populations, we analyzed the multilocus genotype of 10 microsatellite loci for 352 T. infestans collected in 21 houses of 11 rural communities in October 2002. Genetic structure was analyzed at the community and house compound levels. Analysis revealed that vector control actions affected the genetic structure of T. infestans populations. Bug populations from communities under sustained vector control (core area) were highly structured and genetic differentiation between neighboring house compounds was significant. In contrast, bug populations from communities with sporadic vector control actions were more homogeneous and lacked defined genetic clusters. Genetic differentiation between population pairs did not fit a model of isolation by distance at the microgeographical level. Evidence consistent with flight or walking bug dispersal was detected within and among communities, dispersal was more female-biased in the core area and results suggested that houses received immigrants from more than one source. Putative sources and mechanisms of re-infestation are described. These data may be use to design improved vector control strategies.

  9. Changes in nuclear phenotype frequencies following sequential cold shocks in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Campos, Silvana G P; Rodrigues, Vera Lúcia C C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2002-09-01

    The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule cells in fifth instar nymphs of Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vectors of Chagas disease, were studied following sequential shocks at 0 degrees C, separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30 degrees C, under conditions of moderate fasting and full nourishment. The insects pertained to colonies reared in the laboratory and originated from domestic specimens collected in the Brazilian states of São Paulo (north) and Minas Gerais (south). Since nuclear phenotypes in this species are affected by single cold shocks, it was expected that these phenotypes could also be changed by sequential shocks. Nuclear phenotypes indicative of mechanisms of cell survival (nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation) and cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) were observed concomitantly in all the conditions tested. Nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation were not found relevant for the presumed acquisition of the cold-hardening response in T. infestans. The decreased frequency of apoptosis and necrosis following sequential cold shocks including under fasting conditions, indicated that tolerance to sequential cold shocks occurred in T. infestans of the mentioned origin.

  10. Experimental control of Triatoma infestans in poor rural villages of Bolivia through community participation

    PubMed Central

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Depickère, Stéphanie; Aliaga, Claudia; Chavez, Tamara; Zambrana, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries. Present control strategies based on indoor and outdoor residual insecticide spraying are not sufficient to control disease transmission, particularly in Bolivia. Techniques based on the management of the human environment may be good alternatives or supplements. Methods Social and entomological surveys were carried out in four villages of Bolivia situated in the dry inter-Andean Valleys and the Chaco region. Risk factors for house infestation by T. infestans were identified, and an eco-health intervention based on education and community participation was carried out to reduce the risks of house infestation. It consisted of implementing simple and low cost vector control techniques such as coating of mud walls, cleaning activities and removal of poultry that enter rooms to lay eggs. Results The eco-health intervention significantly reduced the number of infested bedrooms, the mean abundance of T. infestans in bedrooms and beds, especially in the Chaco region. Mud wall coating was well accepted and could be proposed as a supplementary tool to the National Program of Chagas Disease Control to enhance the effects of insecticide sprayings. Conclusions Even if cleaning activities were still neglected, community participation proved to be effective in reducing house infestation. PMID:25604766

  11. GENETIC STRUCTURE OF TRIATOMA INFESTANS POPULATIONS IN RURAL COMMUNITIES OF SANTIAGO DEL ESTERO, NORTHERN ARGENTINA

    PubMed Central

    Marcet, PL; Mora, MS; Cutrera, AP; Jones, L; Gürtler, RE; Kitron, U; Dotson, EM

    2008-01-01

    To gain an understanding of the genetic structure and dispersal dynamics of T. infestans populations, we analyzed the multilocus genotype of 10 microsatellite loci for 352 T. infestans collected in 21 houses of 11 rural communities in October 2002. Genetic structure was analyzed at the community and house compound levels. Analysis revealed that vector control actions affected the genetic structure of T. infestans populations. Bug populations from communities under sustained vector control (core area) were highly structured and genetic differentiation between neighboring house compounds was significant. In contrast, bug populations from communities with sporadic vector control actions were more homogeneous and lacked defined genetic clusters. Genetic differentiation between population pairs did not fit a model of isolation by distance at the microgeographical level. Evidence consistent with flight or walking bug dispersal was detected within and among communities, dispersal was more female-biased in the core area and results suggested that houses received immigrants from more than one source. Putative sources and mechanisms of re-infestation are described. These data may be use to design improved vector control strategies PMID:18773972

  12. Mating behavior of the hematophagous bug Triatoma infestans: role of Brindley's and metasternal glands.

    PubMed

    Crespo, J G; Manrique, G

    2007-07-01

    We investigated if Brindley's and metasternal glands are involved in the sexual behavior of Triatoma infestans. In laboratory assays, we analyzed the effect of selective occlusion of Brindley's and metasternal glands of the female (separately and together) on the behavior of males. Control assays without occlusion of glands were also performed. We quantitatively tested if such glands affect mating occurrence, the copulatory attempts of males, and the aggregation of males around a mating couple. The number of mating attempts by males did not differ between treatments, demonstrating that likelihood of males mating did not depend on which gland is occluded in the female. In the absence of any occlusion, T. infestans mated and males aggregated. The proportion of copulations and aggregation behavior of males did not differ between treatments when female's Brindley's glands were occluded. However, when metasternal glands were occluded, the proportion of mating couples decreased and males did not aggregate. We demonstrated that the metasternal glands of the female are involved in the sexual behavior of T. infestans, while Brindley's glands seem to have no effect on mating behavior. Copulation and aggregation behavior of males likely result from the eventual release of volatiles from the female's metasternal glands.

  13. An Updated Insight into the Sialotranscriptome of Triatoma infestans: Developmental Stage and Geographic Variations

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Medrano-Mercado, Nora; Schaub, Günter A.; Struchiner, Claudio J.; Bargues, M. Dolores; Levy, Michael Z.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in South America. As in all hematophagous arthropods, its saliva contains a complex cocktail that assists blood feeding by preventing platelet aggregation and blood clotting and promoting vasodilation. These salivary components can be immunologically recognized by their vector's hosts and targeted with antibodies that might disrupt blood feeding. These antibodies can be used to detect vector exposure using immunoassays. Antibodies may also contribute to the fast evolution of the salivary cocktail. Methodology Salivary gland cDNA libraries from nymphal and adult T. infestans of breeding colonies originating from different locations (Argentina, Chile, Peru and Bolivia), and cDNA libraries originating from F1 populations of Bolivia, were sequenced using Illumina technology. Coding sequences (CDS) were extracted from the assembled reads, the numbers of reads mapped to these CDS, sequences were functionally annotated and polymorphisms determined. Main findings/Significance Over five thousand CDS, mostly full length or near full length, were publicly deposited on GenBank. Transcripts that were over 10-fold overexpressed from different geographical regions, or from different developmental stages were identified. Polymorphisms were mapped to derived coding sequences, and found to vary between developmental instars and geographic origin of the biological material. This expanded sialome database from T. infestans should be of assistance in future proteomic work attempting to identify salivary proteins that might be used as epidemiological markers of vector exposure, or proteins of pharmacological interest. PMID:25474469

  14. Pyrosequencing of environmental soil samples reveals biodiversity of the Phytophthora resident community in chestnut forests.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Andrea; Bruni, Natalia; Tomassini, Alessia; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    Pyrosequencing analysis was performed on soils from Italian chestnut groves to evaluate the diversity of the resident Phytophthora community. Sequences analysed with a custom database discriminated 15 pathogenic Phytophthoras including species common to chestnut soils, while a total of nine species were detected with baiting. The two sites studied differed in Phytophthora diversity and the presence of specific taxa responded to specific ecological traits of the sites. Furthermore, some species not previously recorded were represented by a discrete number of reads; among these species, Phytophthora ramorum was detected at both sites. Pyrosequencing was demonstrated to be a very sensitive technique to describe the Phytophthora community in soil and was able to detect species not easy to be isolated from soil with standard baiting techniques. In particular, pyrosequencing is an highly efficient tool for investigating the colonization of new environments by alien species, and for ecological and adaptive studies coupled with biological detection methods. This study represents the first application of pyrosequencing for describing Phytophthoras in environmental soil samples.

  15. Development of Phytophthora fruit rot resistant watermelon germplasm lines: USVL489-PFR, USVL782-PFR, USVL203-PFR and USVL020-PFR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici, distributed worldwide, is an aggressive pathogen with a broad host range, infecting solanaceous, leguminaceous, and cucurbitaceous crops. Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) caused by Phytophthora capsici was first reported in the U.S. in 1940. Since then...

  16. Two previously unknown Phytophthora species associated with brown rot of Pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Schena, Leonardo; Jung, Thomas; Evoli, Maria; Pane, Antonella; Van Hoa, Nguyen; Van Tri, Mai; Wright, Sandra; Ramstedt, Mauritz; Olsson, Christer; Faedda, Roberto; Magnano di San Lio, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct Phytophthora taxa were found to be associated with brown rot of pomelo (Citrus grandis), a new disease of this ancestral Citrus species, in the Vinh Long province, Mekong River Delta area, southern Vietnam. On the basis of morphological characters and using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) as barcode genes, one of the two taxa was provisionally named as Phytophthora sp. prodigiosa, being closely related to but distinct from P. insolita, a species in Phytophthora Clade 9, while the other one, was closely related to but distinct from the Clade 2 species P. meadii and was informally designated as Phytophthora sp. mekongensis. Isolates of P. sp. prodigiosa and P. sp. mekongensis were also obtained from necrotic fibrous roots of Volkamer lemon (C. volkameriana) rootstocks grafted with ‘King’ mandarin (Citrus nobilis) and from trees of pomelo, respectively, in other provinces of the Mekong River Delta, indicating a widespread occurrence of both Phytophthora species in this citrus-growing area. Koch’s postulates were fulfilled via pathogenicity tests on fruits of various Citrus species, including pomelo, grapefruit (Citrus x paradisi), sweet orange (Citrus x sinensis) and bergamot (Citrus x bergamia) as well as on the rootstock of 2-year-old trees of pomelo and sweet orange on ‘Carrizo’ citrange (C. sinensis ‘Washington Navel’ x Poncirus trifoliata). This is the first report of a Phytophthora species from Clade 2 other than P. citricola and P. citrophthora as causal agent of fruit brown rot of Citrus worldwide and the first report of P. insolita complex in Vietnam. Results indicate that likely Vietnam is still an unexplored reservoir of Phytophthora diversity. PMID:28208159

  17. Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of cultural practices and fungicide treatments on the severity of Phytophthora root rot of blueberries grown in Mississippi Melinda Miller-Butler and Barbara J. Smith ABSTRACT. Phytophthora root rot is an important disease of blueberries especially when grown in areas with poor drainage. Re...

  18. Recovery Plan for Phytophthora kernoviae Causing Bleeding Trunk Cankers, Leaf Blight and Stem Dieback in Trees and Shrubs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora kernoviae, a recently described species of Phytophthora, is an invasive pathogen of forest trees and shrubs such as beech (Fagus sylvatica) and rhododendron (Rhododendron ponticum) that has become established in woodlands and public gardens in Cornwall, United Kingdom. Although the ori...

  19. Effects of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolate, inoculum delivery method, flood, and drought on vigor, disease severity and mortality of blueberry plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four studies evaluated the effect of Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates, inoculum delivery methods, and flood and drought conditions on vigor, disease severity scores, and survival of blueberry plants grown in pots in the greenhouse. Phytophthora cinnamomi isolates were obtained from blueberry plants ...

