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Sample records for phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent

  1. N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent cytochrome c release and apoptosis through ROS generation in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Choi, Yun Jung; Han, Youngsoo; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Hong, Sung Hee

    2009-08-15

    N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine (DMPS) blocks the conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by the enzyme sphingosine kinase (SK). In this study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanisms of DMPS action on a human leukemia cell line using functional pharmacologic and genetic approaches. First, we demonstrated that DMPS-induced apoptosis is evidenced by nuclear morphological change, distinct internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and an increased sub-G1 cell population. DMPS treatment led to the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompanied by the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and led to cytochrome c release, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family. Ectopic expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL conferred resistance of HL-60 cells to DMPS-induced cell death, suggesting that DMPS-induced apoptosis occurs predominantly through the activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We also observed that DMPS activated the caspase-8-Bid-Bax pathway and that the inhibition of caspase-8 by z-IETD-fmk or small interfering RNA suppressed the cleavage of Bid, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptotic cell death. In addition, cells subjected to DMPS exhibited significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and ROS scavengers, such as quercetin and Tiron, but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), inhibited DMPS-induced activations of caspase-8, -3 and subsequent apoptotic cell death, indicating the role of ROS in caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that caspase-8 acts upstream of caspase-3, and that the caspase-8-mediated mitochondrial pathway is important in DMPS-induced apoptosis. Our results also suggest that ROS are critical regulators of caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in DMPS-treated leukemia cells.

  2. N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent cytochrome c release and apoptosis through ROS generation in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Choi, Yun Jung; Han, Youngsoo; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Hong, Sung Hee

    2009-08-15

    N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine (DMPS) blocks the conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by the enzyme sphingosine kinase (SK). In this study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanisms of DMPS action on a human leukemia cell line using functional pharmacologic and genetic approaches. First, we demonstrated that DMPS-induced apoptosis is evidenced by nuclear morphological change, distinct internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and an increased sub-G1 cell population. DMPS treatment led to the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompanied by the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and led to cytochrome c release, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family. Ectopic expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL conferred resistance of HL-60 cells to DMPS-induced cell death, suggesting that DMPS-induced apoptosis occurs predominantly through the activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We also observed that DMPS activated the caspase-8-Bid-Bax pathway and that the inhibition of caspase-8 by z-IETD-fmk or small interfering RNA suppressed the cleavage of Bid, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptotic cell death. In addition, cells subjected to DMPS exhibited significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and ROS scavengers, such as quercetin and Tiron, but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), inhibited DMPS-induced activations of caspase-8, -3 and subsequent apoptotic cell death, indicating the role of ROS in caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that caspase-8 acts upstream of caspase-3, and that the caspase-8-mediated mitochondrial pathway is important in DMPS-induced apoptosis. Our results also suggest that ROS are critical regulators of caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in DMPS-treated leukemia cells.

  3. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells partly through a caspase-8-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Masuo; Suzuki, Ikue; Sato, Masao; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Simizu, Siro; Harada, Motoki; Fujii, Makiko; Osada, Hiroyuki; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2004-10-01

    Defects in apoptosis signaling pathways contribute to tumorigenesis and drug resistance, and these defects are often a cause of failure of chemotherapy. Thus, a major goal in chemotherapy is to find cytotoxic agents that restore the ability of tumor cells to undergo apoptosis. We previously found that an Ent-kaurene diterpene, Ent-11alpha-hydroxy-16-kauren-15-one (KD), induced apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. Here, we found that caspase-8, an apoptotic factor, is involved in KD-induced apoptosis. Although treatment of HL-60 cells with KD resulted in the activation of caspase-8 and -9, a caspase-8-specific inhibitor but not a caspase-9-specific inhibitor attenuated KD-induced apoptosis. Expression of a catalytically inactive caspase-8 partly attenuated KD-induced apoptosis. Treatment with KD led to a time-dependent cleavage of Bid, a substrate of caspase-8, as well as to the proteolytic processing of procaspase-8, indicating that KD treatment induces apoptosis through a caspase-8-dependent pathway. Moreover, overexpression of the drug resistance factor Bcl-2, which is frequently overexpressed in many tumors, failed to confer resistance to KD-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, KD may be a promising experimental cytotoxic agent that possibly points to new strategies to overcome a drug resistance.

  4. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis in microencapsulated juvenile rabbit chondrocytes by caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Zhiguo; Cao Xiaojuan; Peng Shuangqing Wang Changyong; Li Qianqian; Wang Yimei; Liu Mifeng

    2008-01-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic effect in immature animals leading to restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. However, the exact mechanism still remains unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated that ofloxacin, a typical QN, induces apoptosis of alginate microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes by disturbing the {beta}{sub 1} integrin functions and inactivating the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we extend our initial observations to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of ofloxacin-induced apoptosis by utilizing specific caspase inhibitors. Pretreatment with both caspase-9-specific inhibitor zLEHD-fmk and caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk attenuated ofloxacin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 of chondrocyte in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescent dye staining, enzyme activity assay and immunoblotting. Furthermore, the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3 stimulated by ofloxacin was significantly inhibited in the presence of zIETD-fmk while pretreatment with zLEHD-fmk only blocked the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Ofloxacin also stimulated a concentration-dependent translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol and a decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which was completely inhibited by zIETD-fmk. In addition, ofloxacin was found to increase the level of Bax, tBid, p53 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, The current results indicate that the caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway is primarily involved in the ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes.

  5. Id3 induces an Elk-1-caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway in squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Shin; Aubee, Joseph; DiVito, Kyle A; Zhou, Hengbo; Zhang, Weiyi; Chou, Fen-Pi; Simbulan-Rosenthal, Cynthia M; Rosenthal, Dean S

    2015-06-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA-binding (Id) proteins are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors. The Id protein family (Id1-Id4) mediates tissue homeostasis by regulating cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Ids typically function as dominant negative HLH proteins, which bind other HLH proteins and sequester them away from DNA promoter regions. Previously, we have found that Id3 induced apoptosis in immortalized human keratinocytes upon UVB exposure, consistent with its role as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the role of Id3 in malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells (A431), a tetracycline-regulated inducible system was used to induce Id3 in cell culture and mouse xenograft models. We found that upon Id3 induction, there was a decrease in cell number under low serum conditions, as well as in soft agar. Microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, siRNA, and inhibitor studies revealed that Id3 induced expression of Elk-1, an E-twenty-six (ETS)-domain transcription factor, inducing procaspase-8 expression and activation. Id3 deletion mutants revealed that 80 C-terminal amino acids, including the HLH, are important for Id3-induced apoptosis. In a mouse xenograft model, Id3 induction decreased tumor size by 30%. Using immunofluorescent analysis, we determined that the tumor size decrease was also mediated through apoptosis. Furthermore, we show that Id3 synergizes with 5-FU and cisplatin therapies for nonmelanoma skin cancer cells. Our studies have shown a molecular mechanism by which Id3 induces apoptosis in SCC, and this information can potentially be used to develop new treatments for SCC patients.

  6. Stable extracellular RNA fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce early apoptosis in human monocytes via a caspase-8 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F; Brennan, Patrick J; Ortiz, Blanca L; Belisle, John T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis.

  7. Stable Extracellular RNA Fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induce Early Apoptosis in Human Monocytes via a Caspase-8 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A.; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Belisle, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis. PMID:22253841

  8. Irciniastatin A induces JNK activation that is involved in caspase-8-dependent apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Takumi; Nagumo, Yoko; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Imaizumi, Takamichi; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Kataoka, Takao; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Usui, Takeo

    2010-12-15

    Irciniastatin A (ISA)/psymberin, a pederin-type natural product isolated from marine sponge, exhibits extremely potent and selective cytotoxicity against certain human cancer cell lines, but its molecular target and cytotoxic mechanisms are still unknown. Here we show that ISA is a potent inhibitor of protein translation, and induces apoptosis accompanied with activation of the stress-activated protein kinases via the mitochondrial pathway in human leukemia Jurkat cells. ISA potently inhibited protein translation, and induced a slow but prolonged activation of the stress-activated protein kinases, JNK and p38, at between 1h and 6h after treatment. In Bcl-x(L)-transfected cells, the activation of JNK and p38 by ISA was shortened. The same results were obtained in the cells treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, suggesting that the prolonged activation of JNK and p38 by ISA is mediated by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondria. ISA strongly induced apoptosis, which was partially suppressed by the JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the p38 inhibitor SB202190. Apoptosis induction by ISA was partially reduced, but not suppressed by SP600125 in caspase-8-deficient Jurkat cells. These results suggest that ISA activates stress-activated kinases by a mitochondria-mediated mechanism, and that activation of JNK is required for caspase-8-dependent apoptosis.

  9. The CB1/VR1 agonist arvanil induces apoptosis through an FADD/caspase-8-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Rocío; de la Vega, Laureano; Appendino, Giovanni; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Macho, Antonio; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Arvanil (N-arachidonoylvanillamine), a nonpungent capsaicin–anandamide hybrid molecule, has been shown to exert biological activities through VR1/CB1-dependent and -independent pathways. We have found that arvanil induces dose-dependent apoptosis in the lymphoid Jurkat T-cell line, but not in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation through cell cycle and TUNEL analyses. Arvanil-induced apoptosis was initiated independently of any specific phase of the cell cycle, and it was inhibited by specific caspase-8 and -3 inhibitors and by the activation of protein kinase C. In addition, kinetic analysis by Western blots and fluorimetry showed that arvanil rapidly activates caspase-8, -7 and -3, and induces PARP cleavage. The arvanil-mediated apoptotic response was greatly inhibited in the Jurkat-FADDDN cell line, which constitutively expresses a negative dominant form of the adapter molecule Fas-associated death domain (FADD). This cell line does not undergo apoptosis in response to Fas (CD95) stimulation. Using a cytofluorimetric approach, we have found that arvanil induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both Jurkat-FADD+ and Jurkat-FADDDN cell lines. However, ROS accumulation only plays a residual role in arvanil-induced apoptosis. These results demonstrate that arvanil-induced apoptosis is essentially mediated through a mechanism that is typical of type II cells, and implicates the death-inducing signalling complex and the activation of caspase-8. This arvanil-apoptotic activity is TRPV1 and CB-independent, and can be of importance for the development of potential anti-inflammatory and antitumoral drugs. PMID:14530215

  10. Phytosphingosine induced mitochondria-involved apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Yukitoshi; Shinomiya, Takahisa; Kuroda, Sachiko; Kaneko, Naoki; Nishio, Reiji; Ikekita, Masahiko

    2005-02-01

    Sphingolipids are putative intracellular signal mediators in cell differentiation, growth inhibition, and apoptosis. Sphingosine, sphinganine, and phytosphingosine are structural analogs of sphingolipids and are classified as long-chain sphingoid bases. Sphingosine and sphinganine are known to play important roles in apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis mechanism, focusing on mitochondria in human T-cell lymphoma Jurkat cells. Phytosphingosine significantly induced chromatin DNA fragmentation, which is a hallmark of apoptosis. Enzymatic activity measurements of caspases revealed that caspase-3 and caspase-9 are activated in phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis, but there is little activation of caspase-8 suggesting that phytosphingosine influences mitochondrial functions. In agreement with this hypothesis, a decrease in DeltaPsi(m) and the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol were observed upon phytosphingosine treatment. Furthermore, overexpression of mitochondria-localized anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 prevented phytosphingosine apoptotic stimuli. Western blot assays revealed that phytosphingosine decreases phosphorylated Akt and p70S6k. Dephosphorylation of Akt was partially inhibited by protein phosphatase inhibitor OA and OA attenuated phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, using a cell-free system, phytosphingosine directly reduced DeltaPsi(m). These results indicate that phytosphingosine perturbs mitochondria both directly and indirectly to induce apoptosis.

  11. Andrographolide enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis via caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway involving p53 participation in hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wu, Dingfang; Luo, Kewang; Wu, Shihua; Wu, Ping

    2009-04-18

    Despite recent significant advances in the treatment of human carcinoma (HCC), the results of chemotherapy to date remain unsatisfactory. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) still represents the cornerstone of treatment of carcinoma, and resistance to the actions of 5-FU is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy. More effective treatment strategies may involve combinations of agents with activity against HCC. Andrographolide (ANDRO), a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to suppress the growth of HCC cells and trigger apoptosis in vitro. To assess the suitability of ANDRO as a chemotherapeutic agent in HCC, its cytotoxic effects have been evaluated both as a single agent and in combination with 5-FU. ANDRO potentiates the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU in HCC cell line SMMC-7721 through apoptosis. ANDRO alone induces SMMC-7721 apoptosis with p53 expression, Bax conformation and caspase-3,8,9 activation. Surprisingly, the addition of ANDRO to 5-FU induces synergistic apoptosis, which could be corroborated to the increased caspase-8, p53 activity and the significant changes of Bax conformation in these cells, resulting in increased losses of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Suppression of caspase-8 with the specific inhibitor z-IETD-fmk abrogates largely ANDRO/5-FU biological activity by preventing mitochondrial membrane potential disappearance, caspase-3,9 activation and subsequent apoptosis. The results suggest that ANDRO may be effective in combination with 5-FU for the treatment of HCC cells SMMC-7721.

  12. Suppression of extracellular signal-related kinase and activation of p38 MAPK are two critical events leading to caspase-8- and mitochondria-mediated cell death in phytosphingosine-treated human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Choi, Jung-A; Kim, Min-Jeong; Um, Hong-Duck; Bae, Sangwoo; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Su-Jae

    2003-12-12

    We previously demonstrated that the phytosphingosine-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the concomitant induction of both the caspase-8-mediated and mitochondrial activation-mediated apoptosis pathways. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the activation of these two distinct cell death pathways induced by phytosphingosine in human cancer cells. Phytosphingosine caused strong induction of caspase-8 activity and caspase-independent Bax translocation to the mitochondria. A rapid decrease of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and a marked increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation were observed within 10 min after phytosphingosine treatment. Activation of ERK1/2 by pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or forced expression of ERK1/2 attenuated phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8 activation. However, Bax translocation and caspase-9 activation was unaffected, indicating that down-regulation of the ERK activity is specifically required for the phytosphingosine-induced caspase-8-dependent cell death pathway. On the other hand, treatment with SB203580, a p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor, or expression of a dominant negative form of p38 MAPK suppressed phytosphingosine-induced translocation of the proapoptotic protein, Bax, from the cytosol to mitochondria, cytochrome c release, and subsequent caspase-9 activation but did not affect caspase-8 activation, indicating that activation of p38 MAPK is involved in the mitochondrial activation-mediated cell death pathway. Our results suggest that phytosphingosine can utilize two different MAPK signaling pathways for amplifying the apoptosis cascade, enhancing the understanding of the molecular mechanisms utilized by naturally occurring metabolites to regulate cell death. Molecular dissection of the signaling pathways that activate the apoptotic cell death machinery is critical for both our understanding of cell death events and development of cancer therapeutic agents.

  13. Improved high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance by an oral administration of phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Itsuo; Mitsutake, Susumu; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Junko; Suzuki, Akemi; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that phytoceramide and phytosphingosine (PHS) stimulated the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in cells. PPARγ is a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes. We found in this study that an oral administration of PHS improved diet-induced glucose intolerance in mice. Since PHS is highly expressed in yeast, PHS in fermented foods may improve diabetes.

  14. Potentiation of UVB-induced apoptosis by novel phytosphingosine derivative, tetraacetyl phytosphingosine in HaCaT cell and mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Kang, S-Y; Kim, S J; Kim, S H; Kim, T-Y

    2004-07-01

    Inappropriate apoptosis results in the epidermal hyperplasia as in psoriasis and UVB irradiation has been successfully used to treat this kind of skin disorders. Previously, we reported that the novel phytosphingosine derivative, tetraacetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS) induced apoptosis in HaCaT cells. This study examined the effect of UVB irradiation and/or TAPS on the induction of apoptosis in HaCaT. 10 mJ/cm2 of UVB irradiation or 10 microM of TAPS alone exhibited weak cytotoxicity but co-treatment of UVB and TAPS synergistically enhanced the cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HaCaT. The cells treated with UVB and TAPS showed much higher levels of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9 and Bax than with UVB or TAPS alone, whereas Bcl-2 level was decreased by co-administration of UVB and TAPS. In hairless mice, co-treatment of UVB and TAPS synergistically increased apoptosis, as shown in the HaCaT co-treated with UVB and TAPS. Furthermore, UVB irradiation caused an increase of apoptotic cells in the epidermis and the TAPS-treated mice showed an increase of apoptotic cells in the dermis as well as in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TAPS co-treatment synergistically increases the level of UVB-induced apoptosis via caspase activation by regulating the level of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2.

  15. The C-terminal domain of the long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) death domain and regulates caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Iyo; Matsuo, Kentaro; Matsushita, Yuka; Haruna, Yasushi; Niwa, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Takao

    2014-02-14

    Caspase 8 plays an essential role in the regulation of apoptotic and non-apoptotic signaling pathways. The long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) has been shown previously to regulate caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2). In this study, the molecular mechanism by which c-FLIPL regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation was further explored in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK 293 and variant cells barely expressing caspase 8. The caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone greatly diminished caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation induced by Fas ligand (FasL) when c-FLIPL, but not its N-terminal fragment c-FLIP(p43), was expressed. The prodomain of caspase 8 was found to interact with the RIP1 death domain and to be sufficient to mediate NF-κB activation induced by FasL or c-FLIP(p43). The interaction of the RIP1 death domain with caspase 8 was inhibited by c-FLIPL but not c-FLIP(p43). Thus, these results reveal that the C-terminal domain of c-FLIPL specifically inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the RIP1 death domain and, thereby, regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation.

  16. The C-terminal Domain of the Long Form of Cellular FLICE-inhibitory Protein (c-FLIPL) Inhibits the Interaction of the Caspase 8 Prodomain with the Receptor-interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) Death Domain and Regulates Caspase 8-dependent Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Iyo; Matsuo, Kentaro; Matsushita, Yuka; Haruna, Yasushi; Niwa, Masamitsu; Kataoka, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Caspase 8 plays an essential role in the regulation of apoptotic and non-apoptotic signaling pathways. The long form of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIPL) has been shown previously to regulate caspase 8-dependent nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2). In this study, the molecular mechanism by which c-FLIPL regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation was further explored in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK 293 and variant cells barely expressing caspase 8. The caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone greatly diminished caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation induced by Fas ligand (FasL) when c-FLIPL, but not its N-terminal fragment c-FLIP(p43), was expressed. The prodomain of caspase 8 was found to interact with the RIP1 death domain and to be sufficient to mediate NF-κB activation induced by FasL or c-FLIP(p43). The interaction of the RIP1 death domain with caspase 8 was inhibited by c-FLIPL but not c-FLIP(p43). Thus, these results reveal that the C-terminal domain of c-FLIPL specifically inhibits the interaction of the caspase 8 prodomain with the RIP1 death domain and, thereby, regulates caspase 8-dependent NF-κB activation. PMID:24398693

  17. Increased Resistance of Complex I Mutants to Phytosphingosine-induced Programmed Cell Death*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N. Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species. PMID:18474589

  18. Increased resistance of complex I mutants to phytosphingosine-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana; Lemos, Catarina; Falcão, Artur; Glass, N Louise; Videira, Arnaldo

    2008-07-11

    We have studied the effects of phytosphingosine (PHS) on cells of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Highly reduced viability, impairment of asexual spore germination, DNA condensation and fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species were observed in conidia treated with the drug, suggesting that PHS induces an apoptosis-like death in this fungus. Interestingly, we found that complex I mutants are more resistant to PHS treatment than the wild type strain. This effect appears to be specific because it was not observed in mutants defective in other components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, pointing to a particular involvement of complex I in cell death. The response of the mutant strains to PHS correlated with their response to hydrogen peroxide. The fact that complex I mutants generate fewer reactive oxygen species than the wild type strain when exposed to PHS likely explains the PHS-resistant phenotype. As compared with the wild type strain, we also found that a strain containing a deletion in the gene encoding an AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor)-like protein is more resistant to PHS and H2O2. In contrast, a strain containing a deletion in a gene encoding an AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death)-like polypeptide is more sensitive to both drugs. These results indicate that N. crassa has the potential to be a model organism to investigate the molecular basis of programmed cell death in eukaryotic species.

  19. Inositol Depletion Induced by Acute Treatment of the Bipolar Disorder Drug Valproate Increases Levels of Phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Shyamalagauri; Russo, Sarah; Cowart, L Ashley; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2017-03-24

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric illness affecting ∼1% of the world population. Valproate (VPA) and lithium, widely used for the treatment of BD, are not universally effective. These drugs have been shown to cause inositol depletion, but translating this observation to a specific therapeutic mechanism has been difficult, hampering the development of more effective therapies. We have shown previously in yeast that chronic VPA treatment induces the unfolded protein response due to increasing ceramide levels. To gain insight into the mechanisms activated during acute VPA treatment, we performed a genome-wide expression study in yeast treated with VPA for 30 min. We observed increased mRNA and protein levels of RSB1, which encodes an exporter of long chain bases dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and phytosphingosine (PHS), and further saw that VPA increased sensitivity of an rsb1Δ mutant to PHS, suggesting that VPA increases long chain base levels. Consistent with this, PHS levels were elevated in wild type and, to a greater extent, in rsb1Δ cells. Expression of ORM genes (negative regulators of PHS synthesis) and of fatty acid elongase genes FEN1 and SUR4 were decreased, and expression of YOR1 (exporter of PHS-1P) and DPL1 (lyase that degrades DHS-1P and PHS-1P) was increased. These effects were more pronounced in medium lacking inositol, and were mirrored by inositol starvation of an ino1Δ mutant. These findings provide a metabolic explanation as to how VPA-mediated inositol depletion causes increased synthesis of PHS and further support the therapeutic relevance of inositol depletion as a bipolar disorder treatment.

  20. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-12-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 MAPK-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure.

  1. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-01-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 691-695] PMID:26077028

  2. Phytosphingosine stimulates the differentiation of human keratinocytes and inhibits TPA-induced inflammatory epidermal hyperplasia in hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sujong; Hong, Il; Hwang, Jung Sun; Choi, Jin Kyu; Rho, Ho Sik; Kim, Duck Hee; Chang, Ihseop; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Mi-Ock; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2006-01-01

    The binding of sphingoid bases to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) has been detected in a solid-phase binding assay. However, sphingoid base-induced changes in PPAR transactivation activity have not been examined. In this report, we show by reporter gene analyses that phytosphingosine (PS), a natural sphingoid base, activates the transcriptional activity of PPARs in the immortalized human keratinocyte, HaCaT. Real-time PCR analyses showed that the mRNA level of PPARgamma was increased after PS treatment in HaCaT cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Because PPARs play important roles in skin barrier homeostasis by regulating epidermal cell growth, terminal differentiation, and inflammatory response, we examined the effect of PS on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mouse skin. PS increased the production of cornified envelope in NHEKs by approximately 1.8-fold compared with controls. Epidermal differentiation marker proteins such as involucrin, loricrin, and keratin1 were also increased in PS-treated NHEKs, by ELISA or Western blotting analysis. A [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that PS inhibited DNA synthesis in NHEKs to 20% compared with controls. The antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of PS were examined in a mouse model of irritant contact dermatitis produced by topical application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). PS blocked epidermal thickening and edema and the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the dermis in the skin of TPA-treated hairless mice. The anti-inflammatory effects of PS were confirmed by the observation that PS blocked the TPA-induced generation of prostaglandin E(2) in peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Taken together, our results provide an insight into the multiple regulatory roles of PS in epidermal homeostasis, and furthermore point to the potential use of PS as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of inflammatory and proliferative cutaneous diseases.

  3. Phytosphingosine Stimulates the Differentiation of Human Keratinocytes and Inhibits TPA-Induced Inflammatory Epidermal Hyperplasia in Hairless Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sujong; Hong, Il; Hwang, Jung Sun; Choi, Jin Kyu; Rho, Ho Sik; Kim, Duck Hee; Chang, Ihseop; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Mi-Ock; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2006-01-01

    The binding of sphingoid bases to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) has been detected in a solid-phase binding assay. However, sphingoid base–induced changes in PPAR transactivation activity have not been examined. In this report, we show by reporter gene analyses that phytosphingosine (PS), a natural sphingoid base, activates the transcriptional activity of PPARs in the immortalized human keratinocyte, HaCaT. Real-time PCR analyses showed that the mRNA level of PPARγ was increased after PS treatment in HaCaT cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Because PPARs play important roles in skin barrier homeostasis by regulating epidermal cell growth, terminal differentiation, and inflammatory response, we examined the effect of PS on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) and mouse skin. PS increased the production of cornified envelope in NHEKs by approximately 1.8-fold compared with controls. Epidermal differentiation marker proteins such as involucrin, loricrin, and keratin1 were also increased in PS-treated NHEKs, by ELISA or Western blotting analysis. A [3H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that PS inhibited DNA synthesis in NHEKs to 20% compared with controls. The antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of PS were examined in a mouse model of irritant contact dermatitis produced by topical application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). PS blocked epidermal thickening and edema and the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the dermis in the skin of TPA-treated hairless mice. The anti-inflammatory effects of PS were confirmed by the observation that PS blocked the TPA-induced generation of prostaglandin E2 in peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Taken together, our results provide an insight into the multiple regulatory roles of PS in epidermal homeostasis, and furthermore point to the potential use of PS as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of inflammatory and proliferative cutaneous diseases. PMID:16838068

  4. Synthesis of novel phytosphingosine derivatives and their preliminary biological evaluation for enhancing radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byung Seok; Park, Moon-Taek; Park, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Yang, Seung Dae; Chi, Dae Yoon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2007-12-01

    Eight d-ribo-phytosphingosine derivatives were synthesized from d-ribo-phytosphingosine and diverse acyl chlorides with N,N-diisopropylethylamine in tetrahydrofuran for 1h at room temperature. Effect of these compounds on IR-induced cell death was evaluated on blood cancer cells (Jurkat). Among these, 3d showed the highest enhancement of radiosensitizing effect.

  5. Phytosphingosine and C2-phytoceramide induce cell death and inhibit carbachol-stimulated phospholipase D activation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Min, D S; Park, C; Park, C S; Cho, N J

    2001-06-15

    Sphingolipid metabolites, such as sphingosine and ceramide, are known to play important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, but the physiological roles of phytosphingosine (PHS) and phytoceramide (PHC) are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the effects of PHS, C2-PHC (N-acetylPHS) and C6-PHC (N-hexanoylPHS) on cell growth and intracellular signalling enzymes. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with PHS, C2-PHC or C6-PHC resulted in cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. C2-PHC induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, whereas PHS or C6-PHC had little if any effect on DNA fragmentation under the same experimental conditions. Both PHS and C2-PHC inhibited carbachol-induced activation of phospholipase D (PLD), but not of phospholipase C (PLC), in CHO cells expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). On the other hand, no significant effect of C6-PHC on PLD or PLC was observed. Our results show that PHS and C2-PHC exert strong cytotoxic effects on CHO cells and modulate the mAChR-mediated signal transduction pathway.

  6. N,N-Dimethyl phytosphingosine sensitizes HL-60/MX2, a multidrug-resistant variant of HL-60 cells, to doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity through ROS-mediated release of cytochrome c and AIF.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Yong Heon; Joe, Young Ae; Hong, Sung Hee

    2010-08-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is widely used to treat a variety of tumors. However, resistance to this drug is common, making successful treatment more difficult. Previously, we introduced a novel phytosphingosine derivative, N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine (DMPS), as a potent anticancer therapeutic agent in human leukemia cells. This study was performed to investigate whether DMPS can sensitize HL-60/MX2, a multidrug-resistant variant of HL-60, to Dox-induced apoptosis. Low concentrations of DMPS sensitized HL-60/MX2 cells to Dox-induced apoptosis. Combined Dox + DMPS treatment-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 as well as PARP cleavage. Cytochrome c and AIF release were also observed in Dox + DMPS-treated HL60/MX2 cells. Pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk markedly prevented caspase-3 activation and moderately suppressed apoptosis, suggesting that Dox + DMPS-induced apoptosis is somewhat (not completely) dependent on caspase. Cytochrome c and AIF release were not affected by pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk. The ROS scavenger NAC efficiently suppressed not only ROS generation, but also caspase-3-mediated PARP cleavage, apoptosis, and release of cytochrome c and AIF, indicating a role of ROS in combined Dox + DMPS treatment-induced apoptotic death signaling. Taken together, these observations suggest that DMPS may be used as a therapeutic agent for overcoming drug-resistance in cancer cells by enhancing drug-induced apoptosis.

  7. Genetic, biochemical, and transcriptional responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the novel immunomodulator FTY720 largely mimic those of the natural sphingolipid phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Carole A; Roth, Lukas W A; Goetschy, Jean François; Movva, N Rao

    2004-08-27

    Sphingolipids are signaling molecules that influence diverse cellular functions from control of the cell cycle to degradation of plasma membrane proteins. The synthetic sphingolipid-like compound FTY720 is an immunomodulating agent in clinical trials for transplant graft maintenance. In this report, we compare the effects of the natural yeast sphingolipid phytosphingosine with FTY720 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the multicopy suppressor genes that induce growth resistance to FTY720 also confer resistance to growth-inhibitory concentrations of phytosphingosine. In addition, mutants for ubiquitination pathway proteins are shown to be resistant to the growth-inhibiting effect of both FTY720 and phytosphingosine. We observe fewer similarities between sphingosine and FTY720 than between FTY720 and phytosphingosine as revealed by genetic studies. Yeast cells lacking the specific sphingosine kinase LCB4 are sensitive to phytosphingosine and FTY720 but resistant to sphingosine, suggesting that FTY720 and phytosphingosine have a more related mechanism of action. Gene expression profile comparisons of sensitive and resistant yeast cells exposed to FTY720 and phytosphingosine highlight a number of similarities. In response to treatment with these compounds, approximately 77% of the genes that are regulated >2-fold by FTY720 also respond to phytosphingosine in the same direction in the parent strain. In addition, a close inspection of TAT1 and TAT2 transporters following exposure to phytosphingosine indicates that TAT1 protein is degraded in a similar fashion upon treatment with FTY720 and phytosphingosine. There were differences, however, with respect to the TAT2 protein level and the expression profiles of a subset of genes. The genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical data together indicate that FTY720 and phytosphingosine influence similar pathways in yeast cells. These findings offer further insights into the physiological pathways influenced by these

  8. Phytosphingosine derivatives ameliorate skin inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB and JAK/STAT signaling in keratinocytes and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Lee, Ji Min; Jung, Yong-Gyu; Kim, Sanghee; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2014-04-01

    Phytosphingosine is abundant in plants and fungi and is found in mammalian epidermis, including the stratum corneum. Phytosphingosine and its derivatives N-acetyl phytosphingosine and tetraacetyl phytosphingosine are part of the natural defense system of the body. However, these molecules exhibit strong toxicities at high concentrations. We synthesized phytosphingosine derivatives, mYG-II-6 ((Z)-4-oxo-4-(((2S,3S,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxyoctadecan-2-yl)amino)but-2-enoic acid) and fYG-II-6 ((E)-4-oxo-4-(((2S,3S,4R)-1,3,4-trihydroxyoctadecan-2-yl)amino)but-2-enoic acid), to increase efficacy and decrease toxicity, and the biological activities of the derivatives in the inflammatory response were examined. Both YG-II-6 compounds effectively suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammatory skin damage and inflammatory response in a mouse model. In addition, topical application of fYG-II-6 suppressed ear swelling and psoriasiform dermatitis in the ears of IL-23-injected mice. Anti-inflammatory and antipsoriatic activities of the phytosphingosine derivatives inhibited NF-κB, JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Finally, the YG-II-6 compounds induced programmed cell death in keratinocytes and mouse skin and were less toxic than phytosphingosine. Our study demonstrated that the phytosphingosine-derived YG-II-6 compounds have much stronger biological potencies than the lead compounds. The YG-II-6 compounds ameliorated inflammatory skin damage. Thus, YG-II-6 compounds are potential topical agents for treating chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis.

  9. A facile synthesis of phytosphingosine from diisopropylidene-D-mannofuranose.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Tzou, Der-Lii M; Patkar, Laxmikant Narhari; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2003-07-11

    In the present study, an efficient method with a high overall yield for preparing phytosphingosine and an analogue was developed. Starting with commercially available 2,3;5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-d-mannofuranose, a variety of lipid moieties were incorporated to obtain phytosphingosine and an analogue. Through an eight-step manipulation, phytosphingosine was obtained with an overall yield of 57%.

  10. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate represses the hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in human dermal fibroblasts through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Pyo; Cha, Hwa Jun; Lee, Kwang Sik; Lee, Kun Kook; Son, Ju Hyun; Kim, Kwang Nyeon; Lee, Dong Kyu; An, Sungkwan

    2012-10-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are differentiated mesenchymal cells that regulate the extracellular matrix through the production of dermis components. Dermal fibroblasts can be damaged by reactive oxygen species induced by ultraviolet rays and chemicals. In addition to its effects on the dermis, oxidative stress poses a major threat to organisms and is believed to play an essential role in many disease processes. In this study, we show that human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) express sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors S1P(1), S1P(2), and S1P(3). In addition, cell viability of HDFs is increased by phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P) via regulation of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/Akt pathway. Interestingly, regulation of the JNK/Akt pathway by PhS1P attenuated H(2)O(2)-induced cell growth arrest. Together, our data indicate that PhS1P attenuates H(2)O(2)-induced growth arrest through regulation of the signal molecules Akt and JNK, and suggest that PhS1P may have value as an anti-aging material in cosmetics and medicine.

  11. Anti-angiogenic effect of tetraacetyl-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoo Bin; Kim, Chang Deok; Kim, Bo Joong; Kim, Min-Young; Park, Chang Seo; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Seo, Young-Joon; Suhr, Ki-Beom; Park, Jang-Kyu; Lee, Jeung-Hoon

    2007-04-01

    In a search for the wound healing accelerators, we found that tetraacetyl-phytosphingosine (TAPS), a sphingolipid metabolite produced by phytosphingosine acetylation, has significant inhibitory potential on healing of rabbit ear wound. As angiogenesis is fundamental to proper wound healing, we examined the effect of TAPS on angiogenesis using human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured in vitro. TAPS markedly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced chemotactic migration and capillary-like tube formation. Recognizing its inhibitory potential on angiogenesis, we further investigated the action mechanism of TAPS. TAPS significantly inhibited VEGF-induced proteolytic enzyme production, including matrix metalloproteinase-2, urokinase-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. TAPS also suppressed VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p42/44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, TAPS abolished VEGF-induced intracellular calcium increase, measured using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Together, these results suggest that TAPS exerts its inhibitory action on angiogenesis through the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and intracellular calcium increase, thereby affecting the process of wound healing negatively.

  12. Anti-scratching behavioral effects of N-stearoyl-phytosphingosine and 4-hydroxysphinganine in mice.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kwon-Ryeol; Lee, Bomi; Lee, In-Ah; Oh, Sekwan; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2010-07-01

    N-Stearoyl-phytosphingosine (SPS) and 4-hydroxysphinganine (phytosphingosine, PS), which are sphingolipids frequently found in mammalian skin, plants, and yeast, have been used as ingredients in cosmetics. In mice, treatment with SPS and PS inhibited histamine-induced scratching behavior and vascular permeability. These agents inhibited the expression of the allergic cytokines, IL-4 and TNF-alpha, and the activation of the transcription factors, NF-kappaB and c-jun, in histamine-stimulated skin tissues. These agents also showed potent anti-histamine effects in the Magnus test using guinea pig ileum. Based on these results, SPS and PS may improve scratching behavioral reactions in skin by regulating the action of histamine and the activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and c-jun.

