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Sample records for pigment production antibiotic

  1. Functional analysis of SGR4635-induced enhancement of pigmented antibiotic production in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Chi, Won-Jae; Lee, Soon-Youl; Lee, Jaehag

    2011-10-01

    The Gram-positive mycelium-producing bacterium Streptomyces undergoes complex morphological differentiation after autolytic degradation of the vegetative mycelium. Cell-wall breakdown during growth stimulates cell development and secondary metabolite production by Streptomyces. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) produced by cell-wall lysis acts as a signal molecule, triggering the production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor A3(2). Here, we report that introduction of multiple copies of the GlcNAc-internalizing gene (sgr4635, encoding nagE2) of S. griseus activates actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production during the late growth of S. lividans in the absence of GlcNAc. Furthermore, the repressor-type transcriptional regulator DasR binds to two operator sites upstream of sgr4635. Our findings indicate that sgr4635 induces DasR-mediated antibiotic production by internalizing the GlcNAc accumulated from cell-wall lysis.

  2. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  3. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  4. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  5. Identification of an anthraquinone pigment and a hydroxystilbene antibiotic from Xenorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, W H; Schmidt, T M; Nealson, K H

    1988-01-01

    The entomopathogenic bacterium Xenorhabdus luminescens produces a red pigment and an antibiotic in insect carcasses in which it grows and in axenic cultures. The pigment was purified and identified as the anthraquinone derivative 1,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-9,10-anthraquinone, which exhibits a pH-sensitive color change, i.e., it is yellow below pH 9 and red above pH 9. The antibiotic was also purified and identified as the hydroxystilbene derivative 3,5-dihydroxy-4-isopropylstilbene. PMID:3415225

  6. Antibiotics: natural products essential to human health.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2009-11-01

    For more than 50 years, natural products have served us well in combating infectious bacteria and fungi. Microbial and plant secondary metabolites helped to double our life span during the 20th century, reduced pain and suffering, and revolutionized medicine. Most antibiotics are either (i) natural products of microorganisms, (ii) semi-synthetically produced from natural products, or (iii) chemically synthesized based on the structure of the natural products. Production of antibiotics began with penicillin in the late 1940s and proceeded with great success until the 1970-1980s when it became harder and harder to discover new and useful products. Furthermore, resistance development in pathogens became a major problem, which is still with us today. In addition, new pathogens are continually emerging and there are still bacteria that are not eliminated by any antibiotic, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to these problems, many of the major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned the antibiotic field, leaving much of the discovery efforts to small companies, new companies, and the biotechnology industries. Despite these problems, development of new antibiotics has continued, albeit at a much lower pace than in the last century. We have seen the (i) appearance of newly discovered antibiotics (e.g., candins), (ii) development of old but unutilized antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), (iii) production of new semi-synthetic versions of old antibiotics (e.g., glycylcyclines, streptogrammins), as well as the (iv) very useful application of old but underutilized antibiotics (e.g., teicoplanin).

  7. Violacein: Properties and Production of a Versatile Bacterial Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Yeol; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Lee, Jin Il; Mitchell, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Violacein-producing bacteria, with their striking purple hues, have undoubtedly piqued the curiosity of scientists since their first discovery. The bisindole violacein is formed by the condensation of two tryptophan molecules through the action of five proteins. The genes required for its production, vioABCDE, and the regulatory mechanisms employed have been studied within a small number of violacein-producing strains. As a compound, violacein is known to have diverse biological activities, including being an anticancer agent and being an antibiotic against Staphylococcus aureus and other Gram-positive pathogens. Identifying the biological roles of this pigmented molecule is of particular interest, and understanding violacein's function and mechanism of action has relevance to those unmasking any of its commercial or therapeutic benefits. Unfortunately, the production of violacein and its related derivatives is not easy and so various groups are also seeking to improve the fermentative yields of violacein through genetic engineering and synthetic biology. This review discusses the recent trends in the research and production of violacein by both natural and genetically modified bacterial strains. PMID:26339614

  8. Phototrophic pigment production with microalgae: biological constraints and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Kim J M; Lamers, Packo P; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing interest in naturally produced colorants, and microalgae represent a bio-technologically interesting source due to their wide range of colored pigments, including chlorophylls (green), carotenoids (red, orange and yellow), and phycobiliproteins (red and blue). However, the concentration of these pigments, under optimal growth conditions, is often too low to make microalgal-based pigment production economically feasible. In some Chlorophyta (green algae), specific process conditions such as oversaturating light intensities or a high salt concentration induce the overproduction of secondary carotenoids (β-carotene in Dunaliella salina (Dunal) Teodoresco and astaxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow)). Overproduction of all other pigments (including lutein, fucoxanthin, and phycocyanin) requires modification in gene expression or enzyme activity, most likely combined with the creation of storage space outside of the photosystems. The success of such modification strategies depends on an adequate understanding of the metabolic pathways and the functional roles of all the pigments involved. In this review, the distribution of commercially interesting pigments across the most common microalgal groups, the roles of these pigments in vivo and their biosynthesis routes are reviewed, and constraints and opportunities for overproduction of both primary and secondary pigments are presented.

  9. Precipitated green pigments: products of chromate postgalvanic waste utilization.

    PubMed

    Krysztafkiewicz, Andrzej; Klapiszewska, Beata; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2008-10-01

    The paper reports on obtaining highly dispersed chromium(III) silicates and chromium(III) oxides from postchromating waste by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) with hydrazine as a reducing agent. Chromium(III) salt solution and sodium silicate or hydroxide solutions have been used to precipitate green pigments (silicates and oxides). The effect of the precipitation parameters on the quality of green pigments obtained has been studied, and the optimum parameters ensuring getting the product of well-developed surface area and possibly lowest diameter of primary particles have been established. The precipitated silicates and oxides have been subjected to physicochemical analysis to determine bulk density; capacities to absorb water, dibutyl phthalate, and paraffin oil; particles size; particle size distribution; and surface morphology of chromium pigment surfaces. The adsorptive properties of the oxide and silicate pigments have also been examined. The XRD analysis documented that the chromium(III) silicate pigments obtained are amorphous. In addition, the pigments have been subjected to a colorimetric appraisal using the CIE L*a*b* color space system. The high-quality green pigments obtained have shown high dispersion, small tendency to agglomerate formation, and repeatable green hue. The parameters of the products are promising for their future technological use.

  10. Production and chemical characterization of pigments in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Souza, Patrícia Nirlane da Costa; Grigoletto, Tahuana Luiza Bim; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Abreu, Lucas M; Guimarães, Luís Henrique Souza; Santos, Cledir; Galvão, Luciano Ribeiro; Cardoso, Patrícia Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Production of pigments by filamentous fungi is gaining interest owing to their use as food colourants, in cosmetics and textiles, and because of the important biological activities of these compounds. In this context, the objectives of this study were to select pigment-producing fungi, identify these fungi based on internal transcribed spacer sequences, evaluate the growth and pigment production of the selected strains on four different media, and characterize the major coloured metabolites in their extracts. Of the selected fungal strains, eight were identified as Aspergillus sydowii (CML2967), Aspergillus aureolatus (CML2964), Aspergillus keveii (CML2968), Penicillium flavigenum (CML2965), Penicillium chermesinum (CML2966), Epicoccum nigrum (CML2971), Lecanicillium aphanocladii (CML2970) and Fusarium sp. (CML2969). Fungal pigment production was influenced by medium composition. Complex media, such as potato dextrose and malt extract, favoured increased pigment production. The coloured compounds oosporein, orevactaene and dihydrotrichodimerol were identified in extracts of L. aphanocladii (CML2970), E. nigrum (CML2971), and P. flavigenum (CML2965), respectively. These results indicate that the selected fungal strains can serve as novel sources of pigments that have important industrial applications.

  11. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  12. Protocol optimization for enhanced production of pigments in Spirulina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devendra; Kumar, Neeraj; Pabbi, Sunil; Walia, Suresh; Dhar, Dolly Wattal

    2013-01-01

    Spirulina has attracted special attention due to its importance as human foodstuff and natural colours with specific functional properties. These functional properties have been attributed to phycobilins, carotenoids, phenolics and unsaturated fatty acids. Present study was conducted under controlled phytotron conditions to identify the efficient strains of Spirulina in terms of pigment synthesis and to optimize their enhanced production. Methodology for enhanced production was standardized by varying specific environmental parameters (light intensity, temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, pH and NaCl level). Different strains of Spirulina depicted variability and environmental parameters showed distinct influence on pigments. Growth and pigment production was recorded to be most efficient under optimized conditions of light intensity (70 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (30 °C), CO2 concentration (550 ppm and 750 ppm), pH (10.5) and NaCl level (2 g L(-1)). PMID:24764599

  13. Pigment production in Spirulina fussiformis in different photophysical conditions.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, H K; Vatsala, T M

    2007-09-01

    The present investigation makes a comparative investigation of individual light source on the different commercially important pigments in Spirulina fussiformis in photobioreactor culture condition. Continuous culture system was carried out throughout the experimental condition. Initially, seed culture, corresponding to 0.2 g/L on dry weight basis was cultivated in Zarrouks medium with different colored light source in reactor. Maximum daily biomass productivity, 0.8 g/L, 0.75 g/L and 0.69 g/L in white light (WL), blue light (BL) and green light (GL), respectively, conditions was noticed. Pigment content during WL treatment showed the highest accumulation (5.5 microg/mL) of chlorophyll whereas, other pigments roughly remained constant without much change, implying WL intensity is better for chlorophyll synthesis. On the other hand, chlorophyll and phycocyanin content gradually increased up to 7 microg/mL and 2 mg/mL, respectively, at BL intensity. The response to GL was negative to all pigments studied except for phycocyanin; in this case a highest production (2.5 mg/mL) was seen during 18 days experimental period. Additionally, when yellow light (YL) treatment experiments were conducted, the rate of production gradually decreased from 6th day onward in all pigments demonstrating the photobleaching effect of YL. The average rate of pigments production did not show significant accumulation in red light (RL) light treatment except phycoerythrin which showed an increasing trend of production. It is worth to mention here that higher light intensity is better for production of phycocyanin and phycoerythrin in Spirulina.

  14. Understanding and manipulating antibiotic production in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Mervyn J

    2013-12-01

    Actinomycetes are prolific producers of natural products with a wide range of biological activities. Many of the compounds that they make (and derivatives thereof) are used extensively in medicine, most notably as clinically important antibiotics, and in agriculture. Moreover, these organisms remain a source of novel and potentially useful molecules, but maximizing their biosynthetic potential requires a better understanding of natural product biosynthesis. Recent developments in genome sequencing have greatly facilitated the identification of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. In the present article, I summarize the recent contributions of our laboratory in applying genomic technologies to better understand and manipulate natural product biosynthesis in a range of different actinomycetes.

  15. Physics and the production of antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    This article is the first in a series that describe some of the physics involved in the production of antibiotics. The field is often referred to as biochemical engineering but this does not indicate the considerable part played by physics and physicists. It is a process that undergoes continual research and development. Penicillin has been selected for the focus of this article, although the engineering principles and underlying physics apply to the production of other microbial products such as amino acids (which can be used as food additives), bulk chemicals such as ethanol (used in everything from hair spray and aftershave to solvents for paints and explosives) and the well-known processes of brewing and baking. In this article the application of physics to the design of the fermenter—the giant vessel in which the production of these products occurs—is discussed.

  16. 40 CFR 415.640 - Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. 415.640 Section 415.640 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.640 Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  17. 40 CFR 415.340 - Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chrome pigments production subcategory. 415.340 Section 415.340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.340 Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  18. 40 CFR 415.640 - Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. 415.640 Section 415.640 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.640 Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  19. 40 CFR 415.340 - Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chrome pigments production subcategory. 415.340 Section 415.340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.340 Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  20. 40 CFR 415.640 - Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. 415.640 Section 415.640 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.640 Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  1. 40 CFR 415.340 - Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chrome pigments production subcategory. 415.340 Section 415.340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.340 Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  2. 40 CFR 415.340 - Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chrome pigments production subcategory. 415.340 Section 415.340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.340 Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  3. 40 CFR 415.640 - Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. 415.640 Section 415.640 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.640 Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  4. 40 CFR 415.340 - Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chrome pigments production subcategory. 415.340 Section 415.340 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Chrome Pigments Production Subcategory § 415.340 Applicability; description of the chrome pigments production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  5. 40 CFR 415.640 - Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. 415.640 Section 415.640 Protection of Environment... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cadmium Pigments and Salts Production Subcategory § 415.640 Applicability; description of the cadmium pigments and salts production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  6. Effect of light on growth, intracellular and extracellular pigment production by five pigment-producing filamentous fungi in synthetic medium.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Palanivel; Lee, Yong Hoon; Venil, Chidambaram Kulandaisamy; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, Perumalsamy; Chae, Jong-Chan; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The competence of the living creatures to sense and respond to light is well known. The effect of darkness and different color light quality on biomass, extracellular and intracellular pigment yield of five potent pigment producers Monascus purpureus, Isaria farinosa, Emericella nidulans, Fusarium verticillioides and Penicillium purpurogenum, with different color shades such as red, pink, reddish brown and yellow, were investigated. Incubation in total darkness increased the biomass, extracellular and intracellular pigment production in all the fungi. Extracellular red pigment produced by M. purpureus resulted maximum in darkness 36.75 + or - 2.1 OD and minimum in white unscreened light 5.90 + or - 1.1 OD. Similarly, intracellular red pigment produced by M. purpureus resulted maximum in darkness 18.27 + or - 0.9 OD/g and minimum in yellow light 8.03 + or - 0.6 OD/g of substrate. The maximum biomass production was also noticed in darkness 2.51 g/L and minimum in yellow light 0.5 g/L of dry weight. In contrast, growth of fungi in green and yellow wavelengths resulted in low biomass and pigment yield. It was found that darkness, (red 780-622 nm, blue 492-455 nm) and white light influenced pigment and biomass yield. PMID:20226375

  7. CONTROL OF PIGMENT PRODUCTION IN MOUSE MELANOMA CELLS IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Silagi, Selma

    1969-01-01

    A clonally derived amelanotic melanoma cell line repeatedly has been forced to produce pigment by the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, I-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) at sublethal levels. One ara-C-derived melanotic line has been cloned, and has continued to produce pigment for 2 years on normal medium. The inhibitor is most effective when administered to synchronized cells in four pulses on successive days at 1.8 x 10-5 M during the S phase of the cell cycle. Colcemid at a sublethal concentration, and growth on medium solidified with agar also evoked pigment production in this line, but a large number of other inhibitors of biosynthetic processes did not, under the conditions tested. The melanotic lines are active producers of tyrosinase (DOPA oxidase), whereas the amelanotic line produces an inhibitor of tyrosinase activity. Both enzyme and inhibitor are labile at 4° C and -20° C, and decay of the inhibitor in homogenates of amelanotic cells reveals a low level of residual DOPA oxidase activity. The mean population doubling time of a cloned melanotic line is 23 hr, and that of a cloned amelanotic line 16.5 hr. A similar decrease in rate of growth is found in other melanotic lines and is believed to be a significant factor in maintaining this differentiated function. Rapid growth may be related to the production of an inhibitor by the amelanotic cells. PMID:4981070

  8. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives. PMID:25743421

  9. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives.

  10. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  11. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  12. Ultraviolet radiation directly induces pigment production by cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, P.S.; Gilchrest, B.A.

    1987-10-01

    In humans the major stimulus for cutaneous pigmentation is ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Little is known about the mechanism underlying this response, in part because of the complexity of interactions in whole epidermis. Using a recently developed culture system, human melanocytes were exposed daily to a physiologic range of UVR doses from a solar simulator. Responses were determined 24 hours after the last exposure. There was a dose-related increase in melanin content per cell and uptake of /sup 14/C-DOPA, accompanied by growth inhibition. Cells from donors of different racial origin gave proportionately similar increases in melanin, although there were approximately tenfold differences in basal values. Light and electron microscopy revealed UVR-stimulated increases in dendricity as well as melanosome number and degree of melanization, analogous to the well-recognized melanocyte changes following sun exposure of intact skin. Similar responses were seen with Cloudman S91 melanoma cells, although this murine cell line required lower UVR dosages and fewer exposures for maximal stimulation. These data establish that UVR is capable of directly stimulating melanogenesis. Because cyclic AMP elevation has been associated in some settings with increased pigment production by cultured melanocytes, preliminary experiments were conducted to see if the effects of UVR were mediated by cAMP. Both alpha-MSH and isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), as positive controls, caused a fourfold increase in cAMP level in human melanocytes and/or S91 cells, but following a dose of UVR sufficient to stimulate pigment production there was no change in cAMP level up to 4 hours after exposure. Thus, it appears that the UVR-induced melanogenesis is mediated by cAMP-independent mechanisms.

  13. Pigment Production on L-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  14. Pigment production on L-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Cammer, Michael; Nieves, Edward; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years strains previously grouped within Cryptococcus neoformans have been divided into two species C. neoformans and C. gattii, with Cryptococcus neoformans comprising serotypes A, D, and AD and C. gattii comprising serotypes B and C. Cryptococcus neoformans have also been subdivided into two varieties C. neoformans var. grubii, serotype A, and C. neoformans var. neoformans, serotype D. We analyzed the growth and pigment production characteristics of 139 strains of Cryptococcus spp. in L-tryptophan containing media. Nearly all strains of Cryptococcus, including each variety and serotype tested produced a pink water-soluble pigment (molecular weight of 535.2 Da) from L-tryptophan. Consequently, the partial separation of the species was based on whether the pink pigment was secreted into the medium (extracellular) or retained as an intracellular pigment. On L-tryptophan medium C. neoformans var. grubii and serotype AD produced a pink extracellular pigment. In contrast, for C. gattii, the pink pigment was localized intracellularly and masked by heavy production of brown pigments. Pigment production by C. neoformans var. neoformans was variable with some strains producing the pink extracellular pigment and others retained the pink pigment intracellularly. The pink intracellular pigment produced by strains of C. neoformans var. neoformans was masked by production of brown pigments. Cryptococcus laccase mutants failed to produce pigments from L-tryptophan. This is the first report that the enzyme laccase is involved in tryptophan metabolism. Prior to this report Cryptococcus laccase produced melanin or melanin like-pigments from heterocyclic compounds that contained ortho or para diphenols, diaminobenzenes and aminophenol compounds. The pigments produced from L-tryptophan were not melanin. PMID:24736553

  15. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  16. Gene transfer and transposition mutagenesis in Streptomyces roseosporus: mapping of insertions that influence daptomycin or pigment production.

    PubMed

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1996-09-01

    Streptomyces reseosporus, the producer of the cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin, was shown to be a suitable host for molecular genetic manipulation. S. roseosporus does not appear to express significant restriction barriers based upon bacteriophage plaque formation studies. Plasmid DNA can be introduced into S. roseosporus by bacteriophage-FP43-mediated transduction and by conjugation from Escherichia coli. The streptomycete transposons Tn5096 and Tn5099, derived from IS493, transpose in S. roseosporus, and Tn5099-induced transposition mutants altered in the production of daptomycin, red pigment or black pigment were identified, and mapped to Dral and Asnl fragments. Three auxotrophic mutations (argB1, ade-1 and metB1) were identified among 100 individual Tn5096 insertions. Alignment and physical mapping of several Tn5099 insertions in Dral-E and Asnl-B fragments was facilitated by the presence of Dral and Asnl cleavage sites in Tn5099.

  17. Efforts to slacken antibiotic resistance: Labeling meat products from animals raised without antibiotics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J

    2016-09-01

    As bacteria and diseases spread due to climatic change, greater amounts of antibiotics will be used thereby exacerbating the problem of antibiotic resistance. To help slacken the development of resistant bacteria, the medical community is attempting to reduce unnecessary and excessive usage of antibiotics. One of the targets is the use of antibiotics for enhancing animal growth and promoting feed efficiency in the production of food animals. While governments can adopt regulations prohibiting nontherapeutic uses of antibiotics in food animals and strategies to reduce antibiotic usage, another idea is to publicize when antibiotics are used in food animal production by allowing labeled meat products. This paper builds upon existing labeling and marketing efforts in the United States to show how a government can develop a verified antibiotic-free labeling program that would allow consumers to purchase meat products from animals that had never received antibiotics. PMID:27236477

  18. Short communication: Rapid antibiotic screening tests detect antibiotic residues in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, J; Tsang, P C W; Townson, D H

    2010-09-01

    Rapid antibiotic screening tests are widely used in the dairy industry to monitor milk for the presence of antibiotic residues above regulated levels. Given the persistent concern over contamination of milk products with antibiotic residues, we investigated the utility of IDEXX Snap test devices (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, ME) as tools for detecting antibiotic residues in powdered milk products. Five powdered milk products were reconstituted according to manufacturer specification with distilled water: Carnation (Nestlé USA Inc., Solon, OH), Nido youth and Nido adult (Nestlé Mexico Inc., Mexico City, Mexico), ELK (Campina, Eindhoven, the Netherlands), and Regilait (Saint-Martin-Belle-Roche, France). Positive samples were generated by spiking reconstituted milk with penicillin G, cephapirin, or tetracycline to either the European Union-regulated maximum residue limit or the FDA-regulated safe/tolerance level, whichever was lower. Control, unspiked negative milk samples and positive samples were tested with appropriate IDEXX Snap test kits (penicillin G and cephapirin with New Beta-Lactam, tetracycline with New Tetracycline). All samples yielded definitive results consistent with expectations, and there were no instances of false-positive or false-negative readings. These results suggest that both the New Beta-Lactam and New Tetracycline IDEXX Snap test kits effectively detect antibiotic residues in commercially available powdered milk samples and are useful tools for monitoring antibiotic residues in reconstituted powdered milk products. PMID:20723670

  19. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Disposal § 268.20 Waste specific prohibitions—Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. (a) Effective August 23, 2005, the waste specified in 40 CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Waste Number K181, and soil...

  20. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Disposal § 268.20 Waste specific prohibitions—Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. (a) Effective August 23, 2005, the waste specified in 40 CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Waste Number K181, and soil...

  1. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Disposal § 268.20 Waste specific prohibitions—Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. (a) Effective August 23, 2005, the waste specified in 40 CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Waste Number K181, and soil and.../or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment...

  2. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Disposal § 268.20 Waste specific prohibitions—Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. (a) Effective August 23, 2005, the waste specified in 40 CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Waste Number K181, and soil and.../or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment...