  20. Pathogenicity, fungicide resistance, and genetic variability of Phytophthora rubi isolates from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) in the Western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot of raspberry (Rubus idaeus), thought to be primarily caused by Phytophthora rubi, is an economically important disease in the western United States. The objectives of this study were to determine which Phytophthora species are involved in root rot, examine the efficacy of different isolatio...

  1. Genome-wide association mapping of partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean plant introductions from the Republic of Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot is one of the most yield-limiting diseases of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr], caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae. Partial resistance is controlled by several genes and, compared to single gene (Rps gene) resistance to P. sojae, places less selection pressure on...

  2. Molecular response to the pathogen Phytophthora sojae among ten soybean near isogenic lines revealed by comparative transcriptomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRR) of soybean, caused by Phytophthora sojae, is effectively controlled by Rps genes in soybean. Rps genes are race-specific, yet the mechanism of resistance, as well as susceptibility, remains largely unclear. Taking advantage of RNA-seq technology, we sequenced the...

  3. Molecular mapping and characterization of two genes conferring resistance to Phytophthora sojae in a soybean landrace PI 567139B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRR), caused by the soil-borne oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean. PRR can be effectively controlled by race-specific genes conferring resistance to P. sojae (Rps). However, the Rps genes are usually non-durable, a...

  4. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  5. Fungicide rotation schemes for managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon across Southeastern United States (NC, SC, and GA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici has been documented as a pathogen on a wide variety of vegetable crops in the family Solanaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, and plants belonging to 23 other families. Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelons caused by P. capsici is particularly severe in southeastern U.S where optima...

  6. Identification of Phytophthora species baited and isolated from forest soil and streams in northwestern Yunnan province, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora species were surveyed by collecting soil samples and placing bait leaves in selected streams during June - October in the years 2005, 2006 and 2010 at three sites in oak forests in Diqing Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of NW Yunnan province, China. Seventy-three isolates of Phytophthora ...

  7. Reaction of Phytophthora fruit rot resistant germplasm lines to a broad range of Phytophthora capsici isolates from across the United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora fruit rot limits watermelon production in most states in the Southeastern US (FL, GA, SC, NC and VA). It has also become a serious problem in recent years in northern states (IN, MD, DE). About 50% of the US watermelons are grown in the southeastern states where environmental conditions...

  8. Phytophthora community structure analyses in Oregon nurseries inform systems approaches to disease management.

    PubMed

    Parke, Jennifer L; Knaus, Brian J; Fieland, Valerie J; Lewis, Carrie; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2014-10-01

    Nursery plants are important vectors for plant pathogens. Understanding what pathogens occur in nurseries in different production stages can be useful to the development of integrated systems approaches. Four horticultural nurseries in Oregon were sampled every 2 months for 4 years to determine the identity and community structure of Phytophthora spp. associated with different sources and stages in the nursery production cycle. Plants, potting media, used containers, water, greenhouse soil, and container yard substrates were systematically sampled from propagation to the field. From 674 Phytophthora isolates recovered, 28 different species or taxa were identified. The most commonly isolated species from plants were Phytophthora plurivora (33%), P. cinnamomi (26%), P. syringae (19%), and P. citrophthora (11%). From soil and gravel substrates, P. plurivora accounted for 25% of the isolates, with P. taxon Pgchlamydo, P. cryptogea, and P. cinnamomi accounting for 18, 17, and 15%, respectively. Five species (P. plurivora, P. syringae, P. taxon Pgchlamydo, P. gonapodyides, and P. cryptogea) were found in all nurseries. The greatest diversity of taxa occurred in irrigation water reservoirs (20 taxa), with the majority of isolates belonging to internal transcribed spacer clade 6, typically including aquatic opportunists. Nurseries differed in composition of Phytophthora communities across years, seasons, and source within the nursery. These findings suggest likely contamination hazards and target critical control points for management of Phytophthora disease using a systems approach.

  9. Soil bacteria as sources of virulence signal providers promoting plant infection by Phytophthora pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Hong, Chuanxue

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora species are known as “plant destroyers” capable of initiating single zoospore infection in the presence of a quorum of chemical signals from the same or closely related species of oomycetes. Since the natural oomycete population is too low to reach a quorum necessary to initiate a disease epidemic, creation of the quorum is reliant on alternate sources. Here, we show that a soil bacterial isolate, Bacillus megaterium Sb5, promotes plant infection by Phytophthora species. In the presence of Sb5 exudates, colonization of rhododendron leaf discs by 12 Phytophthora species/isolates was significantly enhanced, single zoospores of P. nicotianae infected annual vinca and P. sojae race 25 successfully attacked a non-host plant, Nicotiana benthamiana as well as resistant soybean cultivars with RPS1a or RPS3a. Sb5 exudates, most notably the fractions larger than 3 kDa, promoted plant infection by improving zoospore swimming, germination and plant attachment. Sb5 exudates also stimulated infection hypha growth and upregulated effector gene expression. These results suggest that environmental bacteria are important sources of virulence signal providers that promote plant infection by Phytophthora species, advancing our understanding of biotic factors in the environmental component of the Phytophthora disease triangle and of communal infection of plant pathogens. PMID:27616267

  10. Multiple Phytophthora species associated with a single riparian ecosystem in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Jan H; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Gryzenhout, Marieka

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of Phytophthora spp. in rivers and riparian ecosystems has received considerable international attention, although little such research has been conducted in South Africa. This study determined the diversity of Phytophthora spp. within a single river in Gauteng province of South Africa. Samples were collected over 1 y including biweekly river baiting with Rhododendron indicum leaves. Phytophthora isolates were identified with phylogenetic analyses of sequences for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (coxI) gene. Eight Phytophthora spp. were identified, including a new taxon, P. taxon Sisulu-river, and two hybrid species from Cooke's ITS clade 6. Of these, species from Clade 6 were the most abundant, including P. chlamydospora and P. lacustris. Species residing in Clade 2 also were encountered, including P. multivora, P. plurivora and P. citrophthora. The detection of eight species in this investigation of Phytophthora diversity in a single riparian river ecosystem in northern South Africa adds to the known diversity of this genus in South Africa and globally.

  11. Comparative Trial of Effectiveness of Pyrethroid Insecticides Against Peridomestic Populations of Triatoma infestans in Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    CECERE, MARÍA CARLA; VÁZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, GONZALO M.; CEBALLOS, LEONARDO A.; GUREVITZ, JUAN M.; ZÁRATE, JOAQUÍN E.; ZAIDENBERG, MARIO; KITRON, URIEL; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of different pyrethroid insecticides, formulations, and doses on peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Klug) were evaluated in 128 houses with 148 identified infested peridomestic sites in northwestern Argentina between October 2003 and March 2005. Four treatments were randomly assigned within each community: two doses of 5% suspension concentrate β-cypermethrin in water applied with manual compression sprayers, the standard dose (S) at 50 mg and a double dose (2S) at 100 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2; and two emulsifiable concentrates diluted in diesel fuel and applied with power sprayers, 25% cypermethrin (100 mg [AI]m2) (CF) and 10% permethrin (170 mg [AI]m2) (DF). Infestation was assessed by timed manual collections with a dislodging agent at baseline, 5, 12, and 17 mo postspraying, and the sites found to be reinfested at 5 mo postspraying were selectively resprayed. Only 2S eliminated T. infestans from all peridomestic sites up to 12 mo postspraying, and it was significantly more effective than all other treatments. At 5 mo postspraying, more sites treated with CF or DF rather than S had bug colonies that probably represented residual foci, which they also failed in eliminating after a second spray. At 17 mo postspraying, the prevalence of reinfested peridomestic sites was 5% for 2S, 29% for S, 43% for CF, and 54% for DF. The application of suspension concentrate pyrethroids in dose twice as large as that currently in use in the attack phase produces a greater initial impact and may eliminate peridomestic populations of T. infestans. PMID:17017227

  12. Comparative trial of effectiveness of pyrethroid insecticides against peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans in northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cecere, María Carla; Vázquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Gurevitz, Juan M; Zárate, Joaquín E; Zaidenberg, Mario; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2006-09-01

    The effects of different pyrethroid insecticides, formulations, and doses on peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Klug) were evaluated in 128 houses with 148 identified infested peridomestic sites in northwestern Argentina between October 2003 and March 2005. Four treatments were randomly assigned within each community: two doses of 5% suspension concentrate beta-cypermethrin in water applied with manual compression sprayers, the standard dose (S) at 50 mg and a double dose (2S) at 100 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2; and two emulsifiable concentrates diluted in diesel fuel and applied with power sprayers, 25% cypermethrin (100 mg [AI] /m2) (CF) and 10% permethrin (170 mg [AI]/m2) (DF). Infestation was assessed by timed manual collections with a dislodging agent at baseline, 5, 12, and 17 mo postspraying, and the sites found to be reinfested at 5 mo postspraying were selectively resprayed. Only 2S eliminated T. infestans from all peridomestic sites up to 12 mo postspraying, and it was significantly more effective than all other treatments. At 5 mo postspraying, more sites treated with CF or DF rather than S had bug colonies that probably represented residual foci, which they also failed in eliminating after a second spray. At 17 mo postspraying, the prevalence of reinfested peridomestic sites was 5% for 2S, 29% for S, 43% for CF, and 54% for DF. The application of suspension concentrate pyrethroids in dose twice as large as that currently in use in the attack phase produces a greater initial impact and may eliminate peridomestic populations of T. infestans.

  13. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  14. Experimental evaluation of insecticidal paints against Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), under natural climatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amelotti, Ivana; Catalá, Silvia S; Gorla, David E

    2009-01-01

    Background Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco region of South America. The traditional spraying technique used for the application of pyrethroid insecticides has shown low efficiency in the elimination of the vector species populations occupying peridomestic structures of rural houses in the endemic area of Argentina. As part of studies looking for better alternatives, we evaluated the residual effect of insecticidal paints on the mortality of fourth instar nymphs of T. infestans. Results The study was based on an experimental design that included two groups treated with an organophosphate (Inesfly 5A IGR™) and a pyrethroid (Inesfly 5A IGR NG™) formulations of the paint, that were applied on wood, cement blocks and adobe bricks under natural climatic conditions. A third group was an untreated control. Both paint formulations showed very long residual activity, producing mortality of 84% and 98% (pyrethroid and organophosphate formulations, respectively) after 12 months of the paint application. After eight months, nymphs exposed during 6 hours to the painted surfaces with the pyrethroid and organophosphate formulations showed 81.33% and 100% mortality, respectively. Conclusion The organophosphate- and pyrethroid-based insecticidal paints showed a very long residual activity on the mortality of fourth instar nymphs of T infestans, compared with the traditional spraying technique used for the application of pyrethroid insecticides in peridomestic structures of rural houses in the endemic region for Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco of Argentina. The application of the paints by trained personnel of the vector control programmes could be considered as an alternative control tool in areas where the traditional methods have failed or showed low efficacy. PMID:19586532

  15. Factors limiting the domestic density of Triatoma infestans in north-west Argentina: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Cecere, M C; Gürtler, R E; Chuit, R; Cohen, J E

    1998-01-01

    Reported are the environmental and demographic risk factors associated with the domestic infestation and density of Triatoma infestans in three heavily infested rural villages in Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina. In a one-factor unadjusted analysis, the number of T. infestans captured per person-hour was associated significantly and negatively with the use of domestic insecticides by householders, type of thatch used in the roofs and the age of the house; and positively with the following: degree of cracking of the indoor walls and presence of hens nesting indoors. In one model, using multiple linear regression and a backward stepwise elimination procedure, most of the variation in the overall abundance of T. infestans was explained by insecticide use and the presence of hens nesting indoors; in another model using the same procedure it was explained by insecticide use, bug density in 1988 and previous spraying with deltamethrin in 1985. Variations in bug density per capture stratum (household goods, beds, walls and roof) were explained by the bug density in other strata and by one or two of the following risk factors: hens nesting indoors, type of roof, presence of cracks in the walls and number of people living in the house. Bug density might be locally controlled by the availability of refuges in the roofs and walls, by the presence of hens nesting indoors and by the use of domestic insecticides. Certain local materials, such as a grass known as simbol, could be successfully used in rural housing improvement programmes aimed at reducing the availability of refuges for insects in the roof.