  13. Phytosphingosine kills Candida albicans by disrupting its cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Enno C I; Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van't Hof, Wim; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; Amerongen, Arie V Nieuw

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of action of phytosphingosine (PHS), a member of the sphingosine family which has candidacidal activity when added externally, was investigated. Previously, it has been reported that the fungicidal activity of PHS is based on the induction of caspase-independent apoptosis. In contrast, we found that addition of PHS causes a direct permeabilization of the plasma membrane of yeast, highlighted by the influx of the membrane probe propidium iodide, and the efflux of small molecules (i.e., adenine nucleotides) as well as large cellular constituents such as proteins. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that PHS treatment causes severe damage of the plasma membrane of the cell, which seems to have lost its integrity completely. We also found that PHS reverts the azide-induced insensitivity to histatin 5 (Hst5) of Candida albicans. In a previous study, we had found that the decreased sensitivity to Hst5 of energy-depleted cells is due to rigidification of the plasma membrane, which could be reverted by the membrane fluidizer benzyl alcohol. In line with the increased membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural damage, this reversal of the azide-induced insensitivity by PHS also points to a direct interaction between PHS and the cytoplasmic membrane of C. albicans.

  14. Asymmetric synthesis and cytotoxic activity of isomeric phytosphingosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rives, Arnaud; Baudoin-Dehoux, Cécile; Saffon, Nathalie; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Génisson, Yves

    2011-12-07

    New phytosphingosine analogues have been conceived, synthesised and their cytotoxicity in B16 murine melanoma cells tested. These compounds embed an isomeric substitution pattern resulting from a formal permutation of the C-2 and C-4 substituents along the aliphatic skeleton of the original sphingoid base. Five different stereoisomers have been accessed through regio- and stereocontrolled opening of the oxirane of long chain epoxyamine precursors. The corresponding N-hexyl and N-octanoyl derivatives have also been prepared. In cell viability experiments all the primary amines were found to be more active than the natural phytosphingosine with IC(50) in the low μM range for the most potent compounds.

  15. Phytosphingosine in combination with TRAIL sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL through synergistic up-regulation of DR4 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Young; Kim, Min-Jung; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae; Jang, Young-Ju

    2007-01-01

    Sensitization of cancer cells to TRAIL could improve the effectiveness of TRAIL as an anticancer agent. We explored whether TRAIL in combination with phytosphingosine could sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL. The combined treatment enhanced synergistic apoptotic cell death of Jurkat T cells, compared to TRAIL or phytosphingosine alone. Enhanced apoptosis in response to the combination treatment was associated with caspase-8 activation-mediated Bax and Bak activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. The combination treatment also resulted in synergistic up-regulation of TRAIL receptor R1 (DR4) and R2 (DR5). siRNA targeting of DR5 significantly attenuated the combination treatment-induced caspase-8 activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptotic cell death. Upon stimulation of cells with the combination treatment, NF-kappaB was activated. Moreover, siRNA targeting of NF-kappaB significantly attenuated the combination treatment-induced DR4 and DR5 expression and receptor-mediated caspase-8 activation. These results indicate that phytosphingosine sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL through the synergistic up-regulation of DR4 and DR5 in an NF-kappaB-dependent fashion resulting in caspase-8 activation and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings support the potential application of combination treatment with TRAIL and phytosphingosine in the treatment of cancers that are less sensitive to TRAIL.

  16. Influence of phytosphingosine-type ceramides on the structure of DMPC membrane.

    PubMed

    Zbytovská, J; Kiselev, M A; Funari, S S; Garamus, V M; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R

    2005-12-01

    The present paper describes the influence of the ceramides with phytosphingosine base, N-stearoylphytosphingosine (Cer[NP]) and alpha-hydroxy-N-stearoylphytosphingosine (Cer[AP]), on the structure and properties of multilamellar (MLVs) and unilamellar vesicles (ULVs) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The lamellar repeat distance, D, has been measured at various temperatures using small angle X-ray diffraction. The incorporation of ceramides into the DMPC membrane causes larger D compared to pure DMPC membrane. For both ceramide types, at 32 degrees C, there is a linear relationship between the D value and the ceramide concentration. However, there is no such dependence at 13 or 60 degrees C. Unlike Cer[AP], Cer[NP] induces a new phase with a repeat distance of 38.5A. The membrane thickness and the vesicle radius of ULVs in water and in sucrose solution were calculated from small angle neutron scattering curves. Phytosphingosine ceramides increase both the membrane thickness and the radius in comparison to pure DMPC ULVs. The stability of ULVs in time was studied by dynamic light scattering. Both ceramides induce an aggregation of the ULVs into micrometer sized non-multilamellar structures in pure water. Presence of sucrose in the environment averts the vesicle aggregation.

  17. Efficient and selective synthesis of D-arabino-, D-lyxo-, and D-xylo-phytosphingosine from D-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghee; Lee, Nakyong; Lee, Sukjin; Lee, Taeho; Lee, Yun Mi

    2008-02-15

    A new high-yield approach to the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of d-arabino-, D-lyxo-, and D-xylo-phytosphingosines from inexpensive D-ribo-phytosphingosine is described. The synthetic methodologies mainly rely on the selective configurational inversion of the stereocenter through a neighboring group participation mechanism.

  18. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate is a signaling molecule involved in miconazole resistance in sessile Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P A; Nelis, Hans J; Thevissen, Karin; Coenye, Tom

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells.

  19. Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Signaling Molecule Involved in Miconazole Resistance in Sessile Candida albicans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Nelis, Hans J.; Thevissen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells. PMID:22354293

  20. Synthesis of l-lyxo-phytosphingosine and its 1-phosphonate analogue using a threitol acetal synthon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuequan; Byun, Hoe-Sup; Bittman, Robert

    2004-08-06

    The first synthesis of an isosteric phosphonate analogue of the aminotriol lipid phytosphingosine (3), together with an improved synthesis of (2S,3S,4S)-phytosphingosine (2), are described. A key intermediate is 3-pentylidene acetal 9, which was prepared in two steps from dimethyl 2,3-O-benzylidene-d-tartrate (7).

  1. Minimum structure requirement of immunomodulatory glycolipids for predominant Th2 cytokine induction and the discovery of non-linear phytosphingosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Toba, Tetsuya; Murata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Kyoko; Takahashi, Bitoku; Takemoto, Naohiro; Akabane, Minako; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Imajo, Seiichi; Yamamura, Takashi; Miyake, Sachiko; Annoura, Hirokazu

    2007-05-15

    Analogs of immunomodulatory glycolipid OCH (2) were prepared and minimum structure requirement to exhibit equivalent profiles was disclosed. Analogs bearing non-linear hydrocarbon chain in the phytosphingosine moiety (18, 19) were shown for the first time to possess comparable cytokine inducing profile to 2. Molecular modeling of 2/hCD1d complex based on the crystal structure of alpha-GalCer (1)/hCD1d complex is also described.

  2. Differential regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by phytosphingosine derivatives, NAPS and TAPS, and its role in the NAPS or TAPS-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jung; Shin, Weonhye; Park, Chang Seo; Kim, Hyung-Ok; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2003-11-01

    We investigated the effect of novel phytosphingosine derivatives, N-acetyl phytosphingosine (NAPS) and tetra-acetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS), on induction of apoptosis in HaCaT cells in comparison with C2-ceramide. NAPS/TAPS effectively decreased cell viability in a dose dependent manner mainly due to apoptosis. An apoptosis expression array analysis showed that in the TAPS treated cells 13 genes including COX-2 encoding cyclooxygenase-2, the most induced by TAPS, were up-regulated while 23 others down-regulated. Therefore, we examined the mechanism underlying the altered expression of COX-2. Assays with inhibitors and antibodies against proteins involved in signal transduction demonstrated that NAPS and TAPS elevated COX-2 expression via tyrosine kinase, src, PI-3 kinase and PKC, followed by ERK activation. However, P38 was not involved in the NAPS-mediated COX-2 expression but in the TAPS-mediated. We further demonstrated by FACS analyses that NAPS- or TAPS-mediated apoptosis was greatly increased in cells treated with celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Inhibition of the ERK pathway apparently involved in the NAPS/TAPS-mediated COX-2 expression enhanced the NAPS/TAPS-mediated apoptosis, whereas inhibition of the P38 pathway did not. These results suggest that expression of COX-2 in the TAPS- or NAPS-treated cells may be increased to counteract the effect of those compounds on apoptosis.

  3. Aptamer-based trapping of phytosphingosine in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christin; Klockmann, Sven; Wessels, Hauke; Hünniger, Tim; Schrader, Jil; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Fischer, Markus

    2016-11-20

    Usually, small molecules like single metabolites used in clinical diagnostic can be quantified by instrumental approaches like LC-MS or bioanalytical techniques using antibodies or aptamers as selective receptors. The present work comprises the generation of aptamers with an affinity towards the medically relevant metabolite phytosphingosine via the previously reported just in time-Selection approach (Hünniger et al., 2014). The whole approach could be seen as a proof of concept to extend the existing just in time-Selection protocol for selection towards small molecules with dissociation constants in the low nanomolar range. Moreover it is conceivable that the shown methods could be quickly adapted to further scopes. Aptamers could be applied for clean-up or concentration processes prior to further analysis. As an example, we used the selected aptamers towards phytosphingosine bound to magnetic particles for affinity enrichment in both selection buffer and urine samples. As an outcome, enrichment factors of up to 9-fold (selection buffer)/4-fold (urine samples) were achieved by this approach.

  4. An efficient synthesis of the natural tetrahydrofuran pachastrissamine starting from D-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Richard J B H N; Boltje, Thomas J; Verhagen, Carlo P; Litjens, Remy E J N; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] The natural product pachastrissamine, an anhydrophytosphingosine derivative isolated from various sponges and endowed with cytotoxic activity against several human carcinoma cell lines, was synthesized in three steps and with 72% overall yield from d-ribo-phytosphingosine.

  5. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-10-27

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized.

  6. Production of tetraacetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS) in Wickerhamomyces ciferrii is catalyzed by acetyltransferases Sli1p and Atf2p.

    PubMed

    Ter Veld, Frank; Wolff, Daniel; Schorsch, Christoph; Köhler, Tim; Boles, Eckhard; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2013-10-01

    Wickerhamomyces ciferrii secretes tetraacetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS), and in this study, the catalyzing acetyltransferases were identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The proteome of wild-type strain NRRL Y-1031 served as control and was compared to the tetraacetyl phytosphingosine defective mating type NRRL Y-1031-27. Acetylation of phytosphingosine in W. ciferrii is catalyzed by acetyltransferases Sli1p and Atf2p, encoded by genes similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae YGR212W and YGR177C, respectively. Ablation of SLI1 resulted in an almost complete loss of tri- and tetraacetyl phytosphingosines, whereas the loss ATF2 resulted in an 15-fold increase in triacetyl phytosphingosine. Most likely, it is the concerted action of these two acetyltransferases that yields tetraacetyl phytosphingosine, in which Sli1p catalyzes initial O- and N-acetylation, producing triacetyl phytosphingosine. Finally, Atf2p catalyzes final O-acetylation to yield tetraacetyl phytosphingosine. The current study demonstrates that mass spectrometry-based proteomics can be employed to identify key steps in ill-explored metabolite biosynthesis pathways of nonconventional microorganisms. Furthermore, the identification of phytosphingosine as substrate for alcohol acetyltransferase Atf2p broadens the known substrate range of this enzyme. This interesting property of Atf2p may be exploited to enhance the secretion of heterologous compounds.

  7. Anti-ulcer actions of phytosphingosine hydrochloride in different experimental rat ulcer models.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Woo; Kim, Nam Ki; Jin, Hwan-Jun; Koh, Chang-Woong; Kim, Chul Kyung; Kwon, O-Hyep; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Chan-Koo

    2005-01-01

    The gastroprotective activity of phytosphingosine hydrochloride (PS-HCl, CAS 554-62-1) was assessed in four different rat models of experimentally induced gastric ulcer. Various doses (2.5-10 mg/kg) of PS-HCI were orally administered to rats 30 min before the treatment with HCl/ethanol, indometacin, cysteamine, or to rats with ligated pylorus. Oral administration of PS-HCl (2.5-10 mg/kg) to rats prevented the acute ulcer formation in 4 different types of ulcer in a dose-dependent manner as follows: (1) HCl/ethanol-induced gastric mucosal membrane lesions (20.1-47.8% inhibition), (2) indometacin-induced gastric mucosal membrane lesions (4.6-31.9% inhibition), (3) duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine (10-20% inhibition), (4) gastric secretion and ulceration following pylorus ligation (33.3-61.9% inhibition). These results indicate that PS-HCI may be useful for the prevention of gastric ulcer.

  8. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes 'ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data.

  9. Revealing a signaling role of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cowart, L Ashley; Shotwell, Matthew; Worley, Mitchell L; Richards, Adam J; Montefusco, David J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids including sphingosine-1-phosphate and ceramide participate in numerous cell programs through signaling mechanisms. This class of lipids has important functions in stress responses; however, determining which sphingolipid mediates specific events has remained encumbered by the numerous metabolic interconnections of sphingolipids, such that modulating a specific lipid of interest through manipulating metabolic enzymes causes ‘ripple effects', which change levels of many other lipids. Here, we develop a method of integrative analysis for genomic, transcriptomic, and lipidomic data to address this previously intractable problem. This method revealed a specific signaling role for phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid with no previously defined specific function in yeast, in regulating genes required for mitochondrial respiration through the HAP complex transcription factor. This approach could be applied to extract meaningful biological information from a similar experimental design that produces multiple sets of high-throughput data. PMID:20160710

  10. Combination treatment with arsenic trioxide and phytosphingosine enhances apoptotic cell death in arsenic trioxide-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kang, Young-Hee; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs can sometimes be overcome by combination treatment with other therapeutic drugs. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) enhanced cell death of naturally As(2)O(3)-resistant human myeloid leukemia cells. The combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial relocalization of Bax, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a thiol-containing antioxidant, completely blocked Bax relocalization, PARP-1 activation, and cytochrome c release. Pretreatment of 3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, a PARP-1 inhibitor, or PARP-1/small interfering RNA partially attenuated cytochrome c release, whereas the same treatment did not affect Bax relocalization. The combination treatment induced selective activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by treatment of SB203580 or expression of dominant-negative forms of p38 MAPK suppressed the combination treatment-induced Bax relocalization but did not affect PARP-1 activation. In addition, antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine completely blocked p38 MAPK activation. These results indicate that phytosphingosine in combination with As(2)O(3) induces synergistic apoptosis in As(2)O(3)-resistant leukemia cells through the p38 MAPK-mediated mitochondrial translocation of Bax and the PARP-1 activation, and that p38 MAPK and PARP-1 activations are reactive oxygen species dependent. The molecular mechanism that we elucidated in this study may provide insight into the design of future combination cancer therapies to cells intrinsically less sensitive to As(2)O(3) treatment.

  11. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    PubMed

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier.

  12. Inhibitory effects of N,N,N-trimethyl phytosphingosine-iodide on melanogenesis via ERK activation-mediated MITF degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Jin; Bang, Seunghyun; Chung, Bo Young; Jung, Hyejung; Oh, Eok Soo; Chang, Sung Eun

    2015-01-01

    N,N,N-trimethyl phytosphingosine-iodide (TMP) was recently developed as an antitumor agent. We examined the effects of TMP on melanogenesis and its related signaling pathways in normal human melanocytes. Our results showed that melanin is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner in both cells following liposomal TMP treatment. We also investigated changes in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is related to the degradation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Our results indicated that liposomal TMP treatment leads to the phosphorylation of ERK, which reduces both MITF and tyrosinase protein levels. Treatment with PD98059, an ERK pathway-specific inhibitor, restored liposomal TMP-induced reductions in melanin, abrogated reductions in tyrosinase activity, and downregulated MITF and tyrosinase protein. In conclusion, these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of TMP on melanogenesis are due to MITF and tyrosinase downregulation via ERK activation.

  13. Transcriptional analysis of the response of Neurospora crassa to phytosphingosine reveals links to mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Videira, Arnaldo; Kasuga, Takao; Tian, Chaoguang; Lemos, Catarina; Castro, Ana; Glass, N Louise

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of Neurospora crassa cells with phytosphingosine (PHS) induces programmed cell death (PCD) by an unknown mechanism. To determine the relationship between PHS treatment and PCD, we determined changes in global gene expression levels in N. crassa during a time-course of PHS treatment. Most genes having differential expression levels compared to untreated samples showed an increase in relative expression level upon PHS exposure. However, genes encoding mitochondrial proteins were highly enriched among approximately 100 genes that showed a relative decrease in expression levels after PHS treatment, suggesting that repression of these genes might be related to the death-inducing effects of PHS. Since mutants in respiratory chain complex I are more resistant to both PHS and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than the wild-type strain, possibly related to the production of reactive oxygen species, we also compared gene expression profiles of a complex I mutant (nuo14) and wild-type in response to H(2)O(2). Genes with higher expression levels in the mutant, in the presence of H(2)O(2), are also significantly enriched in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. These data suggest that complex I mutants cope better with drug-induced decrease in expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins and may explain their increased resistance to both PHS and H(2)O(2). As a way of identifying new components required for PHS-induced death, we analysed the PHS sensitivity of 24 strains carrying deletions in genes that showed a significant alteration in expression pattern when the wild-type was exposed to the sphingolipid. Two additional mutants showing increased resistance to PHS were identified and both encode predicted mitochondrial proteins, further supporting the role of the mitochondria in PHS-induced PCD.

  14. Transcriptional analysis of the response of Neurospora crassa to phytosphingosine reveals links to mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Videira, Arnaldo; Kasuga, Takao; Tian, Chaoguang; Lemos, Catarina; Castro, Ana; Glass, N. Louise

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of Neurospora crassa cells with phytosphingosine (PHS) induces programmed cell death (PCD) by an unknown mechanism. To determine the relationship between PHS treatment and PCD, we determined changes in global gene expression levels in N. crassa during a time-course of PHS treatment. Most genes having differential expression levels compared to untreated samples showed an increase in relative expression level upon PHS exposure. However, genes encoding mitochondrial proteins were highly enriched among ∼100 genes that showed a relative decrease in expression levels after PHS treatment, suggesting that repression of these genes might be related to the death-inducing effects of PHS. Since mutants in respiratory chain complex I are more resistant to both PHS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than the wild-type strain, possibly related to the production of reactive oxygen species, we also compared gene expression profiles of a complex I mutant (nuo14) and wild-type in response to H2O2. Genes with higher expression levels in the mutant, in the presence of H2O2, are also significantly enriched in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. These data suggest that complex I mutants cope better with drug-induced decrease in expression of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins and may explain their increased resistance to both PHS and H2O2. As a way of identifying new components required for PHS-induced death, we analysed the PHS sensitivity of 24 strains carrying deletions in genes that showed a significant alteration in expression pattern when the wild-type was exposed to the sphingolipid. Two additional mutants showing increased resistance to PHS were identified and both encode predicted mitochondrial proteins, further supporting the role of the mitochondria in PHS-induced PCD. PMID:19520721

  15. FTIR spectroscopic studies of lipid dynamics in phytosphingosine ceramide models of the stratum corneum lipid matrix.

    PubMed

    Rerek, Mark E; Van Wyck, Dina; Mendelsohn, Richard; Moore, David J

    2005-03-01

    IR spectroscopic studies are reported for N-stearyl-D-erythro-phytosphingosine (Cer NP) and N-stearyl-2-hydroxy-D-erythro-phytosphingosine (Cer AP) in a hydrated model of the skin lipid barrier comprised of equimolar mixtures of each ceramide with cholesterol and d(35)-stearic acid. Examination of the methylene stretching, rocking and bending modes reveal some rotational freedom and hexagonal packing in both the ceramide and stearic acid chains. Analysis of the acid carbonyl stretch and the ceramide Amide I modes show both shift to higher frequencies, indicating weaker hydrogen bonding, in the mixed systems compared to the pure materials. For both systems, the fatty acid chain disordering temperatures are significantly increased from those of the pure acids. The observed behaviors of these phytosphingosine ceramide systems are fundamentally different from the previously reported analogous sphingosine ceramide systems. The implications of these observations for lipid organization in the stratum corneum are briefly discussed.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of novel phytosphingosine derivatives, including N,N-dimethylphytosphingosine and N-monomethylphytosphingosine, in human leukemia cell line HL60.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Ryun; Cho, Hyo Jin; Moon, Kyung Jin; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Kong, Sun-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Seonyang

    2010-01-01

    Novel phytosphingosine derivatives have been developed based on the inhibition of sphingosine kinase, which has been implicated in cell growth and inhibition of ceramide-mediated apoptosis. This study evaluated the cytotoxic effects and underlying mechanisms of action of novel phytosphingosine derivatives, including N-monomethylphytosphingosine (MMPH) and N,N-dimethylphytosphingosine (DMPH) and the pegylated forms MMPH-PEG and DMPH-PEG, in human leukemia HL60 cells. In viability and proliferation assays using WST-1, all four drugs induced suppression of cell growth and viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Among them, DMPH had the highest antileukemic activity and induced apoptosis via caspase-8, caspase-3, and caspase-9 activation. The apoptotic effect was also associated with Fas/FasL upregulation, Bid cleavage, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and cytochrome c release. DMPH decreased the phosphorylation of ERK and inhibited daunorubicin-induced ERK activation. Furthermore, DMPH displayed synergistic cytotoxicity with daunorubicin in a sequence-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that DMPH has potential as an effective cytotoxic agent for leukemia.

  17. Induction of apoptosis and expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in response to a phytosphingosine derivative in HaCaT human keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Ho Jin; Lim, Sung Cil; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae-Yoon

    2003-12-31

    Ceramide, a compound derived from sphingomyelin, a sphingolipid precursor, affects cell functions such as growth, differentiation, cell division and apoptosis. We have shown that the phytosphingosine derivative, tetra-acetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS), inhibits the growth of HaCaT cells mainly by inducing apoptosis. In this study, we investigated its effect on the cell cycle and on cell cycle regulatory proteins. We showed by flow cytometry and staining for BrdU and phosphorylated histone H3 that the cells accumulated in S phase and arrested in G2 phase and did not divide before undergoing apoptosis. The level of the pro-apoptotic regulator Bax peaked after 6 h and then returned to normal, whereas the level of the anti-apoptotic regulator Bcl-xL, which is presumably induced in order to inhibit apoptosis, started to increase at 6 h, and remained high for 24 h. Phosphorylation of Cdc2 on Tyr-15 greatly increased while p21 rose to a plateau at 8 h. Levels of p53 and Mad2 proteins were unchanged. Our observations suggest that TAPS induces apoptosis of the HaCaT cells at least in part via transient G2 arrest.

  18. Dihydroxylation of 2-vinylaziridine: efficient synthesis of D-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyo Jae; Kim, Yong-Woo; Lee, Baeck Kyoung; Lee, Won Koo; Kim, Yongeun; Ha, Hyun-Joon

    2007-01-07

    An efficient and highly stereoselective synthesis of D-ribo-(2S,3S,4R)-phytosphingosine was accomplished in 62% overall yield starting from commercially available (2S)-hydroxymethylaziridine via osmium-catalyzed asymmetric dihydroxylation as a key step.

  19. Menstrual cycle-associated expression of 2-hydroxy fatty acyl phytosphingosine-containing GlcCer, LacCer and Gb3Cer in human uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Mikami, M; Tukazaki, K; Nozawa, S; Iwamori, M; Nagai, Y

    1992-04-08

    In the previous study, we found that sulfatide was characteristically expressed in the secretory phase of human uterine endometrium and that the metabolism of glycosphingolipids was strictly controlled by sex steroid hormones. Therefore, the neutral glycosphingolipid composition of human uterine endometrium in the proliferative and secretory phases was analyzed and was found to be characteristic in both phases. The major neutral glycolipids were GlcCer, LacCer, Gb3Cer and Gb4Cer. The concentrations of GlcCer, LacCer and Gb3Cer in the secretory phase were higher than those in the proliferative phase. Furthermore, on TLC, GlcCer, LacCer and Gb3Cer in the proliferative phase gave three bands, the 3rd band, which migrated to the lowest position, being much more predominant in the secretory phase. The individual band materials in both phases were purified by silica gel column chromatography, and their structures were analyzed by FABMS and GLC. The lower-migrating bands of GlcCer, LacCer and Gb3Cer were found to contain molecules with 2-hydroxy fatty acyl phytosphingosine, indicating that hydroxylation of the fatty acid and sphingosine moieties to give 2-hydroxy fatty acid- and phytosphingosine-containing glycosphingolipids, respectively, is induced selectively in the secretory phase on a change in the hormonal environment.

  20. Chemical synthesis of D-ribo-phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, a potential modulator of cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Wilson, W K; Schroepfer, G J

    1999-01-01

    d-erythro -Sphingosine-1-phosphate (2), an intermediate in sphingosine metabolism, shows a diversity of biological activities. Comparable roles might be anticipated for d-ribo -phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (1). We describe an efficient three-step chemical synthesis of 1 from d-ribo -phytosphingosine. Our approach is based on standard phosphoramidite methodology and on the finding of Boumendjel and Miller ( J. Lipid Res. 1994. 35: 2305-2311) that sphingosine can be monophosphorylated at the 1-hydroxyl without protection of the 3-hydroxyl. However, we were unable to duplicate their reported synthesis of 2 without important modifications in reagents and reaction conditions. Under the reported conditions for preparing 2, we obtained a cyclic carbamate (14), which we have isolated and identified. The structures of 1 and the cyclic carbamate 14 were elucidated by a combination of mass spectrometry and 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  1. Gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of synthetic ceramides containing phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, S

    1970-05-01

    Ceramides containing phytosphingosine as base and one of the fatty acids 16:0, 18:0, 20:0, 22:0, 23:0, and 24:0, were prepared by direct coupling in the presence of a mixed carbodiimide. The ceramides were analyzed as the 1,3,4-tri-O-trimethylsilyl ether derivatives by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Gas chromatographic data is presented, and structures of mass spectral ions are suggested. The structures are supported by mass spectra of the homologous ceramides, by deuterium-labeling experiments, and by high resolution mass spectrometry. Some ions, formed by cleavage between C-3 and C-4 in the long-chain base, indicate the phytosphingosine nature of the ceramide.

  2. The effect of a phytosphingosine-like substance isolated from Asterina pectinifera on involucrin expression in mite antigen-stimulated HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gui Hyang; Wahid, Fazli; Kim, You Young

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of phytosphingosine (PS) on mite antigen-induced terminal differentiation abnormalities in HaCaT cells. For this purpose, a PS-like substance was isolated from Asterina pectinifera (starfish PS) using high-performance liquid chromatography and was partially characterized through 1H NMR analysis. The level of involucrin expression in HaCaT cell was measured by immunoblotting assay. Our results showed that PS treatments remarkably up-regulated the involucrin expression, which is known as a terminal differentiation marker in the epidermal mite antigen-treated HaCaT cells. This indicates that starfish PS could regulate mite antigen-induced terminal differentiation fluctuation in the epidermis. Taken together, the results suggest that starfish PS might be a useful therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis.

  3. Stereoselective synthesis of C18-guggultetrol and C18-phytosphingosine analogues from D-fructose.

    PubMed

    Ramu Sridhar, Perali; Suresh, Mandava; Venu Kumar, Patteti; Seshadri, Kalapati; Venkata Rao, Chunduri

    2012-10-01

    A series of C(18)-guggultetrol stereo isomers and C(18)-phytosphingosine regio/stereo isomers were synthesised in a stereoselective fashion involving metal mediated fragmentation, stereoselective reduction, 1,4 O → O silyl migration, and Grubbs' cross metathesis as key steps. d-Fructose was used as a raw material for the preparation of all the analogues. The isophytosphingosine derivatives were evaluated against their 5-LOX (5-lipoxigenase) inhibitory activity.

  4. Synthesis of pachastrissamine from phytosphingosine: a comparison of cyclic sulfate vs an epoxide intermediate in cyclization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taeho; Lee, Sukjin; Kwak, Young Shin; Kim, Deukjoon; Kim, Sanghee

    2007-02-01

    [reaction: see text] The syntheses of the cytotoxic natural product pachastrissamine and its unnatural 4-epi-congener were accomplished starting from a natural phytosphingosine. The relatively unstrained cyclic sulfate intermediate smoothly underwent the 5-endo cyclization to yield the 2,3,4-trisubstituted tetrahydrofuran ring system of pachastrissamine. The corresponding epoxy alcohol afforded the 4-epi-congener via a tosylate-mediated double inversion process.

  5. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates chemotactic migration of L2071 mouse fibroblasts via pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Kyoung Sun; Lee, Hyuck; Kim, Young Dae; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2007-04-30

    Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P) was found to stimulate an intracellular calcium increase via phospholipase C but not pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-proteins in L2071 mouse fibroblasts. PhS1P also activated ERK and p38 kinase, and these activations by PhS1P were inhibited by PTX. Moreover, PhS1P stimulated the chemotactic migration of L2071 cells via PTX-sensitive Gi protein(s). In addition, the PhS1P-induced chemotactic migration of L2071 cells was also dramatically inhibited by LY294002 and SB203580 (inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p38 kinase, respectively). L2071 cells are known to express four S1P receptors, i.e., S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, and S1P4, and pretreatment with an S1P1 and S1P3 antagonist (VPC 23019) did not affect on PhS1P-induced chemotaxis. This study demonstrates that PhS1P stimulates at least two different signaling cascades, one is a PTX-insensitive but phospholipase C dependent intracellular calcium increase, and the other is a PTX-sensitive chemotactic migration mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and p38 kinase.

  6. Efficient synthesis of D-erythro-sphingosine and D-erythro-azidosphingosine from D-ribo-phytosphingosine via a cyclic sulfate intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghee; Lee, Sukjin; Lee, Taeho; Ko, Hyojin; Kim, Deukjoon

    2006-10-27

    The synthesis of naturally occurring d-erythro-sphingosine and synthetically useful D-erythro-2-azidosphingosine from commercially available d-ribo-phytosphingosine is described. An important feature of this synthesis is the selective transformation of the 3,4-vicinal diol of phytosphingosine into the characteristic E-allylic alcohol of sphingosine via a cyclic sulfate intermediate.

  7. Phytosphingosine in combination with ionizing radiation enhances apoptotic cell death in radiation-resistant cancer cells through ROS-dependent and -independent AIF release.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kim, Min-Jung; Kang, Young-Hee; Choi, Soon-Young; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-A; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Bae, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2005-02-15

    The use of chemical modifiers as radiosensitizers in combination with low-dose irradiation may increase the therapeutic effect on cancer by overcoming a high apoptotic threshold. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation enhanced apoptotic cell death of radiation-resistant human T-cell lymphoma in a caspase-independent manner. Combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial relocalization of B-cell lymphoma-2(Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), poly-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activation, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). siRNA targeting of AIF effectively protected cells from the combination treatment-induced cell death. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), inhibited Bax relocalization and AIF translocation but not PARP-1 activation. Moreover, transfection of Bax-siRNA significantly inhibited AIF translocation. Pretreatment of PARP-1 inhibitor, DPQ (3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)-butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone), or PARP-1-siRNA also partially attenuated AIF translocation, whereas the same treatment did not affect intracellular ROS level and Bax redistribution. Taken together, these results demonstrate that enhancement of cell death of radiation-resistant cancer cells by phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation is mediated by nuclear translocation of AIF, which is in turn mediated both by ROS-dependent Bax relocalization and ROS-independent PARP-1 activation. The molecular signaling pathways that we elucidated in this study may provide potential drug targets for radiation sensitization of cancers refractive to radiation therapy.

  8. Polymorphism of ceramide 6: a vibrational spectroscopic and X-ray powder diffraction investigation of the diastereomers of N-(alpha-hydroxyoctadecanoyl)-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Raudenkolb, Steve; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, R H H

    2005-01-01

    A preparative chromatographic method was developed for the quantitative isolation of the diastereomers of synthetic N-(alpha-hydroxyoctadecanoyl)-phytosphingosine (DL-CER6). The L- and the D-compound were studied each by means X-ray powder diffraction, FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. The diastereomers exhibit different thermotropic polymorphism. Three lamellar crystalline and a lamellar liquid crystalline phase were found for L-CER6. The natural occurring D-CER6 forms an Lalpha phase with a larger repeating distance than the L-CER6. The two lamellar crystalline phases of the D-compound have a significant larger dimension than those of the L-compound. The addition of water lowers the phase transition temperatures but does not induce structural changes such as incorporation into the lamellar sheets.

  9. Regioselective inversion of the hydroxyl group in D-ribo-phytosphingosine via a cyclic sulfate and bis-sulfonate intermediate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Mi; Baek, Dong Jae; Lee, Seokwoo; Kim, Deukjoon; Kim, Sanghee

    2011-01-21

    The selective synthesis of D-xylo- and D-lyxo-phytosphingosines from commercially available D-ribo-phytosphingosine is described. Thermolysis of the N-carbonyl protected cyclic sulfate led to an inversion of configuration of the proximal hydroxyl group to give the xylo-isomer, whereas the corresponding bis-sulfonate resulted in an inversion of configuration of the distal hydroxyl group to give the lyxo-isomer. This study allowed the comparison between a cyclic sulfate and a bis-sulfonate in an intramolecular substitution reaction involving a carbonyl oxygen nucleophile.

  10. Preparation of anti-Vicinal Amino Alcohols: Asymmetric Synthesis of d-erythro-Sphinganine, (+)-Spisulosine, and d-ribo-Phytosphingosine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two variations of the Overman rearrangement have been developed for the highly selective synthesis of anti-vicinal amino alcohol natural products. A MOM ether-directed palladium(II)-catalyzed rearrangement of an allylic trichloroacetimidate was used as the key step for the preparation of the protein kinase C inhibitor d-erythro-sphinganine and the antitumor agent (+)-spisulosine, whereas the Overman rearrangement of chiral allylic trichloroacetimidates generated by the asymmetric reduction of an α,β-unsaturated methyl ketone allowed rapid access both to d-ribo-phytosphingosine and l-arabino-phytosphingosine. PMID:23795558

  11. Divergent syntheses of all stereoisomers of phytosphingosine and their use in the construction of a ceramide library.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ju; Lee, Ji Hyung; Li, Qian; Diaz, Kristine; Chang, Young-Tae; Chung, Sung-Kee

    2008-10-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate have recently attracted intense research interests because of their functional roles as signaling molecules in many important physiological processes, such as growth arrest, apoptosis, and inflammatory responses, and cell proliferation, vascular maturation and trafficking of lymphocytes. The well-defined modular structures of ceramides and related glycosylceramides are ideally amenable to library formation for medicinal chemistry investigation. We have developed divergent synthetic routes to all eight phytosphingosine stereoisomers and then proceeded to prepare phytosphingosine-based ceramide library composed of more than 500 compounds.

  12. Lipophosphonoglycan of the plasma membrane of A canthamoeba castellanii. Inositol and phytosphingosine content and general structural features.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, D G; Smith, S; Korn, E D

    1976-05-25

    Lipophosphonoglycan, a major component of the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii, has now been shown to contain 8% inositol and 13% C25- and C24-phytosphingosines in addition to the previously identified content of neutral sugars (26%), amino sugars (3%), aminophosphonates (10%), acidhydrolyzable phosphate (3%), and long chain fatty acids (14%). The fatty acids and phytosphingosines are in ceramide groups. Lipophosphonoglycan can be separated by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis into two major components that are similar in composition except for different oligosaccharide groups. A tentative structural model incorporating these features is proposed in which each of the two components of lipophosphonoglycan is conceived as an oligomeric inositol-containing glycosphingolipid.