  3. Pigment Production by Streptococcus agalactiae in Quasi-Defined Media

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Sampedro, Antonio; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; García-Peña, Maria Luisa; Ruiz-Bravo, Alfonso; Haïdour, Ali

    2001-01-01

    A quasi-defined medium that supports the growth of Streptococcus agalactiae as pigmented colonies has been developed. The medium contains starch, a peptic digest of albumin, amino acids, nucleosides, vitamins, and salts. The presence of free cysteine, which could be replaced with other sulphur-containing compounds and to a lesser degree by reducing agents, was required for pigment formation. PMID:11133484

  4. Physics and the Production of Antibiotics: 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    In an article in the preceding issue we discussed the design and construction of fermenters in which antibiotics are cultured. For industrial purposes these fermenters can range in size up to 500 m[cube]. They have to be sterilized, filled with sterile culture medium and the culture itself and supplied with oxygen continuously. In some cases they…

  5. Monascus: a Reality on the Production and Application of Microbial Pigments.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Francielo; Meinicke Bühler, Rose Marie; Cesar de Carvalho, Júlio; de Oliveira, Débora; Moritz, Denise Estevez; Schmidell, Willibaldo; Ninow, Jorge Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Monascus species can produce yellow, orange, and red pigments, depending on the employed cultivation conditions. They are classified as natural pigments and can be applied for coloration of meat, fishes, cheese, beer, and pates, besides their use in inks for printer and dyes for textile, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. These natural pigments also present antimicrobial activity on pathogenic microorganisms and other beneficial effects to the health as antioxidant and anticholesterol activities. Depending on the substrates, the operational conditions (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen), and fermentation mode (state solid fermentation or submerged fermentation), the production can be directed for one specific color dye. This review has a main objective to present an approach of Monascus pigments as a reality to obtaining and application of natural pigments by microorganisms, as to highlight properties that makes this pigment as promising for worldwide industrial applications. PMID:26472672

  6. Monascus: a Reality on the Production and Application of Microbial Pigments.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, Francielo; Meinicke Bühler, Rose Marie; Cesar de Carvalho, Júlio; de Oliveira, Débora; Moritz, Denise Estevez; Schmidell, Willibaldo; Ninow, Jorge Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Monascus species can produce yellow, orange, and red pigments, depending on the employed cultivation conditions. They are classified as natural pigments and can be applied for coloration of meat, fishes, cheese, beer, and pates, besides their use in inks for printer and dyes for textile, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. These natural pigments also present antimicrobial activity on pathogenic microorganisms and other beneficial effects to the health as antioxidant and anticholesterol activities. Depending on the substrates, the operational conditions (temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen), and fermentation mode (state solid fermentation or submerged fermentation), the production can be directed for one specific color dye. This review has a main objective to present an approach of Monascus pigments as a reality to obtaining and application of natural pigments by microorganisms, as to highlight properties that makes this pigment as promising for worldwide industrial applications.

  7. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  8. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  9. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  10. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  11. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  12. Pigment production by filamentous fungi on agro-industrial byproducts: an eco-friendly alternative.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Fernanda Cortez; Tichota, Deise Michele; Pereira, Jamile Queiroz; Segalin, Jéferson; Rios, Alessandro de Oliveira; Brandelli, Adriano

    2013-10-01

    The search for new sources of natural pigments has increased, mainly because of the toxic effects caused by synthetic dyes used in food, pharmaceutical, textile, and cosmetic industries. Fungi provide a readily available alternative source of natural pigments. In this context, the fungi Penicillium chrysogenum IFL1 and IFL2, Fusarium graminearum IFL3, Monascus purpureus NRRL 1992, and Penicillium vasconiae IFL4 were selected as pigments producers. The fungal identification was performed using ITS and part of the β-tubulin gene sequencing. Almost all fungi were able to grow and produce water-soluble pigments on agro-industrial residues, with the exception of P. vasconiae that produced pigments only on potato dextrose broth. The production of yellow pigments was predominant and the two strains of P. chrysogenum were the largest producers. In addition, the production of pigments and mycotoxins were evaluated in potato dextrose agar using TOF-MS and TOF-MS/MS. Metabolites as roquefortine C, chrysogine were found in both extracts of P. chrysogenum, as well fusarenone X, diacetoxyscirpenol, and neosolaniol in F. graminearum extract. In the M. purpureus extract, the pigments monascorubrin, rubropunctatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin were found. The crude filtrates have potential to be used in the textile industry; nevertheless, additional pigment purification is required for food and pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Hydrometallurgical processing of a ferrous cake accompanied by nonferrous-metal recovery and pigment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motov, D. L.; Vasekha, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    Balance experiments have been carried out on the application of a flow chart developed for the sulfite conversion of Fe(OH)3 (which is the dump waste product of nonferrous metallurgy) into an iron oxide pigment. The technological parameters of the technological stages are refined. The specific features of the distribution of components in this pigment are revealed.

  14. Counteraction of antibiotic production and degradation stabilizes microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Kelsic, Eric D.; Zhao, Jeffrey; Vetsigian, Kalin; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major challenge in theoretical ecology is understanding how natural microbial communities support species diversity1-8, and in particular how antibiotic producing, sensitive and resistant species coexist9-15. While cyclic “rock-paper-scissors” interactions can stabilize communities in spatial environments9-11, coexistence in unstructured environments remains an enigma12,16. Here, using simulations and analytical models, we show that the opposing actions of antibiotic production and degradation enable coexistence even in well-mixed environments. Coexistence depends on 3-way interactions where an antibiotic degrading species attenuates the inhibitory interactions between two other species. These 3-way interactions enable coexistence that is robust to substantial differences in inherent species growth rates and to invasion by “cheating” species that cease producing or degrading antibiotics. At least two antibiotics are required for stability, with greater numbers of antibiotics enabling more complex communities and diverse dynamical behaviors ranging from stable fixed-points to limit cycles and chaos. Together, these results show how multi-species antibiotic interactions can generate ecological stability in both spatial and mixed microbial communities, suggesting strategies for engineering synthetic ecosystems and highlighting the importance of toxin production and degradation for microbial biodiversity. PMID:25992546

  15. Production of diagnostic pigment by phenoloxidase activity of cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C E; Kapica, L

    1972-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces brown pigmented colonies when grown on agar media made from an extract of potatoes and carrots, broad beans (Vicia faba), or Guizotia abyssinica seeds. Since other yeasts do not produce the pigment, these media are useful as differential isolation media for C. neoformans. Similar specific pigment was produced by C. neoformans on chemically defined agar media which contained six different substrates of phenoloxidase (o-diphenol: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.10.3.1) an enzyme which catalyses the oxidation of o-diphenols to melanin. Substrates were incorporated singly into the media and included L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid, catechol, norepinephrine, and 3-hydroxytyramine hydrochloride (dopamine). No pigment was produced on media without substrate. Phenoloxidase activity in (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitates of C. neoformans cell-free extract was assayed by measuring increases in absorbance at 480 nm produced in solutions of L-DOPA. This reaction showed oxygen uptake and was effectively inhibited by copper chelators, but not by catalase. The enzyme also oxidized the five other substrates which induced pigment formation. Electron micrographs of cells incubated in L-DOPA showed deposition of the pigment in the cell wall. PMID:4118328

  16. Effect of Monascus purpureus inoculum concentration on pigment production in jackfruit seed flour substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdiyati, Yanti; Kusnadi, Yuliani, Lia Amelia

    2016-02-01

    The used of synthetic dyes have various negative effects on human health. Roomates pigment produced by Monascus purpureus mold can be used as an alternative natural food coloring. The research on the effect of inoculum concentration's M. purpureus to pigment production on the jackfruit seed flour has been done. The objective of research to is to investigate the effect of inoculum concentration's M. purpureus to the production of red, yellow and orange pigment on the jackfruit seed flour. The concentrations used were 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% (v/w). The result of the data analysed using One-Way ANOVA showed that the inoculum concentration affected the production of red pigment M. purpureus, as well as the data analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis showed that inoculum concentration has influence on the production of yellow and orange pigments. Inoculum concentration of 15% is the optimum concentration for the production of red, yellow and orange pigments with 0:10, 0:50 and 0:20 absorbance units per gram of sample respectively. Based on the results of the research, it can be concluded that inoculum concentration of M. purpureus influenced the production of red, yellow and orange pigments.

  17. Antibiotic production by myxobacteria plays a role in predation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Wei, Xueming; Ebright, Richard; Wall, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Myxobacteria are predatory and are prolific producers of secondary metabolites. Here, we tested a hypothesized role that secondary metabolite antibiotics function as weapons in predation. To test this, a Myxococcus xanthus Δta1 mutant, blocked in antibiotic TA (myxovirescin) production, was constructed. This TA(-) mutant was defective in producing a zone of inhibition (ZOI) against Escherichia coli. This shows that TA is the major M. xanthus-diffusible antibacterial agent against E. coli. Correspondingly, the TA(-) mutant was defective in E. coli killing. Separately, an engineered E. coli strain resistant to TA was shown to be resistant toward predation. Exogenous addition of spectinomycin, a bacteriostatic antibiotic, rescued the predation defect of the TA(-) mutant. In contrast, against Micrococcus luteus the TA(-) mutant exhibited no defect in ZOI or killing. Thus, TA plays a selective role on prey species. To extend these studies to other myxobacteria, the role of antibiotic corallopyronin production in predation was tested and also found to be required for Corallococcus coralloides killing on E. coli. Next, a role of TA production in myxobacterial fitness was assessed by measuring swarm expansion. Here, the TA(-) mutant had a specific swarm rate reduction on prey lawns, and thus reduced fitness, compared to an isogenic TA(+) strain. Based on these observations, we conclude that myxobacterial antibiotic production can function as a predatory weapon. To our knowledge, this is the first report to directly show a link between secondary metabolite production and predation.

  18. Biomass and pigments production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light sources.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed at enhancing biomass and pigments production together with pollution removal in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment via different light sources. Red, yellow, blue, white LED and incandescent lamp were used. Results showed different light sources had great effects on the PSB. PSB had the highest biomass production, COD removal and biomass yield with red LED. The corresponding biomass, COD removal and biomass yield reached 2580 mg/L, 88.6% and 0.49 mg-biomass/mg-COD-removal, respectively. The hydraulic retention time of wastewater treatment could be shortened to 72 h with red LED. Mechanism analysis showed higher ATP was produced with red LED than others. Light sources could significantly affect the pigments production. The pigments productions were greatly higher with LED than incandescent lamp. Yellow LED had the highest pigments production while red LED produced the highest carotenoid/bacteriochlorophyll ratio. Considering both efficiency and energy cost, red LED was the optimal light source.

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility of enterococci isolated from traditional fermented meat products.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Ferreira, V; Teixeira, P

    2009-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated for 182 Enterococcus spp. isolated from Alheira, Chouriça de Vinhais and Salpicão de Vinhais, fermented meat products produced in the North of Portugal. Previously, a choice was made from a group of 1060 isolates, using phenotypic and genotypic tests. From these, 76 were previously identified as Enterococcus faecalis, 44 as Enterococcus faecium, one as Enterococcus casseliflavus and 61 as Enteroccocus spp. In order to encompass several of the known chemical and functional classes of antibiotics, resistance to ampicillin, penicillin G, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, nitrofurantoin, rifampicin, tetracycline and vancomycin was evaluated. All the isolates were sensitive to antibiotics of clinical importance, such as penicillins and vancomycin. Some differences in Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics, could be associated with the enterococcal species.

  20. Current status of antibiotic resistance in animal production.

    PubMed

    Franklin, A

    1999-01-01

    spread of resistance genes should be studied in detail. Research in these areas will lead to new ideas on how to inhibit the resistance mechanisms. So far, it has been well established that a heavy antimicrobial drug selective pressure in overcrowded populations of production animals creates favourable environments both for the emergence and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  1. Solid-state fermentation for the production of Monascus pigments from jackfruit seed.

    PubMed

    Babitha, Sumathy; Soccol, Carlos R; Pandey, Ashok

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the feasibility of jackfruit seed powder as a substrate for the production of pigments by Monascus purpureus in solid-state fermentation (SSF). A pigment yield of 25ODUnits/g dry fermented substrate was achieved by employing jackfruit seed powder with optimized process parameters such as 50% initial moisture content, incubation temperature 30 degrees C, 9x10(4)spores/g dry substrate inoculum and an incubation period of seven days. The color of the pigments was stable over a wide range of pH, apparently due to the buffering nature of the substrate, which could be a significant point for its scope in food applications. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on pigment production using jackfruit seed powder in solid-state fermentation (SSF).

  2. Pigment gallstone pathogenesis: slime production by biliary bacteria is more important than beta-glucuronidase production.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Ponce, R; Oesterle, A L; Griffiss, J M; Way, L W

    2000-01-01

    Pigment stones are thought to form as a result of deconjugation of bilirubin by bacterial beta-glucuronidase, which results in precipitation of calcium bilirubinate. Calcium bilirubinate is then aggregated into stones by an anionic glycoprotein. Slime (glycocalyx), an anionic glycoprotein produced by bacteria causing foreign body infections, has been implicated in the formation of the precipitate that blocks biliary stents. We previously showed that bacteria are present within the pigment portions of gallstones and postulated a bacterial role in pigment stone formation through beta-glucuronidase or slime production. Ninety-one biliary bacterial isolates from 61 patients and 12 control stool organisms were tested for their production of beta-glucuronidase and slime. The average slime production was 42 for biliary bacteria and 2.5 for stool bacteria (P <0.001). Overall, 73% of biliary bacteria and 8% of stool bacteria produced slime (optical density >3). In contrast, only 38% of biliary bacteria produced beta-glucuronidase. Eighty-two percent of all patients, 90% of patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones, 100% of patients with primary CBD stones, and 93% of patients with biliary tubes had one or more bacterial species in their stones that produced slime. By comparison, only 47% of all patients, 60% of patients with CBD stones, 62% of patients with primary CBD stones, and 50% of patients with biliary tubes had one or more bacteria that produced beta-glucuronidase. Most biliary bacteria produced slime, and slime production correlated better than beta-glucuronidase production did with stone formation and the presence of biliary tubes or stents. Patients with primary CBD stones and biliary tubes had the highest incidence of slime production. These findings suggest that bacterial slime is important in gallstone formation and the blockage of biliary tubes.

  3. Identification of a Peptide from Mammal Albumins Responsible for Enhanced Pigment Production by Group B Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Sampedro, Antonio; Varela, Javier; Garcia-Peña, Marisa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo

    1999-01-01

    The peptide from peptones responsible for enhanced pigment production by Streptococcus agalactiae in culture media has been isolated from a peptic digest of human albumin and has been identified as Ile-Ala-Arg-Arg-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe. The related heptapeptide lacking the N-terminal Ile also had pigment-enhancing activity. A sequence similarity search showed that these sequences are present only in mammal albumins. PMID:10225848

  4. Chapter 4. Analyzing the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Mervyn; Hesketh, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This chapter outlines the approaches and techniques that can be used to analyze the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes. It describes how to isolate antibiotic nonproducing and overproducing mutants by UV, nitrosoguanidine (NTG), transposon, and insertion mutagenesis, and then how to use those mutants to identify regulatory genes. Other approaches to identify both pathway-specific and pleiotropic regulatory genes include overexpression and genome scanning. A variety of methods used to characterize pathway-specific regulatory genes for antibiotic biosynthesis are then covered, including transcriptional analysis and techniques that can be used to distinguish between direct and indirect regulation. Finally, genome-wide approaches that can be taken to characterize pleiotropic regulatory genes, including microarray and ChIP-on-Chip technologies, are described.

  5. Allantoin catabolism influences the production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purines are a primary source of carbon and nitrogen in soil; however, their metabolism is poorly understood in Streptomyces. Using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic engineering, we characterized the allantoin pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor. When cells grew in glucose minimal medium with allantoin as the sole nitrogen source, quantitative proteomics identified 38 enzymes upregulated and 28 downregulated. This allowed identifying six new functional enzymes involved in allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. From those, using a combination of biochemical and genetic engineering tools, it was found that allantoinase (EC 3.5.2.5) and allantoicase (EC 3.5.3.4) are essential for allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. Metabolomics showed that under these growth conditions, there is a significant intracellular accumulation of urea and amino acids, which eventually results in urea and ammonium release into the culture medium. Antibiotic production of a urease mutant strain showed that the catabolism of allantoin, and the subsequent release of ammonium, inhibits antibiotic production. These observations link the antibiotic production impairment with an imbalance in nitrogen metabolism and provide the first evidence of an interaction between purine metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis.

  6. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  7. Enhanced photo-fermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus with pigment content manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Xueqing; Guo, Liejin; Wu, Xiaomin; Yang, Honghui

    2012-08-01

    High content of pigment in purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria hinders its photo-hydrogen production rate under intense light irradiation. In order to alleviate the light shielding effect and improve its photo-fermentative hydrogen production performance, pufQ, which is the regulatory gene of bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus, was cloned and relocated in the genome under cbb3 promoter by homologous recombination. The UV-vis spectra indicated that the light absorption of the mutant between 300 and 900 nm was reduced. Photo-hydrogen production experiments by the recombinant and wild type strain were carried out in 350 mL photo bioreactors using acetic and butyric acid as substrate. The results showed that the hydrogen production of recombinant with reduced pigment was 27% higher than that of its parental strain, indicating that it is effective on enhancing photo-fermentative hydrogen production by manipulating pigment biosynthesis in purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:22717568

  8. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from probiotic products.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, R; Pot, B; Huys, G; Swings, J

    2003-02-25

    In the present study, a total of 55 European probiotic products were evaluated with regard to the identity and the antibiotic resistance of the bacterial isolates recovered from these products. Bacterial isolation from 30 dried food supplements and 25 dairy products, yielded a total of 268 bacterial isolates selected from several selective media. Counts of food supplements showed bacterial recovery in 19 (63%) of the dried food supplements ranging from 10(3) to 10(6) CFU/g, whereas all dairy products yielded growth in the range of 10(5)-10(9) CFU/ml. After identification of the isolates using whole-cell protein profiling, mislabeling was noted in 47% of the food supplements and 40% of the dairy products. In six food supplements, Enterococcus faecium was isolated whereas only two of those products claim this species on their label. Using the disc diffusion method, antibiotic resistance among 187 isolates was detected against kanamycin (79% of the isolates), vancomycin (65%), tetracycline (26%), penicillinG (23%), erythromycin (16%) and chloramphenicol (11%). Overall, 68.4% of the isolates showed resistance against multiple antibiotics including intrinsic resistances. Initially, 38% of the isolated enterococci was classified as vancomycin resistant using the disc diffusion method, whereas additional broth dilution and PCR assays clearly showed that all E. faecium isolates were in fact vancomycin susceptible.

  9. Crp Is a Global Regulator of Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chan; Hindra; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion adversely affected the synthesis of three well-characterized antibiotics in S. coelicolor: actinorhodin (Act), undecylprodigiosin (Red), and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray (ChIP-chip) assays, we determined that eight (out of 22) secondary metabolic clusters encoded by S. coelicolor contained Crp-associated sites. We followed the effect of Crp induction using transcription profiling analyses and found secondary metabolic genes to be significantly affected: included in this Crp-dependent group were genes from six of the clusters identified in the ChIP-chip experiments. Overexpressing Crp in a panel of Streptomyces species led to enhanced antibiotic synthesis and new metabolite production, suggesting that Crp control over secondary metabolism is broadly conserved in the streptomycetes and that Crp overexpression could serve as a powerful tool for unlocking the chemical potential of these organisms. PMID:23232715

  10. Distributions of pigments and primary production in a Gulf Stream meander

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Cullen, J.J.; Phinney, D.A.; Olson, D.B.; Yentsch, C.S.

    1993-08-15

    An investigation was made of physical effects of Gulf Stream meandering on the vertical and horizontal distributions of photosynthetic pigments and primary production. Cruises were conducted in the vicinity of a meander east of 73{degrees}W and north of 37{degrees}N from September 21 to October 5 (leg 1) and October 12-21, 1988 (leg 2), on the R/V Cape Hatteras. Relationships of photosynthesis (normalized to chlorophyll) to irradiance (P-I) did not show large horizontal variation, and water column composite P-I curves from leg 1 and leg 2 were similar. Therefore, a single P-I curve derived from pooled data was used to model distributions of primary production. Distributions of photosynthetic pigments were characterized on the basis of in vivo fluorescence profiles and empirical relationships with extracted pigment concentrations. Subsurface irradiance was described using a spectral irradiance model. Cross sections of the Gulf Stream revealed consistently higher pigment concentrations and primary production on the slope water side. Along-stream variations in pigment distributions and primary production were apparently related to density structure influenced by meander circulation. Such variations were less pronounced during leg 2, which came after a transition from a well-defined meander interacting with a warm-core ring (leg 1) to a more linear stream (leg 2). Higher water-column-integrated primary production during leg 2 was attributed to mixing-induced nutrient injection and redistribution of chlorophyll in the photic zone. 47 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Luminescent photobioreactor design for improved algal growth and photosynthetic pigment production through spectral conversion of light.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Willoughby, Nik

    2013-08-01

    Growth characteristics of two strains of microalgae in bubble column photobioreactors were investigated under different cultivation conditions. Chlorella vulgaris and Gloeothece membranacea were cultivated in luminescent acrylic photobioreactors at different seed culture densities. Luminescent acrylic photobioreactors in blue, green, yellow, orange, and red colours capable of spectral conversion of light were used. The results indicated that the red luminescent photobioreactor enhanced biomass production in both strains of microalgae while pigmentation was induced under different light colours. Green light promoted chlorophyll production in C. vulgaris however chlorophyll production in G. membranacea cultures was less influenced by the light condition or culture density. Phycobiliproteins were the dominant pigments in G. membranacea and red light favoured synthesis of these pigments.

  12. Photostability and breakdown products of pigments currently used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Urs; Hohl, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Tattoos fade with time. Part of this fading can be attributed to the photodegradation of pigments. When people get tired of their tattoos, removal by laser irradiation is the method of choice. In vivo laser irradiation of tattoos on mice has shown that the degradation of pigments can result in toxic compounds. Various in vitro studies on photodegradation by sunlight or laser have shown similar degradation products for both irradiations. Even visible light was shown to be able to decompose some pigments to toxic degradation products in vitro. Whereas the investigated phthalocyanins (C.I. 74160, 74260), quinacridones (C.I. 73915) or dioxazines (C.I. 51319) were fairly photostable in vitro, all azo pigments exposed to sunlight or laser were degraded into a variety of products, some of which were toxic or even carcinogenic, such as 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene, 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine and o-toluidine. Up to now, the absence of specific toxicological data is the reason why legal restrictions for tattoo inks are derived from those for cosmetics, toys and textiles. Photodegradation has not been considered. In light of the present analytical findings, even with their possible shortcomings, the evidence weighs heavily enough to consider banning azo pigments containing carcinogenic aromatic amines or allergens in their structure from use in tattoo inks. PMID:25833639

  13. Microbial antibiotic production aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Benoit, M R; Li, W; Stodieck, L S; Lam, K S; Winther, C L; Roane, T M; Klaus, D M

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies examining metabolic characteristics of bacterial cultures have mostly suggested that reduced gravity is advantageous for microbial growth. As a consequence, the question of whether space flight would similarly enhance secondary metabolite production was raised. Results from three prior space shuttle experiments indicated that antibiotic production was stimulated in space for two different microbial systems, albeit under suboptimal growth conditions. The goal of this latest experiment was to determine whether the enhanced productivity would also occur with better growth conditions and over longer durations of weightlessness. Microbial antibiotic production was examined onboard the International Space Station during the 72-day 8A increment. Findings of increased productivity of actinomycin D by Streptomyces plicatus in space corroborated with previous findings for the early sample points (days 8 and 12); however, the flight production levels were lower than the matched ground control samples for the remainder of the mission. The overall goal of this research program is to elucidate the specific mechanisms responsible for the initial stimulation of productivity in space and translate this knowledge into methods for improving efficiency of commercial production facilities on Earth.