  16. Factors limiting the domestic density of Triatoma infestans in north-west Argentina: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, M. C.; Gürtler, R. E.; Chuit, R.; Cohen, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    Reported are the environmental and demographic risk factors associated with the domestic infestation and density of Triatoma infestans in three heavily infested rural villages in Santiago del Estero Province, Argentina. In a one-factor unadjusted analysis, the number of T. infestans captured per person-hour was associated significantly and negatively with the use of domestic insecticides by householders, type of thatch used in the roofs and the age of the house; and positively with the following: degree of cracking of the indoor walls and presence of hens nesting indoors. In one model, using multiple linear regression and a backward stepwise elimination procedure, most of the variation in the overall abundance of T. infestans was explained by insecticide use and the presence of hens nesting indoors; in another model using the same procedure it was explained by insecticide use, bug density in 1988 and previous spraying with deltamethrin in 1985. Variations in bug density per capture stratum (household goods, beds, walls and roof) were explained by the bug density in other strata and by one or two of the following risk factors: hens nesting indoors, type of roof, presence of cracks in the walls and number of people living in the house. Bug density might be locally controlled by the availability of refuges in the roofs and walls, by the presence of hens nesting indoors and by the use of domestic insecticides. Certain local materials, such as a grass known as simbol, could be successfully used in rural housing improvement programmes aimed at reducing the availability of refuges for insects in the roof. PMID:9803588

  17. Infestation of rural houses by Triatoma infestans in the region of Los Llanos (La Rioja, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Porcasi, X; Hrellac, H; Catalá, S; Moreno, M; Abrahan, L; Hernandez, L; Gorla, D E

    2007-02-01

    Vectorial transmission of Chagas disease has been strongly reduced in most parts of the Southern Cone countries of South America, except in the Gran Chaco region of Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Given periodical interruptions of the vector control programmes in the endemic region of the Gran Chaco of Argentina, the vectorial transmission of the disease has been increasing during the last years. From the beginning of 2004, the provincial Ministry of Health of La Rioja, Argentina, started a vector control programme to cover the rural houses of the Los Llanos area in the southwestern area of the Gran Chaco region. This article reports the result of a standardized entomological survey and insecticide application against Chagas disease vectors in the intra and peridomestic structures of the rural houses of Los Llanos. A total of 4062 houses were inspected, of which 46.8% were found to be infested by Triatoma infestans. Infestation by vector species other than T. infestans was less than 0.5%(T. eratyrusiformis and T. platensis). Intradomestic infestation was found in 27.2%, whereas peridomestic infestation was found in 39.3% of the houses. The lowest figure of intradomestic infestation was 6.6% (Department F Varela), and the highest value of intradomestic infestation was 45.1% (Department Independencia). In spite of the demonstrated success of vector control elsewhere, this study shows that the vector populations are susceptible to pyrethroid insecticides in the southern area of the Gran Chaco of Argentina, that there still are regions where rural houses show heavy infestation by T. infestans associated with big peridomestic structures and that the vectorial transmission of the Chagas disease will continue, unless a sustained and well organized vector control effort is installed in the region.

  18. Genetic characterization of residual Triatoma infestans populations from Brazil by microsatellite.

    PubMed

    Belisário, Carlota Josefovicz; Pessoa, Grasielle Caldas D'Avila; Silva, Eduardo Melos; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Ferreira, Rafaela Elias; Bedin, Cleonara; Wilhelms, Tania; de Mello, Fernanda; Coutinho, Helder Silveira; Fonseca, Eduardo Lins Oyama; Dos Santos, Roberto Fonseca; Rodrigues, Vera Lucia Cortiço Corrêa; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Diotaiuti, Liléia

    2017-02-01

    In spite of long-term efforts to eliminate Triatoma infestans (Klug 1834) from Brazil, residual foci still persist in the states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul. Data on the genetic variability and structuring of these populations are however lacking. Using nine microsatellite loci, we characterized one residual T. infestans population from Bahia and four from Rio Grande do Sul, and compared them with bugs originally from an older focus in São Paulo; 224 bugs were genotyped. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 11. Observed and expected heterozygosities per locus ranged, respectively, from 0 to 0.786 and from 0 to 0.764. Significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, mainly due to heterozygote deficits, were detected in all loci and in most populations. Global indices estimated by AMOVA were: Fis was 0.37; Fst was 0.28; and Fit was 0.55; overall indices with p = 0.00 indicated substantial differentiation. Inter-population Fst ranged from 0.118 to 0.562, suggesting strong genetic structuring and little to no gene flow among populations. Intra-population Fis ranged from 0.301 to 0.307. Inbreeding was apparent in all populations except that from Bahia-which might be either linked by gene flow to nearby unsampled populations or part of a relatively large local population. The overall pattern of strong genetic structuring among pyrethroid-susceptible residual T. infestans populations suggests that their persistence is probably due to operational control failures. Detection and elimination of such residual foci is technically feasible and must become a public health priority in Brazil.

  19. Gene duplication event in family 12 glycosyl hydrolase from Phytophthora spp.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Stefano; Ospina-Giraldo, M D; Deahl, K L; Baker, C J; Jones, Richard W

    2006-10-01

    A total of 18 paralogs of xyloglucan-specific endoglucanases (EGLs) from the glycosyl hydrolase family 12 were identified and characterized in Phytophthora sojae and Phytophthora ramorum. These genes encode predicted extracellular enzymes, with sizes ranging from 189 to 435 amino acid residues, that would be capable of hydrolyzing the xyloglucan component of the host cell wall. In two cases, four and six functional copies of these genes were found in tight succession within a region of 5 and 18 kb, respectively. The overall gene copy number and relative organization appeared well conserved between P. sojae and P. ramorum, with apparent synteny in this region of their respective genomes. Phylogenetic analyses of Phytophthora endoglucanases of family 12 and other known members of EGL 12, revealed a close relatedness with a fairly conserved gene sub-family containing, among others, sequences from the fungi Emericella desertorum and Aspergillus aculeatus. This is the first report of family 12 EGLs present in plant pathogenic eukaryotes.

  20. New structures for goat corrals to control peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the Gran Chaco of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, David Eladio; Abrahan, Luciana; Hernández, María Laura; Porcasi, Ximena; Hrellac, Hugo Américo; Carrizo, Hugo; Catalá, Silvia Susana

    2013-01-01

    Goat production is an important economic activity for rural communities in the Gran Chaco of Argentina. Goat corrals are important for the survival of peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans. This study evaluated the impact of modifying the traditional structure of goat corrals on T. infestans populations and goat productivity in the region of Los Llanos (La Rioja). Thirty-nine experimental corrals were constructed and 57 traditional corrals were used as controls. We evaluated the infestations of the control and experimental corrals for five years following construction of the structures. The results showed that the new structures did not prevent the colonization, although it enhanced the detection of infestation at low densities of T. infestans. No significant difference was found in T. infestans population abundance between control and experimental corrals, probably because of the different detectability in the two types of structures, especially among the small nymphs. Although goat productivity average was higher in experimental than in control corrals, no significant difference was found because of high variability. The new structures can be used as a complement to promote the development of rural communities. Acceptability and adoption of the new corrals by the owners was high, as the enclosures offered better protection for the goats, increased growth of kids and facilitated herd handling. PMID:23778656

  1. Flight Muscle Dimorphism and Heterogeneity in Flight Initiation of Field-Collected Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gurevitz, Juan M.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated that most field-collected Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) adults from northern Argentina either never initiated flight or did so repeatedly in both sexes. This pattern could not be explained by sex, adult age, weight, weight-to-length ratio (W/L), or chance. We examined whether bugs that never initiated flight possessed developed flight muscles, and whether flight muscle mass relative to total body mass (FMR) was related to the probability of flight initiation. Approximately half of the adults that never initiated flight had no flight muscles. The absence of flight muscles was 2.4 times more frequent in males than females. Females had significantly larger flight muscle mass than males. For both sexes, the frequency of bugs with no flight muscles was spatially heterogeneous among individual collection sites. A logistic regression model of flight initiation that included both FMR and W/L provided a better fit than models including either one of these predictors. FMR is a novel predictor of flight initiation in Triatominae, with a stronger effect than W/L. The higher frequency of females initiating flight in our experiments may be explained by females having flight muscles more frequently than males, and having FMR and W/L values more suitable for flying. These findings demonstrate that individuals and natural populations of T. infestans can differ dramatically with regard to flight initiation. PMID:17427685

  2. Flight muscle dimorphism and heterogeneity in flight initiation of field-collected Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Juan M; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2007-03-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated that most field-collected Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) adults from northern Argentina either never initiated flight or did so repeatedly in both sexes. This pattern could not be explained by sex, adult age, weight, weight-to-length ratio (W/L), or chance. We examined whether bugs that never initiated flight possessed developed flight muscles, and whether flight muscle mass relative to total body mass (FMR) was related to the probability of flight initiation. Approximately half of the adults that never initiated flight had no flight muscles. The absence of flight muscles was 2.4 times more frequent in males than females. Females had significantly larger flight muscle mass than males. For both sexes, the frequency of bugs with no flight muscles was spatially heterogeneous among individual collection sites. A logistic regression model of flight initiation that included both FMR and W/L provided abetter fit than models including either one of these predictors. FMR is a novel predictor of flight initiation in Triatominae, with a stronger effect than W/L. The higher frequency of females initiating flight in our experiments may be explained by females having flight muscles more frequently than males, and having FMR and W/L values more suitable for flying. These findings demonstrate that individuals and natural populations of T. infestans can differ dramatically with regard to flight initiation.

  3. Molecular population genetics and phylogeography of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in South America.