  13. Preparation of anti-vicinal amino alcohols: asymmetric synthesis of D-erythro-sphinganine, (+)-spisulosine, and D-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Calder, Ewen D D; Zaed, Ahmed M; Sutherland, Andrew

    2013-07-19

    Two variations of the Overman rearrangement have been developed for the highly selective synthesis of anti-vicinal amino alcohol natural products. A MOM ether-directed palladium(II)-catalyzed rearrangement of an allylic trichloroacetimidate was used as the key step for the preparation of the protein kinase C inhibitor D-erythro-sphinganine and the antitumor agent (+)-spisulosine, whereas the Overman rearrangement of chiral allylic trichloroacetimidates generated by the asymmetric reduction of an α,β-unsaturated methyl ketone allowed rapid access both to D-ribo-phytosphingosine and L-arabino-phytosphingosine.

  14. Protected sphingosine from phytosphingosine as an efficient acceptor in glycosylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, Roberta; Zanetti, Luca; Varese, Monica; Rajabi, Mehdi; Di Brisco, Riccardo; Panza, Luigi

    2014-02-07

    A convenient, simple, and high-yielding five-step synthesis of a sphingosine acceptor from phytosphingosine is reported, and its behavior in glycosylation reactions is described. Different synthetic paths to sphingosine acceptors using tetrachlorophthalimide as a protecting group for the sphingosine amino function and different glycosylation methods have been explored. Among the acceptors tested, the easiest accessible acceptor, unprotected on the two hydroxyl groups in positions 1 and 3, was regioselectively glycosylated on the primary position, the regioselectivity depending on the donor used.

  15. A direct organocatalytic entry to sphingoids: asymmetric synthesis of D-arabino- and L-ribo-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Enders, Dieter; Palecek, Jirí; Grondal, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    The organocatalytic asymmetric synthesis of D-arabino- and L-ribo-phytosphingosine is described employing a diastereo- and enantioselective (S)-proline-catalyzed aldol reaction of 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxan-5-one and pentadecanal as the key step.

  16. Novel, short, stereospecific synthesis of lyxo-(2R,3R,4R)-phytosphingosine and erythro-(2R,3S)-sphingosine.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sadagopan; Rajender, A

    2003-09-05

    Lyxo-phytosphingosine and erythro-sphingosine have been elaborated from a common intermediate. The key step in the reaction sequence involves stereo- and regiospecific functionalization of an olefin by intramolecular nucleophilic sulfinyl group participation.

  17. Asymmetric Synthesis of d-ribo-Phytosphingosine from 1-Tetradecyne and (4-Methoxyphenoxy)acetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Byun, Hoe-Sup

    2010-01-01

    An asymmetric synthesis of d-ribo-phytosphingosine (1) was achieved by utilizing the ProPhenol-catalyzed alkynylation of aldehyde 8 to afford allylic propargylic alcohol (S)-6 followed by asymmetric epoxidation and opening of propargylic epoxy alcohol anti-5 with NaN3/NH4Cl. Deprotection and reduction of the resulting acyclic azide 3 then gave 1. Alkyne-azide 3 was subjected to an intramolecular click reaction, generating a bicyclic triazole, which was found to have unexpected vicinal coupling constants. Application of the advanced Mosher method verified the configurations of the three contiguous stereogenic centers of 1. An alkynyl-azide analogue of 1, which may be useful as a glycosyl acceptor in the synthesis of α-galactosylceramide derivatives, was also readily prepared by this route. PMID:20527744

  18. Asymmetric synthesis of D-ribo-phytosphingosine from 1-tetradecyne and (4-methoxyphenoxy)acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Byun, Hoe-Sup; Bittman, Robert

    2010-07-02

    An asymmetric synthesis of d-ribo-phytosphingosine (1) was achieved by utilizing the ProPhenol (12)-catalyzed alkynylation of unsaturated aldehyde 8 to afford allylic propargylic alcohol (S)-6 followed by asymmetric epoxidation and opening of propargylic epoxy alcohol anti-5 with NaN(3)/NH(4)Cl. Deprotection and reduction of the resulting acyclic azide 3 then gave 1. Alkyne-azide 3 was subjected to an intramolecular click reaction, generating a bicyclic triazole, which was found to have unexpected vicinal coupling constants. Application of the advanced Mosher method verified the configurations of the three contiguous stereogenic centers of 1. An alkynyl azide analogue of 1, which may be useful as a glycosyl acceptor in the synthesis of alpha-galactosylceramide derivatives, was also readily prepared by this route.

  19. Arabidopsis Sphingosine Kinase and the Effects of Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate on Stomatal Aperture1[w

    PubMed Central

    Coursol, Sylvie; Le Stunff, Hervé; Lynch, Daniel V.; Gilroy, Simon; Assmann, Sarah M.; Spiegel, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a major component of membrane lipids and their metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator in animal cells. Recently, we have shown that the enzyme responsible for S1P production, sphingosine kinase (SphK), is stimulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid in guard cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and that S1P is effective in regulating guard cell turgor. We have now characterized SphK from Arabidopsis leaves. SphK activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction and phosphorylated predominantly the Δ4-unsaturated long-chain sphingoid bases sphingosine (Sph) and 4,8-sphingadienine, and to a lesser extent, the saturated long-chain sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine (Phyto-Sph). 4-Hydroxy-8-sphingenine, which is a major sphingoid base in complex glycosphingolipids from Arabidopsis leaves, was a relatively poor substrate compared with the corresponding saturated Phyto-Sph. In contrast, mammalian SphK1 efficiently phosphorylated Sph, dihydrosphingosine, and 4,8-sphingadienine, but not the 4-hydroxylated long-chain bases Phyto-Sph and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine. Surface dilution kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis SphK with Sph presented in mixed Triton X-100 micelles indicated that SphK associates with the micellar surface and then with the substrate presented on the surface. In addition, measurements of SphK activity under different assay conditions combined with phylogenetic analysis suggest that multiple isoforms of SphK may be expressed in Arabidopsis. Importantly, we found that phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, similar to S1P, regulates stomatal apertures and that its action is impaired in guard cells of Arabidopsis plants harboring T-DNA null mutations in the sole prototypical G-protein α-subunit gene, GPA1. PMID:15665242

  20. Arabidopsis sphingosine kinase and the effects of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate on stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Coursol, Sylvie; Le Stunff, Hervé; Lynch, Daniel V; Gilroy, Simon; Assmann, Sarah M; Spiegel, Sarah

    2005-02-01

    Sphingolipids are a major component of membrane lipids and their metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator in animal cells. Recently, we have shown that the enzyme responsible for S1P production, sphingosine kinase (SphK), is stimulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid in guard cells of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and that S1P is effective in regulating guard cell turgor. We have now characterized SphK from Arabidopsis leaves. SphK activity was mainly associated with the membrane fraction and phosphorylated predominantly the Delta4-unsaturated long-chain sphingoid bases sphingosine (Sph) and 4,8-sphingadienine, and to a lesser extent, the saturated long-chain sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine (Phyto-Sph). 4-Hydroxy-8-sphingenine, which is a major sphingoid base in complex glycosphingolipids from Arabidopsis leaves, was a relatively poor substrate compared with the corresponding saturated Phyto-Sph. In contrast, mammalian SphK1 efficiently phosphorylated Sph, dihydrosphingosine, and 4,8-sphingadienine, but not the 4-hydroxylated long-chain bases Phyto-Sph and 4-hydroxy-8-sphingenine. Surface dilution kinetic analysis of Arabidopsis SphK with Sph presented in mixed Triton X-100 micelles indicated that SphK associates with the micellar surface and then with the substrate presented on the surface. In addition, measurements of SphK activity under different assay conditions combined with phylogenetic analysis suggest that multiple isoforms of SphK may be expressed in Arabidopsis. Importantly, we found that phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, similar to S1P, regulates stomatal apertures and that its action is impaired in guard cells of Arabidopsis plants harboring T-DNA null mutations in the sole prototypical G-protein alpha-subunit gene, GPA1.

  1. A facile synthesis of D-ribo-C(20)-phytosphingosine and its C2 epimer from D-ribose.

    PubMed

    Martinková, Miroslava; Gonda, Jozef; Pomikalová, Kvetoslava; Kožíšek, Jozef; Kuchár, Juraj

    2011-09-27

    A facile synthetic route to d-ribo-C(20)-phytosphingosine 31 and its C2 epimer 32 is described. The Overman rearrangement of allylic trichloroacetimidates derived from the known ribose derivative 7 has been used as the key step. The subsequent functional group interconversions in rearranged products 14 and 15 followed by Wittig olefination, Pd/C-mediated reduction and the removal of protecting groups successfully constructed the final molecules.

  2. Salicyloyl-phytosphingosine: a novel agent for the repair of photoaged skin.

    PubMed

    Farwick, M; Watson, R E B; Rawlings, A V; Wollenweber, U; Lersch, P; Bowden, J J; Bastrilles, J Y; Griffiths, C E M

    2007-08-01

    In recent years the importance of sphingolipids (cerebrosides, sphingomyelin, ceramides, sphingosine-1-phospate, etc.) in skin biology is receiving an increasing interest. Not only are ceramides essential for the barrier function of the skin, especially through their phytosphingosine, sphingosine and 6-hydroxysphingosine derivatives, they are now also known to be cell-signalling mediators which can improve epidermal differentiation. However, their effects on dermal anti-ageing markers and reduction of wrinkles have not been established. In this study, we were interested in the effects of a sphingolipid derivative, salicyloyl-phytosphingosine (SP), because of the known independent beneficial effects of salicylic acid and phytosphingosine on skin. Both of these agents are known to reduce the activities of the activator protein-1 transcription factor, in a manner similar to that observed with retinoic acid (RA) treatment. Through this mechanism, RA was shown to reduce the levels of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and the increase levels of extracellular matrix proteins. Therefore, we examined the effects of SP on procollagen-I synthesis in fibroblasts in vitro, its effects in vivo on the expression of dermal markers such as fibrillin-1, procollagen-I and MMP-1 immunochemically in biopsies taken from a short-term occluded patch test protocol and, its effects on periorbital wrinkle reduction over 4 weeks using Fast Optical In Vivo Topometry of Human Skin. In vitro we observed a significant increase in the production of procollagen-I by adult human fibroblasts (two fold increase, P < 0.01) which encouraged us to test the effects of SP in vivo. Initially, test products (SP at 0.05% and 0.2%, all-trans RA (0.025%) and vehicle were applied under occlusion for 8 days prior to biopsy and histological assessment in photoaged volunteers (n = 5). Increased deposition of fibrillin-1 and procollagen-I, together with reductions in the levels of MMP-1, were observed for the SP

  3. Phytosphingosine biosynthesis differs from sphingosine in fish leukocytes and involves a transfer of methyl groups from [3H-methyl]methionine precursor.

    PubMed

    Bodennec, J; Zwingelstein, G; Koul, O; Brichon, G; Portoukalian, J

    1998-09-08

    We have studied the incorporation of radioactivity from either [3-3H]serine as the direct or [3H-methyl]methionine as the indirect precursor into sphingoid bases of free ceramides in lymphocytes from fish. Radioactivity from serine was incorporated mostly in the sphingosine moiety of ceramides. In contrast, the radioactivity from methionine was exclusively incorporated into phytosphingosine base (i.e., 4-hydroxy-sphinganine) and the incorporation increased by about twofold in the presence of folic acid or niacinamide. Identity of the long-chain bases, phytosphingosine and sphingosine, was established chemically by thin-layer chromatography, chemical degradation, and gas-liquid chromatography.

  4. Phytosphingosine 1-phosphate: a high affinity ligand for the S1P(4)/Edg-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Candelore, Mari Rios; Wright, Michael J; Tota, Laurie M; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-ju; Bergstrom, James D; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2002-09-27

    It has been reported recently that the phosphorylated form of the immunomodulator FTY720 activates sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, understanding the biology of this new class of receptors will be important in clarifying the immunological function of bioactive lysosphingolipid ligands. The S1P(4) receptor has generated interest due to its lymphoid tissue distribution. While the S1P(4) receptor binds the prototypical ligand, S1P, a survey of other lysosphingolipids demonstrated that 4D-hydroxysphinganine 1-phosphate, more commonly known as phytosphingosine 1-phosphate (PhS1P), binds to S1P(4) with higher affinity. Using radiolabeled S1P (S133P), the affinity of PhS1P for the S1P(4) receptor is 1.6nM, while that of S1P is nearly 50-fold lower (119+/-20nM). Radiolabeled PhS1P proved to be superior to S133P in routine binding assays due to improved signal-to-noise ratio. The present study demonstrates the utility of a novel radiolabeled probe, PhS133P, for in vitro studies of the S1P(4) receptor pharmacology.

  5. Sulfur Mustard Induces Apoptosis in Cultured Normal Human Airway Epithelial Cells: Evidence of a Dominant Caspase-8-Mediated Pathway and Differential Cellular Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Ray, R., Keyser, B., Benton, B., Daher , A., Simbulan-Rosenthal, C.M., Rosenthal, D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Responses “SM Induces Caspase-8-Dependent Apoptosis”Ray et al. Radharaman Ray,1 Brian Keyser,1 Betty Benton,1 Ahmad Daher ,2 Cynthia M. Simbulan-Rosenthal,2...5. Simbulan-Rosenthal, C., Ray, R., Benton, B., Soeda, E., Daher , A., Anderson, D., Smith, W., Rosenthal, D. (2006). Calmodulin mediates sulfur

  6. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  7. Phytosphingosine as a specific inhibitor of growth and nutrient import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chung, N; Mao, C; Heitman, J; Hannun, Y A; Obeid, L M

    2001-09-21

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have demonstrated a necessary role for sphingolipids in the heat stress response through inhibition of nutrient import (Chung, N., Jenkins, G. M., Hannun, Y. A., Heitman, J., and Obeid, L. M. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 17229-17232). In this study, we used a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches to determine which endogenous sphingolipid is the likely mediator of growth inhibition. When cells were treated with exogenous phytosphingosine (PHS, 20 microm) or structurally similar or metabolically related molecules, including 3-ketodihydrosphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, C(2)-phytoceramide (PHC), and stearylamine, only PHS inhibited growth. Also, PHS was shown to inhibit uptake of uracil, tryptophan, leucine, and histidine. Again this effect was specific to PHS. Because of the dynamic nature of sphingolipid metabolism, however, it was difficult to conclude that growth inhibition was caused by PHS itself. By using mutant yeast strains defective in various steps in sphingolipid metabolism, we further determined the specificity of PHS. The elo2Delta strain, which is defective in the conversion of PHS to PHC, was shown to have slower biosynthesis of ceramides and to be hypersensitive to PHS (5 microm), suggesting that PHS does not need to be converted to PHC. The lcb4Delta lcb5Delta strain is defective in the conversion of PHS to PHS 1-phosphate, and it was as sensitive to PHS as the wild-type strain. The syr2Delta mutant strain was defective in the conversion of DHS to PHS. Interestingly, this strain was resistant to high concentrations of DHS (40 microm) that inhibited the growth of an isogenic wild-type strain, demonstrating that DHS needs to be converted to PHS to inhibit growth. Together, these data demonstrate that the active sphingolipid species that inhibits yeast growth is PHS or a closely related and yet unidentified metabolite.

  8. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate and epidermal growth factor synergistically restore extracellular matrix in human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Bin; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Ka Ram; Choi, Young Min; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; Cha, Hwa Jun

    2017-03-01

    Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P), which is found in plants and fungi, is generated by the phosphorylation of phytosphingosine and is structurally similar to molecules that promote cellular growth and proliferation. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether PhS1P displays synergistic effects together with epidermal growth factor (EGF), which is also critical for activating proliferation, migration and survival pathways. We utilized cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and a number of assays, including western blotting, cell migration assays, quantitative (real-time) PCR, and viability assays. We found that PhS1P promoted the activity of EGF in vitro. We then conducted a clinical trial in females over 35 years of age, with visible signs of skin aging. By evaluating skin hydration, dermal density and thickness, length of fine wrinkles, and skin elasticity, we verified the clinical efficacy of a combined treatment of PhS1P and EGF in vivo. On the whole, our data suggest that PhS1P displays a synergistic anti-aging effect together with EGF, both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate and epidermal growth factor synergistically restore extracellular matrix in human dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Bin; An, Sungkwan; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Ka Ram; Choi, Young Min; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; Cha, Hwa Jun

    2017-01-23

    Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P), which is found in plants and fungi, is generated by the phosphorylation of phytosphingosine and is structurally similar to molecules that promote cellular growth and proliferation. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether PhS1P displays synergistic effects together with epidermal growth factor (EGF), which is also critical for activating proliferation, migration and survival pathways. We utilized cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and a number of assays, including western blotting, cell migration assays, quantitative (real-time) PCR, and viability assays. We found that PhS1P promoted the activity of EGF in vitro. We then conducted a clinical trial in females over 35 years of age, with visible signs of skin aging. By evaluating skin hydration, dermal density and thickness, length of fine wrinkles, and skin elasticity, we verified the clinical efficacy of a combined treatment of PhS1P and EGF in vivo. On the whole, our data suggest that PhS1P displays a synergistic anti-aging effect together with EGF, both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. EPA, an omega-3 fatty acid, induces apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells: role of ROS accumulation, caspase-8 activation, and autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masayuki; Kang, Ki Sung; Okada, Kazushi; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, we showed that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two common omega-3 fatty acids, can cause ROS accumulation and subsequently induce caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells (Kang et al. [2010], PLoS ONE 5: e10296). In this study, we showed that the pancreas has a unique ability to accumulate EPA at a level markedly higher than several other tissues analyzed. Based on this finding, we sought to further investigate the anticancer actions of EPA and its analog DHA in human pancreatic cancer cells using both in vitro and in vivo models. EPA and DHA were found to induce ROS accumulation and caspase-8-dependent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2 and Capan-2) in vitro. Feeding animals with a diet supplemented with 5% fish oil, which contains high levels of EPA and DHA, also strongly suppresses the growth of MIA-PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice, by inducing oxidative stress and cell death. In addition, we showed that EPA can concomitantly induce autophagy in these cancer cells, and the induction of autophagy diminishes its ability to induce apoptotic cell death. It is therefore suggested that combination of EPA with an autophagy inhibitor may be a useful strategy in increasing the therapeutic effectiveness in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Anti-erosive effects of fluoride and phytosphingosine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Yönel, Nermin; Bikker, Floris J; Lagerweij, Maxim D; Kleverlaan, Cees J; van Loveren, Cor; Özen, Bugra; Çetiner, Serap; van Strijp, Augustinus J P

    2016-08-01

    A selection of commercially available products containing stannous fluoride (SnF2 )/sodium fluoride (NaF), SnF2 /amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), SnF2 /NaF/ACP, tin (Sn)/fluorine (F)/chitosan were compared with phytosphingosine (PHS) with respect to their anti-erosive properties in vitro. One-hundred and twenty bovine enamel specimens were immersed in the respective product slurries for 2 min, twice daily. The formulations were diluted with either remineralization solution or artificial saliva. After each treatment, an erosive challenge was performed for 10 min, twice daily, using citric acid, pH 3.4. The specimens were stored in remineralization solution or artificial saliva until the next treatment-erosion challenge. After 10 d, tissue loss was determined using profilometry. Enamel softening was determined through surface microhardness measurements. Tissue-loss values (measured in μm and expressed as mean ± SD) for PHS, SnF2 /NaF, SnF2 /ACP, SnF2 /ACP/NaF, and Sn/F/chitosan treatment groups and for the negative-control group, were, respectively, 35.6 ± 2.8, 15.8 ± 1.8, 22.1 ± 2.0, 22.9 ± 1.8, 16.2 ± 1.2, and 51.2 ± 4.4 in the presence of remineralization solution and 31.7 ± 3.3, 15.6 ± 2.9, 16.5 ± 2.7, 16.8 ± 2.1, 13.1 ± 3.0, and 50.7 ± 2.8 in the presence of artificial saliva. There were no significant differences in surface microhardness measurements between the treatment groups. In conclusion, PHS resulted in a significant reduction of tissue loss compared with the negative control, but in comparison, the toothpastes containing Sn(2+) and F(-) ions were significantly more effective compared with PHS.

  12. A stereocontrolled, efficient synthetic route to bioactive sphingolipids: synthesis of phytosphingosine and phytoceramides from unsaturated ester precursors via cyclic sulfate intermediates.

    PubMed

    He, L; Byun, H S; Bittman, R

    2000-11-03

    An efficient and highly enantioselective method for the preparation of D-ribo- and L-lyxo-phytosphingosines (1a,b, respectively) and phytoceramides (2a,b) has been developed. The key steps in the syntheses are as follows: (i) osmium-catalyzed asymmetric dihydroxylation of 4-O-protected (E)-alpha,beta-unsaturated ester 5 (generated by dihydroxylation of 1-hexadecene, followed by oxidation to the aldehyde and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination), (ii) conversion to cyclic sulfate intermediate 7, and (iii) regioselective alpha-azidation of 7. Reduction of 4-O-protected 2-azido ester 8 via alpha-azidolactone 9 afforded phytosphingosine 1a. Staudinger reduction of the azido group of 8, followed by in situ N-acylation in aqueous media and reduction of the ester functionality with NaBH(4)/LiBr, provided phytoceramide 2a. By using a similar approach, phytosphingosine 1b was synthesized. D-erythro-4, 5-Dihydrosphingosine 1c and D-erythro-4,5-dihydroceramide 2c were synthesized in high yield from 1-hexadecanol via cyclic sulfate intermediate 15. The desired configurations at C-2, C-3, and C-4 of the sphingoid chain can be accessed readily by the route described here.

  13. Analysis of skin penetration of phytosphingosine by fluorescence detection and influence of the thermotropic behaviour of DPPC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hasanovic, Amra; Hoeller, Sonja; Valenta, Claudia

    2010-01-04

    Phytosphingosine (PS) is a promising compound in skin formulations, considering its application in the treatment of acne and different inflammations as well as in the 'anti age' cosmetics. PS, as an active substance was incorporated in DPPC liposomes intended to standard diffusion experiments, where dermatomed porcine skin was mounted in FRANZ cells. The proved skin retention was about 5.5% (w/w) after 24h and about 6.8% (w/w) after 48 h of the applied PS amount, whereas only about 0.05% (w/w) and about 0.07% (w/w) PS, respectively, could be observed in the acceptor medium. To increase analytical sensitivity PS was derivatised by o-phtalaldehyde (OPA) reagent and analysed by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The higher amount of PS within the skin symbolised an interaction with lipid structures in skin. Further evaluation of this interaction was accomplished by applying microDSC studies of PS with DPPC as a model membrane. For this purpose liposomes were prepared by increasing PS content. The characteristic endothermic peak observed for the single system was shifted to a slightly higher temperature and broadened as the mole fraction of PS increased. This might be the effect of mixing of PS with DPPC. An addition of 10 mol% PS resulted in more than double sized particles pointing to a possible change in the liposomal shape.

  14. Glycosphingolipids from Magnaporthe grisea cells: expression of a ceramide dihexoside presenting phytosphingosine as the long-chain base.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Daniela M; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Wait, Robin; Villas Boas, Maria Helena S; Tischer, Cesar A; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2002-09-15

    Magnaporthe grisea is a fungal pathogen that infects rice leaves and causes rice blast, a devastating crop disease. M. grisea produces active elicitors of the hypersensitive response in rice that were previously identified as ceramide monohexosides (CMHs). Using several chromatographic approaches, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified ceramide mono- and dihexosides (CDH) in purified lipid extracts from M. grisea cells. As described by other authors, CMH consists of a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecenoic or 2-hydroxyhexadecenoic acids and a carbohydrate segment consisting of one residue of glucose. CDHs, however, contain beta-galactose (1-->4)-linked to beta-glucose as sugar units and phytosphingosine as the long-chain base, bound to a C24 alpha-hydroxylated fatty acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of CDH in a fungal species and illustrates the existence of an alternative path of ceramide glycosylation in fungal cells.

  15. Anti-microbial and -inflammatory activity and efficacy of phytosphingosine: an in vitro and in vivo study addressing acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pavicic, T; Wollenweber, U; Farwick, M; Korting, H C

    2007-06-01

    Lipids are important constituents of the human epidermis. Either free and organized into broad lipid bilayers in the intercorneocytes spaces, or covalently bound to the corneocyte envelope, they play a crucial role in permeability barrier function and are major contributors to cutaneous anti-microbial defense. Free sphingoid bases are a recent addition to this family of active lipids, which emerged from studies of breakdown products from ceramides. Phytosphingosine (PS) is a lipid occurring naturally in the stratum corneum, both in its free form and as a part of the major fraction of ceramides. The biotechnological production of PS patented by Degussa yields to PS with the correct configuration present in the skin. So, application of a PS containing formulation leads to its integration into the natural lipid structures of the skin. In acne, different pathogenetic factors contribute to the inflammation process, defect in keratinization, increased sebaceous gland activity and increased colonization of Propionibacterium acnes. The results of in vitro and in vivo studies confirm the previous reports on strong anti-microbial effectiveness of skin-identical PS produced by Degussa in vitro and in vivo. In addition, PS shows excellent clinical results in the context of skin care in acne, based on both anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activity. These results demonstrate the potential of PS to enhance or complement existing acne therapies acting as an active cosmetic ingredient.

  16. Yeast 1,3-beta-glucan synthase activity is inhibited by phytosphingosine localized to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Nishida, I; Minemura, M; Qadota, H; Seyama, Y; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y

    2001-07-20

    1,3-beta-D-Glucan, a major filamentous component of the cell wall in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is synthesized by 1,3-beta-glucan synthase (GS). Although a yeast gene whose product is required for GS activity in vitro, GNS1, was isolated and characterized, its role in GS function has remained unknown. In the current study we show that Deltagns1 cells accumulate a non-competitive and non-proteinous inhibitor(s) in the membrane fraction. Investigations of inhibitory activity on GS revealed that the inhibitor(s) is mainly present in the sphingolipid fraction. It is shown that Deltagns1 cells contain phytosphingosine (PHS), an intermediate in the sphingolipid biosynthesis, 30-fold more than wild-type cells do. The membrane fraction isolated from Deltasur2 cells contains an increased amount of dihydrosphingosine (DHS) and also exhibits reduced GS activity. Among constituents of the sphingolipid fraction, PHS and DHS show striking inhibition in a non-competitive manner. The intracellular level of DHS is much lower than that of PHS in wild-type cells, suggesting that PHS is the primary inhibitor of GS in vivo. The localization of PHS to the endoplasmic reticulum in wild-type cells coincides with that of the inhibitor(s) in Deltagns1 cells. Taken together, our results indicate that PHS is a potent inhibitor of yeast GS in vivo.

  17. Design of a phytosphingosine-containing, positively-charged nanoemulsion as a colloidal carrier system for dermal application of ceramides.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erol; Borchert, Hans-Hubert

    2005-05-01

    Positively charged oil/water (o/w) nanoemulsions (PN) are effective vehicles to change the permeability of the skin. This study focused on the preparation and characterisation of phytosphingosine (PS) containing PN (PPN) which serve as colloidal carriers for the dermal application of ceramide IIIB (CIIIB) and the stratum corneum (SC) lipids (PPNSC) such as ceramide III (CIII), cholesterol, and palmitic acid. The investigations were conducted using appropriate emulsification and homogenisation processing conditions to optimise PPNSC with regard to droplet size, physical stability, and solubility of PS, CIII and CIIIB. A decrease in droplet size was observed through eight homogenisation cycles at a pressure of 500 bar and a temperature of 50 degrees C. Above these optimal values, an increase in droplet size was observed. PS and ceramides have low solubilities in oil and water. When Lipoid E-80 (LE80) was added to the oil phase, the solubility of PS and ceramides increased, indicating some interactions shown by DSC measurements. SC lipids and CIIIB could be successfully incorporated in PPN without producing any physical instability. The high stability of PPNSC is probably due to the presence of a hydrophilic (Tween 80) and a lipophilic surfactant (LE80), supported by the lipophilic cosurfactant PS, at the o/w interface. It was shown that PS was responsible for the positive charge and thus supported the high physical stability of PPNSC. This optimised emulsion was selected for further skin absorption evaluation.

  18. Control of Mitochondrial Dynamics by Fas-induced Caspase-8 Activation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo apoptosis mainly via two pathways-the mitochondrial pathway and the cytosolic pathway. It has been well documented that activation of the mitochondrial pathway promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and inhibition of mitochondrial fragmentation partly represses cell death. However, the mitochondrial events following activation of the cytosolic pathway are less understood. In this study, we treated Fas-activating antibody and found mitochondrial fragmentation without cell death in hippocampal primary neurons and HT-22 cell lines. Fas antibody treatment, in fact, promoted rapid activation of caspase-8, while executioner caspase-3 activation was not observed. Furthermore, blockage of caspase-8 efficiently prevented Fas antibody-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. These results suggest that the cytosolic pathway induced by death receptor activation promotes caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial fission. PMID:26412971

  19. Di-Calcium Phosphate and Phytosphingosine as an Innovative Acid-Resistant Treatment to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Salvatore; Lin, Ching-Yang; Bikker, Floris J; Cama, Giuseppe; Dubruel, Peter; Soria, José M; D''Onofrio, Alessia; Gillam, David

    The present investigation evaluated the ability of an experimental di-calcium phosphate (DCP) desensitising agent used alone or combined with phytosphingosine (PHS) to occlude dentine tubules and resist a citric acid (CA) or artificial saliva (AS) challenge. Three groups of human dentine specimens (DS) were treated with the following: (1) PHS alone, (2) DCP or (3) a combination of PHS and DCP. Dentine hydraulic conductance of DS was evaluated using a digital flow sensor at 6.9 kPa. The average fluid volume for each of the treated DS was used to calculate the total dentine permeability reduction (%P) prior to and following CA immersion for 1 min or AS immersion for 4 weeks. The treated DS were subjected to both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis. Statistically significant differences (%P) were identified between the groups by ANOVA and Fisher's multiple comparison test (p < 0.05), respectively. Interestingly, both PHS and DCP appeared to work synergistically. DS treated with DCP or PHS/DCP demonstrated a significant reduction (%P) prior to and following CA or AS challenge (p < 0.05). Both the SEM and FTIR analyses showed consistent brushite crystals occluding the dentine tubules. Conversely, the application of PHS alone failed to demonstrate any significant reduction of dentine permeability (p > 0.05) or show any evidence of occlusion of the dentine tubules. DCP can be used alone or combined with PHS to decrease the dentine permeability as well as to resist a CA and AS challenge. These results would, therefore, suggest that DCP may be a suitable treatment option for dentine hypersensitivity.

  20. Phytosphingosine-phosphate is a signal for AtMPK6 activation and Arabidopsis response to chilling.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Demandre, Chantal; Rézé, Nathalie; Launay, Alban; Pelletier, Sandra; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Zachowski, Alain; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Guillas, Isabelle

    2012-04-01

    • Long-chain bases (LCBs) are pleiotropic sphingolipidic signals in eukaryotes. We investigated the source and function of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-P), a phospho-LCB rapidly and transiently formed in Arabidopsis thaliana on chilling. • PHS-P was analysed by thin-layer chromatography following in vivo metabolic radiolabelling. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to identify the sphingosine kinase isoforms involved in cold-responsive PHS-P synthesis. Gene expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and growth phenotypes of three LCB kinase mutants (lcbk1, sphk1 and lcbk2) were studied following cold exposure. • Chilling provoked the rapid and transient formation of PHS-P in Arabidopsis cultured cells and plantlets. Cold-evoked PHS-P synthesis was reduced by LCB kinase inhibitors and abolished in the LCB kinase lcbk2 mutant, but not in lcbk1 and sphk1 mutants. lcbk2 presented a constitutive AtMPK6 activation at 22°C. AtMPK6 activation was also triggered by PHS-P treatment independently of PHS/PHS-P balance. lcbk2 mutants grew comparably with wild-type plants at 22 and 4°C, but exhibited a higher root growth at 12°C, correlated with an altered expression of the cold-responsive DELLA gene RGL3. • Together, our data indicate a function for LCBK2 in planta. Furthermore, they connect PHS-P formation with plant response to cold, expanding the field of LCB signalling in plants.

  1. Pseudomonas syringae infection triggers de novo synthesis of phytosphingosine from sphinganine in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peer, Markus; Stegmann, Martin; Mueller, Martin J; Waller, Frank

    2010-09-24

    Sphingolipids are important membrane components and also regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. We detected a fast increase of the free sphingobase t18:0 (phytosphinganine) in Arabidopsis leaves after inoculation with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, characterized by host cell death reactions. The induction of phytosphinganine was more transient in virulent interactions lacking cell death reactions, suggesting a positive role of t18:0 in the plants' response to pathogens, e.g. the hypersensitive response. In the mutant sphingobase hydroxylase 1 (sbh1-1), Pseudomonas induced elevated free d18:0 levels. As total t18:0 contents (after hydrolysis of ceramides) were not reduced in sbh1-1, the pathogen-triggered t18:0 increase most likely results from de novo synthesis from d18:0 which would require SBH1.

  2. Regulation of the sphingoid long-chain base kinase Lcb4p by ergosterol and heme: studies in phytosphingosine-resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Sano, Takamitsu; Kihara, Akio; Kurotsu, Fumiko; Iwaki, Soichiro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2005-11-04

    Sphingoid long-chain base 1-phosphates (LCBPs) are widely conserved, bioactive lipid molecules. In yeast, LCBPs are known to be involved in several cellular responses such as heat shock resistance and Ca(2+) mobilization, although their target molecules and signaling pathways remain unclear. To identify genes involved in LCBP signaling and in regulation of LCBP synthesis, we performed transposon mutagenesis in cells lacking the LCBP lyase DPL1 and LCBP phosphatase LCB3 genes and screened for phytosphingosine-resistant clones. Further isolation and identification revealed eight genes (PBP1, HEM14, UFD4, HMG1, TPS1, KES1, WHI2, and ERG5), in addition to the previously characterized LCB4 and PDR5 genes, that are involved in phytosphingosine resistance. Of these eight, four are ergosterol-related genes (HEM14, HMG1, KES1, and ERG5). We also demonstrated that protein expression of the long-chain base kinase Lcb4p was reduced in Deltahem14 and Deltahmg1 cells, likely as a consequence of decreased activity of the heme-dependent transcription factor Hap1p. In addition, phosphorylation of Lcb4p was decreased in all the ergosterol-related mutants isolated and other ergosterol mutants constructed (Deltaerg2, Deltaerg3, and Deltaerg6). Finally, plasma membrane localization of Lcb4p was found to be reduced in Deltaerg6 cells. These results suggest that changes in sterol composition affect the phosphorylation of Lcb4p because of the altered localization. The other genes isolated (PBP1, UFD4, TPS1, and WHI2) may be involved in LCBP signaling.

  3. Lecithin based nanoemulsions: A comparative study of the influence of non-ionic surfactants and the cationic phytosphingosine on physicochemical behaviour and skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Sonja; Sperger, Andrea; Valenta, Claudia

    2009-03-31

    Charged drug delivery systems are interesting candidates for the delivery of drugs through skin. In the present study, it was possible to create negatively and positively charged oil/water nanoemulsions by using sucrose laureate and polysorbate 80 as non-ionic surfactants. The positively charged nanoemulsions were generated by adding cationic phytosphingosine (PS). The relationship between the physicochemical properties of the nanoemulsions was shown by particle size and zeta potential measurements. These properties were dependent on the type of non-ionic surfactant and the concentration of PS. Furthermore the cationic PS had a positive impact on the skin permeation rates (flux) of the incorporated model drugs fludrocortisone acetate and flumethasone pivalate. An enhancement factor between 1.1 and 1.5 was obtained in relation to the control. The interaction of pre-impregnated porcine skin with positively and negatively charged nanoemulsions was confirmed by DSC analysis. The generated DSC-curves showed a slight difference in the phase transition temperature assigned to the characteristic lipid transition. However, it was not possible to assign the effect to one of the ingredients in the multicomponent system.

