Science.gov

Sample records for pi-mu atoms

  1. Search for D(+) yields (pi)(+)(mu)(+)(mu)(-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A.

    1994-07-01

    Flavor-changing neutral current decays are forbidden in lowest order in the Standard Model. The authors present results of a search for the charm changing neutral current decay D(+) (yields) (pi)(+)(mu)(+)(mu)(-) based on the analysis of one third of the data from Fermilab experiment E791, accumulated during the 1991-92 fixed target run with a 500 GeV negative pion beam incident on a segmented target. Assuming that the decay kinematics are the same as for D(+) (yields) K(-)(pi)(+)(pi)(+), they set an upper limit on the branching ratio for this channel, B(D(+) (yields) (pi)(+)(mu)(+)(mu)(-))less than 4.6 x 10(exp -5) at the 90% confidence level.

  2. A measurement of the branching ratio of K+-- ->pi+--mu+mu- decays in the Hyper CP experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zyla, Piotr; other HyperCP Collaborators

    2001-11-26

    Large samples of hyperon and kaon decays were collected with the Hyper CP spectrometer during two fixed-target runs at Fermilab. Based on an analysis of 110 million K pm decays from the 1997 data sample we present a branching ratio for K pm right arrow pi pm mu+ mu-. This is the first observation of K- right arrow pi- mu+ mu- decay.

  3. Mass spectrum analysis of K- pi+ from the semileptonic decay D+ --> K- pi+ mu+ nu

    SciTech Connect

    Massafferri Rodrigues, Andre

    2004-03-01

    The Higgs mechanism preserves the gauge symmetries of the Standard Model while giving masses to the W, Z bosons. Supersymmetry, which protects the Higgs boson mass scale from quantum corrections, predicts at least 5 Higgs bosons, none of which has been directly observed. This thesis presents a search for neutral Higgs bosons, produced in association with bottom quarks. The production rate is greatly enhanced at large values of the Supersymmetric parameter tan {beta}. High-energy p{bar p} collision data, collected from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron using the D0 detector, are analyzed. In the absence of a signal, values of tan {beta} > 80-120 are excluded at 95% Confidence Level (C.L.), depending on the (CP-odd) neutral Higgs boson mass (studied from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}).

  4. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  5. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  6. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  7. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  8. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  9. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  10. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  11. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  12. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  13. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  14. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  15. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  16. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  17. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  18. Viewing minerals, atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    With state-of-the-art technology supported by scissors and bungy cords, Earth scientists are beginning to look at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interactions on an atomic scale.The instrument that can provide such a detailed view is the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which made a great theoretical and practical splash when it was introduced in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer, physicists at IBM's laboratory in Zurich. They won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work 5 years later.

  19. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  20. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  1. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  2. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  3. Ultracold-Atom Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed class of accelerometers and related motion sensors based on use of ultracold atoms as inertial components of motion transducers. Ultracold atoms supplant spring-and-mass components of older accelerometers. As used here, "ultracold atoms" means atoms with kinetic energies equivalent to temperatures equal to or less than 20 mK. Acclerometers essentially frictionless. Primary advantage high sensitivity.

  4. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  5. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  6. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor Fuel…

  7. PHYSICS: Toward Atom Chips.

    PubMed

    Fortágh, József; Zimmermann, Claus

    2005-02-11

    As a novel approach for turning the peculiar features of quantum mechanics into practical devices, researchers are investigating the use of ultracold atomic clouds above microchips. Such "atom chips" may find use as sensitive probes for gravity, acceleration, rotation, and tiny magnetic forces. In their Perspective, Fortagh and Zimmermann discuss recent advances toward creating atom chips, in which current-carrying conductors in the chips create magnetic microtraps that confine the atomic clouds. Despite some intrinsic limits to the performance of atom chips, existing technologies are capable of producing atom chips, and many possibilities for their construction remain to be explored.

  8. Atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Forbes, R.G.

    2009-06-15

    This introductory tutorial describes the technique of atom probe tomography for materials characterization at the atomic level. The evolution of the technique from the initial atom probe field ion microscope to today's state-of-the-art three dimensional atom probe is outlined. An introduction is presented on the basic physics behind the technique, the operation of the instrument, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional data. The common methods for analyzing the three-dimensional atom probe data, including atom maps, isoconcentration surfaces, proximity histograms, maximum separation methods, and concentration frequency distributions, are described.

  9. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  10. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  11. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  12. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Molnar, H.M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  13. Adaptive atom-optics in atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marable, M. L.; Savard, T. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    1997-02-01

    We suggest a general technique for creating virtual atom-optical elements which are adaptive. The shape and position of these elements is determined by the frequency distribution for optical fields which induce transitions in a high gradient potential. This adaptive method is demonstrated in an all-optical atom interferometer, by creating either a variable optical slit or a variable optical grating which is scanned across the atomic spatial patterns to measure the fringes. This method renders mechanical motion of the interferometer elements unnecessary.

  14. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  15. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  16. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  17. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  18. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  19. Single atom microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity.

  20. Single atom microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2012-12-01

    We show that aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy operating at low accelerating voltages is able to analyze, simultaneously and with single atom resolution and sensitivity, the local atomic configuration, chemical identities, and optical response at point defect sites in monolayer graphene. Sequential fast-scan annular dark-field (ADF) imaging provides direct visualization of point defect diffusion within the graphene lattice, with all atoms clearly resolved and identified via quantitative image analysis. Summing multiple ADF frames of stationary defects produce images with minimized statistical noise and reduced distortions of atomic positions. Electron energy-loss spectrum imaging of single atoms allows the delocalization of inelastic scattering to be quantified, and full quantum mechanical calculations are able to describe the delocalization effect with good accuracy. These capabilities open new opportunities to probe the defect structure, defect dynamics, and local optical properties in 2D materials with single atom sensitivity. PMID:23146658

  1. Atomic homodyne detection of weak atomic transitions.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Mevan; Elliott, D S

    2007-01-26

    We have developed a two-color, two-pathway coherent control technique to detect and measure weak optical transitions in atoms by coherently beating the transition amplitude for the weak transition with that of a much stronger transition. We demonstrate the technique in atomic cesium, exciting the 6s(2)S(1/2) --> 8s(2)S(1/2) transition via a strong two-photon transition and a weak controllable Stark-induced transition. We discuss the enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio for this measurement technique over that of direct detection of the weak transition rate, and project future refinements that may further improve its sensitivity and application to the measurement of other weak atomic interactions.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  3. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  4. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  5. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  6. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions.

  7. High pressure atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, F. V.

    1982-03-01

    The main objective of these grants has been to study the fundamental processes which lead to the atomization of high pressure jets injected into compressed gases through single hole nozzles. Specific topics include: Dependence of Spray Angle and Other Spray Parameters on Nozzle Design and Operating Conditions; Ultra High Speed Filming of Atomizing Jets; Mechanism of Breakup of Highly Super Heated Liquid Jets; Measurements of the Spray Angle of Atomizing Jets; Mechanism of Atomization of a Liquid Jet; Scaling of Transient Laminar, Turbulent, and Spray Jets; Computations of Drop Sizes in Pulsating Sprays and of Liquid Core Length in Vaporizing Sprays; and Scaling of Impulsively Started Sprays.

  8. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  9. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  10. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  11. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  12. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  13. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  14. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…

  15. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  16. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  17. Moving Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Single neutral atoms are promising candidates for qubits, the fundamental unit of quantum information. We have built a set of optical tweezers for trapping and moving single Rubidium atoms. The tweezers are based on a far off-resonant dipole trapping laser focussed to a 1 μm spot with a single aspheric lens. We use a digital micromirror device (DMD) to generate dynamic holograms of the desired arrangement of traps. The DMD has a frame rate of 20 kHz which, when combined with fast algorithms, allows for rapid reconfiguration of the traps. We demonstrate trapping of up to 20 atoms in arbitrary arrangements, and the transport of a single-atom over a distance of 14 μm with continuous laser cooling, and 5 μm without. In the meantime, we are developing high-finesse fibre-tip cavities, which we plan to use to couple pairs of single atoms to form a quantum network.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  19. Coaxial airblast atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardalupas, Y.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to quantify the characteristics of the sprays of coaxial injectors with particular emphasis on those aspects relevant to the performance of rocket engines. Measurements for coaxial air blast atomizers were obtained using air to represent the gaseous stream and water to represent the liquid stream. A wide range of flow conditions were examined for sprays with and without swirl for gaseous streams. The parameters varied include Weber number, gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, swirl, and nozzle geometry. Measurements were made with a phase Doppler velocimeter. Major conclusions of the study focused upon droplet size as a function of Weber number, effect of gas flow rate on atomization and spray spread, effect of nozzle geometry on atomization and spread, effect of swirl on atomization, spread, jet recirculation and breakup, and secondary atomization.

  20. Producing and Detecting Correlated Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C. I.; Schellekens, M.; Perrin, A.; Krachmalnicoff, V.; Viana Gomes, J.; Trebbia, J.-B.; Esteve, J.; Chang, H.; Bouchoule, I.; Boiron, D.; Aspect, A.; Jeltes, T.; McNamara, J.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2006-11-07

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions. We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wave mixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  1. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties.

  2. Atomic mass evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Audi, G.; Kondev, F. G.; Xu, X.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2012-11-12

    The atomic masses are important input parameters for nuclear astrophysics calculations. The Atomic Mass Evaluation (AME) is the most reliable source for comprehensive information related to atomic masses. The latest AME was published in 2003. A new version, which will include the impact of a wealth of new, high-precision experimental data, will be published in December 2012. In this paper we will give the current status of AME2012. The mass surface has been changed significantly compared to AME2003, and the impact on astrophysics calculations is discussed.

  3. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  4. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  5. The CHIANTI atomic database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2016-04-01

    The freely available CHIANTI atomic database was first released in 1996 and has had a huge impact on the analysis and modeling of emissions from astrophysical plasmas. It contains data and software for modeling optically thin atom and positive ion emission from low density (≲1013 cm-3) plasmas from x-ray to infrared wavelengths. A key feature is that the data are assessed and regularly updated, with version 8 released in 2015. Atomic data for modeling the emissivities of 246 ions and neutrals are contained in CHIANTI, together with data for deriving the ionization fractions of all elements up to zinc. The different types of atomic data are summarized here and their formats discussed. Statistics on the impact of CHIANTI to the astrophysical community are given and examples of the diverse range of applications are presented.

  6. Atomic bomb health benefits.

    PubMed

    Luckey, T D

    2008-01-01

    Media reports of deaths and devastation produced by atomic bombs convinced people around the world that all ionizing radiation is harmful. This concentrated attention on fear of miniscule doses of radiation. Soon the linear no threshold (LNT) paradigm was converted into laws. Scientifically valid information about the health benefits from low dose irradiation was ignored. Here are studies which show increased health in Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. Parameters include decreased mutation, leukemia and solid tissue cancer mortality rates, and increased average lifespan. Each study exhibits a threshold that repudiates the LNT dogma. The average threshold for acute exposures to atomic bombs is about 100 cSv. Conclusions from these studies of atomic bomb survivors are: One burst of low dose irradiation elicits a lifetime of improved health.Improved health from low dose irradiation negates the LNT paradigm.Effective triage should include radiation hormesis for survivor treatment.

  7. The Atomic Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummo, Evelyn; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed to provide students with opportunities to practice drawing atomic models and discover the logical pairings of whole families on the periodic table. Follows the format of a television game show. (DDR)

  8. Atomic hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

  9. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  10. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  11. Improved Atomizer Resists Clogging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Improved constant-output atomizer has conical orifice that permits air to sweep out all liquid thoroughly and prevent any buildup of liquid or dissolved solids. Capillary groove guides liquid to gas jet. Simple new design eliminates clogging.

  12. Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adatom chains, precise structures artificially created on an atomically regulated surface, are the smallest possible candidates for future nanoelectronics. Since all the devices are created by combining adatom chains precisely prepared with atomic precision, device characteristics are predictable, and free from deviations due to accidental structural defects. In this atomic dimension, however, an analogy to the current semiconductor devices may not work. For example, Si structures are not always semiconducting. Adatom states do not always localize at the substrate surface when adatoms form chemical bonds to the substrate atoms. Transport properties are often determined for the entire system of the chain and electrodes, and not for chains only. These fundamental issues are discussed, which will be useful for future device considerations.

  13. Sharing the atom bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Chace, J.

    1996-01-01

    Shaken by the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and fearful that the American atomic monopoly would spark an arms race, Dean Acheson led a push in 1946 to place the bomb-indeed, all atomic energy-under international control. But as the memories of wartime collaboration faded, relations between the superpowers grew increasingly tense, and the confrontational atmosphere undid his proposal. Had Acheson succeeded, the Cold War might not have been. 2 figs.

  14. Atomizing nozzle and method

    DOEpatents

    Ting, Jason; Anderson, Iver E.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    2000-03-16

    A high pressure close-coupled gas atomizing nozzle includes multiple discrete gas jet discharge orifices having aerodynamically designed convergent-divergent geometry with an first converging section communicated to a gas supply manifold and to a diverging section by a constricted throat section to increase atomizing gas velocity. The gas jet orifices are oriented at gas jet apex angle selected relative to the melt supply tip apex angle to establish a melt aspiration condition at the melt supply tip.

  15. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  16. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  17. Optical atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P.

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  18. Correctly Expressing Atomic Weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolini, Moreno; Cercignani, Giovanni; Bauer, Carlo

    2000-11-01

    Very often, atomic or molecular weights are expressed as dimensionless quantities, but although the historical importance of their definition as "pure numbers" is acknowledged, it is inconsistent with experimental formulas and with the theory of measure in general. Here, we propose on the basis of clear-cut formulas that, contrary to customary statements, atomic and molecular weights should be expressed as dimensional quantities (masses) in which the Dalton (= 1.663 x 10-24 g) is taken as the unit.

  19. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  20. On Atomization in Carburetors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheubel, F N

    1931-01-01

    The outstanding quantity of the whole atomization problem is the characteristic K, and therefore the ratio of the static pressure of the air stream with respect to the liquid to the surface tension of the liquid. The higher its value, the better the atomization. The shape of the Venturi tube plays a secondary role. The increase of section beyond the throat had best not be too abrupt.

  1. NONLINEAR ATOM OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    T. MILONNI; G. CSANAK; ET AL

    1999-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objectives were to explore theoretically various aspects of nonlinear atom optics effects in cold-atom waves and traps. During the project a major development occurred the observation, by as many as a dozen experimental groups, of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold-atom traps. This stimulated us to focus our attention on those aspects of nonlinear atom optics relating to BEC, in addition to continuing our work on a nonequilibrium formalism for dealing with the interaction of an electromagnetic field with multi-level atomic systems, allowing for macroscopic coherence effects such as BEC. Studies of several problems in BEC physics have been completed or are near completion, including the suggested use of external electric fields to modify the nature of the interatomic interaction in cold-atom traps; properties of two-phase condensates; and molecular loss processes associated with BEC experiments involving a so-called Feshbach resonance.

  2. Atomic mass compilation 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, B.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Czok, U.; Scheidenberger, C.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

  3. Atom-atom inelastic collisions and three-body atomic recombination in weakly ionized argon plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, C. G.; Kunc, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A stationary collisional-radiative model including both inelastic electron-atom and atom-atom collisions is used to examine nonequilibrium weakly ionized argon plasmas with atomic densities 10 to the 16th to 10 to the 20th/cu cm, temperatures below 6000 K, and with different degrees of radiation trapping. It is shown that three-body atomic recombination becomes important at high particle densities. Comparison is made between the present approach and Thomson's theory for atomic recombination.

  4. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  5. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  6. Computer Modeling Of Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M.; Ibrahim, E.; Przekwas, A.; Cheuch, S.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mathematical models based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum developed for use in computer simulation of atomization of jets of liquid fuel in rocket engines. Models also used to study atomization in terrestrial applications; prove especially useful in designing improved industrial sprays - humidifier water sprays, chemical process sprays, and sprays of molten metal. Because present improved mathematical models based on first principles, they are minimally dependent on empirical correlations and better able to represent hot-flow conditions that prevail in rocket engines and are too severe to be accessible for detailed experimentation.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  8. Hirshfeld atom refinement

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Silvia C.; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly–l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree–Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints – even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu’s), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu’s. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å2 as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements – an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å. PMID:25295177

  9. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  10. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  11. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  12. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  13. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  14. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea). PMID:20521424

  15. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-06-15

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 {mu}K in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 {mu}m, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip.

  16. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  17. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  18. Chiral atomically thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm–1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  19. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  20. Light antiprotonic atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gotta, Detlev

    2005-10-19

    The present knowledge on strong-interaction effects in light antiprotonic atoms is reviewed. Data were obtained during the LEAR era, where the high flux made possible the use of high-resolution devices like semiconductor detectors and a crystal spectrometer. Open questions and possible extensions at the future antiproton facilities are discussed.

  1. Energy from the Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Patricia L.

    This curriculum guide was written to supplement fifth and sixth grade science units on matter and energy. It was designed to provide more in-depth material on the atom. The first part, "Teacher Guide," contains background information, biographical sketches of persons in the history of nuclear energy, vocabulary, answer sheets, management sheets…

  2. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  3. Atoms in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  4. Atomism, Pragmatism, Holism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    1986-01-01

    Examines three world views influencing curriculum development--atomism (underpinning competency-based education), pragmatism (promoting inquiry-based approaches), amd holism (associated with confluent or Waldorf education). Holism embodies the perennial philosophy and attempts to integrate cognitive, affective, and transpersonal dimensions,…

  5. Chiral atomically thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  6. Conformal atoms in Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we summarize recent attempts to construct holographic models of atoms and lattices in the context of applications to solid state physics. The simplest setup turned out to impose strong constraints on the choice of matter interactions of dual gravitational theory.

  7. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  8. HPAM: Hirshfeld Partitioned Atomic Multipoles.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l(max) on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l(max) = 0 (atomic charges) to l(max) = 4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l(max) are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L ≤ l(max). In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only (l(max) = 0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used.

  9. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  10. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  11. Effect of liquid film on atomizing performance in airblast atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qishou; Gan, Xiaohua

    1991-08-01

    Results are presented from a comprehensive consideration of the relationship between experimental data obtained in the course of several years on atomization characteristics and both (1) liquid film thickness and (2) airblast atomizer dynamic characteristics. It is noted that no liquid accumulation arises at the atomizer's edges.

  12. Interfacing ultracold atoms and mechanical oscillators on an atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutlein, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped and coherently manipulated close to a chip surface using atom chip technology. This opens the exciting possibility of studying interactions between atoms and on-chip solid-state systems such as micro- and nanostructured mechanical oscillators. One goal is to form hybrid quantum systems, in which atoms are used to read out, cool, and coherently manipulate the oscillators' state. In our work, we investigate different coupling mechanisms between ultracold atoms and mechanical oscillators. In a first experiment, we use atom-surface forces to couple the vibrations of a mechanical cantilever to the motion of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a magnetic microtrap on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at about one micrometer distance from the cantilever surface. We make use of the coupling to read out the cantilever vibrations with the atoms and observe resonant coupling to several well-resolved mechanical modes of the condensate. In a second experiment, we investigate coupling via a 1D optical lattice that is formed by a laser beam retroreflected from a SiN membrane oscillator. The optical lattice serves as a `transfer rod' that couples vibrations of the membrane to the atoms and vice versa. We point out that the strong coupling regime can be reached in coupled atom-oscillator systems by placing both the atoms and the oscillator in a high-finesse optical cavity.

  13. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  14. Atom scattering from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. W.

    In the initial portion of this dissertation studies of Ar scattering from Ru(0001) at thermal and hyperthermal energies are compared to calculations with classical scattering theory. These data exhibited a number of characteristics that are unusual in comparison to other systems for which atomic beam experiments have been carried out under similar conditions. The measured energy losses were unusually small. Some of the angular distributions exhibited an anomalous shoulder feature in addition to a broad peak near the specular direction and quantum mechanical diffraction was observed under conditions for which it was not expected. Many of the unusual features observed in the measurements are explained, but only upon using an effective surface mass of 2.3 Ru atomic masses, which implies collective effects in the Ru crystal. The large effective mass, because it leads to substantially larger Debye-Waller factors, explains and confirms the observations of diffraction features. It also leads to the interesting conclusion that Ru is a metal for which atomic beam scattering measurements in the purely quantum mechanical regime, where diffraction and single-phonon creation are dominant, should be possible not only with He atoms, but with many other atomic species with larger masses. A useful theoretical expression for interpreting and analyzing observed scattering intensity spectra for atomic and molecular collisions with surfaces is the differential reflection coefficient for a smooth, vibrating surface. This differential reflection coefficient depends on a parameter, usually expressed in dimensions of velocity, that arises due to correlated motions of neighboring regions of the surface and can be evaluated if the polarization vectors of the phonons near the surface are known. As a part of this dissertation experimental conditions are suggested under which this velocity paramenter may be more precisely measured than it has been in the past. Experimental data for scattering

  15. Atomic Disorder in Tetrahedrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasin, John Robert; Chakoumakos, Bryan; Rawn, Claudia; May, Andrew; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; McGuire, Michael; Cao, Huibo

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelectrics (TE) are materials which turn heat energy into electrical energy with applications spanning multiple disciplines including space exploration, Peltier cooling, and engine efficiency. Tetrahedrite is a copper sulfosalt with the general formula Cu12-xMx(Sb,As)4S13. Where M denotes a Cu2+ site frequently replaced in natural tetrahedrite with Zn, Fe, Hg, or Mn. It has a cubic structure with an I-43m symmetry, a = 10.4 Å, and only a handful of adjustable parameters. This structural study corroborates theoretical calculations on atomic disorder. Positional disorder of the trigonally coordinated Cu(2) site is suggested from the temperature dependence of the atomic displacement parameters determine from single-crystal x-ray and neutron diffraction. The displacements are extremely anisotropic for Cu(2) with a maximum rms static displacement of ~ 0.25 Å.

  16. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  17. Rotary cup slurry atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, H. T.; Marnicio, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The theory of a two-phase flow in a rotating cup atomizer is described. The analysis considers the separation of the solid and liquid media thus realistically modeling the flow of two layers along the inner cup wall: a slurry of increasing solids concentration and a supernatent liquid layer. The analysis is based on the earlier work of Hinze and Milborn (1950) which addressed the flow within a rotary cup for a homogeneous liquid. The superimposition of a settling velocity under conditions of high centrifugal acceleration permits the extended analysis of the separation of the two phases. Appropriate boundary conditions have been applied to the film's free surface and the cup wall and to match the flow characteristics at the liquid-slurry interface. The changing slurry viscosity, increasing nonlinearly with growing solid loading, was also considered. A parameter study illustrates the potential for a cup design to provide optimal slurry and liquid film thicknesses for effective atomization.

  18. A Saturnian atom.

    PubMed

    Lee, E; Farrelly, D; Uzer, T

    1997-09-29

    In Bohr's original planetary model of the atom the electron moves along orbits of special geometric simplicity. While wave mechanics precludes the idea that a physical path could be ascribed to the electron, a classical or planetary atom can still be envisaged in which the electronic wavepacket neither spreads nor disperses as its center moves along the Kepler orbit, and this orbit is conned to a single plane in space. We show theoretically how an electronic wavepacket may be localized in this fashion in a similar way to ion confinement in a Penning trap. Because external fields are needed to keep the packet confined, a more fitting analogy than a planetary orbit is the motion of a charged dust grain in one of the rings of a giant planet such as Saturn.

  19. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency. PMID:25401364

  20. Atomic lighthouse effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Kaiser, R.; Courteille, Ph. W.; Bachelard, R.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  1. Semiclassical model for atoms

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Ralph G.

    1981-01-01

    The energies of several two- and three-electron atoms, in both ground states and excited states, are calculated by a very simple semiclassical model. The only change from Bohr's original method is to replace definite orbits by probability distribution functions based on classical dynamics. The energies are better than Hartree-Fock values. There is still a need for an exchange-energy correction. Images PMID:16593047

  2. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    PubMed

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  3. Atomic properties of Lu+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Eduardo; Arnold, K. J.; Hajiyev, Elnur; Porsev, S. G.; Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Barrett, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    Singly ionized lutetium has recently been suggested as a potential clock candidate. Here we report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of Lu+. Measurements relevant to practical clock operation are made and compared to atomic structure calculations. Calculations of scalar and tensor polarizabilities for clock states over a range of wavelengths are also given. These results will be useful for future work with this clock candidate.

  4. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Dynamic splitting and merging of an atom cloud on an atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Min; Yan, Bo; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2009-11-01

    Chip-based atom interferometers bring together the advantages of atom chips and Bose-Einstein condensates. Their central prerequisite is that a condensate can be coherently split into two halves with a determined relative phase. This paper demonstrates the dynamical splitting and merging of an atom cloud with two U-wires on an atom chip. Symmetrical and asymmetrical splittings are realized by applying a bias field with different directions and magnitudes. The trajectories of the splitting are consistent with theoretical calculations. The atom chip is a good candidate for constructing an atom interferometer.

  5. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  6. Atomic physics in strong fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shih-I.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses: Microwave Driven Multiphoton Excitation Dynamics in Rydberg Atoms; Nonadiabatic Geometric Phases of Multiphoton Transitions in Dissipative Systems and Spin-j Systems; and Nonperturbative Treatments of Atomic and Molecular Processes in Intense Laser Fields.

  7. Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 144 Atomic Weights and Isotopic Compositions (Web, free access)   The atomic weights are available for elements 1 through 111, and isotopic compositions or abundances are given when appropriate.

  8. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  9. Stability of atomic clocks based on entangled atoms.

    PubMed

    André, A; Sørensen, A S; Lukin, M D

    2004-06-11

    We analyze the effect of realistic noise sources for an atomic clock consisting of a local oscillator that is actively locked to a spin-squeezed (entangled) ensemble of N atoms. We show that the use of entangled states can lead to an improvement of the long-term stability of the clock when the measurement is limited by decoherence associated with instability of the local oscillator combined with fluctuations in the atomic ensemble's Bloch vector. Atomic states with a moderate degree of entanglement yield the maximal clock stability, resulting in an improvement that scales as N(1/6) compared to the atomic shot noise level.