  14. PP-O and PP-V, Monascus pigment homologues, production, and phylogenetic analysis in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Arai, Teppei; Kojima, Ryo; Motegi, Yoshiki; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ogihara, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The production of pigments as secondary metabolites by microbes is known to vary by species and by physiological conditions within a single strain. The fungus strain Penicillium purpurogenum IAM15392 has been found to produce violet pigment (PP-V) and orange pigment (PP-O),Monascus azaphilone pigment homologues, when grown under specific culture conditions. In this study, we analysed PP-V and PP-O production capability in seven strains of P. purpurogenum in addition to strain IAM15392 under specific culture conditions. The pigment production pattern of five strains cultivated in PP-V production medium was similar to that of strain IAM15392, and all violet pigments produced by these five strains were confirmed to be PP-V. Strains that did not produce pigment were also identified. In addition, two strains cultivated in PP-O production medium produced a violet pigment identified as PP-V. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences from the eight P. purpurogenum strains were sequenced and used to construct a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. PP-O and PP-V production of P. purpurogenum was shown to be related to phylogenetic placement based on rDNA ITS sequence. Based on these results, two hypotheses for the alteration of pigment production of P. purpurogenum in evolution were proposed.

  15. Triclosan and prescription antibiotic exposures and enterolactone production in adults

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of disease. The composition of the microbiome is influenced by factors such as mode of delivery at birth, diet and antibiotic use, yet the influence of environmental chemical exposures is largely unknown. The antimicrobial compound triclosan, found in many personal care products and widely detected in human urine, is an environmental exposure for which systemic microbiotic effects may be of particular interest. To investigate the relationship between triclosan and gut microflora, we assessed the association between triclosan and enterolactone, an intestinal metabolite that is produced via bacterial transformation of dietary lignans (seeds, nuts) and has known susceptibility to oral antibiotics. Methods We examined urinary triclosan and enterolactone for 2005–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey subjects, aged ≥ 20 years (n = 3,041). We also examined the association between prescription antibiotic use and enterolactone to confirm its susceptibility to changes in bacterial composition of the body. Associations between natural log-transformed enterolactone and 1) detected vs. not detected (<2.3 ng/mL) triclosan, 2) triclosan quintiles (Q1–Q5), and 3) any vs. no antibiotics were estimated with multiple linear regression, adjusting for sex, age, race, body mass index, poverty income ratio, education, fiber intake, bowel movement frequency, cotinine and creatinine (n=2,441). Results Triclosan was detected in 80% of subjects (range: <2.3 – 3620 ng/mL), while enterolactone was detected in >99% of subjects (range: <0.1 – 122,000 ng/mL). After adjustment, enterolactone was not associated with triclosan (detect vs. nondetect: β= 0.07 (95% CI: −0.15, 0.30); Q5 (≥104.5 ng/mL) vs. Q1 (none): β= 0.06 (95% CI:−0.21, 0.34)). In sex-stratified analyses, triclosan was associated with higher enterolactone in women (detect vs. non-detect: β= 0.31 (95% CI:−0.07, 0.70), but

  16. Stochastic modelling and control of antibiotic subtilin production.

    PubMed

    Thalhofer, V; Annunziato, M; Borzì, A

    2016-09-01

    A stochastic hybrid model for the production of the antibiotic subtilin by the Bacillus subtilis is investigated. This model consists of 5 variables with four possible discrete dynamical states and this high dimensionality represents a bottleneck for using statistical tools that require to solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck problem. For this reason, a suitable reduced model with 3 variables and two dynamical states is proposed. The corresponding Fokker-Planck hyperbolic system is used to validate the evolution statistics and to construct a robust feedback control strategy to increase subtilin production. Results of numerical experiments are presented that show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26837869

  17. Triggering the production of the cryptic blue pigment indigoidine from Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Brachmann, Alexander O; Kirchner, Ferdinand; Kegler, Carsten; Kinski, Sebastian C; Schmitt, Imke; Bode, Helge B

    2012-01-01

    The production of the blue pigment indigoidine has been achieved in the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens by a promoter exchange and in Escherichia coli following heterologous expression of the biosynthesis gene indC. Moreover, genes involved in the regulation of this previously "silent" biosynthesis gene cluster have been identified in P. luminescens. PMID:22085970

  18. 40 CFR 268.20 - Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 23, 2005, the waste specified in 40 CFR part 261 as EPA Hazardous Waste Number K181, and soil and... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste specific prohibitions-Dyes and/or pigments production wastes. 268.20 Section 268.20 Protection of Environment...

  19. Effects of oxidative stress on the production of carotenoid pigments byPhaffia rhodozyma (Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous).

    PubMed

    Santopietro, L M; Spencer, J F; Spencer, D M; Siñeriz, F

    1998-01-01

    The resistance to killing by free radicals of two mutants ofPhaffia rhodozyma was determined. Mutant 5-7 did not produce astaxanthin but produced beta-carotene, while mutant 3-4 did not produce any carotenoid pigments. The resistance of mutant 5-7 was the same as that of the wild type but mutant 3-4 was rapidly killed. Carotenoid pigments increased the resistance to killing by free radicals. We investigated the effects of free radicals, generated by H(2)O(2) and Fe(2+) added to the medium, on wild-type cells and mutants ofP. rhodozyma. Unpigmented mutants of basidiomycetous yeasts (Rhodotorula spp. and others) are more susceptible to killing by UV-irradiation than the pigmented, wild-type strains. Therefore, we investigated the effect of free radicals on a similar basidiomycetous yeast,P. rhodozyma, a species of economic importance, in the biological production of astaxanthin. PMID:18470490

  20. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  1. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  2. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-07-21

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics.

  3. Effect of oxygen supply on Monascus pigments and citrinin production in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Chen, Qi; Wang, Weiping; Hu, Jiajun; Hu, Chuan

    2015-05-01

    The influence of oxygen supply on Monascus pigments and citrinin production by Monascus ruber HS.4000 in submerged fermentation was studied. For Monascus cultivation with high pigments and low citrinin production, the initial growth phase, mid-stage phase, and later-stage production phase were separated by shifting oxygen supply. The optimal condition for the fermentation process in shake-flask fermentation was a three-stage rotating rate controlled strategy (0-48 h at 150 rpm, 48-108 h at 250 rpm, 108-120 h at 200 rpm) with medium volume of 100 mL added to 250 mL Erlenmeyer flasks at 30°C for 120 h cultivation. Compared to constant one-stage cultivation (medium volume of 100 mL, rotating rate of 250 rpm), the pigments were reduced by 40.4%, but citrinin was reduced by 64.2%. The most appropriate condition for the fermentation process in a 10 L fermentor is also a three-stage aeration process (0-48 h at 300 L/h, 48-96 h at 500 L/h, 96-120 h at 200 L/h) with agitation of 300 rpm at 30°C for 120 h cultivation, and 237.3 ± 5.7 U/mL pigments were produced in 120 h with 6.05 ± 0.19 mg/L citrinin in a 10 L fermentor. Compared to aeration-constant (500 L/h) cultivation, pigment production was increased by 29.6% and citrinin concentration was reduced by 79.5%.

  4. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  5. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  6. A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment - Eliminating CO2 Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2013-11-05

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the potential of a new process technology to reduce the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission from the production of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) pigment. TiO{sub 2} is one of the most commonly used minerals in the chemical manufacturing industry. It has been commercially processed as a pigment since the early 1900's, and has a wide variety of domestic and industrial applications. TiO{sub 2} pigment is currently produced primarily by the use of the so called chloride process. A key step of the chloride process relies on high temperature carbo-chlorination of TiO{sub 2} bearing raw materials, hence producing large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The new method uses a chemical/metallurgical sequential extraction methodology to produce pigment grade TiO{sub 2} from high-TiO{sub 2} slag. The specific project objectives were to 1) study and prove the scientific validity of the concept, 2) understand the primary chemical reactions and the efficiency of sequential extraction schemes, 3) determine the properties of TiO{sub 2} produced using the technology, and 4) model the energy consumptions and environmental benefits of the technology. These objectives were successfully met and a new process for producing commercial quality TiO{sub 2} pigment was developed and experimentally validated. The process features a unique combination of established metallurgical processes, including alkaline roasting of titania slag followed by leaching, solvent extraction, hydrolysis, and calcination. The caustic, acidic, and organic streams in the process will also be regenerated and reused in the process, greatly reducing environmental waste. The purpose and effect of each of these steps in producing purified TiO{sub 2} is detailed in the report. The levels of impurities in our pigment meet the requirements for commercial pigment, and are nearly equivalent to those of two commercial pigments. Solvent extraction with an amine extractant proved to

  7. The evolution of antibiotic production and public health problems.

    PubMed

    Mansford, K R; Slocombe, B

    1987-06-01

    Antibiotic evolution is closely paralleled by the evolution of bacterial resistance. Prior to wide usage of penicillin G, resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics as a consequence of beta-lactamase production had been recognized, and has been an increasing clinical problem ever since. Discovery of antibiotics other than beta-lactams, such as macrolides, tetracyclines and aminoglycosides, has also resulted in the eventual selection of bacteria resistant to these agents. Synthesis of novel beta-lactam derivatives from 6-APA, such as methicillin and isoxazolyl penicillins, resistant to staphylococcal beta-lactamase, overcame the clinical problem of penicillin-resistant S. aureus. Likewise, the isolation of cephamycins and monobactams, and further exploitation of the cephalosporin nucleus, led to the development of derivatives which display a high degree of stability to a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial beta-lactamases, thus rendering organisms producing these enzymes susceptible to these agents. Analogous modification of the penicillin nucleus, to give 6 alpha-substituted penicillins, also resulted in derivatives with exceptional stability to beta-lactamases. An alternative approach to the problem of beta-lactamase was the isolation or synthesis of substances able to inhibit the activity of enzymes, thus protecting the unstable beta-lactams from inactivation by beta-lactamase. In this way the activity of beta-lactamase-labile agents was effectively restored against a wide range of beta-lactamase-producing bacterial pathogens. The wide diversity of new antibacterial agents, together with an increasing knowledge and understanding of mechanisms of resistance, indicates that further advances against resistant bacterial pathogens is ensured.

  8. Production of brown and black pigments by using flotation waste from copper slag.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Emel; Turan, Servet; Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri

    2006-04-01

    One of the major problems in copper-producing countries is the treatment of the large amount of copper slag or copper flotation waste generated from copper slag which contains significant amounts of heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Pb and Co. Dumping or disposal of such large quantities of flotation waste from copper slag causes environmental and space problems. In this study, the treatment of flotation waste from copper slag by a thermal method and its use as an iron source in the production of inorganic brown and black pigments that are used in the ceramic industry were investigated. The pigments were produced by calcining different amounts of flotation waste and chromite, Cr2O3, ZnO and CoO mixtures. The pigments obtained were added to transparent ceramic glazes and porcelainized tile bodies. Their colours were defined by L*a*b* measurements with a spectrophotometer. The results showed that flotation waste from copper slag could be used as an iron source to produce brown and black pigments in both ceramic body and glazes.

  9. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets and ...

  10. Report: antibiotic production by thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT-4.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmad, Safia; Hameed, Abdul

    2009-07-01

    Production of antimicrobial compounds seems to be a general phenomenon for most bacteria. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among key microbial pathogens is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Current solutions involve development of a more rationale approach to antibiotic use and discover of new antimicrobials. Bacillus species produce a large number of biological compounds active against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The process of production usually involves screening of wide range of microorganisms, testing and modification. Production is carried out using fermentation. Thermophilic spore-forming, gram positive, motile rod bacterial strains were isolated from the Thar Desserts, Sindh Province, Pakistan. These strains were screened and checked for antibacterial activity. The best activity was observed by SAT4 against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The activity was only observed against gram positive bacteria and no activity was seen against Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT4 was found to be active in the fermentation process to produce the antimicrobial agents. Further optimizations of different conditions (time of incubation, media, pH, glucose concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, and temperature) for antimicrobial production by the selected bacterial strain was performed. Agar diffusion assay was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity. Optimum conditions for the production of antimicrobials by selected isolate were observed to be 48 hour, pH 5, temperature 55 degrees C, 2% glucose and 1.5% nitrogen concentration. This newly isolated bacterial strain has great potential for antimicrobial production at industrial scale. PMID:19553186

  11. Why and how antibiotics are used in swine production.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Gary L

    2002-05-01

    In summary, published research data clearly show that the use of antibiotics during all phases of growth benefits the rate and efficiency of body weight gain, reduces mortality and morbidity, reduces subclinical disease, and improves health in pigs. Also, antibiotics at breeding and during lactation benefits reproductive and lactational performance in sows. The economic benefits are several-fold greater than the cost of the antibiotic when a cost-effective antibiotic is used for this purpose. Monitoring and surveillance of microbial resistance in animals and humans has continued, with no animal-to-human infection path being clearly delineated. Although the incidence of antibiotic resistance in the human population remains high, there is no clear evidence that the levels or patterns have changed. The high levels of antimicrobial resistance in humans likely result from antibiotics prescribed directly to humans, because well over half of the antibiotics produced in the United States is used in human medicine. Whether antibiotic usage in swine, poultry, and other food-producing animals contributes to antibiotic resistance in the human population will continue to be debated. Even though antibiotics have been fed for nearly 50 years to literally billions of animals, there is still no convincing evidence of unfavorable health effects in humans that can be directly linked to the feeding of subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics to swine or other animals. Hopefully, policy decisions in the future regarding the use of antimicrobials in animals will be based on science and sound risk assessment, and not on emotionalism. PMID:12212945

  12. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential

    PubMed Central

    Adini, Irit; Adini, Avner; Bazinet, Lauren; Watnick, Randolph S.; Bielenberg, Diane R.; D’Amato, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of certain angiogenesis-dependent diseases is higher in Caucasians than in African Americans. Angiogenesis is amplified in wound healing and cornea models in albino C57 mice compared with black C57 mice. Moreover, mouse and human melanocytes with low pigmentation stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration in vitro more than melanocytes with high pigmentation. This effect is due, in part, to the secretion of an angiogenic protein called fibromodulin (FMOD) from lowly pigmented melanocytes. Herein, we expand upon the mechanism contributing to increased angiogenesis in lighter skin and report that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is secreted by nonpigmented mouse melanocytes by 5- to 10-fold more than pigmented melanocytes. MCP-1 protein stimulates EC proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Mechanistic studies determine that FMOD is upstream of MCP-1 and promotes its secretion from both melanocytes and activated ECs via stimulation of NF-κB activity. Mice injected with FMOD-neutralizing antibodies show 2.3-fold decreased levels of circulating MCP-1. Human studies confirmed that, on average, Caucasians have 2-fold higher serum levels of MCP-1 than African Americans. Taken together, this study implicates the FMOD/MCP-1 pathway in the regulation of angiogenesis by local melanocytes and suggests that melanogenic activity may protect against aberrant angiogenic diseases.—Adini, I., Adini, A., Bazinet, L., Watnick, R. S., Bielenberg, D. R., and D’Amato, R. J. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential. PMID:25406462

  13. Small molecule inhibition of microbial natural product biosynthesis – An emerging antibiotic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Cisar, Justin S.; Tan, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of natural products modulate critical biological processes in the microorganisms that produce them. Thus, inhibition of the corresponding natural product biosynthesis pathways represents a promising avenue to develop novel antibiotics. In this tutorial review, we describe several recent examples of designed small molecule inhibitors of microbial natural product biosynthesis and their use in evaluating this emerging antibiotic strategy. PMID:18568158

  14. Biomass Productivities in Wild Type and Pigment Mutant of Cyclotella sp. (Diatom)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Bartha, Richard; Aksoy, M.; Weissman, Joseph C.; Benemann, John

    2008-07-03

    Microalgae are expected to play a significant role in greenhouse gas mitigation because they can utilize CO2 from powerplant flue gases directly while producing a variety of renewable carbon-neutral biofuels. In order for such a microalgal climate change mitigation strategy to become economically feasible, it will be necessary to significantly improve biomass productivities. One approach to achieve this objective is to reduce, via mutagenesis, the number of light harvesting pigments, which, according to theory, should significantly improve the light utilization efficiency, primarily by increasing the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is). Employing chemical (ethylmethylsulfonate, EMS) and UV mutagenesis of a wild type strain of the diatom Cyclotella, approximately 10,000 pigment mutants were generated, and two of the most promising ones (CM1 and CM1-1) were subjected to further testing in both laboratory cultures and outdoor ponds. Measurements of photosynthetic oxygen production rates as a function of light intensity (i.e., P-I curves) of samples taken from laboratory batch cultures during the exponential and linear growth phase indicated that the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is) was two to three times greater in the pigment mutant CM1-1 than in the wild type, i.e., 355-443 versus 116-169 μmole/m2∙sec, respectively. While theory, i.e., the Bush equation, predicts that such a significant gain in Is should increase light utilization efficiencies and thus biomass productivities, particularly at high light intensities, no improvements in biomass productivities were observed in either semi-continuous laboratory cultures or outdoor ponds. In fact, the maximum biomass productivity in semi-continuous laboratory culture was always greater in the wild type than in the mutant, namely 883 versus 725 mg/L∙d, respectively at low light intensity (200 μmole/m2∙sec) and 1229 versus 1043 mg/L∙d, respectively at high light intensity

  15. Irgasan-induced pigmentation in Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kranz, R G; Lynch, D L

    1979-01-01

    Two irgasan-resistant micro-organisms (P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens) were used to study the effects of various antibiotic and chemotherapeutic agents on pigment production. These agents included streptomycin, thallium acetate, polymyxin B, hexachlorophene, irgasan, prodigiosin and DMSO (dimethyl sulphoxide). Only irgasan, compared to other drugs and membrane-active agents showed the unique property of inducing pigmentation in both P. aeruginosa and S. marcescens, i.e. prodigiosin in S. marcescens and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa.

  16. TBARs distillation method: revision to minimize the interference from yellow pigments in meat products.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Linares, M B; Egea, M; Auqui, S M; Garrido, M D

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to study the effect of the incubation method and TBA reagent (concentration/solvent) on yellow pigment interference in meat products. Distillates from red sausage, sucrose, malondialdehyde and a mixture of sucrose-malondialdehyde were reacted with four different TBA solutions at five different temperature/time relations. Two TBA solutions were prepared at 20mM using 90% glacial acetic acid or 3.86% perchloric acid. In addition, an 80mM TBA solution was prepared using distilled water adjusted to pH4 and another using 0.8% TBA in distilled water. The temperature/time relations were: (1) 35min in a boiling water bath; (2) 70°C/30min; (3) 40°C/90min; (4) room temperature (r.t.) (24°C) in dark conditions for 20h; and (5) 60min in a boiling water bath. The results showed that aqueous or diluted acid solutions of TBA reagent and the application of 100°C for less than 1h provided the best conditions to minimize the presence of yellow pigments and maximize pink pigment formation in meat products.

  17. The effect of nanosilver on pigments production by Fusarium culmorum (W. G. Sm.) Sacc.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Marek J; Gorczyca, Anna; Frandsen, Rasmus J N

    2013-01-01

    A disk-diffusion method experiment assessed the impact of nanosilver on production of secondary metabolites (pigments) by the Fusarium culmorum fungus. Nanosilver colloidal particles in water have been obtained by the use of a method based on high voltage electric arcs between silver electrodes. The silver nanoparticles size in colloid ranged between 15 and 100 nm and 7, 35 and 70 ppm concentration. Nanosilver modifies the metabolism of the researched F. culmorum strain. Coming into contact with nanosilver colloids induces more intensive mycelia pigmentation correlated with nanosilver concentration levels. The performed analysis of metabolites indicates that under the influence of nanosilver fungi biosynthesise aurofusarin more intensively and the conversion of rubrofusarin to aurofusarin is intensified as compared to the control culture. Under the influence of nanosilver F. culmorum intensively biosynthesises an unidentified dye which shares structural features with aurofusarin but which is not produced by fungi in standard cultures.

  18. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  19. Effect of support materials on antibiotic MSW2000 production by immobilized Streptomyces violatus.

    PubMed

    el-Naggar, Mousatfa Y; Hassan, Maha A; Said, Wafa Y Y; el-Aassar, Samy A

    2003-08-01

    The production of an antibiotic by free and immobilized cells of Streptomyces violatus through entrapment or adsorption on different materials was investigated. S. violatus entrapped in Ca-alginate beads gave low antibiotic activity compared to the free cell or adsorbed cell, while the adsorption of S. violatus on sponge cubes yielded the highest antibiotic concentration after 4 days of incubation in static cultures. A starch concentration of 10 g/L was optimum for the production of the antibiotic by adsorbed cells. The weight and size of the sponge cubes used for immobilization influenced production of the antibiotic and the optimum weight and size of the sponge were 0.8 g and 1.0 cm(3), respectively, yielding a maximum antibiotic production of 280 mg/ml. Maximum antibiotic production was obtained at an initial pH value of 7.5 and in an inoculum size of 3 ml (spore suspension) per 50 ml. The production of the antibiotic in a fixed-bed bioreactor reached a maximum value after 2 days of incubation at a circulation rate of 30 ml/h. The immobilized cells in the bioreactor were reused seven successive times over a period of 14 days.

  20. Effect of algae pigmentation on photobioreactor productivity and scale-up: A light transfer perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoğlu, Halil

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports a numerical study coupling light transfer with photosynthetic rate models to determine the size and microorganism concentration of photobioreactors based on the pigmentation of algae to achieve maximum productivity. The wild strain Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and its transformant tla1 with 63% lower pigmentation are used as exemplary algae. First, empirical models of the specific photosynthetic rates were obtained from experimental data as a function of local irradiance using inverse methods. Then, these models were coupled with the radiative transfer equation (RTE) to predict both the local and total photosynthetic rates in a planar photobioreactor (PBR). The optical thickness was identified as the proper scaling parameter. The results indicated that under full sunlight corresponding to about 400 W/m2 photosynthetically active irradiation, enhancement of PBR productivity up to 30% was possible with tla1. Moreover, under similar irradiation, optical thicknesses above 169 and 275 for the wild strain and tla1, respectively, did not further enhance PBR productivity. Based on these results guidelines are provided for maximizing PBR productivity from a light transport perspective.

  1. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27383577

  2. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  3. [Pseudomonas fluorescens: production of pyoverdine in human blood at 4 degrees C and cytotoxic effect of the pigment].