  4. The sphingoid long chain base phytosphingosine activates AGC-type protein kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae including Ypk1, Ypk2, and Sch9.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Zhang, Xiping; Lester, Robert L; Dickson, Robert C

    2005-06-17

    The Pkh1 protein kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a homolog of the mammalian 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase (PDK1), regulates downstream AGC-type protein kinases including Ypk1/2 and Pkc1, which control cell wall integrity, growth, and other processes. Phytosphingosine (PHS), a sphingoid long chain base, is hypothesized to be a lipid activator of Pkh1 and thereby controls the activity of Ypk1/2. Here we present biochemical evidence supporting this hypothesis, and in addition we demonstrate that PHS also stimulates autophosphorylation and activation of Ypk1/2. Greatest stimulation of Ypk1/2 phosphorylation and activity are achieved by inclusion of both PHS and Pkh1 in an in vitro kinase reaction. We also demonstrate for the first time that Pkh1 phosphorylates the Sch9 protein kinase in vitro and that such phosphorylation is stimulated by PHS. This is the first biochemical demonstration of Sch9 activators, and the results further support roles for long chain bases in heat stress resistance in addition to implying roles in chronological aging and cell size determination, since Sch9 functions in these processes. Thus, our data support a model in which PHS, rather than simply being an upstream activator of Pkh1, also activates kinases that are downstream targets of Pkh1 including Ypk1/2 and Sch9.

  5. High-level production of tetraacetyl phytosphingosine (TAPS) by combined genetic engineering of sphingoid base biosynthesis and L-serine availability in the non-conventional yeast Pichia ciferrii.

    PubMed

    Schorsch, Christoph; Köhler, Tim; Andrea, Heiko; Boles, Eckhard

    2012-03-01

    The non-conventional yeast Pichia ciferrii is known to secrete the sphingoid long-chain base phytosphingosine in a tetraacetylated form (TAPS). Sphingolipids are important ingredients in cosmetic applications as they play important roles in human skin. Our work aimed to improve TAPS production by genetic engineering of P. ciferrii. In the first step we improved precursor availability by blocking degradation of L-serine, which is condensed with palmitoyl-CoA by serine palmitoyltransferase in the first committed step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Successive deletion of two genes, SHM1 and SHM2, encoding L-serine hydroxymethyltransferases, and of CHA1 encoding L-serine deaminase, resulted in a strain producing 65 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)), which is a threefold increase in comparison with the parental strain. Attempts to increase the metabolic flux into and through the L-serine biosynthesis pathway did not improve TAPS production. However, genetic engineering of the sphingolipid pathway further increased secretion of TAPS. Blocking of sphingoid long-chain base phosphorylation by deletion of the LCB kinase gene PcLCB4 resulted in a further increase in TAPS production by 78% and significant secretion of the direct precursor of phytosphingosine, sphinganin, in a triacetylated form (TriASa). Overproduction of two serine palmitoyltransferase subunits, Lcb1 and Lcb2, together with a deletion of the gene ORM12 encoding a putative negative regulator of sphingolipid synthesis resulted in a strain producing 178 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)). Additional overproduction of the C4-hydroxylase Syr2 converting sphinganine to phytosphingosine reduced TriASa production and further improved TAPS production. The final recombinant P. ciferrii strain produced up to 199 mg((TAPS))g(-1)((cdw)) with a maximal production rate of 8.42 mg×OD(600nm)(-1)h(-1) and a titer of about 2 g L(-1), and should be applicable for industrial TAPS production.

  6. Asymmetric synthesis of N,O,O,O-tetra-acetyl d-lyxo-phytosphingosine, jaspine B (pachastrissamine), 2-epi-jaspine B, and deoxoprosophylline via lithium amide conjugate addition.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Elin; Brock, E Anne; Candela-Lena, José I; Davies, Stephen G; Georgiou, Matthew; Nicholson, Rebecca L; Perkins, James H; Roberts, Paul M; Russell, Angela J; Sánchez-Fernández, Elena M; Scott, Philip M; Smith, Andrew D; Thomson, James E

    2008-05-07

    The highly diastereoselective anti-aminohydroxylation of (E)-gamma-tri-iso-propylsilyloxy-alpha,beta-unsaturated esters, via conjugate addition of lithium (S)-N-benzyl-N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)amide and subsequent in situ enolate oxidation with (+)-(camphorsulfonyl)oxaziridine, has been used as the key step in the asymmetric synthesis of N,O,O,O-tetra-acetyl d-lyxo-phytosphingosine (20% yield over 7 steps), the anhydrophytosphingosine jaspine B (10% yield over 9 steps), 2-epi-jaspine B (14% yield over 9 steps), and the Prosopis alkaloid deoxoprosophylline (26% yield over 7 steps).

  7. Effective, high-yielding, and stereospecific total synthesis of D-erythro-(2R,3S)-sphingosine from D-ribo-(2S,3S,4R)-phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Richard J B H N; Korevaar, Cornelius G N; Overkleeft, Herman S; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; van Boom, Jacques H

    2004-08-20

    The synthesis of naturally occurring D-erythro-(2R,3S,4E)-sphingosine from commercially available D-ribo-(2S,3S,4R)-phytosphingosine is described. The key step in the reaction sequence comprises TMSI/DBN promoted regio- and stereoselective oxirane opening of intermediate 2-phenyl-4-(S)-[(1S,2S)-1,2-epoxyhexadecyl]-1,3-oxazoline followed by the in situ trans-elimination of 2-phenyl-4-(S)-[(1S,2R)-1,2-dideoxy-2-iodo-1-trimethylsilyloxyhexadecyl]-1,3-oxazoline.

  8. Phytosphingosine-containing neutral glycosphingolipids and sulfatides in the human female genital tract: their association in the cervical epithelium and the uterine endometrium and their dissociation in the mucosa of fallopian tube with the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, K

    1992-09-01

    In human cervical epithelium and uterine endometrium, globo-series neutral glycosphingolipids with N-alpha-hydroxy fatty acyl phytosphingosine (4-D-hydroxysphinganine) as the ceramide and sulfatide (I3SO3-GalCer), which were contained in trace amount at the follicular phase, significantly increased in concentration at the luteal phase, comprising about 20% of the individual neutral glycosphingolipids and about 15% of the total acidic glycosphingolipids, respectively. However, in the mucosa of fallopian tube, neutral glycosphingolipids with the same polarity as those in the cervical epithelium and uterine endometrium at the luteal phase and sulfatide remained at a constant and higher level independently of the menstrual cycle. The structures of neutral glycosphingolipids in the fallopian tube, having the same polarity as that of N-alpha-hydroxy fatty acyl phytosphingosine-containing molecules appeared in the cervical epithelium and uterine endometrium at the luteal phase, were determined to be N-alpha-hydroxy palmitoyl 4-sphingenine-containing ones by negative-ion FABMS. Also, laminin, but not collagen type IV, was found to be contained in the concentration correlated well with that of sulfatide in the genital tract, when determined by western blotting with monoclonal anti-laminin and anti-collagen type IV antibodies, indicating a possible function of sulfatide as a receptor for laminin in the human female genital tract.

  9. The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex regulates TRAIL-induced gene activation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Elodie; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Draber, Peter; De Miguel, Diego; Hartwig, Torsten; Reichert, Matthias; Kupka, Sebastian; Shimizu, Yutaka; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Spit, Maureen; Sprick, Martin R; Walczak, Henning

    2017-03-03

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is the only known E3 ubiquitin ligase which catalyses the generation of linear ubiquitin linkages de novo LUBAC is a crucial component of various immune receptor signalling pathways. Here, we show that LUBAC forms part of the TRAIL-R-associated complex I as well as of the cytoplasmic TRAIL-induced complex II In both of these complexes, HOIP limits caspase-8 activity and, consequently, apoptosis whilst being itself cleaved in a caspase-8-dependent manner. Yet, by limiting the formation of a RIPK1/RIPK3/MLKL-containing complex, LUBAC also restricts TRAIL-induced necroptosis. We identify RIPK1 and caspase-8 as linearly ubiquitinated targets of LUBAC following TRAIL stimulation. Contrary to its role in preventing TRAIL-induced RIPK1-independent apoptosis, HOIP presence, but not its activity, is required for preventing necroptosis. By promoting recruitment of the IKK complex to complex I, LUBAC also promotes TRAIL-induced activation of NF-κB and, consequently, the production of cytokines, downstream of FADD, caspase-8 and cIAP1/2. Hence, LUBAC controls the TRAIL signalling outcome from complex I and II, two platforms which both trigger cell death and gene activation.

  10. Polymorphism of ceramide 3. Part 2: a vibrational spectroscopic and X-ray powder diffraction investigation of N-octadecanoyl phytosphingosine and the analogous specifically deuterated d(35) derivative.

    PubMed

    Raudenkolb, Steve; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2003-07-01

    In order to characterize the arrangements of the hydrocarbon chains of ceramide 3, the thermotropic phase behaviour of the ceramides N-octadecanoylphytosphingosine (CER3) and its chain deuterated derivative N-(d(35)-octadecanoyl)phytosphingosine (d(35)CER3) was studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. CER3 and d(35)CER3 exhibit an identical thermotropic polymorphism involving three different crystalline phases. The selective deuteration of the fatty acid chain enables to distinguish the sphingoid part from the fatty acid part by means of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. It could be shown that both hydrocarbon chains are arranged in different subcells. Temperature dependent Raman measurements elucidate simultaneously the changes in the trans/gauche ratios and the packing of both the hydrocarbon chains of the fatty acid and of the sphingoid part. The phase behaviour of CER3 and d(35)CER3, both dry and hydrated, was investigated.

  11. Autophagy protein p62/SQSTM1 is involved in HAMLET-induced cell death by modulating apotosis in U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-B; Gong, J-L; Xing, T-Y; Zheng, S-P; Ding, W

    2013-03-21

    HAMLET is a complex of oleic acids and decalcified α-lactalbumin that was discovered to selectively kill tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in drug-induced cell death of glioma cells. We treated U87MG human glioma cells with HAMLET and found that the cell viability was significantly decreased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy. Interestingly, we observed an increase in p62/SQSTM1, an important substrate of autophagosome enzymes, at the protein level upon HAMLET treatment for short periods. To better understand the functionality of autophagy and p62/SQSTM1 in HAMLET-induced cell death, we modulated the level of autophagy or p62/SQSTM1 with biochemical or genetic methods. The results showed that inhibition of autophagy aggravated HAMLET-induced cell death, whereas activation of authophagy attenuated this process. Meanwhile, we found that overexpression of wild-type p62/SQSTM1 was able to activate caspase-8, and then promote HAMLET-induced apoptosis, whereas knockdown of p62/SQSTM1 manifested the opposite effect. We further demonstrated that the function of p62/SQSTM1 following HAMLET treatment required its C-terminus UBA domain. Our results indicated that in addition to being a marker of autophagy activation in HAMLET-treated glioma cells, p62/SQSTM1 could also function as an important mediator for the activation of caspase-8-dependent cell death.

  12. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus induces apoptosis in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoye; Ding, Shuangyang; Shi, Peijie; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Zhu, Kui

    2016-10-20

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic pathogen that often causes foodborne infectious diseases and food poisoning. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is the major toxin found in almost all enteropathogenic B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates. However, little is known about the cellular response after Nhe triggered pore formation on cell membrane. Here, we demonstrate that Nhe induced cell cycle arrest at G0 /G1 phase and provoked apoptosis in Vero cells, most likely associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and death receptor pathways. The influx of extracellular calcium ions and increased level of reactive oxygen species in cytoplasm were sensed by apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and p38 MAPK. Extrinsic death receptor Fas could also promote the activation of p38 MAPK. Subsequently, ASK1 and p38 MAPK triggered downstream caspase-8 and 3 to initiate apoptosis. Our results clearly demonstrate that ASK1, and Fas-p38 MAPK-mediated caspase-8 dependent pathways are involved in apoptotic cell death provoked by the pore-forming enterotoxin Nhe.

  13. Hypoxia remodels the composition of the constituent ceramide species of HexCer and Hex2Cer with phytosphingosine and hydroxy fatty acids in human colon cancer LS174T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kouji; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Yamada, Masaki; Murate, Takashi; Kannagi, Reiji; Kyogashima, Mamoru

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen-requiring enzymes, such as Δ4-desaturase (dihydroceramide desaturase), sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase/C-4-hydroxylase, and fatty acid 2-hydroxylase are involved in ceramide synthesis. We prepared free ceramides, sphingomyelins and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from cancer cells cultivated under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia, and analyzed these compounds using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Human colon cancer LS174T cells were employed because these cells highly express hydroxyl fatty acids and phytosphingosine (t18:0) which are expected to be greatly influenced by changes in oxygen levels. As expected, the populations of dihydro-species of free ceramide and sphingomyelin with C16:0 non-hydroxy fatty acid were elevated, and the populations of HexCers and Hex2Cers, composed of C16:0 or C16:0 hydroxy fatty acid (C16:0h), and sphingosine (d18:1) or t18:0, were decreased under hypoxia. However, appreciable populations of HexCer and Hex2Cer species of C24:0 or C24:0h and t18:0 remained. These results suggest that the individual species of GSLs with fatty acids possessing different alkyl chain lengths, either non-hydroxy fatty acids or hydroxyl fatty acids, may be metabolized individually.

  14. Metabonomic study on the plasma of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with Ge Gen Qin Lian Decoction by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyun; Xu, Guoliang; Li, Jia; Guo, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong; Li, Bingtao; Tu, Jun; Zhang, Huashan

    2016-02-20

    Changes in endogenous metabolites in the plasma of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats treated with Ge Gen Qin Lian Decoction (GGQLD) were studied. The endogenous compounds in plasma were detected using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS). Rats were divided into three groups: control, model, and administration (4.95g crude drug/kg body weight). After the final administration, plasma samples from the three groups were analyzed using metabonomics. The three sample groups could be clearly distinguished. The administration group exhibited a distinct return to the levels of phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine of the control group according to the principal component analysis score, and the corresponding biomarkers were defined. Significant changes in endogenous metabolites, such as dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine, cholylglycine, and pantothenic acid, were identified in STZ-induced diabetic rats. These biochemical changes are associated with the metabolism of sphingolipids, fats, and acetyl coenzyme-A, which could be useful to further investigate the characteristics of STZ-induced diabetes mellitus and the therapeutic mechanism of action of GGQLD. This metabonomic analysis could provide a useful starting point toelucidate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of action of GGQLD in diabetes mellitus.

  15. Topical ceramides neither enhance UVB-induced apoptosis in normal human keratinocytes nor affect viability in UVB-irradiated reconstructed human epidermis.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Felsner, Ingo; Koehler, Tim; Farwick, Mike; Lersch, Peter; Rawlings, Anthony V; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-11-01

    Ceramides are the major lipid of lamellar sheets present in intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum contributing to epidermal barrier properties. Therefore, ceramides and their analogues have been studied for barrier enhancing and water-holding properties for decades. In vitro studies have indicated cytotoxic potential for cell-permeable ceramides thereby raising the question whether topical ceramide application might contribute to UVB-induced apoptosis. Phytosphingosine, N-hexanoyl-phytosphingosine and N-stearoylphytosphingosine (ceramide III) in concentrations ≤5 μm have been used for co-stimulation with low (160 J/m(2) ) or high (600 J/m(2) ) UVB doses in subconfluent basal and confluent differentiating keratinocytes. Significantly, increased caspase-3 activity was observed in basal keratinocytes irradiated with 600 J/m(2) UVB and in differentiating keratinocytes with both UVB doses. Co-stimulation with the named ceramides did not further increase (i) caspase-3 activity and (ii) nucleosomal fragmentation in differentiating keratinocytes. Moreover, co-stimulation with 1-mm ceramides did not further affect viability/lactate dehydrogenase release in UVB-irradiated reconstructed human epidermis corroborating the safety of these ceramides.

  16. MAPK p38 and JNK have opposing activities on TRAIL-induced apoptosis activation in NSCLC H460 cells that involves RIP1 and caspase-8 and is mediated by Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Azijli, Kaamar; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; van Roosmalen, Ingrid; Flach, Koen; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J; de Jong, Steven; Kruyt, Frank A E

    2013-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce both caspase-dependent apoptosis and kinase activation in tumor cells. Here, we examined the consequences and mechanisms of TRAIL-induced MAPKs p38 and JNK in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. In apoptosis sensitive H460 cells, these kinases were phosphorylated, but not in resistant A549 cells. Time course experiments in H460 cells showed that induction of p38 phosphorylation preceded that of JNK. To explore the function of these kinases in apoptosis activation by TRAIL, chemical inhibitors or siRNAs were employed to impair JNK or p38 functioning. JNK activation counteracted TRAIL-induced apoptosis whereas activation of p38 stimulated apoptosis. Notably, the serine/threonine kinase RIP1 was cleaved following TRAIL treatment, concomitant with detectable JNK phosphorylation. Further examination of the role of RIP1 by short hairpin (sh)RNA-dependent knockdown or inhibition by necrostatin-1 showed that p38 can be phosphorylated in both RIP1-dependent and -independent manner, whereas JNK phosphorylation occurred independent of RIP1. On the other hand JNK appeared to suppress RIP1 cleavage via an unknown mechanism. In addition, only the activation of JNK by TRAIL was caspase-8-dependent. Finally, we identified Mcl-1, a known substrate for p38 and JNK, as a downstream modulator of JNK or p38 activity. Collectively, our data suggest in a subset of NSCLC cells a model in which TRAIL-induced activation of p38 and JNK have counteracting effects on Mcl-1 expression leading to pro- or anti-apoptotic effects, respectively. Strategies aiming to stimulate p38 and inhibit JNK may have benefit for TRAIL-based therapies in NSCLC.

  17. The necrosome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-04-14

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells

  18. Somatostatin protects photoreceptor cells against high glucose–induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Aurora; Cazzoni, Daniele; Beltramo, Elena; Hernández, Cristina; Porta, Massimo; Simó, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many cellular and molecular studies in experimental animals and early retinal function tests in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have shown that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of the disease. Somatostatin (SST) is one of the most important neuroprotective factors synthesized by the retina: SST levels are decreased in parallel to retinal neurodegeneration in early stages of DR. In this study, we characterized the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in a 661W photoreceptor-like cell line cultured under high glucose (HG) conditions and the effect of SST. Methods A 661W photoreceptor-like cell line and retinal explants from 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were cultured under HG conditions and treated with SST. Results Hyperglycemia significantly reduced the cellular viability by increasing the percentage of apoptotic cells, and this effect was ameliorated by SST (p˂0.05). Activation of caspase-8 by hyperglycemia was found in the 661W cells and retinal explants and decreased in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Moreover, we detected activation of calpain-2 associated with hyperglycemia-induced cell death, as well as increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) protein levels; both had a pattern of cleavage that was absent in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Treatment of the 661W cells and retinal explants with SST for 24 h increased the phosphorylation of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR; tyrosine 1165/1166) and protein kinase B (Akt; serine 473), suggesting this survival signaling is activated in the neuroretina by SST (p˂0.05). Conclusions This study has provided new mechanistic insights first into the involvement of calpain-2 and PTP1B in the loss of cell survival and increased caspase-8-dependent apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia in photoreceptor cells and second, on the protective effect of SST against apoptosis by the enhancement of IGF-IR-mediated Akt phosphorylation. PMID:28050125

  19. The Necrosome Promotes Pancreas Oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle Induced Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are widely believed to die via Caspase 8-dependant apoptotic cell death and chemotherapy is thought to further promote tumor apoptosis1. Conversely, disruption of apoptosis is a basic modality cancer cells exploit for survival2,3. However, the role of necroptosis, or programmed necrosis, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is uncertain. There are a multitude of potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA including ligation of TNFR1, CD95, TRAIL receptors, Toll-like receptors, ROS, and Chemotherapeutics4,5. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, RIP1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by chemotherapy. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo RIP3 deletion or RIP1 inhibition was protective against oncogenic progression and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signaling was in-part contingent on necroptosis-induced CXCL1 expression whereas CXCL1 blockade was protective against PDA. Moreover, we found that cytoplasmic SAP130 was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle – its cognate receptor – was upregulated in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Mincle ligation by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis whereas Mincle deletion was protective and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the TME characteristic of RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion experiments suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects in the context of RIP3 or Mincle deletion. As such, T cells which are dispensable to PDA progression in hosts with intact RIP3 or Mincle signaling become reprogrammed into indispensable mediators of anti-tumor immunity in absence of RIP3 or Mincle. Our work

  20. Molecular mechanism for sphingosine-induced Pseudomonas ceramidase expression through the transcriptional regulator SphR

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic, but serious multidrug-resistant pathogen, secretes a ceramidase capable of cleaving the N-acyl linkage of ceramide to generate fatty acids and sphingosine. We previously reported that the secretion of P. aeruginosa ceramidase was induced by host-derived sphingolipids, through which phospholipase C-induced hemolysis was significantly enhanced. We herein investigated the gene(s) regulating sphingolipid-induced ceramidase expression and identified SphR, which encodes a putative AraC family transcriptional regulator. Disruption of the sphR gene in P. aeruginosa markedly decreased the sphingomyelin-induced secretion of ceramidase, reduced hemolytic activity, and resulted in the loss of sphingomyelin-induced ceramidase expression. A microarray analysis confirmed that sphingomyelin significantly induced ceramidase expression in P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SphR specifically bound free sphingoid bases such as sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, and phytosphingosine, but not sphingomyelin or ceramide. A β-galactosidase-assisted promoter assay showed that sphingosine activated ceramidase expression through SphR at a concentration of 100 nM. Collectively, these results demonstrated that sphingosine induces the secretion of ceramidase by promoting the mRNA expression of ceramidase through SphR, thereby enhancing hemolytic phospholipase C-induced cytotoxicity. These results facilitate understanding of the physiological role of bacterial ceramidase in host cells. PMID:27941831

  1. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  2. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  3. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  4. Study the therapeutic mechanism of Amomum compactum in gentamicin-induced acute kidney injury rat based on a back propagation neural network algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiye; Chen, Hongmei; Chang, Chun; Jiang, Mingyang; Wang, Xiulan; Xu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major global public health problems, as it causes high morbidity and serious injury to renal function. However, the etiology for AKI is not very clear. In this study, a serum metabolite profile analysis was performed to identify potential biomarkers for gentamicin-induced AKI and to investigate the mechanism of action of Amomum compactum (AC) used for treatment. A metabonomics approach by ultra-performance liquid chromatography together with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to perform the analysis. Back propagation (BP) neural network models were established for classifying data from the control, model, and AC-treated groups. Accuracy rate for classification was 91.7% in positive ion mode and 87.5% in negative ion mode. By orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), 29 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers of gentamicin-induced AKI. Most of them are related to phospholipid metabolism. After treatment with AC, the levels of sphingomyelin, sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and arachidonic acid were restored to normal. The results indicate that AC plays a protective role in rats with gentamicin-induced AKI via regulation of the phospholipid metabolic pathway. In this work, early biomarkers of AKI has been identified and underlying therapeutic mechanism of AC has been understood, therefore, AC can be further investigated and tested for clinical application.

  5. The necroptosis-inducing kinase RIPK3 dampens adipose tissue inflammation and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gautheron, Jérémie; Vucur, Mihael; Schneider, Anne T.; Severi, Ilenia; Roderburg, Christoph; Roy, Sanchari; Bartneck, Matthias; Schrammen, Peter; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Ehling, Josef; Gremse, Felix; Heymann, Felix; Koppe, Christiane; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Van Best, Niels; Pabst, Oliver; Courtois, Gilles; Linkermann, Andreas; Krautwald, Stefan; Neumann, Ulf P.; Tacke, Frank; Trautwein, Christian; Green, Douglas R.; Longerich, Thomas; Frey, Norbert; Luedde, Mark; Bluher, Matthias; Herzig, Stephan; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Luedde, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) mediates necroptosis, a form of programmed cell death that promotes inflammation in various pathological conditions, suggesting that it might be a privileged pharmacological target. However, its function in glucose homeostasis and obesity has been unknown. Here we show that RIPK3 is over expressed in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of obese mice fed with a choline-deficient high-fat diet. Genetic inactivation of Ripk3 promotes increased Caspase-8-dependent adipocyte apoptosis and WAT inflammation, associated with impaired insulin signalling in WAT as the basis for glucose intolerance. Similarly to mice, in visceral WAT of obese humans, RIPK3 is overexpressed and correlates with the body mass index and metabolic serum markers. Together, these findings provide evidence that RIPK3 in WAT maintains tissue homeostasis and suppresses inflammation and adipocyte apoptosis, suggesting that systemic targeting of necroptosis might be associated with the risk of promoting insulin resistance in obese patients. PMID:27323669

  6. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Induced Abortion Home For Patients Search FAQs Induced Abortion Page ... Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced Abortion Special Procedures What is an induced abortion? What ...

  7. A metabonomic analysis of the effect of quercetin on toxicity induced by chronic exposure to low-level dichlorvos in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Qi, Lei; Li, Sifan; Hou, Yurong; Xu, Wei; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2014-10-01

    A previous study of ours has reported that chronic exposure to low-level dichlorvos (DDVP, 7.2 mg per kg bw) damages the liver, interferes with fatty acid metabolism, and disturbs the antioxidant defense system in rats. This study aims to investigate whether or not quercetin can protect against DDVP-induced toxicity through metabonomics and to elucidate the mechanism underlying this protective effect. Rats were randomly assigned into the control group, DDVP-treated group, quercetin-treated group, and quercetin plus DDVP-treated group. DDVP and quercetin were administered to the rats daily via drinking water and gavage, respectively, continuously for 90 d. The metabonomic profiles of rat plasma were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Finally, 11 metabolites were identified, including those of quercetin, isorhamnetin, and quercetin-3-glucuronide. The 11 metabolites showed significant changes in some treatment groups compared with the control group. Arachidonic acid, phytosphingosine, and C16 sphinganine significantly decreased while p-cresol, lysoPE (16:0/0:0), lysoPC (15:0/0:0), lysoPC (16:0/0:0), lysoPC (0:0/18:0), and tryptophan significantly increased in the DDVP-treated group compared with the control group. The tendency of the aforementioned metabolites to change was significantly ameliorated in the high-dose quercetin (50 mg per kg bw per day) plus DDVP-treated group compared with the DDVP-treated group. However, the levels of these metabolites in the high-dose quercetin plus DDVP-treated group were still significantly different from those in the control group. The results indicate that high-dose quercetin (50 mg per kg bw per day) elicits a partial protective effect on DDVP-induced toxicity. The histopathology of the liver tissues was consistent with the above results. Quercetin demonstrated regulatory effects on the metabolism of lipids and amino acids, the antioxidant defense system, etc. Therefore, increasing the

  8. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-02

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases.

  9. TRANSCRIPTIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE REPONSE OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA TO PHYTOSHINGOSINE REVEALS LINKS TO MITOCHRONDRIAL FUNCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of Neurospora crassa cells with phytosphingosine (PHS) induces programmed cell death (PCD) by an unknown mechanism. To determine the relationship between treatment with PHS and PCD, we determined changes in global gene expression levels in N. crassa during a time course of PHS treatment. M...

  10. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... inducing labor is to "break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic exam and will guide a small plastic probe with a hook on the end through your cervix to create a hole in the membrane. This does not hurt you ...

  11. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  12. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma ... they choose. previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with ...

  13. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  14. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  15. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-04-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms.

  16. Flumazenil-induced ballism.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Ko, Seok-Bum; Choi, Yeong-Bin; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2003-01-01

    Flumazenil, an imidazobenzodiazepine, is the first benzodiazepine antagonist and is being used to reverse the adverse pharmacological effects of benzodiazepine. There have been a few reports on the central nevous system side effects with its use. We report a patient with generalized ballism following administration of flumazenil. The mechanism through which flumazenil induced this symptom is unknown. It is conceivable that flumazenil may antagonize the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor complex and induce dopamine hypersensitivity, thus induce dyskinesic symptoms. PMID:12692435

  17. Drug-induced nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Paueksakon, Paisit; Fogo, Agnes B

    2017-01-01

    Drugs are associated frequently with the development of various types of acute and chronic kidney diseases. Nephrotoxicity is associated most commonly with injury in the tubulointerstitial compartment manifested as either acute tubular injury or acute interstitial nephritis. A growing number of reports has also highlighted the potential for drug-induced glomerular disease, including direct cellular injury and immune-mediated injury. Recognition of drug-induced nephropathies and rapid discontinuation of the offending agents are critical to maximizing the likelihood of renal function recovery. This review will focus on the pathology and pathogenesis of drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis and drug-induced glomerular diseases.

  18. Teacher-Induced Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Kent C.

    Students of English as a second language (ESL) often come to the classroom with little or no experience in writing in any language and with inaccurate assumptions about writing. Rather than correct these assumptions, teachers often seem to unwittingly reinforce them, actually inducing errors into their students' work. Teacher-induced errors occur…

  19. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  20. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  1. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  2. Drug-induced catatonia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-09-01

    Catatonia is a heterogeneous syndrome that varies in etiology, presentation, course and sequelae. Initially conceptualized as a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur not only with other psychiatric conditions but also with medical conditions and drug-induced and toxic states. While drug-induced catatonia is now a recognized entity, most studies club it with catatonia due to general medical conditions or organic catatonia, thus precluding any meaningful interpretation of such cases. The literature on drug-induced catatonia mostly draws from scattered case reports. This article attempts to review the available literature in this realm and integrate the information in an attempt to explore the epidemiology, etiology, mechanism and treatment of drug-induced catatonia.

  3. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  4. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  5. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  6. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression.

  7. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Awareness of the need for prevention of glucocorticoid-induced fractures is growing, but glucocorticoid administration is often overlooked as the most common cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis develops in 9-40% of patients receiving long-term therapy although it may also occur with short-term exposure to high doses, after intra-articular injection, and without glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The name, osteonecrosis, is misleading because the primary histopathological lesion is osteocyte apoptosis. Apoptotic osteocytes persist because they are anatomically unavailable for phagocytosis and, with glucocorticoid excess, decreased bone remodeling retards their replacement. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and unrepairable defect, uniquely disrupts the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system and thus starts the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head. Current evidence indicates that bisphosphonates may rapidly reduce pain, increase ambulation, and delay joint collapse in patients with osteonecrosis.

  8. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin.

  9. Levodopa-induced myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Klawans, H L; Goetz, C; Bergen, D

    1975-05-01

    Twelve parkinsonian patients on long-term levodopa therapy developed intermittent, myoclonic body jerks. The movements consisted of single unilateral or bilateral abrupt jerks of the extremities and occurred most frequently during sleep. Although directly related to daily dosage of levodopa, the myoclonus was specifically blocked by the serotonin antagonist, methysergide. Levodopa-induced myoclonus may be related to intermittent increases of activity of serotonin in the brain and results from levodopa-induced dysregulation of serotonin activity.

  10. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  11. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  12. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  13. Drug-induced mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Peters, S

    1995-02-01

    Mania can occur by chance association during drug treatment, particularly in patients predisposed to mood disorder. Single case reports are unreliable, and evidence must be sought from large series of treated patients, particularly those with a matched control group. Drugs with a definite propensity to cause manic symptoms include levodopa, corticosteroids and anabolic-androgenic steroids. Antidepressants of the tricyclic and monoamine oxidase inhibitor classes can induce mania in patients with pre-existing bipolar affective disorder. Drugs which are probably capable of inducing mania, but for which the evidence is less scientifically secure, include other dopaminergic anti-Parkinsonian drugs, thyroxine, iproniazid and isoniazid, sympathomimetic drugs, chloroquine, baclofen, alprazolam, captopril, amphetamine and phencyclidine. Other drugs may induce mania rarely and idiosyncratically. Management involves discontinuation or dosage reduction of the suspected drug, if this is medically possible, and treatment of manic symptoms with antipsychotic drugs or lithium.

  14. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  15. The Yersinia pestis Effector YopM Inhibits Pyrin Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Alnemri, Emad S.; Johnson, Peter F.; Lee, Bettina; Mecsas, Joan; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Goguen, Jon D.; Lien, Egil

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are central virulence factors for many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and secreted T3SS effectors can block key aspects of host cell signaling. To counter this, innate immune responses can also sense some T3SS components to initiate anti-bacterial mechanisms. The Yersinia pestis T3SS is particularly effective and sophisticated in manipulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, which are typically processed into their mature forms by active caspase-1 following inflammasome formation. Some effectors, like Y. pestis YopM, may block inflammasome activation. Here we show that YopM prevents Y. pestis induced activation of the Pyrin inflammasome induced by the RhoA-inhibiting effector YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein. YopM blocks YopE-induced Pyrin-mediated caspase-1 dependent IL-1β/IL-18 production and cell death. We also detected YopM in a complex with Pyrin and kinases RSK1 and PKN1, putative negative regulators of Pyrin. In contrast to wild-type mice, Pyrin deficient mice were also highly susceptible to an attenuated Y. pestis strain lacking YopM, emphasizing the importance of inhibition of Pyrin in vivo. A complex interplay between the Y. pestis T3SS and IL-1β/IL-18 production is evident, involving at least four inflammasome pathways. The secreted effector YopJ triggers caspase-8- dependent IL-1β activation, even when YopM is present. Additionally, the presence of the T3SS needle/translocon activates NLRP3 and NLRC4-dependent IL-1β generation, which is blocked by YopK, but not by YopM. Taken together, the data suggest YopM specificity for obstructing the Pyrin pathway, as the effector does not appear to block Y. pestis-induced NLRP3, NLRC4 or caspase-8 dependent caspase-1 processing. Thus, we identify Y. pestis YopM as a microbial inhibitor of the Pyrin inflammasome. The fact that so many of the Y. pestis T3SS components are participating in regulation of IL-1β/IL-18 release suggests

  16. Geomagnetism and induced voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-07-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of conceptual integrated science over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is initiated by the change in the magnetic flux due to the Earth's magnetic field and movement. This simple and enjoyable experiment will demonstrate how basic concepts in physics and geology can help us think about possible health effects due to the induced voltage.

  17. Surgery induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian V; Peter, Mark B; Shenoy, Hrishikesh G; Horgan, Kieran; Hughes, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia result in a variety of metabolic and endocrine responses, which result in a generalised state of immunosuppression in the immediate post-operative period. Surgery induced immunosuppression has been implicated in the development of post-operative septic complications and tumour metastasis formation. In addition the effectiveness of many treatments in the adjuvant setting is dependent on a functioning immune system. By understanding the mechanisms contributing to surgery-induced immunosuppression, surgeons may undertake strategies to minimise its effect and reduce potential short-term and long-term consequences to patients.

  18. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement. PMID:28289500

  19. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  20. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, S.Y.

    1989-08-08

    An improvement in a pump is described including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means which cooperate with a first vortex cell and a series of secondary vortex cells to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow. 3 figs.

  1. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  2. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  3. Drug-induced uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates. PMID:23522744

  4. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  5. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  6. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  7. Shrouded inducer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  8. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  9. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  10. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  11. Topological induced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton’s coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological quantum-field theory (TQFT).

  12. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  13. Warfarin-induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey J; Robertson, Ivan; James, Daniel; McMeniman, Erin

    2015-02-01

    Erythroderma is a potentially serious and life-threatening skin disease with a number of possible aetiologies. Drug reactions are well-documented causes, with carbamazepine, penicillin and allopurinol being the most commonly implicated. This case describes a unique presentation of warfarin-induced erythroderma in a 78-year-old female patient.

  14. Friction induced rail vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralov, Ivan; Sinapov, Petko; Nedelchev, Krasimir; Ignatov, Ignat

    2012-11-01

    A model of rail, considered as multiple supported beam, subjected on friction induced vibration is studied in this work using FEM. The model is presented as continuous system and the mass and elastic properties of a real object are taken into account. The friction forces are nonlinear functions of the relative velocity during slipping. The problem is solved using Matlab Simulink.

  15. Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Gounden, Ronald; Blockman, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is an acquired, transient prothrombotic disorder caused by heparin. The predominant problem is the creation of a prothrombotic milieu, accompanied by a fall in the platelet count. This explains the apparent paradox of thrombosis in the face of thrombocytopaenia and why non-heparin antithrombotic agents are integral to its management.