  10. Atomic-based stabilization for laser-pumped atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Gerginov, V; Shah, V; Knappe, S; Hollberg, L; Kitching, J

    2006-06-15

    We describe a novel technique for stabilizing frequency shifts in laser-interrogated vapor-cell atomic clocks. The method suppresses frequency shifts due to changes in the laser frequency, intensity, and modulation index as well as atomic vapor density. The clock operating parameters are monitored by using the atoms themselves, rather than by using conventional schemes for laser frequency and cell temperature control. The experiment is realized using a chip-scale atomic clock. The novel atomic-based stabilization approach results in a simpler setup and improved long-term performance.

  11. Rapid prototyping of versatile atom chips for atom interferometry applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasch, Brian; Squires, Matthew; Olson, Spencer; Kroese, Bethany; Imhof, Eric; Kohn, Rudolph; Stuhl, Benjamin; Schramm, Stacy; Stickney, James

    2016-05-01

    We present recent advances in the manipulation of ultracold atoms with ex-vacuo atom chips (i.e. atom chips that are not inside to the UHV chamber). Details will be presented of an experimental system that allows direct bonded copper (DBC) atom chips to be removed and replaced in minutes, requiring minimal re-optimization of parameters. This system has been used to create Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as magnetic waveguides with precisely tunable axial parameters, allowing double wells, pure harmonic confinement, and modified harmonic traps. We investigate the effects of higher order magnetic field contributions to the waveguide, and the implications for confined atom interferometry.

  12. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  13. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  14. The International Atomic Energy Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufour, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    The dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II inaugurated a new era in world history, the atomic age. After the war, the Soviet Union, eager to develop the same military capabilities as those demonstrated by the United States, soon rivaled the U.S. as an atomic and nuclear superpower. Faced by the possibility of…

  15. Indirect Determinations of Atomic Radii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1976-01-01

    Describes laboratory activities which relate the mass, volume, density, and radii of atoms through the assumption that the smallest unit of matter is a cubic box containing one atom. From calculations based on macroscopic materials, the author feels that the concept of an atom may be better developed. (CP)

  16. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Osborne, M.G.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled. 6 figs.

  17. Atomizer with liquid spray quenching

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Osborne, Matthew G.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1998-04-14

    Method and apparatus for making metallic powder particles wherein a metallic melt is atomized by a rotating disk or other atomizer at an atomizing location in a manner to form molten droplets moving in a direction away from said atomizing location. The atomized droplets pass through a series of thin liquid quenching sheets disposed in succession about the atomizing location with each successive quenching sheet being at an increasing distance from the atomizing location. The atomized droplets are incrementally cooled and optionally passivated as they pass through the series of liquid quenching sheets without distorting the atomized droplets from their generally spherical shape. The atomized, cooled droplets can be received in a chamber having a collection wall disposed outwardly of the series of liquid quenching sheets. A liquid quenchant can be flowed proximate the chamber wall to carry the cooled atomized droplets to a collection chamber where atomized powder particles and the liquid quenchant are separated such that the liquid quenchant can be recycled.

  18. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  19. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  20. Current-driven atomic waterwheels.

    PubMed

    Dundas, Daniel; McEniry, Eunan J; Todorov, Tchavdar N

    2009-02-01

    A current induces forces on atoms inside the conductor that carries it. It is now possible to compute these forces from scratch, and to perform dynamical simulations of the atomic motion under current. One reason for this interest is that current can be a destructive force--it can cause atoms to migrate, resulting in damage and in the eventual failure of the conductor. But one can also ask, can current be made to do useful work on atoms? In particular, can an atomic-scale motor be driven by electrical current, as it can be by other mechanisms? For this to be possible, the current-induced forces on a suitable rotor must be non-conservative, so that net work can be done per revolution. Here we show that current-induced forces in atomic wires are not conservative and that they can be used, in principle, to drive an atomic-scale waterwheel. PMID:19197311

  1. Cancer in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Shigematsu, I.; Kagan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: sampling of atomic bomb survivors and method of cancer detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; atomic bomb dosimetry for epidemiological studies of survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; tumor and tissue registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the cancer registry in Nagasaki, with atomic bomb survivor data, 1973-1977; cancer mortality; methods for study of delayed health effects of a-bomb radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis in rodents; leukemia, multiple myeloma, and malignant lymphoma; cancer of the thyroid and salivary glands; malignant tumors in atomic bomb survivors with special reference to the pathology of stomach and lung cancer; colorectal cancer among atomic bomb survivors; breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors; and ovarian neoplasms in atomic bomb survirors.

  2. Generalizing Atoms in Constraint Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, C. David, Jr.; Frisch, Alan M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the generalization of atomic formulas, or atoms, that are augmented with constraints on or among their terms. The atoms may also be viewed as definite clauses whose antecedents express the constraints. Atoms are generalized relative to a body of background information about the constraints. This paper first examines generalization of atoms with only monadic constraints. The paper develops an algorithm for the generalization task and discusses algorithm complexity. It then extends the algorithm to apply to atoms with constraints of arbitrary arity. The paper also presents semantic properties of the generalizations computed by the algorithms, making the algorithms applicable to such problems as abduction, induction, and knowledge base verification. The paper emphasizes the application to induction and presents a pac-learning result for constrained atoms.

  3. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  4. Observation of Atomic Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mandelkern, M.; Schultz, J.; Zioulas, G.; Christian, D.C.; Munger, C.T.

    1998-04-01

    We report the background-free observation of atomic antihydrogen, produced by interactions of an antiproton beam with a hydrogen gas jet target in the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. We measure the cross section of the reaction {ovr p}p{r_arrow}{ovr H}e{sup {minus}}p for {ovr p} beam momenta between 5203 and 6232 MeV/c to be 1.12{plus_minus}0.14{plus_minus}0.09 pb. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  6. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  7. Experiments in cold atom optics towards precision atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aveline, David C.

    Atom optics has been a highly active field of research with many scientific breakthroughs over the past two decades, largely due to successful advances in laser technology, microfabrication techniques, and the development of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. This dissertation details several atom optics experiments with the motivation to develop tools and techniques for precision atom wave interferometry. It provides background information about atom optics and the fundamentals behind laser cooling and trapping, including basic techniques for cold gas thermometry and absorptive detection of atoms. A brief overview of magnetic trapping and guiding in tight wire-based traps is also provided before the experimental details are presented. We developed a novel laser source of 780 nm light using frequency-doubled 1560 nm fiber amplifier. This laser system provided up to a Watt of tunable frequency stabilized light for two Rb laser cooling and trapping experiments. One system generates Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical trap while the second is based on atom chip magnetic traps. The atom chip system, detailed in this thesis, was designed and built to develop the tools necessary for transport and loading large numbers of cold atoms and explore the potential for guided atom interferometry. Techniques and results from this experiment are presented, including an efficient magnetic transport and loading method to deliver cold atom to atom chip traps. We also developed a modeling tool for the magnetic fields formed by coiled wire geometries, as well as planar wire patterns. These models helped us design traps and determine adiabatic transportation of cold atoms between macro-scale traps and micro-traps formed on atom chips. Having achieved near unity transfer efficiency, we demonstrated that this approach promises to be a consistent method for loading large numbers of atoms into micro-traps. Furthermore, we discuss an in situ imaging technique to investigate

  8. Mapping Out Atom-Wall Interaction with Atomic Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, A.; Obreshkov, B.; Dzuba, V. A.

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  9. Mapping out atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Derevianko, A; Obreshkov, B; Dzuba, V A

    2009-09-25

    We explore the feasibility of probing atom-wall interaction with atomic clocks based on atoms trapped in engineered optical lattices. Optical lattice is normal to the wall. By monitoring the wall-induced clock shift at individual wells of the lattice, one would measure the dependence of the atom-wall interaction on the atom-wall separation. We find that the induced clock shifts are large and observable at already experimentally demonstrated levels of accuracy. We show that this scheme may uniquely probe the long-range atom-wall interaction in all three qualitatively distinct regimes of the interaction: van der Waals (image-charge interaction), Casimir-Polder (QED vacuum fluctuations), and Lifshitz (thermal-bath fluctuations) regimes.

  10. Atomization Performance of an Atomizer with Internal Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muh-Rong; Lin, Tien-Chu; Lai, Teng-San; Tseng, Ing-Ren

    This paper describes the atomization performance of a newly designed atomizer with internal impinging mechanisms inside the atomizer. The spray drop size distribution was measured by a Malvern RT-Sizer. Results show that the Sauter mean diameter below 10µm has been achieved with GLR of 0.14. The minimum mean drop size can be lowered to 4.0µm under a test condition of the liquid pressure and gas pressure of 2.5bar and 3.5bar, respectively. This test suggests that extra fine atomization on the liquid phase can be achieved under low pressure conditions using this particular atomizer. Such performance cannot be easily achieved with the conventional nozzle design. Results also show that better atomization performance can be achieved by increasing the internal impinging angle and the orifice diameter. An empirical formula of SMD, in terms of operating conditions and nozzle length scale is also presented in this paper.

  11. Control of atom-atom entanglement by cavity detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, O.; Joya, M. R.; Fonseca Romero, K. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using the atomic levels previously employed to demonstrate a two-photon maser, we show that the atom-atom entanglement produced by the successive passage of two three-level Rydberg atoms across a single-mode lossless cavity can be enhanced using the Stark shift. The atoms are assumed to be prepared in their excited states and to interact with the field during the same amount of time. Employing a physically motivated perturbation-theory approach, we obtain an effective two-level Hamiltonian. We show that, within the limits of validity of the approximation, atomic entanglement can be controlled by changing the frequency of the cavity field, and can be enhanced up to a maximum where the squared concurrence attains the value 16/27.

  12. Electron correlation energies in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Shane Patrick

    This dissertation is a study of electron correlation energies Ec in atoms. (1) Accurate values of E c are computed for isoelectronic sequences of "Coulomb-Hooke" atoms with varying mixtures of Coulombic and Hooke character. (2) Coupled-cluster calculations in carefully designed basis sets are combined with fully converged second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) computations to obtain fairly accurate, non-relativistic Ec values for the 12 closed-shell atoms from Ar to Rn. The complete basis-set (CBS) limits of MP2 energies are obtained for open-shell atoms by computations in very large basis sets combined with a knowledge of the MP2/CBS limit for the next larger closed-shell atom with the same valence shell structure. Then higher-order correlation corrections are found by coupled-cluster calculations using basis sets that are not quite as large. The method is validated for the open-shell atoms from Al to Cl and then applied to get E c values, probably accurate to 3%, for the 4th-period open-shell atoms: K, Sc-Cu, and Ga-Br. (3) The results show that, contrary to quantum chemical folklore, MP2 overestimates |Ec| for atoms beyond Fe. Spin-component scaling arguments are used to provide a simple explanation for this overestimation. (4) Eleven non-relativistic density functionals, including some of the most widely-used ones, are tested on their ability to predict non-relativistic, electron correlation energies for atoms and their cations. They all lead to relatively poor predictions for the heavier atoms. Several novel, few-parameter, density functionals for the correlation energy are developed heuristically. Four new functionals lead to improved predictions for the 4th-period atoms without unreasonably compromising accuracy for the lighter atoms. (5) Simple models describing the variation of E c with atomic number are developed.

  13. Efficient atomic clocks operated with several atomic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Sørensen, A S

    2013-08-30

    Atomic clocks are typically operated by locking a local oscillator (LO) to a single atomic ensemble. In this Letter, we propose a scheme where the LO is locked to several atomic ensembles instead of one. This results in an exponential improvement compared to the conventional method and provides a stability of the clock scaling as (αN)(-m/2) with N being the number of atoms in each of the m ensembles and α a constant depending on the protocol being used to lock the LO.

  14. Dense atom clouds in a holographic atom trap.

    PubMed

    Newell, R; Sebby, J; Walker, T G

    2003-07-15

    We demonstrate the production of high-density cold 87Rb samples (2 x 10(14) atoms/cm3) in a simple optical lattice formed with YAG light that is diffracted from a holographic phase plate. A loading protocol is described that results in 10,000 atoms per 10 microm x 10 microm x 100 microm unit cell of the lattice site. Rapid free evaporation leads to a temperature of 50 microK and phase space densities of 1/150 within 50 ms. The resulting small, high-density atomic clouds are very attractive for a number of experiments, including ultracold Rydberg atom physics.

  15. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    PubMed

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  16. Efficient atomic clocks operated with several atomic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Sørensen, A S

    2013-08-30

    Atomic clocks are typically operated by locking a local oscillator (LO) to a single atomic ensemble. In this Letter, we propose a scheme where the LO is locked to several atomic ensembles instead of one. This results in an exponential improvement compared to the conventional method and provides a stability of the clock scaling as (αN)(-m/2) with N being the number of atoms in each of the m ensembles and α a constant depending on the protocol being used to lock the LO. PMID:24033017

  17. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  18. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  19. Magnetic trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2011-08-31

    For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

  20. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  1. Atomic and gravitational clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic and gravitational clocks are governed by the laws of electrodynamics and gravity, respectively. While the strong equivalence principle (SEP) assumes that the two clocks have been synchronous at all times, recent planetary data seem to suggest a possible violation of the SEP. Past analysis of the implications of an SEP violation on different physical phenomena revealed no disagreement. However, these studies assumed that the two different clocks can be consistently constructed within the framework. The concept of scale invariance, and the physical meaning of different systems of units, are now reviewed and the construction of two clocks that do not remain synchronous - whose rates are related by a non-constant function beta sub a - is demonstrated. The cosmological character of beta sub a is also discussed.

  2. Atoms in astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  3. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    PubMed

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-01

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  4. Integration of light and atom optics on an atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilzbach, Marco; Domokos, Peter; Fernholz, Thomas; Folman, Ron; Groth, Sönke; Haase, Albrecht; Hock, Christian; Horak, Peter; Klappauf, Bruce; Schwarz, Michael; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2004-05-01

    The whole business of quantum computing with neutral atoms requires accurate preparation and control of their quantum states. The envisioned procedure of preparing and operating an atom chip quantum processor involves two main tools at all its stages: quasi-static electro-magnetic fields to provide taylored potentials for trapping and guiding atomic qubits and light optical elements for initialisation, gate operation and read-out. Our vision is to implement microoptics directly on the atom chip. A large scale quantum processor will probably involve microscale structures such as waveguides or photonic crystals. As a final goal even the light sources themselves (diode lasers) might be integrated on the chip. The miniaturisation of optical elements already is a rapidly growing field driven by the telecommunication boom. We hope to adapt these techniques to develope an atom optical toolbox for Quantum Information Processing. Our first experiments aim at the detection of few or even single atoms in miniaturized traps using optical fibres. Two single mode fibres will be mounted on an atom chip with a small gap between the facets. Light that is sent through the fibres will be absorbed by the atoms leading to a decreased output intensity. In order to enhance the coupling between light and atom, the two fibres should form a cavity. Each time an atom enters the cavity, the output intensity will decrease. Here we present our ongoing experiments, where we try to build a fibre cavity on a chip serving as a single atom detector. The concepts will be introduced, theoretical estimates for expectable signals will be presented and first setups will be shown. Beyond this we will discuss future perspectives of this technology.

  5. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    1998-09-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  6. Many-Body Atomic Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, J. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2005-11-01

    Preface; Contributors; Introduction; Part I. Atomic Structure: 1. Development of atomic many-body theory Ingvar Lindgren; 2. Relativistic MBPT for highly charged ions W. R. Johnson; 3. Parity nonconservation in atoms S. A. Blundell, W. R. Johnson, and J. Sapirstein; Part II. Photoionization of Atoms: 4. Single photoionization processes J. J. Boyle, and M. D. Kutzner; 5. Photoionization dominated by double excitation T. N. Chang; 6. Direct double photoionization in atoms Z. W. Liu; 7. Photoelectron angular distributions Steven T. Manson; Part III. A. Atomic Scattering - General Considerations: 8. The many-body approach to electron-atom collisions M. Ya Amusia; 9. Theoretical aspects of electron impact ionization P. L. Altick; Part III. B. Atomic Scattering - Low-Order Applications: 10. Perturbation series methods D. H. Madison; 11. Target dependence of the triply differential cross section Cheng Pan and Anthony F. Starace; 12. Overview of Thomas processes for fast mass transfer J. H. McGuire, Jack C. Straton and T. Ishihara; Part III. C. Atomic Scattering - All-Order Applications: 13. R-matrix Theory: Some Recent Applications Philip G. Burke: 14. Electron scattering: application of Dirac R-matrix theory Wasantha Wijesundera, Ian Grant and Patrick Norrington; 15. Close coupling and distorted-wave theory D. C. Griffin and M. S. Pindzola; Appendix: Units and notation; References; Index.

  7. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  8. Energy partitioning for ``fuzzy'' atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, P.; Mayer, I.

    2004-03-01

    The total energy of a molecule is presented as a sum of one- and two-atomic energy components in terms of "fuzzy" atoms, i.e., such divisions of the three-dimensional physical space into atomic regions in which the regions assigned to the individual atoms have no sharp boundaries but exhibit a continuous transition from one to another. By proper definitions the energy components are on the chemical energy scale. The method is realized by using Becke's integration scheme and weight function permitting very effective numerical integrations.

  9. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  10. A Quantum Model of Atoms (the Energy Levels of Atoms).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, Francois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the model for all atoms which was developed on the same basis as Bohr's model for the hydrogen atom. Calculates the radii and the energies of the orbits. Demonstrates how the model obeys the de Broglie's hypothesis that the moving electron exhibits both wave and particle properties. (Author/ASK)

  11. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A. H.

    1993-11-01

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge.

  12. Intermolecular atom-atom bonds in crystals - a chemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-03-01

    Short atom-atom distances between molecules are almost always indicative of specific intermolecular bonding. These distances may be used to assess the significance of all hydrogen bonds, including the C-H⋯O and even weaker C-H⋯F varieties.

  13. Detection of palladium by cold atom solution atomic absorption.

    PubMed

    Molloy, John L; Holcombe, James A

    2006-09-15

    One of the largest obstacles in miniaturizing traditional atomic spectroscopic sources is the need for a thermal/electrical source for free atom production. A single article in the literature has demonstrated atomic absorption detection of Ag, Cu, and Pd in solution at room temperature for atoms in the gas phase, which may ultimately permit miniaturization. Unfortunately, several laboratories have found that reproducing the phenomenon has been difficult. Without a sound fundamental explanation of the processes leading to the signal, one must conclude that it can be done, but some unsuspected and unknown design/methodological nuances are responsible for only a single reported success. Gas phase atoms could exist at room temperature "in solution" if the atoms were trapped in very small bubbles. In the current study, submicrometer-sized bubbles were created in a flow-through cell during the mixing of an alcohol-water solution containing a reducing agent with water containing the analyte. A repeatable atomic absorption signal was produced. Replacement of ethanol with 1-propanol and use of a surfactant increased the signal. Limits of detection of approximately 100 ppb in Pd were achieved, and it is estimated that approximately 0.4% of the Pd initially added is contained within the bubbles as gaseous atoms. The paper discusses the fundamental processes needed to achieve a repeatable signal. PMID:16970344

  14. How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark

    2008-03-28

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup -28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  15. Testing Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-07

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28} e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup 28} e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  16. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  17. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  18. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  19. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  20. Algorithms for international atomic time.

    PubMed

    Panfilo, Gianna; Arias, E Felicitas

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the creation and technical evolution of atomic time scales. In particular, we focus our attention on the method of calculation and the characteristics of International Atomic Time (TAI), and show how it is disseminated at the ultimate level of precision.

  1. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  2. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  3. The Stair-Step Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a model of a generic atom that is used to represent the movement of electrons from lower to higher levels and vice-versa due to excitation and de-excitation of the atom. As the process of de-excitation takes place, photons represented by colored ping-pong balls are emitted, indicating the emission of light. (MDH)

  4. Fuel Injector With Shear Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, George W.; Mills, Virgil L.; Smith, Durward B., II; Beacom, William F.

    1995-01-01

    Atomizer for injecting liquid fuel into combustion chamber uses impact and swirl to break incoming stream of fuel into small, more combustible droplets. Slanted holes direct flow of liquid fuel to stepped cylindrical wall. Impact on wall atomizes liquid. Air flowing past vanes entrains droplets of liquid in swirling flow. Fuel injected at pressure lower than customarily needed.

  5. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  6. Atoms in flux

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, M.

    1996-07-01

    In 1953, President Eisenhower offered the United Nations his vision for peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the construction of nuclear power plants to generate electricity. However, in the four decades since the infancy of the nuclear-energy industry, its creators` dream of cheap, abundant, and safe source of energy has not been fully realized, says Michel Damian, research associate with the Institut d`Economie et de Politique de l`Energie in France. Though some observers cite such nuclear mishaps as Three Mile Island and Chernobyl as the reason for the slowdown in the nuclear industry, Damian lays the blame largely on the inflated estimates of the future need for electricity made in the 1960`s. {open_quotes}In fact, declining demand for electricity may be a more critical factor in the slow growth of commercial nuclear power worldwide than the poor track record of nuclear power-plant construction and operation,{close_quotes} he notes. No clear resolution to the woes of the nuclear-energy industry is in sight, Damian says. {open_quotes}Indeed, that will occur only when engineers design a risk-free reactor and find a safe, long-term disposal method for nuclear waste.{close_quotes}

  7. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  8. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  9. Atoms and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L.

    1959-01-01

    The stated subject of this paper is so broad that it might include everything from the study of the infinitely small recesses of the atom to the vast infinity of galactic space. We will therefore begin by limiting the scope of the subject to a discussion of three questions: --- (1) What are the potentialities of the use of nuclear energy in the exploration of space? --- (2) What uses of nuclear energy in space exploration are expected in the next decade? - - - (3) What is likely to be the impact of space exploration on the development of other applications of nuclear energy? We will discuss these questions in relation to the space activities of the United States as set forth in the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 and in the programs of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the agency established by Congress to carry out the policy established in that Act that activities in space should be devoted to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all mankind. Such activities include at present the exploration of space to gain greater knowledge and understanding of the earth and its atmosphere, the moon, planets, and the universe; the application of available knowledge to develop capabilities for other activities in space for the benefit of mankind; and the beginning of the exploration of space by man himself.

  10. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  11. Atom mapping with constraint programming.

    PubMed

    Mann, Martin; Nahar, Feras; Schnorr, Norah; Backofen, Rolf; Stadler, Peter F; Flamm, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactions are rearrangements of chemical bonds. Each atom in an educt molecule thus appears again in a specific position of one of the reaction products. This bijection between educt and product atoms is not reported by chemical reaction databases, however, so that the "Atom Mapping Problem" of finding this bijection is left as an important computational task for many practical applications in computational chemistry and systems biology. Elementary chemical reactions feature a cyclic imaginary transition state (ITS) that imposes additional restrictions on the bijection between educt and product atoms that are not taken into account by previous approaches. We demonstrate that Constraint Programming is well-suited to solving the Atom Mapping Problem in this setting. The performance of our approach is evaluated for a manually curated subset of chemical reactions from the KEGG database featuring various ITS cycle layouts and reaction mechanisms.

  12. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Terpstra, Robert L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray.

  13. In-situ control system for atomization

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, I.E.; Figliola, R.S.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1995-06-13

    Melt atomizing apparatus comprising a melt supply orifice for supplying the melt for atomization and gas supply orifices proximate the melt supply orifice for supplying atomizing gas to atomize the melt as an atomization spray is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor, such as an optical and/or audio sensor, for providing atomization spray data, and a control unit responsive to the sensed atomization spray data for controlling at least one of the atomizing gas pressure and an actuator to adjust the relative position of the gas supply orifice and melt supply in a manner to achieve a desired atomization spray. 3 figs.

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Atoms, Light, and Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    Up to now, the spatial properties of quantum particles played no more than a secondary role: we only needed the de Broglie relation (1.4) which gives the quantum particles wavelength, and our discussion of the quantum properties of photons was based mainly on their polarization, which is an internal degree of freedom of the photon. The probability amplitudes which we used did not involve the positions or velocities of the particles, which are spatial, or external degrees of freedom. In the present chapter, we shall introduce spatial dependence by defining probability amplitudes a(ěc r) that are functions of the position ěc r. In full generality, a(ěc r) is a complex number, but we shall avoid this complication and discuss only cases where the probability amplitudes may be taken real. For simplicity, we also limit ourselves to particles propagating along a straight line, which we take as the Ox axis: x will define the position of the particle and the corresponding probability amplitude will be a function of x, a(x). In our discussion, we shall need to introduce the so-called potential well, where a particle travels back and forth between two points on the straight line. One important particular case is the infinite well, where the particle is confined between two infinitely high walls over which it cannot pass. This example is not at all academic, and we shall meet it again in Chapter 6 when explaining the design of a laser diode! Furthermore, it will allow us to introduce the notion of energy level, to write down the Heisenberg inequalities, to understand the interaction of a light wave with an atom and finally to explain schematically the principles of the laser.

  16. Giant light enhancement in atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gadomsky, O. N. Gadomskaya, I. V.; Altunin, K. K.

    2009-07-15

    We show that the polarizing effect of the atoms in an atomic cluster can lead to full compensation of the radiative damping of excited atomic states, a change in the sign of the dispersion of the atomic polarizability, and giant light enhancement by the atomic cluster.

  17. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.; Balsavich, John

    1991-01-01

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  18. Rydberg atoms in ultracold plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Ultracold plasmas are formed through the photoionization of laser-cooled atoms, or spontaneous ionization of a dense cloud of Rydberg atoms or now molecules[1]. Ultracold plasmas are inherently metastable, as the ions and electrons would be in a lower energy state bound together as atoms. The dominant process of atom formation in these plasmas is three-body recombination, a collision between two electrons and an ion that leads to the formation of a Rydberg atom. This collisional process is not only important in determining the lifetime and density of the plasma, but is also critical in determining the time evolution of the temperature. The formation of the Rydberg atoms is accompanied by an increase in electron energy for the extra electron in the collision, and is a source of heating in these plasmas. Classical three-body recombination theory scales as T-9/2, and thus as a plasma cools due to a process such as adiabatic expansion, recombination-induced heating turns on, limiting the temperature [2]. The Rydberg atoms formed live in the plasma and contribute to the temperature dynamics, as collisions with plasma electrons can change the principal quantum number of the Rydberg atom, driving it to more tightly bound states (a source of plasma heating) or to higher states (a source of plasma cooling). If the plasma is cold and dense enough to be strongly coupled, classical three-body recombination theory breaks down. Recent theoretical work [3] suggests that the rate limits as the plasma gets strongly coupled. I will review the role of Rydberg atoms in ultracold plasmas and prospects for probing Rydberg collisions in the strongly coupled environment. [4pt] [1] J. P. Morrison, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 205005 (2008 [0pt] [2] R. S. Fletcher, X. Zhang, and S. L. Rolston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 145001 (2007 [0pt] [3] T. Pohl, private communication.