    PubMed

    Piccinali, R V; Marcet, P L; Noireau, F; Kitron, U; Gürtler, R E; Dotson, E M

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge of the genetic variability, population structure, and evolutionary history of Triatoma infestans may be useful for developing rational vector control strategies. A 661-bp fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI) was sequenced and analyzed in bugs from Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, and Bolivia, including peridomestic, domestic, Andean, and Chaco sylvatic bugs. A total of 48 polymorphic sites among 37 haplotypes were described. Nucleotide variation fluctuated among samples, with the highest nucleotide diversity observed in seven Argentinean provinces. Within this group, some populations showed patterns of variability compatible with population expansions and/or fine-scale population structure, whereas others suggested population bottlenecks and/or population admixture processes. A maximum parsimony analysis of the haplotypes showed the presence of a Bolivian/Peruvian and an Argentinean/Uruguayan clade. Bolivian sequences were further divided in Chaco sylvatic and Andean domestic and sylvatic. Two different nested clades were found within the Argentinean/Uruguayan cluster. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and K(ST)* analysis supported a strong population structure in Argentina, where genetic differentiation was correlated with geographic distance. Departures from neutrality expectations and a nested cladistic analysis suggest a recent population expansion of T. infestans in Argentina, followed by restricted gene flow and patterns of isolation by distance. This expansion could have taken place as a two-wave process, as was shown by the phylogenetic analysis and signatures of population admixture in the southern most Argentinean populations.

  4. Variability of the susceptibility to deltamethrin in Triatoma infestans: the female factor.

    PubMed

    Amelotti, Ivana; Romero, Nahuel; Catalá, Silvia S; Gorla, David E

    2011-11-01

    We analyzed the variability of susceptibility to deltamethrin in putatively susceptible Triatoma infestans Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), and evaluated the sample size implications on the hypotheses used in the current World Health Organization protocol for the measure of insecticide resistance in Triatominae. Following the protocol, using topical application of deltamethrin to unfed first instar nymphs of T. infestans, we found that susceptibility showed significant differences between offspring from different females, a significant association with female age, and significant interaction female x female age. Considering individual female data, three patterns of nymphal mortality were identified: one showed a strong positive relation between nymphal mortality and their mother's age, another showed high mortality with low variability and the third showed intermediate mortality with high variability along female age. The analysis suggests revision of the World Health Organization protocol for resistance detection in Triatominae, not only to take into consideration the sources of variation in susceptibility, but also the effects of sample size in relation to the significance and power probabilities of the test.

  5. Purification and properties of the very high density lipoprotein from the hemolymph of adult Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, O J; Soulages, J L; González, S M; Peluffo, R O; Brenner, R R

    1989-06-01

    The very high density lipoprotein (VHDL) of Triatoma infestans hemolymph from adult males has been isolated and purified by two-step density gradient ultracentrifugation. It appears to be homogeneous as judged by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The content of VHDL in hemolymph was estimated to be 8 mg protein/ml. The purified protein has a molecular weight (Mr) of 450,000, is composed of six subunits of Mr approximately equal to 77,000, and possesses a high content of aromatic amino acids. This protein is glycosylated and contains 3% of lipids by weight with a remarkable amount of free fatty acids (25% of total lipids). The T. infestans VHDL has a different lipid and amino acid composition from lipophorin. The lipid composition and the spectroscopic studies using cis-parinaric acid indicated a high fatty acid binding affinity. It has nine binding sites per mol of VHDL. Competence studies revealed that VHDL has its highest affinity for the binding of palmitic acid followed by stearic and arachidonic acids.

  6. Determinants of the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans, vector of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R E; Cecere, M C; Rubel, D N; Schweigmann, N J

    1992-01-01

    In two heavily infested rural villages of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, where no indoor-spraying with residual insecticides had ever been carried out by official control services, we studied the influence of roof and wall structure, domestic use of insecticide, family size and the number of domestic dogs, on the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans (Klug). Bug density was significantly associated with (1) the interaction between insecticide use and type of roof, (2) the structure of indoor walls, (3) the number of dogs sharing sleeping areas of people (room-mate dogs), and (4) the number of people plus room-mate dogs, but not with just the number of people resident in the house. The interaction between insecticide use and a roof made of 'simbol', a locally available grass (Pennisetum sp.), also reflected a younger age structure of domestic bug populations. In infested houses, the density of bugs infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas was significantly correlated with overall bug density. Our data suggest that the application of environmental management measures by the affected people, such as plastering of walls and modification of roofs, coupled with keeping dogs away from bedrooms and application of insecticides, should limit the domestic population density of T. infestans and thus reduce the transmission of T. cruzi to people.

  7. Distribution and characterization of nitric oxide synthase in the nervous system of Triatoma infestans (Insecta: Heteroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Coronel, María F.; Nowicki, Susana; Nighorn, Alan J.; Villar, Marcelo J.

    2007-01-01

    The biochemical characterization of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its distribution in the central nervous system (CNS) were studied in the heteropteran bug Triatoma infestans. NOS-like immunoreactivity was found in the brain, subesophageal ganglion, and thoracic ganglia by using immunocytochemistry. In the protocerebrum, NOS-immunoreactive (IR) somata were detected in the anterior, lateral, and posterior soma rinds. In the optic lobe, numerous immunostained somata were observed at the level of the first optic chiasma, around the lobula, and in the proximal optic lobe. In the deutocerebrum, NOS-IR perikarya were mainly observed in the lateral soma rind, surrounding the sensory glomeruli, and a few cell bodies were seen in association with the antennal mechanosensory and motor neuropil. No immunostaining could be detected in the antennal nerve. The subesophageal and prothoracic ganglia contained scattered immunostained cell bodies. NOS-IR somata were present in all the neuromeres of the posterior ganglion. Western blotting showed that a universal NOS antiserum recognized a band at 134 kDa, in agreement with the expected molecular weight of the protein. Analysis of the kinetics of nitric oxide production revealed a fully active enzyme in tissue samples of the CNS of T. infestans. PMID:17235602

  8. Molecular Population Genetics and Phylogeography of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in South America

    PubMed Central

    Piccinali, R. V.; Marcet, P. L.; Noireau, F; Kitron, U; GÜrtler, R. E.; Dotson, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic variability, population structure, and evolutionary history of Triatoma infestans may be useful for developing rational vector control strategies. A 661-bp fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI) was sequenced and analyzed in bugs from Argentina, Uruguay, Peru, and Bolivia, including peridomestic, domestic, Andean, and Chaco sylvatic bugs. A total of 48 polymorphic sites among 37 haplotypes were described. Nucleotide variation fluctuated among samples, with the highest nucleotide diversity observed in seven Argentinean provinces. Within this group, some populations showed patterns of variability compatible with population expansions and/or fine-scale population structure, whereas others suggested population bottlenecks and/or population admixture processes. A maximum parsimony analysis of the haplotypes showed the presence of a Bolivian/Peruvian and an Argentinean/Uruguayan clade. Bolivian sequences were further divided in Chaco sylvatic and Andean domestic and sylvatic. Two different nested clades were found within the Argentinean/Uruguayan cluster. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and KST* analysis supported a strong population structure in Argentina, where genetic differentiation was correlated with geographic distance. Departures from neutrality expectations and a nested cladistic analysis suggest a recent population expansion of T. infestans in Argentina, followed by restricted gene flow and patterns of isolation by distance. This expansion could have taken place as a two-wave process, as was shown by the phylogenetic analysis and signatures of population admixture in the southernmost Argentinean populations. PMID:19645282

  9. Filling dynamics of the Brindley's glands in the blood-sucking bug Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Palottini, Florencia; González, Andrés; Manrique, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    The filling dynamics of exocrine defensive glands is an important component of the defensive capacity of an insect in its natural environment. We studied the filling state and reloading rate of the Brindley's glands in the haematophagous Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). Quantitative analyses of isobutyric acid, the main secretion component, were carried out with glands dissected from adults under different scenarios of development, number of discharging events and feeding conditions. The alarm-pheromone function of the gland secretion was also assessed in bioassays with conspecific nymphs. Although pharate adults have their glands completely developed, these were not full until imaginal ecdysis. If kept undisturbed, the adults maintained a constant gland load, and discharged about 75% of the gland contents upon one disturbance event. While the glands can be discharged several times, full replenishing was not complete after one week, unless the insect had access to food. The escape behavior of nymphs in bioassays correlated with the chemical analyses, with nymphs showing significant avoidance only toward gland discharges from undisturbed or disturbed/fed adults. The results are discussed in reference to the feeding frequency and gregarious behavior of T. infestans under natural conditions, which suggest a relevant role of the filling dynamics of the Brindley's glands in the intraspecific communication of the insect.

  10. Spectral sensitivity of the photonegative reaction of the blood-sucking bug Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Reisenman, Carolina E; Lazzari, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    We studied the spectral sensitivity of the visual system of the blood-sucking bug Triatoma infestans, one of the main vectors of Chagas Disease in South America. We quantified the photonegative reaction of this insect in a rectangular arena, half of which was kept dark and the other half illuminated with various intensities of different monochromatic lights (or broadband stimuli for lambda>665 nm). As a behavioral parameter of the photonegative response, we measured the time each insect spent in the dark half of the arena. We found that low intensity levels (under 0.06 microW/cm(2)) of monochromatic lights of 397, 458, 499, and 555 nm evoked a statistically significant (i.e., different from that of control groups) photonegative reaction. Insects were less sensitive to monochromatic lights of 357 nm (UV) and 621 nm (dark orange), and to broadband stimuli in the red part of the spectrum (665-695 nm). These findings indicate that the visual system of T. infestans is sensitive to broader regions of the spectrum than those previously reported.

  11. Potential of oil-based formulations of Beauveria bassiana to control Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Luz, C; Batagin, I

    2005-08-01

    The in vitro development of Beauveria bassiana conidia was monitored when immersed in six concentrations of seven non-ionic (MP 6400, MP 600, Renex 60, Renex 95, Span 80, Tween 20 and Tween 80) and three anionic (DOS 75, Hostapaval BVQ 9 and Surfax 220) surfactants and 11 vegetable oils (linseed, soybean, groundnut, rapeseed, thistle, sunflower, olive, sesame, corn, castor, and babassu). The influence of the oils on the settling behavior of Triatoma infestans nymphs and the activity of an oil-water formulation of the fungus against this vector under laboratory and simulated field conditions were also determined. With exception of DOS 75 and Surfax 220 germination of conidia on complete medium was >98% at 24 h after exposure to surfactants up to 10%. Elevated rates of germination (>25%) were observed in 10% corn, thistle and linseed oil 8 days after incubation. Pure oils had a significant repellent effect to T. infestans. Repellency decreased generally at 10% of the oil and some oils showed some attractiveness for nymphs when tested at 1%. Nymphs were highly susceptible to oil-water formulated conidia, even at unfavorable moisture for extra-tegumental development of the fungus on the insect cuticle.

  12. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W; Wellappili, Dulani P; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast.

  13. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains. PMID:26930612

  14. Detection, Diversity, and Population Dynamics of Waterborne Phytophthora ramorum Populations.

    PubMed

    Eyre, C A; Garbelotto, M

    2015-01-01

    Sudden oak death, the tree disease caused by Phytophthora ramorum, has significant environmental and economic impacts on natural forests on the U.S. west coast, plantations in the United Kingdom, and in the worldwide nursery trade. Stream baiting is vital for monitoring and early detection of the pathogen in high-risk areas and is performed routinely; however, little is known about the nature of water-borne P. ramorum populations. Two drainages in an infested California forest were monitored intensively using stream-baiting for 2 years between 2009 and 2011. Pathogen presence was determined both by isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from symptomatic bait leaves. Isolates were analyzed using simple sequence repeats to study population dynamics and genetic structure through time. Isolation was successful primarily only during spring conditions, while PCR extended the period of pathogen detection to most of the year. Water populations were extremely diverse, and changed between seasons and years. A few abundant genotypes dominated the water during conditions considered optimal for aerial populations, and matched those dominant in aerial populations. Temporal patterns of genotypic diversification and evenness were identical among aerial, soil, and water populations, indicating that all three substrates are part of the same epidemiological cycle, strongly influenced by rainfall and sporulation on leaves. However, there was structuring between substrates, likely arising due to reduced selection pressure in the water. Additionally, water populations showed wholesale mixing of genotypes without the evident spatial autocorrelation present in leaf and soil populations.