  16. Viral induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  17. [Steroid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Perrot, Serge; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Bone-related steroid involvement is one of the most frequent complications of steroid treatment. Epidemiological data demonstrate that osteoporosis starts early during the treatment, predominantly involves trabecular bone and is correlated to dosage and treatment duration. Mechanisms and consequences of steroid bone involvement are related to osseous and extra-osseous mechanisms. In clinical practice, steroid-induced osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and undertreated both in preventive and curative approaches. Recently, new molecules as teriparatide and zoledronic acid got indication for the treatment of steroid-induced osteoporosis. To guide treatment strategies, several recommendations are available: French, not updated recommendations since 2003 (Afssaps, 2003), European elaborated by the EULAR in 2007 and those of the ACR updated in 2010.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  19. Current induced interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Peter M.; Heide, Carsten; Zhang, Shufeng; Fert, Albert

    2001-03-01

    It has recently been shown that a perpendicular current in a magnetically multilayered structures induces an unusual bilinear coupling between the magnetizations of the layers [1]. While this was demonstrated in the ballistic regime, transport is likely to be diffusive in the structures where this may be relevant to the role of currents in switching the magnetization of the layers. We have derived the current induced coupling by using the Boltzmann equation in terms of the parameters used to describe the giant magnetoresistance of magnetically layered structures, and thereby estimate the strength of this coupling. Work supported in part by DARPA and ONR. [1] C.Heide and R.J.Elliott, Europhys. Lett. 50, 271 (2000).

  20. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  1. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  2. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  3. Buckling-Induced Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  4. Buckling-Induced Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-02-24

    We investigate the mechanical response of thin sheets perforated with a square array of mutually orthogonal cuts, which leaves a network of squares connected by small ligaments. Our combined analytical, experimental and numerical results indicate that under uniaxial tension the ligaments buckle out of plane, inducing the formation of 3D patterns whose morphology is controlled by the load direction. We also find that by largely stretching the buckled perforated sheets, plastic strains develop in the ligaments. This gives rise to the formation of kirigami sheets comprising periodic distribution of cuts and permanent folds. As such, the proposed buckling-induced pop-up strategy points to a simple route for manufacturing complex morphable structures out of flat perforated sheets.

  5. Cocaine-Induced Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Mark; Paran, Daphna; Elkayam, Ori

    2016-01-01

    The use of cocaine continues to grow worldwide. One of the possible side-effects of cocaine is vasculitis. Two distinct vasculitic syndromes have been described due to cocaine. One is cocaine-induced midline destructive lesion, secondary to a direct vasoconstrictor effect of cocaine, inducing ischemic necrosis of the septal cartilage and perforation of the nasal septum, mimicking findings of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in the upper airways. The other is ANCA-associated vasculitis, attributed to the levamisole component that contaminates about 70% of the cocaine. This type of vasculitis may be myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) positive, and its main manifestations are typical cutaneous findings, arthralgia, otolaryngologic involvement, and agranulocytosis. A high degree of suspicion and awareness is needed in order properly to diagnose and treat these patients. PMID:27824551

  6. Drug-induced hypokalaemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Hmouda, Houssem; Bouraoui, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    Hypokalaemia (defined as a plasma potassium concentration<3.5 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Drugs are a common cause of either asymptomatic or symptomatic hypokalaemia. Drug-induced hypokalaemia is an important problem particularly in the elderly and in patients with cardiovascular, renal or hepatic disease. Hypokalaemia can complicate the use of the drug in the therapeutic concentration range, and can also be precipitated with overdose or conditions leading to drug intoxication. Because the etiologies of hypokalaemia are numerous, the diagnosis of drug-induced hypokalaemia may be overlooked. Physicians should always pay close attention to this common side effect. Evaluation and management of a hypokalaemic patient should include a careful review of medications history to determine if a drug capable of causing or aggravating this electrolyte abnormality is present.

  7. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  8. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  9. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  10. Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

  11. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  12. Allopurinol induced erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Geeta; Govil, Dinesh Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely prescribed urate lowering agent is responsible for various adverse drug reactions, including erythroderma. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of fever, redness and scaling all over the body after 3-4 weeks of allopurinol treatment for asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Elevated liver enzymes were detected in his blood analysis. Skin biopsy was consistent with drug induced erythroderma. Allopurinol was stopped and steroids were started. Patient improved over a period of 2 weeks.

  13. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  14. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  15. Induced QCD I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-11-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU( N c ) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N b can be as small as N c . In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U( N c ) to SU( N c ), (ii) derive refined bounds on N b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  16. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  17. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  18. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  19. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder.

  20. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  1. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  2. Isoniazid-induced pellagra.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Karadag, Ayse Serap; Calka, Omer; Altun, Faruk

    2011-12-01

    Pellagra is characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death occurring as a result of niacin or its precursor tryptophan deficiency. Although pellagra is a well-known complication of isoniazid (INH) therapy, the clinical diagnosis may be missed or delayed that may cause life-threatening consequences. Due to the diversity of pellagra-related signs and symptoms, the diagnosis can be made with an appropriate index of suspicion. We report a 7-year-old boy presenting with INH-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of the niacin therapy.

  3. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity.

  4. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism.

  5. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  6. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  7. Inducing Pluripotency in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technologies in general and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in particular have opened the door to a vast number of practical applications in regenerative medicine and biotechnology. It also represents a possible alternative to the still evasive achievement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) isolation from refractory species such as Bos. taurus. Herein, we described a protocol for bovine iPSCs (biPSCs) generation and characterization. The protocol is based on the overexpression of the exogenous transcription factors NANOG, OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, using a pantropic retroviral system.

  8. 5-fluorouracil induced pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Killu, Ammar; Madhavan, Malini; Prasad, Kavita; Prasad, Abhiram

    2011-04-15

    Cardiac toxicity is an infrequent, but potentially serious side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The reported incidence of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity is approximately 3%, although estimates vary from 1.2% to 18%. Cardiac death occurs in less than 1%. The prompt recognition of cardiac toxicity demands a thorough understanding of the myriad of potential cardiac manifestations and a high index of suspicion. The most common presentation is angina pectoris while other manifestations, namely myocardial infarction, left ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias and sudden death have been recognised. The authors report an unusual case of myopericarditis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

  9. Method for inducing hypothermia

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  10. Antacid-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Boutsen, Y; Devogelaer, J P; Malghem, J; Noel, H; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from generalized skeletal pain and multiple fractures accompanied by severe hypophosphataemia and low urinary phosphorus excretion is reported. She had been taking large amounts of antacids containing aluminum hydroxide for many years. A diagnosis of antacid-induced osteomalacia was made. It was confirmed by biological work-up, radiographs and bone biopsy. A dramatic biological, osteodensitometric, and clinical improvement was achieved by withdrawal of antacids and phosphorus administration. The literature concerning this unusual condition has been reviewed.

  11. Synthesis of D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine and D-xylo-phytosphingosine from a serine-derived 1,5-dioxaspiro[3.2]hexane template.

    PubMed

    Ndakala, Albert J; Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; So, Regina C; Howell, Amy R

    2002-05-16

    [reaction: see text] A serine-derived 1,5-dioxaspiro[3.2]hexane template is shown to be a useful precursor for both aminodiol and aminotriol sphingoid bases by its conversion to D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine and D-xylo-phytoshingosine.

  12. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  13. [Exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Gani, Federica; Selvaggi, Lucia; Roagna, Davide

    2008-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) was defined for the first time in 1980. EIA is associated with different kind of exercise, although jogging is the most frequently reported. The clinical manifestations progress from itching, erythema and urticaria to some combination of cutaneous angioedema, gastrointestinal and laryngeal symptoms and signs of angioedema and vascular collapse. Mast cell participation in the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been proved by the finding of an elevated serum histamine level during experimentally-induced attacks and by cutaneous degranulation of mast cells with elevated serum tryptase after attacks. As predisposing factors of EIA, a specific or even aspecific sensitivity to food has been reported and such cases are called "food-dependent EIA". Many foods are implicated but particularly wheat, vegetables, crustacean. Another precipitating factor includes drugs intake (non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), climate variations and menstrual cycle factors. Treatment of an attack should include all the manoeuvres efficacious in the management of conventional anaphylactic syndrome, including the administration of epinephrine and antihistamines. Prevention of the attacks may be achieved with the interruption of the exercise at the appearance of the first premonitory symptoms. To prevent the onset of EIA it is also suitable to delay the exercise practice after at least 4-6 hours from the swallowing of food.

  14. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  15. [Gluten induced diseases].

    PubMed

    Frič, P; Zavoral, M; Dvořáková, T

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cereals in human nutrition 10 000 years ago caused the occurrence of gluten induced diseases. This protein complex is involved in pathogenesis of wheat allergy, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. Wheat allergy and celiac disease are mediated by the system of adaptive immunity. Gluten sensitivity is a recently defined entity induced by innate immune mechanisms. These subjects present various intestinal and particularly extraintestinal symptoms. The differences between celiac disease and gluten intolerance include permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, histology of duodenal biopsy, and mucosal gene expression. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity may also have another genetic background of food intolerance independent of the HLADQ2, - DQ8 system and tissue transglutaminase (eg. in some psychiatric disorders). At present, there is no specific bio-marker of gluten sensitivity. The diagnosis is possible only by exclusion of other causes of symptoms and improvement on a glutenfree diet applied in a doubleblind placebo controlled manner with optional sequence of both stages to exclude the placebo effect due to nutritional intervention.

  16. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  17. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels.

  18. Drug-induced exanthems.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2005-04-15

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs can comprise a broad spectrum of clinical and histopathological features. Recent evidence from immunohistological and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells suggest that distinct T-cell functions may be responsible for this broad spectrum of different clinical reactions. Maculopapular exanthems represent the most commonly encountered cutaneous drug eruption. Previous studies on maculopapular exanthems indicate that drug-specific CD4+ T cells expressing cytotoxic granule proteins such as perforin and granzyme B are critically involved in killing activated keratinocytes. These cells are particularly found at the dermo-epidermal junction and may contribute to the generation of vacuolar alteration and destruction of basal keratinocytes, which are typical found in drug-induced maculopapular exanthems. In contrast to maculopapular exanthems, the preferential activation of drug-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells may lead to more severe reactions like bullous drug eruptions. Furthermore, activation of drug-specific T with distinct cytokine and chemokines profiles may also explain the different clinical features of drug-induced exanthems. IL-5 and eotaxin are upregulated in maculopapular exanthems and explain the eosinophilia often found in these reactions.

  19. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  20. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  1. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  2. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  3. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  4. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  5. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    PubMed

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  6. Catatonia induced by levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Marie-Josée; Nguyen, Dang-Khoa; Clément, Jean-François; Bruneau, Marie-Andrée

    2006-02-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug approved as adjunctive treatment for adults with partial onset seizures. Although the drug is generally well tolerated, behavioral side effects have been reported in variable frequency. Most behavioral problems are mild in nature (agitation, hostility, anxiety, emotional lability, apathy, depression) and quickly resolve with discontinuation of medication. However, serious psychiatric adverse events may also occur with rare cases of psychosis and suicidal behavior. We report here the case of a 43-year-old woman who developed symptoms compatible with catatonia after being exposed to levetiracetam for the treatment of epilepsy. To our knowledge, it is the first reported case of catatonia induced by levetiracetam. We review the difficulties that may be encountered in the differential diagnosis of medical catatonia.

  7. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  8. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use.

  9. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  10. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  11. [Drug-induced asterixis].

    PubMed

    Rittmannsberger, H; Leblhuber, F

    1994-04-22

    A 54-year-old woman with acute schizoaffective psychosis was treated with lithium carbonate (1,350 mg daily) and zuclopenthixol. On admission, clozapine was added (250 mg daily). Because extrapyramidal symptoms (rigor, akinesia) developed, she was additionally given biperiden retard (4 mg daily) from the fourth hospital day onwards. Eleven days after admission she began to complain of "unsteadiness" and "tremors" in her arms and she had asterixis (flapping tremor) on holding up her arms. The electromyogram showed electrical pauses of 60-120 ms, typical for asterixis. There were no significant metabolic or organic cerebral changes that could have accounted for the symptoms which presumably had been induced by the drugs even though their dosage was not unusual. The symptoms in fact regressed completely after the clozapine dose had been reduced, at first to 125 mg then to 50 mg. Previous experience has suggested that the risk of asterixis is particularly high when lithium and clozapine are taken together.

  12. Load Induced Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005d`) was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus—a phenomenon of load induced blindness. PMID:18823196

  13. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  14. Pertussis-induced cough.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kay; Harnden, Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) is one of the commonest vaccine preventable diseases in the UK, despite vaccination coverage being maintained for the last 15 years at over 90% among infants and the addition of a pre-school booster to the UK national immunisation programme in 2001. However, it is known that pertussis vaccine does not confer long-term immunity to clinical infection. Evidence of pertussis infection has been reported in 37% of children presenting in UK primary care and 20% of adolescents and adults presenting in Canadian health centres with persistent cough. In children and adults with persistent cough, paroxysmal coughing is the most sensitive indicator of pertussis, but has poor specificity and limited diagnostic value. Vomiting and whooping, particularly in combination, are stronger predictors of pertussis. Cough duration is longer in children than in adults with pertussis (median cough duration 112 days versus 42 days); individuals may take even longer to recover fully and regain previous levels of exercise tolerance. A diagnosis of pertussis may be confirmed by culture, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) or serology. Single estimates of anti-pertussis toxin (PT) antibody titres in blood or oral fluid samples are highly specific. There are currently no proven efficacious treatments for pertussis-induced cough. Treatment with macrolide antibiotics reduces the duration of an individual's infectious period, but does not alter the duration of cough. Further research is needed to re-examine the epidemiology of pertussis in countries with different vaccination schedules, find efficacious treatments and develop methods of measuring cough frequency and severity in patients with pertussis-induced cough.

  15. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  16. Fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Bababekov, Yanik J; Stanelle, Eric J; Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2015-05-20

    We review the literature and describe a case of fishbone-induced appendicitis. A 63-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Work up including a focused history and imaging revealed fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis. The patient was managed safely and successfully with laparoscopic removal of the foreign body and appendectomy.

  17. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  18. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  19. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  20. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  1. Laughter-induced syncope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Alexander J; Frishman, William H

    2012-01-01

    Reported cases of syncope caused directly by laughter are rare. The common scenario described in a few reports involved episodes of fortuitous laughter, sometimes followed by a short prodrome of lightheadedness, facial flushing, and dizziness, followed by an episode of definite syncope. There were no seizure-like movements, automatisms, or bladder or bowel incontinence. After the syncopal episodes that were seconds in length, the patients regained consciousness, and at that point were fully oriented. These episodes could recur in a similar situation with such laughter. Many of these patients subsequently underwent full syncope workups, without elucidating a primary cardiac or neurologic cause. In this review of laughter-induced syncope, we describe a patient of ours who fit these descriptions. This phenomenon is likely a subtype of benign Valsalva-related syncope, with autonomic reflex arcs coming into play that ultimately result in global cerebral hypoperfusion. Besides the Valsalva produced by a great fit of laughter, laughter itself has its own neuroendocrine and vasculature effects that may play a role.

  2. Inductive source induced polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, David; Haber, Eldad; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2013-02-01

    Induced polarization (IP) surveys are commonly performed to map the distribution of electrical chargeability that is a diagnostic physical property in mineral exploration and in many environmental problems. Although these surveys have been successful in the past, the galvanic sources required for traditional IP and magnetic IP (MIP) surveys prevent them from being applied in some geological settings. We develop a new methodology for processing frequency domain EM data to identify the presence of IP effects in observations of the magnetic fields arising from an inductive source. The method makes use of the asymptotic behaviour of the secondary magnetic fields at low frequency. A new quantity, referred to as the ISIP datum, is defined so that it equals zero at low frequencies for any frequency-independent (non-chargeable) conductivity distribution. Thus, any non-zero response in the ISIP data indicates the presence of chargeable material. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the method can be applied even in complicated geological situations. A 3-D inversion algorithm is developed to recover the chargeability from the ISIP data and the inversion is demonstrated on synthetic examples.

  3. Load induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James S P; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-10-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005, for a review). Here we varied the level of perceptual load in a letter-search task and assessed its effect on the conscious perception of a search-irrelevant shape stimulus appearing in the periphery, using a direct measure of awareness (present/absent reports). Detection sensitivity (d') was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus--a phenomenon of load induced blindness.

  4. Loperamide-induced hypopituitarism

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Catherine; Gan, Earn H; Pearce, Simon H S

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is the most commonly used antidiarrhoeal medication in the UK. We report a serious and hitherto undocumented adverse effect of chronic use in a 45-year-old man with inflammatory bowel disease. He presented to the endocrine clinic with fatigue and low libido; biochemical assessment revealed hypogonadism and adrenal insufficiency without any elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone. When symptoms allowed, loperamide was reduced and a short synacthen test (SST) showed a ‘clear pass’ with a normal peak cortisol of 833 nmol/L. Later, worsening diarrhoea necessitated an escalation in loperamide use again. While taking a daily dose of 15–20 mg (recommended daily maximum 16 mg) reassessment revealed a fall in peak cortisol on SST to 483 nmol/L, a subnormal response. Clinicians should exercise caution when relying on loperamide to manage their patients’ chronic diarrhoea and remain mindful of the possibility of drug-induced life-threatening adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27681351

  5. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  7. miR-31 Links Lipid Metabolism and Cell Apoptosis in Bacteria-Challenged Apostichopus japonicus via Targeting CTRP9

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yina; Li, Chenghua; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Pengjuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xuelin

    2017-01-01

    The biological functions of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been studied in a number of eukaryotic species. Recent studies on vertebrate animals have demonstrated critical roles of miRNA in immune and metabolic activities. However, studies on the functions of miRNA in invertebrates are very limited. Here, we demonstrated that miR-31 from Apostichopus japonicus disrupts the balance of lipid metabolism, thus resulting in cell apoptosis by targeting complement C1q tumor necrosis factor-related protein 9 (AjCTRP9), a novel adipokine with pleiotropic functions in immunity and metabolism. Lipidomic analysis suggested that the intercellular lipid metabolites were markedly altered, and three ceramide (Cer) species synchronously increased in the AjCTRP9-silenced coelomocytes. Moreover, exogenous Cer exposure significantly induced apoptosis in the coelomocytes in vivo, in agreement with findings from miR-31 mimic- or AjCTRP9 small-interfering RNA-transfected coelomocytes. Furthermore, we found that the imbalance in sphingolipid metabolism triggered by the overproduction of Cers ultimately resulted in the activation of the apoptosis initiator caspase-8 and executioner caspase-3. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that miR-31 negatively modulates the expression of AjCTRP9 and disturbance of Cer channels, thus leading to caspase-3- and caspase-8-dependent apoptosis, during the interactions between pathogens and host. PMID:28348559

  8. Distinct combinatorial effects of the plant polyphenols curcumin, carnosic acid and silibinin on proliferation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pesakhov, Stella; Khanin, Marina; Studzinski, George P.; Danilenko, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignancy without effective treatment for most patients. Here we demonstrate that combinations of the dietary plant polyphenols curcumin and carnosic acid, at non-cytotoxic concentrations of each agent, produced a synergistic antiproliferative effect and a massive apoptotic cell death in HL-60 and KG-1a human AML cells. In contrast, combinations of curcumin and another plant polyphenol silibinin had a predominantly additive cytostatic effect, without pronounced cytotoxicity. Neither polyphenol combination affected viability of normal human fibroblasts or proliferating and non-proliferating blood cells. Early stage of curcumin/carnosic acid-induced apoptosis was associated with cleavage (activation) of caspases-8, -9, and -3 and the proapoptotic protein Bid, but not with oxidative stress or altered levels of other Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1, Bax and Bak). Inhibitors of caspase-8 and -9 markedly attenuated apoptosis, indicating the involvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Caspase-8 inhibition abrogated Bid cleavage and strongly reduced caspase-9 activation, suggesting that the cross-talk mechanism mediated by caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage can contribute to the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by CUR+CA. Collectively, these results suggest a mechanistic basis for the potential use of dietary plant polyphenol combinations in the treatment and prevention of AML. PMID:20661831

  9. Inhibition of A2780 Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Proliferation by a Rubus Component, Sanguiin H-6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dahae; Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Su-Nam; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-02-03

    The effects of a red raspberry component, sanguiin H-6 (SH-6), on the induction of apoptosis and the related signaling pathways in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells were investigated. SH-6 caused an antiproliferative effect and a severe morphological change resembling that of apoptotic cell death but no effect on the cancer cell cycle arrest. In addition, SH-6 induced an early apoptotic effect and activation of caspases as well as the cleavage of PARP, which is a hallmark of apoptosis. The early apoptotic percentages of A2780 cells exposed to 20 and 40 μM SH-6 were 35.39 and 41.76, respectively. Also, SH-6 caused the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38, and the increase of truncated p15/BID. These results in the present study suggest that the apoptosis of A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells by SH-6 is mediated by the MAPK p38 and a caspase-8-dependent BID cleavage pathway.

  10. Pregnancy-Induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kintiraki, Evangelia; Papakatsika, Sophia; Kotronis, George; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Kotsis, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) complicates 6-10% of pregnancies. It is defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg. It is classified as mild (SBP 140-149 and DBP 90-99 mmHg), moderate (SBP 150-159 and DBP 100-109 mmHg) and severe (SBP ≥ 160 and DBP ≥ 110 mmHg). PIH refers to one of four conditions: a) pre-existing hypertension, b) gestational hypertension and preeclampsia (PE), c) pre-existing hypertension plus superimposed gestational hypertension with proteinuria and d) unclassifiable hypertension. PIH is a major cause of maternal, fetal and newborn morbidity and mortality. Women with PIH are at a greater risk of abruptio placentae, cerebrovascular events, organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fetuses of these mothers are at greater risk of intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and intrauterine death. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a period of 24 h seems to have a role in predicting deterioration from gestational hypertension to PE. Antiplatelet drugs have moderate benefits when used for prevention of PE. Treatment of PIH depends on blood pressure levels, gestational age, presence of symptoms and associated risk factors. Non-drug management is recommended when SBP ranges between 140-149 mmHg or DBP between 90-99 mmHg. Blood pressure thresholds for drug management in pregnancy vary between different health organizations. According to 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines, antihypertensive treatment is recommended in pregnancy when blood pressure levels are ≥ 150/95 mmHg. Initiation of antihypertensive treatment at values ≥ 140/90 mmHg is recommended in women with a) gestational hypertension, with or without proteinuria, b) pre-existing hypertension with the superimposition of gestational hypertension or c) hypertension with asymptomatic organ damage or symptoms at any time during pregnancy. Methyldopa is the drug of choice in pregnancy. Atenolol and metoprolol appear to be

  11. Drug-induced urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary.

  12. Phentermine induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Emily Ximin; Wilson, Gregory John; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2017-03-09

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) has a number of medication-related aetiologies. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes; however, any medication has the potential to cause drug-induced AIN. We report the first case of phentermine-induced AIN. A Caucasian woman aged 43 years presented with a 5-week history of lethargy, left-sided lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She had been taking phentermine for weight loss for 9 months and had recently ceased the medication. The patient underwent a renal biopsy that showed a predominantly lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate with a moderate number of eosinophils consistent with AIN. Phentermine is increasingly used for weight loss in obese patients. This is the first case implicating phentermine as the causative agent for drug-induced AIN. While rare, phentermine-induced AIN is a possible adverse reaction of phentermine. Physicians and patients need to be aware of this risk.

  13. Groundwater: Climate-induced pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurdak, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater resources are directly affected by climate variability via precipitation, evapotranspiration and recharge. Analyses of US and India trends reveal that climate-induced pumping indirectly influences groundwater depletion as well.

  14. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is similar to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is an autoimmune disorder. This means ... 2015:chap 132. Wright B, Bharadwaj S, Abelson A. Systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Carey WD, ed. Cleveland Clinic: Current Clinical ...

  15. Victim-induced criminality.

    PubMed

    Fooner, M

    1966-09-02

    about the probable effects on the administration of criminal justice. These are pragmatic problems; there is a third problem which may at this time seem speculative, but is, nevertheless, quite important. 3) To what extent will a particular proposal for victim compensation contribute to a temptation-opportunity pattern in victim behavior? In previous studies it has been pointed out that large numbers of our fellow Americans have tended to acquire casual money-handling habits-generically designated "carelessness"-which contribute to the national growth of criminality. How the victim helps the criminal was sketched in reports of those studies (10). It was made abundantly clear that human beings in our affluent society cannot be assumed to be prudent or self-protective against the hazards of crime. Even when the "victim" is not overtly acting to commit a crime-as in the case of the property owner who hires an arsonist-he often tempts the offender. Among the victims of burglary-statistically the most prevalent crime in the United States-are a substantial number of Americans who keep cash, jewelry, and other valuables carelessly at home or in hotel rooms to which the burglar has easy access through door or window. Victims of automobile theft-one of the fastest growing classes of crime-include drivers who leave the vehicle or its contents invitingly accessible to thieves. And so on with other classes of crime. As pointed out in previous studies, when victim behavior follows a temptation-opportunity pattern, it (i) contributes to a "climate of criminal inducements," (ii) adds to the economic resources available to criminal societies, and (iii) detracts from the ability of lawenforcement agencies to suppress the growth of crime.

  16. Reprogramming with defined factors: from induced pluripotency to induced transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Masip, Manuel; Veiga, Anna; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Simón, Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Ever since work on pluripotency induction was originally published, reporting the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) by the ectopic expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, high expectations regarding their potential use for regenerative medicine have emerged. Very recently, the direct conversion of fibroblasts into functional neurons with no prior pluripotent stage has been described. Interconversion between adult cells from ontogenically different lineages by an induced transdifferentiation process based on the overexpression of a cocktail of transcription factors, while avoiding transition through an embryonic stem cell-like state, provides a new impetus in the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we review the induced reprogramming of somatic cells with defined factors and analyze their potential clinical use. Beginning with induced pluripotency, we summarize the initial objections including their extremely low efficiency and the risk of tumor generation. We also review recent reports describing iPS cells' capacity to generate viable offspring through tetraploid complementation, the most restrictive pluripotency criterion. Finally, we explore the available evidence for 'induced transdifferentiated cells' as a novel tool for adult cell fate modification.

  17. A rapid and transient ROS generation by cadmium triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells and this is inhibited through N-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Lim, Sung-Chul . E-mail: sclim@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, the role of ROS in this pathway remains unclear. Therefore, we attempted to determine the molecular mechanisms relevant to Cd-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. Cd was found to induce apoptosis in the HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, as confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and TUNEL staining. In the early stages, both rapid and transient ROS generation triggered apoptosis via Fas activation and subsequent caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage, as well as by calpain-mediated mitochondrial Bax cleavage. The timing of Bid activation was coincided with the timing at which the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) collapsed as well as the cytochrome c (Cyt c) released into the cytosol. Furthermore, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BA), did not block Cd-induced ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the complete inhibition of the Cd-induced apoptosis via catalase upregulation and subsequent Fas downregulation. NAC treatment also completely blocked the Cd-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release, indicating that Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may be regulated indirectly by ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, a rapid and transient ROS generation by Cd triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway and subsequent mitochondrial pathway. NAC inhibits Cd-induced apoptosis through the blocking of ROS generation as well as the catalase upregulation.

  18. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect.

  19. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  20. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  1. Validating induced seismicity forecast models—Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király-Proag, Eszter; Zechar, J. Douglas; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SaSS forecasts the spatial distribution better and gives better seismicity rate estimates before shut-in. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in.

  2. Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Nimno, Francis

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the diapir-induced reorientation of Enceladus is shown. The contents include: 1) Activity on Enceladus; 2) Miranda's Coronae: Origin above Diapirs; 3) Reorientation of Miranda; 4) Planetary Reorientation; 5) Modeling Diapir-Induced Reorientation; 6) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Results; 7) Tectonic Implications of Reorientation; 8) Additional Tests of Reorientation; 9) Diapir-Induced Reorientation of Enceladus: Conclusions; and 10) Diapir-Induced Reorientation: Future Work

  3. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  5. Graphene with geometrically induced vorticity.

    PubMed

    Pachos, Jiannis K; Stone, Michael; Temme, Kristan

    2008-04-18

    At half filling, the electronic structure of graphene can be modeled by a pair of free two-dimensional Dirac fermions. We explicitly demonstrate that in the presence of a geometrically induced gauge field an everywhere-real Kekulé modulation of the hopping matrix elements can correspond to a nonreal Higgs field with nontrivial vorticity. This provides a natural setting for fractionally charged vortices with localized zero modes. For fullerenelike molecules we employ the index theorem to demonstrate the existence of six low-lying states that do not depend strongly on the Kekulé-induced mass gap.

  6. Efavirenz-induced exfoliative dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Sun, Yong-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at higher risk of developing adverse drug reactions. Multiple drugs are usually prescribed to patients with HIV infection for preventing the replication of HIV and for the treatment of the associated opportunistic infections. We report here the first case of an HIV-1-infected patient who developed an exfoliative dermatitis induced by efavirenz, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Physicians should be aware of the possible occurrence of efavirenz-induced skin eruptions from the start of antiviral treatment of HIV infection.

  7. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  8. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  9. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  10. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  11. Oxaliplatin-induced lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arpan; Udwadia, Zarir F.; Almel, Sachin

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin has been approved for use as an adjuvant treatment in stage III colorectal carcinoma by the US-FDA. The majority of toxicity caused by this drug is manageable. However, rare, isolated cases of pulmonary fibrosis induced by this drug have been reported in literature. We report one such case of rapidly evolving pulmonary fibrosis following treatment with oxaliplatin. PMID:20838550

  12. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  13. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period.

  14. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  15. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited.

  16. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380

  17. Diuretic-induced hypokalaemia inducing torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Chvilicek, J P; Hurlbert, B J; Hill, G E

    1995-12-01

    Torsades de pointes (TP), an unique polymorphous type of ventricular tachycardia, is associated with either an acquired or congenitally prolonged QT interval. Several reports have demonstrated TP to follow an acquired prolonged QT interval secondary to chronic hypocalcaemia, hypomagnesaemia, or hypokalaemia. We report a rapid onset, acute extracellular hypokalaemia not associated with other electrolyte disturbances inducing a prolonged QT interval followed by TP. This is the first case report of a rapid onset isolated acute extracellular hypokalaemia inducing TP. Since anaesthetists are involved in therapies that will rapidly reduce extracellular potassium (diuretic, catecholamine, and/or insulin administration, hyperventilation), this cae report serves as a warning that such therapy may have the risk of arrhythmia induction.

  18. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  19. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  20. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  1. Toxin-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Annette M; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    Toxins such as pharmaceuticals, herbals, foods, and supplements may lead to hepatic damage. This damage may range from nonspecific symptoms in the setting of liver test abnormalities to acute hepatic failure. The majority of severe cases of toxin-induced hepatic injury are caused by acetaminophen and ethanol. The most important step in the patient evaluation is to gather an extensive history that includes toxin exposure and exclude common causes of liver dysfunction. Patients whose hepatic dysfunction progresses to acute liver failure may benefit from transfer to a transplant service for further management. Currently, the mainstay in management for most exposures is discontinuing the offending agent. This manuscript will review the incidence, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of the different forms of toxin-induced hepatic injury and exam in-depth the most common hepatic toxins.

  2. Disorder induced Floquet Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel; Rechtsman, Mikael; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of realizing a disorder induced topological state in two dimensional periodically driven systems. This phenomenon is akin to the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in equilibrium systems. We focus on graphene band structures, where in the presence of the driving electromagnetic field, but in the absence of disorder, the system starts off in a trivial state due to the presence of a sublattice potential. We show that by adding on-site disorder a topological state is induced in this system. We numerically compute the average Bott index (the analog of the Chern number for disordered systems) to show that starting from a trivial phase, topological behavior can be observed at finite disorder strength. In the topological phase, we detect chiral edge states by a numerical time evolution of wavepackets at the edge of the system. We propose an experimental set-up in photonic lattices to observe this phenomenon.

  3. Aloe-induced Toxic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ha Na; Kim, Young Mook; Kim, Byoung Ho; Sohn, Kyoung Min; Choi, Myung Jin; Choi, Young Hee

    2010-01-01

    Aloe has been widely used in phytomedicine. Phytomedicine describes aloe as a herb which has anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, anti-aging effects. In recent years several cases of aloe-induced hepatotoxicity were reported. But its pharmacokinetics and toxicity are poorly described in the literature. Here we report three cases with aloe-induced toxic hepatitis. A 57-yr-old woman, a 62-yr-old woman and a 55-yr-old woman were admitted to the hospital for acute hepatitis. They had taken aloe preparation for months. Their clinical manifestation, laboratory findings and histologic findings met diagnostic criteria (RUCAM scale) of toxic hepatitis. Upon discontinuation of the oral aloe preparations, liver enzymes returned to normal level. Aloe should be considered as a causative agent in hepatotoxicity. PMID:20191055

  4. Drug-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    David, Stefan; Hamilton, James P

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is common and nearly all classes of medications can cause liver disease. Most cases of DILI are benign, and improve after drug withdrawal. It is important to recognize and remove the offending agent as quickly as possible to prevent the progression to chronic liver disease and/or acute liver failure. There are no definite risk factors for DILI, but pre-existing liver disease and genetic susceptibility may predispose certain individuals. Although most patients have clinical symptoms that are identical to other liver diseases, some patients may present with symptoms of systemic hypersensitivity. Treatment of drug and herbal-induced liver injury consists of rapid drug discontinuation and supportive care targeted to alleviate unwanted symptoms. PMID:21874146

  5. Abacavir-induced liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pezzani, Maria Diletta; Resnati, Chiara; Di Cristo, Valentina; Riva, Agostino; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abacavir-induced liver toxicity is a rare event almost exclusively occurring in HLA B*5701-positive patients. Herein, we report one case of abnormal liver function tests occurring in a young HLA B*5701-negative woman on a stable nevirapine-based regimen with no history of liver problems or alcohol abuse after switching to abacavir from tenofovir. We also investigated the reasons for abacavir discontinuation in a cohort of patients treated with abacavir-lamivudine-nevirapine.

  6. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  7. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, {le}{approximately}{ovr J} {times} {approximately}{ovr B}{ge}, has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  8. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, [le][approximately][ovr J] [times] [approximately][ovr B][ge], has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  9. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne.

  10. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  11. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  12. Propulsion Induced Effects Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Won, Mark; Bencze, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this milestone is to assess the propulsion/airframe integration characteristics of the Technology Concept Airplane and design variations through computational analysis and experimental subsonic through supersonic wind tunnel testing. The Milestone will generate a comprehensive CFD and wind tunnel data base of the baseline, and design variations. Emphasis will be placed on establishing the propulsion induced effects on the flight performance of the Technology Concept Airplane with all appropriate wind tunnel corrections.

  13. Acyclovir-induced thrombotic microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goli, R.; Mukku, K. K.; Devaraju, S. B. R.; Uppin, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Acyclovir is a commonly used antiviral drug. Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to intratubular crystal precipitation and interstitial nephritis is well known. Here we present a case of acyclovir induced AKI in a 61 year old male with herpes zoster, which presented like thrombotic microangiopathy with acute interstitial nephritis. This is the first case report on acyclovir causing thrombotic microaniopathy with partial improvement in renal function after plasmapharesis. PMID:28356666

  14. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Charakorn, Natamon; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is an upper airway evaluation technique in which fiberoptic examination is performed under conditions of unconscious sedation. Unique information obtained from this 3-dimensional examination of the airway potentially provides additive benefits to other evaluation methods to guide treatment selection. This article presents recommendations regarding DISE technique and the VOTE Classification system for reporting DISE findings and reviews the evidence concerning DISE test characteristics and the association between DISE findings and treatment outcomes.