  19. Localized atomic orbitals for atoms in molecules. III. Polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufderheide, Keith H.; Chung-Phillips, Alice

    1982-02-01

    Using a previously described method, localized atomic orbitals (LAOs) for atoms in molecules are constructed for the atoms C, N, O, and F in the polyatomic molecules CH4, NH3, OH2, CH3CH3, CH3NH2, CH3OH, CH3F, CH2CH2, C6H6, CO2, and CHCH. As in our prior studies, LAOs partition into sets of core, lone pair, and bonding orbitals. Ordinarily, both core and lone pair LAOs are doubly occupied and bonding is described principally as the interaction of bonding LAOs on adjacent, bonded atoms. Angles between valence LAOs on a given atom continue to vary in a manner reminiscent of trends common to simple valence shell electron pair repulsion theory. Of special interest are the systems CO2, C6H6, and CH3F: The peculiarities germane to these molecules are discussed fully in the text. Finally, certain properties (orbital populations, intra-atomic orbital angles, etc.) of groups (-CH3, -NH2, -OH, etc.) common to several systems studied show a remarkable transferability.

  20. AtomPy: an open atomic-data curation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel; Mendoza, Claudio; Boswell, Josiah S; Ajoku, Chukwuemeka

    2014-06-01

    We present a cloud-computing environment for atomic data curation, networking among atomic data providers and users, teaching-and-learning, and interfacing with spectral modeling software. The system is based on Google-Drive Sheets, Pandas (Python Data Analysis Library) DataFrames, and IPython Notebooks for open community-driven curation of atomic data for scientific and technological applications. The atomic model for each ionic species is contained in a multi-sheet Google-Drive workbook, where the atomic parameters from all known public sources are progressively stored. Metadata (provenance, community discussion, etc.) accompanying every entry in the database are stored through Notebooks. Education tools on the physics of atomic processes as well as their relevance to plasma and spectral modeling are based on IPython Notebooks that integrate written material, images, videos, and active computer-tool workflows. Data processing workflows and collaborative software developments are encouraged and managed through the GitHub social network. Relevant issues this platform intends to address are: (i) data quality by allowing open access to both data producers and users in order to attain completeness, accuracy, consistency, provenance and currentness; (ii) comparisons of different datasets to facilitate accuracy assessment; (iii) downloading to local data structures (i.e. Pandas DataFrames) for further manipulation and analysis by prospective users; and (iv) data preservation by avoiding the discard of outdated sets.

  1. Development of an atomic gravimeter based on atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Yu, Dai-Hyuk

    2015-05-01

    We present an atomic gravimeter under development at KRISS in Korea for precise measurement of absolute gravity. It is based on atomic interference of laser cooled 87Rb atoms in free fall. The temperature of the atoms is cooled to about 5 μK in a magneto-optic trap. Three Raman light pulses are applied for splitting, reflecting and recombining the atoms clouds while the atoms are in free fall. The pulse width and spacing time of Raman pulses is 40 μs and about 50 ms, respectively. During the interferometry, the frequency difference between the two counter-propagating Raman beams is chirped to compensate for Doppler shift induced by gravitational acceleration. The interference signals are measured at different spacing times to find the chirping rate at which the phase of interference fringe is independent of the spacing time. The chirping rate (~ 25.1 MHz/s) corresponds to g .keff/2 π, where keff = k1 +k2 (k1 and k2 are wave numbers for two Raman beams). At present, we are going to introduce an anti-vibration platform and a magnetic shield for accuracy evaluation of the gravimeter. In the presentation, the preliminary results of the KRISS gravimeter will be discussed.

  2. Artificial atoms on semiconductor surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, W. A.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are called artificial atoms because of their atom-like discrete electronic structure resulting from quantum confinement. Artificial atoms can also be assembled into artificial molecules or solids, thus, extending the toolbox for material design. We address the interaction of artificial atoms with bulk semiconductor surfaces. These interfaces are model systems for understanding the coupling between localized and delocalized electronic structures. In many perceived applications, such as nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and solar energy conversion, interfacing semiconductor nanocrystals to bulk materials is a key ingredient. Here, we apply the well established theories of chemisorption and interfacial electron transfer as conceptual frameworks for understanding the adsorption of semiconductor nanocrystals on surfaces, paying particular attention to instances when the nonadiabatic Marcus picture breaks down. We illustrate these issues using recent examples from our laboratory. PMID:21097704

  3. Resonance Radiation and Excited Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Allan C. G.; Zemansky, Mark W.

    2009-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Physical and chemical effects connected with resonance radiation; 3. Absorption lines and measurements of the lifetime of the resonance state; 4. Collision processes involving excited atoms; 5. The polarization of resonance radiation; Appendix; Index.

  4. Three-beam atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Rieger, V.; Ruschewitz, F.; Peng, J. L.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1997-09-01

    We present an atom interferometer based on the interference of three partial matter waves in three different internal and external states. Coherent laser excitation acts as a beamsplitter to create a superposition state of the ground state and two Zeeman sublevels of the metastable state of magnesium atoms. The interference pattern of the output ports shows high contrast and the characteristics of three-beam interferences as known from optical interferometry. In comparison to two-beam interferometry a reduction of the fringe width of (32+/-8)% is observed. This offers various possibilities for improved measurements of quantum-mechanical phases due to the internal atomic-state sensitive coupling of external potentials. This is demonstrated for the interaction of magnesium atoms with an external magnetic field.

  5. Contemporary Aspects of Atomic Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, R. G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approach generally used in writing undergraduate textbooks on Atomic and Nuclear Physics presents this branch as historical in nature. Describes the concepts of astrophysics, plasma physics and spectroscopy as contemporary and intriguing for modern scientists. (PS)

  6. Precision measurement with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Development of atom interferometry and its application in precision measurement are reviewed in this paper. The principle, features and the implementation of atom interferometers are introduced, the recent progress of precision measurement with atom interferometry, including determination of gravitational constant and fine structure constant, measurement of gravity, gravity gradient and rotation, test of weak equivalence principle, proposal of gravitational wave detection, and measurement of quadratic Zeeman shift are reviewed in detail. Determination of gravitational redshift, new definition of kilogram, and measurement of weak force with atom interferometry are also briefly introduced. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2010CB832805) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11227803).

  7. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, R.

    1994-02-25

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state.

  8. Atomic quantum state teleportation and swapping.

    PubMed

    Kuzmich, A; Polzik, E S

    2000-12-25

    A set of protocols for atoms-photons and atoms-atoms quantum state teleportation and swapping utilizing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen light is proposed. The protocols work for polarization quantum states of multiphoton light pulses and macroscopic samples of atoms, i.e., for continuous quantum variables. A simple free space interaction of polarized light with a spin polarized atomic ensemble is shown to suffice for these protocols. Feasibility of experimental realization using gas samples of atoms is analyzed.

  9. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Visions of Atomic Scale Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T. F.; Miller, Michael K; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    A microscope, by definition, provides structural and analytical information about objects that are too small to see with the unaided eye. From the very first microscope, efforts to improve its capabilities and push them to ever-finer length scales have been pursued. In this context, it would seem that the concept of an ultimate microscope would have received much attention by now; but has it really ever been defined? Human knowledge extends to structures on a scale much finer than atoms, so it might seem that a proton-scale microscope or a quark-scale microscope would be the ultimate. However, we argue that an atomic-scale microscope is the ultimate for the following reason: the smallest building block for either synthetic structures or natural structures is the atom. Indeed, humans and nature both engineer structures with atoms, not quarks. So far as we know, all building blocks (atoms) of a given type are identical; it is the assembly of the building blocks that makes a useful structure. Thus, would a microscope that determines the position and identity of every atom in a structure with high precision and for large volumes be the ultimate microscope? We argue, yes. In this article, we consider how it could be built, and we ponder the answer to the equally important follow-on questions: who would care if it is built, and what could be achieved with it?

  11. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieddu, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-05-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed and, recently, several schemes to implement optical memories have been proposed. We also discuss some possible directions where this research field may head, in particular, in relation to the use of optical nanofibres that can support higher-order modes with an associated orbital angular momentum.

  12. Transition from LEDCOP to ATOMIC

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, N. H.; Abdallah, J.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Mazevet, S.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of the ATOMIC code, a new low to mid Z opacity code, which will replace the current Los Alamos low Z opacity code LEDCOP. The ATOMIC code is based on the FINE code, long used by the Los Alamos group for spectral comparisons in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for non-LTE calculations, both utilizing the extensive databases from the atomic physics suite of codes based on the work of R.D. Cowan. Many of the plasma physics packages in LEDCOP, such as line broadening and free-free absorption, are being transferred to the new ATOMIC code. A new equation of state (EOS) model is being developed to allow higher density calculations than were possible with either the FINE or LEDCOP codes. Extensive modernization for both ATOMIC and the atomic physics code suites, including conversion to Fortran 90 and parallelization, are underway to speed up the calculations and to allow the use of expanded databases for both the LTE opacity tables and the non-LTE calculations. Future plans for the code will be outlined, including considerations for new generation opacity tables.

  13. Accurate atom counting in mesoscopic ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hume, D B; Stroescu, I; Joos, M; Muessel, W; Strobel, H; Oberthaler, M K

    2013-12-20

    Many cold atom experiments rely on precise atom number detection, especially in the context of quantum-enhanced metrology where effects at the single particle level are important. Here, we investigate the limits of atom number counting via resonant fluorescence detection for mesoscopic samples of trapped atoms. We characterize the precision of these fluorescence measurements beginning from the single-atom level up to more than one thousand. By investigating the primary noise sources, we obtain single-atom resolution for atom numbers as high as 1200. This capability is an essential prerequisite for future experiments with highly entangled states of mesoscopic atomic ensembles.

  14. Semiconductor surface sublimation energies and atom-atom interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-01-01

    The energy required to remove an atom from semiconductor surfaces is calculated using a Green's-function approach. Contrary to intuition, it is found that, in some cases, less energy is needed to remove an atom from the nearly full surface than from a nearly empty surface. The results are explained in terms of the relative energies of anion and cation dangling bonds, and the charge transfers between them. The deducted effective pair-interaction energies and their effects on surface morphology and growth perfection are discussed.

  15. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    DOEpatents

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  16. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  17. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Blanford, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {anti H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment`s results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  18. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, Glenn Delfosse, Jr.

    1997-09-01

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for /bar Ho production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e+e/sp- pair creation near a nucleus with the e+ being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  19. Efficient transfer of francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Seth; Behr, John; Gorelov, Alexander; Pearson, Matt; Tandecki, Michael; Collister, Robert; Gwinner, Gerald; Shiells, Kyle; Gomez, Eduardo; Orozco, Luis; Zhang, Jiehang; Zhao, Yanting; FrPNC Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress of the FrPNC collaboration towards Parity Non Conservation Measurements (PNC) using francium atoms at the TRIUMF accelerator. We demonstrate efficient transfer (higher than 40%) to the science vacuum chamber where the PNC measurements will be performed. The transfer uses a downward resonant push beam from the high-efficiency capture magneto optical trap (MOT) towards the science chamber where the atoms are recaptured in a second MOT. The transfer is very robust with respect to variations in the parameters (laser power, detuning, alignment, etc.). We accumulate a growing number of atoms at each transfer pulse (limited by the lifetime of the MOT) since the push beam does not eliminate the atoms already trapped in the science MOT. The number of atoms in the science MOT is on track to meet the requirements for competitive PNC measurements when high francium rates (previously demonstrated) are delivered to our apparatus. The catcher/neutralizer for the ion beam has been tested reliably to 100,000 heating/motion cycles. We present initial tests on the direct microwave excitation of the ground hyperfine transition at 45 GHz. Support from NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and Fulbright from USA, and CONACYT from Mexico.

  20. Light element opacities from ATOMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Armstrong, G. S. J.; Abdallah, J.; Sherrill, M. E.; Fontes, C. J.; Zhang, H. L.; Hakel, P.

    2013-06-01

    We present new calculations of local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (LTE) light element opacities from the Los Alamos ATOMIC code. ATOMIC is a multi-purpose code that can generate LTE or non-LTE quantities of interest at various levels of approximation. A program of work is currently underway to compute new LTE opacity data for all elements H through Zn. New opacity tables for H through Ne are complete, and a new Fe opacity table will be available soon. Our calculations, which include fine-structure detail, represent a systematic improvement over previous Los Alamos opacity calculations using the LEDCOP legacy code. Our opacity calculations incorporate atomic structure data computed from the CATS code, which is based on Cowan's atomic structure codes, and photoionization cross section data computed from the Los Alamos ionization code GIPPER. We make use of a new equation-of-state (EOS) model based on the chemical picture. ATOMIC incorporates some physics packages from LEDCOP and also includes additional physical processes, such as improved free-free cross sections and additional scattering mechanisms. In this report, we briefly discuss the physics improvements included in our new opacity calculations and present comparisons of our new opacities with other work for C, O, and Fe at selected conditions.

  1. Atom world based on nano-forces: 25 years of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has opened up the new nanoworlds of scanning probe microscopy. STM is the first-generation atomic tool that can image, evaluate and manipulate individual atoms and consequently can create nanostructures by true bottom-up methods based on atom-by-atom manipulation. Atomic force microscopy is a second-generation atomic tool that has followed the footsteps of STM, and which is now opening doors to a new atom world based on using nanoscale forces.

  2. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1995-01-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are given.

  3. Experiments with trapped hydrogen atoms and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    1993-03-01

    The earliest trapped atom coherent resonance experiments were with material traps or bottles. In the atomic hydrogen maser, the atoms are trapped inside a teflon-coated quartz bulb for about a second. Neutrons have been trapped for hundreds of seconds in suitably coated bottles or in superconducting magnetic traps. Results from experiments with trapped atoms and neutrons are reported.

  4. Teleportation of an atomic ensemble quantum state.

    PubMed

    Dantan, A; Treps, N; Bramati, A; Pinard, M

    2005-02-11

    We propose a protocol to achieve high fidelity quantum state teleportation of a macroscopic atomic ensemble using a pair of quantum-correlated atomic ensembles. We show how to prepare this pair of ensembles using quasiperfect quantum state transfer processes between light and atoms. Our protocol relies on optical joint measurements of the atomic ensemble states and magnetic feedback reconstruction.

  5. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1997-01-01

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  6. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  7. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G; Scalettar, Richard T

    2015-12-11

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.

  8. Atomic Magnetometry for fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Walker, Thad; Wakai, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    We present results of using an array of atomic magnetometers in detecting fetal Magnetocardiograms(fMCG). The array consists of four 87-Rb atomic magnetometers operating in the spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. They have a demonstrated sensitivity of 5 - 10 fT /√{ Hz } -limited by the Johnson noise of the magnetic shielding. We report measurements of fMCG on gestational ages as small as 21 weeks and describe the technical challenges and design features that make the measurements possible. We present a method for minimizing the impact of AC Stark Shifts on the magnetometer array performance by relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms from a pumping region to an AC Stark shift free active region. This work was supported by the NIH.

  9. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40/sup 0/ biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals.

  10. Atom lithography with metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Claire S.; Reeves, Jason; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2010-02-15

    A bright metastable helium (He*) beam is collimated sequentially with the bichromatic force and three optical molasses velocity compression stages. Each He* atom in the beam has 20 eV of internal energy that can destroy a molecular resist assembled on a gold coated silicon wafer. Patterns in the resist are imprinted onto the gold layer with a standard selective etch. Patterning of the wafer with the He{sup *} was demonstrated with two methods. First, a mesh was used to protect parts of the wafer making an array of grid lines. Second, a standing wave of {lambda}=1083 nm light was used to channel and focus the He* atoms into lines separated by {lambda}/2. The patterns were measured with an atomic force microscope establishing an edge resolution of 80 nm. Our results are reliable and repeatable.

  11. Atomic oxygen studies on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morison, W. D.; Tennyson, R. C.; French, J. B.; Braithwaite, T.; Moisan, M.; Hubert, J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose was to study the effects of atomic oxygen on the erosion of polymer based materials. The development of an atomic oxygen neutral beam facility using a SURFATRON surface wave launcher that can produce beam energies between 2 and 3 eV at flux levels as high as approx. 10 to the 17th power atoms/cm (2)-sec is described. Thin film dielectric materials were studied to determine recession rates and and reaction efficiencies as a function of incident beam energy and fluence. Accelerated testing was also accomplished and the values of reaction efficiency compared to available space flight data. Electron microscope photomicrographs of the samples' surface morphology were compared to flight test specimens.

  12. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  13. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  14. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-07-01

    A source of thermal atoms that emits 100% of its atoms into a narrow beam with small angular divergence is described. It uses both surface ionization and surface neutralization in conjunction with electric fields to selectively emit a highly directional (orthotropic) beam of neutral atoms. The ion recycling process can be modulated electronically and lends itself to scanning. This orthotropic source is ideal for the efficient use of rare atomic species, well suited for atomic clocks, essential in the efficient delivery of radioactive atoms to optical traps, and has potential to produce ultra high intensity beams of stable atoms.

  15. [Recent Development of Atomic Spectrometry in China].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuan-fang; Wang, Xiao-hua; Hang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    As an important part of modern analytical techniques, atomic spectrometry occupies a decisive status in the whole analytical field. The development of atomic spectrometry also reflects the continuous reform and innovation of analytical techniques. In the past fifteen years, atomic spectrometry has experienced rapid development and been applied widely in many fields in China. This review has witnessed its development and remarkable achievements. It contains several directions of atomic spectrometry, including atomic emission spectrometry (AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), and atomic mass spectrometry (AMS). Emphasis is put on the innovation of the detection methods and their applications in related fields, including environmental samples, biological samples, food and beverage, and geological materials, etc. There is also a brief introduction to the hyphenated techniques utilized in atomic spectrometry. Finally, the prospects of atomic spectrometry in China have been forecasted.

  16. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, Alexander D.; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-07-15

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic clocks. Atom interferometry is now reaching maturity as a powerful art with many applications in modern science. In this review the basic tools for coherent atom optics are described including diffraction by nanostructures and laser light, three-grating interferometers, and double wells on atom chips. Scientific advances in a broad range of fields that have resulted from the application of atom interferometers are reviewed. These are grouped in three categories: (i) fundamental quantum science, (ii) precision metrology, and (iii) atomic and molecular physics. Although some experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates are included, the focus of the review is on linear matter wave optics, i.e., phenomena where each single atom interferes with itself.

  17. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed.

  18. The RPA Atomization Energy Puzzle.

    PubMed

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P; Csonka, Gábor I

    2010-01-12

    There is current interest in the random phase approximation (RPA), a "fifth-rung" density functional for the exchange-correlation energy. RPA has full exact exchange and constructs the correlation with the help of the unoccupied Kohn-Sham orbitals. In many cases (uniform electron gas, jellium surface, and free atom), the correction to RPA is a short-ranged effect that is captured by a local spin density approximation (LSDA) or a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Nonempirical density functionals for the correction to RPA were constructed earlier at the LSDA and GGA levels (RPA+), but they are constructed here at the fully nonlocal level (RPA++), using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) of Langreth, Lundqvist, and collaborators. While they make important and helpful corrections to RPA total and ionization energies of free atoms, they correct the RPA atomization energies of molecules by only about 1 kcal/mol. Thus, it is puzzling that RPA atomization energies are, on average, about 10 kcal/mol lower than those of accurate values from experiment. We find here that a hybrid of 50% Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof GGA with 50% RPA+ yields atomization energies much more accurate than either one does alone. This suggests a solution to the puzzle: While the proper correction to RPA is short-ranged in some systems, its contribution to the correlation hole can spread out in a molecule with multiple atomic centers, canceling part of the spread of the exact exchange hole (more so than in RPA or RPA+), making the true exchange-correlation hole more localized than in RPA or RPA+. This effect is not captured even by the vdW-DF nonlocality, but it requires the different kind of full nonlocality present in a hybrid functional.

  19. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  20. The Atom and the Ocean, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, E. W. Seabrook

    Included is a brief description of the characteristics of the ocean, its role as a resource for food and minerals, its composition and its interactions with land and air. The role of atomic physics in oceanographic exploration is illustrated by the use of nuclear reactors to power surface and submarine research vessels and the design and use of…

  1. Atomic clusters and atomic surfaces in icosahedral quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Portier, Richard; Gratias, Denis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the basic tools commonly used to describe the atomic structures of quasicrystals with a specific focus on the icosahedral phases. After a brief recall of the main properties of quasiperiodic objects, two simple physical rules are discussed that lead one to eventually obtain a surprisingly small number of atomic structures as ideal quasiperiodic models for real quasicrystals. This is due to the fact that the atomic surfaces (ASs) used to describe all known icosahedral phases are located on high-symmetry special points in six-dimensional space. The first rule is maximizing the density using simple polyhedral ASs that leads to two possible sets of ASs according to the value of the six-dimensional lattice parameter A between 0.63 and 0.79 nm. The second rule is maximizing the number of complete orbits of high symmetry to construct as large as possible atomic clusters similar to those observed in complex intermetallic structures and approximant phases. The practical use of these two rules together is demonstrated on two typical examples of icosahedral phases, i-AlMnSi and i-CdRE (RE = Gd, Ho, Tm).

  2. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments. PMID:24746062

  3. Electrochemically Controlled Atom by Atom Deposition of Gold to Polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Jonke, Alex P.; Josowicz, Mira A.; Janata, Jiri; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2010-08-17

    Plyaniline (PANI) has been shown to be an effective matrix for hosting metal nanoclusters. In the case of gold, the tetrachloroaurate anion (AuCl₄) has a high affinity for the imine sites of polyaniline. Upon contract with PANI, AuCl₄ is spontaneously reduced to metallic gold, but the size of the formed Au clusters can not be precisely controlled. Herein, we report on electrochemical method of controlled deposition of one atom by one atom of gold per one imine site of PANI. By controlling the potential, we keep PANI in an oxidized state while exposing it to a solution of AuCl₄ to form a PANI*AuCl₄ complex. The AuCl₄ is reduced to atomic gold by sweeping the potential negative. That frees up the imine sites of PANI again and makes them accessible for the next Au deposition cycle. The repeated deposition of Au atoms follows a cyclic pathway. The amount of gold deposited using this method is consistent for each repeated cycle.

  4. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Prokscha, T.; Kirch, K.; Liszkay, L.; Salman, Z.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into a vacuum from mesoporous silica reflects between two SiO2 confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection probability on the confining surfaces kept at 100 K is about 90% and the reflection process is well described by a cosine law. This technique enables new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1 S -2 S transition frequency using continuous-wave laser spectroscopy.

  5. Pathology of atomic bomb casualties.

    PubMed

    Iijima, S

    1982-01-01

    Thirty seven years ago, 6 August 1945 marks the date of the first atomic bombing never experienced in human history. It was dropped on Hiroshima and this was followed by a second bombing three days later on Nagasaki. The total deaths following exposure to the bomb by the end of 1945 totalled 140,000 (+/- 10,000) in Hiroshima and 70,000 (+/- 10,000) in Nagasaki. The present article described and outline of the physical effects of the atomic bomb and injury to the human body by exposure to the bomb.

  6. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  7. Magnetic remanence in single atoms.

    PubMed

    Donati, F; Rusponi, S; Stepanow, S; Wäckerlin, C; Singha, A; Persichetti, L; Baltic, R; Diller, K; Patthey, F; Fernandes, E; Dreiser, J; Šljivančanin, Ž; Kummer, K; Nistor, C; Gambardella, P; Brune, H

    2016-04-15

    A permanent magnet retains a substantial fraction of its saturation magnetization in the absence of an external magnetic field. Realizing magnetic remanence in a single atom allows for storing and processing information in the smallest unit of matter. We show that individual holmium (Ho) atoms adsorbed on ultrathin MgO(100) layers on Ag(100) exhibit magnetic remanence up to a temperature of 30 kelvin and a relaxation time of 1500 seconds at 10 kelvin. This extraordinary stability is achieved by the realization of a symmetry-protected magnetic ground state and by decoupling the Ho spin from the underlying metal by a tunnel barrier. PMID:27081065

  8. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  9. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  10. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  11. LIGAMENT-CONTROLLED EFFERVESCENT ATOMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The operating principles and performance of a new type of spray nozzle are presented. This nozzle, termed a "ligament-controlled effervescent atomizer," was developed to allow consumer product manufacturers to replace volatile organic compound (VOC) solvents with water and hydroc...