  15. Production of gametangia by Phytophthora ramorum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Clive; Kirk, Susan

    2004-07-01

    Until now gametangia have not been obtained between paired European A1 and American A2 isolates of Phytopthora ramorum in vitro. Their production in artificial culture relies on interspecific pairings. Using P. drechsleri and P. cambivora testers, 51 of 110 P. ramorum isolates from across Europe were all shown to be A1s; while 32 of 38 American isolates from across California and southwest Oregon were shown to be A2s. However, these interspecific pairings are complex, unusually slow and unpredictable. A range of culture media and conditions are described that were tested, unsuccessfully, with a view to enhancing the efficiency of the interspecific pairings. In further tests, gametangia were obtained between A1 and A2 isolates of P. ramorum when juvenile, pre-chlamydospore producing mycelia were mixed together on carrot agar. The gametangia formed in 3-10 d, sparsely to frequently, initially only within the boundaries of the mixed inocula but subsequently in the extended mycelial growth. Chlamydospores were also produced. This inoculum-mixing method, though again sometimes unpredictable, should enhance efficiency of testing for compatibility types and facilitate further studies on whether the sexual outcrossing system of P. ramorum is functional. Differences between sexual reproduction of P. ramorum and that of other heterothallic Phytophthora species are discussed.

  16. Contrasting microsatellite diversity in the evolutionary lineages of Phytophthora lateralis.

    PubMed

    Vettraino, AnnaMaria; Brasier, Clive M; Webber, Joan F; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Tomassini, Alessia; Bruni, Natalia; Vannini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Following recent discovery of Phytophthora lateralis on native Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, four phenotypically distinct lineages were discriminated: the Taiwan J (TWJ) and Taiwan K (TWK) in Taiwan, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in North America and Europe and the UK in west Scotland. Across the four lineages, we analysed 88 isolates from multiple sites for microsatellite diversity. Twenty-one multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were resolved with high levels of diversity of the TWK and PNW lineages. No alleles were shared between the PNW and the Taiwanese lineages. TWK was heterozygous at three loci, whereas TWJ isolates were homozygous apart from one isolate, which exhibited a unique allele also present in the TWK lineage. PNW lineage was heterozygous at three loci. The evidence suggests its origin may be a yet unknown Asian source. North American and European PNW isolates shared all their alleles and also a dominant MLG, consistent with a previous proposal that this lineage is a recent introduction into Europe from North America. The UK lineage was monomorphic and homozygous at all loci. It shared its alleles with the PNW and the TWJ and TWK lineages, hence a possible origin in a recent hybridisation event between a Taiwan lineage and PNW cannot be ruled out.

  17. Four phenotypically and phylogenetically distinct lineages in Phytophthora lateralis.

    PubMed

    Brasier, Clive M; Franceschini, Selma; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Webber, Joan F; Vannini, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Until recently Phytophthora lateralis was known only as the cause of dieback and mortality of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana in its native range in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Since the 1990s however disease outbreaks have occurred increasingly on ornamental C. lawsoniana in Europe; and in 2007 the pathogen was discovered in soil around old growth Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, where it may be endemic. When the phenotypes of over 150 isolates of P. lateralis from Taiwan, across the PNW (British Columbia to California) and from France, the Netherlands and the UK were compared three growth rate groups were resolved: one slow growing from Taiwan, one fast growing from the PNW and Europe, and one of intermediate growth from a small area of the UK. Within these growth groups distinct subtypes were identified based on colony patterns and spore metrics and further discriminated in a multivariate analysis. The assumption that the three main growth groups represented phylogenetic units was tested by comparative sequencing of two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes. This assumption was confirmed. In addition two phenotype clusters within the Taiwan growth group were also shown to be phylogenetically distinct. These four phenotypically and genotypically unique populations are informally designated as the PNW lineage, the UK lineage, the Taiwan J lineage, and the Taiwan K lineage. Their characteristics and distribution are described and their evolution, taxonomic, and plant health significance is discussed.

  18. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W.; Wellappili, Dulani P.; Tyler, Brett M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast. PMID:28210240

  19. Hidden Sylvatic Foci of the Main Vector of Chagas Disease Triatoma infestans: Threats to the Vector Elimination Campaign?

    PubMed Central

    Schachter-Broide, Judith; Dujardin, Jean-Pierre; Dotson, Ellen M.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Establishing the sources of reinfestation after residual insecticide spraying is crucial for vector elimination programs. Triatoma infestans, traditionally considered to be limited to domestic or peridomestic (abbreviated as D/PD) habitats throughout most of its range, is the target of an elimination program that has achieved limited success in the Gran Chaco region in South America. Methodology/Principal Findings During a two-year period we conducted semi-annual searches for triatomine bugs in every D/PD site and surrounding sylvatic habitats after full-coverage spraying of pyrethroid insecticides of all houses in a well-defined rural area in northwestern Argentina. We found six low-density sylvatic foci with 24 T. infestans in fallen or standing trees located 110–2,300 m from the nearest house or infested D/PD site detected after insecticide spraying, when house infestations were rare. Analysis of two mitochondrial gene fragments of 20 sylvatic specimens confirmed their species identity as T. infestans and showed that their composite haplotypes were the same as or closely related to D/PD haplotypes. Population studies with 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci and wing geometric morphometry consistently indicated the occurrence of unrestricted gene flow between local D/PD and sylvatic populations. Mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite sibship analyses in the most abundant sylvatic colony revealed descendents from five different females. Spatial analysis showed a significant association between two sylvatic foci and the nearest D/PD bug population found before insecticide spraying. Conclusions Our study shows that, despite of its high degree of domesticity, T. infestans has sylvatic colonies with normal chromatic characters (not melanic morphs) highly connected to D/PD conspecifics in the Argentinean Chaco. Sylvatic habitats may provide a transient or permanent refuge after control interventions, and function as sources for D/PD reinfestation. The

  20. A country bug in the city: urban infestation by the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interruption of vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi remains an unrealized objective in many Latin American countries. The task of vector control is complicated by the emergence of vector insects in urban areas. Methods Utilizing data from a large-scale vector control program in Arequipa, Peru, we explored the spatial patterns of infestation by Triatoma infestans in an urban and peri-urban landscape. Multilevel logistic regression was utilized to assess the associations between household infestation and household- and locality-level socio-environmental measures. Results Of 37,229 households inspected for infestation, 6,982 (18.8%; 95% CI: 18.4 – 19.2%) were infested by T. infestans. Eighty clusters of infestation were identified, ranging in area from 0.1 to 68.7 hectares and containing as few as one and as many as 1,139 infested households. Spatial dependence between infested households was significant at distances up to 2,000 meters. Household T. infestans infestation was associated with household- and locality-level factors, including housing density, elevation, land surface temperature, and locality type. Conclusions High levels of T. infestans infestation, characterized by spatial heterogeneity, were found across extensive urban and peri-urban areas prior to vector control. Several environmental and social factors, which may directly or indirectly influence the biology and behavior of T. infestans, were associated with infestation. Spatial clustering of infestation in the urban context may both challenge and inform surveillance and control of vector reemergence after insecticide intervention. PMID:24171704

  1. Kdr mutations in Triatoma infestans from the Gran Chaco are distributed in two differentiated foci: Implications for pyrethroid resistance management.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Ivana; Capriotti, Natalia; Fronza, Georgina; Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Ons, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    Point mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel, the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides, have been associated with the resistance in Triatoma infestans, an important vector of Chagas' disease. Hence, the sustainability of vector control programs requires the implementation of resistance management strategies. We determined the sensitivity of the molecular assays previously designed for early resistance detection to be used in pooled samples from a wide area of the endemic region, and validated them for their routine use in control campaigns for the monitoring of insecticide resistance in T. infestans. Consequently, we used these methods to examine the distribution of resistance-associated mutations in the sodium channel gene in populations of T. infestans from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco. The PASA and REA assays tested proved sensitive enough to detect kdr SNPs in pooled samples, indicating these assays are suitable for routine screening in insecticide resistance surveillance. Two geographically differentiated foci were detected in T. infestans populations from the Argentinean and Bolivian Gran Chaco, with populations on the Bolivian-Argentinean border carrying L1014F mutation, and those from the Argentinean Chaco carrying L925I mutation. In all highly resistant populations analyzed, one of both kdr mutations was present, and toxicological assays determined that all pyrethroid resistant populations analyzed herein were sensitive to fenitrothion. The principal cause of pyrethroid resistance in T. infestans from the Gran Chaco ecoregion is kdr mutations in the sodium channel. Different levels of resistance occur in different populations carrying identical mutation, suggesting the existence of contributory mechanisms.

  2. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Robertson, Alison E.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance. PMID:28081566

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Life Sciences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-12

    Genotype Dynamics in Populations of Phytopathogenic Fungus Phytophthora Infestans (Mont.) De Bary (I.N. Rybakova, L.M. Suprun, et al.; DOKLADY AKADEMII... PHYTOPHTHORA INFESTANS (MONT.) DE BARY Moscow DOKLADY AKADEMII NAUK SSSR in Russian Vol 294, No 3, May 87 (manuscript received 9 Dec 86) pp 696-698...in aggressiveness and virulence of Phytophthora infestans on Dotato plants in Moscow Oblast to assess geno- type dynamics. Phenotypic changes in

  4. The effect of salinity on the growth, sporulation and infection of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, a threat to Eastern U.S. forests, has been found in waterways outside the boundaries of infested ornamental nurseries. Very little is known about what factors are conducive to its survival and sporulation in water. This study examined the effect of salt on growth, sporulation,...

  5. Lineage, Temperature, and Host Species Have Interacting Effects on Lesion Development in Phytophthora Ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are four recognized clonal lineages of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. The two major lineages present in North America are NA1 and NA2. With a few exceptions, NA1 is found in natural forest ecosystems and nurseries, and NA2 is generally restricted to nurseries. Isolates from the NA1 and NA2...

  6. Evaluation of fungicide rotations for management of Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. For the past 6 years, the field has been infested with Phytophthora capsici. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with four replications. Five-week-old seedli...

  7. Population structure and genetic diversity of Phytophthora nicotianae from tobacco in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black shank caused by Phytophthora nicotianae occurs worldwide and is responsible for significant yield loss in tobacco production in Georgia. Management of the disease has primarily relied on utilization of tobacco cultivars with resistance to race 0 of the pathogen and application of the fungicide...

  8. A combined mitochondrial and nuclear multilocus phylogeny of the genus Phytophthora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most recent phylogenetic analysis of the genus Phytophthora was completed in 2008 (Blair et al. 2008) and utilized 8.1 kb of sequence data from seven nuclear loci. Given the large number of species that have recently been described, this study was undertaken to broaden the available information...

  9. Using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) to identify Loci in Colocasiae esculenta linked to Phytophthora colocasiae resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most significant threats to taro production is taro leaf blight (TLB) caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora colocasiae. Therefore, one of the primary selection criteria for the University of Hawaii taro breeding program is TLB resistance. Some cultivars from Palau, Micronesia and o...