    PubMed

    Pájaro, M C; Barberis, I L; Albesa, I

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PAB strain produced pyoverdine in a synthetic medium, this pigment was purified by solvent extraction and ion exchange, then sterilized by filtration. Where cytotoxic effect on human leukocytes was assayed, death and lysis was observed. Sublytic doses decreased leukocytes phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Bacteria grew and produced pigment in blood stored a 4 degrees C, with a pyoverdine production of 0.13 mg/ml of serum after 5 days of incubation. PMID:7784726

  4. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate.

  5. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate. PMID:27497132

  6. Umbelliprenin from Ferula persica roots inhibits the red pigment production in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Shahverdi, Ahmad R; Mirjani, Roohollah; Amin, Gholamreza; Shafiee, Abbas

    2004-01-01

    The chloroform extract of Ferula persica var. persica roots was found to inhibit red pigment production of Serratia marcescens. A bioguided fractionation study by preparative thin layer chromatography (PTLC) detected a fraction (Rf = 0.71, petroleum ether/EtOAc, 2:1 v/v), which was effective on depigmentation of Serratia marcescens. Using conventional spectroscopy methods, the active fraction was identified as umbelliprenin. Neither the chloroform extract nor the isolated umbelliprenin fraction showed any antibacterial activity against the test strain at a certain concentration. In contrast, they exhibited depigmentation zones on culture plates.

  7. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams.

  8. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams. PMID:26395288

  9. Antibiotic resistance—consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics. PMID:24678738

  10. Antibiotic resistance--consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Björn; Greko, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics.

  11. [Degradation pathways and main degradation products of tetracycline antibiotics: research progress].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Bao, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Qi-Xing

    2012-08-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) can produce a series of abiotic degradation reactions in the process of production and storage, and some of the degradation products have lower antibacterial activity but higher toxicity, as compared to the parent antibiotics. TCs can enter the environment via the disposal of livestock and poultry wastes, and then degrade in one or more ways according to the external conditions. Besides abiotic degradation, bio-degradation also happens. This paper reviewed the degradation pathways and main degradation products of TCs in different ecological environments, and discussed the future research directions, aimed to provide valuable reference for the ecological risk assessment of the antibiotics.

  12. Matrix Production, Pigment Synthesis, and Sporulation in a Marine Isolated Strain of Bacillus pumilus

    PubMed Central

    Di Luccia, Blanda; Riccio, Antonio; Vanacore, Adele; Baccigalupi, Loredana; Molinaro, Antonio; Ricca, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    The ability to produce an extracellular matrix and form multicellular communities is an adaptive behavior shared by many bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, the model system for spore-forming bacteria, matrix production is one of the possible differentiation pathways that a cell can follow when vegetative growth is no longer feasible. While in B. subtilis the genetic system controlling matrix production has been studied in detail, it is still unclear whether other spore formers utilize similar mechanisms. We report that SF214, a pigmented strain of Bacillus pumilus isolated from the marine environment, can produce an extracellular matrix relying on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for matrix synthesis in B. subtilis. We also report a characterization of the carbohydrates forming the extracellular matrix of strain SF214. The isolation and characterization of mutants altered in matrix synthesis, pigmentation, and spore formation suggest that in strain SF214 the three processes are strictly interconnected and regulated by a common molecular mechanism. PMID:26506360

  13. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique DM; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2009-01-01

    Background Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Methods Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. Results The MIC and MBC values were ≥1024 μg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Conclusion Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19761599

  14. Spectral conversion of light for enhanced microalgae growth rates and photosynthetic pigment production.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Richards, Bryce; Willoughby, Nik

    2012-12-01

    The effect of light conditions on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacteria Gloeothece membranacea was investigated by filtering different wavelengths of visible light and comparing against a model daylight source as a control. Luminescent acrylic sheets containing violet, green, orange or red dyes illuminated by a solar simulator produced the desired wavelengths of light for this study. From the experimental results the highest specific growth rate for C. vulgaris was achieved using the orange range whereas violet light promoted the growth of G. membranacea. Red light exhibited the least efficiency in conversion of light energy into biomass in both strains of microalgae. Photosynthetic pigment formation was examined and maximum chlorophyll-a production in C. vulgaris was obtained by red light illumination. Green light yielded the best chlorophyll-a production in G. membranacea. The proposed illumination strategy offers improved microalgae growth without resorting to artificial light sources, reducing energy use and costs of cultivation.

  15. Simultaneous determination of red and yellow artificial food colourants and carotenoid pigments in food products.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Xu, Zhimin

    2014-08-15

    A method for simultaneously determining four artificial food colourants [Red Nos. 2 (R2) and 40 (R40), Yellow Nos. 5 (Y5) and 6 (Y6)] and three carotenoids [lycopene, lutein, and β-carotene] was developed. They were successfully separated by the developed high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method combined with a photo diode array detector. The detection limit (at signal to noise>4) was from the lowest of 0.2 ng/mL for lutein to the highest of 50.0 ng/mL for R40. With a two-phase solvent and ultrasound-assisted extraction, the recoveries of the artificial and natural pigments in fifteen different types of food products were between 80.5-97.2% and 80.1-98.4%, respectively. This HPLC method with the ultrasound-assisted extraction protocol could be used as a sensitive and reliable analysis technique in simultaneously identifying and quantifying the reddish and yellowish pigments in different foods regardless of they are artificial food colourants or/and natural carotenoids. PMID:24679817

  16. Simultaneous determination of red and yellow artificial food colourants and carotenoid pigments in food products.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Xiumei; Prinyawiwatkul, Witoon; Xu, Zhimin

    2014-08-15

    A method for simultaneously determining four artificial food colourants [Red Nos. 2 (R2) and 40 (R40), Yellow Nos. 5 (Y5) and 6 (Y6)] and three carotenoids [lycopene, lutein, and β-carotene] was developed. They were successfully separated by the developed high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method combined with a photo diode array detector. The detection limit (at signal to noise>4) was from the lowest of 0.2 ng/mL for lutein to the highest of 50.0 ng/mL for R40. With a two-phase solvent and ultrasound-assisted extraction, the recoveries of the artificial and natural pigments in fifteen different types of food products were between 80.5-97.2% and 80.1-98.4%, respectively. This HPLC method with the ultrasound-assisted extraction protocol could be used as a sensitive and reliable analysis technique in simultaneously identifying and quantifying the reddish and yellowish pigments in different foods regardless of they are artificial food colourants or/and natural carotenoids.

  17. A chalcone isomerase-like protein enhances flavonoid production and flower pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yasumasa; Takagi, Kyoko; Fukuchi-Mizutani, Masako; Ishiguro, Kanako; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Nitasaka, Eiji; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Saito, Norio; Kagami, Takashi; Hoshino, Atsushi; Iida, Shigeru

    2014-04-01

    Flavonoids are major pigments in plants, and their biosynthetic pathway is one of the best-studied metabolic pathways. Here we have identified three mutations within a gene that result in pale-colored flowers in the Japanese morning glory (Ipomoea nil). As the mutations lead to a reduction of the colorless flavonoid compound flavonol as well as of anthocyanins in the flower petal, the identified gene was designated enhancer of flavonoid production (EFP). EFP encodes a chalcone isomerase (CHI)-related protein classified as a type IV CHI protein. CHI is the second committed enzyme of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, but type IV CHI proteins are thought to lack CHI enzymatic activity, and their functions remain unknown. The spatio-temporal expression of EFP and structural genes encoding enzymes that produce flavonoids is very similar. Expression of both EFP and the structural genes is coordinately promoted by genes encoding R2R3-MYB and WD40 family proteins. The EFP gene is widely distributed in land plants, and RNAi knockdown mutants of the EFP homologs in petunia (Petunia hybrida) and torenia (Torenia hybrida) had pale-colored flowers and low amounts of anthocyanins. The flavonol and flavone contents in the knockdown petunia and torenia flowers, respectively, were also significantly decreased, suggesting that the EFP protein contributes in early step(s) of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway to ensure production of flavonoid compounds. From these results, we conclude that EFP is an enhancer of flavonoid production and flower pigmentation, and its function is conserved among diverse land plant species.

  18. The comparison of laser surface designing and pigment printing methods for the product quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozguney, Arif Taner

    2007-07-01

    Developing new designs by using the computer and transferring the designs that are obtained to textile surfaces will not only increase and facilitate the production in a more practical manner, but also help you create identical designs. This means serial manufacturing of the products at standard quality and increasing their added values. Moreover, creating textile designs using the laser will also contribute to the value of the product as far as the consumer is concerned because it will not cause any wearing off and deformation in the texture of the fabric unlike the other methods. In the system that has been designed, the laser beam at selected wavelength and intensity was directed onto a selected textile surface and a computer-controlled laser beam source was used to change the colour substances on the textile surface. Pigment printing is also used for designing in textile and apparel sector. In this method, designs are transferred to the fabric manually by using dyestuff. In this study, the denim fabric used for the surfacing trial was 100% cotton, with a weft count per centimeter of 20 and a warp count per centimeter of 27, with fabric weight of 458 g/m 2. The first step was to prepare 40 pieces of denim samples, half of which were prepared manually pigment printing and the other half by using the laser beam. After this, some test applications were done. The tensile strength, tensile extension and some fastness values of designed pieces with two methods were compared according to the international standards.

  19. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s).

  20. A mutation in the aroE gene affects pigment production, virulence, and chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice. To study its function, a random insertion mutation library of Xoo was constructed using the Tn5 transposon. A mutant strain with decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar IR24 was isolated from the library (aroE mutant), which also had extremely low pigment production. Thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR) and sequence analysis of the mutant revealed that the transposon was inserted into the aroE gene (encoding shikimate dehydrogenase). To investigate gene expression changes in the pigment- and virulence-deficient mutant, DNA microarray analysis was performed, which showed downregulation of 20 genes involved in the chemotaxis of Xoo. Our findings reveal that mutation of the aroE gene affects virulence and pigment production, as well as expression of genes involved in Xoo chemotaxis.

  1. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  2. Pigment-Dispersing Factor Modulates Pheromone Production in Clock Cells that Influence Mating in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Joshua J.; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Wong, Amy; Choi, Charles; Nitabach, Michael N.; Levine, Joel D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Social cues contribute to the circadian entrainment of physiological and behavioral rhythms. These cues supplement the influence of daily and seasonal cycles in light and temperature. In Drosophila, the social environment modulates circadian mechanisms that regulate sex pheromone production and mating behavior. Here we demonstrate that a neuroendocrine pathway, defined by the neuropeptide Pigment-Dispersing Factor (PDF), couples the central nervous system (CNS) to the physiological output of peripheral clock cells that produce pheromones, the oenocytes. PDF signaling from the CNS modulates the phase of the oenocyte clock. Despite its requirement for sustaining free-running locomoter activity rhythms, PDF is not necessary to sustain molecular rhythms in the oenocytes. Interestingly, disruption of the PDF signaling pathway reduces male sex pheromones and results in sex-specific differences in mating behavior. Our findings highlight the role of neuropeptide signaling and the circadian system in synchronizing the physiological and behavioral processes which govern social interactions. PMID:23849197

  3. Nannochloropsis sp. biomass recovery by Electro-Coagulation for biodiesel and pigment production.

    PubMed

    Matos, C T; Santos, M; Nobre, B P; Gouveia, L

    2013-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgal biomass could be an alternative solution to conventional biofuels typically dependent on food and high land/water demanding crops. However, the economic and energetic viability of microalgal biofuels is limited by their harvesting processes. The finding of innovative, low cost and efficient harvesting method(s) is imperative. In this study, the Electro-Coagulation (EC) was studied as a process to harvest the marine Nannochloropsis sp. microalga. Several EC operational conditions were studied and the best EC recovery efficiency (>97%) was achieved using a current density of 8.3 mA cm(-2) for 10 min. The quality of the recovered microalgal biomass was evaluated in terms of total lipids, fatty acid and pigment profile where no significant differences were observed after EC treatment. The energy requirements of the harvesting process were estimated and the combination of EC and centrifugation processes proved to decrease significantly the energy demand when compared with the individual process.

  4. Pigment-dispersing factor modulates pheromone production in clock cells that influence mating in drosophila.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Joshua J; Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Wong, Amy; Choi, Charles; Nitabach, Michael N; Levine, Joel D

    2013-07-10

    Social cues contribute to the circadian entrainment of physiological and behavioral rhythms. These cues supplement the influence of daily and seasonal cycles in light and temperature. In Drosophila, the social environment modulates circadian mechanisms that regulate sex pheromone production and mating behavior. Here we demonstrate that a neuroendocrine pathway, defined by the neuropeptide Pigment-Dispersing Factor (PDF), couples the CNS to the physiological output of peripheral clock cells that produce pheromones, the oenocytes. PDF signaling from the CNS modulates the phase of the oenocyte clock. Despite its requirement for sustaining free-running locomoter activity rhythms, PDF is not necessary to sustain molecular rhythms in the oenocytes. Interestingly, disruption of the PDF signaling pathway reduces male sex pheromones and results in sex-specific differences in mating behavior. Our findings highlight the role of neuropeptide signaling and the circadian system in synchronizing the physiological and behavioral processes that govern social interactions.

  5. Formation of naturally occurring pigments during the production of nitrite-free dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    De Maere, Hannelore; Fraeye, Ilse; De Mey, Eveline; Dewulf, Lore; Michiels, Chris; Paelinck, Hubert; Chollet, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the potential of producing red coloured dry fermented sausages without the addition of nitrite and/or nitrate. Therefore, the formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX (Zn(II)PPIX) as naturally occurring pigment, and the interrelated protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and heme content were evaluated during nitrite-free dry fermented sausage production at different pH conditions. Zn(II)PPIX was only able to form in dry fermented sausages at pH conditions higher than approximately 4.9. Additionally, the presence of Zn(II)PPIX increased drastically at the later phase of the production process (up to day 177), confirming that in addition to pH, time is also a crucial factor for its formation. Similarly, PPIX also accumulated in the meat products at increased pH conditions and production times. In contrast, a breakdown of heme was observed. This breakdown was more gradual and independent of pH and showed no clear relationship with the formed amounts of Zn(II)PPIX and PPIX. A statistically significant relationship between Zn(II)PPIX formation and product redness was established.

  6. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with food animals: a United States perspective of livestock production.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Alan G; Cissell, Robin; Liamthong, S

    2007-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial compounds in food animal production provides demonstrated benefits, including improved animal health, higher production and, in some cases, reduction in foodborne pathogens. However, use of antibiotics for agricultural purposes, particularly for growth enhancement, has come under much scrutiny, as it has been shown to contribute to the increased prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria of human significance. The transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and selection for resistant bacteria can occur through a variety of mechanisms, which may not always be linked to specific antibiotic use. Prevalence data may provide some perspective on occurrence and changes in resistance over time; however, the reasons are diverse and complex. Much consideration has been given this issue on both domestic and international fronts, and various countries have enacted or are considering tighter restrictions or bans on some types of antibiotic use in food animal production. In some cases, banning the use of growth-promoting antibiotics appears to have resulted in decreases in prevalence of some drug resistant bacteria; however, subsequent increases in animal morbidity and mortality, particularly in young animals, have sometimes resulted in higher use of therapeutic antibiotics, which often come from drug families of greater relevance to human medicine. While it is clear that use of antibiotics can over time result in significant pools of resistance genes among bacteria, including human pathogens, the risk posed to humans by resistant organisms from farms and livestock has not been clearly defined. As livestock producers, animal health experts, the medical community, and government agencies consider effective strategies for control, it is critical that science-based information provide the basis for such considerations, and that the risks, benefits, and feasibility of such strategies are fully considered, so that human and animal health can be maintained while

  7. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:23702321

  8. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics.

  9. Aerobic inhibition assessment for anaerobic treatment effluent of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cetecioglu, Zeynep

    2014-02-01

    Biological treatment of antibiotic production effluents is an economical approach; however, there are still difficulties to overcome because of the recalcitrant characteristics of these compounds to biodegradation. This study aims to reveal that anaerobic treatment technology can be an option as pretreatment before the activated sludge system treatment to treat antibiotic production effluents. The ISO 8192 method was chosen to test the inhibitory effect of raw and treated antibiotic production effluents in this work. Inhibition tests, which were applied according to ISO 8192, highlighted that the anaerobic treatment effluent is less inhibitory than antibiotic production effluent for activated sludge system. Early EC50 concentrations (30-min values) of raw and treated wastewaters were lower than 180-min values. Also, triple effects (sulfamethoxazole-erythromycin-tetracycline) of antibiotics are more toxic than dual effects (sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline). In light of the experimental results obtained and their evaluation, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion can be applied as a biological pretreatment method for pharmaceutical industry wastewater including antibiotic mixtures prior to aerobic treatment.

  10. YS-822A, a new polyene macrolide antibiotic. I. Production, isolation, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Itoh, A; Ido, J; Iwamoto, Y; Goshima, E; Miki, T; Hasuda, K; Hirota, H

    1990-08-01

    A new polyene macrolide antibiotic, YS-822A was isolated from the culture filtrate of a mutant strain H-8 of Streptoverticillium eurocidicum var. asterocidicus S-822. Whereas the original S-822 strain produced not only YS-822 substances but also teleocidin as by-product which is well-known as a strong carcinogenic promoter, the mutagenized H-8 strain produced the antibiotic with only a trace amount of teleocidin. Chemical and biological characterizations of the antibiotic revealed that YS-822A (molecular formula: C37H59NO14) is a new polyene macrolide with a wide antifungal spectrum and a low acute toxicity. PMID:2211361

  11. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  12. Occurrence of antibiotics and their impacts to primary productivity in fishponds around Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Cong; Fan, Limin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Kamira, Barry; Chen, Jiazhang

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used to improve the health and yields of farmed animals, including fish, but their use is accompanied by undesirable ecological effects. Relatively little is known about the water-body burden of antibiotics and their influence on primary productivity in aquaculture ecosystem. In this study, antibiotics usage within 24 fishponds, covering 4 areas, sampled 5 times, and having 5 fish species, was investigated surrounding Tai Lake in China. The study analyzed 15 antibiotics (including 5 sulfonamides, 2 quinolones, 3 β-lactams, 3 tetracyclines, 1 amphenicol, and 1 macrolide), and all of them were detected in water samples, with a detection frequency of 2-60%. Sulfonamides were the most prevalent, and concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamonomethoxine, and florfenicol being over 2000 ng L(-1) in some samples, while the other antibiotics levels ranged from ND (no detection) to 551.18 ng L(-1). Significant differences were observed in antibiotic burden among different regions for total antibiotics, sulfonamides, quinolones, and amphenicols; among time points for quinolones, β-lactams, and tetracyclines; and among species for quinolones and macrolides. Furthermore, basing on the risk quotient (RQ) method, the assessment revealed that florfenicol was of highest risk to algae with RQ values exceeding 0.1, while macrolide erythromycin posed the second highest risk. The partial correlation coefficient between total antibiotics and chlorophyll (a) was -0.035 that clearly indicated total antibiotics were detrimental to green algae growth, while the nutrient input and other physical - chemical factors were much more beneficial. Overall, holistic far-reaching measures of antibiotics control are recommended to preserve aquaculture ecosystem health. PMID:27424054

  13. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency.

  14. [Separation of the biosynthesis products of a mutant strain of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides and the identification of actinomycin antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sverdlova, A N; Nefelova, M V; Silaev, A B

    1979-01-01

    An orange antibiotically active substance isolated from the mycelium of a mutant strain of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides was identified as a mixture of actinomycins according to its light absorption spectra, circular dichroism spectra, IR spectra and chromatographic comparison with the standard samples. A scheme for successive extraction of the biologically active substances from the mycelium resulting in isolation of a fraction enriched with antibiotic substances and a fraction enriched with pigments is presented. A method for separation and purification of 3 groups of biologically active substances from the mycelium enriched extract was developed.

  15. Developmentally Regulated Production of meso-Zeaxanthin in Chicken Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Choroid and Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Shyam, Rajalekshmy; Li, Binxing; Vachali, Preejith; Subhani, Yumna K.; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose meso-Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that is rarely encountered in nature outside of the vertebrate eye. It is not a constituent of a normal human diet, yet this carotenoid comprises one-third of the primate macular pigment. In the current study, we undertook a systematic approach to biochemically characterize the production of meso-zeaxanthin in the vertebrate eye. Methods Fertilized White Leghorn chicken eggs were analyzed for the presence of carotenoids during development. Yolk, liver, brain, serum, retina, and RPE/choroid were isolated, and carotenoids were extracted. The samples were analyzed on C-30 or chiral HPLC columns to determine the carotenoid composition. Results Lutein and zeaxanthin were found in all studied nonocular tissues, but no meso-zeaxanthin was ever detected. Among the ocular tissues, the presence of meso-zeaxanthin was consistently observed starting at embryonic day 17 (E17) in the RPE/choroid, several days before its consistent detection in the retina. If RPE/choroid of an embryo was devoid of meso-zeaxanthin, the corresponding retina was always negative as well. Conclusions This is the first report of developmentally regulated synthesis of meso-zeaxanthin in a vertebrate system. Our observations suggest that the RPE/choroid is the primary site of meso-zeaxanthin synthesis. Identification of meso-zeaxanthin isomerase enzyme in the developing chicken embryo will facilitate our ability to determine the biochemical mechanisms responsible for production of this unique carotenoid in other higher vertebrates, such as humans. PMID:27082300

  16. Manipulating and understanding antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) with decoy oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Michael; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2008-01-22

    We have adapted and extended the decoy oligonucleotide technique for use in prokaryotes. To identify cis-acting regulatory elements within a promoter, we developed a DNase I/T7 exonuclease footprinting technique and applied it to actII-orf4 from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), which encodes the pathway-specific activator for production of the antibiotic actinorhodin. Our in vivo mapping data allowed us to create decoy oligonucleotides incorporating the identified regulatory elements and to test whether their introduction into S. coelicolor affected antibiotic production. We mapped the promoter region when in a transcriptionally inactive state before the onset of actinorhodin production with the aim of designing decoy oligonucleotides capable of interfering with potential repressor binding and so stimulate actinorhodin production. Mapping identified five candidates for decoy oligonucleotides, and these were tested in a plate-based assay to rapidly validate their activity. A transfection protocol was developed for liquid cultures that enabled efficient uptake of decoys, and quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated decoy persistence for >70 h. Measurement of the effects on growth, expression of actII-orf4, and antibiotic production demonstrated that one of the decoys, in concordance with the plate assay, was more efficacious than the others in increasing actinorhodin production. Two of the identified regulatory elements occurred upstream of gene SCO5812, deletion of which reduced actinorhodin production, confirming that experimental analysis of regulatory motifs can provide new insights into factors influencing antibiotic production in streptomycetes.