  15. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  16. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  17. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  18. [Drug-induced oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Madinier, I; Berry, N; Chichmanian, R M

    2000-06-01

    Different side effects of drugs have been described in the oral cavity, including oral ulcerations. Direct contact between drugs and oral mucosa may induce chemical burn or local hypersensitivity. Less frequently, these drug-induced oral ulcerations are part of a complex reaction with cutaneous or systemic manifestations. Sometimes, one or more oral ulcerations appear as the main side-effect of a drug, or exceptionally as solitary lesions. Solitary oral ulcerations usually appear after few weeks of treatment. In most of cases, these lesions resist to conventional treatments, with a rapid healing following the suppression of the responsible drug. This diagnosis is usually difficult, particularly with patients receiving multiple drug therapy. Besides, special attention must be paid to new drugs. Oral ulcerations following symptoms of burning mouth, metallic taste, dysgueusia or agueusia are strongly suggestive of a pharmacological origin. Most of the molecules able to induce solitary oral ulcerations are commonly prescribed in a) rheumatology: NSAI (diclofenac, flurbiprofen, indomethacin, naproxen), long-term rheumatoid arthritis therapy (azathioprine, methotrexate, penicillamine, gold compounds, tiopronin); b) cardiology: angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril), angiotensin 2-receptor antagonist (losartan), anti-angorous (nicorandil), c) psychiatry: antidepressants (fluoxetine, lithium), d) AIDS therapy (foscarnet, zalcitabine).

  19. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  20. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  1. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  2. Identification of Two Suppressors of CSG2 Calcium Sensitivity, SCS7 and SUR2, as Genes Encoding Hydroxylases of the Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-10

    the aliphatic chains is provided by a long chain base, (LCB; phytosphingosine in Figure 1), and the other is in amide linkage with the LCB. Ceramide...the ceramide structure they are the first three carbon positions ofthe ceramide long chain base, ( phytosphingosine as drawn). Sphingosine differs from...biosyn- thesis, the condensation ofserine and palmitoyl-CoA to form 3-ketosphinganine. There- fore the scsI mutant was tested for phytosphingosine

  3. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  4. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  5. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds.

  6. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (si)RNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/−) mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the neuroinflammatory LPS

  7. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramon; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Here, we studied transcriptional regulation in homocysteine (Hcy)-induced gene expression in monocytes (MC). We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN gamma)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFN gamma -induced genes, but not that in TNF alpha -induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF as putative Hcy-responsive TFs.

  8. Homocysteine induces inflammatory transcriptional signaling in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shu; Ciment, Stephen; Jan, Michael; Tran, Tran; Pham, Hung; Cueto, Ramón; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This study is to investigate transcriptional mechanism underlying homocysteine (Hcy)-induced and monocytes (MC)-derived inflammatory response. We identified 11 Hcy-induced genes, 17 anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10-induced, 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ)-induced and 8 pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced genes through literature search. Binding frequency of 36 transcription factors (TFs) implicated in inflammation and MC differentiation were analyzed within core promoter regions of identified genes, and classified into 3 classes based on the significant binding frequency to the promoter of Hcy-induced genes. Class 1 TFs exert high significant binding frequency in Hcy-induced genes. Class 2 and 3 TFs have low and no significant binding frequency, respectively. Class 1 TF binding occurrence in Hcy-induced genes is similar to that in IFNγ-induced genes, but not that in TNFα-induced. We conclude that Hcy is a pro-inflammatory amino acid and induces inflammatory transcriptional signal pathways mediated by class 1 TF. We term class 1 TF, which includes heat shock factor, MC enhancer factor-2, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells and Krueppel-like factor 4, as putative Hcy-responsive TFs. PMID:23276953

  9. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  10. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion.

    PubMed

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J

    2015-04-28

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI-LC-MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte.

  11. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  12. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  13. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  14. Spallation-induced fission reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the last decade spallation-induced fission reactions have received particular attention because of their impact in the design of spallation-neutron sources or radioactive beam facilities, but also in the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energy. In this paper, we review the main progress brought by modern experimental techniques, in particular those based in the inverse kinematic, as well as the achievements in modelling these reactions. We will also address future possibilities for improving the investigation of fission dynamics.

  15. Sertraline-induced ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishit H; Golwala, Harsh; Stavrakis, Stavros; Schechter, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which is a commonly used drug for major depressive disorder. Most frequently reported adverse effects of sertraline in patients receiving 50-150 mg/d are dry mouth, headache, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, sweating, and dizziness. We hereby report one of the few cases of sertraline-induced ventricular tachycardia, which has been for the first time objectively assessed by the Naranjo scale. We therefore urge the primary care physicians and the cardiologists to keep sertraline as a possible precipitating factor for evaluation of ventricular tachycardia.

  16. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-04-03

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients.

  17. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone

    PubMed Central

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients. PMID:24700048

  18. Cocaine-induced mesenteric ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J; Farreras, N; Ortiz De Zárate L; Bachs, E

    2000-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old man with distal ileum infarction after intravenous abuse of cocaine. He underwent resection of a gangrenous bowel segment and survived. We review the literature regarding intestinal ischaemia related to cocaine. To date, 19 cases have been published. Like most previously reported cases, our patient was young and had no previous history of arteriosclerosis. He suffered cocaine-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Mesenteric ischaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic abdominal pain in cocaine consumers.

  19. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs.

  20. [Pregnancy-induced haemolytic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Karagiozova, J; Masseva, A; Ivanov, St; Marinov, B; Kulinska, R; Boiadjiev, D; Jordanova, D

    2014-01-01

    This is the clinical case of a primiparous eight month pregnant female, presenting with symptoms of pregnancy-induced acute haemolytic anaemia (haemolytic aneamia provoked by an immune mechanism, intra- and extra-erythrocyte defects, and HELLP syndrome were excluded). The anaemia progressed to become life-threatening for both the pregnant women and the foetus, which brought the following questions into consideration: diagnosis of anaemia during pregnancy; dosing of corticosteroid therapy; possibility of giving birth to a viable foetus and prognosis for next pregnancies. Owing to the inter-disciplinary efforts, the life and health of this pregnant woman were preserved, but the foetus was lost.

  1. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  2. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  3. HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS.

    PubMed

    Confederat, Luminiţa; Constantin, Sandra; Lupaşcu, Florentina; Pânzariu, Andreea; Hăncianu, Monica; Profire, Lenuţa

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs.

  4. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  5. Chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss occurs with an estimated incidence of 65%. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss to be the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy and 8% would decline chemotherapy due to fears of hair loss. At present, no approved pharmacologic intervention exists to circumvent this side-effect of anticancer treatment, though a number of agents have been investigated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration, but it did not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, though most published data on this technique are of poor quality. Fortunately, the condition is usually reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care along with temporarily wearing a wig may represent the most effective coping strategy. However, some patients may show changes in color and/or texture of regrown hair, and in limited cases the reduction in density may persist.

  6. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    PubMed

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

  7. Preference pulses induced by reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki; Silberberg, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Eight rats responded on concurrent Variable-Ratio 20 Extinction schedules for food reinforcement. The assignment of variable-ratio reinforcement to a left or right lever varied randomly following each reinforcer, and was cued by illumination of a stimulus light above that lever. Postreinforcement preference levels decreased substantially and reliably over time when the lever that just delivered reinforcement was now in extinction; however, if that lever was once again associated with variable ratio, this decrease in same-lever preference tended to be small, and for some subjects, not in evidence. The changes in preference level to the extinction lever were well described by a modified version of Killeen, Hanson, and Osborne's (1978) induction model. Consistent with this model's attribution of preference change to induction, we attribute preference change in this report to a brief period of reinforcer-induced arousal that energizes responding to the lever that delivered the last reinforcer. After a few seconds, this induced responding diminishes, and the operant responding that remains comes under the control of the stimulus light cuing the lever providing variable-ratio reinforcement.

  8. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  9. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This "rotating balance" was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  10. Neutrino-Induced Meson Productions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Satoshi X.

    We develop a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model for neutrino-nucleon reactions in the resonance region, by extending the DCC model that we have previously developed through an analysis of π N,γ N to π N,η N,KΛ ,KΣ reaction data for W ≤ 2.1 GeV. We analyze electron-induced reaction data for both proton and neutron targets to determine the vector current form factors up to Q2 ≤ 3.0 (GeV/c)2. Axial-current matrix elements are derived in accordance with the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) relation to the πN interactions of the DCC model. As a result, we can uniquely determine the interference pattern between resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. Our calculated cross sections for neutrino-induced single-pion productions are compared with available data, and are found to be in reasonable agreement with the data. We also calculate the double-pion production cross sections in the resonance region, for the first time, with relevant resonance contributions and channel couplings. The result is compared with the double-pion production data. For a future development of a neutrino-nucleus reaction model and/or a neutrino event generator for analyses of neutrino experiments, the DCC model presented here can give a useful input.

  11. Stress proteins induced by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Del Razo, L M; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Brambila-Colombres, E; Calderón-Aranda, E S; Manno, M; Albores, A

    2001-12-01

    The elevated expression of stress proteins is considered to be a universal response to adverse conditions, representing a potential mechanism of cellular defense against disease and a potential target for novel therapeutics. Exposure to arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo in a variety of model systems has been shown to cause the induction of a number of the major stress protein families such as heat shock proteins (Hsp). Among them are members with low molecular weight, such as metallotionein and ubiquitin, as well as ones with masses of 27, 32, 60, 70, 90, and 110 kDa. In most of the cases, the induction of stress proteins depends on the capacity of the arsenical to reach the target, its valence, and the type of exposure, arsenite being the biggest inducer of most Hsp in several organs and systems. Hsp induction is a rapid dose-dependent response (1-8 h) to the acute exposure to arsenite. Thus, the stress response appears to be useful to monitor the sublethal toxicity resulting from a single exposure to arsenite. The present paper offers a critical review of the capacity of arsenicals to modulate the expression and/or accumulation of stress proteins. The physiological consequences of the arsenic-induced stress and its usefulness in monitoring effects resulting from arsenic exposure in humans and other organisms are discussed.

  12. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  13. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  14. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, DH; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349

  15. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher-frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  16. Diet-induced metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Adeva, María M; Souto, Gema

    2011-08-01

    The modern Western-type diet is deficient in fruits and vegetables and contains excessive animal products, generating the accumulation of non-metabolizable anions and a lifespan state of overlooked metabolic acidosis, whose magnitude increases progressively with aging due to the physiological decline in kidney function. In response to this state of diet-derived metabolic acidosis, the kidney implements compensating mechanisms aimed to restore the acid-base balance, such as the removal of the non-metabolizable anions, the conservation of citrate, and the enhancement of kidney ammoniagenesis and urinary excretion of ammonium ions. These adaptive processes lower the urine pH and induce an extensive change in urine composition, including hypocitraturia, hypercalciuria, and nitrogen and phosphate wasting. Low urine pH predisposes to uric acid stone formation. Hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria are risk factors for calcium stone disease. Even a very mild degree of metabolic acidosis induces skeletal muscle resistance to the insulin action and dietary acid load may be an important variable in predicting the metabolic abnormalities and the cardiovascular risk of the general population, the overweight and obese persons, and other patient populations including diabetes and chronic kidney failure. High dietary acid load is more likely to result in diabetes and systemic hypertension and may increase the cardiovascular risk. Results of recent observational studies confirm an association between insulin resistance and metabolic acidosis markers, including low serum bicarbonate, high serum anion gap, hypocitraturia, and low urine pH.

  17. Coalescence-induced nanodroplet jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Xu, Chenyu; Sotelo, Jesus; Chun, Jae Min; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-10-01

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years due to the ability of such surfaces to shed microscale water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping, resulting in heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance enhancement. Here we report the coalescence-induced removal of water nanodroplets (R ≈500 nm ) from superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. The two-droplet coalescence time is measured for varying droplet Ohnesorge numbers, confirming that coalescence prior to jumping is governed by capillary-inertial dynamics. By varying the conformal hydrophobic coating thickness on the CNT surface, the minimum jumping droplet radius is shown to increase with increasing solid fraction and decreasing apparent advancing contact angle, allowing us to explore both hydrodynamic limitations stemming from viscous dissipation and surface adhesion limitations. We find that, even for the smallest nanostructure length scale (≤100 nm) and lowest surface adhesions, nonideal surface interactions and the evolved droplet morphology play defining roles in limiting the minimum size for jumping on real surfaces. The outcomes of this work demonstrate the ability to passively shed nanometric water droplets, which has the potential to further increase the efficiency of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of energy and water applications.

  18. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  19. Psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Stotland, N L

    1997-09-01

    US anti-abortion groups have used misinformation on the long-term psychological impact of induced abortion to advance their position. This article reviews the available research evidence on the definition, history, cultural context, and emotional and psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion. Notable has been a confusion of normative, transient reactions to unintended pregnancy and abortion (e.g., guilt, depression, anxiety) with serious mental disorders. Studies of the psychiatric aspects of abortion have been limited by methodological problems such as the impossibility of randomly assigning women to study and control groups, resistance to follow-up, and confounding variables. Among the factors that may impact on an unintended pregnancy and the decision to abort are ongoing or past psychiatric illness, poverty, social chaos, youth and immaturity, abandonment issues, ongoing domestic responsibilities, rape and incest, domestic violence, religion, and contraceptive failure. Among the risk factors for postabortion psychosocial difficulties are previous or concurrent psychiatric illness, coercion to abort, genetic or medical indications, lack of social supports, ambivalence, and increasing length of gestation. Overall, the literature indicates that serious psychiatric illness is at least 8 times more common among postpartum than among postabortion women. Abortion center staff should acknowledge that the termination of a pregnancy may be experienced as a loss even when it is a voluntary choice. Referrals should be offered to women who show great emotional distress, have had several previous abortions, or request psychiatric consultation.

  20. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  1. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  2. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters.

  3. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  4. Anion adsorption induced surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    2005-11-01

    Surface stress plays an important role in the behavior of solid surfaces. Potential-controlled anion adsorption in electrolytes alters the surface stress of the electrode and results in morphology changes to the surfaces. With a combination of potential-induced surface stress measurement and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), it is demonstrated that anion adsorption induces changes in structure of thin films and modifies the growth morphology and stress evolution in epitaxially grown films. Surface structural transitions in the heteroepitaxial system consisting of one to two gold monolayers on platinum substrates were observed. By increasing the potential, structural transitions, from (1 x 1), to a striped phase, to a hexagonal structure, occurred in the gold bilayer. This hexagonal structure was related to the formation of an ordered sulfate adlayer with a ( 3x7 ) structure. Such transitions were repeatable by cycling the potential. Furthermore, the transitions between various dislocation structures were affected by anion adsorption. The surface composition of the gold bilayer on Pt was measured by underpotential deposition of copper. By subtracting the contribution of a pure Pt surface from the gold bi-layer on Pt, a stress change of -2.4 N/m was observed, which agrees with the stress change of -2.46 N/m predicted to accompany formation of 1.5 MLs of coherent Au on Pt(111) from epitaxy theory. The Cu monolayer deposited on Au(111) from an acid sulfate electrolyte was found to be pseudomorphic while the Cu monolayer formed on Au(111) in vacuum was incoherent. The stress-thickness change associated with the coherent monolayer of copper on Au(111) in electrolyte was -0.6 N/m, while conventional epitaxy theories predict a value of +7.76 N/m. STM results elucidated the sulfate adsorption on the copper monolayer caused an expansion of the layer as evidenced by a Moire Structure. For the Cu monolayer on Au(111), the sulfate-induced expansion

  5. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  6. The mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiongwei; Liu, Timon C.; Ding, Xin-Min; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fan-Guang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can induce apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. Cells become more oxidation with PDT, and maintain differentiation and proliferation, go apoptosis and necrosis with the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. ROS can induce apoptosis through mitochondria by inhibiting respiration chain or oxidative phosphorylation or damaging mitochondrial membrane. ROS can initiate apoptosis through endoplamic reticulum(ER) by opening Ca2+ channel or starting unfold protein response (UPR). ROS can also induce apoptosis through Golgi by producing ganglioside GD3 by use of ceramide, which induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3, JNK and p38 MAPK. It can also induce apoptosis by activating Bip (mitochondria-dependant) or preocaspase-12 (mitochondria- independent) or inhibiting protein synthesizing. There are so complicated cross-talking among different signal pathways or organnells that we think PDT-induced apoptosis is mediated by multiplex pathways and excessive levels in a refined network.

  7. Tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Heena; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions are a common complication of anti-retroviral therapy. Tenofovir is a newer anti-retroviral drug belonging to the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor group. Systemic adverse effects like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hepatotoxicity and renal toxicity are common with tenofovir but cutaneous adverse effects are rare. Lichenoid drug eruptions are a common adverse effect seen with a large variety of drugs including antimalarials, antihypertensives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics. Lichenoid drug eruption is a rare cutaneous adverse effect of tenofovir with only a single case reported till date. Here, we report a case of tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption in a 54-year-old human immunodeficiency virus affected male who presented with generalized lichenoid eruption after 6 weeks of initiation of tenofovir and complete clearance on cessation of the drug.

  8. Pressure induced polymerization of Formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, Oliver

    2004-03-01

    The discovery of pressure induced polymerization of CO2 inspired us to search for C-O based chain structures forming at high pressure. We used salts of carboxylic acids as starting materials and exposed them to pressures between 10 and 30 GPa. Upon heating to temperatures above 1800 K we observed deprotonation and significant changes in the Raman shifts of C-O streching modes. Structure analysis based on powder diffraction patterns collected at sector 16 of the APS showed formation of extended C-O chain structures with the cations of the salts residing in the interchain spaces. These new high pressure polymers are interesting by their mechanical strength and provide basic molecular patterns of organic metallic conductors.

  9. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  10. Human-induced Arctic moistening.

    PubMed

    Min, Seung-Ki; Zhang, Xuebin; Zwiers, Francis

    2008-04-25

    The Arctic and northern subpolar regions are critical for climate change. Ice-albedo feedback amplifies warming in the Arctic, and fluctuations of regional fresh water inflow to the Arctic Ocean modulate the deep ocean circulation and thus exert a strong global influence. By comparing observations to simulations from 22 coupled climate models, we find influence from anthropogenic greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols in the space-time pattern of precipitation change over high-latitude land areas north of 55 degrees N during the second half of the 20th century. The human-induced Arctic moistening is consistent with observed increases in Arctic river discharge and freshening of Arctic water masses. This result provides new evidence that human activity has contributed to Arctic hydrological change.

  11. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  12. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  13. Drug-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Collins-Yoder, Angela; Collins, Rachel E

    2016-10-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can result from both idiosyncratic and intrinsic mechanisms. This article discusses the clinical impact of DILI from a broad range of medications as well as herbal and dietary supplements. Risk factors for idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) are the result of multiple host, environmental, and compound factors. Some triggers of IDILI often seen in critical care include antibiotics, antiepileptic medications, statins, novel anticoagulants, proton pump inhibitors, inhaled anesthetics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and azathioprine. The mechanism of IDILI due to these medications varies, and the resulting damage can be cholestatic, hepatocellular, or mixed. The primary treatment of IDILI is to discontinue the causative agent. DILI due to acetaminophen is intrinsic because the liver damage is predictably aligned with the dose ingested. Acute acetaminophen ingestion can be treated with activated charcoal or N-acetylcysteine. Future areas of research include identification of mitochondrial stress biomarkers and of the patients at highest risk for DILI.

  14. Phenytoin-induced Lyell's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lobão, Bárbara; Martins, Claúdio; Sousa, Manuel; Marques, Susana; Pedroso, Ermelinda

    2012-01-01

    Lyell's syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare dermatological disease that causes serious morbidity and mortality. It is most commonly drug induced. The authors report the case of a 57-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital with severe rash all over the body. She had been previously submitted to brain surgery for total resection of a large meningioma and medicated with phenytoin for seizures prophylaxis. During this treatment, erythematous lesions and blisters were observed first on her face and trunk and then spreading to the entire body. Detachment of the skin, as well as mucous involvement especially of mouth and conjunctiva, was also observed. TEN was diagnosed, and phenytoin was discontinued. Intravenous fluids, systemic steroids and tightened infection control measures were implemented. After 10 days, skin recovery and re-epithelialisation were established, temperature decreased and mucosal complications stabilised. The patient was discharged after 1 month of hospitalisation. PMID:23230258

  15. Radiocontrast-Induced Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Misson, Robert T.; Cutler, Ralph E.

    1985-01-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretic advantages over the presently used agents. PMID:4013281

  16. Hemolysis induced by PMIVSD occluder.

    PubMed

    Rao, D Sheshagiri; Barik, Ramachandra; Siva Prasad, Akula

    2016-09-01

    Hemolysis related to occluder, prosthetic valve, and prosthetic ring used for mitral valve annuloplasty are not very unusual. However, hemolysis related to transcathetor closure of post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defect (PMIVSD) is infrequent. A close follow-up for spontaneous resolution with or without blood transfusion has been reported in a few cases. Occasionally, surgical retrieval is unavoidable or lifelong blood transfusion is required if surgery cannot be done because of higher risk. In this illustration, we have showed a close follow-up of a case of hemolysis induced by atrial septal occluder used for VSD closure after myocardial infarction. Despite successful device closure of PMIVSD which is difficult, a close watch is needed for complications like residual leak, device embolization, and hemolysis.

  17. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  18. Pressure induced metallization of Germane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Canales, M.; Bergara, A.; Feng, J.; Grochala, W.

    2006-09-01

    Recently reported superconductivity in lithium under pressure has renewed the interest on hydrogen and hydrogen-rich systems in the long standing quest for room temperature superconductivity. Although the required metallization of pure hydrogen cannot be achieved within correct experimental capabilities, chemical precompression exerted by heavier atoms in compounds with a large hydrogen content is expected to imply that lower pressures might be required to attain the metallic transition in these alloys. In this article, we present an ab initio analysis of pressure induced metallization of germane, as a particular case between group IVa hydrides. According to our calculations, metallization of germane is predicted to occur at an experimentally accessible pressure of around 70 GPa, which corresponds to a compression factor of 3.4.

  19. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes.

  20. Ciprofloxacin-induced erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Shilpashree, H S; Sarapur, Shriprasad

    2012-10-01

    Ciprofloxacin is one of the most commonly used antibacterial agents with relatively few side effects. Serious adverse reactions reported with ciprofloxacin are rare with an incidence of 0.6%. One of the side effects of ciprofloxacin is erythema multiforme (EM). EM is an acute, self -limiting mucocutaneous hypersensitivity syndrome. It exhibits a diverse etiology, often recurs, has unusual clinical features and is of uncertain etiopathogenesis. It usually exhibits a distinctive skin or mucosal lesions that are characterized by combination of bullae, papules, macules or ulcers. It is most probably an immunologically mediated process. With the use of ciprofloxacin becoming more and more widespread, fatal complications of ciprofloxacin should be borne in mind. In this article we present a case of ciprofloxacin induced erythema multiforme in 40 year old woman.

  1. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature. PMID:27635409

  2. Laser-induced magnetization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayoshi, Shintaro; Sato, Masahiro; Oka, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    We propose an all optical ultrafast method to highly magnetize general quantum magnets using a circularly polarized terahertz laser. The key idea is to utilize a circularly polarized laser and its chirping. Through this method, one can obtain magnetization curves of a broad class of quantum magnets as a function of time even without any static magnetic field. We numerically demonstrate the laser-induced magnetization process in realistic quantum spin models and find a condition for the realization. The onset of magnetization can be described by a many-body version of Landau-Zener mechanism. In a particular model, we show that a plateau state with topological properties can be realized dynamically.

  3. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species.

  4. Nanoparticle-induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine Jia'en; Muralikrishnan, Sindu; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in nanotechnology engineering have given rise to the rapid development of many novel applications in the biomedical field. However, studies into the health and safety of these nanomaterials are still lacking. The main concerns are the adverse effects to health caused by acute or chronic exposure to nanoparticles (NPs), especially in the workplace environment. The lung is one of the main routes of entry for NPs into the body and, hence, a likely site for accumulation of NPs. Once NPs enter the interstitial air spaces and are quickly taken up by alveolar cells, they are likely to induce toxic effects. In this review, we highlight the different aspects of lung toxicity resulting from NP exposure, such as generation of oxidative stress, DNA damage and inflammation leading to fibrosis and pneumoconiosis, and the underlying mechanisms causing pulmonary toxicity.

  5. Capecitabine-Induced Coronary Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Danish; Rudzik, Francine; Butts, Allison; Mathew, Aju

    2016-01-01

    Capecitabine, an oral prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), is approved for early-stage and advanced colorectal cancer and metastatic breast cancer. Cardiotoxicity of 5-FU is well described in the literature. However, cardiac adverse effects of capecitabine are poorly described. We report a case of coronary vasospasm induced by capecitabine. A 41-year-old female with metastatic breast cancer presented with chest pain 3 days after starting capecitabine. The chest pain was relieved by rest and exacerbated by exertion. Her physical examination was unremarkable except for a rapid heart rate of 100 bpm. Electrocardiogram test showed no acute ischemic changes. Troponin tests were negative. CT angiography of the chest was negative for acute pulmonary embolism. An echocardiogram showed a left ventricular ejection fraction of 60% without any wall motion abnormalities. The chest pain resolved with aspirin and analgesic use. She was discharged following an inconclusive cardiac workup. Further use of capecitabine was discontinued. PMID:27920693

  6. Candesartan cilexetil induced pustular psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Ai; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2003-01-01

    Pustular eruptions caused by anti-hypertension drugs are relatively rare. They have been reported with beta-adrenergic blocking agents, calcium channel blocker and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Angiotensin II type 1 (AT 1) receptor antagonists, as a new class of drug for hypertension, has become an established and popular treatment. We describe a patient with generalized pustular psoriasis induced by candesartan cilexetil (AT1 receptor antagonist), who was previously diagnosed as flexural psoriasis. It is known that AT1 receptor antagonists do not increase the bradykinin level, inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system more potently than ACE inhibitor. But our results suggest that AT 1 receptor antagonists could have some ACE inhibitor potency as an up-regulator for bradykinin in our patient, with pustular eruptions developing on the psoriatic background. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of pustular psoriasis associated with AT1 receptor antagonists.

  7. Levetiracetam-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Aisling; Fuld, Jonathan; Soon, Elaine

    2017-03-08

    Levetiracetam is widely regarded as a benign antiepileptic drug, compared to older antiepileptic medication. We report a case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam use in a non-smoking woman aged 59 years with no previous respiratory history. Our patient presented with exertional breathlessness and marked desaturation on exertion. She displayed 'reverse bat-wing' infiltrates on her chest radiograph and peripheral eosinophilia on a complete blood count. Her symptoms, radiology and peripheral eosinophilia resolved completely with cessation of levetiracetam and a course of prednisolone. This is the first report of isolated eosinophilic pneumonia due to levetiracetam. Other reports of levetiracetam-induced eosinophilia describe drug rash, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome). Detection of pulmonary drug reactions requires a careful drug history and high index of suspicion. Identifying and reporting a causative agent is crucially important, as cessation of the drug is essential for resolution of the syndrome.

  8. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  9. Seborrheic dermatitis in neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Binder, R L; Jonelis, F J

    1983-06-01

    An increased prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis has previously been noted in idiopathic Parkinson's disease and in postencephalitic parkinsonism. Our study of 42 hospitalized patients with drug-induced parkinsonism and 47 hospitalized psychiatric patients without that disorder showed a statistically significant higher prevalence of clinically diagnosed seborrheic dermatitis in the group with drug-induced parkinsonism (59.5% v 15%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of an increased prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis with drug-induced parkinsonism.

  10. Induced activation study of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is continuing with extraction of specific activities for various spacecraft materials. Data and results of activation measurements from eight facilities are being collected for interpretation at Eastern Kentucky University and NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The major activation mechanism in LDEF components is the proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). This flux is highly anisotropic, and could be sampled by taking advantage of the gravity-gradient stabilization of the LDEF. The directionally-dependent activation due to these protons was clearly observed in the data from aluminum experiment tray clamps (reaction product Na-22), steel trunnions (reaction product Mn-54 and others) and is also indicated by the presence of a variety of nuclides in other materials. A secondary production mechanism, thermal neutron capture, was observed in cobalt, indium, and tantalum, which are known to have large capture cross sections. Experiments containing samples of these metals and significant amounts of thermalizing low atomic number (Z) material showed clear evidence of enhanced activation of Co-60, In-114m, and Ta-182. Other mechanisms which activate spacecraft material that are not as easily separable from SAA proton activation, such as galactic proton bombardment and secondary production by fast neutrons, are being investigated by comparison to radiation environmental calculations. Deviations from one-dimensional radiation models indicate that these mechanisms are more important at greater shielding depths. The current status of the induced radioactivity measurements as of mid-year 1992 are reviewed. Specific activities for a number of materials which show SAA effects and thermal neutron capture are presented. The results for consistency by combining data from the participating institutions is also examined.

  11. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  12. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    PubMed

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  13. UVRAG Deficiency Exacerbates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    An, Lin; Hu, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Xiaowen; Song, Zongpei; Naz, Amber; Zi, Zhenguo; Wu, Jian; Li, Can; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2017-02-22

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of various types of cancers. However, its clinical application has been largely limited by potential development of cardiotoxicity. Previously we have shown that ultra-violet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagy-related protein, is essential for the maintenance of autophagic flux in the heart under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine the role of UVRAG-mediated autophagy in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Mouse models of acute or chronic DOX-induced cardiotoxicity were established. UVRAG deficiency exacerbated DOX-induced mortality and cardiotoxicity manifested by increased cytoplasmic vacuolization, enhanced collagen accumulation, elevated serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and myocardial muscle creatine kinase, higher ROS levels, aggravated apoptosis and more depressed cardiac function. Autophagic flux was impaired in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. UVRAG deficiency aggravated impaired autophagic flux in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Intermittent fasting restored autophagy and ameliorated pathological alterations of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our data suggest that UVRAG deficiency exacerbates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, through aggravation of DOX-induced impaired autophagic flux. Intermittent fasting, which restores blunted autophagic flux and ameliorates pathology in the mouse models of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, may be used as a potential preventive or therapeutic approach for DOX cardiotoxicity.

  14. UVRAG Deficiency Exacerbates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    An, Lin; Hu, Xiao-wen; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Xiaowen; Song, Zongpei; Naz, Amber; Zi, Zhenguo; Wu, Jian; Li, Can; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of various types of cancers. However, its clinical application has been largely limited by potential development of cardiotoxicity. Previously we have shown that ultra-violet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagy-related protein, is essential for the maintenance of autophagic flux in the heart under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine the role of UVRAG-mediated autophagy in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Mouse models of acute or chronic DOX-induced cardiotoxicity were established. UVRAG deficiency exacerbated DOX-induced mortality and cardiotoxicity manifested by increased cytoplasmic vacuolization, enhanced collagen accumulation, elevated serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and myocardial muscle creatine kinase, higher ROS levels, aggravated apoptosis and more depressed cardiac function. Autophagic flux was impaired in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. UVRAG deficiency aggravated impaired autophagic flux in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Intermittent fasting restored autophagy and ameliorated pathological alterations of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our data suggest that UVRAG deficiency exacerbates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, through aggravation of DOX-induced impaired autophagic flux. Intermittent fasting, which restores blunted autophagic flux and ameliorates pathology in the mouse models of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, may be used as a potential preventive or therapeutic approach for DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:28225086

  15. Dynamics of cavitating cascades and inducer pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Report chronicles advances in understanding and predicting unsteady dynamic characteristics of cavitating cascades and inducer pumps. It includes bibliography of 19 papers authored between 1972 and 1980.

  16. [Induced abortion in China: problems and interventions].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-chun; Qiu, Hong-yan

    2010-10-01

    Pooled literatures showed that the induced abortion in China faces many problems:the number of induced abortion remains large; most cases are young and nulliparity women; the frequency of abortion is high; and the interval between one and another abortion is short. Health promotion strategies should be applied to address these problems. It is important to increase the population's awareness of contraception,especially among nulliparity and migrant populations. Routine and effective contraceptive methods should be recommended and emphasized during induced abortion and delivery to lower the rate of induced abortion.