  10. Enhanced recovery of Phytophthora ramorum from soil following 30 days storage at 4C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlamydospores of Phytophthora ramorum produced by mixing 20 percent V8 juice broth cultures with sand and incubating over a 30 day period were used to infest field soil at densities ranging from 0.2 to 42 chlamydospores per cubic centimeter of soil. Chlamydospore recovery was determined by baiting...

  11. Survival of Phytophthora ramorum hyphae following exposure to temperature extremes and various humidities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the impact of short-term exposure to high and low temperatures and a range of relative humidities on survival of Phytophthora ramorum hyphae. Spore-free hyphal colonies were grown on dialysis squares atop V8 medium. Relative humidity ranged from 41 – 93% at 20 C and 43 – 86% at 28 C. ...

  12. Isolation of nine Phytophthora capsici pectin methylesterase genes which are differentially expressed in various plant species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici causes damage on many plant species, and secretes various pectin methylesterases during all stages of infection. We identified nine Pme genes (Pcpme 1-9) from a genomic library of highly virulent P. capsici strain SD33 and further analyzed the expression pattern of nine genes on...

  13. Draft genome sequences of seven isolates of Phytophthora ramorum EU2 from Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Mata Saez, Lourdes de la; McCracken, Alistair R.; Cooke, Louise R.; O'Neill, Paul; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present draft-quality genome sequence assemblies for the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum genetic lineage EU2. We sequenced genomes of seven isolates collected in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. Multiple genome sequences from P. ramorum EU2 will be valuable for identifying genetic variation within the clonal lineage that can be useful for tracking its spread. PMID:26697370

  14. Draft genome sequences of seven isolates of Phytophthora ramorum EU2 from Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Mata Saez, Lourdes de la; McCracken, Alistair R; Cooke, Louise R; O'Neill, Paul; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2015-12-01

    Here we present draft-quality genome sequence assemblies for the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum genetic lineage EU2. We sequenced genomes of seven isolates collected in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. Multiple genome sequences from P. ramorum EU2 will be valuable for identifying genetic variation within the clonal lineage that can be useful for tracking its spread.

  15. Efficient Genome Editing in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Cui, Linkai; Gu, Biao; Arredondo, Felipe; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-06

    Phytophthora is a filamentous fungus-like microorganism, but belongs to the oomycetes, in the kingdom Stramenopila. Phytophthora species are notorious as plant destroyers, causing multibillion-dollar damage to agriculture and natural ecosystems worldwide annually. For a long time, genome editing has been unattainable in oomycetes, because of their extremely low rate of homologous recombination. The recent implementation of the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system in the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae, an experimental model for oomycetes, has opened up a powerful new research capability for the oomycete community. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in P. sojae, including single guide RNA (sgRNA) design and construction, efficient gene replacement, and mutant-screening strategies. This protocol should be generally applicable for most culturable oomycetes. We also describe an optimized transformation method that is useful for other Phytophthora spp. including P. capsici and P. parasitica. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots of Eastern United States oak species to Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about root susceptibility of eastern U.S. tree species to Phytophthora ramorum. In this study, we examined root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots. Sprouted acorns of Q. rubra, Q. palustrus, Q. coccinia, Q. alba, Q. michauxii and Q. prinus were exposed to motile zoos...

  17. Functional analysis of Pcipg2 from the straminopilous plant Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici is an oomycete plant pathogen that causes severe diseases in a wide variety of crops. Polygalacturonases (PGs) play a major role in the degradation pectin in plant cell walls. A genomic library was made from a highly virulent strain of P. capsici with high PGs activity. Seven pg...

  18. Evolution of an experimental population of Phytophthora capsici in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici are often highly diverse, with limited gene flow between fields. To investigate the structure of a newly established, experimental population, an uninfested research field was inoculated with two single zoospore isolates of P. capsici in Sep...

  19. Response of U.S. bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) Plant Introductions to Phytophthora capsici

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora capsici causes severe damage to cucurbit crops grown in open fields in southeast U.S. Most cucurbit species are susceptible to damping-off, root and crown rot, and/or fruit rot caused by P. capsici. Bottle gourd plants (Lagenaria siceraria), which are resistant to Fusarium wilt, are b...

  20. Selection of genetically diverse trichoderma spp. isolates for suppression of phytophthora capsici on bell pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally compatible control measures are needed for suppression of Phytophthora capsici on pepper. Twenty-four isolates of Trichoderma were screened for suppression of this pathogen on bell pepper in greenhouse pot assays. Of these twenty-four isolates, GL12, GL13, and Th23 provided signifi...

  1. Suppression of Phytophthora capsici on bell pepper with isolates of Trichoderma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biologically based disease management strategies, including biological control, are being developed for Phytophthora capsici on bell pepper. Biological control agents that are effective in controlling this disease under a number of soil environmental conditions when applied alone or with cover crop...

  2. Interactions of Phytophthora capsici with Resistant and Susceptible Pepper Roots and Stems.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Amara R; Smart, Christine D

    2015-10-01

    Using host resistance is an important strategy for managing pepper root and crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. An isolate of P. capsici constitutively expressing a gene for green fluorescent protein was used to investigate pathogen interactions with roots, crowns, and stems of Phytophthora-susceptible bell pepper 'Red Knight', Phytophthora-resistant bell pepper 'Paladin', and Phytophthora-resistant landrace Criollos de Morelos 334 (CM-334). In this study, the same number of zoospores attached to and germinated on roots of all cultivars 30 and 120 min postinoculation (pi), respectively. At 3 days pi, significantly more secondary roots had necrotic lesions on Red Knight than on Paladin and CM-334 plants. By 4 days pi, necrotic lesions had formed on the taproot of Red Knight but not Paladin or CM-334 plants. Although hyphae were visible in the crowns and stems of all Red Knight plants observed at 4 days pi, hyphae were observed in crowns of only a few Paladin and in no CM-334 plants, and never in stems of either resistant cultivar at 4 days pi. These results improve our understanding of how P. capsici infects plants and may contribute to the use of resistant pepper cultivars for disease management and the development of new cultivars.

  3. Biological Control of Phytophthora palmivora Causing Root Rot of Pomelo Using Chaetomium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wattanachai, Pongnak; Kasem, Soytong; Poaim, Supatta

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora diseases have become a major impediment in the citrus production in Thailand. In this study, an isolate of Phytophthora denominated as PHY02 was proven to be causal pathogen of root rot of Pomelo (Citrus maxima) in Thailand. The isolate PHY02 was morphologically characterized and identified as Phytophthora palmivora based on molecular analysis of an internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequence. This work also presents in vitro evaluations of the capacities of Chaetomium spp. to control the P. palmivora PHY02. As antagonists, Chaetomium globosum CG05, Chaetomium cupreum CC3003, Chaetomium lucknowense CL01 inhibited 50~61% mycelial growth, degraded mycelia and reduced 92~99% sporangial production of P. palmivora PHY02 in bi-culture test after 30 days. Fungal metabolites from Chaetomium spp. were tested against PHY02. Results showed that, methanol extract of C. globosum CG05 expressed strongest inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and sporangium formation of P. palmivora PHY02 with effective dose ED50 values of 26.5 µg/mL and 2.3 µg/mL, respectively. It is interesting that C. lucknowense is reported for the first time as an effective antagonist against a species of Phytophthora. PMID:25892917

  4. Differentiating Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae from other species isolated from foliage of rhododendrons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora species are among plant pathogens that are the most threatening to agriculture. After the discovery of P. ramorum, surveys have identified new species and new reports on Rhododendrons. Based upon propagule production and characteristics and colony growth, a dichotomous key was produce...

  5. Anaerobic soil disinfestation reduces survival and infectivity of Phytophthora nicotianae chlamydospores in pepper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora nicotianae is the principal causal agent of root and crown rot disease of pepper plants in Extremadura (western Spain), a spring-summer crop in this region. Preplant soil treatment by anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) may effectively control plant pathogens in many crop production sys...

  6. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  7. Ethanol attracts scolytid beetles to Phytophthora ramorum cankers on coast live oak

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical abstract: Ethanol in sapwood was analyzed along vertical transects, through small spot cankers and larger basal cankers, of Phytophthora ramorum-infected stems of Quercus agrifolia at three sites in California. Trees with large basal cankers, known to attract scolytid beetles, had a 4.3 ti...

  8. Diverse evolutionary trajectories for small RNA biogenesis genes in the oomycete genus Phytophthora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, ...

  9. Identification and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large number of SSR loci were screened in the genomic assemblies of 14 different isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae and primers were developed for amplification of 17 markers distributed among different contigs. These loci were highly polymorphic and amplified from genetically distant isolates of...

  10. Management of Phytophthora cinnamomi root rot disease of blueberry with gypsum and compost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root rot disease of blueberry caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi is becoming more prevalent as a consequence of widespread adoption of drip irrigation. This creates higher moisture content in the root zone more conducive for the pathogen. Options for disease control under organic management are limi...

  11. A Multiplexed, Probe-Based Quantitative PCR Assay for DNA of Phytophthora sojae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora sojae (Kaufm. & Gerd.) causes seed rot, pre- and post-emergence damping off, and sometimes foliar blight in soybean (Glycine max). Crop loss may approach 100% with susceptible cultivars. We report here the development of a unique quantitative PCR assay specific to DNA of P. sojae, and a...

  12. Genetic mapping and characterization of two novel Phytophthora resistance genes from soybean landrace PI567139B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot (PRR) disease, caused by P. sojae, is a widespread soybean disease resulting in an annual yield loss of $1~2 billion worldwide. To control the disease, breeders primarily employ race-specific resistant genes which are named Rps genes which have been identified to be lo...

  13. Identification of quantitative trait loci conditioning partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean PI 407861A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving resistance for Phytophthora root and stem rot is an important goal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] breeding. Partial resistance can be as effective in managing this disease as single-gene (Rps) mediated resistance and is more durable. The objective of this study was to identify QTL con...

  14. Multi-Year Evaluation of Commercial Soybean Cultivars for Resistance to Phytophthora sojae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora sojae causes damping off, root rot, and stem rot of soybean, particularly in poorly drained soils. The use of resistance has been one of the primary management tools used to control this disease, with the most commonly used genes being Rps1c and Rps1k, followed by Rps1a. The Varietal In...

  15. Effect of phytophthora capsici crown rot on watermelon rootstocks and grafts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crown and fruit rot caused by Phytophthora capsici is becoming an important and emerging disease of watermelon in the southeastern United States. In recent years, the practice of grafting seedless watermelons onto rootstocks belonging to other Cucurbitaceae genera is also gaining acceptance in our l...

  16. Evaluation of Actigard and fungicides for management of Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon, 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC, in summer of 2013. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand and the field has been infested with Phytophthora capsici for the previous 2 years. Five-week-old seedlings of the seedless watermelon cultivar Vanessa growi...

  17. Evaluation of Actigard and fungicides for management of Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon, 2011.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. The field has been infested with Phytophthora capsici for the previous 2 years. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with 4 replications. Four-week old seedlings...