  17. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  18. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  19. Dynamics of symbiont-mediated antibiotic production reveal efficient long-term protection for beewolf offspring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insects have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to defend themselves and their offspring against antagonists. One of these strategies involves the utilization of antimicrobial compounds provided by symbiotic bacteria to protect the host or its nutritional resources from pathogens and parasites. In the symbiosis of the solitary digger wasp, Philanthus triangulum (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), the bacterial symbiont ‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’ defends the developing larvae against pathogens by producing a mixture of at least nine antimicrobial substances on the cocoon surface. This antibiotic cocktail inhibits the growth of a broad range of detrimental fungi and bacteria, thereby significantly enhancing the offspring’s survival probability. Results Here we show that the production of antimicrobial compounds by the beewolf symbionts is confined to the first two weeks after cocoon spinning, leading to a high concentration of piericidins and streptochlorin on the cocoon surface. Expression profiling of housekeeping, sporulation, and antibiotic biosynthesis genes indicates that antibiotic production coincides with morphological differentiation that enables the symbionts to survive the nutrient-limited conditions on the beewolf cocoon. The antibiotic substances remain stable on the cocoon surface for the entire duration of the beewolf’s hibernation period, demonstrating that the compounds are resistant against environmental influences. Conclusions The antibiotic production by the beewolf symbionts serves as a reliable protection for the wasp offspring against pathogenic microorganisms during the long and unpredictable developmental phase in the subterranean brood cells. Thus, the beewolf-Streptomyces symbiosis provides one of the rare examples of antibiotics serving as an efficient defense in the natural environment and may aid in devising new strategies for the utilization of antibiotic combination therapies in human medicine against increasingly

  20. Nannochloropsis sp. biomass recovery by Electro-Coagulation for biodiesel and pigment production.

    PubMed

    Matos, C T; Santos, M; Nobre, B P; Gouveia, L

    2013-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgal biomass could be an alternative solution to conventional biofuels typically dependent on food and high land/water demanding crops. However, the economic and energetic viability of microalgal biofuels is limited by their harvesting processes. The finding of innovative, low cost and efficient harvesting method(s) is imperative. In this study, the Electro-Coagulation (EC) was studied as a process to harvest the marine Nannochloropsis sp. microalga. Several EC operational conditions were studied and the best EC recovery efficiency (>97%) was achieved using a current density of 8.3 mA cm(-2) for 10 min. The quality of the recovered microalgal biomass was evaluated in terms of total lipids, fatty acid and pigment profile where no significant differences were observed after EC treatment. The energy requirements of the harvesting process were estimated and the combination of EC and centrifugation processes proved to decrease significantly the energy demand when compared with the individual process. PMID:23500578

  1. Nutrient availability affects pigment production but not growth in lichens of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Koch, G.W.; Belnap, J.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that micronutrients such as Mn may limit growth of slow-growing biological soil crusts (BSCs) in some of the drylands of the world. These soil surface communities contribute strongly to arid ecosystem function and are easily degraded, creating a need for new restoration tools. The possibility that Mn fertilization could be used as a restoration tool for BSCs has not been tested previously. We used microcosms in a controlled greenhouse setting to investigate the hypothesis that Mn may limit photosynthesis and consequently growth in Collema tenax, a dominant N-fixing lichen found in BSCs worldwide. We found no evidence to support our hypothesis; furthermore, addition of other nutrients (primarily P, K, and Zn) had a suppressive effect on gross photosynthesis (P = 0.05). We also monitored the growth and physiological status of our microcosms and found that other nutrients increased the production of scytonemin, an important sunscreen pigment, but only when not added with Mn (P = 0.01). A structural equation model indicated that this effect was independent of any photosynthesis-related variable. We propose two alternative hypotheses to account for this pattern: (1) Mn suppresses processes needed to produce scytonemin; and (2) Mn is required to suppress scytonemin production at low light, when it is an unnecessary photosynthate sink. Although Mn fertilization does not appear likely to increase photosynthesis or growth of Collema, it could have a role in survivorship during environmentally stressful periods due to modification of scytonemin production. Thus, Mn enrichment should be studied further for its potential to facilitate BSC rehabilitation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. High value pigment production from Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis cultured in seawater.

    PubMed

    Leema, J T Mary; Kirubagaran, R; Vinithkumar, N V; Dheenan, P S; Karthikayulu, S

    2010-12-01

    The prospects of utilizing pretreated seawater for the culture of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis was evaluated under laboratory conditions with three seawater media and a control: (1) Zarrouk media (freshwater-control) (2) seawater media SW 1 (3) seawater media SW2 and (4) seawater media SW 3. The relative performance of these media were investigated with respect to their biomass production, pigment production (phycocyanin, lutein and betacarotene), and biochemical composition. A. platensis grown in media SW 2 had a biomass production (2.99+/-0.145 g L(-1)) comparable to that of control media (3.114+/-0.085 g L(-1)); highest specific growth rate (0.255 d(-1)) and lowest doubling time (2.720 days). Phycocyanin content of the cells grown in seawater media SW 3(81.85%) was closer to that of control. Similarly the purity ratio of phycocyanin produced from cells grown in seawater media SW 3 and control were closer to 4, while the phycocyanin obtained from cells grown in other two media exhibited lower purity ratios due to accumulation of lower molecular weight carbohydrates. The phycocyanin/Chl-a ratio and the betacarotene/Chl-a ratio of the cells grown in seawater media were higher than control. The lutein content of A. platensis cells grown in seawater media SW 2 was higher than that of control. The cells grown in seawater media had a slightly modified biochemical composition than the control with a higher carbohydrate and lower protein content. All the three seawater based media with fewer chemicals than the control (Zarrouk media) supported the growth of A. platensis as good as the control. PMID:20655201

  3. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production: a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Kieffer, Leah; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-04-15

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin 'spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems. PMID:22442364

  4. Relative contributions of pigments and biophotonic nanostructures to natural color production: a case study in budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) feathers.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Kieffer, Leah; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2012-04-15

    Understanding the mechanistic bases of natural color diversity can provide insight into its evolution and inspiration for biomimetic optical structures. Metazoans can be colored by absorption of light from pigments or by scattering of light from biophotonic nanostructures, and these mechanisms have largely been treated as distinct. However, the interactions between them have rarely been examined. Captive breeding of budgerigars (Aves, Psittacidae, Melopsittacus undulatus) has produced a wide variety of color morphs spanning the majority of the spectrum visible to birds, including the ultraviolet, and thus they have been used as examples of hypothesized structure-pigment interactions. However, empirical data testing these interactions in this excellent model system are lacking. Here we used ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, light and electron microscopy, pigment extraction experiments and optical modeling to examine the physical bases of color production in seven budgerigar morphs, including grey and chromatic (purple to yellow) colors. Feathers from all morphs contained quasi-ordered air-keratin 'spongy layer' matrices, but these were highly reduced and irregular in grey and yellow feathers. Similarly, all feathers but yellow and grey had a layer of melanin-containing melanosomes basal to the spongy layer. The presence of melanosomes likely increases color saturation produced by spongy layers whereas their absence may allow increased expression of yellow colors. Finally, extraction of yellow pigments caused some degree of color change in all feathers except purple and grey, suggesting that their presence and contribution to color production is more widespread than previously thought. These data illustrate how interactions between structures and pigments can increase the range of colors attainable in birds and potentially in synthetic systems.

  5. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the antibiotic tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ross C; Creemer, Lawrence C; Ziprin, Richard L; Nisbet, David J

    2005-12-14

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were developed that specifically bind tilmicosin. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates were used for the immunogen and plate coating antigen, respectively. The conjugates were synthesized by different methods, resulting in different linkages. Six hybridoma cell lines were isolated that produced Mabs that competed with tilmicosin, and have IgG1 isotype. The Til-1 and Til-5 Mabs had IC50 values for tilmicosin of 9.6 and 6.4 ng/well (48 and 32 ng/mL), respectively, and limits of detection at IC20 of 1.84 and 0.89 ng/well (9.2 and 4.45 ng/mL), respectively. The Mabs demonstrated high cross-reactivity to the macrolides containing 3,5-dimethylpiperidine at C20 and the amino sugar at C5. No cross-reactivity was observed for tylosin and other macrolides that did not contain 3,5-dimethylpiperidine. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the antibiotic tilmicosin by use of the developed Mabs. These Mabs may be excellent candidates for the determination and immunolocalization of tilmicosin.

  6. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  7. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  8. Prevalence of Veterinary Antibiotics and Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in the Surface Water of a Livestock Production Region in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L−1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  9. Embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J

    1976-01-01

    The embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies may be due, although rather rarely, to chemical factors, such as antibiotics and thalidomide, to ionizing radiation and to infectious factors, syphilis or viral infections, such as mumps, measles, varicella, or cytomegalovirus. The most frequent and the most typical dystrophy is, nevertheless, the rubella epitheliopathy with its widespread scattered black pigment deposits, found predominantly in the posterior pole, and its unaffected visual functions. The macular dystrophy associated with deaf-mutism is also often due to a maternal rubella infection.

  10. Production of phycocyanin--a pigment with applications in biology, biotechnology, foods and medicine.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Niels T

    2008-08-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a blue pigment in cyanobacteria, rhodophytes and cryptophytes with fluorescent and antioxidative properties. C-PC is presently extracted from open pond cultures of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis although these cultures are not very productive and open for contaminating organisms. C-PC is considered a healthy ingredient in cyanobacterial-based foods and health foods while its colouring, fluorescent or antioxidant properties are utilised only to a minor extent. However, recent research and developments in C-PC synthesis and functionality have expanded the potential applications of C-PC in biotechnology, diagnostics, foods and medicine: The productivity of C-PC has been increased in heterotrophic, high cell density cultures of the rhodophyte Galdieria sulphuraria that are grown under well-controlled and axenic conditions. C-PC purification protocols based on various chromatographic principles or novel two-phase aqueous extraction methods have expanded in numbers and improved in performance. The functionality of C-PC as a fluorescent dye has been improved by chemical stabilisation of C-PC complexes, while protein engineering has also introduced increased stability and novel biospecific binding sites into C-PC fusion proteins. Finally, our understanding of the physiological functions of C-PC in humans has been improved by a mechanistic hypothesis that links the chemical properties of the phycocyanobilin chromophores of C-PC to the natural antioxidant, bilirubin, and may explain the observed health benefits of C-PC intake. This review outlines how C-PC is produced and utilised and discusses the novel C-PC synthesis procedures and applications.

  11. Influence of growth regulators and elicitors on cell growth and α-tocopherol and pigment productions in cell cultures of Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Smita P; Lokhande, Vinayak H; Nitnaware, Kirti M; Nikam, Tukaram D

    2011-03-01

    The present study examined the effects of plant growth hormones, incubation period, biotic (Trametes versicolor, Mucor sp., Penicillium notatum, Rhizopus stolonifer, and Fusarium oxysporum) and abiotic (NaCl, MgSO(4), FeSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeCl(3)) elicitors on cell growth and α-tocopherol and pigment (red and yellow) productions in Carthamus tinctorius cell cultures. The cell growth and α-tocopherol and pigment contents improved significantly on Murashige and Skoog (MS) liquid medium containing 50.0 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 2.5 μM 6-Benzyladenine (BA) at 28 days of incubation period. Incorporation of T. versicolor (50 mg l(-1)) significantly enhanced the production of α-tocopherol (12.7-fold) and red pigment (4.24-fold). Similarly, supplementation of 30 mg l(-1) T. versicolor (7.54-fold) and 70 mg l(-1) Mucor sp. (7.40-fold) significantly increased the production of yellow pigment. Among abiotic elicitors, NaCl (50-70 mg l(-1)) and MgSO(4) (10-30 mg l(-1)) significantly improved production of α-tocopherol (1.24-fold) and red pigment (20-fold), whereas yellow pigment content increased considerably by all the abiotic elicitor treatments. Taken together, the present study reports improved productions of α-tocopherol and the pigment as a stress response of safflower cell cultures exposed to these elicitors.

  12. ARS Research Review on "Recent progress in developing alternative strategies to antibiotics in poultry production"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global animal industry needs to address the increasing regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production. Many AGPs have already been restricted by animal farms in the European Union and soon other countries are expected to be under increasing scrutin...

  13. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products for intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial resistance is a global problem, probably due to the indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics, prescriptions for incorrect medicines or incorrect determinations of dose, route and/or duration. Another consideration is the uncertainty of patients receiving antibiotics about whether the quality of a generic medicine is equal to, greater than or less than its equivalent brand-name drug. The antibiotics behaviors must be evaluated in vitro and in vivo in order to confirm their suitability for therapeutic use. Methods The antimicrobial activities of Meropenem and Piperacillin/Tazobactam were studied by microbiological assays to determine their potencies (content), minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), critical concentrations and capacity to produce spontaneous drug-resistant mutants. Results With respect to potency (content) all the products fulfill USP requirements, so they should all be considered pharmaceutical equivalents. The MIC values of the samples evaluated (trade marks and generics) were the same for each strain tested, indicating that all products behaved similarly. The critical concentration values were very similar for all samples, and the ratios between the critical concentration of the standard and those of each sample were similar to the ratios of their specific antibiotic contents. Overall, therefore, the results showed no significant differences among samples. Finally, the production of spontaneous mutants did not differ significantly among the samples evaluated. Conclusions All the samples are pharmaceutical equivalents and the products can be used in antimicrobial therapy. PMID:20113478

  14. Cold drugs. Circulation, production and intelligence of antibiotics in post-WWII years.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper details how the earliest antibiotics were subject to a strict control during the earliest phase of the Cold War. Because of antibiotics strategic and economic value, Anglo-American Governments restricted circulation of scientists, techno-scientific know-how and technology related to penicillin production, as well as closely controlling the circulation of the drugs in the Communist countries. These efforts are documented by archival documents, testifying how drugs were actual instruments of propaganda and political strategies, affecting pharmaceutical development both in the Western and the Eastern bloc.

  15. Antibiotics and bioactive natural products in treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains with Methicillin resistance are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, aggressive course, multiple drug resistance and hospital outbreaks. Several first and second line antibiotics are rapidly becoming ineffective for treatment due to emergence of resistance. Extracts of medicinal plants are rich source of unique phytochemicals. Plants used in traditional medicine have been reported to have significant anti-MRSA activity. The objective of this review is to provide a brief overview of antibiotics as well as anti-MRSA natural products and their future prospect. PMID:26009690

  16. Cold drugs. Circulation, production and intelligence of antibiotics in post-WWII years.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper details how the earliest antibiotics were subject to a strict control during the earliest phase of the Cold War. Because of antibiotics strategic and economic value, Anglo-American Governments restricted circulation of scientists, techno-scientific know-how and technology related to penicillin production, as well as closely controlling the circulation of the drugs in the Communist countries. These efforts are documented by archival documents, testifying how drugs were actual instruments of propaganda and political strategies, affecting pharmaceutical development both in the Western and the Eastern bloc. PMID:26054208

  17. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  18. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  19. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  20. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  1. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  2. Production of peptide antibiotics by Bacillus sp. GU 057 indigenously isolated from saline soil

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Adnan; Khan, Muhammad Ayaz; Ehsanullah, Malik; Haroon, Uzma; Azam, Sheikh Muhammad Farooq; Hameed, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    A total of 112 soil samples were taken from differents areas of district D.I.Khan and Kohat (KPK) Pakistan and screened for production of antibiotics against the Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus. Widest zone of inhibition (18mm) was produced by microorganism isolated from saline soil. The strain was later identified as Bacillus GU057 by standard biochemical assays. Maximum activity (18mm inhibition zone) was observed against Staphylococcus aureus after 48 hours of incubation at pH 8 and 4% concentration of glucose. The antibiotic was identified by autobiography as bacitracin. The Bacillus strain GU057 was confirmed as good peptide antibiotic producer and can effectively be indulged as biocontrol agent. PMID:24031962

  3. The Effect of Antibiotics on Associated Bacterial Community of Stored Product Mites

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Mareckova-Sagova, Marketa; Hubert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata). The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mgg−1 of diet) for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor. Conclusions/Significance The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mgg−1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet. PMID:25387104

  4. The Functional Significance of Black-Pigmented Leaves: Photosynthesis, Photoprotection and Productivity in Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’

    PubMed Central

    Hatier, Jean-Hugues B.; Clearwater, Michael J.; Gould, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Black pigmented leaves are common among horticultural cultivars, yet are extremely rare across natural plant populations. We hypothesised that black pigmentation would disadvantage a plant by reducing photosynthesis and therefore shoot productivity, but that this trait might also confer protective benefits by shielding chloroplasts against photo-oxidative stress. CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll a fluorescence, shoot biomass, and pigment concentrations were compared for near isogenic green- and black-leafed Ophiopogonplaniscapus ‘Nigrescens’. The black leaves had lower maximum CO2 assimilation rates, higher light saturation points and higher quantum efficiencies of photosystem II (PSII) than green leaves. Under saturating light, PSII photochemistry was inactivated less and recovered more completely in the black leaves. In full sunlight, green plants branched more abundantly and accumulated shoot biomass quicker than the black plants; in the shade, productivities of the two morphs were comparable. The data indicate a light-screening, photoprotective role of foliar anthocyanins. However, limitations to photosynthetic carbon assimilation are relatively small, insufficient to explain the natural scarcity of black-leafed plants. PMID:23826347

  5. Natural Products as a Source for Novel Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Natural products have historically been of crucial importance in the identification and development of antibacterial agents. Interest in these systems has waned in recent years, but the rapid emergence of resistant bacterial strains has forced their re-evaluation as a route to identify novel chemical skeletons with antibacterial activity for elaboration in drug development. This overview examines the current situation, highlights new natural product systems which have been found, together with re-examination of some old ones, and new technologies for their identification. While natural products certainly have the potential to re-emerge as a key start-point in antibacterial drug discovery, reports of new or reinvestigated structures need to be supported with sufficient quality chemical (solubility, stability), biochemical (including toxicity in particular, along with target information) and microbiological [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and resistance frequency] validation data to assist in the identification of promising hit structures and to avoid wasted effort from trawling over already cultivated territory. This is particularly important in a resource-limited research environment. PMID:27267698

  6. Statistical optimization of pigment production by Monascus sanguineus under stress condition.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Rashmi; Tallapragada, Padmavathi

    2014-01-01

    Natural pigments are produced by the Monascus sp., which are used for coloring food substances. The intent of this study was to optimize the pigment yield and biomass produced from the unexplored Monascus sanguineus in submerged culture under stress conditions. For inducing thermal stress, the spores were incubated at various temperatures at higher ranges. For inducing osmotic stress, varied concentrations of NaCl, glycerol, and peptone were used. The medium components were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The combined effects of the four medium constituents mentioned were studied using a 2⁴ full factorial central composite design (CCD). The relationships between the predicted values and actual values, independent variable, and the response were calculated according to a second-order quadratic model. It was deduced that the variable with the leading effect was the linear effect of glycerol concentration. Furthermore, the quadratic effects of peptone and the interactive effects of temperature and glycerol were more noteworthy than other factors. The optimum values for the test variables in coded factors were found to be spores treated with 70°C for temperature, 0.25 M for glycerol, 0.51% (w/v) for peptone, and 1.25% (w/v) for NaCl, corresponding to a maximum red pigment yield of 55.67 color value units (CVU)/mL. With optimized conditions, the pigment yield was almost three times the yield observed with the control.

  7. Melanocyte pigmentation inversely correlates with MCP-1 production and angiogenesis-inducing potential.

    PubMed

    Adini, Irit; Adini, Avner; Bazinet, Lauren; Watnick, Randolph S; Bielenberg, Diane R; D'Amato, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of certain angiogenesis-dependent diseases is higher in Caucasians than in African Americans. Angiogenesis is amplified in wound healing and cornea models in albino C57 mice compared with black C57 mice. Moreover, mouse and human melanocytes with low pigmentation stimulate endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration in vitro more than melanocytes with high pigmentation. This effect is due, in part, to the secretion of an angiogenic protein called fibromodulin (FMOD) from lowly pigmented melanocytes. Herein, we expand upon the mechanism contributing to increased angiogenesis in lighter skin and report that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is secreted by nonpigmented mouse melanocytes by 5- to 10-fold more than pigmented melanocytes. MCP-1 protein stimulates EC proliferation and migration in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. Mechanistic studies determine that FMOD is upstream of MCP-1 and promotes its secretion from both melanocytes and activated ECs via stimulation of NF-κB activity. Mice injected with FMOD-neutralizing antibodies show 2.3-fold decreased levels of circulating MCP-1. Human studies confirmed that, on average, Caucasians have 2-fold higher serum levels of MCP-1 than African Americans. Taken together, this study implicates the FMOD/MCP-1 pathway in the regulation of angiogenesis by local melanocytes and suggests that melanogenic activity may protect against aberrant angiogenic diseases.

  8. A new, simple method for the production of meat-curing pigment under optimised conditions using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2012-12-01

    The production of cured meat pigment using nitrite and ascorbate in acidic conditions was evaluated. HCl, ascorbate and nitrite concentrations were optimised at three levels using the response surface method (RSM). The effects of process variables on the nitrosoheme yield, the wavelength of maximum absorbance (λ(max)), and L*, a* and b* values were evaluated. The response surface equations indicate that variables exerted a significant effect on all dependent factors. The optimum combinations for the reaction were HCl=-0.8, ascorbate=0.46 and nitrite=1.00 as coded values for conversion of 1mM hemin to nitrosoheme, by which a pigment yield of 100%, which was similar to the predicted value of 99.5%, was obtained. Likewise, the other parameters were not significantly different from predicted values as the λ(max), L*, a* and b* values were 558 nm, 47.03, 45.17 and 17.20, respectively. The structure of the pigment was identified using FTIR and ESI/MS.

  9. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products.

  10. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococci isolated from ready-to-eat meat products.

    PubMed

    Podkowik, M; Bystroń, J; Bania, J

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence of mecA, blaZ, tetO/K/M, ermA/B/C, aph, and vanA/B/C/D genes conferring resistance to oxacillin, penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, and vancomycin was investigated in 65 staphylococcal isolates belonging to twelve species obtained from ready-to-eat porcine, bovine, and chicken products. All coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) and S. aureus isolates harbored at least one antibiotic resistance gene. None of the S. aureus possessed more than three genes, while 25% of the CNS isolates harbored at least four genes encoding resistance to clinically used antibiotics. In 15 CNS isolates the mecA gene was detected, while all S. aureus isolates were mecA-negative. We demonstrate that in ready-to-eat food the frequency of CNS harboring multiple antibiotic resistance genes is higher than that of multiple resistant S. aureus, meaning that food can be considered a reservoir of bacteria containing genes potentially contributing to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in staphylococci.