  17. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  18. Geldanamycin Prevents Hemorrhage-Induced ATP Loss by Overexpressing Inducible HSP70 and Activating Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    levels were determined using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay Kit HS II (Roche; Mannheim, Germany). Luminescence was measured with a TD-20/20...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehydrogenase Juliann G. Kiang,1,2,3...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehy- drogenase. Am J Physiol Gastrointest

  19. Towards inducing superconductivity into graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri K.

    Graphenes transport properties have been extensively studied in the 10 years since its discovery in 2004, with ground-breaking experimental observations such as Klein tunneling, fractional quantum Hall effect and Hofstadters butterfly. Though, so far, it turned out to be rather poor on complex correlated electronic ground states and phase transitions, despite various theoretical predictions. The purpose of this thesis is to help understanding the underlying theoretical and experimental reasons for the lack of strong electronic interactions in graphene, and, employing graphenes high tunability and versatility, to identify and alter experimental parameters that could help to induce stronger correlations. In particular graphene holds one last, not yet experimentally discovered prediction, namely exhibiting intrinsic superconductivity. With its vanishingly small Fermi surface at the Dirac point, graphene is a semi-metal with very weak electronic interactions. Though, if it is doped into the metallic regime, where the size of the Fermi surface becomes comparable to the size of the Brillouin zone, the density of states becomes sizeable and electronic interactions are predicted to be dramatically enhanced, resulting in competing correlated ground states such as superconductivity, magnetism and charge density wave formation. Following these predictions, this thesis first describes the creation of metallic graphene at high carrier doping via electrostatic doping techniques based on electrolytic gates. Due to graphenes surface only properties, we are able to induce carrier densities above n>1014 cm-2 (epsilonF>1eV) into the chemically inert graphene. While at these record high carrier densities we yet do not observe superconductivity, we do observe fundamentally altered transport properties as compared to semi-metallic graphene. Here, detailed measurements of the low temperature resistivity reveal that the electron-phonon interactions are governed by a reduced, density

  20. RIPK1 counteracts ZBP1-mediated necroptosis to inhibit inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juan; Kumari, Snehlata; Kim, Chun; Van, Trieu-My; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Polykratis, Apostolos; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2016-12-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) regulates cell death and inflammation through kinase-dependent and -independent functions. RIPK1 kinase activity induces caspase-8-dependent apoptosis and RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase like (MLKL)-dependent necroptosis. In addition, RIPK1 inhibits apoptosis and necroptosis through kinase-independent functions, which are important for late embryonic development and the prevention of inflammation in epithelial barriers. The mechanism by which RIPK1 counteracts RIPK3-MLKL-mediated necroptosis has remained unknown. Here we show that RIPK1 prevents skin inflammation by inhibiting activation of RIPK3-MLKL-dependent necroptosis mediated by Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1, also known as DAI or DLM1). ZBP1 deficiency inhibited keratinocyte necroptosis and skin inflammation in mice with epidermis-specific RIPK1 knockout. Moreover, mutation of the conserved RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) of endogenous mouse RIPK1 (RIPK1(mRHIM)) caused perinatal lethality that was prevented by RIPK3, MLKL or ZBP1 deficiency. Furthermore, mice expressing only RIPK1(mRHIM) in keratinocytes developed skin inflammation that was abrogated by MLKL or ZBP1 deficiency. Mechanistically, ZBP1 interacted strongly with phosphorylated RIPK3 in cells expressing RIPK1(mRHIM), suggesting that the RIPK1 RHIM prevents ZBP1 from binding and activating RIPK3. Collectively, these results show that RIPK1 prevents perinatal death as well as skin inflammation in adult mice by inhibiting ZBP1-induced necroptosis. Furthermore, these findings identify ZBP1 as a critical mediator of inflammation beyond its previously known role in antiviral defence and suggest that ZBP1 might be implicated in the pathogenesis of necroptosis-associated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Hydralazine-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahad; Hammad, Raza; Cucco, Robert; Niranjan, Selva

    2009-01-01

    Hydralazine has been widely used for treating hypertension, particularly in patients with renal failure. We report a case on a patient in whom we believe the drug was implicated in an otherwise unexplained disturbance of liver function. A 63-year-old African-American female with medical history of hypertension and end-stage renal disease (on hemodialysis) was admitted to the hospital with epigastric pain and jaundice. The symptoms started about 1 week ago. Initial laboratory tests showed abnormal liver enzymes with elevated conjugated bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase suggestive of cholestatic jaundice. Amylase and lipase were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed normal caliber common bile duct without evidence of obstruction. Abdominal CT scan does not show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation, and no mass lesions were seen in the pancreas. Further blood chemistry showed worsening of liver enzymes and increased bilirubin over the next 2-3 days. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography failed to show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation. No other laboratory evidence of cholestatic jaundice was found. Before proceeding for invasive diagnostic procedure, that is, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, the patient's drug history was reviewed. She was on hydralazine 75 mg 3 times per day, started 5 months ago. At that time, her liver function tests were normal. As we could not find any other cause of cholestatic jaundice, we attributed this as a side effect of hydralazine. A trial was given by stopping the hydralazine. It was seen that there was significant improvement in the liver function enzymes over the next week. Complete clinical and biochemical recovery occurred over the next 4 weeks. Liver injury after long-term therapy with hydralazine and after short-term therapy with hydralazine (2-10 days) has been described. Hydralazine-induced hepatotoxicity may manifest as hypersensitivity-type injury

  2. Psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, M

    1984-03-01

    An attempt is made to identify and document the problems of comparative evaluation of the more recent studies of psychiatric morbidity after abortion and to determine the current consensus so that when the results of the joint RCGP/RCOG study of the sequelae of induced abortion become available they can be viewed in a more informed context. The legalization of abortion has provided more opportunities for studies of subsequent morbidity. New laws have contributed to the changing attitudes of society, and the increasing acceptability of the operation has probably influenced the occurrence of psychiatric sequelae. The complexity of measuring psychiatric sequelae is evident from the many terms used to describe symptomatology and behavioral patterns and from the number of assessment techniques involved. Numerous techniques have been used to quantify psychiatric sequelae. Several authors conclude that few psychiatric problems follow an induced abortion, but many studies were deficient in methodology, material, or length of follow-up. A British study in 1975 reported a favorable outcome for a "representative sample" of 50 National Health Service patients: 68% of these patients had an absence of or only mild feelings of guilt, loss, or self reproach and considered abortion as the best solution to their problem. The 32% who had an adverse outcome reported moderate to severe feelings of guilt, regret, loss, and self reproach, and there was evidence of mental illness. In most of these cases the adverse outcome was related to the patient's environment since the abortion. A follow-up study of 126 women, which compared the overall reaction to therapeutic abortion between women with a history of previous mild psychiatric illness and those without reported that a significantly different emotional reaction could not be demonstrated between the 2 groups. In a survey among women seeking an abortion 271 who were referred for a psychiatric opinion regarding terminations of pregnancy

  3. Organophosphate-induced delayed polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marcello; Moretto, Angelo

    2005-01-01

    Organophosphate-induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP) is a rare toxicity resulting from exposure to certain organophosphorus (OP) esters. It is characterised by distal degeneration of some axons of both the peripheral and central nervous systems occurring 1-4 weeks after single or short-term exposures. Cramping muscle pain in the lower limbs, distal numbness and paraesthesiae occur, followed by progressive weakness, depression of deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs and, in severe cases, in the upper limbs. Signs include high-stepping gait associated with bilateral foot drop and, in severe cases, quadriplegia with foot and wrist drop as well as pyramidal signs. In time, there might be significant recovery of the peripheral nerve function but, depending on the degree of pyramidal involvement, spastic ataxia may be a permanent outcome of severe OPIDP. Human and experimental data indicate that recovery is usually complete in the young. At onset, the electrophysiological changes include reduced amplitude of the compound muscle potential, increased distal latencies and normal or slightly reduced nerve conduction velocities. The progression of the disease, usually over a few days, may lead to non-excitability of the nerve with electromyographical signs of denervation. Nerve biopsies have been performed in a few cases and showed axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is thought to be the target of OPIDP initiation. The ratio of inhibitory powers for acetylcholinesterase and NTE represents the crucial guideline for the aetiological attribution of OP-induced peripheral neuropathy. In fact, pre-marketing toxicity testing in animals selects OP insecticides with cholinergic toxicity potential much higher than that to result in OPIDP. Therefore, OPIDP may develop only after very large exposures to insecticides, causing severe cholinergic toxicity. However, this was not the case with certain triaryl phosphates that were not used as

  4. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the leading cause of occupationally induced hearing loss in industrialized countries. It discusses causes of NIHL and compelling evidence that reactive oxygen metabolites and cochlear hypoprefusion are responsible for the destruction of cochlear hair cells. Prevention is also…

  6. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure.

  7. Low speed inducers for cryogenic upper stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Briefing charts are presented, which were used in an oral presentation of the results and recommendations for the design and analysis of low speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers and their drive systems applicable to the space tug. A discussion of the design of the 15K and RL-10 inducers is included.

  8. Mechanisms of chemical-induced porphyrinopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Silbergeld, E.K. Fowler, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 45 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic Regulation of the Heme Pathway; Porphyrins in Urine as an Indication of Exposure to Chlorinated Hydrocarbons; Mechanisms of PCB-induced Porphyria and Yusho Disease; and Lead-Induced Abnormalities of Porphyrin Metabolism: The Relationship with Iron Deficiency.

  9. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  10. Photo-induced Defects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, David; Bube, Richard H.

    2006-03-01

    1. Introduction: metastable defects; 2. III-V compounds: DX2 and EL2 centers; 3. Other crystalline materials; 4. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: properties of defects; 5. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: photo-induced defect kinetics and processes; 6. Other amorphous semiconductors; 7. Photo-induced defect effects in devices; References; Index.

  11. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    4], prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) [5], IL-1β [6, 7], IL-6 [8], S100A8/A9 [9, 10], the complement component C5a [11], and endotoxin [12] induce the...by complement. Nat Immunol, 2008. 9(11): p. 1225-35. 9 12. De Wilde, V., et al., Endotoxin -induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit

  12. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    6, 7], IL-6 [8], S100A8/A9 [9, 10], the complement component C5a [11], and endotoxin [12] induce the accumulation of MDSC. MDSC block adaptive anti...11 12. De Wilde, V., et al., Endotoxin -induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit alloimmune responses via heme oxygenase-1. Am J

  13. Laughter-induced left bundle branch block.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Desai, Dipan; Spragg, David D; Zakaria, Sammy

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a patient with ischemic heart disease and intermittent left bundle branch block, reproducibly induced by laughter. Following treatment of ischemia with successful deployment of a drug-eluting stent, no further episodes of inducible LBBB were seen. Transient ischemia, exacerbated by elevated intrathoracic pressure during laughter, may have contributed to onset of this phenomenon.

  14. Dynamically induced Zeeman effect in massless QED.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Efrain J; de la Incera, Vivian

    2009-02-06

    It is shown that in nonperturbative massless QED an anomalous magnetic moment is dynamically induced by an applied magnetic field. The induced magnetic moment produces a Zeeman splitting for electrons in Landau levels higher than l=0. The expressions for the nonperturbative Lande g factor and Bohr magneton are obtained. Possible applications of this effect are outlined.

  15. Dynamically Induced Zeeman Effect in Massless QED

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; Incera, Vivian de la

    2009-02-06

    It is shown that in nonperturbative massless QED an anomalous magnetic moment is dynamically induced by an applied magnetic field. The induced magnetic moment produces a Zeeman splitting for electrons in Landau levels higher than l=0. The expressions for the nonperturbative Lande g factor and Bohr magneton are obtained. Possible applications of this effect are outlined.

  16. Methods for determining Myc-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dan; Littlewood, Trevor D

    2013-01-01

    Although many oncoproteins promote cell growth and proliferation, some also possess the potential to induce cell death by apoptosis. Deregulated expression of the myc oncogene promotes apoptosis in both cultured cells and in some tissues in vivo. Here we describe techniques to detect Myc-induced apoptosis in vitro using flow cytometry and microscopy and in vivo using immunohistochemical staining.

  17. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  18. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  19. Heart failure and tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major health care concern affecting almost six million Americans and an estimated 23 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing with time. Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognized cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy with effective treatment of the causative arrhythmia, either with medications, surgery, or catheter ablation. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood and is likely under-diagnosed. A better understanding of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy and improved recognition of its presence in clinical practice is vital to the health of patients with this disorder. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, as well as approaches to its diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Induced gauge theories and W gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Schoutens, K. . Inst. for Theoretical Physics); Sevrin, A. ); van Nieuwenhuizen, P. . Theory Div. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Inst. for Theoretical Physics)

    1991-11-01

    We review some aspects of induced gauge theories in two dimensions. We focus on W{sub 3} gravity, paying particular attention to the treatment of the non-linearities inherent to W gravity. We show that the induced action {Gamma}{sub ind}(h,b) for chiral W{sub 3} in the c {yields} {plus minus}infinity limit is obtained from the induced action of a gauged Sl(3,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten model by imposing constraints on some of the affine currents. Subsequently we investigate the effective action, which is obtained by integrating the induced action over the gauge fields. We show perturbatively that certain subleading terms which appear in the induced action for finite c (and which are related to nonlocal terms in the Ward identifies) get canceled by similar terms due to loop corrections, and we propose an all-order result for the effective action.

  1. Induced gauge theories and W gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Schoutens, K.; Sevrin, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, P. |

    1991-11-01

    We review some aspects of induced gauge theories in two dimensions. We focus on W{sub 3} gravity, paying particular attention to the treatment of the non-linearities inherent to W gravity. We show that the induced action {Gamma}{sub ind}[h,b] for chiral W{sub 3} in the c {yields} {plus_minus}infinity limit is obtained from the induced action of a gauged Sl(3,R) Wess-Zumino-Witten model by imposing constraints on some of the affine currents. Subsequently we investigate the effective action, which is obtained by integrating the induced action over the gauge fields. We show perturbatively that certain subleading terms which appear in the induced action for finite c (and which are related to nonlocal terms in the Ward identifies) get canceled by similar terms due to loop corrections, and we propose an all-order result for the effective action.

  2. Ibuprofen-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2010-06-01

    Ibuprofen is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID). With the aging of the population, there will be a significant increase in the prevalence of painful degenerative and inflammatory rheumatic conditions. This increase likely will lead to a parallel increase in the use of NSAIDs, including ibuprofen. The primary effect of the NSAIDs is to inhibit cyclooxygenase (prostaglandin synthase), thereby impairing the ultimate transformation of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxanes. Although in the majority of cases it is safe, this NSAID, ibuprofen, can produce an unpredictable, idiosyncratic, type B reaction that may pose a major concern in clinical practice. Type B reactions are known to occur in susceptible individuals. The true hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a systemic disease defined by the triad of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement that starts 1 day to 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. HSR has limited the therapeutic use of many drugs, including ibuprofen. Hypersensitivity syndrome associated with ibuprofen is a host-dependent drug reaction that is idiosyncratic in nature. This reaction likely is caused by a combination of metabolic and immunologic factors. Immune mediated components, such as T-cell and their products cytokines and chemokines, can exacerbate cellular responses and create complex pathways that lead to a variety of clinical manifestations. Our review presents an ibuprofen-induced clinical manifestation of hypersensitivity syndrome and the necessity of wisely monitoring the patients clinically and by laboratory investigations when prescribing this drug.

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  4. Polydopamine-induced tooth remineralization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun-Zhi; Cao, Ying; Liu, Wei; Chu, Chun Hung; Li, Quan-Li

    2012-12-01

    Inspired by mussel bioadhesion in nature, dopamine is extensively used for biomaterial surface modification. In this study, we coated dopamine on demineralized enamel and dentin surfaces to evaluate the effect of polydopamine coating on dental remineralization. Dental slices containing enamel and dentin were first etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 2 min, followed by immersion in a 2 mg/mL freshly prepared solution of dopamine (10 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.5) for approximately 24 h at room temperature in the dark to obtain polydopamine coating. Then, the dental slices with and without polydopamine coating were immersed in the supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate at 37 °C for 2 and 7 days. The supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate was refreshed each day. The precipitates were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR, microhardness, and nanoscratch analyses. No significant difference was observed in the remineralization of enamel whether it was coated with polydopamine or not. However, a significant difference was found in dentin remineralization between dentin with and without polydopamine coating. Polydopamine coating remarkably promoted demineralized dentin remineralization, and all dentin tubules were occluded by densely packed hydroxyapatite crystals. Thus, coating polydopamine on dental tissue surface may be a simple universal technique to induce enamel and dentin remineralization simultaneously.

  5. Drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Katarey, Dev; Verma, Sumita

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) remains the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the western world. Excluding paracetamol overdose, nearly all DILI encountered in the clinical setting is idiosyncratic in nature because affected individuals represent only a small proportion of those treated with such drugs. In many cases, the mechanism for idiosyncrasy is immune-mediation and is often identified by genetic risk determined by human leukocyte antigen variants. In the absence of diagnostic tests and/or biomarkers, the diagnosis of DILI requires a high index of suspicion after diligently excluding other causes of abnormal liver tests. Antibiotics are the class of drugs most frequently associated with idiosyncratic DILI, although recent studies indicate that herbal and dietary supplements are an increasingly recognised cause. It is imperative that upon development of DILI the culprit drug be discontinued, especially in the presence of elevated transaminases (aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratio ≥5 times the upper limit of normal) and/or jaundice. Risk factors for the development ALF include hepatocellular DILI and female gender, the treatment being supportive with some benefit of N-acetylcysteine in the early stages. In view of the poor transplant-free survival in idiosyncratic DILI, early consideration for liver transplant is mandatory.

  6. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  7. Buoyancy-Induced, Columnar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Mark; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Free buoyancy-induced, columnar vortices (dust devils) that are driven by thermal instabilities of ground-heated, stratified air in areas with sufficient insolation convert the potential energy of low-grade heat in the surface air layer into a vortex flow with significant kinetic energy. A variant of the naturally-occurring vortex is deliberately triggered and anchored within an azimuthal array of vertical, stator-like flow vanes that form an open-top enclosure and impart tangential momentum to the radially entrained air. This flow may be exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. The fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex within such a facility are investigated experimentally using a heated ground plane. Specific emphasis is placed on the manipulation of the vortex formation and structure and the dependence of the vorticity production and sustainment mechanisms on the thermal resources and characteristic scales of the anchoring flow vanes using stereo-PIV. It is shown that manipulation of the formation and advection of vorticity concentrations within the enclosure can be exploited for increasing the available kinetic energy. Supported by ARPA-E.

  8. Saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jibrin, Ismaila; Erinle, Ayodele; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Aliyu, Zakari Y

    2006-06-01

    Saw palmetto is a frequently used botanical agent in benign prostatic enlargement (BPH). Although it has been reported to cause cholestatic hepatitis and many medical conditions, Saw palmetto has not been implicated in acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a probable Saw palmetto induced acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. A 55-year-old reformed alcoholic, sober for greater than 15 years, presented with severe non-radiating epigastric pain associated with nausea and vomiting. His only significant comorbidity is BPH for which he intermittently took Saw palmetto for about four years. Physical examination revealed normal vital signs, tender epigastrium without guarding or rebound tenderness. Cullen and Gray Turner signs were negative. Complete blood count and basic metabolic profile were normal. Additional laboratory values include a serum amylase: 2,152 mmol/L, lipase: 39,346 mmol/L, serum triglyceride: 38 mmol/L, AST: 1265, ALT: 1232 and alkaline phosphatase was 185. Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography revealed sludge without stones. A hepatic indole diacetic acid scan was negative. Patient responded clinically and biochemically to withdrawal of Saw palmetto. Two similar episodes of improvements followed by recurrence were noted with discontinuations and reinstitution of Saw Palmetto. Simultaneous and sustained response of hepatitis and pancreatitis to Saw palmetto abstinence with reoccurrence on reinstitution strongly favors drug effect. "Natural" medicinal preparations are therefore not necessarily safe and the importance of detailed medication history (including "supplements") cannot be over emphasized.

  9. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  10. What induces watts in WAT?

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Claude; Joffin, Nolwenn; Jaubert, Anne-Marie; Noirez, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Excess calories stored in white adipose tissue (WAT) could be reduced either through the activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the development of brown-like cells (“beige” or “brite”) in WAT, a process named “browning.” Calorie dissipation in brown and beige adipocytes might rely on the induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is absent in white fat cells. Any increase in UCP1 is commonly considered as the trademark of energy expenditure. The intracellular events involved in the recruitment process of beige precursors were extensively studied lately, as were the effectors, hormones, cytokines, nutrients and drugs able to modulate the route of browning and theoretically affect fat mass in rodents and in humans. The aim of this review is to update the characterization of the extracellular effectors that induce UCP1 in WAT and potentially provoke calorie dissipation. The potential influence of metabolic cycling in energy expenditure is also questioned. PMID:27386158

  11. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  12. Minocycline suppresses morphine-induced respiratory depression, suppresses morphine-induced reward, and enhances systemic morphine-induced analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Northcutt, Alexis L.; Chao, Lindsey W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra L.; Loram, Lisa C.; Rozeske, Robert R.; Bland, Sondra T.; Maier, Steven F.; Gleeson, Todd T.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest that opioids can activate immune-like cells of the central nervous system (glia). This opioid-induced glial activation is associated with decreased analgesia, owing to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Here we examine in rats whether the putative microglial inhibitor, minocycline, may affect morphine-induced respiratory depression and/or morphine-induced reward (conditioned place preference). Systemic co-administration of minocycline significantly attenuated morphine-induced reductions in tidal volume, minute volume, inspiratory force and expiratory force, but did not affect morphine-induced reductions in respiratory rate. Minocycline attenuation of respiratory depression was also paralleled with significant attenuation by minocycline of morphine-induced reductions in blood oxygen saturation. Minocycline also attenuated morphine conditioned place preference. Minocycline did not simply reduce all actions of morphine, as morphine analgesia was significantly potentiated by minocycline co-administration. Lastly, morphine dose-dependently increased cyclooxygenase-1 gene expression in a rat microglial cell line, an effect that was dose-dependently blocked by minocycline. Together, these data support that morphine can directly activate microglia in a minocycline-suppressible manner and suggest a pivotal role for minocycline-sensitive processes in the mechanisms of morphine-induced respiration depression, reward, and pain modulation. PMID:18706994

  13. The timing of induced resistance and induced susceptibility in the soybean-Mexican bean beetle system.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Nora C

    1998-04-01

    Induced plant responses to herbivory have been demonstrated in many systems. It has been suggested that the timing of these responses may influence the impact of induced resistance on herbivore populations, and may affect the evolution of induced defenses. This study used a bioassay to characterize the time course of systemic induced responses to Mexican bean beetle herbivory in four genotypes of soybeans. The results suggest that the time course of induced responses in this system is more complex than most previous studies have indicated. Herbivory provoked both rapid induced resistance and subsequent induced susceptibility to beetle feeding. All four genotypes of soybean induced significant resistance to beetle damage (beetles preferred undamaged to damaged plants) by 3 days after damage. By 15 days after damage, this resistance had decayed (beetles showed no preference for undamaged over damaged plants), and by 20 days after damage, all four genotypes exhibited significant induced susceptibility (beetles preferred previously damaged plants over undamaged plants). The magnitude of induced resistance in each genotype correlated strongly with the magnitude of induced susceptibility in that genotype.

  14. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  15. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  16. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor.

  17. Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Snehal S.; Paulino, Arnold C. . E-mail: apaulino@tmh.tmc.edu; Mai, Wei Y.; Teh, Bin S.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The moyamoya syndrome is an uncommon late complication after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language articles, with radiation, radiotherapy, and moyamoya syndrome used as search key words, yielded 33 articles from 1967 to 2002. Results: The series included 54 patients with a median age at initial RT of 3.8 years (range, 0.4 to 47). Age at RT was less than 5 years in 56.3%, 5 to 10 years in 22.9%, 11 to 20 years in 8.3%, 21 to 30 years in 6.3%, 31 to 40 years in 2.1%, and 41 to 50 years in 4.2%. Fourteen of 54 patients (25.9%) were diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). The most common tumor treated with RT was low-grade glioma in 37 tumors (68.5%) of which 29 were optic-pathway glioma. The average RT dose was 46.5 Gy (range, 22-120 Gy). For NF-1-positive patients, the average RT dose was 46.5 Gy, and for NF-1-negative patients, it was 58.1 Gy. The median latent period for development of moyamoya syndrome was 40 months after RT (range, 4-240). Radiation-induced moyamoya syndrome occurred in 27.7% of patients by 2 years, 53.2% of patients by 4 years, 74.5% of patients by 6 years, and 95.7% of patients by 12 years after RT. Conclusions: Patients who received RT to the parasellar region at a young age (<5 years) are the most susceptible to moyamoya syndrome. The incidence for moyamoya syndrome continues to increase with time, with half of cases occurring within 4 years of RT and 95% of cases occurring within 12 years. Patients with NF-1 have a lower radiation-dose threshold for development of moyamoya syndrome.

  18. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  19. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  20. Research on cavitation characteristic of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Wang, L. Q.; Y Kong, F.; Wu, D. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The fact which can not be neglected is that the inducer itself is a kind of axial pump. Research on inducer's cavitation characteristic is very important. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. The relationship between cavity length and head breakdown was discussed. With the decrease of NPSH, there is a slight increase in the head just prior to the decrease associated with head breakdown. This conclusion coincides with experimental results. The influence of backflow eddy on the inducer's cavitation characteristic was analyzed, and the change of backflow eddy in the process of cavitation was illustrated. It can be concluded that the correlation between the inducer head breakdown and the relative cavity length is very close which agrees well with the theoretical and experimental results. As the inlet pressure is decreased, inception almost always occurs in the tip vortex generated by the corner where the leading edge meets the tip. And backflow vortex gradually disappears in the process of cavitation.

  1. Hypocenter Estimation of Induced Earthquakes in Groningen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, Jesper; Dost, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Induced earthquakes due to gas production have taken place in the province of Groningen in the North-East of the Netherlands since 1986. In the first years of seismicity, a sparse seismological network with large station distances from the seismogenic area in Groningen was used. The location of induced earthquakes was limited by the few and wide spread stations. Recently, the station network has been extended significantly and the location of induced earthquakes in Groningen has become routine work. Except for the depth estimation of the events. In the hypocenter method used for source location by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), the depth of the induced earthquakes is by default set to 3 km which is the average depth of the gas-reservoir. Alternatively, a differential travel time for P-waves approach for source location is applied on recorded data from the extended network. The epicenter and depth of 87 induced earthquakes from 2014 to July 2016 have been estimated. The newly estimated epicentres are close to the induced earthquake locations from the current method applied by the KNMI. It is observed that most induced earthquakes take place at reservoir level. Several events in the same magnitude order are found near a brittle anhydrite layer in the overburden of mainly rock salt evaporites.

  2. Mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seo Won; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Joon-Tae; Welgampola, Miriam; Deriu, Franca

    2014-03-01

    Even though trigeminovestibular connections are well established in animals, mastication-induced dizziness has been described only as a vascular steal phenomenon in humans. We determined induction or modulation of nystagmus in two index patients with mastication-induced vertigo, 12 normal controls, and 52 additional patients with peripheral (n = 38, 26 with vestibular neuritis/labyrinthitis and 12 with Meniere's disease) or central (n = 14, 11 with Wallenberg syndrome, two with cerebellar infarction, and one with pontine infarction) vestibulopathy during their acute or compensated phase. Both index patients developed mastication-induced vertigo after near complete resolution of the spontaneous vertigo from presumed acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy. The nystagmus and vertigo gradually built up during mastication and dissipated slowly after cessation of mastication. Brain MRI and cerebral angiography were normal in these patients. Mastication did not induce nystagmus in normal controls. However, mastication induced nystagmus in five (24 %) of the 21 patients without spontaneous nystagmus (SN) but with a previous history of a vestibular syndrome, and either increased (21/31, 68 %) or decreased (7/31, 23 %) the SN in almost all the patients (28/31, 90 %) with SN. Mastication may induce significant vertigo and nystagmus in patients with a prior history of acute vestibulopathy. The induction or modulation of nystagmus by mastication in both peripheral and central vestibulopathies supports trigeminal modulation of the vestibular system in human. The gradual build-up and dissipation suggest a role of the velocity storage mechanism in the generation of mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus.

  3. Characterization of Deoxyribonucleases Induced by Poxviruses 1

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, C.; Launer, J.; Dombrowski, G.; Horák, I.

    1969-01-01

    Increases in deoxyribonuclease activity assayed at alkaline pH can be observed in poxvirus-infected cells when native or denatured deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is used as substrate. The deoxyribonuclease assayable with native DNA as substrate, induced in HeLa cells by cowpoxvirus or vaccinia virus WR, can be separated from the corresponding enzyme present in normal cells by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose. In addition, the two enzymes induced in the virus-infected cells differ from each other in their chromatographic properties. The two induced enzymes have been further characterized with respect to properties of enzymatic reaction. PMID:16789119

  4. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture.

  5. Observation of density-induced tunneling.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Meinert, Florian; Mark, Manfred J; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2014-11-07

    We study the dynamics of bosonic atoms in a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice and report on the first direct observation of density-induced tunneling. We show that the interaction affects the time evolution of the doublon oscillation via density-induced tunneling and pinpoint its density and interaction dependence. The experimental data for different lattice depths are in good agreement with our theoretical model. Furthermore, resonances caused by second-order tunneling processes are studied, where the density-induced tunneling breaks the symmetric behavior for attractive and repulsive interactions predicted by the Hubbard model.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide induces calcium waves in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yasuo; Tsugane, Mamiko; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Kimura, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) modifies hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and functions as a neuromodulator. Here, we show that H2S increases intracellular Ca2+ and induces Ca2+ waves in primary cultures of astrocytes as well as hippocampal slices. H2S increases the influx of Ca2+ and to a lesser extent causes the release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ waves induced by neuronal excitation as well as responses to exogenously applied H2S are potently blocked by La3+ and Gd3+, inhibitors of Ca2+ channels. These observations suggest that H2S induces Ca2+ waves that propagate to neighboring astrocytes.

  7. Terbinafine-induced lichenoid drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Haiyan; Lai, Wei; Maibach, Howard I

    2017-03-01

    Drug-induced lichen planus has been induced by antibiotics, anticonvulsants, antidiabetics, antimalarials, antitubercular drugs, antihypertensives, psychiatric drugs, chemotherapeutic agents, diuretic, heavy metals, NSAIDs, etc. Terbinafine, an antifungal agent, is widely used for dermatophyte infections and onychomycosis. Cutaneous adverse effects of terbinafine are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of terbinafine-induced lichenoid drug eruption in a 22-year-old who presented with generalized lichenoid eruption 2 weeks after terbinafine initiation of. The body and lip cleared completely after 8 weeks of drug withdrawal; nail change cleared after 12 weeks.

  8. Local bias-induced phase transitions

    DOE PAGES

    Seal, Katyayani; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2008-11-27

    Electrical bias-induced phase transitions underpin a wide range of applications from data storage to energy generation and conversion. The mechanisms behind these transitions are often quite complex and in many cases are extremely sensitive to local defects that act as centers for local transformations or pinning. Furthermore, using ferroelectrics as an example, we review methods for probing bias-induced phase transitions and discuss the current limitations and challenges for extending the methods to field-induced phase transitions and electrochemical reactions in energy storage, biological and molecular systems.

  9. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anil C; Prapa, Matina; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Mabote, Thato; Nasir, Mansoor; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure in pregnancy is rare, but usually ascribed to peripartum cardiomyopathy in the absence of other possible diagnoses. However, heart failure can develop solely due to a tachycardia, so-called 'tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy'. The incidence of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy is unknown, but it is a treatable and potentially reversible cause of heart failure. Clinically, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy during pregnancy might present in a similar manner, but its management has to be individualized according to the arrhythmic substrate and usually involve multidisciplinary input from specialists in obstetrics, cardiac electrophysiology and heart failure.

  10. Treatment of Radiation-Induced Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Matthias D; Liu, Joceline S; Morey, Allen F

    2017-02-01

    Radiation therapy may result in urethral strictures from vascular damage. Most radiation-induced urethral strictures occur in the bulbomembranous junction, and urinary incontinence may result as a consequence of treatment. Radiation therapy may compromise reconstruction due to poor tissue healing and radionecrosis. Excision and primary anastomosis is the preferred urethroplasty technique for radiation-induced urethral stricture. Principles of posterior urethroplasty for trauma may be applied to the treatment of radiation-induced urethral strictures. Chronic management with suprapubic tube is an option based on patient comorbidities and preference.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cold-induced sweating syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions cold-induced sweating syndrome cold-induced sweating syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Cold-induced sweating syndrome is characterized by problems with regulating body ...

  12. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  13. Vibration-induced droplet atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan

    The atomization of liquid drops is investigated experimentally using laser vibrometry, high-speed imaging, and particle tracking techniques. The spray is generated by a novel vibration-induced droplet atomization (VIDA) process in which a sessile drop is atomized by an underlying vibrating thin metal diaphragm, resulting in rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the free surface of the primary drop. Under some conditions, the primary drop can be atomized extremely rapidly by a bursting-like mechanism (e.g., a 0.1 ml water drop can be atomized in 0.4 seconds). The present research has focused on four major areas: global characteristics of VIDA process, instability modes and free surface dynamics of the forced drop, mechanisms of the interface breakup, and parametric characterization of the ensuing spray. Prior to atomization, the drop free surface undergoes three transitions: from axisymmetric standing waves to azimuthal waves, to a newly-observed lattice mode, and to a disordered pre-ejection state. The droplet ejection results from localized collapse of surface troughs and initiation and ultimate breakup of momentary liquid spikes. Breakup begins with capillary pinch-off from spike tips and can be followed by additional pinching of liquid droplets. For a relatively low-viscosity liquid, e.g., water, a capillary-wave instability of the spike is observed in some cases, while for a very viscous liquid, e.g., a glycerin/water solution, the first breakup occurs near the stem of the spike, with or without subsequent breakup of the detached, elongated thread. Different mechanisms dominating the primary breakup of the spike are operative in the low- and high-viscosity ejection regimes. When ejection of the secondary droplets is triggered, the evolution and rate of atomization depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary drop and the vibrating diaphragm. Due to these dynamics, the process can be either self-intensifying or self-decaying. The resulting VIDA spray

  14. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  15. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  16. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  17. Charge Induced by Displacement of an Ion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spokas, John J.

    1978-01-01

    Tries to clarify and explain some inaccuracies that appeared in a recent article dealing with a current induced in an external circuit due to charges moving within a device, an ionization chamber of planar geometry, in the circuit. (GA)

  18. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  19. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  20. Animal models of glucocorticoid-induced glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Overby, Darryl R; Clark, Abbot F

    2015-12-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is widely used to treat a variety of inflammatory diseases and conditions. While unmatched in their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities, GC therapy is often associated with the significant ocular side effect of GC-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) and iatrogenic open-angle glaucoma. Investigators have generated GC-induced OHT and glaucoma in at least 8 different species besides man. These models mimic many features of this condition in man and provide morphologic and molecular insights into the pathogenesis of GC-OHT. In addition, there are many clinical, morphological, and molecular similarities between GC-induced glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), making animals models of GC-induced OHT and glaucoma attractive models in which to study specific aspects of POAG.

  1. Radiation-induced accelerated coronary arteriosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.; Deutsch, M.; Thompson, M.; Dameshek, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    There is a paucity of information on radiation-induced coronary heart disease. A young patient with myocardial infarction following mediastinal irradiation is described. The role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the subsequent development of coronary heart disease is discussed.

  2. Studies of induced radioactivity at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Tanaka, M.

    1987-01-01

    With the goals of higher proton intensities, along with the many modes the AGS now runs and those being commissioned to run, we have begun detailed studies of the beam induced radioactivity in the AGS.

  3. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role.

  4. Animal Models of Glucocorticoid-Induced Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Overby, Darryl R.; Clark, Abbot F.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is widely used to treat a variety of inflammatory diseases and conditions. While unmatched in their anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities, GC therapy is often associated with the significant ocular side effect of GC-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) and iatrogenic open-angle glaucoma. Investigators have generated GC-induced OHT and glaucoma in at least 8 different species besides man. These models mimic many features of this condition in man and provide morphologic and molecular insights into the pathogenesis of GC-OHT. In addition, there are many clinical, morphological, and molecular similarities between GC-induced glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), making animals models of GC-induced OHT and glaucoma attractive models in which to study specific aspects of POAG. PMID:26051991

  5. TARGETING HYALURONIDASE FOR CANCER THERAPY: ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF SULFATED HYALURONIC ACID IN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Anaid; Yates, Travis J.; Lopez, Luis E.; Cerwinka, Wolfgang H.; Bakkar, Ashraf; Lokeshwar, Vinata B.

    2011-01-01

    The tumor cell-derived hyaluronidase HYAL-1 degrades hyaluronic acid (HA) into pro-angiogenic fragments that support tumor progression. Although HYAL-1 is a critical determinant of tumor progression and a marker for cancer diagnosis and metastasis prediction, it has not been evaluated as a target for cancer therapy. Similarly, sulfated hyaluronic acid (sHA) has not been evaluated for biological activity, although it is a HAase inhibitor. In this study we show that sHA is a potent inhibitor of prostate cancer. sHA blocked the proliferation, motility and invasion of LNCaP, LNCaP-AI, DU145 and LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells, also inducing caspase 8-dependent apoptosis associated with downregulation of Bcl-2 and phospho-Bad. sHA inhibited Akt signaling including androgen receptor (AR) phosphorylation, AR-activity, NFkb activation and VEGF expression. These effects were traced to a blockade in complex formation between PI3K and HA receptors and to a transcriptional downregulation of HA receptors, CD44 and RHAMM, along with PI3K inhibition. Angiogenic HA fragments or overexpression of myristoylated-Akt or HA receptors blunted these effects of sHA, implicating a feedback loop between HA receptors and PI3K/Akt signaling in the mechanism of action. In an animal model, sHA strongly inhibited LNCaP-AI prostate tumor growth without causing weight loss or apparent serum-organ toxicity. Inhibition of tumor growth was accompanied by a significant decrease in tumor angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis index. Taken together, our findings offer mechanistic insights into the tumor-associated HA-HAase system and a preclinical proof-of-concept of the safety and efficacy of sHA to control prostate cancer growth and progression. PMID:21555367

  6. HOXC9-Induced Differentiation in Neuroblastoma Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0613 TITLE: HOXC9-Induced Differentiation in Neuroblastoma Development...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/30/2012 – 09/29/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HOXC9-­‐Induced  Differentiation  in   Neuroblastoma ...determining the differentiation states of neuroblastoma tumors, with higher levels of HOXC9 promoting differentiation. At the cellular level, HOXC9

  7. Intermittent amantadine for fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Balon, R

    1996-01-01

    Various drugs, including amantadine, have been reported in the successful treatment of antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction. Only a regular daily dosing schedule of amantadine has been used for the treatment of sexual dysfunction so far. This case demonstrates that an intermittent dose of amantadine at 100 mg five to six hours prior to coitus could be useful in the treatment of fluoxetine-induced anorgasmia.

  8. Escitalopram-induced word finding difficulty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao-Ming; Lee, Wen-Kuei; Chang, Shang-Wen; Chiu, Nien-Mu; Huang, Jen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Escitalopram is the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for treatment of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. No available report indicating escitalopram may induce word finding difficulty. Here we are presenting a 50-year-old patient who suffered from escitalopram-induced word finding difficulty and the symptom resolved after replacing with bupropion. Carefully monitoring word finding difficulty and speech fluency during antidepressant treatment is important in clinical practice when using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, especially escitalopram.