  18. Effect of actigard and other new fungicides on phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit rot, caused by Phytophthora capsici is an emerging disease in most watermelon producing regions of Southeast U.S. Between 2003 and 2008, we observed many watermelon farms in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, where growers did not harvest the crop due to severe fruit rot. The Natio...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED PCR-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF PHYTOPHTHORA CACTORUM IN STRAWBERRY PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific and rapid plant pathogen detection methods can aid in strawberry disease management decisions. PCR-based diagnostics for Phytophthora cactorum and other strawberry pathogens are hindered by PCR inhibitors and lack of species-specific PCR primers. We developed a DNA extraction and purificati...

  20. Clonal Expansion of the Belgian Phytophthora ramorum Populations Based on New Microsatellite Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coexistence of both mating types A1 and A2 within the EU1 lineage of Phytophthora ramorum has only been observed in Belgium, begging the question whether sexual reproduction is occurring. A collection of 411 Belgian P. ramorum isolates was established during a seven year survey. Our main objective w...

  1. Roles of small RNAs in soybean defense against Phytophthora sojae infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, James; Gao, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Jixian; Arikit, Siwaret; Yu, Yu; Duan, Shuyi; Chan, Vicky; Xiong, Qin; Yan, Jun; Li, Shengben; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Yuanchao; Tang, Guiliang; Meyers, Blake C; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-09-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many notorious pathogens of crops and forestry trees. At present, battling Phytophthora diseases is challenging due to a lack of understanding of their pathogenesis. We investigated the role of small RNAs in regulating soybean defense in response to infection by Phytophthora sojae, the second most destructive pathogen of soybean. Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are universal regulators that repress target gene expression in eukaryotes. We identified known and novel small RNAs that differentially accumulated during P. sojae infection in soybean roots. Among them, miR393 and miR166 were induced by heat-inactivated P. sojae hyphae, indicating that they may be involved in soybean basal defense. Indeed, knocking down the level of mature miR393 led to enhanced susceptibility of soybean to P. sojae; furthermore, the expression of isoflavonoid biosynthetic genes was drastically reduced in miR393 knockdown roots. These data suggest that miR393 promotes soybean defense against P. sojae. In addition to miRNAs, P. sojae infection also resulted in increased accumulation of phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) that are predominantly generated from canonical resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat proteins and genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat-containing proteins. This work identifies specific miRNAs and phasiRNAs that regulate defense-associated genes in soybean during Phytophthora infection.

  2. Bioassay conditions for infection of Pinus radiata seedlings with Phytophthora pinifolia zoospores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora pinifolia is known to cause a devastating disease on Monterey pines in Chile. Although this pathogen is not yet present in the U.S., there is reason for concern. The main source of Monterey pine genetic material is found in California and there is potential for other important tree sp...

  3. Characterisation and detection of Pythium and Phytophthora species associated with grapevines in South Africa.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replant and decline diseases of grapevines not only cause quantitative and qualitative yield losses, but also results in extra costs when vineyards have to be replanted. This study investigated the role of Pythium and Phytophthora in the decline syndrome in South Africa by determining the (i) speci...

  4. Phytophthora effector targets a novel component of small RNA pathway in plants to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yongli; Shi, Jinxia; Zhai, Yi; Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    A broad range of parasites rely on the functions of effector proteins to subvert host immune response and facilitate disease development. The notorious Phytophthora pathogens evolved effectors with RNA silencing suppression activity to promote infection in plant hosts. Here we report that the Phytophthora Suppressor of RNA Silencing 1 (PSR1) can bind to an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein containing the aspartate–glutamate–alanine–histidine-box RNA helicase domain in plants. This protein, designated PSR1-Interacting Protein 1 (PINP1), regulates the accumulation of both microRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis. A null mutation of PINP1 causes embryonic lethality, and silencing of PINP1 leads to developmental defects and hypersusceptibility to Phytophthora infection. These phenotypes are reminiscent of transgenic plants expressing PSR1, supporting PINP1 as a direct virulence target of PSR1. We further demonstrate that the localization of the Dicer-like 1 protein complex is impaired in the nucleus of PINP1-silenced or PSR1-expressing cells, indicating that PINP1 may facilitate small RNA processing by affecting the assembly of dicing complexes. A similar function of PINP1 homologous genes in development and immunity was also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana. These findings highlight PINP1 as a previously unidentified component of RNA silencing that regulates distinct classes of small RNAs in plants. Importantly, Phytophthora has evolved effectors to target PINP1 in order to promote infection. PMID:25902521

  5. Standardizing the Nomenclature for Clonal Lineages of the Sudden Oak Death Pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages based on a range of molecular marker systems. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of lineages. Here we name clonal lineages of P. ramor...

  6. Evaluation of watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew and Phytophthora fruit rot, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted at the U.S. Vegetable Laboratory farm in Charleston, SC. The soil was Yonges loamy fine sand. This study was undertaken to determine the performance of seeded and seedless commercial watermelon varieties for tolerance to powdery mildew (PM) and Phytophthora fruit rot as...

  7. Post-Control Surveillance of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma sordida with Chemically-Baited Sticky Traps

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Nidia; López, Elsa; González, Nilsa; Zerba, Eduardo; Tarelli, Guillermo; Masuh, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease prevention critically depends on keeping houses free of triatomine vectors. Insecticide spraying is very effective, but re-infestation of treated dwellings is commonplace. Early detection-elimination of re-infestation foci is key to long-term control; however, all available vector-detection methods have low sensitivity. Chemically-baited traps are widely used in vector and pest control-surveillance systems; here, we test this approach for Triatoma spp. detection under field conditions in the Gran Chaco. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a repeated-sampling approach and logistic models that explicitly take detection failures into account, we simultaneously estimate vector occurrence and detection probabilities. We then model detection probabilities (conditioned on vector occurrence) as a function of trapping system to measure the effect of chemical baits. We find a positive effect of baits after three (odds ratio [OR] 5.10; 95% confidence interval [CI95] 2.59–10.04) and six months (OR 2.20, CI95 1.04–4.65). Detection probabilities are estimated at p≈0.40–0.50 for baited and at just p≈0.15 for control traps. Bait effect is very strong on T. infestans (three-month assessment: OR 12.30, CI95 4.44–34.10; p≈0.64), whereas T. sordida is captured with similar frequency in baited and unbaited traps. Conclusions/Significance Chemically-baited traps hold promise for T. infestans surveillance; the sensitivity of the system at detecting small re-infestation foci rises from 12.5% to 63.6% when traps are baited with semiochemicals. Accounting for imperfect detection, infestation is estimated at 26% (CI95 16–40) after three and 20% (CI95 11–34) after six months. In the same assessments, traps detected infestation in 14% and 8.5% of dwellings, whereas timed manual searches (the standard approach) did so in just 1.4% of dwellings only in the first survey. Since infestation rates are the main indicator used for decision-making in control

  8. Antimicrobial activity of extractable conifer heartwood compounds toward Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Manter, Daniel K; Kelsey, Rick G; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2007-11-01

    Ethyl acetate extracts from heartwood of seven western conifer trees and individual volatile compounds in the extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity against Phytophthora ramorum. Extracts from incense and western redcedar exhibited the strongest activity, followed by yellow-cedar, western juniper, and Port-Orford-cedar with moderate activity, and no activity for Douglas-fir and redwood extracts. Chemical composition of the extracts varied both qualitatively and quantitatively among the species with a total of 37 compounds identified by mass spectrometry. Of the 13 individual heartwood compounds bioassayed, three showed strong activity with a Log(10) EC(50) less than or equal to 1.0 ppm (hinokitiol, thymoquinone, and nootkatin), three expressed moderate activity ranging from 1.0-2.0 ppm (nootkatol, carvacrol, and valencene-11,12-diol), four compounds had weak activity at 2.0-3.0 ppm [alpha-terpineol, valencene-13-ol, (+)-beta-cedrene, (-)-thujopsene], and three had no activity [(+)-cedrol, delta-cadinene, and methyl carvacrol]. All of the most active compounds contained a free hydroxyl group, except thymoquinone. The importance of a free hydroxyl was demonstrated by the tremendous difference in activity between carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) 1.81 +/- 0.08 ppm) and methyl carvacrol (Log(10) EC(50) >3.0 ppm). A field trial in California, showed that heartwood chips from redcedar placed on the forest floor for 4 months under Umbellularia californica (California bay laurel) with symptoms of P. ramorum leaf blight significantly limited the accumulation of P. ramorum DNA in the litter layer, compared with heartwood chips from redwood.

  9. Genetic mapping of resistance factors to Phytophthora palmivora in cocoa.

    PubMed

    Flament, M H; Kebe, I; Clément, D; Pieretti, I; Risterucci, A M; N'Goran, J A; Cilas, C; Despréaux, D; Lanaud, C

    2001-02-01

    Phytophthora palmivora causes pod rot, a serious disease on cocoa widespread throughout the producing regions. In order to ascertain the genetic determination of cocoa resistance to P. palmivora, a study was carried out on two progenies derived from crosses between a heterozygous, moderately resistant Forastero clone, T60/887, and two closely related and highly susceptible Forastero clones, one completely homozygous, IFC2, and one partially heterozygous, IFC5. The cumulative size of both progenies was 112 individuals. Plants were subjected to natural and artificial inoculation of P. palmivora in C te d'Ivoire. The genetic maps of T60/887 and of IFC5 were constructed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and microsatellites. The map of T60/887 comprised 198 markers assembled in 11 linkage groups and representing a total length of 793 cM. The map of IFC5 comprised 55 AFLP markers that were assembled into six linkage groups for a total length of 244 cM. Ratio of rotten over total number of fruit under natural infection was measured for each tree over two harvests. Artificial inoculations were performed on leaves and pods. These tests were weakly correlated with the pod rot rate in the field. Five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of resistance were detected for T60/887 but none were common between the three traits measured. Stability and reliability of the experimental procedures are discussed and revealed the difficult use of these artificial tests on adult trees for a good prediction of field resistance.

  10. Antagonistic interaction between Trichoderma asperellum and Phytophthora capsici in vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Heng; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Jing-ze; Ojaghian, Mohammad Reza; Hyde, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a phytopathogen that causes a destructive pepper blight that is extremely difficult to control. Using a fungicide application against the disease is costly and relatively ineffective and there is also a huge environmental concern about the use of such chemicals. The genus Trichoderma has been known to have a potential biocontrol issue. In this paper we investigate the mechanism for causing the infection of T. asperellum against P. capsici. Trichoderma sp. (isolate CGMCC 6422) was developed to have a strong antagonistic action against hyphae of P. capsici through screening tests. The strain was identified as T. asperellum through using a combination of morphological characteristics and molecular data. T. asperellum was able to collapse the mycelium of the colonies of the pathogen through dual culture tests by breaking down the pathogenic hyphae into fragments. The scanning electron microscope showed that the hyphae of T. asperellum surrounded and penetrated the pathogens hyphae, resulting in hyphal collapse. The results show that seven days after inoculation, the hyphae of the pathogen were completely degraded in a dual culture. T. asperellum was also able to enter the P. capsici oospores through using oogonia and then developed hyphae and produced conidia, leading to the disintegration of the oogonia and oospores. Seven days after inoculation, an average 10.8% of the oospores were infected, but at this stage, the structures of oospores were still intact. Subsequently, the number of infected oospores increased and the oospores started to collapse. Forty-two days after inoculation, almost all the oospores were infected, with 9.3% of the structures of the oospores being intact and 90.7% of the oospores having collapsed.