  12. 'Seeing' atoms: the crystallographic revolution.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Laue's experiment in 1912 of the diffraction of X-rays by crystals led to one of the most influential discoveries in the history of science: the first determinations of crystal structures, NaCl and diamond in particular, by W. L. Bragg in 1913. For the first time, the visualisation of the structure of matter at the atomic level became possible. X-ray diffraction provided a sort of microscope with atomic resolution, atoms became observable physical objects and their relative positions in space could be seen. All branches of science concerned with matter, solid-state physics, chemistry, materials science, mineralogy and biology, could now be firmly anchored on the spatial arrangement of atoms. During the ensuing 100 years, structure determination by diffraction methods has matured into an indispensable method of chemical analysis. We trace the history of the development of 'small-structure' crystallography (excepting macromolecular structures) in Switzerland. Among the pioneers figure Peter Debye and Paul Scherrer with powder diffraction, and Paul Niggli and his Zurich School with space group symmetry and geometrical crystallography. Diffraction methods were applied early on by chemists at the Universities of Bern and Geneva. By the 1970s, X-ray crystallography was firmly established at most Swiss Universities, directed by full professors. Today, chemical analysis by structure determination is the task of service laboratories. However, the demand of diffraction methods to solve problems in all disciplines of science is still increasing and powerful radiation sources and detectors are being developed in Switzerland and worldwide. PMID:24801690

  13. Four Weeks of Atomic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Presto, Michael C.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a strategy for presenting ideas of atomic physics in the laboratory portion of the course before it is introduced during a lecture in order to give students an appreciation for the concepts involved, a historical look at how the field developed, and a comprehensive review of physics concepts. Presents a worksheet for the Bohr atom…

  14. Atomism from Newton to Dalton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    Indicates that although Newton's achievements were rooted in an atomistic theory of matter resembling aspects of modern nuclear physics, Dalton developed his chemical atomism on the basis of the character of the gross behavior of substances rather than their particulate nature. (Author/SK)

  15. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the electromagnetic…

  16. Atom Wavelike Nature Solved Mathematically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sven, Charles

    2010-02-01

    Like N/S poles of a magnet the strong force field surrounding, confining the nucleus exerts an equal force [noted by this author] driving electrons away from the attraction of positively charged protons force fields in nucleus -- the mechanics for wavelike nature of electron. Powerful forces corral closely packed protons within atomic nucleus with a force that is at least a million times stronger than proton's electrical attraction that binds electrons. This then accounts for the ease of electron manipulation in that electron is already pushed away by the very strong atomic N/S force field; allowing electrons to drive photons when I strike a match. Ageless atom's electron requirements, used to drive light/photons or atom bomb, without batteries, must be supplied from a huge, external, super high frequency, super-cooled source, undetected by current technology, one that could exist 14+ billion years without degradation -- filling a limitless space prior to Big Bang. Using only replicable physics, I show how our Universe emanated from that event. )

  17. Atom Wavelike Nature Solved Mathematically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sven, Charles

    2010-03-01

    Like N/S poles of a magnet the strong force field surrounding, confining the nucleus exerts an equal force [noted by this author] driving electrons away from the attraction of positively charged protons force fields in nucleus -- the mechanics for wavelike nature of electron. Powerful forces corral closely packed protons within atomic nucleus with a force that is at least a million times stronger than proton's electrical attraction that binds electrons. This then accounts for the ease of electron manipulation in that electron is already pushed away by the very strong atomic N/S force field; allowing electrons to drive photons when I strike a match. Ageless atom's electron requirements, used to drive light/photons or atom bomb, without batteries, must be supplied from a huge, external, super high frequency, super-cooled source, undetected by current technology, one that could exist 14+ billion years without degradation -- filling a limitless space prior to Big Bang. Using only replicable physics, I show how our Universe emanated from that event.

  18. Atom Wavelike Nature Solved Mathematically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sven, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Like N/S poles of a magnet the strong force field surrounding, confining the nucleus exerts an equal force [noted by this author] driving electrons away from the attraction of positively charged protons force fields in nucleus -- the mechanics for wavelike nature of electron. Powerful forces corral closely packed protons within atomic nucleus with a force that is at least a million times stronger than proton's electrical attraction that binds electrons. This then accounts for the ease of electron manipulation in that electron is already pushed away by the very strong atomic N/S force field; allowing electrons to drive photons when I strike a match. Ageless atom's electron requirements, used to drive light/photons or atom bomb, without batteries, must be supplied from a huge, external, super high frequency, super-cooled source, undetected by current technology, one that could exist 14+ billion years without degradation -- filling a limitless space prior to Big Bang. Using only replicable physics, I show how our Universe emanated from that event.

  19. Atomic Entanglement in Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2006-03-01

    The development of materials that may host quantum coherent states is a critical research problem for the nearest future. Recent progress in the growth of centimeter-long small-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNs)[1] and successful experiments on the encapsulation of single atoms into CNs[2], stimulate the study of dynamical quantum processes in atomically doped CN systems. We have recently shown[3] that atomic states may be strongly coupled to vacuum surface photonic modes in the CN, thus forming quasi-1D cavity polaritons similar to those observed for quantum dots in semiconductor nanocavities[4], which were recently suggested to be a possible way to produce the excitonic qubit entanglement[5]. Here, we show that, being strongly coupled to the (resonator-like) cylindrical nanotube environment, the two atomic quasi-1D polaritons can be easily entangled as well, thus challenging a novel alternative approach towards quantum information transfer over centimeter-long distances. [1]L.X.Zheng et al, Proc. Nanotech 2005 (May 8-12, 2005, Anaheim, CA, USA), vol.3, p.126. [2]G.-H.Jeong et al, Phys. Rev. B68,075410(2003). [3]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, in: Trends in Nanotubes Reasearch (NovaScience, NY, 2005); Phys. Rev. B70,035407(2004); Phys. Rev. B72,035451(2005). [4]T.Yoshie et al, Nature 432,200(2004). [5]S.Hughes, Phys. Rev. Lett.94,227402(2005).

  20. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  1. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  2. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  3. Advances in atomic oxygen simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, Joseph F.; Bareiss, Lyle E.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) present in the atmosphere at orbital altitudes of 200 to 700 km has been shown to degrade various exposed materials on Shuttle flights. The relative velocity of the AO with the spacecraft, together with the AO density, combine to yield an environment consisting of a 5 eV beam energy with a flux of 10(exp 14) to 10(exp 15) oxygen atoms/sq cm/s. An AO ion beam apparatus that produces flux levels and energy similar to that encountered by spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) has been in existence since 1987. Test data was obtained from the interaction of the AO ion beam with materials used in space applications (carbon, silver, kapton) and with several special coatings of interest deposited on various surfaces. The ultimate design goal of the AO beam simulation device is to produce neutral AO at sufficient flux levels to replicate on-orbit conditions. A newly acquired mass spectrometer with energy discrimination has allowed 5 eV neutral oxygen atoms to be separated and detected from the background of thermal oxygen atoms of approx 0.2 eV. Neutralization of the AO ion beam at 5 eV was shown at the Martin Marietta AO facility.

  4. Atom-ion quantum gate

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, Hauke; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso

    2010-01-15

    Ultracold collisions of ions with neutral atoms in traps are studied. Recently, ultracold atom-ion systems have become available in experimental setups, where their quantum states can be coherently controlled. This control allows for an implementation of quantum information processing, combining the advantages of charged and neutral particles. The state-dependent dynamics that is a necessary ingredient for quantum computation schemes is provided in this case by the short-range interaction forces that depend on the hyperfine states of both particles. In this work, a theoretical description of spin-state-dependent trapped atom-ion collisions is developed in the framework of a multichannel quantum-defect theory and an effective single-channel model is formulated that reduces the complexity of the problem. Based on this description, a two-qubit phase gate between a {sup 135}Ba{sup +} ion and a {sup 87}Rb atom is simulated using a realistic combination of the singlet and triplet scattering lengths. The gate process is optimized and accelerated with the help of optimal control techniques. The result is a gate fidelity of 1-10{sup -3} within 350 mus.

  5. A subfemtotesla multichannel atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kominis, I K; Kornack, T W; Allred, J C; Romalis, M V

    2003-04-10

    The magnetic field is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous physical observables, carrying information about all electromagnetic phenomena. For the past 30 years, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4 K have been unchallenged as ultrahigh-sensitivity magnetic field detectors, with a sensitivity reaching down to 1 fT Hz(-1/2) (1 fT = 10(-15) T). They have enabled, for example, mapping of the magnetic fields produced by the brain, and localization of the underlying electrical activity (magnetoencephalography). Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have approached similar levels of sensitivity using large measurement volumes, but have much lower sensitivity in the more compact designs required for magnetic imaging applications. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with non-cryogenic operation of atomic magnetometers would enable new applications, including the possibility of mapping non-invasively the cortical modules in the brain. Here we describe a new spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer, and demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54 fT Hz(-1/2) with a measurement volume of only 0.3 cm3. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device are below 0.01 fT Hz(-1/2). We also demonstrate simple multichannel operation of the magnetometer, and localization of magnetic field sources with a resolution of 2 mm.

  6. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  7. Fraunhofer effect atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rust, Jennifer A; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Calloway, Clifton P; Jones, Bradley T

    2005-02-15

    The dark lines in the solar spectrum were discovered by Wollaston and cataloged by Fraunhofer in the early days of the 19th century. Some years later, Kirchhoff explained the appearance of the dark lines: the sun was acting as a continuum light source and metals in the ground state in its atmosphere were absorbing characteristic narrow regions of the spectrum. This discovery eventually spawned atomic absorption spectrometry, which became a routine technique for chemical analysis in the mid-20th century. Laboratory-based atomic absorption spectrometers differ from the original observation of the Fraunhofer lines because they have always employed a separate light source and atomizer. This article describes a novel atomic absorption device that employs a single source, the tungsten coil, as both the generator of continuum radiation and the atomizer of the analytes. A 25-microL aliquot of sample is placed on the tungsten filament removed from a commercially available 150-W light bulb. The solution is dried and ashed by applying low currents to the coil in a three-step procedure. Full power is then applied to the coil for a brief period. During this time, the coil produces white light, which may be absorbed by any metals present in the atomization cloud produced by the sample. A high-resolution spectrometer with a charge-coupled device detector monitors the emission spectrum of the coil, which includes the dark lines from the metals. Detection limits are reported for seven elements: 5 pg of Ca (422.7 nm); 2 ng of Co (352.7 nm); 200 pg of Cr (425.4 nm); 7 pg of Sr (460.7 nm); 100 pg of Yb (398.8 nm); 500 pg of Mn (403.1 nm); and 500 pg of K (404.4 nm). Simultaneous multielement analyses are possible within a 4-nm spectral window. The relative standard deviations for the seven metals are below 8% for all metals except for Ca (10.7%), which was present in the blank at measurable levels. Analysis of a standard reference material (drinking water) resulted in a mean percent

  8. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  9. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

  10. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  11. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  12. Displacement per Atom, Primary Knocked-on Atoms Produced in an Atomic Solid Target

    2015-07-01

    Version 00 DART calculates the total number of displacements, primary knocked-on atoms, recoil spectra, displacement cross sections and displacement per atoms rates in a poly atomic solid target, composed of many different isotopes, using ENDF/B-VI derived cross sections. To calculate these values, different incident particles were considered: neutrons, ions and electrons. The user needs only to specify an incident particle energy spectrum and the composition of the target. The number of displaced atoms is calculatedmore » within the Binary Collision Approximation framework. To calculate the number of displacements the DART code does not use the classical NRT dpa analytical formula, which is only appropriate for projectile and target of the same mass. It numerically solves the linearized Boltzmann equation for a polyatomic target. It can be a useful tool to select the nature and energy of ions or electrons in particle accelerators or electron microscopes to mimic the primary damage induced by neutron irradiation in nuclear plants or fission facilities. Nuclear data: • Typically any ENDFB format evaluation may be used. This package includes the ENDFB-VI nuclear data library. Energy ranges: • Neutron or ion : 10E-11 to 20 MeV Data library distributed with DART v1.0: • ENDFB-VI nuclear data library« less

  13. Displacement per Atom, Primary Knocked-on Atoms Produced in an Atomic Solid Target

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Version 00 DART calculates the total number of displacements, primary knocked-on atoms, recoil spectra, displacement cross sections and displacement per atoms rates in a poly atomic solid target, composed of many different isotopes, using ENDF/B-VI derived cross sections. To calculate these values, different incident particles were considered: neutrons, ions and electrons. The user needs only to specify an incident particle energy spectrum and the composition of the target. The number of displaced atoms is calculated within the Binary Collision Approximation framework. To calculate the number of displacements the DART code does not use the classical NRT dpa analytical formula, which is only appropriate for projectile and target of the same mass. It numerically solves the linearized Boltzmann equation for a polyatomic target. It can be a useful tool to select the nature and energy of ions or electrons in particle accelerators or electron microscopes to mimic the primary damage induced by neutron irradiation in nuclear plants or fission facilities. Nuclear data: • Typically any ENDFB format evaluation may be used. This package includes the ENDFB-VI nuclear data library. Energy ranges: • Neutron or ion : 10E-11 to 20 MeV Data library distributed with DART v1.0: • ENDFB-VI nuclear data library

  14. Slow atom scattering from magnetic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Timothy; Candee, Katelyn; Moran, Kevin; Richardson, Craig

    2013-05-01

    The use of magnetic field gradients to manipulate atomic motion has a long history, using a variety of field sources: permanent- and electro-magnet, time- and space-dependent, on macro- and micro-scopic scales. We use a curved sub-micron patterned permanent magnet made from recording media to scatter slow atoms arriving at near normal incidence. The atomic waves are expected to be both diffracted and focused. A cloud of Rb atoms from a MOT is released to fall ~10cm to the magnetic surface and the atoms are probed with laser light after the interaction. Preliminary measurements of the scattered atoms will be presented.

  15. Realization of a Superconducting Atom Chip

    SciTech Connect

    Nirrengarten, T.; Qarry, A.; Roux, C.; Emmert, A.; Nogues, G.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J.-M.; Haroche, S.

    2006-11-17

    We have trapped rubidium atoms in the magnetic field produced by a superconducting atom chip operated at liquid helium temperatures. Up to 8.2x10{sup 5} atoms are held in a Ioffe-Pritchard trap at a distance of 440 {mu}m from the chip surface, with a temperature of 40 {mu}K. The trap lifetime reaches 115 s at low atomic densities. These results open the way to the exploration of atom-surface interactions and coherent atomic transport in a superconducting environment, whose properties are radically different from normal metals at room temperature.

  16. Atom Microscopy via Dual Resonant Superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Jabar, M. S.; Bakht, Amin Bacha; Jalaluddin, M.; Iftikhar, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    An M-type Rb87 atomic system is proposed for one-dimensional atom microscopy under the condition of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. Super-localization of the atom in the absorption spectrum while its delocalization in the dispersion spectrum is observed due to the dual superposition effect of the resonant fields. The observed minimum uncertainty peaks will find important applications in Laser cooling, creating focused atom beams, atom nanolithography, and in measurement of the center-of-mass wave function of moving atoms.

  17. Microwave initiated atomic spectra from select atomic species.

    PubMed

    Anand, Amand; Roberts, James; Croley, Richard; Dahiya, Jai N

    2010-01-01

    Isotopes of gaseous Helium (3He and 4He) were admitted into the vacuum system at various pressures and allowed to stabilize. Quantum states were then energized using a 2.45 GHz magnetron coupled to the gases by loose coupling. A residual gas analyzer Model 100 series manufactured by Stanford Research Systems was used to determine the massof each species. An Ocean Optics Optical Spectrometer model collecting the light via an optic probe was used to obtain the spectra and to characterize the spectroscopic peaks. The data collected from these isotopes represent characteristic spectral emission lines generated due to the transitions among discrete quantum energy levels. The data analysis, especially for atomic spectroscopy, becomes an extremely important tool in developing an understanding of the quantum levels active within each atom. In this paper is presented a summary of the analysis of work that was done on two isotopes of helium. Data using both computational as well as theoretical techniques are presented. Traditional high voltage arc discharge data were taken for the gas species and these are compared with microwave stimulated atomic emissions.

  18. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  19. Atomizer for thermal management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles L. (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randal T. (Inventor); Appel, Philip W. (Inventor); Knight, Paul A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An atomizer for thermal management system for efficiently thermally managing one or more heat producing devices. The atomizer for thermal management system includes a housing having a coolant passage and a dispensing end, an orifice within the dispensing end, and an actuator manipulating a plunger within the housing. The plunger includes a head that is sealable within a recessed portion of the orifice to open or close the orifice. The coolant passes through the coolant passage into the orifice for spraying upon a heat producing device. The actuator may reciprocate so that the coolant spray emitted through the orifice is pulsating. The pulsing frequency may be increased to increase cooling or decreased to decrease cooling of the heat producing device.

  20. Progress in Atomic Mass Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Audi, Georges

    2005-05-24

    Different types of experimental data require different procedures for collection and for evaluation. I am more directly concerned with the evaluation of the masses of nuclei, more precisely their atomic masses: the 'Atomic Mass Evaluation' (AME). And also, directly connected to the masses, by the properties of ground states and long-lived isomers of nuclei, their spins, half-lives, excitation energies, and decay modes, called the NUBASE evaluation. Masses as well as nuclear and decay properties have in common requiring 'horizontal' collection and evaluation. Here I describe the most prominent features of the AME, the reasons for its complexity, and how they are faced and solved. The masses of still unknown nuclides we estimate from the regularity of the surface of masses. We finally succeeded in having AME and NUBASE co-ordinated and published for the first time together in December 2003.

  1. Catalysis on Single Supported Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The highly successful application of supported metals as heterogeneous catalysts in automotive catalysts, fuel cells, and other multitudes of industrial processes have led to extensive efforts to understand catalyst behavior at the nano-scale. Recent discovery of simple wet methods to prepare single supported atoms, the smallest nano-catalyst, has allowed for experimental validation of catalytic activity of a variety of catalysts and potential for large scale production for such catalysts for industrial processes. In this chapter, we summarize the synthetic and structural aspects of single supported atoms. We also present proposed mechanisms for the activity of single supported catalysts where conventional mechanisms cannot operate due to lack of M-M bonds in the catalysts.

  2. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  3. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  4. Rutherford, Maestro of the Atom

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John

    2003-12-10

    This talk will cover some of the lesser known aspects of Rutherford's work, including his early work in wireless signaling and his later encouragement of radio studies of the ionosphere, the development of what was later improved to be now called the Geiger-Muller tube, his acoustic work for submarine detection during the First World War, the development of particle accelerators and the race to splitting the atom, the first use of coincidence detectors, and why he received just one Nobel Prize.

  5. Prospects for atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audoin, C.

    1984-01-01

    The potentialities of different atomic frequency standards which are not yet into field operation, for most of them, but for which preliminary data, obtained in laboratory experiments, give confidence that they may improve greatly the present state of the art are described. The review will mainly cover the following devices: (1) cesium beam frequency standards with optical pumping and detection; (2) optically pumped rubidium cells; (3) magnesium beam; (4) cold hydrogen masers; and (5) traps with stored and cooled ions.

  6. Stochastic models for atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. A.; Jones, R. H.; Tryon, P. V.; Allan, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    For the atomic clocks used in the National Bureau of Standards Time Scales, an adequate model is the superposition of white FM, random walk FM, and linear frequency drift for times longer than about one minute. The model was tested on several clocks using maximum likelihood techniques for parameter estimation and the residuals were acceptably random. Conventional diagnostics indicate that additional model elements contribute no significant improvement to the model even at the expense of the added model complexity.

  7. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  8. IONIS: Approximate atomic photoionization intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinäsmäki, Sami

    2012-02-01

    A program to compute relative atomic photoionization cross sections is presented. The code applies the output of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method for atoms in the single active electron scheme, by computing the overlap of the bound electron states in the initial and final states. The contribution from the single-particle ionization matrix elements is assumed to be the same for each final state. This method gives rather accurate relative ionization probabilities provided the single-electron ionization matrix elements do not depend strongly on energy in the region considered. The method is especially suited for open shell atoms where electronic correlation in the ionic states is large. Program summaryProgram title: IONIS Catalogue identifier: AEKK_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKK_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1149 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 877 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: Workstations Operating system: GNU/Linux, Unix Classification: 2.2, 2.5 Nature of problem: Photoionization intensities for atoms. Solution method: The code applies the output of the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock codes Grasp92 [1] or Grasp2K [2], to compute approximate photoionization intensities. The intensity is computed within the one-electron transition approximation and by assuming that the sum of the single-particle ionization probabilities is the same for all final ionic states. Restrictions: The program gives nonzero intensities for those transitions where only one electron is removed from the initial configuration(s). Shake-type many-electron transitions are not computed. The ionized shell must be closed in the initial state. Running time: Few seconds for a

  9. The Future of Atomic Energy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fermi, E.

    1946-05-27

    There is definitely a technical possibility that atomic power may gradually develop into one of the principal sources of useful power. If this expectation will prove correct, great advantages can be expected to come from the fact that the weight of the fuel is almost negligible. This feature may be particularly valuable for making power available to regions of difficult access and far from deposits of coal. It also may prove a great asset in mobile power units for example in a power plant for ship propulsion. On the negative side there are some technical limitations to be applicability of atomic power of which perhaps the most serious is the impossibility of constructing light power units; also there will be some peculiar difficulties in operating atomic plants, as for example the necessity of handling highly radioactive substances which will necessitate, at least for some considerable period, the use of specially skilled personnel for the operation. But the chief obstacle in the way of developing atomic power will be the difficulty of organizing a large scale industrial development in an internationally safe way. This presents actually problems much more difficult to solve than any of the technical developments that are necessary, It will require an unusual amount of statesmanship to balance properly the necessity of allaying the international suspicion that arises from withholding technical secrets against the obvious danger of dumping the details of the procedures for an extremely dangerous new method of warfare on a world that may not yet be prepared to renounce war. Furthermore, the proper balance should be found in the relatively short time that will elapse before the 'secrets' will naturally become open knowledge by rediscovery on part of the scientists and engineers of other countries.

  10. Atomic physics in strong fields. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Shih-I

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses: Microwave Driven Multiphoton Excitation Dynamics in Rydberg Atoms; Nonadiabatic Geometric Phases of Multiphoton Transitions in Dissipative Systems and Spin-j Systems; and Nonperturbative Treatments of Atomic and Molecular Processes in Intense Laser Fields.

  11. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  12. "Electronium": A Quantum Atomic Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an alternative atomic model to the probability model, the descriptive quantum atomic model Electronium. Discusses the way in which it is intended to support students in learning quantum-mechanical concepts. (Author/MM)

  13. Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1977-01-01

    Analyzes simple electrical circuits, showing that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decay of atoms. Compares a two-circuit electrical system with a two-level atom. (MLH)

  14. Employment in the Atomic Energy Field, 1973

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moylan, Maurice P.

    1974-01-01

    Private industry is gradually replacing the Federal Government in peaceful atomic energy activities. As a consequence, employment in the field of atomic energy is increasing in private industry and decreasing in government-owned establishments. (AG)

  15. The Kinetics of Nitrogen Atom Recombination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Ronald; Winkler, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a study of the kinetics of the recombination of nitrogen atoms in which concentration-time relations are determined directly by utilizing visual observations of emissions to make gas phase titrations of N atoms with NO. (MLH)

  16. Simulation of Individual Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The atomic dynamics of the hole in graphene was simulated via a kinetic monte carlo method. Probabilities for atomic migration, insertion and ejection were determined by ab-initio calculation. The simulation starts with a predefined hole in a graphene sheet. As it proceeds, the hole grows and the atoms along the edge rearrange themselves. The zigzag configuration is found to dominate the armchair one. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  17. Teleportation of atomic states via position measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tumminello, Michele; Ciccarello, Francesco

    2008-02-15

    We present a scheme for conditionally teleporting an unknown atomic state in cavity QED, which requires two atoms and one cavity mode. The translational degrees of freedom of the atoms are taken into account using the optical Stern-Gerlach model. We show that successful teleportation with probability 1/2 can be achieved through local measurements of the cavity photon number and atomic positions. Neither direct projection onto highly entangled states nor holonomous interaction-time constraints are required.

  18. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  19. Dynamics and Coherence of Cold Atoms in Atom Optics Billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunzweig, Tzahi

    This thesis describes basic experimental research of dynamics and loss of hyperfine-states-coherence of ultra-cold atoms in atom-optics billiards. Ultra-cold atoms trapped in an optical-dipole trap and prepared in a coherent superposition of their hyperfine split ground-states, decohere as they interact with the environment. Here we realized microwave spectroscopy as a tool to study dynamics of ensembles of trapped atoms, with a controlled environment. First, we demonstrated that under the special conditions of a dark optical trap, Ramsey spectroscopy can be interpreted as Loschmidt echo (or fidelity), which is a measure of evolution of hyperfine coherence as a function of time. The detuning of the trapping laser is used to change the "perturbation", which causes a decay in the Ramsey fringe contrast. However, revivals of fringe contrast are observed in contrast to the predictions of random matrix theory. We suggest these system specific revivals originate from dynamical resonances in the fidelity. To minimize inhomogeneous effects we used a microwave echo spectroscopy technique. We measured the coherence properties of the system under different perturbation strengths. Two different regimes were observed: First, a perturbative regime in which the decay of echo coherence is non-monotonic and partial revivals of coherence were observed. These revivals are more pronounced in traps with mixed dynamics as compared to traps where the dynamics is fully chaotic. Next, for stronger perturbations, the decay becomes monotonic and independent of the strength of the perturbation. In this regime no clear distinction can be made between chaotic traps and traps with mixed dynamics. Next, by using compensating techniques to minimize the inherent trap perturbations, and application of artificial, tailored perturbations we showed that the decay of coherence is closely related to the symmetry properties of the perturbations. We considered two generic perturbations: speckle

  20. Atomic and molecular science with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-07

    This paper discusses the following topics: electron correlation in atoms; atomic innershell excitation and decay mechanisms; timing experiments; x-ray scattering; properties of ionized species; electronic properties of actinide atoms; total photon-interaction cross sections; and molecular physics. 66 refs. (LSP)

  1. How Good Are the Standard Atomic Weights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peiser, H. Steffen

    1985-01-01

    This review of standard atomic weights is written chiefly for chemical analysts who may place too much confidence in the accuracy of these values. Topics considered include Frank Clarke's atomic weights, effects of radioactivity and other anomalies in isotopic abundance, atomic weight limitations from experimental uncertainties, and others. (JN)

  2. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of storing large amounts of energy in a free radical system such as atomic hydrogen is analyzed. Attention is focused on theoretical calculations of the ground state properties of spin-aligned atomic triplet hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium. The solid-liquid phase transition in atomic hydrogen is also examined.

  3. Rydberg States of Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Dunning, F. B.

    2011-03-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics A. Dalgarno; 2. Theoretical studies of hydrogen Rydberg atoms in electric fields R. J. Damburg and V. V. Kolosov; 3. Rydberg atoms in strong fields D. Kleppner, Michael G. Littman and Myron L. Zimmerman; 4. Spectroscopy of one- and two-electron Rydberg atoms C. Fabre and S. Haroche; 5. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with blackbody radiation T. F. Gallagher; 6. Theoretical approaches to low-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with atoms and ions A. P. Hickman, R. E. Olson and J. Pascale; 7. Experimental studies of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with atomic species at thermal energies F. Gounand and J. Berlande; 8. Theoretical studies of collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules Michio Matsuzawa; 9. Experimental studies of thermal-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules F. B. Dunning and R. F. Stebbings; 10. High-Rydberg molecules Robert S. Freund; 11. Theory of Rydberg collisions with electrons, ions and neutrals M. R. Flannery; 12. Experimental studies of the interactions of Rydberg atoms with charged particles J. -F. Delpech; 13. Rydberg studies using fast beams Peter M. Koch; Index.