  9. Hemolysis induced by Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Oda, Masataka; Takahashi, Masaya; Matsuno, Takayuki; Uoo, Kana; Nagahama, Masahiro; Sakurai, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (Bc-SMase) induces hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes which contain large amounts of sphingomyelin. We investigated the mechanism of this hemolysis in comparison to that induced by Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin. Pertussis toxin, a Gi-specific inhibitor, N-oleoylethernolamine, a ceramidase inhibitor, and dihydrosphingosine, a sphingosine kinase inhibitor, did not inhibit the hemolysis by Bc-SMase, but did inhibit that by alpha-toxin. Bc-SMase broadly bound to whole membranes, and alpha-toxin specifically bound to the detergent-resistant membrane fractions, lipid rafts. The level of ceramide production induced by Bc-SMase in sheep erythrocytes was 6- to 15-fold that induced by alpha-toxin, when the extent of the hemolysis by Bc-SMase was the same as that by the toxin. However, the level of ceramide production induced by Bc-SMase in SM-liposomes was equal to that triggered by the toxin, when the carboxyl fluorescein-release from liposomes induced by Bc-SMase was the same as that induced by alpha-toxin. Confocal laser microscopy showed that treatment of the cells with Bc-SMase resulted in the formation of ceramide-rich domains. A photobleaching analysis suggested that treatment of the cells with Bc-SMase leads to a reduction in membrane fluidity. These results show that Bc-SMase-induced hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes is related to the formation of interface between ceramide-rich domains and ceramide-poor domains through production of ceramide from SM.

  10. Cholinergic urticaria and exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stefan L

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will present the physical manifestations of two similar conditions. The first is cholinergic urticaria. This is chronic urticaria precipitated by an elevated body temperature. The second is exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be idiopathic, a result of a specific allergenic trigger (food, medication, or insect sting), or exercise induced. We will focus on the third subtype. We describe the causes, symptoms, pathophysiology, testing, treatment, and prognosis of these two conditions.

  11. Acute provoked reflex seizures induced by thinking.

    PubMed

    Nevler, Naomi; Gandelman-Marton, Revital

    2012-11-01

    Thinking epilepsy is a rare form of reflex epilepsy that can be induced by specific cognitive tasks, and occurs mainly in idiopathic generalized epilepsies. We report a case of complex partial seizures triggered by thinking in a young man with acute bacterial meningitis and a remote head injury. This case illustrates that thinking-induced reflex seizures can be partial and can be provoked by an acute brain insult.

  12. White noise does not induce fetal sleep.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, E Z; Jakobi, P; Talmon, R; Shenhav, R; Weissman, A

    1993-01-01

    White noise has been shown to induce sleep in newborns. We sought to examine whether this type of sound will also induce a quiet state in the fetus. Twenty-two fetuses at 36-41 weeks of gestation were exposed to white noise during an active state. The sound was delivered for 5 min at an intensity of 100 dB. No significant change in fetal activity was noted following the sound.

  13. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  14. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  15. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    PubMed

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  16. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  17. [Hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism syndrome induced by plasma exchange].

    PubMed

    Fourrier, F; Leclerc, L; Racadot, A; Wemeau, J L; Lestavel, P; Chopin, C

    1988-10-08

    The study was designed to measure sequential changes in plasma renin activity, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and ionograms, prior to, and after therapeutic plasma exchange. Each measurement was repeated before and after stimulation of renin activity induced by furosemide. The results showed that plasma exchange induces a syndrome of hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism associated with a depletion in angiotensin-converting enzyme activity which might account for the dissociation between plasma renin activity and aldosterone.

  18. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    PubMed

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  19. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  20. A Case of Olanzapine-Induced Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cho-Hsiang; Chen, Ying-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Olanzapine, a frequently used second-generation antipsychotic, has rarely been implicated as a cause of drug-induced fever in the absence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who developed isolated fever following olanzapine monotherapy, which subsided after discontinuation of olanzapine. Blockade of dopaminergic receptors and elevated cytokines concentration are possible mechanisms of fever development during treatment with olanzapine. This case calls for attention to olanzapine-induced fever in clinical practice. PMID:28138204

  1. TALEN-Induced Translocations in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Ghezraoui, Hind; Brunet, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Induction of chromosomal translocations in human cells is of a great interest to study tumorigenesis and genome instability. Here, we explain in detail a method to induce translocations using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We describe how to detect translocation formation by PCR, calculate translocation frequency by 96-well PCR screen, and analyze breakpoint junctions. When inducing cancer translocations, it is also possible to detect the fusion gene by FISH analysis or western blot.

  2. Brugada electrocardiographic pattern induced by fever

    PubMed Central

    Lamelas, Pablo; Labadet, Carlos; Spernanzoni, Fernando; Saubidet, Cristian Lopez; Alvarez, Paulino A

    2012-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a major cause of sudden death in young adults. Fever has been described to induce a Brugada-type electrocardiogram in asymptomatic patients with a negative family history, to disclose Brugada syndrome and to increase the risk of death and induce T wave alternans in patients with diagnosed Brugada syndrome. Risk stratification is challenging and demands a careful evaluation. Here we present 2 case reports and review the literature. PMID:22451857

  3. Method for inducing saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed to uniformly and systematically induce saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Three different methods for inducing saprolegniasis were evaluated in waters containing known zoospore concentrations of Saprolegnia parasitica (1) low-temperature shock to induce immunosuppression: (2) physical abrasion stress; and (3) a combination of both low temperature shock and abrasion stress. Low-temperature shock or abrasion stress alone were not effective for inducing saprolegniasis. Only 10% of fish stressed by low-temperature shock alone became infected. No fish receiving abrasion stress treatments alone became infected even though these fish were subject to significant abrasion and dewatering stress. A combination of low-temperature and abrasion stress, however, was sufficient to induce saprolegniasis in 100% of fish tested and resulted in 90% mortality. No fish became infected in the positive control group (exposed to zoospores of S. Parasitica without stress) or in the negative control group. The combined-stress method should enable researchers to induce saprolegniasis in channel catfish at will to study its pathogenesis or to test the efficacy of candidate antifungal treatments. In conducting efficacy studies, therapeutic treatments must begin immediately when the first signs of saprolegniasis are observed because the disease progresses quickly and is deadly.

  4. Cardiomyocyte death in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Wei; Shi, Jianjian; Li, Yuan-Jian; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most widely used and successful antitumor drugs, but its cumulative and dose-dependent cardiac toxicity has been the major concern of oncologists in cancer therapeutic practice for decades. With the increasing population of cancer survivals, there is a growing need to develop preventive strategies and effective therapies against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, in particular, the late onset cardiomyopathy. Although intensive investigations on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have been continued for decades, the underlying mechanisms responsible for DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have not been completely elucidated. A rapidly expanding body of evidence supports that cardiomyocyte death by apoptosis and necrosis is a primary mechanism of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and other types of cell death, such as autophagy and senescence/aging, may participate in this process. In this review, we will focus on the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying DOX-induced cardiomyocyte death, including the major primary mechanism of excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other recently discovered ROS-independent mechanisms. Different sensitivity to DOX-induced cell death signals between adult and young cardiomyocytes will also be discussed. PMID:19866340

  5. Local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Xu, Hua; Siegel, Cory D; Krichevsky, Igor E

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell apoptosis contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in neuronal and lymphocytic cell lines. We examined the effects of chronic (48 h) local anesthetic treatment (lidocaine, bupivacaine and tetracaine) on human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. Apoptosis induction was assessed by detecting poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase fragmentation, caspase activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, DNA laddering and by cellular morphology. Cell death was quantified by measuring neutral red dye uptake and lactate dehydrogenase released into the cell culture medium. All 3 local anesthetics caused concentration-dependent cell death, induced HK-2 cell apoptosis and potentiated TNF-alpha induced apoptosis. Local anesthetics induced HK-2 cell apoptosis by activation of caspases 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9. ZVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked the local anesthetic induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. Local anesthetics also inhibited the activities of anti-apoptotic kinases protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated mitrogen-activated protein kinase. Local anesthetic's pro-apoptotic effects are independent of sodium channel inhibition as tetrodotoxin, a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, failed to mimic local anesthetic-mediated induction or potentiation of HK-2 cell apoptosis. We conclude that local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptotic signaling by caspase activation and via inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways.

  6. Tamoxifen Induces Cytotoxic Autophagy in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, Christopher D; Kaza, Niroop; Klocke, Barbara J; Gillespie, G Yancey; Shevde, Lalita A; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) are the most common and aggressive primary human malignant brain tumors. 4-Hydroxy tamoxifen (OHT) is an active metabolite of the tamoxifen (TMX) prodrug and a well-established estrogen receptor (ER) and estrogen-related receptor antagonist. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated that OHT induced ER-independent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cell death by autophagic degradation of the prosurvival protein Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog. Because both MPNST and GBM are glial in cell origin, we hypothesized that OHT could mediate similar effects in GBM. OHT induced a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability that was largely independent of caspase activation in a human GBM cell line and 2 patient-derived xenolines. Further, OHT induced both cytotoxic autophagy and a concentration-dependent decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein levels. A GBM cell line expressing EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) was relatively resistant to OHT-induced death and EGFRvIII was refractory to OHT-induced degradation. Thus, OHT induces GBM cell death through a caspase-independent, autophagy-related mechanism and should be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in patients with GBM whose tumors express wild-type EGFR.

  7. DPI induces mitochondrial superoxide-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianyu; Ragheb, Kathy; Lawler, Gretchen; Sturgis, Jennie; Rajwa, Bartek; Melendez, J Andres; Robinson, J Paul

    2003-02-15

    The iodonium compounds diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (IDP) are well-known phagocyte NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. However, it has been shown that at high concentrations they can inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain as well. Since inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been shown to induce superoxide production and apoptosis, we investigated the effect of iodonium compounds on mitochondria-derived superoxide and apoptosis. Mitochondrial superoxide production was measured on both cultured cells and isolated rat-heart submitochondrial particles. Mitochondria function was examined by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential. Apoptotic pathways were studied by measuring cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting DNA fragmentation on agarose gel and measuring propidium iodide- (PI-) stained subdiploid cells using flow cytometry. Our results showed that DPI could induce mitochondrial superoxide production. The same concentration of DPI induced apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c. Addition of antioxidants or overexpression of MnSOD significantly reduced DPI-induced mitochondrial damage, cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis. These observations suggest that DPI can induce apoptosis via induction of mitochondrial superoxide. DPI-induced mitochondrial superoxide production may prove to be a useful model to study the signaling pathways of mitochondrial superoxide.

  8. Sulforaphane protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress is closely associated with acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced tissue injury. This study investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN), as a HO-1 inducer, plays a protective role against APAP hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of primary hepatocyte with SFN induced nuclear factor E2-factor related factor (Nrf2) target gene expression, especially HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed APAP-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion and lipid peroxidation, which eventually leads to hepatocyte cell death. A comparable effect was observed in mice treated with APAP. Mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP 30 min after SFN (5 mg/kg) administration and were then sacrificed after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injuries as characterized by increased plasma AST and ALT levels, GSH depletion, apoptosis, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) formations. This APAP-induced liver damage was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SFN. Furthermore, while hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased by APAP exposure, pretreatment with SFN completely blocked ROS formation. These results suggest that SFN plays a protective role against APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity through antioxidant effects mediated by HO-1 induction. SFN has preventive action in oxidative stress-mediated liver injury.

  9. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  10. [Induced abortion: a world perspective].

    PubMed

    Henshaw, S K

    1987-01-01

    This article presents current estimates of the number, rate, and proportion of abortions for all countries which make such data available. 76% of the world's population lives in countries where induced abortion is legal at least for health reasons. Abortion is legal in almost all developed countries. Most developing countries have some laws against abortion, but it is permitted at least for health reasons in the countries of 67% of the developing world's population. The other 33%--over 1 billion persons--reside mainly in subSaharan Africa, Latin America, and the most orthodox Muslim countries. By the beginning of the 20th century, abortion had been made illegal in most of the world, with rules in Africa, Asia, and Latin America similar to those in Europe and North America. Abortion legislation began to change first in a few industrialized countries prior to World War II and in Japan in 1948. Socialist European countries made abortion legal in the first trimester in the 1950s, and most of the industrialized world followed suit in the 1960s and 1970s. The worldwide trend toward relaxed abortion restrictions continues today, with governments giving varying reasons for the changes. Nearly 33 million legal abortions are estimated to be performed annually in the world, with 14 million of them in China and 11 million in the USSR. The estimated total rises to 40-60 million when illegal abortions added. On a worldwide basis some 37-55 abortions are estimated to occur for each 1000 women aged 15-44 years. There are probably 24-32 abortions per 100 pregnancies. The USSR has the highest abortion rate among developed countries, 181/1000 women aged 15-44, followed by Rumania with 91/1000, many of them illegal. The large number of abortions in some countries is due to scarcity of modern contraception. Among developing countries, China apparently has the highest rate, 62/1000 women aged 15-44. Cuba's rate is 59/1000. It is very difficult to calculate abortion rates in countries

  11. Interactions between test- and inducer-tone durations in induced loudness reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieder, Bärbel; Buus, Søren; Florentine, Mary; Scharf, Bertram

    2003-11-01

    A tone usually declines in loudness when preceded by a more intense inducer tone. This phenomenon is called ``loudness recalibration'' or ``induced loudness reduction'' (ILR). The present study investigates how ILR depends on level, loudness, and duration. A 2AFC procedure was used to obtain loudness matches between 2500-Hz comparison tones and 500-Hz test tones at 60 and 70 dB SPL, presented with and without preceding 500-Hz inducer tones. For 200-ms test and comparison tones, the amount of ILR did not depend on inducer level (set at 80 dB SPL and above), but ILR was greater with 200- than with 5-ms inducers, even when both were equally loud. For 5-ms tones, ILR was as great with 5- as with 200-ms inducers and about as great as when test and inducer tones both lasted 200 ms. These results suggest that (1) neither the loudness nor the SPL of the inducer alone governs ILR, and (2) inducer duration must equal or exceed test-tone duration to yield maximal amounts of ILR. Further analysis indicates that the efferent system may be partly responsible for ILR of 200-ms test tones, but is unlikely to account for ILR of 5-ms tones.

  12. Statin-induced necrotizing myositis - a discrete autoimmune entity within the "statin-induced myopathy spectrum".

    PubMed

    Hamann, Philip D H; Cooper, Robert G; McHugh, Neil J; Chinoy, Hector

    2013-10-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing myositis is increasingly being recognised as part of the "statin-induced myopathy spectrum". As in other immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myositis is characterised by proximal muscle weakness with marked serum creatinine kinase elevations and histological evidence of myonecrosis, with little or no inflammatory cell infiltration. Unlike other necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myopathy is associated with the presence of autoantibodies directed against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl- coenzyme A reductase (the enzyme target of statin therapies), and with Human Leukocyte Antigen-DRB1*11. This article summarises the clinical presentation, investigations and management of this rare, but serious complication of statin therapy.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Etoposide Induced DNA Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Muslimović, Aida; Nyström, Susanne; Gao, Yue; Hammarsten, Ola

    2009-01-01

    Background Etoposide is a cancer drug that induces strand breaks in cellular DNA by inhibiting topoisomerase II (topoII) religation of cleaved DNA molecules. Although DNA cleavage by topoisomerase II always produces topoisomerase II-linked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the action of etoposide also results in single-strand breaks (SSBs), since religation of the two strands are independently inhibited by etoposide. In addition, recent studies indicate that topoisomerase II-linked DSBs remain undetected unless topoisomerase II is removed to produce free DSBs. Methodology/Principal Findings To examine etoposide-induced DNA damage in more detail we compared the relative amount of SSBs and DSBs, survival and H2AX phosphorylation in cells treated with etoposide or calicheamicin, a drug that produces free DSBs and SSBs. With this combination of methods we found that only 3% of the DNA strand breaks induced by etoposide were DSBs. By comparing the level of DSBs, H2AX phosphorylation and toxicity induced by etoposide and calicheamicin, we found that only 10% of etoposide-induced DSBs resulted in histone H2AX phosphorylation and toxicity. There was a close match between toxicity and histone H2AX phosphorylation for calicheamicin and etoposide suggesting that the few etoposide-induced DSBs that activated H2AX phosphorylation were responsible for toxicity. Conclusions/Significance These results show that only 0.3% of all strand breaks produced by etoposide activate H2AX phosphorylation and suggests that over 99% of the etoposide induced DNA damage does not contribute to its toxicity. PMID:19516899

  14. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  15. Oxidative Stress Marker and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Draganovic, Dragica; Lucic, Nenad; Jojic, Dragica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. Hence, research and test of role and significance of oxidative stress in hypertensive disturbance in pregnancy is very important. Aim: Aims of this research were to determine a level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as oxidative stress marker in blood of pregnant woman with pregnancy induced hypertension and to analyze correlation of TBARS values with blood pressure values in pregnancy induced hypertensive pregnant women. Patients and methods: Research has been performed at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Clinical Centre in the Republic of Srpska. It covered 100 pregnant women with hypertension and 100 healthy pregnant women of gestation period from 28 to 40 weeks. Level of TBARS is determined as an equivalent of malondialdehyde standard, in accordance with recommendations by producer (Oxi Select TBARS Analisa Kit). Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. All pregnant women experiencing hypertension had increased TBARS values in medium value interval over 20 µmol, 66%, whereas in group of healthy pregnant women, only 1% experienced increased TBARS value. Pregnant women with difficult preeclampsia (32%) had high TBARS values, over 40 µmol, and with mild PIH, only 4.9% pregnant women. Conclusion: Pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension have extremely increased degree of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. TBARS values are in positive correlation with blood pressure values, respectively the highest TBARS value were present in pregnant women with the highest blood pressure values. PMID:28210016

  16. HNE as an inducer of COX-2.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Koji

    2017-02-09

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform responsible for high levels of prostaglandin (PG) production during inflammation and immune responses, mediate a variety of biological actions involved in vascular pathophysiology. COX-2 is induced by various stimuli, including proinflammatory cytokines, to result in PG synthesis associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of a group of small molecules that can induce COX-2 expression. The mechanistic studies have revealed that the HNE-induced COX-2 expression results from the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and uniquely requires a serum component, which is eventually identified to be modified low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), such as the oxidized form of LDLs. It has also been shown that HNE-induced COX-2 expression is mechanistically linked to the expression of transcription factor p53 and that the overexpression of COX-2 is associated with down-regulation of a proteasome subunit, leading to the enhanced accumulation of p53 and ubiquitinated proteins and to the enhanced sensitivity toward HNE. Thus, the overall mechanism and pathophysiological role of the COX-2 induction by HNE have become increasingly evident.

  17. Olanzapine-induced restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mangsuo; Geng, Tongchao; Qiao, Liyan; Zhang, Mingjie; Shi, Jie; Huang, Fangjie; Lin, Xianzhong; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Huancong

    2014-09-01

    Only nine patients with olanzapine-induced restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been reported in the literature to our knowledge. We describe two patients with olanzapine-induced RLS treated at our hospital and review the nine reported patients. There were five women and six men aged between 28 and 62 years in the overall group. RLS symptoms emerged at olanzapine doses between 2.5 and 20mg. The symptoms improved in all patients when the dose was reduced and immediately disappeared when the medication was stopped. International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS) scores ranged from 10 to 35. Three patients had a family history of idiopathic RLS. Supplemental drugs were administered to control RLS symptoms in five patients. Ropinirole was effective in one patient, while two patients did not respond to the drug. Propoxyphene effectively relieved symptoms in one patient who did not respond to ropinirole or clonazepam. RLS symptoms did not recur following substitution of other antipsychotic drugs for olanzapine. In conclusion, olanzapine can induce RLS, particularly in patients with a family history of idiopathic RLS. More than half of the patients experienced severe to very severe symptoms. A dose-dependent relationship was observed between olanzapine and RLS symptoms. A gradual increase in dose may prevent olanzapine-induced RLS. The optimal treatment for olanzapine-induced RLS is discontinuation of olanzapine.

  18. Hippocampal leptin suppresses methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Leptin is an anorexigenic peptide which is synthesized in white adipose tissue. The actions of leptin are mediated by the leptin receptor which is abundantly localized in the hypothalamus and is involved in energy regulation and balance. Recently, there has been evidence suggesting that the leptin receptor is also present in the hippocampus and may be involved with hippocampal excitability and long-term depression. To investigate the physiological function of leptin signalling in the hippocampus, we studied the effects of leptin on methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity by utilizing intra-hippocampal infusion (i.h.) in mice. Our results show that the infusion of leptin (5 ng each bilaterally i.h.) does not affect the basal ambulatory activity but significantly suppresses methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity as compared to saline-infused controls. Interestingly, higher dose of leptin increases the suppression of the methamphetamine-induced ambulatory hyperactivity. The i.h. infusion of leptin did not activate the JAK-STAT pathway, which is the cellular signalling pathway through which leptin acts in the hypothalamus. The infusion of leptin also did not affect activation of p42/44 MAPK which is known to be another leptin-induced signalling pathway in the brain. These results demonstrate that leptin has a novel potential suppressive effect on methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and also suggest that there must be an alternative pathway in the hippocampus through which leptin signalling is being mediated.

  19. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  20. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  1. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-05-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  3. The quality of high pressure-induced and heat-induced yuzu marmalade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwada, Hiroko; Jibu, Yuri; Teramoto, Ai; Fuchigami, Michiko

    2010-12-01

    Yuzu is a typical Japanese citrus with a desirable smell. The objectives of this study are to establish a process for pressure-induced marmalade (without both heating or the addition of pectin) and compare it with heat-induced marmalade. Sliced peel (flavedo) was soaked in 2% citric acid solution (pH 2.0). Albedo, endocarp and juice sacs were homogenized with 0.3% citric acid solution (pH 2.5). After soaking for 24 h, these were mixed and 50% or 60% sucrose of the total weight was added, then pressurized at 500 MPa or boiled (process A). Process B: all processing was done at pH 2.7. Peel of high pressure-induced marmalade maintained a natural color. Flavedo in heat-induced marmalade was softer than that of pressure-induced marmalade. There was no difference in viscosity between heat-induced and high pressure-induced marmalade. High pressure-induced marmalade with 50% sugar was preferred by a sensory test because fresh flavor and color were maintained.

  4. Coevolution of phenotypic plasticity in predator and prey: why are inducible offenses rarer than inducible defenses?

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko; Kishida, Osamu; Iwasa, Yoh

    2011-04-01

    Inducible defenses of prey and inducible offenses of predators are drastic phenotypic changes activated by the interaction between a prey and predator. Inducible defenses occur in many taxa and occur more frequently than inducible offenses. Recent empirical studies have reported reciprocal phenotypic changes in both predator and prey. Here, we model the coevolution of inducible plasticity in both prey and predator, and examine how the evolutionary dynamics of inducible plasticity affect the population dynamics of a predator-prey system. Under a broad range of parameter values, the proportion of predators with an offensive phenotype is smaller than the proportion of prey with a defensive phenotype, and the offense level is relatively lower than the defense level at evolutionary end points. Our model also predicts that inducible plasticity evolves in both species when predation success depends sensitively on the difference in the inducible trait value between the two species. Reciprocal phenotypic plasticity may be widespread in nature but may have been overlooked by field studies because offensive phenotypes are rare and inconspicuous.

  5. Sox9 potentiates BMP2-induced chondrogenic differentiation and inhibits BMP2-induced osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Junyi; Hu, Ning; Zhou, Nian; Lin, Liangbo; Zhao, Chen; Yi, Shixiong; Fan, Tingxu; Bao, Wei; Liang, Xi; Chen, Hong; Xu, Wei; Chen, Cheng; Cheng, Qiang; Zeng, Yongming; Si, Weike; Yang, Zhong; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) is one of the key chondrogenic growth factors involved in the cartilage regeneration. However, it also exhibits osteogenic abilities and triggers endochondral ossification. Effective chondrogenesis and inhibition of BMP2-induced osteogenesis and endochondral ossification can be achieved by directing the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards chondrocyte lineage with chodrogenic factors, such as Sox9. Here we investigated the effects of Sox9 on BMP2-induced chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. We found exogenous overexpression of Sox9 enhanced the BMP2-induced chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. Also, it inhibited early and late osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in vitro. Subcutaneous stem cell implantation demonstrated Sox9 potentiated BMP2-induced cartilage formation and inhibited endochondral ossification. Mouse limb cultures indicated that BMP2 and Sox9 acted synergistically to stimulate chondrocytes proliferation, and Sox9 inhibited BMP2-induced chondrocytes hypertrophy and ossification. This study strongly suggests that Sox9 potentiates BMP2-induced MSCs chondrogenic differentiation and cartilage formation, and inhibits BMP2-induced MSCs osteogenic differentiation and endochondral ossification. Thus, exogenous overexpression of Sox9 in BMP2-induced mesenchymal stem cells differentiation may be a new strategy for cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Establishment of opioid-induced rewarding effects under oxaliplatin- and Paclitaxel-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tomohisa; Kanbara, Tomoe; Harumiya, Masato; Iwase, Yoshiyuki; Masumoto, Aki; Komiya, Sachiko; Nakamura, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The rewarding effects of μ-receptor agonists can be suppressed under several pain conditions. We recently showed that clinically used μ-receptor agonists possess efficacies for relieving the neuropathic pain induced by chemotherapeutic drug in rats; however, it is possible that the use of μ-receptor agonists may trigger the rewarding effects even under chemotherapeutic drug-induced neuropathic pain. Nevertheless, no information is available regarding whether μ-receptor agonists produce psychological dependence under chemotherapeutic drug-induced neuropathic pain. Therefore, we examined the effects of neuropathy induced by chemotherapeutic drugs on the rewarding effects of morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl in rats. Repeated treatment with oxaliplatin or paclitaxel produced neuropathy as measured by the von Frey test. Rewarding effects produced by antinociceptive doses of μ-receptor agonists were not suppressed under oxaliplatin- or paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. Furthermore, the morphine-induced increase in the release of dopamine from the nucleus accumbens, which is a critical step in the rewarding effects of μ-receptor agonists, was not altered in paclitaxel-treated rats. These results suggest that the rewarding effects of μ-receptor agonists can still be established under oxaliplatin- or paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. Therefore, patients should be carefully monitored for psychological dependence on μ-receptor agonists when they are used to control chemotherapeutic drug-induced neuropathic pain.

  7. Summary of Recent Inducer Testing at MSFC and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers water flow tests on the RS-83 Main LOX Inducer for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The presentation lists recent water tests on the SSME liquid oxygen (LOX) pump inducer, includes images and diagrams of the water test facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), profiles inducer hydrodynamic forces, and diagrams the performance of the RS-83 inducer.

  8. Influence of absorption induced thermal initiation pathway on irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Jurna, Martin; Palero, Jonathan; Verhagen, Margaret Hortonand Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal initiation pathway on the irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms. We observed a transition from laser-induced optical breakdown to laser-induced thermal breakdown as the absorption coefficient of the medium is increased. We found that the irradiance threshold after correction for the path length dependent absorption and scattering losses in the medium is lower due to the thermal pathway for the generation of seed electrons compared to the laser-induced optical breakdown. Furthermore, irradiance threshold gradually decreases with the increase in the absorption properties of the medium. Creating breakdown with lower irradiance threshold that is specific at the target chromophore can provide intrinsic target selectivity and improve safety and efficacy of skin treatment methods that use laser induced breakdown. PMID:25909007

  9. NLRP3 promotes inflammation-induced skin cancer but is dispensable for asbestos-induced mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Chow, Melvyn T; Tschopp, Jürg; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J

    2012-11-01

    Asbestos exposure can result in serious and frequently lethal diseases, including malignant mesothelioma. The host sensor for asbestos-induced inflammation is the NLRP3 inflammasome and it is widely assumed that this complex is essential for asbestos-induced cancers. Here, we report that acute interleukin-1β production and recruitment of immune cells into peritoneal cavity were significantly decreased in the NLRP3-deficient mice after the administration of asbestos. However, NLRP3-deficient mice displayed a similar incidence of malignant mesothelioma and survival times as wild-type mice. Thus, early inflammatory reactions triggered by asbestos are NLRP3-dependent, but NLRP3 is not critical in the chronic development of asbestos-induced mesothelioma. Notably, in a two-stage carcinogenesis-induced papilloma model, NLRP3-deficient mice showed a resistance phenotype in two different strain backgrounds, suggesting a tumour-promoting role of NLRP3 in certain chemically-induced cancer types.

  10. Different growth rates for catalyst-induced and self-induced GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chèze, C.; Geelhaar, L.; Jenichen, B.; Riechert, H.

    2010-10-01

    The catalyst- and self-induced pathways of GaN nanowire growth by molecular beam epitaxy are compared. The catalyst-induced nanowires elongate faster than the self-induced ones and their growth rate is fully determined by the impinging N rate. The self-induced nanowire growth rate is identical on both Si(111) and Si(001) and approaches the impinging N rate only for the few longest nanowires. This difference is attributed to the presence of the Ni-catalyst which enhances the incorporation of Ga at the nanowire tip while for the self-induced nanowires, growth is limited by the different incorporation rates on the nanowire tip and sidewall facets.

  11. Non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Razeghinejad, M R; Pro, M J; Katz, L J

    2011-01-01

    Numerous systemically used drugs are involved in drug-induced glaucoma. Most reported cases of non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma are closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). Indeed, many routinely used drugs that have sympathomimetic or parasympatholytic properties can cause pupillary block CAG in individuals with narrow iridocorneal angle. The resulting acute glaucoma occurs much more commonly unilaterally and only rarely bilaterally. CAG secondary to sulfa drugs is a bilateral non-pupillary block type and is due to forward movement of iris–lens diaphragm, which occurs in individuals with narrow or open iridocorneal angle. A few agents, including antineoplastics, may induce open-angle glaucoma. In conclusion, the majority of cases with glaucoma secondary to non-steroidal medications are of the pupillary block closed-angle type and preventable if the at-risk patients are recognized and treated prophylactically. PMID:21637303

  12. Radiation induced dynamic mutations and transgenerational effects.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that radiation can induce genomic instability in whole body systems. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying induced genomic instability are not known at present, this interesting phenomenon could be the manifestation of a cellular fail-safe system in which fidelity of repair and replication is down-regulated to tolerate DNA damage. Two features of genomic instability namely, delayed mutation and untargeted mutation, require two mechanisms of ;damage memory' and ;damage sensing, signal transduction and execution' to induce mutations at a non damaged-site. In this report, the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability and possible mechanisms are discussed using mouse data collected in our laboratory as the main bases.

  13. Modelling of electron beam induced nanowire attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Lucas A.; Speich, Claudia; Schäfer, David; Erni, Daniel; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz J.; Benson, Niels; Schmechel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) induced nanowire (NW) attraction or bundling is a well known effect, which is mainly ascribed to structural or material dependent properties. However, there have also been recent reports of electron beam induced nanowire bending by SEM imaging, which is not fully explained by the current models, especially when considering the electro-dynamic interaction between NWs. In this article, we contribute to the understanding of this phenomenon, by introducing an electro-dynamic model based on capacitor and Lorentz force interaction, where the active NW bending is stimulated by an electromagnetic force between individual wires. The model includes geometrical, electrical, and mechanical NW parameters, as well as the influence of the electron beam source parameters and is validated using in-situ observations of electron beam induced GaAs nanowire (NW) bending by SEM imaging.

  14. An update on drug-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Marwan H

    2016-08-01

    A large and heterogeneous group of drugs can cause drug-induced arthritis. No single pathogenetic mechanism or drug class unifies these diverse culprits. Recognizing that joint symptoms may, in fact, be drug-related not only saves time and unnecessary investigations but can also prevent needless suffering and morbidity due to late recognition of a drug-induced arthritic condition. The extent of drug-induced arthritis is variable and ranges from minor short-lived and reversible arthralgia to a prolonged and occasionally destructive arthritis. The onset of arthritis due to various medications in relation to the timing of drug initiation is also variable and may range from a few days to several months.

  15. Drug-induced hyperuricaemia and gout.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, C; Slim, Raoudha; Fathallah, Neila; Hmouda, Houssem

    2016-08-07

    Hyperuricaemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum uric acid level >6.8 mg/dl (404 µmol/l). Gout, a recognized complication of hyperuricaemia, is the most common inflammatory arthritis in adults. Drug-induced hyperuricaemia and gout present an emergent and increasingly prevalent problem in clinical practice. Diuretics are one of the most important causes of secondary hyperuricaemia. Drugs raise serum uric acid level by an increase of uric acid reabsorption and/or decrease in uric acid secretion. Several drugs may also increase uric acid production. In this review, drugs leading to hyperuricaemia are summarized with regard to their mechanism of action and clinical significance. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperuricaemia and gout, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the morbidity related to drug-induced hyperuricaemia and gout.

  16. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, M.; Luisi, P.L. ); Hochkoeppler, A. . Dept. di Biologia)

    1993-10-01

    Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.

  17. Wind induced composition effects at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature and compositional structure of the upper atmosphere are discussed in relation to the impacts of wind-induced diffusion processes. Seasonal variations in thermospheric temperature and composition are explained by energy and mass transport from the summer to the winter hemisphere induced by preferential heating, with the winter oxygen bulge participating in a feedback mechanism which acts to dampen wind velocities and increase temperature contrast. Changes in the eddy diffusion coefficient are considered as a complementary mechanism of producing the seasonal anomalies. The role of winds induced by high-latitude heating by particles and Joule dissipation during magnetic storms and substorms in accounting for thermospheric density increases and N2 and Ar enhancements and O and He depletions at high latitudes are discussed, and the rather weak compositional signature of E x B momentum coupling is distinguished from the effects of Joule dissipation.

  18. Optically-induced-potential-based image encryption.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing-Chu; Wang, He-Zhou

    2011-11-07

    We present a technique of nonlinear image encryption by use of virtual optics. The image to be encrypted is superposed on a random intensity image. And this superposed image propagates through a nonlinear medium and a 4-f system with single phase key. The image is encrypted to a stationary white noise. The decryption process is sensitive to the parameters of the encryption system and the phase key in 4-f system. This sensitivity makes attackers hard to access the phase key. In nonlinear medium, optically-induced potentials, which depend on intensity of optical wave, make the superposition principle frustrated. This nonlinearity based on optically induced potentials highly improves the secrecy level of image encryption. Resistance against attacks based on the phase retrieval technique proves that it has the high secrecy level. This nonlinear image encryption based on optically induced potentials is proposed and demonstrated for the first time.

  19. [Chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2011-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a clinically important and sometimes dose-limiting toxicity of cancer treatment, including standard-dose chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Consequently, dose reductions or treatment delays resulting from mucositis may impair treatment effectiveness. Symptoms are oral mucositis, dysphagia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, depending on the affected site. Although the underlying pathobiology of oral mucositis has been considerably elucidated over the past decade, there are few interventions for the prevention or treatment validated by randomized trials. The most commonly accepted intervention is basic oral care. Diarrhea is most common in patients treated with irinotecan and in some cases, life-threatening. No definitive interventions for the prevention of diarrhea exist, but there is evidence that loperamide and octreotide are effective for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. In future, there is a need for well designed trials, preferably including a placebo or no treatment control, validating more effective interventions for managing chemotherapy- induced mucositis.

  20. Microbe- and danger-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Achille; Granucci, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The ability of the immune system to give rise to an effective response against pathogens while maintaining tolerance towards self-tissues has always been an object of keen interest for immunologist. Over the years, different theories have been proposed to explain if and how the immune system is able to discriminate between self and non-self, including the Infectious Non-self theory from Charles Janeway and Polly Matzinger's Danger theory. Nowadays we know Janeway's theory is largely true, however the immune system does respond to injured, stressed and necrotic cells releasing danger signals (DAMPs) with a potent inflammatory response. To avoid unwanted prolonged autoimmune reactions, though, danger-induced inflammation should be tightly regulated. In the present review we discuss how prototypic DAMPs are able to induce inflammation and the peculiarity of danger-induced inflammation, as opposed to a complete immune response to fight pathogen invasions.