  11. Hfq regulates antibacterial antibiotic biosynthesis and extracellular lytic-enzyme production in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaoge; Zhao, Yuxin; Du, Liangcheng; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2015-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is an important biocontrol agent with the ability to produce a variety of lytic enzymes and novel antibiotics. Little is known about their regulatory mechanisms. Understanding these will be helpful for improving biocontrol of crop diseases and potential medical application. In the present study, we generated an hfq (encoding a putative ribonucleic acid chaperone) deletion mutant, and then utilized a new genomic marker-free method to construct an hfq-complemented strain. We showed for the first time that Hfq played a pleiotropic role in regulating the antibacterial antibiotic biosynthesis and extracellular lytic enzyme activity in L. enzymogenes. Mutation of hfq significantly increased the yield of WAP-8294A2 (an antibacterial antibiotic) as well as the transcription of its key biosynthetic gene, waps1. However, inactivation of hfq almost abolished the extracellular chitinase activity and remarkably decreased the activity of both extracellular protease and cellulase in L. enzymogenes. We further showed that the regulation of hfq in extracellular chitinase production was in part through the impairment of the secretion of chitinase A. Collectively, our results reveal the regulatory roles of hfq in antibiotic metabolite and extracellular lytic enzymes in the underexplored genus of Lysobacter. PMID:25683974

  12. Spatial patterns of phytoplanktonic pigments and primary production in a semi-enclosed periantarctic ecosystem: the Strait of Magellan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggiomo, V.; Goffart, A.; Carrada, G. C.; Hecq, J. H.

    1994-07-01

    The spatial patterns of nitrate, phytoplankton size-fractionated chlorophyll a, photosynthetic pigments detected by HPLC and primary production were studied at the end of the austral summer (February-March 1991), in the Strait of Magellan to provide insight into the mechanisms governing this seemi-enclosed periantartic ecosystem. Climatological peculiarities, hydrodynamic constraints, runoff and land forcing were considered. The most important features identified for this area were the confinement of the microphytoplankton fraction to the external parts of the Strait and the rather uniform dimensional structure of the phytoplankton communities (< 5 μm) within the internal sectors. In particular, the nanoplanktonic fraction (10-2 μm) comprised 33%, while the picoplanktonic one (2-0.5 μm) represented 62% of the total. The concentration of active Chl. a and plant pigments detected by HPLC, nitrate and primary production showed an uneven but similar distribution, allowing for the characterization of different sectors within the Strait, according to different types and intensities of forcing factors. The different ecological sectors identified along the Strait were associated with distinct hydrographic typologies: an oligotrophic, wind-mixed coastal area, adjacent to the Pacific opening; a high runoff fjord and a divergence zone in the Andean sectors; a stratified inland sea in the basin-like part of the channel (Paso Ancho) and a shallow, tidally mixed system in the Patagonian sectors. Areas of relatively low and high phytoplankton biomass and primary production alternate along the Strait, according to the hydrographic structures of the different sectors. Phytoplankton biomass, in terms of active Chl. a (spectrofluorometric determination) ranged between 10 and 51 mg m -2 and primary production between 275 and 1170 mg C m -2 d -1. The assemblage of plant pigments detected by HPLC indicated that the high levels of phytoplankton pigments and production were most likely

  13. The re-emerging role of microbial natural products in antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, Olga

    2014-07-01

    New classes of antibacterial compounds are urgently needed to respond to the high frequency of occurrence of resistances to all major classes of known antibiotics. Microbial natural products have been for decades one of the most successful sources of drugs to treat infectious diseases but today, the emerging unmet clinical need poses completely new challenges to the discovery of novel candidates with the desired properties to be developed as antibiotics. While natural products discovery programs have been gradually abandoned by the big pharma, smaller biotechnology companies and research organizations are taking over the lead in the discovery of novel antibacterials. Recent years have seen new approaches and technologies being developed and integrated in a multidisciplinary effort to further exploit microbial resources and their biosynthetic potential as an untapped source of novel molecules. New strategies to isolate novel species thought to be uncultivable, and synthetic biology approaches ranging from genome mining of microbial strains for cryptic biosynthetic pathways to their heterologous expression have been emerging in combination with high throughput sequencing platforms, integrated bioinformatic analysis, and on-site analytical detection and dereplication tools for novel compounds. These different innovative approaches are defining a completely new framework that is setting the bases for the future discovery of novel chemical scaffolds that should foster a renewed interest in the identification of novel classes of natural product antibiotics from the microbial world.

  14. Algal pigment distribution and primary production in the eastern Mediterranean as derived from coastal zone color scanner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, David; Morel, André; André, Jean-Michel

    1995-08-01

    About 300 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) scenes, gathered over the eastern Mediterranean basin mostly during the years 1979-1981, have been processed from level 1 by using improved pixel-by-pixel procedures for the atmospheric correction and pigment retrieval. The seasonal evolution of the upper ocean pigment concentration is described and analyzed within the whole basin and its subbasins. From the chlorophyll concentration in the top layer, and by using statistical relationships, the depth-integrated pigment content is estimated and used in conjunction with a light-photosynthesis model to estimate the carbon fixation. The model relies on a set of physiological parameters, selected after the validation of the light-photosynthesis model and not on locally measured parameters. Additional information needed in the modeling are the photosynthetically available radiation (computed from astronomic and atmospheric parameters, combined with a cloud climatology), sea temperature and mixed-layer depth (taken from Levitus (1982)). Actually, the model is used to generate look-up tables in such a way that all possible situations (concerning available radiation, chlorophyll concentration, and temperature) are covered. The appropriate situation associated with any pixel is selected from these tables to generate primary production maps. Despite a relatively good spatial coverage, studying the interannual variability of the pigment distribution and primary production appeared to be impossible. Therefore 12 "climatological" monthly chlorophyll maps have been produced by merging the data corresponding to several years. The carbon fixation rates in each of the subbasins have been computed on a monthly basis, and annual mean values derived thereafter. The primary production values are compared with sparse field determinations. They are also compared with those previously derived for the Western basin, also by using CZCS data (Morel and André, 1991). When put together, these

  15. Macroalgal Endophytes from the Atlantic Coast of Canada: A Potential Source of Antibiotic Natural Products?

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, Katelyn T.; Sanford, Joseph; Forward, Erica; Johnson, John A.; Gray, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for new and more effective antibiotics increases, untapped sources of biodiversity are being explored in an effort to provide lead structures for drug discovery. Endophytic fungi from marine macroalgae have been identified as a potential source of biologically active natural products, although data to support this is limited. To assess the antibiotic potential of temperate macroalgal endophytes we isolated endophytic fungi from algae collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada and screened fungal extracts for the presence of antimicrobial compounds. A total of 79 endophytes were isolated from 7 species of red, 4 species of brown, and 3 species of green algae. Twenty of the endophytes were identified to the genus or species level, with the remaining isolates designated codes according to their morphology. Bioactivity screening assays performed on extracts of the fermentation broths and mycelia of the isolates revealed that 43 endophytes exhibited antibacterial activity, with 32 displaying antifungal activity. Endophytic fungi from Bay of Fundy macroalgae therefore represent a significant source of antibiotic natural products and warrant further detailed investigation.

  16. Releasing intracellular product to prepare whole cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments in water-edible oil two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minglue; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2016-11-01

    Selective releasing intracellular product in Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution to prepare whole cell biocatalyst is a novel strategy for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments, in which cell suspension culture exhibits some advantages comparing with the corresponding growing cell submerged culture. In the present work, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 was successfully replaced by edible plant oils for releasing intracellular Monascus pigments. High concentration of Monascus pigments (with absorbance nearly 710 AU at 470 nm in the oil phase, normalized to the aqueous phase volume approximately 142 AU) was achieved by cell suspension culture in peanut oil-water two-phase system. Furthermore, the utilization of edible oil as extractant also fulfills the demand for application of Monascus pigments as natural food colorant.

  17. Releasing intracellular product to prepare whole cell biocatalyst for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments in water-edible oil two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minglue; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Zhilong

    2016-11-01

    Selective releasing intracellular product in Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution to prepare whole cell biocatalyst is a novel strategy for biosynthesis of Monascus pigments, in which cell suspension culture exhibits some advantages comparing with the corresponding growing cell submerged culture. In the present work, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 was successfully replaced by edible plant oils for releasing intracellular Monascus pigments. High concentration of Monascus pigments (with absorbance nearly 710 AU at 470 nm in the oil phase, normalized to the aqueous phase volume approximately 142 AU) was achieved by cell suspension culture in peanut oil-water two-phase system. Furthermore, the utilization of edible oil as extractant also fulfills the demand for application of Monascus pigments as natural food colorant. PMID:27470059

  18. Games of life and death: antibiotic resistance and production through the lens of evolutionary game theory.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Peter L; Chandler, Josephine R; Kerr, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we demonstrate how game theory can be a useful first step in modeling and understanding interactions among bacteria that produce and resist antibiotics. We introduce the basic features of evolutionary game theory and explore model microbial systems that correspond to some classical games. Each game discussed defines a different category of social interaction with different resulting population dynamics (exclusion, coexistence, bistability, cycling). We then explore how the framework can be extended to incorporate some of the complexity of natural microbial communities. Overall, the game theoretical perspective helps to guide our expectations about the evolution of some forms of antibiotic resistance and production because it makes clear the precise nature of social interaction in this context.

  19. Persistence of Pigment Production by Yeast Isolates Grown on CHROMagar Candida Medium

    PubMed Central

    Hospenthal, Duane R.; Murray, Clinton K.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Green, Judith A.; Dooley, David P.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the persistence of pigmentation in yeast isolates grown on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida over 7 days. Candida, Cryptococcus, and Trichosporon isolates were inoculated alone or mixed onto duplicate sets of plates and incubated at 30 and 35°C. Candida albicans and Candida krusei were readily identified throughout the reading period, but Candida glabrata was difficult to differentiate from other species until the 3- or 4-day time point. Candida tropicalis produced colonies similar to those of rare Cryptococcus and Trichosporon species, and mixed cultures were often difficult to identify as such. PMID:12454192

  20. [Macular pigments].

    PubMed

    Canovas, Renata; Cypel, Marcela; Farah, Michel Eid; Belfort, Rubens

    2009-01-01

    Lutein and Zeaxanthin are yellow pigments located at the macula. Because of your location macular pigments decrease and filter the amount of blue light that reach photoreceptors, protect the outer retina from oxidative stress and may improve the vision quality. This is a review regarding incorporation mechanism, function and knowledge update. PMID:20098912

  1. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria in a river impacted by both an antibiotic production plant and urban treated discharges.

    PubMed

    Sidrach-Cardona, Ricardo; Hijosa-Valsero, María; Marti, Elisabet; Balcázar, José Luis; Becares, Eloy

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the abundance and spatial dynamics of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms and Enterococcus spp.) were determined in water and sediment samples from a river impacted by both antibiotic production plant (APP) and urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. Agar dilution and disk diffusion methods were also used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Two antimicrobial agents, cephalexin (25 μg/ml) and amoxicillin (50 μg/ml), were evaluated using the agar dilution method for E. coli, total coliforms (TC) and Enterococcus spp., whereas the degree of sensitivity or resistance of E. coli isolates to penicillin (10 U), ampicillin (10 μg), doxycycline (30 μg), tetracycline (30 μg), erythromycin (15 μg), azithromycin (15 μg) and streptomycin (10 μg) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Real-time PCR assays were used to determine the prevalence of three antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs). The agar dilution method showed that most E. coli isolates and TC were resistant to amoxicillin, especially after receiving the APP discharges. Antibiotic resistances to amoxicillin and cephalexin were higher after the APP discharge point than after the WWTP effluent. The disk diffusion method revealed that 100% of bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected and showed a higher proportion at the WWTP discharge point than those in the APP. Highly multidrug-resistant bacteria (resistance to more than 4 antibiotics) were also detected, reaching mean values of 41.6% in water samples and 50.1% in sediments. The relative abundance of the blaTEM, blaCTX-M and blaSHV genes was higher in samples from the treatment plants than in those collected upstream from the discharges, especially for water samples collected at the APP discharge point. These results clearly demonstrate that both the APP and the WWTP contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic

  2. A biorefinery from Nannochloropsis sp. microalga--extraction of oils and pigments. Production of biohydrogen from the leftover biomass.

    PubMed

    Nobre, B P; Villalobos, F; Barragán, B E; Oliveira, A C; Batista, A P; Marques, P A S S; Mendes, R L; Sovová, H; Palavra, A F; Gouveia, L

    2013-05-01

    The microalga Nannochloropsis sp. was used in this study, in a biorefinery context, as biomass feedstock for the production of fatty acids for biodiesel, biohydrogen and high added-value compounds. The microalgal biomass, which has a high lipid and pigment content (mainly carotenoids), was submitted to supercritical CO2 extraction. The temperature, pressure and solvent flow-rate were evaluated to check their effect on the extraction yield. The best operational conditions to extract 33 g lipids/100 g dry biomass were found to be at 40 °C, 300 bar and a CO2 flow-rate of 0.62 g/min. The effect of adding a co-solvent (ethanol) was also studied. When supercritical CO2 doped with 20% (w/w) ethanol was used, it was possible to extract 45 g lipids/100 g dry biomass of lipids and recover 70% of the pigments. Furthermore, the remaining biomass after extraction was effectively used as feedstock to produce biohydrogen through dark fermentation by Enterobacter aerogenes resulting in a hydrogen production yield of 60.6 mL/g dry biomass.

  3. 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products containing antibiotics and steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, K.; Kane, M. P.; Rahn, P. D.; Steindler, K. A.

    Effects of 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products were evaluated. The mastitis products which were examined contained various combinations of antibiotics and steroids suspended in peanut oil vehicle. Bioburden data indicated that the unirradiated products were only occasionally contaminated with microorganisms. The D-values of the nonsterile product and environmental isolates were 0.028, 0.15, 0.017, and 0.018 Mrads for Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium oxalicum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas maltophilia, respectively. The D-value of the biological indicator organism, Bacillus pumilus spores, in the vehicle was 0.27 Mrads. Thus, an irradiation dose of 1.6 Mrads would be sufficient to achieve six log cycles of destruction of the biological indicator organism. The minimum absorbed irradiation dose of 2.5 Mrads preferred by many countries for sterilization would achieve 9.3 log cycle destruction of the indicator organism and guarantee a probability of 1 × 10 -15 assurance for the most radio-resistant product isolate, Penicillium oxalicum. In order to examine short and long term chemical stabilities of active components, stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for the determination of the following antibiotics and steroids were developed. They were: dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, and prednisolone. The rates of degradation and radiolytic degradation schemes for the majority of these compounds were elucidated. Formation of new compounds was not observed in these antibiotics and steroids upon 60Co irradiation. The compounds that increased by irradiation were inherently present in commercially available non-irradiated lots and/or can easily be formed by either acidic, basic, or thermal treatment.

  4. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products of vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the most critical problems about antimicrobial therapy is the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that there is a direct relation between erroneous prescription, dosage, route, duration of the therapy and the antibiotics resistance. Other important point is the uncertainty about the quality of the prescribed medicines. Some physicians believe that generic drugs are not as effective as innovator ones, so it is very important to have evidence that shows that all commercialized drugs are suitable for therapeutic use. Methods Microbial assays were used to establish the potency, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs), the Minimal Bactericidal Concentration (MBCs), the critical concentrations, and the production of spontaneous mutants that are resistant to vancomycin. Results The microbial assay was validated in order to determine the Vancomycin potency of the tasted samples. All the products showed that have potency values between 90 - 115% (USP requirement). The products behave similarly because the MICs, The MBCs, the critical concentrations, the critical concentrations ratios between standard and samples, and the production of spontaneous mutants don't have significant differences. Conclusions All products analyzed by microbiological tests, show that both trademarks and generics do not have statistical variability and the answer of antimicrobial activity Show also that they are pharmaceutical equivalents. PMID:21777438

  5. Pigment chemistry: the red sweat of the hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Yoko; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya; Yoshihara, Masato; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ida, Motoyasu; Komiya, Teruyuki

    2004-05-27

    Within a few minutes of perspiration, the colourless, viscous sweat of the hippopotamus gradually turns red, and then brown as the pigment polymerizes. Here we isolate and characterize the pigments responsible for this colour reaction. The unstable red and orange pigments turn out to be non-benzenoid aromatic compounds that are unexpectedly acidic and have antibiotic as well as sunscreen activity.

  6. Pigment chemistry: the red sweat of the hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Yoko; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya; Yoshihara, Masato; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ida, Motoyasu; Komiya, Teruyuki

    2004-05-27

    Within a few minutes of perspiration, the colourless, viscous sweat of the hippopotamus gradually turns red, and then brown as the pigment polymerizes. Here we isolate and characterize the pigments responsible for this colour reaction. The unstable red and orange pigments turn out to be non-benzenoid aromatic compounds that are unexpectedly acidic and have antibiotic as well as sunscreen activity. PMID:15164051

  7. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ferrate(VI): Effects of water constituents and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Sui, Yunxia; Cizmas, Leslie; Wang, Zunyao; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-10-15

    The degradation of five fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics (flumequine (FLU), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and marbofloxacin (MAR)) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) was examined to demonstrate the potential of this iron-based chemical oxidant to treat antibiotics in water. Experiments were conducted at different molar ratios of Fe(VI) to FQs at pH 7.0. All FQs, except FLU, were degraded within 2 min at [Fe(VI)]:[FQ] ≤ 20.0. Multiple additions of Fe(VI) improved the degradation efficiency, and provided greater degradation than a single addition of Fe(VI). The effects of anions, cations, and humic acid (HA), usually present in source waters and wastewaters, on the removal of FLU were investigated. Anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and HCO3(-)) and monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) had no influence on the removal of FLU. However, multivalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+)) in water decreased the efficiency of FLU removal by Fe(VI). An increase in the ionic strength of the solution, and the presence of HA in the water, also decreased the percentage of FLU removed by Fe(VI). Experiments on the removal of selected FQs, present as co-existing antibiotics in pure water, river water, synthetic water and wastewater, were also conducted to demonstrate the practical application of Fe(VI) to remove the antibiotics during water treatment. The seventeen oxidized products (OPs) of FLU were identified using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction pathways are proposed, and are theoretically confirmed by molecular orbital calculations.

  8. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ferrate(VI): Effects of water constituents and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Sui, Yunxia; Cizmas, Leslie; Wang, Zunyao; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-10-15

    The degradation of five fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics (flumequine (FLU), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and marbofloxacin (MAR)) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) was examined to demonstrate the potential of this iron-based chemical oxidant to treat antibiotics in water. Experiments were conducted at different molar ratios of Fe(VI) to FQs at pH 7.0. All FQs, except FLU, were degraded within 2 min at [Fe(VI)]:[FQ] ≤ 20.0. Multiple additions of Fe(VI) improved the degradation efficiency, and provided greater degradation than a single addition of Fe(VI). The effects of anions, cations, and humic acid (HA), usually present in source waters and wastewaters, on the removal of FLU were investigated. Anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and HCO3(-)) and monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) had no influence on the removal of FLU. However, multivalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+)) in water decreased the efficiency of FLU removal by Fe(VI). An increase in the ionic strength of the solution, and the presence of HA in the water, also decreased the percentage of FLU removed by Fe(VI). Experiments on the removal of selected FQs, present as co-existing antibiotics in pure water, river water, synthetic water and wastewater, were also conducted to demonstrate the practical application of Fe(VI) to remove the antibiotics during water treatment. The seventeen oxidized products (OPs) of FLU were identified using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction pathways are proposed, and are theoretically confirmed by molecular orbital calculations. PMID:27429354

  9. Impact of Malic Enzymes on Antibiotic and Triacylglycerol Production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have characterized two malic enzymes (ME), SCO2951 and SCO5261, from Streptomyces coelicolor and analyzed their role in antibiotic and triacylglycerol (TAG) production. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that Sco2951 and Sco5261 genes encode NAD+- and NADP+-dependent malic enzymes, respectively. Single or double mutants in the ME-encoding genes show no effect on growth rate compared to the parental M145 strain. However, the single Sco2951 and the double Sco2951 Sco5261 mutants display a strong reduction in the production of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin; additionally, the Sco2951 Sco5261 mutant shows a decrease in stored TAGs during exponential growth. The lower production of actinorhodin in the double mutant occurs as a consequence of a decrease in the expression of actII-ORF4, the transcriptional activator of the actinorhodin gene cluster. On the other hand, the reduced TAG accumulation is not due to reduced transcript levels of fatty acid biosynthetic genes nor to changes in the amount of the precursor acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). This mutant accumulates intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that could alter the regulation of the actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that MEs are important anaplerotic enzymes that redirect C4 intermediates from the TCA cycle to maintain secondary metabolism and TAG production in Streptomyces. PMID:22544242

  10. The antibiotic planosporicin coordinates its own production in the actinomycete Planomonospora alba.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Emma J; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2013-07-01

    Planosporicin is a ribosomally synthesized, posttranslationally modified peptide lantibiotic produced by the actinomycete Planomonospora alba. It contains one methyl-lanthionine and four lanthionine bridges and inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in other Gram-positive bacteria probably by binding to lipid II, the immediate precursor for cell wall biosynthesis. Planosporicin production, which is encoded by a cluster of 15 genes, is confined to stationary phase in liquid culture and to the onset of morphological differentiation when P. alba is grown on agar. This growth phase-dependent gene expression is controlled transcriptionally by three pathway-specific regulatory proteins: an extracytoplasmic function σ factor (PspX), its cognate anti-σ factor (PspW), and a transcriptional activator (PspR) with a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain. Using mutational analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional fusions, we have determined the direct regulatory dependencies within the planosporicin gene cluster and present a model in which subinhibitory concentrations of the lantibiotic function in a feed-forward mechanism to elicit high levels of planosporicin production. We show that in addition to acting as an antibiotic, planosporicin can function as an extracellular signaling molecule to elicit precocious production of the lantibiotic, presumably ensuring synchronous and concerted lantibiotic biosynthesis in the wider population and, thus, the production of ecologically effective concentrations of the antibiotic.

  11. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  12. Characterization of major betalain pigments -gomphrenin, betanin and isobetanin from Basella rubra L. fruit and evaluation of efficacy as a natural colourant in product (ice cream) development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Sravan; Manoj, P; Shetty, N P; Prakash, Maya; Giridhar, P

    2015-08-01

    Basella rubra L. (Basellaceae) commonly known as Malabar spinach is a leafy vegetable which accumulates pigments in its fruits. To find out the feasibility of utilizing pigment rich extracts of its fruit as natural food colourant, fruits at different stages were analysed for pigment profiling, carbohydrate content, physical dimensions and weight. Total betalains content increased rapidly from early (green) through intermediate (half-done red-violet) to matured stage (red-violet). Maximum pigment content was observed in ripened fruits (143.76 mg/100 g fresh weight). The major betalain pigment characterized was gomphrenin I in ripened fruits (26.06 mg), followed by intermediate fruits (2.15 mg) and least in early fruits (0.23 mg) in 100 g of fresh deseeded fruits. Total carbohydrates content and the chroma values (redness) were also increased during ontogeny of B. rubra fruits. The textural characters of developing fruits showed the smoothness of green fruits with lower rupture force (0.16 N/s) than ripe ones (0.38 N/s). The pigment-rich fruit extract was used as natural colourant in ice-cream, to evaluate its effect on physicochemical properties and acceptability of the product. After six months of storage at -20 °C, 86.63 % colour was retained in ice-cream. The ice-cream had good overall sensorial quality and was liked by consumers indicating that addition of B. rubra fruit extract did not alter the sensory quality of the product. The colour values also indicate that there was no significant decrease of this pigment-rich extracts of fruits for its incorporation in food products.