  11. Development of Rapid Isothermal Amplification Assays for Detection of Phytophthora spp. in Plant Tissue.

    PubMed

    Miles, Timothy D; Martin, Frank N; Coffey, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Several isothermal amplification techniques recently have been developed that are tolerant of inhibitors present in many plant extracts, which can reduce the need for obtaining purified DNA for running diagnostic assays. One such commercially available technique that has similarities with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for designing primers and a labeled probe is recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). This technology was used to develop two simple and rapid approaches for detection of Phytophthora spp.: one genus-specific assay multiplexed with a plant internal control and the other species-specific assays for Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae. All assays were tested for sensitivity (ranging from 3 ng to 1 fg of DNA) and specificity using DNA extracted from more than 136 Phytophthora taxa, 21 Pythium spp., 1 Phytopythium sp., and a wide range of plant species. The lower limit of linear detection using purified DNA was 200 to 300 fg of DNA in all pathogen RPA assays. Six different extraction buffers were tested for use during plant tissue maceration and the assays were validated in the field by collecting 222 symptomatic plant samples from over 50 different hosts. Only 56 samples were culture positive for Phytophthora spp. whereas 91 were positive using the Phytophthora genus-specific RPA test and a TaqMan real-time PCR assay. A technique for the generation of sequencing templates from positive RPA amplifications to confirm species identification was also developed. These RPA assays have added benefits over traditional technologies because they are rapid (results can be obtained in as little as 15 min), do not require DNA extraction or extensive training to complete, use less expensive portable equipment than PCR-based assays, and are significantly more specific than current immunologically based methods. This should provide a rapid, field-deployable capability for pathogen detection that will facilitate point-of-sample collection processing

  12. Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Mudge, Joanne [NCGR

    2016-07-12

    Joanne Mudge on "Phytophthora capsici - Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH): A Widespread Mechanism for Rapid Mutation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  14. Attractant volatiles released by female and male Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), a vector of chagas disease: chemical analysis and behavioral bioassay.

    PubMed

    Fontan, Andrea; Audino, Paola Gonzalez; Martinez, Adriana; Alzogaray, Raul A; Zerb, Eduardo N; Camps, Francisco; Cork, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Volatiles emitted by male and female T infestans before and during copula were collected on Porapak-Q filters, desorbed with dichloromethane, and analyzed by gas chromotography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after confirmation of attractiveness in an arena bioassay. Chemical analysis confirmed the presence of (R,S) -2- and 3-methylbutan-1-ol in a 2:1 ratio; short chain acids (ethanoic to nonanoic acid); long chains acids decanoic to (Z)-9-octadecenoic acid; aliphatic aldehydes (hexanal to nonanal), benzaldehyde and dipropylsulphide from insects in copula. Electroantennographic studies conducted with a homologous series of aliphatic aldehydes on female and male T infestans showed that, for a given dose, EAG responses elicited from both sexes increased with increased chain length up to nonanal, after which EAG-activity declined. Attractiveness of non-acidic trace components identified in the volatiles were tested on male and female T. infestans, in an arena bioassay using a video tracking method. Aliphatic C6 to C10 aldehydes were tested: hexanal (1-100 microg) and heptanal (10 microg) were attractive to female T. infestans, high doses of octanal and nonanal (1-100 microg) were Unattractive to male and female T. infestans but low doses of nonanal (0.01-0.1 microg) were attractive to male T infestans. Benzaldehyde was highly attractive to female T. infestans at low doses (0.05- 0.1 microg). 3-methylbutan-1-ol was attractive to male T infestans at high dose (1,000 microg). (S) or (S,R) 2-methyl-butan-1-ol were attractive to males or females (1-1,000 microg). Blends of hexanal and benzaldehyde (20:1 and 40:1) showed an additive effect on attraction compared with hexanal alone, when tested on female T. infestans. The study has demonstrated the presence of a number of electrophysiologically and behaviorally active compounds in volatiles emitted by T. infestans in copula that may have a role in the postulated copulation pheromone.

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of a very high density lipoprotein (VHDL) in ovarian follicles of Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    González, M S; Ronderos, J R; Rimoldi, O J; Brenner, R R

    2001-04-01

    The ability of Triatoma infestans ovarian follicles to synthesize a very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) has been examined by immunohistochemical methods. This kind of lipoprotein can be envisaged as a storage hexameric protein present in the hemolymph of some insect species. VHDL immunoreactivity is observed in oocytes at different stages of maturation. The antigen is present in the oocyte cytoplasm as well as in the follicular epithelial cells. The immunopositive reaction in the apical surface of follicle cells suggests both a VHDL synthesis and a secretion process. Furthermore, VHDL seems to be stored into oocyte in yolk granules. On the contrary, no immunopositive reaction is observed in the intracellular spaces between follicle cells, suggesting that VHDL is not incorporated from hemolymph into the oocyte.

  16. Spatial stratification of house infestation by Triatoma infestans in La Rioja, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gorla, David E; Porcasi, Ximena; Hrellac, Hugo; Catalá, Silvia S

    2009-03-01

    Vectorial transmission of Chagas disease has been decreasing over the past few decades because of effective vector control programs in the southern cone of South America. However, the disease is still actively transmitted within the Gran Chaco region. In this area, vector populations are abundant and highly prevalent in poor rural houses. This study analyses the spatial pattern of rural house infestation by Triatoma infestans in a 56,000 km(2) area in the province of La Rioja, Argentina, before the re-initiation of systematic activity on vector control intervention. Data on 5,045 rural houses show that infestation has high spatial heterogeneity, with highly infested localities concentrated in a few areas. House infestation has a negative significant relationship with locality size. Rural houses in the region are highly dispersed and this feature has been and will remain a challenge for any vigilance system to be installed in the region.

  17. Circadian entrainment by light and host in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra; Amelotti, Ivana; Gorla, David Eladio; Catalá, Silvia Susana; Ralph, Martin Roland

    2014-03-01

    Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae: Triatominae, "kissing bug") is the main insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a chronic trypanosomiasis infecting 10 million people world-wide. This hematophagous bug feeds on diurnal and nocturnal species during each host's quiescent time. As the hosts are also its major predators, kissing bugs are subjected to dual selective pressures from a single source. Therefore, synchronization of feeding with the host's behavior is critical to the insects' survival. We show that nonphotic signals linked to the host eclipse the role of light and dark as the primary circadian zeitgeber for these bugs, although light still strongly inhibits locomotor behavior directly. In nature, this combination provides the insect with great flexibility in organizing physiology and behavior: anticipating a quiescent host or avoiding its potential predation while remaining directly responsive to immediate environmental conditions. Manipulation of nonphotic entrainment could be a useful chronobiotic tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  18. Fine-scale genetic structure of Triatoma infestans in the Argentine Chaco.

    PubMed

    Piccinali, Romina Valeria; Gürtler, Ricardo Esteban

    2015-08-01

    The patterns of genetic structure in natural populations provide essential information for the improvement of pest management strategies including those targeting arthropod vectors of human diseases. We analyzed the patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in Triatoma infestans in a well-defined rural area close to Pampa del Indio, in the Argentine Arid-Humid Chaco transition, where a longitudinal study on house infestation and wing geometric morphometry is being conducted since 2007. A total of 228 insects collected in 16 domestic and peridomestic sites from two rural communities was genotyped for 10 microsatellite loci and analyzed. We did not find departures from Hardy-Weinberg expectations in collection sites, with three exceptions probably due to null alleles and substructuring. Domestic sites were more variable than peridomestic sites suggesting the presence of older bug populations in domestic sites or higher effective population sizes. Significant genetic structure was detected using F-statistics, a discriminant analysis of principal components and Bayesian clustering algorithms in an area of only 6.32 km(2). Microsatellite markers detected population structuring at a finer geographic scale (180-6300 m) than a previous study based on wing geometric morphometry (>4000 m). The spatial distribution of genetic variability was more properly explained by a hierarchical island than by an isolation-by-distance model. This study illustrates that, despite more than a decade without vector control interventions enhancing differentiation, genetic structure can be detected in T. infestans populations, particularly applying spatial information. This supports the potential of genetic studies to provide key information for hypothesis testing of the origins of house reinfestation.

  19. The Botanical Monoterpenes Linalool and Eugenol Flush-Out Nymphs of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Moretti, A N; Seccacini, E A; Zerba, E N; Canale, D; Alzogaray, R A

    2017-03-29

    Monoterpenes are the main components of essential oils. Some members of this chemical family present insecticidal activity. Triatoma infestans (Klug) is the main vector of Chagas disease in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Perú. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of six monoterpenes (1,8-cineole, eugenol, linalool, menthol, α-terpineol, and thymol) on the locomotor and flushing out activity of T. infestans. A video tracking technique was used to evaluate the locomotor activity of nymphs exposed to different concentrations of these chemicals applied as films on filter paper. Papers treated with acetone alone were used as negative controls, while solutions of tetramethrin were applied as positive controls. Only linalool and menthol produced hyperactivation. Flushing out was assessed under laboratory conditions using a standardized aerosolization method. All monoterpenes were applied at 1.5 g/m3. 1,8-Cineole, α-terpineol, and thymol flushed out 10% or less nymphs. The average flushing out produced by eugenol was 36.7%. Values of median flushing out time (FT50) could only be calculated for linalool and menthol (16.67 and 42.98 min, respectively). The FT50 value for the positive control tetramethrin (applied at 0.006 g/m3) was 8.29 min. Following these results, the flushing out activity of a mixture of linalool and eugenol was evaluated. The FT50 of this 2:1 linalool:eugenol mixture was 40.73 min. Finally, flushing out assays performed in semifield conditions showed similar results to those obtained at the laboratory.

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity and Risk Maps of Community Infestation by Triatoma infestans in Rural Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Spillmann, Cynthia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Kitron, Uriel

    2012-01-01

    Background Fifty years of residual insecticide spraying to control Triatoma infestans in the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia shows that vertically coordinated interventions aiming at full coverage have limited effects and are unsustainable. We quantified the spatial distribution of T. infestans domestic infestation at the district level, identified environmental factors associated with high infestation and then explored the usefulness of risk maps for the spatial stratification of interventions. Methods and Findings We performed spatial analyses of house infestation data collected by the National Chagas Service in Moreno Department, northern Argentina (1999–2002). Clusters of high domestic infestation occurred in the southwestern extreme of the district. A multi-model selection approach showed that domestic infestation clustered in areas of low elevation, with few farmlands, high density of rural houses, high mean maximum land surface temperature, large NDVI, and high percentage of degraded and deforested lands. The best model classified 98.4% of the communities in the training dataset (sensitivity, 93.3%; specificity, 95.4%). The risk map evidenced that the high-risk area only encompassed 16% of the district. By building a network-based transportation model we assessed the operational costs of spatially contiguous and spatially targeted interventions. Targeting clusters of high infestation would have reached ∼80% of all communities slated for full-coverage insecticide spraying, reducing in half the total time and economic cost incurred by a spatially contiguous strategy. Conclusions and Significance In disperse rural areas where control programs can accomplish limited coverage, consideration of infestation hot spots can contribute to the design and execution of cost-effective interventions against Chagas disease vectors. If field validated, targeted vertical control in high risk areas and horizontal control in medium to low risk