  4. Quantum properties of atomic-sized conductors: Single atoms, chains of atoms, and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruitenbeek, Jan

    2005-03-01

    Using remarkably simple experimental techniques it is possible to gently break a metallic contact and thus form a conducting nanowire. Although the atomic structure of contacts can be quite complicated, as soon as the weakest point is reduced to just a single atom the complexity is removed. This has allowed for quantitative comparison of theory and experiment for many properties, and atomic contacts have proven to form a rich test-bed for concepts from mesoscopic physics (N. Agra"it, A. Levy Yeyati and J.M. van Ruitenbeek, Phys. Rep. 377 (2003) 81). More recently, similar techniques are being used to contact and study individual organic molecules. Junctions of single molecules such as H2 and CO bonded between Pt electrodes can be characterized in great detail by vibration spectroscopy and the dependence of the vibration modes on the stretching of the junction (R.H.M. Smit, et al., Nature 419 (2002) 906; D. Djukic, J.M. van Ruitenbeek, K.S. Thygesen and K.W. Jacobsen, cond-mat/0409640).

  5. Atomic alchemy: Weak decays of muonic and pionic atoms into other atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Greub, C.; Wyler, D.; Brodsky, S.J.; Munger, C.T.

    1995-10-01

    The rates of weak transitions between electromagnetic bound states, for example, ({pi}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({mu}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}, and the exclusive weak decay of a muonic atom into an electronic atom, ({ital Z}{mu}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({ital Ze}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}, are calculated. For {ital Z}=80, relativistic effects are shown to increase the latter rate by a factor of 50 compared to the results of a nonrelativistic calculation. It is argued that the conditions for producing the muonic decay in neon gas ({ital Z}=10), where the branching ratio for the decay per captured muon is 1.7{times}10{sup {minus}9}, can be realized using cyclotron traps, though the prospect for a practical experiment seems remote. In lead the same ratio would be approximately {similar_to}1{times}10{sup {minus}6}. In addition to providing detailed information on the high momentum tail of the wave functions in atomic physics, these decays of QED bound states provide a simple toy model for investigating kinematically analogous situations in exclusive heavy hadronic decays in quantum chromodynamics, such as {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup *}{gamma} or {ital B}{r_arrow}{pi}{ital e}{nu}.

  6. An orthotropic source of thermal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1995-06-01

    A highly efficient source that produces a narrow beam of neutral atoms at thermal velocity with small angular divergence is described. It uses a high work function interior surface to evaporate alkali atoms as ions and a low work function neutralizer, biased to collect the ions and evaporated them as neutral atoms. The neutralizer is located opposite an exit aperture so that the beam characteristics are determined by the geometry of the neutralizer and aperture. The orthotropic source is especially well suited for atomic clocks and for efficient loading of short lived radioactive alkali atoms into an optical trap.

  7. Atomic scale memory at a silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennewitz, R.; Crain, J. N.; Kirakosian, A.; Lin, J.-L.; McChesney, J. L.; Petrovykh, D. Y.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2002-08-01

    The limits of pushing storage density to the atomic scale are explored with a memory that stores a bit by the presence or absence of one silicon atom. These atoms are positioned at lattice sites along self-assembled tracks with a pitch of five atom rows. The memory can be initialized and reformatted by controlled deposition of silicon. The writing process involves the transfer of Si atoms to the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. The constraints on speed and reliability are compared with data storage in magnetic hard disks and DNA.

  8. Electromagnetically induced grating with maximal atomic coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Silvania A.; Araujo, Luis E. E. de

    2011-10-15

    We describe theoretically an atomic diffraction grating that combines an electromagnetically induced grating with a coherence grating in a double-{Lambda} atomic system. With the atom in a condition of maximal coherence between its lower levels, the combined gratings simultaneously diffract both the incident probe beam as well as the signal beam generated through four-wave mixing. A special feature of the atomic grating is that it will diffract any beam resonantly tuned to any excited state of the atom accessible by a dipole transition from its ground state.

  9. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  10. Atomic Fock state preparation using Rydberg blockade.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G

    2014-01-31

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected √N Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with an essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi π pulses to produce N=1, 2 atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48%, respectively. The N=2 Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  11. Atomic Structure Calculations from the Los Alamos Atomic Physics Codes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cowan, R. D.

    The well known Hartree-Fock method of R.D. Cowan, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is used for the atomic structure calculations. Electron impact excitation cross sections are calculated using either the distorted wave approximation (DWA) or the first order many body theory (FOMBT). Electron impact ionization cross sections can be calculated using the scaled hydrogenic method developed by Sampson and co-workers, the binary encounter method or the distorted wave method. Photoionization cross sections and, where appropriate, autoionizations are also calculated. Original manuals for the atomic structure code, the collisional excitation code, and the ionization code, are available from this website. Using the specialized interface, you will be able to define the ionization stage of an element and pick the initial and final configurations. You will be led through a series of web pages ending with a display of results in the form of cross sections, collision strengths or rates coefficients. Results are available in tabular and graphic form.

  12. Entanglement between two atoms in the presence of dipole-dipole interaction and atomic coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Eugene K.; Litvinova, Darya V.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of dipole-dipole interaction and initial atomic coherence on dynamics of two-atom systems. We have considered a model, in which only one atom is trapped in a cavity, and the other one can be spatially moved freely outside the cavity. We have shown the possibility of disappearance of the entanglement sudden death effect in the presence of the dipole interaction of atoms. We have also derived that the initial atomic coherence can be used for effective control of the degree of the atom-atom entanglement.

  13. Ohm's law survives to the atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Mahapatra, S; Ryu, H; Lee, S; Fuhrer, A; Reusch, T C G; Thompson, D L; Lee, W C T; Klimeck, G; Hollenberg, L C L; Simmons, M Y

    2012-01-01

    As silicon electronics approaches the atomic scale, interconnects and circuitry become comparable in size to the active device components. Maintaining low electrical resistivity at this scale is challenging because of the presence of confining surfaces and interfaces. We report on the fabrication of wires in silicon--only one atom tall and four atoms wide--with exceptionally low resistivity (~0.3 milliohm-centimeters) and the current-carrying capabilities of copper. By embedding phosphorus atoms within a silicon crystal with an average spacing of less than 1 nanometer, we achieved a diameter-independent resistivity, which demonstrates ohmic scaling to the atomic limit. Atomistic tight-binding calculations confirm the metallicity of these atomic-scale wires, which pave the way for single-atom device architectures for both classical and quantum information processing.

  14. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  15. Push-pull laser-atomic oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jau, Y-Y; Happer, W

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the "field-independent 0-0 frequency" of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  16. Orientational atom interferometers sensitive to gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, Dennis; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Wicht, Andreas

    2010-02-15

    We present an atom interferometer that differs from common atom interferometers as it is not based on the spatial splitting of electronic wave functions, but on orienting atoms in space. As an example we present how an orientational atom interferometer based on highly charged hydrogen-like atoms is affected by gravitational waves. We show that a monochromatic gravitational wave will cause a frequency shift that scales with the binding energy of the system rather than with its physical dimension. For a gravitational wave amplitude of h=10{sup -23} the frequency shift is of the order of 110 {mu}Hz for an atom interferometer based on a 91-fold charged uranium ion. A frequency difference of this size can be resolved by current atom interferometers in 1 s.

  17. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  18. Atomic oxygen effects on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of specimen geometry on the attack of metals by atomic oxygen is addressed. This is done by extending the coupled-currents approach in metal oxidation to spherical and cylindrical geometries. Kinetic laws are derived for the rates of oxidation of samples having these geometries. It is found that the burn-up time for spherical particles of a given diameter can be as much as a factor of 3 shorter than the time required to completely oxidize a planar sample of the same thickness.

  19. Entanglement-enhanced atomic gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J. J.; Hallwood, D. W.; Dunningham, J. A.

    2010-04-15

    The advent of increasingly precise gyroscopes has played a key role in the technological development of navigation systems. Ring-laser and fiber-optic gyroscopes, for example, are widely used in modern inertial guidance systems and rely on the interference of unentangled photons to measure mechanical rotation. The sensitivity of these devices scales with the number of particles used as 1/{radical}(N). Here we demonstrate how, by using sources of entangled particles, it is possible to do better and even achieve the ultimate limit allowed by quantum mechanics where the precision scales as 1/N. We propose a gyroscope scheme that uses ultracold atoms trapped in an optical ring potential.

  20. Atomic oxygen effects on materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Brady, Joyce A.; Merrow, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding of the basic processes of atomic oxygen interaction is currently at a very elementary level. However, measurement of erosion yields, surface morphology, and optical properties for low fluences have brought about much progress in the past decade. Understanding the mechanisms and those factors that are important for proper simulation of low Earth orbit is at a much lower level of understanding. The ability to use laboratory simulations with confidence to quantifiably address the functional performance and durability of materials in low Earth orbit will be necessary to assure long-term survivability to the natural space environment.

  1. Theoretical Studies of Atomic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Charlotte Froese Fischer

    2005-07-08

    Atomic structure calculations were performed for properties such as energy levels, binding energies, transition probabilities, lifetimes, hyperfine structure, and isotope shifts. Accurate computational procedures were devised so that properties could be predicted even when they could not be obtained from experiment, and to assist in the identification of observed data. The method used was the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, optionally corrected for relativistic effects in the Breit-Pauli approximation. Fully relativistic Dirac-Fock calculations also were performed using the GRASP code A database of energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities was designed and implemented and, at present, includes many results for Be-like to Ar-like.

  2. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisner, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique applicable to many elements. A major present application to the enrichement of uranium for lightwater power reactor fuel has been under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1973. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet future U.S. needs for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. Major features of the AVLIS process will be discussed with consideration of the process figures of merit.

  3. Atomic Gradiometers for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Deland, Zack; Wahl, Colin; Bulatowicz, Michael; Wakai, Ron; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We present results on development of 87 Rb atomic magnetometers configured as magnetic field gradiometers for fetal Magnetocardiography (fMCG). Operating in the Spin Exchange Relaxation Free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers have a sensitivity 1 fT /√{ Hz} . Magnetic field gradient measurements significantly reduce the interference of uniform background fields. In fMCG applications, the field from the mother's heart is one such background and cannot be passively shielded. We report schemes for implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  4. British atomic tests in Australia.

    PubMed

    Suter, K

    1994-01-01

    The United Kingdom and Australia have reached agreement on the British payment for cleaning up the Maralinga (South Australia) site at which the UK tested some of its atomic weapons in the 1960s. The tests were conducted amid great secrecy and only in recent years has the truth about the health hazards fully emerged. The peace movement opposed the tests and its stand has been vindicated. Also vindicated have been the claims by Aborigines that more damage was done by the tests than was earlier admitted.

  5. Quantum jumps and spin dynamics of interacting atoms in a strongly coupled atom-cavity system.

    PubMed

    Khudaverdyan, M; Alt, W; Kampschulte, T; Reick, S; Thobe, A; Widera, A; Meschede, D

    2009-09-18

    We experimentally investigate the spin dynamics of one and two neutral atoms strongly coupled to a high finesse optical cavity. We observe quantum jumps between hyperfine ground states of a single atom. The interaction-induced normal-mode splitting of the atom-cavity system is measured via the atomic excitation. Moreover, we observe the mutual influence of two atoms simultaneously coupled to the cavity mode.

  6. Loading Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms into the ground state of an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Julienne, P. S.; Williams, C. J.; Band, Y. B.; Trippenbach, Marek

    2005-11-15

    We optimize the turning on of a one-dimensional optical potential, V{sub L}(x,t)=S(t)V{sub 0} cos{sup 2}(kx) to obtain the optimal turn-on function S(t) so as to load a Bose-Einstein condensate into the ground state of the optical lattice of depth V{sub 0}. Specifically, we minimize interband excitations at the end of the turn-on of the optical potential at the final ramp time t{sub r}, where S(t{sub r})=1, given that S(0)=0. Detailed numerical calculations confirm that a simple unit cell model is an excellent approximation when the turn-on time t{sub r} is long compared with the inverse of the band excitation frequency and short in comparison with nonlinear time ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})/{mu} where {mu} is the chemical potential of the condensate. We demonstrate using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with an optimal turn-on function S(t) that the ground state of the optical lattice can be loaded with no significant excitation even for times t{sub r} on the order of the inverse band excitation frequency.

  7. Coherent Control of Collective Atomic Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trail, Collin M.

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis I explore the use of collective spin angular momentum as a platform for quantum information processing. In the limit of a large number of atoms, the collective variables of atomic systems have a natural connection to the bosonic algebra of light (known as the Holstein-Primakoff or HP approximation) where components of the collective spin angular momentum effectively act as quadratures, making them natural systems for coupling to light. I have sought to improve previous schemes for the spin squeezing of atomic ensembles, such as the proposal of Takeuchi et. al. based on coherent quantum feedback [39]. In this scheme a beam of linearly polarized light passes through the atomic ensemble (prepared in a coherent state), coupling to the atoms through a state-dependent index of refraction (the Faraday effect). The light is then passed through a wave-plate and reflected back through the atoms for a second pass. This double-pass scheme leads to an effective nonlinearity as the atomic fluctuations are mapped onto the light on the first pass and then back on to the atoms in the second pass. The light acts as a bus coupling each atom to each of the others. This nonlinear interaction forms a shearing of the atomic coherent state that results in squeezing. The light is entangled to the atoms through these interactions, and remains entangled as it escapes the system. This leads to decoherence of the atoms as the light is lost to the environment, reducing the amount of spin squeezing achieved. The first step towards improving the double-pass scheme was to add a quantum eraser step in which the light is disentangled from the squeezed atoms. By first measuring one quadrature of the light, and then performing a measurement-dependent rotation on the atomic ensemble, it is possible to decouple the atoms and light so that the loss of the light does not reduce the atomic squeezing. This results in an improvement of the rate of atomic spin squeezing. A complete model

  8. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  9. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  10. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  11. Atomic Coordination Reflects Peptide Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Germenis, Anastasios E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated that the immunological identity of variant peptides may be accurately predicted on the basis of atomic coordination of both unprotonated and protonated tertiary structures, provided that the structure of the native peptide (index) is known. The metric which was discovered to account for this discrimination is the coordination difference between the variant and the index; we also showed that increasing coordination difference in respect to the index was correlated to a correspondingly weakening immunological outcome of the variant. Additionally, we established that this metric quickly seizes to operate beyond the peptide scale, e.g., within a coordination shell inclusive of atoms up to a distance of 7 Å away from the peptide or over the entire pMHC-TCR complex. Analysis of molecular orbital interactions for a range of formal charges further revealed that the N-terminus of the agonists was always able to sustain a stable ammonium (NH3+) group which was consistently absent in antagonists. We deem that the presence of NH3+ constitutes a secondary observable with a biological consequence, signifying a change in T cell activation. While our analysis of protonated structures relied on the quantum chemical relaxation of the H species, the results were consistent across a wide range of peptide charge and spin polarization conditions. PMID:26793714

  12. Plasmonics in atomically thin materials.

    PubMed

    García de Abajo, F Javier; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The observation and electrical manipulation of infrared surface plasmons in graphene have triggered a search for similar photonic capabilities in other atomically thin materials that enable electrical modulation of light at visible and near-infrared frequencies, as well as strong interaction with optical quantum emitters. Here, we present a simple analytical description of the optical response of such kinds of structures, which we exploit to investigate their application to light modulation and quantum optics. Specifically, we show that plasmons in one-atom-thick noble-metal layers can be used both to produce complete tunable optical absorption and to reach the strong-coupling regime in the interaction with neighboring quantum emitters. Our methods are applicable to any plasmon-supporting thin materials, and in particular, we provide parameters that allow us to readily calculate the response of silver, gold, and graphene islands. Besides their interest for nanoscale electro-optics, the present study emphasizes the great potential of these structures for the design of quantum nanophotonics devices.

  13. Atomic inner-shell transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Mark, H.

    1984-01-01

    Atomic inner-shell processes have quite different characteristics, in several important aspects, from processes in the optical regime. Energies are large, e.g., the 1s binding energy reaches 100 keV at Z = 87; relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects therefore are strong. Radiationless transitions vastly dominate over photon emission in most cases. Isolated inner-shell vacancies have pronounced single-particle character, with correlations generally contributing only approximately 1 eV to the 1s and 2p binding energies; the structure of such systems is thus well tractable by independent-particle self-consistent-field atomic models. For systems containing multiple deep inner-shell vacancies, or for highly stripped ions, the importance of relativistic intermediate coupling and configuration interaction becomes pronounced. Cancellation of the Coulomb interaction can lead to strong manifestations of the Breit interaction in such phenomena as multiplet splitting and hypersatellite X-ray shifts. Unique opportunities arise for the test of theory.

  14. Atom cooling by nonadiabatic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Muga, J. G.; Campo, A. del; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2009-12-15

    Motivated by the recent discovery that a reflecting wall moving with a square-root-in-time trajectory behaves as a universal stopper of classical particles regardless of their initial velocities, we compare linear-in-time and square-root-in-time expansions of a box to achieve efficient atom cooling. For the quantum single-atom wave functions studied the square-root-in-time expansion presents important advantages: asymptotically it leads to zero average energy whereas any linear-in-time (constant box-wall velocity) expansion leaves a nonzero residual energy, except in the limit of an infinitely slow expansion. For finite final times and box lengths we set a number of bounds and cooling principles which again confirm the superior performance of the square-root-in-time expansion, even more clearly for increasing excitation of the initial state. Breakdown of adiabaticity is generally fatal for cooling with the linear expansion but not so with the square-root-in-time expansion.

  15. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  16. Speciation of mercury compounds by differential atomization - atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the dual stage atomization technique which allows speciation of several mercury-containing compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids. The technique holds great promise for further speciation studies. Accurate temperature control, expecially at temperatures less than 200/sup 0/C, is needed to separate the extremely volatile mercury halides and simple organomercurials from each other. Studies with mercury salts and EDTA, L-cysteine and dithioxamide demonstrate that this technique may be used to study the extent of complex formation. Investigations of biological fluids indicate that there is a single predominant form of mercury in sweat and a single predominant form of mercury in urine. The mercury compound in urine is more volatile than that in sweat. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are possible with this technique.

  17. Laser cooling atoms to indistinguishability: Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and entanglement through spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Motional control of neutral atoms has a rich history and increasingly interest has turned to single-atom control. In my thesis work, we created a platform to individually prepare single bosonic atoms in highly pure quantum states, by developing methods to laser cool single atoms to the vibrational ground state of optical tweezer traps. Applying this toolset, we observe the atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel effect when we arrange for atom tunneling to play the role of a balanced beam splitter between two optical tweezers. In another experiment, we utilize spin exchange to create entanglement, which we then verify after spatially separating the atoms to observe their non-local correlations. Merging these results with our recent demonstration of deterministic loading of atomic arrays, our results establish the concept of quantum gas assembly, which could be applied to a variety of systems ranging from the production of single dipolar molecules to the assembly of low-entropy arrays of atoms.

  18. Direct observation of a long-lived single-atom catalyst chiseling atomic structures in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Li; Santos, Elton J G; Jiang, Bin; Cubuk, Ekin Dogus; Ophus, Colin; Centeno, Alba; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Ciston, Jim; Westervelt, Robert; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-02-12

    Fabricating stable functional devices at the atomic scale is an ultimate goal of nanotechnology. In biological processes, such high-precision operations are accomplished by enzymes. A counterpart molecular catalyst that binds to a solid-state substrate would be highly desirable. Here, we report the direct observation of single Si adatoms catalyzing the dissociation of carbon atoms from graphene in an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The single Si atom provides a catalytic wedge for energetic electrons to chisel off the graphene lattice, atom by atom, while the Si atom itself is not consumed. The products of the chiseling process are atomic-scale features including graphene pores and clean edges. Our experimental observations and first-principles calculations demonstrated the dynamics, stability, and selectivity of such a single-atom chisel, which opens up the possibility of fabricating certain stable molecular devices by precise modification of materials at the atomic scale.

  19. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  20. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinuco-León, German A.; Burrows, Kathryn A.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the ‘dressing’ of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, 7Li and 87Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control.

  1. Inductively guided circuits for ultracold dressed atoms.

    PubMed

    Sinuco-León, German A; Burrows, Kathryn A; Arnold, Aidan S; Garraway, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in optics, atomic physics and material science has paved the way to study quantum effects in ultracold atomic alkali gases confined to non-trivial geometries. Multiply connected traps for cold atoms can be prepared by combining inhomogeneous distributions of DC and radio-frequency electromagnetic fields with optical fields that require complex systems for frequency control and stabilization. Here we propose a flexible and robust scheme that creates closed quasi-one-dimensional guides for ultracold atoms through the 'dressing' of hyperfine sublevels of the atomic ground state, where the dressing field is spatially modulated by inductive effects over a micro-engineered conducting loop. Remarkably, for commonly used atomic species (for example, (7)Li and (87)Rb), the guide operation relies entirely on controlling static and low-frequency fields in the regimes of radio-frequency and microwave frequencies. This novel trapping scheme can be implemented with current technology for micro-fabrication and electronic control. PMID:25348163

  2. Electrochemical Potential Derived from Atomic Cluster Structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglian; Xiao, Debao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Based on the atomic cluster structures and free electron approximation model, it is revealed that the electrochemical potential (ECP) for the system of interest is proportional to the reciprocal of atomic cluster radius squared, i.e., φ = k·(1/r(2)). Applied to elemental crystals, the correlation between atomic cluster radii and the ECP that we have predicted agrees well with the previously reported results. In addition, some other physicochemical properties associated with the ECP have also been found relevant to the atomic cluster radii of materials. Thus, the atomic cluster radii can be perceived as an effective characteristic parameter to measure the ECP and related properties of materials. Our results provide a better understanding of ECP directly from the atomic structures perspective. PMID:26801811

  3. Attenuation of Scattered Thermal Energy Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce a.; Seroka, Katelyn T.; McPhate, Jason B.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    The attenuation of scattered thermal energy atomic oxygen is relevant to the potential damage that can occur within a spacecraft which sweeps through atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO). Although there can be significant oxidation and resulting degradation of polymers and some metals on the external surfaces of spacecraft, there are often openings on a spacecraft such as telescope apertures, vents, and microwave cavities that can allow atomic oxygen to enter and scatter internally to the spacecraft. Atomic oxygen that enters a spacecraft can thermally accommodate and scatter to ultimately react or recombine on surfaces. The atomic oxygen that does enter a spacecraft can be scavenged by use of high erosion yield polymers to reduce its reaction on critical surfaces and materials. Polyoxymethylene and polyethylene can be used as effective atomic oxygen scavenging polymers.

  4. Electrochemical Potential Derived from Atomic Cluster Structures.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinglian; Xiao, Debao; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Based on the atomic cluster structures and free electron approximation model, it is revealed that the electrochemical potential (ECP) for the system of interest is proportional to the reciprocal of atomic cluster radius squared, i.e., φ = k·(1/r(2)). Applied to elemental crystals, the correlation between atomic cluster radii and the ECP that we have predicted agrees well with the previously reported results. In addition, some other physicochemical properties associated with the ECP have also been found relevant to the atomic cluster radii of materials. Thus, the atomic cluster radii can be perceived as an effective characteristic parameter to measure the ECP and related properties of materials. Our results provide a better understanding of ECP directly from the atomic structures perspective.

  5. Atomic oxygen transport in the thermosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F. S.; Gottlieb, B.

    1973-01-01

    The photodissociation of oxygen in the lower thermosphere is evaluated to obtain its global average value and the hemispheric imbalance. The observed concentrations of atomic oxygen do not reflect this imbalance in production due to the effect of seasonal wind patterns redistributing the atomic oxygen. The wind system necessary to compensate for the imbalance in solar thermal input into the lower thermosphere is found to transport an amount of atomic oxygen sufficient to compensate for the hemispheric imbalance in production. Ionospheric data indicate a winter enhancement in atomic oxygen concentration; to produce this, a higher degree of oxygen dissociation than that normally accepted (i.e., higher than an atomic to molecular oxygen ratio of unity at 120 km) is needed. The concept that the concentrations of atomic oxygen observed over the winter polar region are maintained by transport from lower latitudes requires that eddy diffusion coefficients derived from vertical transport at low latitudes (ignoring horizontal transport) be reduced by about 25%.

  6. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    PubMed

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  7. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  8. Atomic Dynamics in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Levashov, Valentin A; Aga, Rachel S; Morris, James R

    2007-01-01

    How atoms move in metallic glasses and liquids is an important question in discussing atomic transport, glass formation, structural relaxation and other properties of metallic glasses. While the concept of free-volume has long been used in describing atomic transport, computer simulations and isotope measurements have shown that atomic transport occurs by a much more collective process than assumed in the free-volume theory. We introduce a new approach to describe the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses, in terms of local energy landscapes related to fluctuations in the topology of atomic connectivity. This approach may form the basis for a new paradigm for discussing the structure-properties relationship in metallic glasses.

  9. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  10. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  11. Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

  12. Antimisting kerosene atomization and flammability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, R.; Petersen, R. A.; Toaz, R. D.; Jakub, A.; Sarohia, V.

    1982-01-01

    Various parameters found to affect the flammability of antimisting kerosene (Jet A + polymer additive) are investigated. Digital image processing was integrated into a technique for measurement of fuel spray characteristics. This technique was developed to avoid many of the error sources inherent to other spray assessment techniques and was applied to the study of engine fuel nozzle atomization performance with Jet A and antimisting fuel. Aircraft accident fuel spill and ignition dynamics were modeled in a steady state simulator allowing flammability to be measured as a function of airspeed, fuel flow rate, fuel jet Reynolds number and polymer concentration. The digital imaging technique was employed to measure spray characteristics in this simulation and these results were related to flammability test results. Scaling relationships were investigated through correlation of experimental results with characteristic dimensions spanning more than two orders of magnitude.

  13. Atomic clocks for astrophysical measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Mattison, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recently developed atomic hydrogen masers have achieved stability well into the 10 to the -16th domain for averaging time intervals beyond 1000 sec and that further improvements are in prospect. These devices are highly adaptable for space use in very high precision measurements of angle through Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and of range and range-rate through Doppler techniques. Space missions that will use these clocks for measuring the sun's gravity field distribution and for testing gravitation and relativity (a project that will include a search for pulsed low-frequency gravitational waves) are discussed. Estimates are made of system performance capability, and the accuracy capability of relativistic measurements is evaluated in terms of the results from the 1976 NASA/SAO spaceborne clock test of the Einstein Equivalence Principle.