  13. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  14. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with retail aquaculture products from Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Lu, Zhang; Li, Xinhui; Shi, Lei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hua H

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant (ART) bacteria and representative antibiotic resistance (AR)-encoding genes associated with several aquaculture products from retail markets in Guangzhou, China. ART commensal bacteria were found in 100% of the products examined. Among 505 multidrug-resistant isolates examined, close to one-fourth contained intI and sul1 genes: 15% contained sul2 and 5% contained tet (E). Incidences of β-lactamase-encoding genes bla(TEM), bla(CMY) and erythromycin resistance determinants ermB and ermC were 4.5, 1.7, 1.3, and 0.3%, respectively. Most of the ART isolates identified from the rinse water were Aeromonas spp.; those from intestines belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae. Plasmid-associated intI and AR-encoding genes were identified in several ART isolates by Southern hybridization. Three multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids were transferred into Escherichia coli DH5 a by chemical transformation and led to acquired AR in the transformants. In addition, the AR traits in many isolates were quite stable, even in the absence of selective pressure. Further studies are needed to reveal risk factors associated with the aquaculture production chain for targeted AR mitigation.

  15. Pigment distribution and primary production in the western Mediterranean as derived and modeled from coastal zone color scanner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, André; André, Jean-Michel

    1991-07-01

    A set of 114 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) images of the western Mediterranean (mainly in the year 1981) have been processed and analyzed to describe the algal biomass evolution and estimate its potential carbon fixation. For that, the pigment concentration in the top layer, Csat, is used through empirical relationships to infer the depth-integrated pigment content of the productive column, tot. A spectral light-photosynthesis model driven by tot is operated with additional information, namely, about sea temperature and photosynthetically available radiation (computed from astronomical and atmospherical parameters then combined with a cloud climatology). This model also includes a standard set of physiological parameters which account for the light capture by algae and for the use of this radiant energy in photosynthesis. This model allows a climatology of ψ* the cross section for photosynthesis per unit of areal chlorophyll, to be produced and then convoluted with the biomass maps after they have been averaged and composited. On average and for the whole western Mediterranean, the pigment concentration in the upper layer is about 0.25 mg Chl m-3, leading to an areal mean concentration of 21 mg Chl m-2. The maximum (bloom) occurs in early May in all zones. Seasonal variations in algal biomass are much more marked in the northern part than in the southern part (apart from Alboran Sea); the south Tyrrhenian basin and the central part of the Algerian basin are steadily oligotrophic. The mean annual carbon fixation rate for the whole basin is about 94 g C m-2 yr-1, or 106 and 87, for the northern and southern basins when separately considered. The seasonality is expressed by a six-fold change in the production rate (between February and May) within the northern zone, whereas only a two-fold change occurs in the southern zone between the same months. These estimates, which compare well with previous episodic field data, considerably extend our knowledge of

  16. Prevalence of LRTI in Patients Presenting with Productive Cough and Their Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Aim To find out the prevalence of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (LRTI) such as bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial infections etc. in patients with productive cough of duration less than 15 days and to rule out the patients having previous history of tuberculosis or having treatment of tuberculosis. Materials and Methods Outdoor and Indoor patients of Department of Medicine and Chest & TB, SRG hospital and Jhalawar Medical College, Jhalawar were included. After sample collection the specimens were sent to the Microbiology department, for processing of Gram staining, Acid fast staining, KOH mount and bacteriological culture and sensitivity. Results A total of 200 samples were obtained from the outpatient and inpatient Department of Medicine and Chest & TB of which 66% were male and 34% were female. Seventy seven percent of samples were culture positive for both single pathogen and mixed infection of which 56.5% were male and 20.5% were female as males are more at risk for LRTI. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most prevalent pathogen (71/193), followed by coagulase positive Staphylococci i.e. COPS (43/193). More resistant pattern was found in coagulase negative Staohylococci (CONS) showed 61.11% Methicillin Resistant Staohylococci (MRS) incidence compared to 41.86% in COPS, also regarding Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) production Escherichia coli showed incidence of 36.36% as compared to other gram negative bacilli. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most resistant organism found based on the antibiotic susceptibility pattern while Proteus mirabilis was the most sensitive organism. Conclusion Lower respiratory tract infections can spread easily among community and indiscriminate use of antibiotics contributes to their therapeutic failure. Area-wise studies on antimicrobial susceptibility profiles are essential to guide policy on the appropriate use of antibiotics to reduce the morbidity and mortality and also to control the emergence of antimicrobial resistance

  17. Bacterial production of sunscreen pigments increase arid land soil surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, HsiaoChien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northern, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2015-04-01

    Biological Soil Crusts (BSCs) are desert top soils formations built by complex microbial communities and dominated by the filamentous cyanobacterium Microcoleus sp. BSCs cover extensive desert areas where they correspond to millimeters size mantles responsible of soil stability and fertility. Despite their ecological importance, little is known about how these communities will endure climate change. It has been shown in North America that different species of Microcoleus showed distinct temperature preferences and that their continental biogeography may be susceptible to small changes in temperature with unknown consequences for the ecosystem function. Using a combination of physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to characterize a successional gradient of crust maturity from light to dark BSCs (Moab, Utah) we found that the concentration of scytonemin (a cyanobacterial sunscreen pigment) increased with crust maturity. We also confirmed that scytonemin was by far the major pigment responsible of light absorption in the visible spectrum in BSCs, and is then responsible of the darkening of the BSCs (i.e decrease of albedo) with maturity. We measured the surface temperature and albedo and found, as predicted, a negative linear relationship between these two parameters. The decrease in albedo across the gradient of crust maturity corresponded to an increase in surface temperature up to 10° C. Upon investigation of microbial community composition using SSU rRNA gene analysis, we demonstrate that warmer crust surface temperatures (decreased albedo) are associated with a replacement of the dominant cyanobacterium; the thermosensitive Microcoleus sp. being replaced by a thermotolerant Microcoleus sp. in darker BSCs. This study supports at the local scale a finding previously made at the continental scale, but also sheds light on the importance of scytonemin as a significant warmer of soils with important consequences for BSC composition and function. Based on

  18. Resistance to colistin: what is the fate for this antibiotic in pig production?

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Colistin, a cationic polypeptide antibiotic, has reappeared in human medicine as a last-line treatment option for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). Colistin is widely used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. GNB resistant to colistin owing to chromosomal mutations have already been reported both in human and veterinary medicine, however several recent studies have just identified a plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene encoding for colistin resistance in Escherichia coli colistin resistance. The discovery of a non-chromosomal mechanism of colistin resistance in E. coli has led to strong reactions in the scientific community and to concern among physicians and veterinarians. Colistin use in food animals and particularly in pig production has been singled out as responsible for the emergence of colistin resistance. The present review will focus mainly on the possible link between colistin use in pigs and the spread of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. First we demonstrate a possible link between Enterobacteriaceae resistance emergence and oral colistin pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and its administration modalities in pigs. We then discuss the potential impact of colistin use in pigs on public health with respect to resistance. We believe that colistin use in pig production should be re-evaluated and its dosing and usage optimised. Moreover, the search for competitive alternatives to using colistin with swine is of paramount importance to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections in human medicine. PMID:27234675

  19. Improvement of antibiotic productivity by knock-out of dauW in Streptomyces coeruleobidus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tianjie; Yin, Chenghui; Zhu, Chunbao; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2011-10-20

    Daunorubicin (DNR) is an important anthracycline antibiotic. Its biosynthesis pathway has been well understood, however, the regulation of DNR biosynthesis needs further investigations. An ORF cloned between drrB and dnrX from the genome of a DNR producer, Streptomyces coeruleobidus DM, was named dauW and designated as an orthologous gene with dnrW and drrD. Several plasmids were constructed for over-expression and/or disruption of dauW in DM. Complete disruption of dauW can significantly increase the yield of DNR. We also found that the transcription level of dnrI, a major regulatory protein in the biosynthesis of DNR, and the self-resistance level were improved in dauW knock-out mutant. These results suggested that dauW may be a down-regulatory gene for DNR biosynthesis. Antibiotics productivity in S. coeruleobidus could be improved via regulation of the transcription of dnrI, a SARP regulator. The production of DNR in a high-producer and the yield of epi-DNR in an engineering strain were also increased by disruption of dauW.

  20. Growth and Pigment Production on d-Tryptophan Medium by Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans▿

    PubMed Central

    Chaskes, Stuart; Frases, Susana; Cammer, Michael; Gerfen, Gary; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus gattii (serotypes B and C) strains, there is a need for rapid and reliable tests that discriminate C. gattii from Cryptococcus neoformans (serotypes A, D, and AD). Seventy-two C. neoformans strains, sixty-seven C. gattii strains, and five Candida albicans strains were analyzed for their ability to grow and produce pigment on minimal d-tryptophan d-proline (m-DTDP) medium, on yeast carbon base d-tryptophan d-proline (YCB-DTDP) medium, and on fructose d-tryptophan glycine (m-FDTG) medium. Of the C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates, 94% and 0% grew on m-DTDP agar, respectively, and 98% and 0% grew in YCB-DTDP medium, respectively. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigment(s) on m-DTDP agar and smaller amounts of yellow-brown (amber) extracellular pigment(s). C. albicans grew on both media and produced a pink photoactivated pigment on m-DTDP agar. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigments on the differential medium m-FDTG, whereas C. neoformans produced smaller amounts of the brown pigments and C. albicans produced a pink pigment. The pigments produced by C. gattii from d-tryptophan were distinct and were not related to melanin formation from 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Thin-layer chromatography of the methanol-extracted C. gattii cells detected four different pigments, including brown (two types), yellow, and pink-purple compounds. We conclude that tryptophan-derived pigments are not melanins and that growth on m-DTDP or YCB-DTDP agar can be used to rapidly differentiate C. gattii from C. neoformans. PMID:17989195

  1. Growth and pigment production on D-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Frases, Susana; Cammer, Michael; Gerfen, Gary; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus gattii (serotypes B and C) strains, there is a need for rapid and reliable tests that discriminate C. gattii from Cryptococcus neoformans (serotypes A, D, and AD). Seventy-two C. neoformans strains, sixty-seven C. gattii strains, and five Candida albicans strains were analyzed for their ability to grow and produce pigment on minimal D-tryptophan D-proline (m-DTDP) medium, on yeast carbon base D-tryptophan D-proline (YCB-DTDP) medium, and on fructose D-tryptophan glycine (m-FDTG) medium. Of the C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates, 94% and 0% grew on m-DTDP agar, respectively, and 98% and 0% grew in YCB-DTDP medium, respectively. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigment(s) on m-DTDP agar and smaller amounts of yellow-brown (amber) extracellular pigment(s). C. albicans grew on both media and produced a pink photoactivated pigment on m-DTDP agar. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigments on the differential medium m-FDTG, whereas C. neoformans produced smaller amounts of the brown pigments and C. albicans produced a pink pigment. The pigments produced by C. gattii from D-tryptophan were distinct and were not related to melanin formation from 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Thin-layer chromatography of the methanol-extracted C. gattii cells detected four different pigments, including brown (two types), yellow, and pink-purple compounds. We conclude that tryptophan-derived pigments are not melanins and that growth on m-DTDP or YCB-DTDP agar can be used to rapidly differentiate C. gattii from C. neoformans.

  2. Growth and pigment production on D-tryptophan medium by Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaskes, Stuart; Frases, Susana; Cammer, Michael; Gerfen, Gary; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of cryptococcosis caused by Cryptococcus gattii (serotypes B and C) strains, there is a need for rapid and reliable tests that discriminate C. gattii from Cryptococcus neoformans (serotypes A, D, and AD). Seventy-two C. neoformans strains, sixty-seven C. gattii strains, and five Candida albicans strains were analyzed for their ability to grow and produce pigment on minimal D-tryptophan D-proline (m-DTDP) medium, on yeast carbon base D-tryptophan D-proline (YCB-DTDP) medium, and on fructose D-tryptophan glycine (m-FDTG) medium. Of the C. gattii and C. neoformans isolates, 94% and 0% grew on m-DTDP agar, respectively, and 98% and 0% grew in YCB-DTDP medium, respectively. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigment(s) on m-DTDP agar and smaller amounts of yellow-brown (amber) extracellular pigment(s). C. albicans grew on both media and produced a pink photoactivated pigment on m-DTDP agar. C. gattii produced large amounts of brown intracellular pigments on the differential medium m-FDTG, whereas C. neoformans produced smaller amounts of the brown pigments and C. albicans produced a pink pigment. The pigments produced by C. gattii from D-tryptophan were distinct and were not related to melanin formation from 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Thin-layer chromatography of the methanol-extracted C. gattii cells detected four different pigments, including brown (two types), yellow, and pink-purple compounds. We conclude that tryptophan-derived pigments are not melanins and that growth on m-DTDP or YCB-DTDP agar can be used to rapidly differentiate C. gattii from C. neoformans. PMID:17989195

  3. A turning point for natural product discovery--ESF-EMBO research conference: synthetic biology of antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Takano, Eriko; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Breitling, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic Biology is in a critical phase of its development: it has finally reached the point where it can move from proof-of-principle studies to real-world applications. Secondary metabolite biosynthesis, especially the discovery and production of antibiotics, is a particularly relevant target area for such applications of synthetic biology. The first international conference to explore this subject was held in Spain in October 2011. In four sessions on General Synthetic Biology, Filamentous Fungal Systems, Actinomyces Systems, and Tools and Host Structures, scientists presented the most recent technological and scientific advances, and a final-day Forward Look Plenary Discussion identified future trends in the field.

  4. Swapping one red pigment for another.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are bright red and yellow pigments, which are produced in only one order of plants, the Caryophyllales, and replace the more familiar anthocyanin pigments. The evolutionary origin of betalain production is a mystery, but a new study has identified the first regulator of betalain production and discovered a previously unknown link between the two pigment pathways. PMID:25547597

  5. cmdABCDEF, a cluster of genes encoding membrane proteins for differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptomyces coelicolor is the most studied Streptomyces species and an excellent model for studying differentiation and antibiotic production. To date, many genes have been identified to be required for its differentiation (e.g. bld genes for aerial growth and whi genes for sporulation) and antibiotics production (including actII-orf4, redD, cdaR as pathway-specific regulatory genes and afsR, absA1/A2 as pleiotropic regulatory genes). Results A gene cluster containing six genes (SCO4126-4131) was proved to be co-transcribed in S. coelicolor. Deletions of cmdABCDEF (SCO4126-4131) displayed defective sporulation including formation of aberrant branches, and abnormalities in chromosome segregation and spore septation. Disruption mutants of apparently orthologous genes of S. lividans and S. avermitilis also showed defective sporulation, implying that the role of these genes is similar among Streptomyces. Transcription of cmdB, and therefore presumably of the whole operon, was regulated developmentally. Five of the encoded proteins (CmdA, C, D, E, F) were predicted membrane proteins. The other, CmdB, a predicted ATP/GTP-binding protein with an ABC-transporter-ATPase domain shown here to be essential for its function, was also located on the cell membrane. These results indicate that CmdABCDEF proteins mainly affect Streptomyces differentiation at an early stage of aerial hyphae formation, and suggest that these proteins may form a complex on cell membrane for proper segregation of chromosomes. In addition, deletions of cmdABCDEF also revealed over-production of blue-pigmented actinorhodin (Act) via activation of transcription of the pathway-specific regulatory gene actII-orf4 of actinorhodin biosynthesis. Conclusion In this study, six co-transcribed genes cmdABCDEF were identified by their effects on differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). These six membrane-located proteins are possibly assembled into a complex to

  6. Antibiotics and sweeteners in the aquatic environment: biodegradability, formation of phototransformation products, and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bergheim, Marlies; Gminski, Richard; Spangenberg, Bernd; Debiak, Malgorzata; Bürkle, Alexander; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Kümmerer, Klaus; Gieré, Reto

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, in vitro toxicity as well as biopersistence and photopersistence of four artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine, and sucralose) and five antibiotics (levofloxacin, lincomycin, linezolid, marbofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and of their phototransformation products (PTPs) were investigated. Furthermore, antibiotic activity was evaluated after UV irradiation and after exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. The study reveals that most of the tested compounds and their PTPs were neither readily nor inherently biodegradable in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-biodegradability tests. The study further demonstrates that PTPs are formed upon irradiation with an Hg lamp (UV light) and, to a lesser extent, upon irradiation with a Xe lamp (mimics sunlight). Comparing the nonirradiated with the corresponding irradiated solutions, a higher chronic toxicity against bacteria was found for the irradiated solutions of linezolid. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was found in human cervical (HeLa) and liver (Hep-G2) cells for any of the investigated compounds or their PTPs. Antimicrobial activity of the tested fluoroquinolones was reduced after UV treatment, but it was not reduced after a 28-day exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. This comparative study shows that PTPs can be formed as a result of UV treatment. The study further demonstrated that UV irradiation can be effective in reducing the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics, and consequently may help to reduce antimicrobial resistance in wastewaters. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that some PTPs may exhibit a higher ecotoxicity than the respective parent compounds. Consequently, UV treatment does not transform all micropollutants into harmless compounds and may not be a large-scale effluent treatment option. PMID:26169816

  7. Antibiotics and sweeteners in the aquatic environment: biodegradability, formation of phototransformation products, and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bergheim, Marlies; Gminski, Richard; Spangenberg, Bernd; Debiak, Malgorzata; Bürkle, Alexander; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Kümmerer, Klaus; Gieré, Reto

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, in vitro toxicity as well as biopersistence and photopersistence of four artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine, and sucralose) and five antibiotics (levofloxacin, lincomycin, linezolid, marbofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and of their phototransformation products (PTPs) were investigated. Furthermore, antibiotic activity was evaluated after UV irradiation and after exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. The study reveals that most of the tested compounds and their PTPs were neither readily nor inherently biodegradable in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-biodegradability tests. The study further demonstrates that PTPs are formed upon irradiation with an Hg lamp (UV light) and, to a lesser extent, upon irradiation with a Xe lamp (mimics sunlight). Comparing the nonirradiated with the corresponding irradiated solutions, a higher chronic toxicity against bacteria was found for the irradiated solutions of linezolid. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was found in human cervical (HeLa) and liver (Hep-G2) cells for any of the investigated compounds or their PTPs. Antimicrobial activity of the tested fluoroquinolones was reduced after UV treatment, but it was not reduced after a 28-day exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. This comparative study shows that PTPs can be formed as a result of UV treatment. The study further demonstrated that UV irradiation can be effective in reducing the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics, and consequently may help to reduce antimicrobial resistance in wastewaters. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that some PTPs may exhibit a higher ecotoxicity than the respective parent compounds. Consequently, UV treatment does not transform all micropollutants into harmless compounds and may not be a large-scale effluent treatment option.

  8. Does the Recent Growth of Aquaculture Create Antibiotic Resistance Threats Different from those Associated with Land Animal Production in Agriculture?

    PubMed

    Done, Hansa Y; Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-05-01

    Important antibiotics in human medicine have been used for many decades in animal agriculture for growth promotion and disease treatment. Several publications have linked antibiotic resistance development and spread with animal production. Aquaculture, the newest and fastest growing food production sector, may promote similar or new resistance mechanisms. This review of 650+ papers from diverse sources examines parallels and differences between land-based agriculture of swine, beef, and poultry and aquaculture. Among three key findings was, first, that of 51 antibiotics commonly used in aquaculture and agriculture, 39 (or 76%) are also of importance in human medicine; furthermore, six classes of antibiotics commonly used in both agriculture and aquaculture are also included on the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of critically important/highly important/important antimicrobials. Second, various zoonotic pathogens isolated from meat and seafood were observed to feature resistance to multiple antibiotics on the WHO list, irrespective of their origin in either agriculture or aquaculture. Third, the data show that resistant bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and agriculture share the same resistance mechanisms, indicating that aquaculture is contributing to the same resistance issues established by terrestrial agriculture. More transparency in data collection and reporting is needed so the risks and benefits of antibiotic usage can be adequately assessed.

  9. N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone regulates carbapenem antibiotic production in Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Bainton, N J; Stead, P; Chhabra, S R; Bycroft, B W; Salmond, G P; Stewart, G S; Williams, P

    1992-12-15

    Erwinia carotovora A.T.C.C. 39048 produces the antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid. A number of mutants with a carbapenem-non-producing phenotype were selected as part of an investigation into the molecular and genetic basis of carbapenem biosynthesis. Cross-feeding studies revealed that the mutants fell into two discrete groups. Group 1 mutants were found to secrete a diffusible low-molecular-mass compound which restored carbapenem production in group 2 mutants. This compound was isolated from the spent culture supernatant of a group 1 mutant using solvent extraction, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and silica-gel chromatography, and finally purified by reverse-phase semipreparative h.p.l.c. M.s. and n.m.r. spectroscopy revealed that the compound was N-(3-oxohexanoyl)homoserine lactone. Both D- and L-isomers were synthesized, and subsequent analysis by c.d. established that the natural product has the L-configuration. Although carbapenem production was restored by both isomers, dose-response curves indicated that the L-isomer has greater activity, with an induction threshold of about 0.5 micrograms/ml. N-(3-Oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone is, therefore, an autoregulator of carbapenem biosynthesis rather than a biosynthetic intermediate. This compound is already known for its role in autoinduction of bioluminescence in the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It is also structurally-related to the A- and I-factors which are known to regulate production of antibiotics in some Streptomyces species. Its association in this work with the regulation of carbapenem biosynthesis implies a broader role for autoregulator-controlled gene expression in prokaryotes.

  10. Stigmatellin, a new antibiotic from Stigmatella aurantiaca (Myxobacterales). I. Production, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Kunze, B; Kemmer, T; Höfle, G; Reichenbach, H

    1984-05-01

    An antibiotic activity was extracted from the cell mass of the myxobacterium, Stigmatella aurantiaca strain Sg a15. The antibiotic was toxic for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but not for most bacteria. The compound had the molecular formula C30H42O7, appears to be a new antibiotic, and was named stigmatellin. In addition to stigmatellin, the strain produced relatively large quantities of a second, structurally unrelated antibiotic, a mixture of three myxalamid homologues. PMID:6429114

  11. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    PubMed

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph). PMID:26562446

  12. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    PubMed

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph).

  13. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prakasham Reddy; Buddana, Sudheer Kumar; Tatipamula, Vinay Bharadwaj; Naga, Yaswanth Varanasi Venkata; Ahmad, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs) of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus). In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D) was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2.