  14. Atomic and Molecular Photodetachment Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondel, Christophe

    2004-05-01

    Detachment from a negative ion leads to the emission of a nearly unperturbed free electron wave. Detachment in the presence of an electric field thus gives a unique opportunity to study the propagation of a matter wave submitted to uniform acceleration from a pointlike source. As the expression of the corresponding Green function shows, spatially resolved detection of the detached electron should reveal the existence of interference fringes, which can be interpreted as the interference between the well-known pairs of parabolic trajectories of elementary ballistics. Whereas no real free-fall experiment has been able yet to materialize those fringes, photodetachment microscopy experiments carried out since 1996 have now produced electron interference patterns from five different atomic anions. The orders of magnitude of the fringe interval and the spatial resolution of electron detectors are such that these interference patterns can be observed only in relatively weak electric fields and at low energies above the detachment thresholds. The sensitivity of the pattern with respect to the ejection energy of the electron is an interferometric way for measuring the energy brought in excess by the detaching photon, and the electron affinity of the parent neutral itself. The free-electron approximation used to analyze photodetachment microscopy images can be questioned when one deals with a big atom or a molecular anion. The first molecular photodetachment microscopy experiments were carried out recently on OH^-. They still show an observable electron interference pattern, even though OH can be left in a high angular momentum state. On a quantitative basis, the electron interferograms still appear very robust with respect to either internal or external perturbations, which should make it possible to compress the error bars on electron affinities well below 1 μeV, even in the molecular case.

  15. Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 108 Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopic Data (Web, free access)   This handbook provides a selection of the most important and frequently used atomic spectroscopic data. The compilation includes data for the neutral and singly-ionized atoms of all elements hydrogen through einsteinium (Z = 1-99). The wavelengths, intensities, and spectrum assignments are given for each element, and the data for the approximately 12,000 lines of all elements are also collected into a single table.

  16. Collisionally induced atomic clock shifts and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Osherov, I.

    2011-07-15

    We develop a formalism to incorporate exchange symmetry considerations into the calculation of collisional frequency shifts for atomic clocks using a density-matrix formalism. The formalism is developed for both fermionic and bosonic atomic clocks. Numerical results for a finite-temperature {sup 87}Sr {sup 1}S{sub 0} (F=9/2) atomic clock in a magic wavelength optical lattice are presented.

  17. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  18. Entanglement swapping: entangling atoms that never interacted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, E. S.; Carvalho, C. R.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper we discuss four different proposals of entangling atomic states of particles which have never interacted. The experimental realization proposed makes use of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in either a coherent state or in a superposition of the field Fock states |0> and |1>. We consider atoms in either a three-level cascade or lambda configuration.

  19. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  20. Quantum Theory of Atom Laser Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai; Wang, Yan; Ba, Nuo; Li, Jing-Wu

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we study the laser cooling mechanisms with extended Schrodinger quantum wave equation, which can describe a particle in conservative and non-conservative force field. We prove the atom in laser field can be cooled with the theory, and predict that the atom cooling temperature T is directly proportional to the atom vibration frequency ω, which are in accordance with experiment results (A.D. Oconnell, et al. in Nature 464:697, 2010).

  1. Atomicity violation detection using access interleaving invariants

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Lu, Shan; Tucek, Joseph Andrew

    2013-09-10

    During execution of a program, the situation where the atomicity of a pair of instructions that are to be executed atomically is violated is identified, and a bug is detected as occurring in the program at the pair of instructions. The pairs of instructions that are to be executed atomically can be identified in different manners, such as by executing a program multiple times and using the results of those executions to automatically identify the pairs of instructions.

  2. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  3. Exotic atoms and their electron shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, L. M.; Abbot, D.; Bach, B.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; DeCecco, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Heitlinger, K.; Horváth, D.; Kottmann, F.; Morenzoni, E.; Missimer, J.; Reidy, J. J.; Siegel, R.; Taqqu, D.; Viel, D.

    1994-04-01

    Progress in the field of exotic atoms seems to increase proportionally with the number of exotic atoms produced and the increase in energy resolution with which the transition energies are determined. Modern experiments use high resolution crystal spectrometers or even aim at laser spectroscopy. The accuracy of these methods is limited by the interaction of the exotic atoms with their surroundings. The most important source of errors is the energy shift caused by the not well known status of the atomic electron shell. A novel method to eliminate these sources of error is presented and the possibilities for further high precision experiments is outlined.

  4. Advanced atom chips with two metal layers.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Benito, Francisco M.; Biedermann, Grant

    2010-12-01

    A design concept, device layout, and monolithic microfabrication processing sequence have been developed for a dual-metal layer atom chip for next-generation positional control of ultracold ensembles of trapped atoms. Atom chips are intriguing systems for precision metrology and quantum information that use ultracold atoms on microfabricated chips. Using magnetic fields generated by current carrying wires, atoms are confined via the Zeeman effect and controllably positioned near optical resonators. Current state-of-the-art atom chips are single-layer or hybrid-integrated multilayer devices with limited flexibility and repeatability. An attractive feature of multi-level metallization is the ability to construct more complicated conductor patterns and thereby realize the complex magnetic potentials necessary for the more precise spatial and temporal control of atoms that is required. Here, we have designed a true, monolithically integrated, planarized, multi-metal-layer atom chip for demonstrating crossed-wire conductor patterns that trap and controllably transport atoms across the chip surface to targets of interest.

  5. Fabrication methods for compact atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Aaron R.; Hulbert, John F.; Carroll, Brandon T.; Wu, Bin; Schmidt, Holger

    2008-02-01

    Atomic spectroscopy relies on photons to probe the energy states of atoms, typically in a gas state. In addition to providing fundamental scientific information, this technique can be applied to a number of photonic devices including atomic clocks, laser stabilization references, slow light elements, and eventually quantum communications components. Atomic spectroscopy has classically been done using bulk optics and evacuated transparent vapor cells. Recently, a number of methods have been introduced to dramatically decrease the size of atomic spectroscopy systems by integrating optical functionality. We review three of these techniques including: 1) photonic crystal fiber based experiments, 2) wafer bonded mini-cells containing atomic vapors and integrated with lasers and detectors, and 3) hollow waveguides containing atomic vapors fabricated on silicon substrates. In the context of silicon photonics, we will emphasize the hollow waveguide platform. At the heart of these devices is the anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW). ARROW fabrication techniques will be described for both hollow and solid core designs. Solid-core waveguides are necessary to direct light on and off the silicon chip while confining atomic vapors to hollow-core waveguides. We will also discuss the methods and challenges of attaching rubidium vapor reservoirs to the chip. Experimental results for optical spectroscopy of rubidium atoms on a chip will be presented.

  6. Nagaoka's atomic model and hyperfine interactions.

    PubMed

    Inamura, Takashi T

    2016-01-01

    The prevailing view of Nagaoka's "Saturnian" atom is so misleading that today many people have an erroneous picture of Nagaoka's vision. They believe it to be a system involving a 'giant core' with electrons circulating just outside. Actually, though, in view of the Coulomb potential related to the atomic nucleus, Nagaoka's model is exactly the same as Rutherford's. This is true of the Bohr atom, too. To give proper credit, Nagaoka should be remembered together with Rutherford and Bohr in the history of the atomic model. It is also pointed out that Nagaoka was a pioneer of understanding hyperfine interactions in order to study nuclear structure.

  7. The two-photon Rydberg atom micromaser

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Raimond, J.M.; Goy, P.; Davidovich, L.; Haroche, S.

    1988-07-01

    The authors recently operated a Rydberg atom maser on a two-photon degenerate atomic transition. This device combines two interesting features: it is a quantum oscillator working on an intrinsically nonlinear effect and it is a micromaser, with only a few atoms and few tens of photons at a time in the cavity. In this paper, they discuss why Rydberg atom-superconducting cavity systems are well adapted for two-photon maser studies and the authors analyze the main properties of this new device by comparing it to Rydberg masers operating on one-photon transitions.

  8. Conditional ramsey spectroscopy with synchronized atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Holland, M J

    2015-03-13

    We investigate Ramsey spectroscopy performed on a synchronized ensemble of two-level atoms. The synchronization is induced by the collective coupling of the atoms to a heavily damped mode of an optical cavity. We show that, in principle, with this synchronized system it is possible to observe Ramsey fringes indefinitely, even in the presence of spontaneous emission and other sources of individual-atom dephasing. This could have important consequences for atomic clocks and a wide range of precision metrology applications. PMID:25815931

  9. Atom interferometry with polarizing beam splitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Ruschewitz, F.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1998-06-01

    A special kind of atomic beam splitter using a four-level atomic system in combination with polarized light fields is demonstrated. These specific atom optical elements are used to operate an atom interferometer where the beam-splitting mechanism acts selectively on specific paths only and therefore allows for several different interferometer geometries. Based on a Ramsey-Bordé configuration, the experimental data show considerably better accuracy and a contrast enhanced by 65% compared to the two-level interferometer. Our concept appears to be especially interesting in the context of metrological aspects in matter-wave interferometry.

  10. Nanolithography based on an atom pinhole camera.

    PubMed

    Melentiev, P N; Zablotskiy, A V; Lapshin, D A; Sheshin, E P; Baturin, A S; Balykin, V I

    2009-06-10

    In modern experimental physics the pinhole camera is used when the creation of a focusing element (lens) is difficult. We have experimentally realized a method of image construction in atom optics, based on the idea of an optical pinhole camera. With the use of an atom pinhole camera we have built an array of identical arbitrary-shaped atomic nanostructures with the minimum size of an individual nanostructure element down to 30 nm on an Si surface. The possibility of 30 nm lithography by means of atoms, molecules and clusters has been shown.

  11. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B; Schütz, S; Cooper, J; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M J

    2016-04-15

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  12. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon; Schütz, Stefan; Cooper, John; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, Murray

    2016-05-01

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  13. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B.; Schütz, S.; Cooper, J.; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  14. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  15. Atomic Fock states and quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shoupu

    The potential impact of quantum computing has stimulated a world-wide effort to develop the necessary experimental and theoretical resources. In the race for the quantum computer, several candidate systems have emerged, but the ultimate system is still unclear. We study theoretically how to realize atomic Fock states both for fermionic and bosonic atoms, mainly in one-dimensional optical traps. We demonstrate a new approach of quantum computing based on ultracold fermionic atomic Fock states in optical traps. With the Pauli exclusion principle, producing fermionic atomic Fock states in optical traps is straightforward. We find that laser culling of fermionic atoms in optical traps can produce a scalable number of ultra-high fidelity qubits. We show how each qubit can be independently prepared, and how to perform the required entanglement operations and detect the qubit states with spatially resolved, single-atom detection with adiabatic trap-splitting and fluorescence imaging. On the other hand, bosonic atoms have a strong tendency to stay together. One must rely on strong repulsive interactions to produce bosonic atomic Fock states. To simulate the physical conditions of producing Fock states with ultracold bosonic atoms, we study a many-boson system with arbitrary interaction strength using the Bethe ansatz method. This approach provides a general framework, enabling the study of Fock state production over a wide range of realistic experimental parameters.

  16. Atom Interferometry on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dennis; Seidel, Stephan; Lachmann, Maike; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The universality of free fall is one of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature. The comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry comprises a method to precisely test this assumption. By performing the experiments in a microgravity environment the sensitivity of such an atom interferometric measurement can be increased. In order to fully utilize the potential of these experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein condensate as the initial state of the atom interferometer is necessary. As a step towards the transfer of such a system in space an atom optical experiment is currently being prepared as the scientific payload for a sounding rocket mission. This mission is aiming at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein condensate in space and using this quantum degenerate matter as a source for atom interferometry. The launch of the rocket is planned for 2015 from ESRANGE. This first mission will be followed by two more that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures in space and simultaneous atom interferometry with two atomic species. Their success would mark a major advancement towards a precise measurement of the universality of free fall with a space-born atom interferometer. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under grant number DLR 50 1131-37.

  17. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  18. Remote Preparation of an Atomic Quantum Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Berner, Stefan; Volz, Juergen; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2007-02-02

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and future quantum communication networks. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped {sup 87}Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  19. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  20. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Yasin; Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg- 1. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml- 1, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect.

  1. Big Atoms for Small Children: Building Atomic Models from Common Materials to Better Visualize and Conceptualize Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipolla, Laura; Ferrari, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on approach to introduce the chemical elements and the atomic structure to elementary/middle school students is described. The proposed classroom activity presents Bohr models of atoms using common and inexpensive materials, such as nested plastic balls, colored modeling clay, and small-sized pasta (or small plastic beads).

  2. Atomic structures of 13-atom clusters by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Wei, Ching-Ming

    2007-03-01

    The 13-atom cluster structures of the alkaline metals, alkaline earth metals, boron group, 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals in the periodic table, and Pb are investigated by density functional theory with three kinds of exchange correlation approximation: i) LDA (Local Density Approximation), ii) GGA (Generalized Gradient Approximation) [1], and iii) PBE (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) [2]. The results mainly focus on five 3-D structures: icosahedral, cuboctahedral, hexagonal-closed packed, body-center cubic, decahedral, and the other two layer structures: buckled biplanar (bbp) and garrison-cap biplanar (gbp) structures. Limited by accuracy of exchange correlation approximation, two interesting results are found. The ground states of Ca13, Sr13, Ba13, Sc13, Y13, La13, Ti13, Zr13, and Hf13 are icosahedral structures. The clusters of Ir13, Pt13, Cu13, Ag13, and Au13 are more favorable for layer structures (i.e. bbp and gbp) than the other five 3-D structures. [1] J. P. Perdew et al., Phys. Rev. B 46, 6671 (1992). [2] J. P. Perdew, K. Burke, and M. Ernzerhof, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).

  3. Conduction of molecular electronic devices: Qualitative insights through atom-atom polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Stuyver, T.; Fias, S. De Proft, F.; Geerlings, P.; Fowler, P. W.

    2015-03-07

    The atom-atom polarizability and the transmission probability at the Fermi level, as obtained through the source-and-sink-potential method for every possible configuration of contacts simultaneously, are compared for polycyclic aromatic compounds. This comparison leads to the conjecture that a positive atom-atom polarizability is a necessary condition for transmission to take place in alternant hydrocarbons without non-bonding orbitals and that the relative transmission probability for different configurations of the contacts can be predicted by analyzing the corresponding atom-atom polarizability. A theoretical link between the two considered properties is derived, leading to a mathematical explanation for the observed trends for transmission based on the atom-atom polarizability.

  4. Cumulative atomic multipole moments complement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate electrostatic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of several atomic charge models based on different definitions has been analyzed using cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMM). This formalism can generate higher atomic moments starting from any atomic charges, while preserving the corresponding molecular moments. The atomic charge contribution to the higher molecular moments, as well as to the electrostatic potentials, has been examined for CO and HCN molecules at several different levels of theory. The results clearly show that the electrostatic potential obtained from CAMM expansion is convergent up to R-5 term for all atomic charge models used. This illustrates that higher atomic moments can be used to supplement any atomic charge model to obtain more accurate description of electrostatic properties.

  5. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode. PMID:27582467

  6. Apparatus for fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry and quantum pumping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A.; Field, J.; Aubin, S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the current state of an apparatus designed to create and manipulate ultracold bosonic and fermionic Rb and K isotopes for a fermion atomic clock, atom interferometry, microwave trapping, and quantum pumping experiments. Quantum pumping is a phenomenon which can precisely control bias-less flow of single electrons in a circuit. Using ultracold atoms on atom chips, we can test theoretical predictions which have not yet been verified due to experimental difficulties in solid state systems. The apparatus design consists of a magneto-optical trap, magnetic transport system, atom chip, and optical dipole trap. We have demonstrated basic laser cooling and trapping and are working towards transport of the collected atoms to the atom chip for cooling to quantum degeneracy. Once quantum degeneracy is achieved at the chip, micro-magnetic reservoirs of ultracold atoms connected by a 1D ``wire'' create a circuit for various quantum pumping schemes. These schemes are also more broadly applicable to atomtronics experiments.

  7. Three-dimensional atom localization from spatial interference in a double two-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhonghu; Yang, Wen-Xing; Xie, Xiao-Tao; Liu, Shasha; Liu, Shaopeng; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2016-07-01

    We propose a efficient scheme for high-precision three-dimensional (3D) atom localization via spatial interference in a generic double two-level atomic system driven by a weak probe field and three mutually perpendicular standing-wave fields. Because the spatial interference originates from the position-dependent atom-field interaction, the position information of the atom can be obtained by the measurement of the atom population. We find that the precision of 3D atom localization in volumes depends sensitively on the frequency detuning and the phase shifts associated with the standing-wave fields. Interestingly enough, we show that adjusting the frequency detuning and phase shifts can lead to a redistribution of the atoms and a significant change in the visibility of the interference pattern. As a result, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength.

  8. Conduction of molecular electronic devices: qualitative insights through atom-atom polarizabilities.

    PubMed

    Stuyver, T; Fias, S; De Proft, F; Fowler, P W; Geerlings, P

    2015-03-01

    The atom-atom polarizability and the transmission probability at the Fermi level, as obtained through the source-and-sink-potential method for every possible configuration of contacts simultaneously, are compared for polycyclic aromatic compounds. This comparison leads to the conjecture that a positive atom-atom polarizability is a necessary condition for transmission to take place in alternant hydrocarbons without non-bonding orbitals and that the relative transmission probability for different configurations of the contacts can be predicted by analyzing the corresponding atom-atom polarizability. A theoretical link between the two considered properties is derived, leading to a mathematical explanation for the observed trends for transmission based on the atom-atom polarizability.

  9. Atom-atom interactions around the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jonathan D; Goban, Akihisa; Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Lu, Mingwu; Yu, Su-Peng; Chang, Darrick E; Kimble, H J

    2016-09-20

    Tailoring the interactions between quantum emitters and single photons constitutes one of the cornerstones of quantum optics. Coupling a quantum emitter to the band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) provides a unique platform for tuning these interactions. In particular, the cross-over from propagating fields [Formula: see text] outside the bandgap to localized fields [Formula: see text] within the bandgap should be accompanied by a transition from largely dissipative atom-atom interactions to a regime where dispersive atom-atom interactions are dominant. Here, we experimentally observe this transition by shifting the band edge frequency of the PCW relative to the [Formula: see text] line of atomic cesium for [Formula: see text] atoms trapped along the PCW. Our results are the initial demonstration of this paradigm for coherent atom-atom interactions with low dissipation into the guided mode.

  10. Three-dimensional atom localization via electromagnetically induced transparency in a three-level atomic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Cao, Dewei; Yu, Benli

    2016-05-01

    We present a new scheme for three-dimensional (3D) atom localization in a three-level atomic system via measuring the absorption of a weak probe field. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the probe absorption. It is found that, by properly varying the parameters of the system, the probability of finding the atom in 3D space can be almost 100%. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency 3D atom localization, which provides some potential applications in laser cooling or atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  11. PREFACE: Atom-surface scattering Atom-surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    It has been a privilege and a real pleasure to organize this special issue or festschrift in the general field of atom-surface scattering (and its interaction) in honor of J R Manson. This is a good opportunity and an ideal place to express our deep gratitude to one of the leaders in this field for his fundamental and outstanding scientific contributions. J R Manson, or Dick to his friends and colleagues, is one of the founding fathers, together with N Cabrera and V Celli, of the 'Theory of surface scattering and detection of surface phonons'. This is the title of the very well-known first theoretical paper by Dick published in Physical Review Letters in 1969. My first meeting with Dick was around twenty years ago in Saclay. J Lapujoulade organized a small group seminar about selective adsorption resonances in metal vicinal surfaces. We discussed this important issue in surface physics and many other things as if we had always known each other. This familiarity and warm welcome struck me from the very beginning. During the coming years, I found this to be a very attractive aspect of his personality. During my stays in Göttingen, we had the opportunity to talk widely about science and life at lunch or dinner time, walking or cycling. During these nice meetings, he showed, with humility, an impressive cultural background. It is quite clear that his personal opinions about history, religion, politics, music, etc, come from considering and analyzing them as 'open dynamical systems'. In particular, with good food and better wine in a restaurant or at home, a happy cheerful soirée is guaranteed with him, or even with only a good beer or espresso, and an interesting conversation arises naturally. He likes to listen before speaking. Probably not many people know his interest in tractors. He has an incredible collection of very old tractors at home. In one of my visits to Clemson, he showed me the collection, explaining to me in great detail, their technical properties

  12. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  13. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  14. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Lifetime Measurement of Cold Atoms in an Integrating Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Zhuo; Wang, Xu-Cheng; Cheng, Hua-Dong; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Liang; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2009-08-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the lifetime of the cold 87Rb atoms in an integrating sphere. The atoms are cooled by the diffuse light which is generated by the diffuse reflection of laser beams in the integrating sphere. Our result shows that the lifetime is primarily determined by the free fall of the cold 87Rb atoms, and its half-life can reach 40 ms, which is suitable for many experiments, especially for a cold atom clock.

  15. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  16. Advances in atomic physics: Four decades of contribution of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M

    2015-09-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University - Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s - when the author first engaged in research - an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics.

  17. 75 FR 36449 - Yankee Atomic Electric Co.; Yankee Atomic Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Issuance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... COMMISSION Yankee Atomic Electric Co.; Yankee Atomic Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Issuance of... Atomic Electric Company (YAEC), pursuant to 10 CFR 72.7, from the specific provisions of 10 CFR 72.212(a.... 1025 on May 10, 2007 (72 FR 26535), with an effective date of July 24, 2007 (72 FR 38468, July 13,...

  18. Tried and True: The Romance of the Atoms--Animated Atomic Attractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbitt, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Since the formation of atomic bonds is active, the authors sought a way of learning through drama or kinetic activity. To achieve this goal, they developed an activity called Romance of the Atoms. The activity requires students to use computer-animation technology to develop short cartoons that explain atomic classification and bonds. This…

  19. Use of surface area computations to describe atom-atom interactions.

    PubMed

    de La Cruz, X; Calvo, M

    2001-06-01

    Accessible surface (ASA) and atomic contact (ACA) areas are powerful tools for protein structure analysis. However, their use for analysis purposes could be extended if a relationship between them and protein stability could be found. At present, this is the case only for ASAs, which have been used to assess the contribution of the hydrophobic effect to protein stability. In the present work we study whether there is a relationship between atomic contact areas and the free energy associated to atom-atom interactions. We utilise a model in which the contribution of atomic interactions to protein stability is expressed as a linear function of the accessible surface area buried between atom pairs. We assess the validity of this hypothesis, using a set of 124 lysozyme mutants (Matthews, 1995, Adv Protein Chem, 249-278) for which both the X-ray structure and the experimental stability are known. We tested this assumption for residue representations with increasing numbers of atom types. Our results indicate that for simple residue representations, with only 4 to 5 atom types, there is not a clear linear relationship between stability and buried accessible area. However, this relationship is observed for representations with 6 to 9 atom types, where gross heterogeneities in the atom type definition are eliminated. Finally, we also study a version of the linear model in which the atom- atom interactions are represented utilising a simple function for the buried accessible area, which may be useful for protein structure prediction studies.

  20. 78 FR 42556 - Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company; Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant Issuance of Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... COMMISSION Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company; Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant Issuance of Environmental... facilities (76 FR 72560; November 23, 2011) (EP Final Rule). The EP Final Rule was effective on December 23, 2011, with various implementation dates for each of the rule changes. Maine Yankee Atomic Power...

  1. Fast and robust entanglement using Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côté, Robin

    2001-05-01

    In recent years, numerous proposals to build quantum information processors have been suggested. Due to their very long coherence times and the well-developed techniques for cooling and trapping them, neutral atoms are particularly attractive for quantum computing. To design fast quantum gates, one needs to identify strong and controllable two-body interactions. However, large interactions are usually associated with strong mechanical forces on the trapped atoms: their internal states (the qubits) may become entangled with their motional degrees of freedom, leading to rapid decoherence. A new system for implementing quantum logic gates based on ultracold Rydberg atoms is presented. Atoms in excited Rydberg states have long lifetimes and enormous dipole moments. When excited in a constant electric field, their controllable strong dipole-dipole interactions provide the large interaction energy required to perform fast gate operations. The mechanical effects can also be greatly suppressed by using the ``dipole blockade" resulting from the strong dipole-dipole interactions. The gate becomes insensitive to the temperature of the atoms and to the variations in atom-atom separation. Hence, a fast and robust two-qubit quantum gate with operation time much faster than the time scale of the atomic motion is possible(D. Jaksch et al.) Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2208 (2000).. The generalization to collective states of mesoscopic ensembles can be accomplished using the same dipole blockade(M.D. Lukin et al.), quant-phy/0011028..

  2. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  3. Design for an optical cw atom laser

    PubMed Central

    Ashkin, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    A new type of optical cw atom laser design is proposed that should operate at high intensity and high coherence and possibly record low temperatures. It is based on an “optical-shepherd” technique, in which far-off-resonance blue-detuned swept sheet laser beams are used to make new types of high-density traps, atom waveguides, and other components for achieving very efficient Bose–Einstein condensation and cw atom laser operation. A shepherd-enhanced trap is proposed that should be superior to conventional magneto-optic traps for the initial collection of molasses-cooled atoms. A type of dark-spot optical trap is devised that can cool large numbers of atoms to polarization-gradient temperatures at densities limited only by three-body collisional loss. A scheme is designed to use shepherd beams to capture and recycle essentially all of the escaped atoms in evaporative cooling, thereby increasing the condensate output by several orders of magnitude. Condensate atoms are stored in a shepherd trap, protected from absorbing light, under effectively zero-gravity conditions, and coupled out directly into an optical waveguide. Many experiments and devices may be possible with this cw atom laser. PMID:15302937

  4. Hiroshima: Perspectives on the Atomic Bombing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Amy

    In this curriculum module students analyze both U.S. and Japanese perspectives of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The activities integrate Howard Gardner's work on multiple intelligences. The module is recommended as a supplement to textbook coverage of the war in the Pacific and of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. It can be used to support both…

  5. Atomic Physics, Science (Experimental): 5318.42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Ralph E.

    Presented is the study of modern and classical concepts of the atom; the structure of the atom as a mass-energy relationship; practical uses of radioactivity; isotopes; and the strange particles. Performance objectives (16) are included as well as a detailed course outline. Experiments, demonstrations, projects and reports to enhance student…

  6. Light scattering from dense cold atomic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bihui; Cooper, John; Ye, Jun; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically study the propagation of light through a cold atomic medium, where the effects of motion, laser intensity, atomic density, and polarization can all modify the properties of the scattered light. We present two different microscopic models: the "coherent dipole model" and the "random-walk model", both suitable for modeling recent experimental work done in large atomic arrays in the low-light-intensity regime. We use them to compute relevant observables such as the linewidth, peak intensity, and line center of the emitted light. We further develop generalized models that explicitly take into account atomic motion. Those are relevant for hotter atoms and beyond the low-intensity regime. We show that atomic motion can lead to drastic dephasing and to a reduction of collective effects, together with a distortion of the line shape. Our results are applicable to model a full gamut of quantum systems that rely on atom-light interactions, including atomic clocks, quantum simulators, and nanophotonic systems.

  7. Systematic Effects in Atomic Fountain Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibble, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    We describe recent advances in the accuracies of atomic fountain clocks. New rigorous treatments of the previously large systematic uncertainties, distributed cavity phase, microwave lensing, and background gas collisions, enabled these advances. We also discuss background gas collisions of optical lattice and ion clocks and derive the smooth transition of the microwave lensing frequency shift to photon recoil shifts for large atomic wave packets.

  8. Index to the Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This index was prepared for the set of 51 booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school students and their teachers. In addition to the index, a complete list of the series is provided in which the booklets are grouped into the categories of physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear…

  9. About the atomic structures of icosahedral quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Gratias, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the crystallographic methods that have been developed these last twenty five years to decipher the atomic structures of the icosahedral stable quasicrystals since their discovery in 1982 by D. Shechtman. After a brief recall of the notion of quasiperiodicity and the natural description of Z-modules in 3-dim as projection of regular lattices in N>3-dim spaces, we give the basic geometrical ingredients useful to describe icosahedral quasicrystals as irrational 3-dim cuts of ordinary crystals in 6-dim space. Atoms are described by atomic surfaces (ASs) that are bounded volumes in the internal (or perpendicular) 3-dim space and the intersections of which with the physical space are the actual atomic positions. The main part of the paper is devoted to finding the major properties of quasicrystalline icosahedral structures. As experimentally demonstrated, they can be described with a surprisingly few high symmetry ASs located at high symmetry special points in 6-dim space. The atomic structures are best described by aggregations and intersections of high symmetry compact interpenetrating atomic clusters. We show here that the experimentally relevant clusters are derived from one generic cluster made of two concentric triacontahedra scaled by τ and an external icosidodecahedron. Depending on which ones of the orbits of this cluster are eventually occupied by atoms, the actual atomic clusters are of type Bergman, Mackay, Tsai and others….

  10. The Elusive Neutrino, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The discovery of the neutrino and the research involving this important elementary particle of matter is discussed. The introductory section reviews topics basic to the…

  11. Defect-free atom arrays on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Harry; Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alex; Anschuetz, Eric; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Endres, Manuel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Arrays of neutral, trapped atoms have proven to be an extraordinary platform for studying quantum many-body physics and implementing quantum information protocols. Conventional approaches to generate such arrays rely on loading atoms into optical lattices and require elaborate experimental control. An alternative, simpler approach is to load atoms into individual optical tweezers. However, the probabilistic nature of the loading process limits the size of the arrays to small numbers of atoms. Here we present a new method for assembling defect-free arrays of large numbers of atoms. Our technique makes use of an array of tightly focused optical tweezers generated by an acousto-optic deflector. The positions of the traps can be dynamically reconfigured on a sub-millisecond timescale. With single-site resolved fluorescence imaging, we can identify defects in the atom array caused by the probabilistic loading process and rearrange the trap positions in response. This will enable us to generate defect-free atom arrays on demand. We discuss our latest results towards reaching this goal along with schemes to implement long-range interactions between atoms in the array. Now at Caltech.

  12. Defect-free atom arrays on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernien, Hannes; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Endres, Manuel; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-05-01

    Arrays of neutral, trapped atoms have proven to be an extraordinary platform for studying quantum many-body physics and implementing quantum information protocols. Conventional approaches to generate such arrays rely on loading atoms into optical lattices and require elaborate experimental control. An alternative, simpler approach is to load atoms into individual optical tweezers. However, the probabilistic nature of the loading process limits the size of the arrays to small numbers of atoms. Here we present a new method for assembling defect-free arrays of large numbers of atoms. Our technique makes use of an array of tightly focused optical tweezers generated by an acousto-optic deflector. The positions of the traps can be dynamically reconfigured on a sub-millisecond timescale. With single-site resolved fluorescence imaging, we can identify defects in the atom array caused by the probabilistic loading process and rearrange the trap positions in response. This will enable us to generate defect-free atom arrays on demand. We discuss our latest results towards reaching this goal along with schemes to implement long-range interactions between atoms in the array.

  13. Relativistic atomic physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following proposed work for relativistic atomic physics at the Superconducting Super Collider: Beam diagnostics; atomic physics research; staffing; education; budget information; statement concerning matching funds; description and justification of major items of equipment; statement of current and pending support; and assurance of compliance.

  14. Fully methylated, atomically flat (111) silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidélis, A.; Ozanam, F.; Chazalviel, J.-N.

    2000-01-01

    The atomically flat hydrogenated (111) silicon surface has been methylated by anodization in a Grignard reagent and the surface obtained characterized by infrared spectroscopy. 100% substitution of the hydrogen atoms by methyl groups is observed. The resulting surface exhibits preserved ordering and superior chemical stability.

  15. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, R. M.

    Dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion are reviewed. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrum plasma states are described.

  16. Studying Atomic Dynamics with Designer Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdorfer, J.; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-09-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical progress on the dynamics of Rydberg atoms using short half cycle pulses. We discuss new possibilities in coherent control and non-linear dynamics of atoms which have lately become possible using various superpositions of such pulses.

  17. Electron-atom /molecule/ collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electron-atom (molecule) collision processes at low and intermediate energies, from near threshold to a few hundred electron volts, are discussed. Attention is given to experimental techniques and procedures, electron impact cross sections, impact excitation and electron-atom scattering in laser fields. Specific examples are presented that illustrate various experimental techniques and interpretations of observations.

  18. Atomic preference between left and right

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchiat, M.A.; Pottier, L.

    1984-06-01

    According to theoretical calculations, the weak force between each electron and the atomic nucleus should cause small perturbations in the orbits of the electrons, provided the electrons wander close enough to feel the effects of the weak force. The perturbations caused by the weak force should give rise to a small violation of parity in the atom. The effects of the weak force in the atom can therefore be tested experimentally in a way that is conceptually straight forward, although by no means practically so: the configuration of the atoms in a gas is given a preferential handedness, say left, and some suitable property of the atom is measured. The configuration is then replaced by one that coincides with the mirror image of the first configuration; the second configuration must therefore have a preferential handedness opposite to that of the first. The same atomic property is then measured for the second configuration. If the measured property in the second experiment is not the exact mirror image of the first result, parity is violated. Several groups, including the authors have confirmed the existence of parity violations in a few atomic systems. One group observed parity violations in the thalium atom. The authors used cesium in their experiment to show parity violation.

  19. Photoionization of Atomic Oxygen and Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, Alexander

    1960-01-01

    A knowledge of the photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen from the spectral heads down to the x-ray region is necessary for the interpretaton of the behavior of the ionized layers. In this note we examine the available theoretical and experimental data and obtain sets of recommended values.

  20. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  1. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  2. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  3. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  4. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  5. Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The cascade [1,n]-hydrogen transfer/cyclization, recognized as the tert-amino effect one century ago, has received considerable interest in recent decades, and great achievements have been made. With the aid of this strategy, the inert C(sp(3))-H bonds can be directly functionalized into C-C, C-N, C-O bonds under catalysis of Lewis acids, Brønsted acids, as well as organocatalysts, and even merely under thermal conditions. Hydrogen can be transferred intramolecularly from hydrogen donor to acceptor in the form of hydride, or proton, followed by cyclization to furnish the cyclic products in processes featuring high atom economy. Methylene/methine adjacent to heteroatoms, e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, can be exploited as hydride donor as well as methylene/methine without heteroatom assistance. Miscellaneous electrophilic subunits or intermediates, e.g., alkylidene malonate, carbophilic metal activated alkyne or allene, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes/ketone, saturated aldehydes/iminium, ketenimine/carbodiimide, metal carbenoid, electron-withdrawing groups activated allene/alkyne, in situ generated carbocation, can serve as hydride acceptors. This methodology has shown preeminent power to construct 5-, 6-, or 7-membered heterocyclic as well as carbon rings. In this chapter, various hydrogen donors and acceptors are adequately discussed. PMID:27573142

  6. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  7. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  8. Large spin magnetism with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laburthe-Tolra, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The properties of quantum gases made of ultra-cold atoms strongly depend on the interactions between atoms. These interactions lead to condensed-matter-like collective behavior, so that quantum gases appear to be a new platform to study quantum many-body physics. In this seminar, I will focus on the case where the atoms possess an internal (spin) degrees of freedom. The spin of atoms is naturally larger than that of electrons. Therefore, the study of the magnetic properties of ultra-cold gases allows for an exploration of magnetism beyond the typical situation in solid-state physics where magnetism is associated to the s = 1/2 spin of the electron. I will describe three specific cases: spinor Bose-Einstein condensates, where spin-dependent contact interactions introduce new quantum phases and spin dynamics; large spin magnetic atoms where strong dipole-dipole interactions lead to exotic quantum magnetism; large spin Fermi gases.

  9. Absorption imaging of a single atom.

    PubMed

    Streed, Erik W; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-03

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  10. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  11. An off-axis rotating atom trap.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Moscatelli, F; Oh, E

    2006-06-12

    We present a novel configuration of a magneto-optical trap for cold atoms. The trap is very simple in design, employing only a small permanent magnet and an external Helmholtz bias coil. The trap's principal advantage is that the entire volume of the overlapping laser beams can be used for atom guiding and manipulation. An especially interesting effect is the rotation of the trapped atoms in circular motion as the permanent magnet is rotated. Clouds containing on the order of 2*10(6) atoms are rotated up to 60Hz forming a 5 mm diameter ring. This rotation can potentially be used in studying the behavior of cold atoms in 2-dimensional potential as well as applications for rotational sensors. We also present a classical theoretical model to simulate the experiment.

  12. Atomic weights of the elements 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    The biennial review of atomic-weight, Ar(E), determinations and other cognate data have resulted in changes for the standard atomic weights of the following elements: Presented are updated tables of the standard atomic weights and their uncertainties estimated by combining experimental uncertainties and terrestrial variabilities. In addition, this report again contains an updated table of relative atomic-mass values and half-lives of selected radioisotopes. Changes in the evaluated isotopic abundance values from those published in 1997 are so minor that an updated list will not be published for the year 1999. Many elements have a different isotopic composition in some nonterrestrial materials. Some recent data on parent nuclides that might affect isotopic abundances or atomic-weight values are included in this report for the information of the interested scientific community.

  13. Scattered Atomic Oxygen Effects on Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K. R.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Low Earth orbital (LEO) atomic oxygen cannot only erode the external surfaces of polymers on spacecraft, but can cause degradation of surfaces internal to components on the spacecraft where openings to the space environment exist. Although atomic oxygen attack on internal or interior surfaces may not have direct exposure to the LEO atomic oxygen flux scattered impingement can have serious degradation effects where sensitive interior surfaces are present. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymer interior to an aperture on a spacecraft is simulated using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A 2-dimensional model is used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of distance into a parallel walled cavity. The degree of erosion re1ative is compared between the various interior locations and the external surface of a LEO spacecraft.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Effects on Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K. R.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Low Earth orbital (LEO) atomic oxygen cannot only erode the external surfaces of polymers on spacecraft, but can cause degradation of surfaces internal to components on the spacecraft where openings to the space environment exist. Although atomic oxygen attack on internal or interior surfaces may not have direct exposure to the LEO atomic oxygen flux, scattered impingement can have can have serious degradation effects where sensitive interior surfaces are present. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymers interior to an aperture on a spacecraft is simulated using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A 2-dimensional model is used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of distance into a parallel walled cavity. The degree of erosion relative is compared between the various interior locations and the external surface of an LEO spacecraft.

  15. Atoms and cavities: Explorations of quantum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, J. M.; Hagley, E.; Maitre, X.; Nogues, G.; Wunderlich, C.; Brune, M.; Haroche, S.

    1999-06-11

    The interaction of circular Rydberg atoms with a high-quality microwave cavity makes it possible to realize complex quantum state manipulations. The state of an atom can be 'copied' onto the cavity. Reversing this operation at a later time with a second atom, we realize an elementary 'quantum memory' holding an atomic quantum coherence for a while in a cavity mode. We have also generated two-atom entangled states of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type. At variance with previous experiments, this one implies massive particles in a completely controlled process. These entanglement manipulations can be generalized to more complex or to mesoscopic systems and open the way to new tests of fundamental aspects of the quantum world.

  16. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  17. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology. PMID:26550871

  18. Oxidation Resistance of Reactive Atoms in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, Matthew F; Duscher, Gerd; Windl, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We have found that reactive elements that are normally oxidized at room temperature are present as individual atoms or clusters on and in graphene. Oxygen is present in these samples but it is only detected in the thicker amorphous carbon layers present in the graphene specimens we have examined. However, we have seen no evidence that oxygen reacts with the impurity atoms and small clusters of these normally reactive elements when they are incorporated in the graphene layers. First principles calculations suggest that the oxidation resistance is due to kinetic effects such as preferential bonding of oxygen to nonincorporated atoms and H passivation. The observed oxidation resistance of reactive atoms in graphene may allow the use of these incorporated metals in catalytic applications. It also opens the possibility of designing and producing electronic, opto-electronic, and magnetic devices based on these normally reactive atoms.

  19. Fluid induced rotordynamic instability in rotary atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colding-Jorgensen, Jorgen

    1988-06-01

    A theory is presented for the calculation of rotordynamic coefficients of the fluid-rotor interaction in rotary atomizers, based on calculation of the fluid flow through a whirling atomizer wheel. The theory predicts potentially unstable rotor whirl in high speed rotary atomizers. The whirl frequency can be that of the first critical forward or the first critical backward precession of the rotor, depending on atomizer wheel geometry, speed, fluid properties and flow rate. The predicted whirl phenomena have been produced in an atomizer test stand. Both forward and backward precession have been observed to become unstable. The observed whirl directions and amplitudes are consistent with the calculated coefficients. Some design parameters are identified which can help control and suppress the whirl.

  20. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  1. Realization of a Strained Atomic Wire Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong

    2015-11-24

    A superlattice of strained Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a strain on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a strained-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires. PMID:26446292

  2. Coupling cold atoms with mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2014-05-01

    Macroscopic systems, coupled to quantum systems with well understood coherence properties, can enable the study of the boundary between quantum microscopic phenomena and macroscopic systems. Ultra-cold atoms can be probed and manipulated with micro-mechanical resonators that provide single-spin sensitivity and sub-micron spatial resolution, facilitating studies of decoherence and quantum control. In the future, hybrid quantum systems consisting of cold atoms interfaced with mechanical devices may have applications in quantum information science. We describe our experiment to couple laser-cooled Rb atoms to a magnetic cantilever tip. This cantilever is precisely defined on the surface of a chip with lithography and the atoms are trapped at micron-scale distances from this chip. To match cantilever mechanical resonances, atomic magnetic resonances are tuned with a magnetic field.

  3. Single-atom thermometer for ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Michael; Kindermann, Farina; Lausch, Tobias; Mayer, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix; Widera, Artur

    2016-04-01

    We use single or a few Cs atoms as a thermometer for an ultracold, thermal Rb cloud. Observing the thermometer atoms' thermalization with the cold gas using spatially resolved fluorescence detection, we find an interesting situation, where a fraction of thermometer atoms thermalizes with the cloud while the other fraction remains unaffected. We compare release-recapture measurements of the thermometer atoms to Monte Carlo simulations while correcting for the nonthermalized fraction, and recover the cold cloud's temperature. The temperatures obtained are verified by independent time-of-flight measurements of the cold cloud's temperature. We also check the reliability of our simulations first by numerically modeling the unperturbed in-trap motion of single atoms in the absence of the cold cloud, and second by performing release-recapture thermometry on the cold cloud itself. Our findings pave the way for local temperature probing of quantum systems in nonequilibrium situations.

  4. High data rate atom interferometric device

    DOEpatents

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash

    2015-07-21

    A light-pulse atomic interferometry (LPAI) apparatus is provided. The LPAI apparatus comprises a vessel, two sets of magnetic coils configured to magnetically confine an atomic vapor in two respective magneto-optical traps (MOTs) within the vessel when activated, and an optical system configured to irradiate the atomic vapor within the vessel with laser radiation that, when suitably tuned, can launch atoms previously confined in each of the MOTs toward the other MOT. In embodiments, the magnetic coils are configured to produce a magnetic field that is non-zero at the midpoint between the traps. In embodiments, the time-of-flight of the launched atoms from one MOT to the other is 12 ms or less. In embodiments, the MOTs are situated approximately 36 mm apart. In embodiments, the apparatus is configured to activate the magnetic coils according to a particular temporal magnetic field gradient profile.

  5. Magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D.; Sokolov, A.; Chebakov, K.; Akimov, A.; Kanorsky, S.; Kolachevsky, N.; Sorokin, V.

    2010-07-15

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to 7x10{sup 4} atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40-cm-long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the magneto-optical trap which varies between 0.3 and 1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s{sup -1}. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  6. Friction and Wear on the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Bennewitz, Roland; Pfeiffer, Oliver; Socoliuc, Anisoara; Meyer, Ernst

    Friction is an old subject of research: the empirical da Vinci-Amontons laws are common knowledge. Macroscopic experiments systematically performed by the school of Bowden and Tabor have revealed that macroscopic friction can be related to the collective action of small asperities. During the last 15 years, experiments performed with the atomic force microscope gave new insight into the physics of single asperities sliding over surfaces. This development, together with complementary experiments by means of surface force apparatus and quartz microbalance, established the new field of nanotribology. At the same time, increasing computing power allowed for the simulation of the processes in sliding contacts consisting of several hundred atoms. It became clear that atomic processes cannot be neglected in the interpretation of nanotribology experiments. Experiments on even well-defined surfaces directly revealed atomic structures in friction forces. This chapter will describe friction force microscopy experiments that reveal, more or less directly, atomic processes in the sliding contact.

  7. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  8. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  9. Atom optics with standing wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jayson Leonard

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation explores the spatial patterns that evolve dynamically in atomic clouds and beams after they interact with one or more standing wave fields, typically formed by laser beams. The main systems under study are ensembles of free atoms, but a model Bose-Einstein condensate and the harmonic oscillator are considered as well. Focused atomic patterns with features much smaller than the wave length of the light fields are possible owing to the nonlinear atom-field interaction and are emphasized. The quantitative results combine numerical simulations and analytical expressions. Computer algorithms were developed from known methods in partial differential equations to perform the numerical simulations. The analytical results relied on standard and newly contrived techniques in quantum physics. The analytical expressions were evaluated by computer in order to extract valuable quantitative information and to compare different analytical methods with one another and with the numerical simulations. The thesis is written as a self-contained piece, and as such, develops specific examples of atom-field configurations and atomic patterns of interest from a general theory of the atoms interacting with a spatially varying light field that influences the subsequent center-of-mass motion. Beyond those already published by our group and expanded upon in the thesis, significant advances are made in: the link between transient interactions in the time- and spatial-domains; an understanding of the Raman-Nath approximation, its range of validity, and its corrections; atomic focusing by pulsed adiabatic interactions between an atom and a single standing wave light field; the differences between classical and quantum free motion after periodic interactions; the distinctions between free motion after amplitude and phase gratings; harmonic oscillator ground states kicked by spatially varying pulses; and quasiperiodic echo effects. The general theoretical structure that was

  10. Intensification of liquid jet atomization through injection into the exit channel of the atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel'Fand, B. E.; Dranovskii, M. L.; Novikov, A. G.; Pikalov, V. P.

    The injection of a gas jet into the liquid flow at the exit of an atomizer nozzle, directly before the liquid is discharged into the ambient atmosphere, was investigated experimentally as a possible method of improving the quality of atomization. The atomizer used in the experiments had transparent side walls and a nozzle of rectangular (2 x 4 mm) cross section; the relative length of the nozzle was 1.5-1.6. It is shown that gas injection not only improves the quality of atomization but also makes it possible to lower the liquid supply pressure and to increase the atomizer nozzle diameter.

  11. Atom and Bond Fukui Functions and Matrices: A Hirshfeld-I Atoms-in-Molecule Approach.

    PubMed

    Oña, Ofelia B; De Clercq, Olivier; Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-09-19

    The Fukui function is often used in its atom-condensed form by isolating it from the molecular Fukui function using a chosen weight function for the atom in the molecule. Recently, Fukui functions and matrices for both atoms and bonds separately were introduced for semiempirical and ab initio levels of theory using Hückel and Mulliken atoms-in-molecule models. In this work, a double partitioning method of the Fukui matrix is proposed within the Hirshfeld-I atoms-in-molecule framework. Diagonalizing the resulting atomic and bond matrices gives eigenvalues and eigenvectors (Fukui orbitals) describing the reactivity of atoms and bonds. The Fukui function is the diagonal element of the Fukui matrix and may be resolved in atom and bond contributions. The extra information contained in the atom and bond resolution of the Fukui matrices and functions is highlighted. The effect of the choice of weight function arising from the Hirshfeld-I approach to obtain atom- and bond-condensed Fukui functions is studied. A comparison of the results with those generated by using the Mulliken atoms-in-molecule approach shows low correlation between the two partitioning schemes.

  12. Optimization of electrothermal atomization parameters for simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harnly, J.M.; Kane, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the acid matrix, the measurement mode (height or area), the atomizer surface (unpyrolyzed and pyrolyzed graphite), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the atomization temperature on the simultaneous electrothermal atomization of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn was examined. The 5% HNO3 matrix gave rise to severe irreproducibility using a pyrolyzed tube unless the tube was properly "prepared". The 5% HCl matrix did not exhibit this problem, and no problems were observed with either matrix using an unpyrolized tube or a pyrolyzed platform. The 5% HCl matrix gave better sensitivities with a pyrolyzed tube but the two matrices were comparable for atomization from a platform. If Mo and V are to be analyzed with the other seven elements, a high atomization temperature (2700??C or greater) is necessary regardless of the matrix, the measurement mode, the atomization mode, or the atomizer surface. Simultaneous detection limits (peak height with pyrolyzed tube atomization) were comparable to those of conventional atomic absorption spectrometry using electrothermal atomization above 280 nm. Accuracies and precisions of ??10-15% were found in the 10 to 120 ng mL-1 range for the analysis of NBS acidified water standards.

  13. Atom and Bond Fukui Functions and Matrices: A Hirshfeld-I Atoms-in-Molecule Approach.

    PubMed

    Oña, Ofelia B; De Clercq, Olivier; Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-09-19

    The Fukui function is often used in its atom-condensed form by isolating it from the molecular Fukui function using a chosen weight function for the atom in the molecule. Recently, Fukui functions and matrices for both atoms and bonds separately were introduced for semiempirical and ab initio levels of theory using Hückel and Mulliken atoms-in-molecule models. In this work, a double partitioning method of the Fukui matrix is proposed within the Hirshfeld-I atoms-in-molecule framework. Diagonalizing the resulting atomic and bond matrices gives eigenvalues and eigenvectors (Fukui orbitals) describing the reactivity of atoms and bonds. The Fukui function is the diagonal element of the Fukui matrix and may be resolved in atom and bond contributions. The extra information contained in the atom and bond resolution of the Fukui matrices and functions is highlighted. The effect of the choice of weight function arising from the Hirshfeld-I approach to obtain atom- and bond-condensed Fukui functions is studied. A comparison of the results with those generated by using the Mulliken atoms-in-molecule approach shows low correlation between the two partitioning schemes. PMID:27381271

  14. Multi-Atom Resonant Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alex; Yang, See-Hun; Garcia de Abajo, F. J.; Elke, Arenholz; Mun, Bongjin S.; Mannella, Norman; Zhao, Limin; Hussain, Zahid; van Hove, Michel; Fadley, Charles S.

    2001-03-01

    We will present experimental and theoretical results related to multi-atom resonant photoemission (MARPE) [1], in which the photoelectron intensity from a core level on one atom is influenced by a core-level absorption resonance on another. We will first point out that some prior experimental data [1-3] has been strongly influenced by non-linearities in the detector utilized [2], and that the effects seen in new corrected data are smaller, have a different form, and are strongly dependent on x-ray incidence angle. Data for the specific case of O 1s photoemission from MnO in resonance with Mn 2p excitations that are properly corrected for detector non-linearities data are found to be well described by an extension of resonant photoemission theory to the interatomic case [4], provided that interactions beyond the usual second-order Kramers-Heisenberg treatment are included. These higher-order interactions represent the equivalent of multiple resonant elastic scattering of the radiation. This microscopic theory is also found to simplify so as to yield results equivalent to a classical macroscopic x-ray optical approach, with the latter providing an alternative, although less detailed and general, physical picture of these effects. The relationship of these core-core resonant effects to similar effects seen in valence-core resonances [5-7], as well as in photoelectron angular distributions from a free molecule [8], and to x-ray fluorescence holography, will be discussed. Possible future applications of MARPE to studies of near-neighbor identities and bonding will also be suggested. [1] A. Kay, E. Arenholz, S. Mun, J. Garcia de Abajo, C.S. Fadley, R. Denecke, Z. Hussain, and M.A. Van Hove, Science 281, 679 (1998). [2] M.G. Garnier, N. Witkowski, R. Denecke, D. Nordlund, A. Nilsson, M. Nagasono, N. Mårtensson, and A. Föhlisch, Maxlab Annual Report for 1999 and private communication correcting this data for detector non-linearities. [3] A. Kikas, E. Nommiste, R. Ruus, A

  15. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  16. Light-induced atomic desorption in a compact system for ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D.; Smirne, Giuseppe; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of alkali atoms from the inner surface of a vacuum chamber has been employed in cold atom experiments for the purpose of modulating the alkali background vapour. This is beneficial because larger trapped atom samples can be loaded from vapour at higher pressure, after which the pressure is reduced to increase the lifetime of the sample. We present an analysis, based on the case of rubidium atoms adsorbed on pyrex, of various aspects of LIAD that are useful for this application. Firstly, we study the intensity dependence of LIAD by fitting the experimental data with a rate-equation model, from which we extract a correct prediction for the increase in trapped atom number. Following this, we quantify a figure of merit for the utility of LIAD in cold atom experiments and we show how it can be optimised for realistic experimental parameters. PMID:26458325

  17. Atomic-scale control of graphene magnetism by using hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    González-Herrero, Héctor; Gómez-Rodríguez, José M; Mallet, Pierre; Moaied, Mohamed; Palacios, Juan José; Salgado, Carlos; Ugeda, Miguel M; Veuillen, Jean-Yves; Yndurain, Félix; Brihuega, Iván

    2016-04-22

    Isolated hydrogen atoms absorbed on graphene are predicted to induce magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate that the adsorption of a single hydrogen atom on graphene induces a magnetic moment characterized by a ~20-millielectron volt spin-split state at the Fermi energy. Our scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments, complemented by first-principles calculations, show that such a spin-polarized state is essentially localized on the carbon sublattice opposite to the one where the hydrogen atom is chemisorbed. This atomically modulated spin texture, which extends several nanometers away from the hydrogen atom, drives the direct coupling between the magnetic moments at unusually long distances. By using the STM tip to manipulate hydrogen atoms with atomic precision, it is possible to tailor the magnetism of selected graphene regions.

  18. Single-atom Catalysis Using Pt/Graphene Achieved through Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuhui; Zhang, Gaixia; Gauquelin, Nicolas; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Yang, Songlan; Chen, Weifeng; Meng, Xiangbo; Geng, Dongsheng; Banis, Mohammad N.; Li, Ruying; Ye, Siyu; Knights, Shanna; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xueliang

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-nanoparticle-based catalysts are widely used in many important chemical processes and automobile industries. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their use efficiency, however, very challenging. Here we report a practical synthesis for isolated single Pt atoms anchored to graphene nanosheet using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. ALD offers the capability of precise control of catalyst size span from single atom, subnanometer cluster to nanoparticle. The single-atom catalysts exhibit significantly improved catalytic activity (up to 10 times) over that of the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses reveal that the low-coordination and partially unoccupied densities of states of 5d orbital of Pt atoms are responsible for the excellent performance. This work is anticipated to form the basis for the exploration of a next generation of highly efficient single-atom catalysts for various applications.

  19. Light-induced atomic desorption in a compact system for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Bruce, Graham D; Smirne, Giuseppe; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) of alkali atoms from the inner surface of a vacuum chamber has been employed in cold atom experiments for the purpose of modulating the alkali background vapour. This is beneficial because larger trapped atom samples can be loaded from vapour at higher pressure, after which the pressure is reduced to increase the lifetime of the sample. We present an analysis, based on the case of rubidium atoms adsorbed on pyrex, of various aspects of LIAD that are useful for this application. Firstly, we study the intensity dependence of LIAD by fitting the experimental data with a rate-equation model, from which we extract a correct prediction for the increase in trapped atom number. Following this, we quantify a figure of merit for the utility of LIAD in cold atom experiments and we show how it can be optimised for realistic experimental parameters. PMID:26458325

  20. Mechanical gate control for atom-by-atom cluster assembly with scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Hirayama, Naoki; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2014-07-11

    Nanoclusters supported on substrates are of great importance in physics and chemistry as well as in technical applications, such as single-electron transistors and nanocatalysts. The properties of nanoclusters differ significantly from those of either the constituent atoms or the bulk solid, and are highly sensitive to size and chemical composition. Here we propose a novel atom gating technique to assemble various atom clusters composed of a defined number of atoms at room temperature. The present gating operation is based on the transfer of single diffusing atoms among nanospaces governed by gates, which can be opened in response to the chemical interaction force with a scanning probe microscope tip. This method provides an alternative way to create pre-designed atom clusters with different chemical compositions and to evaluate their chemical stabilities, thus enabling investigation into the influence that a single dopant atom incorporated into the host clusters has on a given cluster stability.

  1. Life with Four Billion Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Thomas

    2013-04-10

    Today it is commonplace to design and construct single silicon chips with billions of transistors. These are complex systems, difficult (but possible) to design, test, and fabricate. Remarkably, simple living systems can be assembled from a similar number of atoms, most of them in water molecules. In this talk I will present the current status of our attempts at full understanding and complexity reduction of one of the simplest living systems, the free-living bacterial species Mesoplasma florum. This 400 nm diameter cell thrives and replicates every 40 minutes with a genome of only 800 kilobases. Our recent experiments using transposon gene knockouts identified 354 of 683 annotated genes as inessential in laboratory culture when inactivated individually. While a functional redesigned genome will certainly not remove all of those genes, this suggests that roughly half the genome can be removed in an intentional redesign. I will discuss our recent knockout results and methodology, and our future plans for Genome re-engineering using targeted knock-in/knock-out double recombination; whole cell metabolic models; comprehensive whole cell metabolite measurement techniques; creation of plug-and-play metabolic modules for the simplified organism; inherent and engineered biosafety control mechanisms. This redesign is part of a comprehensive plan to lay the foundations for a new discipline of engineering biology. Engineering biological systems requires a fundamentally different viewpoint from that taken by the science of biology. Key engineering principles of modularity, simplicity, separation of concerns, abstraction, flexibility, hierarchical design, isolation, and standardization are of critical importance. The essence of engineering is the ability to imagine, design, model, build, and characterize novel systems to achieve specific goals. Current tools and components for these tasks are primitive. Our approach is to create and distribute standard biological parts

  2. RADIOACTIVE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular elements has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass number to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of ''these constants'' for use in chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was most stable, i.e., it had the longest known half-life. In their 1973 report, the Commission noted that the users of the Atomic Weights Table were dissatisfied with the omission of values in the Table for some elements and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for elements. In their 1983 report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to

  3. Laser Technology in Commercial Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwak, R.

    2006-05-01

    Commercial atomic frequency standards (AFS) are deployed in diverse civilian, military, and aerospace applications, ranging from high-precision measurement and calibration to navigation, communications and, of course, timekeeping. Currently, commercially available AFS include magnetically-selected cesium beam frequency standards and hydrogen masers and lamp-pumped rubidium oscillators. Despite the revolution in atomic physics and laboratory-scale AFS brought about by the advent of the tunable laser in the early 1970s, commercial AFS invariably rely on more conventional atomic physics technology developed in the 1950s. The reason for this lack of advancement of commercial AFS technology is the relatively poor reliability and environmental sensitivity of narrow-linewidth single-mode laser sources at atomic resonance wavelengths. Over the past 8 years, Symmetricom, in collaboration with laser manufacturers, has developed specialized laser sources for commercial AFS applications. These laser devices, optimized for high spectral purity and long-term reliability, will enable a new generation of commercial AFS. This talk will briefly describe two laser-based atomic frequency standard development programs at Symmetricom. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock, two orders of magnitude smaller and lower power than any commercial AFS, will enable atomic timing accuracy in portable battery-powered applications. The Optically-Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard, under development for deployment onboard the GPS-III satellite constellation, will provide enhanced short-term stability and longer lifetime compared to magnetically-selected cesium beam AFS.

  4. Applicability of Rydberg atoms to quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, Igor I.; Tretyakov, Denis B.; Beterov, Ilya I.

    2005-01-01

    The applicability of Rydberg atoms to quantum computers is examined from an experimental point of view. In many recent theoretical proposals, the excitation of atoms into highly excited Rydberg states was considered as a way to achieve quantum entanglement in cold atomic ensembles via dipole-dipole interactions that could be strong for Rydberg atoms. Appropriate conditions to realize a conditional quantum phase gate have been analysed. We also present the results of modelling experiments on microwave spectroscopy of single- and multi-atom excitations at the one-photon 37S1/2 → 37P1/2 and two-photon 37S1/2 → 38S1/2 transitions in an ensemble of a few sodium Rydberg atoms. The microwave spectra were investigated for various final states of the ensemble initially prepared in its ground state. The results may be applied to the studies on collective laser excitation of ground-state atoms aiming to realize quantum gates.

  5. Gold coated nano gratings for atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonij, Vincent; Perreault, John; Kornilov, Oleg; Cronin, Alex

    2007-06-01

    The Van der Waals (VdW) interaction between neutral atoms is important to the dynamics of mechanical systems on nanometer scales. We used diffraction of sodium atoms from nano gratings to measure the Van der Waals potentials for atoms and different surfaces with improved precision. Atoms passing through the grating acquire an additional phase shift due to the attractive potential between the atoms and the grating bars, causing the diffraction pattern to be modified [1]. Previous measurements reported the VdW coefficient for sodium atoms and a silicon-nitride(SiNx) surface [2]. In our experiment we used a SiNx grating coated with a 2 nm layer of gold and we were able to measure a 40% increase in the VdW coefficient due to the gold. We also improved precision by combing results from the sodium diffraction experiment with results from a diffraction experiment with helium atoms on the same gratings. [1] R. E. Grisenti, W. Schollkopf, J. P. Toennies, G. C. Hegerfeldt, and T. Kohler. Phys. Rev. Lett., 83(9):1755, 1999. [2] J. D. Perreault, A. D. Cronin, and T. A. Savas. Phys. Rev. A, 71(5):053612, 2005.

  6. Squeezing of Spin Waves in Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragiola, Ben; Norris, Leigh; Montano, Enrique; Michelson, Pascal; Jessen, Poul; Deutsch, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    Squeezing the collective spin of an atomic ensemble via QND measurement is based on the lighhift interaction between a cloud of atoms and a laser probe. When the shot noise resolution of the laser probe is below the projection noise of the atoms, the resulting backaction can reduce the uncertainty for a collective atomic observable. Most current models of this process rely on idealized one-dimensional plane wave approximations of the underlying light-matter interaction, which are not appropriate for describing a real system consisting of an atomic cloud in dipole trap interacting with a paraxial probe laser. We derive from first principles a model for three-dimensional QND spin squeezing of an ensemble of alkali atoms. The model includes spin waves, diffraction, propagation phase, paraxial modes, and optical pumping, based on a full master equation description. Our model easily generalizes to atoms with hyperfine spin f >1/2, for which initial state preparation of the ensemble using internal hyperfine control can enhance the entangling power of the Faraday interaction [Norris et al., PRL 109, 173603 (2012)]. Including dissipative dynamics, we find optimal geometries to maximize spin squeezing for a variety of state preparations and spin sizes.

  7. Atomic oxygen exposure of LDEF experiment trays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Atomic oxygen exposures were determined analytically for rows, longerons, and end bays of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The calculations are based on an analytical model that accounts for the effects of thermal molecular velocity, atmospheric temperature, number density, spacecraft velocity, incidence angle, and atmospheric rotation on atomic oxygen flux. Results incorporate variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and orbital parameters occurring over the 6-year flight of the spacecraft. To facilitate use of the data, both detailed tabulations and summary charts for atomic oxygen fluences are presented.

  8. An atomic symmetry-controlled thermal switch.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Daniel; Kyoseva, Elica

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple diatomic system trapped inside an optical cavity to control the energy flow between two thermal baths. Through the action of the baths the system is driven to a non-equilibrium steady state. Using the Large Deviation theory we show that the number of photons flowing between the two baths is dramatically different depending on the symmetry of the atomic states. Here we present a deterministic scheme to prepare symmetric and antisymmetric atomic states with the use of external driving fields, thus implementing an atomic control switch for the energy flow. PMID:27503552

  9. Diffraction-contrast imaging of cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, L. D.; Domen, K. F. E. M.; Scholten, R. E.

    2005-09-01

    We consider the inverse problem of in-line holography, applied to minimally destructive imaging of cold atom clouds. Absorption imaging near resonance provides a simple, but destructive measurement of atom column density. Imaging off resonance greatly reduces heating, and sequential images may be taken. Under the conditions required for off-resonant imaging, the generally intractable inverse problem may be linearized. A minimally destructive, quantitative and high-resolution image of the atom cloud column density is then retrieved from a single diffraction pattern.

  10. 1982 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1982. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  11. The Manhattan Project: Making the atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, F.G.

    1994-09-01

    This article is a short history of the origins and development of the American atomic bomb program during World War II. Beginning with the scientific developments of the pre-war years, the monograph details the role of US government in conducting a secret, nationwide enterprise that took science from the laboratory and into combat with an entirely new type of weapon. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the immediate postwar period, the debate over the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, and the founding of the Atomic Energy Commission.

  12. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  13. Quantum Trapping of Atoms in Optical Molasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takusagawa, Kimie

    1992-10-01

    The force acting on a two-level atom in a low -intensity standing laser wave is calculated. On account of this force, atoms can be trapped at the loops (antinodes) of the field. By quantizing the atomic motion near the bottom of the sinusoidal potential, we have studied the atomic behavior when they are trapped in bound states as well as when they are in the free state. Laser cooling of neutral atoms was first suggested by T. Hansh and A. Schawlow in 1975. The principle involves the Doppler effect in a detuned laser beam. The absorption rate of a photon depends on the apparent frequency of the photon that is shifted omega v/c from omega, where omega is the frequency of the laser, v is the velocity of the atom, and c is the velocity of light. For a single laser beam detuned slightly below an atomic resonance frequency, the apparent frequency for atoms moving toward the laser is closer to resonance, which causes a higher absorption rate. And these atoms lose momentum when they absorb a photon from the beam. The velocity of atoms can be decreased from 10^5 cm/sec, the velocity they have when they escape from an oven, to 10^2 cm/sec (about 1mK) by a laser beam. For further cooling, counterpropagating beams are necessary. In this study we propose a new mechanism for supercooling, that is, cooling well below the Doppler cooling limit. Within a standing laser wave there exists a force called a "dipole force", which has a sinusoidal spatial dependence. Once atoms are trapped by the potential, their motion around the minimum of the potential well is that of a simple harmonic oscillator. Restricting our attention to the two lowest quantized states, we calculate transition rates between free states and bound states, from which the average residence times in the bound states can be obtained. This first quantum treatment of an atom trapped in the sinusoidal potential is restricted to the one-dimensional case. Generalization to higher dimensions is left for future research.

  14. Plasticity of single-atom Pb junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Salgado, C.; Néel, N.; Palacios, J. J.; Kröger, J.

    2016-06-01

    A low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope was used to fabricate atomic contacts on Pb(111). Conductance characteristics of the junctions were simultaneously recorded with forming and subsequent breaking of the contacts. A pronounced hysteresis effect in conductance traces was observed from junctions comprising the clean Pb(111) surface. The hysteretic behavior was less profound in contacts to single Pb atoms adsorbed to Pb(111). Density-functional calculations reproduced the experimental results by performing a full ab initio modeling of plastic junction deformations. A comprehensive description of the experimental findings was achieved by considering different atomic tip apex geometries.

  15. Light scattering from a moving atom.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this work, scattering of an incident electric field from a moving atom is reexamined classically in two steps: the time-dependent current density created by the field inside the atom is first calculated under the electric-dipole approximation, and is then used to calculate the field scattered from the atom. Unlike the conventional frame-hopping method, the present method does not need to treat the Doppler effect as an effect separated from the scattering process, and it derives instead of simply uses the Doppler effect.

  16. 1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howald, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  17. Growth of diamond by atomic vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Satoshi; Inuzuka, Tadao; Sawabe, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    1990-01-01

    Diamond has been synthesized by a new vacuum deposition method called atomic vapor deposition (AVD). In AVD, most of the evaporated carbon is decomposed to atomic carbon. Diamond growth has been achieved on Si(100) surfaces using AVD at a substrate temperature of 800 C in a hydrogen atmosphere at 0.0002 torr. The average diamond crystalline size, as determined by TEM, is 2000 A with a number density of 2 x 10 to the 8th/sq cm. It is found that diamond can be deposited at low pressure by the deposition of atomic carbon with the aid of hydrogen.

  18. An atomic symmetry-controlled thermal switch.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Daniel; Kyoseva, Elica

    2016-08-09

    We propose a simple diatomic system trapped inside an optical cavity to control the energy flow between two thermal baths. Through the action of the baths the system is driven to a non-equilibrium steady state. Using the Large Deviation theory we show that the number of photons flowing between the two baths is dramatically different depending on the symmetry of the atomic states. Here we present a deterministic scheme to prepare symmetric and antisymmetric atomic states with the use of external driving fields, thus implementing an atomic control switch for the energy flow.

  19. Strong Interactions in Strange Exotic Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.

    2003-08-01

    Strong interaction level shifts and widths in - and K- atoms have been analyzed. The phenomenological density dependent approach as well as the relativistic mean field (RMF) model yield nucleus optical potentials with a repulsive real part in the nuclear interior. This has important consequences for the spectroscopy of hypernuclei. The study of K- atoms cannot resolve the depth of the K- nucleus potential. The fits to the kaonic atom data are satisfactory for both the relatively shallow potentials derived from chiral models and for the deep potentials based on the phenomenological and RMF analyses.

  20. Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1984-10-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1983. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  1. Thermal nonequilibrium in partially ionized atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A stationary, nonlinear collisional-radiative model for high-temperature atomic oxygen is presented. Populations of electrons, ions, and excited atoms and intensities of spectral, continuum, and dielectronic recombination lines are calculated in a wide range of conditions. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations for production of the electrons, ions, and excited atoms with the concept of the escape factors that are not constant but dependent upon plasma conditions. The calculated total continuum emission is in good agreement with existing measurements.

  2. Transport properties of ground state oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Paul M.; Biolsi, Louis

    1988-01-01

    The transport properties of dilute monatomic gases depend on the two-body interactions between like atoms. When two ground-state oxygen atoms interact, they can follow any of 18 potential energy curves corresponding to O2, all of which contribute to the transport properties of the ground-state atoms. Transport collision integrals have been calculated for those interactions with an attractive minimum in the potential, and repulsive ab initio potential-energy curves have been accurately represented. Results are given for viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion and they are compared with previous theoretical calculations.

  3. Atom-mirror entanglement via cavity dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingchao; Hu, Xiangming; Rao, Shi; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    We present a cavity dissipation scheme to prepare a hybrid system of an atomic ensemble and a moving mirror in squeezed and entangled states. This scheme is based on four-wave mixing in the atoms and radiation pressure on the mirror, both of which combine to lead to Bogoliubov interactions of the atoms and the mirror with the cavity fields. Under adiabatic conditions, the cavity fields cause the hybrid Bogoliubov modes to evolve into the vacuum states, which correspond to the two-mode squeezed and entangled states. The dependence of the hybrid entanglement on the system parameters is also presented in and beyond the Bogoliubov interactions.

  4. Detection of sputtered metastable atoms by autoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wucher, A.; Berthold, W.; Oechsner, H.; Franzreb, K.

    1994-03-01

    We report on a scheme for the detection of sputter-generated metastable atoms that is based on the resonant excitation of an autoionizing state by single-photon absorption from a tunable laser. Using this technique, sputtered silver atoms ejected in the metastable 4{ital d}{sup 9}5{ital s}{sup 2}{ital D}{sub 5/2} state with an excitation energy of 3.75 eV have been detected. This represents the highest excitation energy of sputtered metastable atoms observed so far.

  5. An atomic symmetry-controlled thermal switch

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Daniel; Kyoseva, Elica

    2016-01-01

    We propose a simple diatomic system trapped inside an optical cavity to control the energy flow between two thermal baths. Through the action of the baths the system is driven to a non-equilibrium steady state. Using the Large Deviation theory we show that the number of photons flowing between the two baths is dramatically different depending on the symmetry of the atomic states. Here we present a deterministic scheme to prepare symmetric and antisymmetric atomic states with the use of external driving fields, thus implementing an atomic control switch for the energy flow. PMID:27503552

  6. Cold Light from Hot Atoms and Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, Graeme; Curry, John J.

    2011-05-11

    The introduction of rare earth atoms and molecules into lighting discharges led to great advances in efficacy of these lamps. Atoms such as Dy, Ho and Ce provide excellent radiation sources for lighting applications, with rich visible spectra, such that a suitable combination of these elements can provide high quality white light. Rare earth molecules have also proved important in enhancing the radiation spectrum from phosphors in fluorescent lamps. This paper reviews some of the current aspects of lighting research, particularly rare earth chemistry and radiation, and the associated fundamental atomic and molecular data.

  7. Atom trapping with a thin magnetic film

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Micah; Streed, Erik W.; Medley, Patrick; Campbell, Gretchen K.; Mun, Jongchul; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David E.

    2007-10-15

    We have created a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate in a magnetic trapping potential produced by a hard disk platter written with a periodic pattern. Cold atoms were loaded from an optical dipole trap and then cooled to Bose-Einstein condensation on the surface with radio-frequency evaporation. Fragmentation of the atomic cloud due to imperfections in the magnetic structure was observed at distances closer than 40 {mu}m from the surface. Attempts to use the disk as an atom mirror showed dispersive effects after reflection.

  8. On-line atomic data access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David R.; Nash, Jeffrey K.

    1996-07-01

    The need for atomic data is one which continues to expand in a wide variety of applications including fusion energy, astrophysics, laser-produced plasma research, and plasma processing. Modern computer database and communications technology enables this data to be placed on-line and obtained by users over the INTERNET. Presented here is a summary of the observations and conclusions regarding such on-line atomic data access derived from a forum held at the Tenth APS Topical Conference on Atomic Processes in Plasmas.

  9. Spacecraft thermal energy accommodation from atomic recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, Karen L.; Marinelli, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of atomic recombination probabilities important in determining energy release to reusable spacecraft thermal protection surfaces during reentry are presented. An experimental apparatus constructed to examine recombination of atomic oxygen from thermal protection and reference materials at reentry temperatures is described. The materials are examined under ultrahigh vacuum conditions to develop and maintain well characterized surface conditions that are free of contamination. When compared with stagnation point heat transfer measurements performed in arc jet facilities, these measurements indicate that a significant fraction of the excess energy available from atom recombination is removed from the surface as metastable O2.

  10. Prediction of instabilities at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delph, T. J.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic-scale instabilities, in which atomic bonds are broken and reform as the body shifts into a lower-energy configuration, are responsible for a wide range of material behaviours of interest. Building upon previous work, we outline here the construction of a criterion for the prediction of such instabilities. The criterion is implemented within the context of the well-known embedded atom method family of interatomic potentials. We present two examples of the application of this criterion: oriented cavitation in an FCC crystal due to uniform triaxial stretching and dislocation nucleation due to nanoindentation of the (0 0 1) face of an FCC crystal.

  11. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  12. Calculation of Atomic Data for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Korista, K. T.; Fu, J.; Nikolic, D.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Dumitriu, I.; Badnell, N. R.; Savin, D. W.; Manson, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    The interpretation of cosmic spectra relies on a vast sea of atomic data which are not readily obtainable from analytic expressions or simple calculations. Rather, their evaluation typically requires state-of-the-art atomic physics calculations, with the inclusion of weaker effects (spin-orbit and configuration interactions, relaxation, Auger broadening, etc.), to achieve the level of accuracy needed for use by astrophysicists. Our NASA-supported research program is focused on calculating data for three important atomic processes, 1) dielectronic recombination (DR), 2) inner-shell photoabsorption, and 3) fluorescence and Auger decay of inner-shell vacancy states. Some additional details and examples of our recent findings are given.

  13. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.

    1985-04-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  14. The H-atom resource on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, B. C.

    The hydrogen atom is considered to be the key to the chemical manufacturing and the agricultural endeavors to be undertaken on the surface of Mars. The only apparent abundant supply of H-atoms on Mars is the oxidized form, H2O. Water may be obtained at various penalties on the limited energy resources, depending on the source from which it is extracted atmospheric vapor, soil minerals, soil ice, or polar cap block ice. H-atoms may be stockpiled in several forms, e.g., H2O ice, food molecules, and chemical hydrides.

  15. Light scattering from a moving atom.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this work, scattering of an incident electric field from a moving atom is reexamined classically in two steps: the time-dependent current density created by the field inside the atom is first calculated under the electric-dipole approximation, and is then used to calculate the field scattered from the atom. Unlike the conventional frame-hopping method, the present method does not need to treat the Doppler effect as an effect separated from the scattering process, and it derives instead of simply uses the Doppler effect. PMID:23455906

  16. An atomic symmetry-controlled thermal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Kyoseva, Elica

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple diatomic system trapped inside an optical cavity to control the energy flow between two thermal baths. Through the action of the baths the system is driven to a non-equilibrium steady state. Using the Large Deviation theory we show that the number of photons flowing between the two baths is dramatically different depending on the symmetry of the atomic states. Here we present a deterministic scheme to prepare symmetric and antisymmetric atomic states with the use of external driving fields, thus implementing an atomic control switch for the energy flow.

  17. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  18. AMO Database in KAERI and Atomic Structure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Yongjoo; Park, H. M.; Kwon, D. H.

    2005-05-01

    Atomic spectroscopy studies carried out at the Laboratory for Quantum Optics in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are introduced together with the AMO (Atomic, Molecular, and Optical) database established based upon those studies.

  19. Prospects of laser cooling in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Isaac; Chen, Tzu-Ling; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Lien, Yu-Hung; Liu, Yi-Wei; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-10-15

    One of the most precisely determined upper limits for the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) is set by the thallium (Tl) atomic beam experiment. One way to enhance the sensitivity of the atomic beam setup is to laser cool the Tl atoms to reduce the EDM-like phase caused by the Exv effect. In this report, a cooling scheme based on the 6P{sub 3/2}(F=2){r_reversible}6D{sub 5/2}(F{sup '}=3) transition in Tl is proposed. The absolute frequency measurement of this nearly closed-cycle transition was performed in an atomic beam apparatus. Two Ti:sapphire lasers were frequency-doubled using enhancement cavities in X-type configurations to provide the needed 377- and 352-nm light sources for the optical pumping and cooling transitions, respectively. The absolute frequency of this cooling transition is determined to be 851 634 646(56) MHz.

  20. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421