  14. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakasham Reddy; Buddana, Sudheer Kumar; Tatipamula, Vinay Bharadwaj; Naga, Yaswanth Varanasi Venkata; Ahmad, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs) of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus). In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D) was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. PMID:24948949

  15. Estimating phytoplankton size-fractionated primary production in the northwestern Iberian upwelling: Is mixotrophy relevant in pigmented nanoplankton?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiras, F. G.; Espinoza-González, O.; Arbones, B.; Garrido, J. L.; Teixeira, I. G.; Castro, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    Primary production of micro- (PPmicro), nano- (PPnano) and picophytoplankton (PPpico) in the NW Iberian margin were estimated by combining biomarker pigments to derive class-specific chlorophyll concentration and published class-specific photophysiological variables for large oceanic scales (Uitz et al., 2008). The accuracy of this approach was assessed comparing the predicted total primary production (PPp = PPmicro + PPnano + PPpico) with the measured total primary production (PPm). Despite the general agreement, PPp overestimated PPm when mixing in the water column was important. Therefore, the photophysiological variables originally derived from stratified and oligotrophic zones with strong influence of photoacclimation in the water column were re-evaluated to incorporate the particular conditions usually found in coastal upwelling systems, characterized by higher homogenization of the water column and lesser importance of photoacclimation. With this new fractionation we estimated the export capacity (f-ratio = new production) of the microbial plankton community, which can be assimilated to the fraction of primary production due to microphytoplankton. The NW Iberian margin showed f-ratios varying between the highest values recorded for coastal upwelling systems (f > 0.75) and the low values usually found in oligotrophic oceanic areas (f < 0.1). This size-fractionated primary production combined with phytoplankton size-fractionated biomass to obtain turnover rates allowed us to infer the existence of mixotrophy within nanophytoplankton. The occurrence of this type of nutrition was indirectly verified by comparing carbon fixation with estimates of gross primary production based on the metabolic theory of ecology. Realistic values of the photosynthetic quotient (PQ = 1.78 ± 0.17; mol O2 mol C-1) were only obtained when heterotrophic nutrition of nanophytoplankton was considered.

  16. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatoye, Isaac Olufemi; Daniel, Oluwayemisi Folashade; Ishola, Sunday Ayobami

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. Materials and Methods: The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara), and 90 fermented milk (nono) from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi® test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Results: Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL) of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. Conclusion: The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers’ extension education

  17. Prevalence, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance of Bacillus cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Park, Yong-Bae; Yoon, Mi-Hye; Lee, Jong-Bok; No, Wan-Seob; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus contamination is a major food safety problem for Korean fermented soybean products, but few studies have assessed its potential to cause foodborne illness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of B. cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. B. cereus was detected in 110 of 162 (67.9%) samples. The highest B. cereus frequency was observed in deonjang (68 of 93 samples, 73.1%) and cheonggukjang (18 of 25, 72.0%); however, nonhemolytic enterotoxin was detected only in 22 of 162 samples (13.6%). Although the tested B. cereus isolates showed diverse pulsotypes according to repetitive sequence-PCR banding patterns, they displayed similar antibiotic sensitivity spectra. The low frequency of enterotoxin detection suggests that the potential risk of B. cereus foodborne illness associated with Korean fermented soybean products is lower than generally presumed. However, considering the prevalence of B. cereus and the high content of fermented soybean products in the Korean diet, it is necessary to constantly monitor the level of contamination with B. cereus and its toxins in such Korean food products.

  18. Effect of different ripening conditions on pigments of pepper for paprika production at green stage of maturity.

    PubMed

    Kevrešan, Žarko S; Mastilović, Jasna S; Mandić, Anamarija I; Torbica, Aleksandra M

    2013-09-25

    The content and composition of pigments and CIELab color properties in fruits ripened in the field were compared with those obtained in ground paprika produced from green pepper fruits after postharvest ripening for 15 days in a greenhouse under different conditions. Obtained data for pigment content, composition, and esterification rate have shown that the processes of pigment biosynthesis in fruits ripened under greenhouse conditions are different from those occurring in fruits naturally matured in the field: the red/yellow pigment ratio (3:1) in greenhouse-ripened fruits is much higher than in naturally ripened pepper in breaker (1:1) and also in faint red (2:1) ripening stages from the field. Additionally, during the postharvest ripening of green pepper in the greenhouse esterification processes are less expressed than during the ripening of the fruits in the field. Postharvest ripening under natural daylight resulted in higher content of red pigments, followed by higher ASTA value.

  19. Somatic embryogenesis, pigment accumulation, and synthetic seed production in Digitalis davisiana Heywood.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sandeep Kumar; Sahin, Gunce; Gurel, Ekrem

    2016-04-01

    Digitalis davisiana, commonly called Alanya foxglove, from Turkey, is an important medicinal herb as the main source of cardiac glycosides, cardenolides, anthraquinones, etc. It is also known in the Indian Medicine for treatment of wounds and burns. It has ornamental value as well. Overexploitation of D. davisiana has led this species to be declared protected, and thereby encouraged various methods for its propagation. In this study, an optimized and efficient plant tissue culture protocol was established using cotyledonary leaf, hypocotyl and root explants of D. davisiana. Callus tissues were obtained from the cotyledonary leaf, hypocotyl and root segments cultured on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium containing different plant growth regulators. The maximum number of somatic embryos were achieved by the MS medium containing 6-benzyladenine (1.0 mg/L BAP) or 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acids (0.1 mg/L 2,4-D), which produced an average of 8.3 ± 1.5 or 5.3 ± 1.5 embryos per cotyledonary leaf, respectively. After 3 wk of culture in MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/L 2,4-D, callus showed a clear accumulation of orange pigmentation. Shoot regeneration was remarkably higher (14.3 indirect shoots) in a combination of α-naphthalene acetic acid (0.25 mg/L NAA) plus 3.0 mg/L BAP than 2.0 mg/L zeatin (10.3 ± 0.5 direct shoots) alone. The shoots were successfully rooted on MS medium supplemented with NAA (0.1-1.0 mg/L). In addition, synthetic seeds were produced by encapsulating shoot tips in 4% sodium alginate solution. Maximum conversion frequency of 76.6% was noted from encapsulated shoot tips cultured on 0.25 mg/L NAA with 1.0 mg/L BAP. The encapsulated shoot tips could be stored up to 60 days at 4 °C. Regenerated plantlets of D. davisiana were successfully acclimatized and transferred to soil. This study has demonstrated successful preservation of elite genotypes of D. davisiana. PMID:27295921

  20. Gold nanostructure-integrated silica-on-silicon waveguide for the detection of antibiotics in milk and milk products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Badilescu, Simona; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics are extensively used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. The use of antibiotics for the treatment of animals used for food production raised the concern of the public and a rapid screening method became necessary. A novel approach of detection of antibiotics in milk is reported in this work by using an immunoassay format and the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance property of gold. An antibiotic from the penicillin family that is, ampicillin is used for testing. Gold nanostructures deposited on a glass substrate by a novel convective assembly method were heat-treated to form a nanoisland morphology. The Au nanostructures were functionalized and the corresponding antibody was absorbed from a solution. Solutions with known concentrations of antigen (antibiotics) were subsequently added and the spectral changes were monitored step by step. The Au LSPR band corresponding to the nano-island structure was found to be suitable for the detection of the antibody antigen interaction. The detection of the ampicillin was successfully demonstrated with the gold nano-islands deposited on glass substrate. This process was subsequently adapted for the integration of gold nanostructures on the silica-on-silicon waveguide for the purpose of detecting antibiotics.

  1. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  2. Non-pigmented strain of serratia marcescens: an unusual pathogen causing pulmonary infection in a patient with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Priyamvada; Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, R K

    2014-06-01

    Serratia marcescens is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It has emerged in recent years as an opportunistic pathogen of nosocomial infections. Some biotypes of Serratia marcescens produce the non-diffusible red pigment prodigiosin. Though both pigmented and non-pigmented biotypes may be pathogenic for humans, the non-pigmented biotypes are more virulent due to cytotoxin production and presence of plasmids mediating antibiotic resistance. However in India only one study done 31 years back has reported on infections caused by non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens. We present a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the left retromolar trigone, soft palate and buccal mucosa, who developed pulmonary infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens. According to the available literature, this is the second report on infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens from India. It is imperative to accurately detect the non-pigmented biotypes due to their tendency to cause serious and difficult to treat infections.

  3. Non-Pigmented Strain of Serratia Marcescens: An Unusual Pathogen Causing Pulmonary Infection in A Patient with Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain; Grover, R.K

    2014-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae. It has emerged in recent years as an opportunistic pathogen of nosocomial infections. Some biotypes of Serratia marcescens produce the non-diffusible red pigment prodigiosin. Though both pigmented and non-pigmented biotypes may be pathogenic for humans, the non-pigmented biotypes are more virulent due to cytotoxin production and presence of plasmids mediating antibiotic resistance. However in India only one study done 31 years back has reported on infections caused by non-pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens. We present a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the left retromolar trigone, soft palate and buccal mucosa, who developed pulmonary infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens. According to the available literature, this is the second report on infection with non-pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens from India. It is imperative to accurately detect the non-pigmented biotypes due to their tendency to cause serious and difficult to treat infections. PMID:25120985

  4. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  5. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  6. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  8. New approaches to the measurement of chlorophyll, related pigments and productivity in the sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, C. R.; Keifer, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    In the 1984 SBIR Call for Proposals, NASA solicited new methods to measure primary production and chlorophyll in the ocean. Biospherical Instruments Inc. responded to this call with a proposal first to study a variety of approaches to this problem. A second phase of research was then funded to pursue instrumentation to measure the sunlight stimulated naturally occurring fluorescence of chlorophyll in marine phytoplankton. The monitoring of global productivity, global fisheries resources, application of above surface-to-underwater optical communications systems, submarine detection applications, correlation, and calibration of remote sensing systems are but some of the reasons for developing inexpensive sensors to measure chlorophyll and productivity. Normally, productivity measurements are manpower and cost intensive and, with the exception of a very few expensive multiship research experiments, provide no contemporaneous data. We feel that the patented, simple sensors that we have designed will provide a cost effective method for large scale, synoptic, optical measurements in the ocean. This document is the final project report for a NASA sponsored SBIR Phase 2 effort to develop new methods for the measurements of primary production in the ocean. This project has been successfully completed, a U.S. patent was issued covering the methodology and sensors, and the first production run of instrumentation developed under this contract has sold out and been delivered.

  9. Intronic Sequence Regulates Sugar-Dependent Expression of Arabidopsis thaliana Production of Anthocyanin Pigment-1/MYB75

    PubMed Central

    Broeckling, Bettina E.; Watson, Ruth A.; Steinwand, Blaire; Bush, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific regulation of gene expression is recognized as an important signaling response, distinct from glucose, which serves to modulate plant growth, metabolism, and physiology. The Arabidopsis MYB transcription factor Production of Anthocyanin Pigment-1 (PAP1) plays a key role in anthocyanin biosynthesis and expression of PAP1 is known to be regulated by sucrose. Sucrose treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings led to a 20-fold induction of PAP1 transcript, which represented a 6-fold increase over levels in glucose-treated seedlings. The PAP1 promoter was not sufficient for conferring a sucrose response to a reporter gene and did not correctly report expression of PAP1 in plants. Although we identified 3 putative sucrose response elements in the PAP1 gene, none were found to be necessary for this response. Using deletion analysis, we identified a 90 bp sequence within intron 1 of PAP1 that is necessary for the sucrose response. This sequence was sufficient for conferring a sucrose response to a minimal promoter: luciferase reporter when present in multiple copies upstream of the promoter. This work lays the foundation for dissecting the sucrose signaling pathway of PAP1 and contributes to understanding the interplay between sucrose signaling, anthocyanin biosynthesis, and stress responses. PMID:27248141

  10. Pigment epithelium-derived factor stimulates skeletal muscle glycolytic activity through NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Carlessi, Rodrigo; Newsholme, Philip; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-09-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor is a multifunctional serpin implicated in insulin resistance in metabolic disorders. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of peripheral tissues such as skeletal muscle to PEDF has profound metabolic consequences with predisposition towards chronic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Chronic inflammation shifts muscle metabolism towards increased glycolysis and decreased oxidative metabolism. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel effect of PEDF on cellular metabolism in mouse cell line (C2C12) and human primary skeletal muscle cells. PEDF addition to skeletal muscle cells induced enhanced phospholipase A2 activity. This was accompanied with increased production of reactive oxygen species in a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-dependent manner that triggered a shift towards a more glycolytic phenotype. Extracellular flux analysis and glucose consumption assays demonstrated that PEDF treatment resulted in enhanced glycolysis but did not change mitochondrial respiration. Our results demonstrate that skeletal muscle cells express a PEDF-inducible oxidant generating system that enhances glycolysis but is sensitive to antioxidants and NADPH oxidase inhibition. PMID:27343430

  11. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten O A; Oluwasegun, Rantimi D; Church, George M

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotics are a crucial line of defense against bacterial infections. Nevertheless, several antibiotics are natural products of microorganisms that have as yet poorly appreciated ecological roles in the wider environment. We isolated hundreds of soil bacteria with the capacity to grow on antibiotics as a sole carbon source. Of 18 antibiotics tested, representing eight major classes of natural and synthetic origin, 13 to 17 supported the growth of clonal bacteria from each of 11 diverse soils. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics are surprisingly phylogenetically diverse, and many are closely related to human pathogens. Furthermore, each antibiotic-consuming isolate was resistant to multiple antibiotics at clinically relevant concentrations. This phenomenon suggests that this unappreciated reservoir of antibiotic-resistance determinants can contribute to the increasing levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18388292

  12. SELECTIVE INHIBITION OF PROLINE-INDUCED PIGMENTATION IN WASHED CELLS OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS.

    PubMed

    BLIZZARD, J L; PETERSON, G E

    1963-05-01

    Blizzard, John L. (University of Houston, Houston, Texas) and G. E. Peterson. Selective inhibition of proline-induced pigmentation in washed cells of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 85:1136-1140. 1963.-Streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracyclines inhibited the synthesis of prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens strain D1. This occurred at concentrations of the antibiotic too low to inhibit the growth of the organism in either agar media or broth cultures. Nonpigmented cells were produced in broth by either adding streptomycin or incubating at 37 C. After being washed and resuspended in aqueous saline containing either casein hydrolysate, l-proline, or a glycine-succinate mixture and incubated at 27 C for 24 hr, these cells formed pigment. The appearance of pigment was preceded by a lag period of 10 hr. Prodigiosin production by these washed suspensions of cells was completely inhibited by either streptomycin or glucose, or by incubation at 37 C instead of 27 C. Even though pigmentation by washed-cell suspensions was induced by proline, the utilization of proline was not affected by streptomycin or glucose, or by incubation at 37 C. To block pigmentation completely, streptomycin had to be added to proline-supplemented cells before they were 10 hr old. Addition of the antibiotic after the end of the induction period caused either partial or no inhibition of pigment production. Streptomycin caused an increase in the endogenous respiration of S. marcescens but failed to affect the constitutive enzymes that oxidize glucose. The possible relationships of these phenomena are discussed. Weil (1952) reported that low concentrations of chloramphenicol and certain tetracyclines inhibit the synthesis of prodigiosin while permitting growth by Serratia marcescens. He noted the potential value to "mode-of-action" studies of an organism having certain functions selectively inhibited by antibiotics. We confirmed Weil's (1952) observations and found that streptomycin at low

  13. Stored-product insects carry antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci.

    PubMed

    Channaiah, Lakshmikantha H; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju; McKinney, Leland J; Zurek, Ludek

    2010-11-01

    A total of 154 enterococcal isolates from 95 stored-product insects collected from a feed mill, a grain storage silo, and a retail store were isolated and identified to the species level using PCR. Enterococcus casseliflavus represented 51% of the total isolates, followed by Enterococcus gallinarum (24%), Enterococcus faecium (14%), Enterococcus faecalis (7%), and Enterococcus hirae (5%). Many isolates were resistant to tetracycline (48%), followed by streptomycin (21%), erythromycin (14%), kanamycin (13%), ciprofloxacin (12%), ampicillin (4%), and chloramphenicol (<1%). Enterococci carried genes coding for virulence factors, including the gelatinase gene gelE (26% of isolates), an enterococcal surface protein gene esp (1%), and the cytolysin gene cylA (2%). An aggregation substance (asa1) gene was detected in six out of 10 E. faecalis isolates and five of these were positive for the aggregation substance. Enterococci were positive for hemolytic (57% of isolates) and gelatinolytic (23%) activity. The filter-mating assay showed that the tetracycline resistance gene, tetM, was transferable among E. faecalis by conjugation. These data demonstrated that stored-product insects can serve as potential vectors in disseminating antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci.

  14. Effects of returning NF concentrate on the MBR-NF process treating antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cheng, Yutao; Wang, Jianxing; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Li, Mingyue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-07-01

    The optimization of the nanofiltration (NF) concentrate backflow ratio (R cb) and the influence of the NF concentrate on the performance of membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration (MBR-NF) process treating antibiotic production wastewater were investigated on a laboratory scale. The R cb was optimized at 60 % based on the removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH4 (+)-N by MBR. Data analyses indicated that salinity brought by NF concentrate is the major driver leading to the decrease of sludge activity, especially at a high R cb. EPS analysis showed that electric conductivity (EC), proteins in soluble microbial products (SMP), and SMP brought by NF concentrate are the dominant factors causing the severe membrane fouling in MBR. Furthermore, undegradable substances including fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like compounds accumulated in NF concentrate showed significant influence on fouling of NF. MBR could well degrade small MW compounds in NF concentrate, which confirmed the enhancement of organic removal efficiency by recycling the NF concentrate to MBR. The MBR-NF process showed a relatively stable performance at the R cb of 60 % (volume reduction factor (VRF) = 5), and the NF permeate could satisfy the water quality standard for fermentation process with a water recovery rate of 90.9 %.

  15. Antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria isolated from some pharmaceutical and dairy products

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Gamal Fadl M.; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Farag, Zeinab Shawky H.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 244 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from 180 dairy and pharmaceutical products that were collected from different areas in Minia governorate, Egypt. LAB were identified phenotypically on basis of morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Lactobacillus isolates were further confirmed using PCR-based assay. By combination of phenotypic with molecular identification Lactobacillus spp. were found to be the dominant genus (138, 76.7%) followed by Streptococcus spp. (65, 36.1%) and Lactococcus spp. (27, 15%). Some contaminant organisms such as (Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., mould and yeast) were isolated from the collected dairy samples but pharmaceutical products were free of such contaminants. Susceptibility of LAB isolates to antibiotics representing all major classes was tested by agar dilution method. Generally, LAB were highly susceptible to Beta-lactams except penicillin. Lactobacilli were resistant to vancomycin, however lactococci and streptococci proved to be very susceptible. Most strains were susceptible to tetracycline and showed a wide range of streptomycin MICs. The MICs of erythromycin and clindamycin for most of the LAB were within the normal range of susceptibility. Sixteen Lactobacillus, 8 Lactococcus and 8 Streptococcus isolates including all tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant strains were tested for the presence of tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant genes [tet(M) and/or erm(B)]. PCR assays shows that some resistant strains harbor tet(M) and/or erm(B) resistance genes. PMID:24948910

  16. Effects of returning NF concentrate on the MBR-NF process treating antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cheng, Yutao; Wang, Jianxing; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Li, Mingyue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-07-01

    The optimization of the nanofiltration (NF) concentrate backflow ratio (R cb) and the influence of the NF concentrate on the performance of membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration (MBR-NF) process treating antibiotic production wastewater were investigated on a laboratory scale. The R cb was optimized at 60 % based on the removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH4 (+)-N by MBR. Data analyses indicated that salinity brought by NF concentrate is the major driver leading to the decrease of sludge activity, especially at a high R cb. EPS analysis showed that electric conductivity (EC), proteins in soluble microbial products (SMP), and SMP brought by NF concentrate are the dominant factors causing the severe membrane fouling in MBR. Furthermore, undegradable substances including fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like compounds accumulated in NF concentrate showed significant influence on fouling of NF. MBR could well degrade small MW compounds in NF concentrate, which confirmed the enhancement of organic removal efficiency by recycling the NF concentrate to MBR. The MBR-NF process showed a relatively stable performance at the R cb of 60 % (volume reduction factor (VRF) = 5), and the NF permeate could satisfy the water quality standard for fermentation process with a water recovery rate of 90.9 %. PMID:27000117

  17. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6. PMID:26505308

  18. Luminamicin, a new antibiotic. Production, isolation and physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Iwata, R; Iwai, Y; Taga, S; Tanaka, Y; Tomoda, H

    1985-10-01

    A new antibiotic, luminamicin, was isolated from the culture broth of an actinomycete strain OMR-59. It exhibits antibacterial activity against anaerobic bacteria, especially against Clostridium sp. The molecular formula of the antibiotic was determined as C32H38O12 on the basis of high resolution mass spectrum, elemental analysis and NMR spectrum. PMID:3840790

  19. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their prudent use in animals has garnered global...

  20. [Utilization of mycelial waste of antibiotic production in the technology of kilned construction materials].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, V F; Krymskiĭ, M V; Ivanov, I A; Makridin, N I; Kalashnikov, V I

    1985-01-01

    At present the main part of the mycelial waste of antibiotic production is collected in sludge lagoones, discarded to the sewage treatment system or burnt. The mycelial waste is one of the causes of the environmental pollution. It contains a significant quantity of valuable substances, such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids. The inorganic portion of the waste includes the compounds of calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, silicium and phosphorus. The levels of the above substances in the mycelial waste allow using it as organic mineral additives in making expanded clay aggregate gravel with the use of low quality clay and loam. It may be also used as the burn-out of the raw material charge in making burnt bricks and other burnt building materials. By its calorific value the mycelial waste is equal to brown coal or peat. It was shown that the structural and mechanical properties of the mixtures of the mycelium and clay depended on the moisture content of the composition and the proportion of its components. The mycelial waste provided a decrease in the optimal temperature of burning by 40-50 degrees C. The production tests at the expanded clay aggregate plants showed that the bulk weight of expanded clay aggregate might be lowered by 50-100 kg/m3 and the usual additives with the use of petroleum products might be completely excluded from the technological process. The use of the mycelial waste for manufacture of burnt building materials provides saving of the fuel energy sources and improvement of the quality of the finished product. It is also important from the ecological viewpoint.

  1. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  2. Farm factors associated with the use of antibiotics in pig production.

    PubMed

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Puister-Jansen, L F; van Asselt, E D; Burgers, S L G E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate farm-level economic and technical factors that are associated with the use of antibiotics on pig farms. Identification of such factors, like farm size and net farm result, may help to increase epidemiological knowledge and to specify farm advice and policy making to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics. The study used over 300 farm-year records collected during 2004 to 2007 from pig farms in the Netherlands. Data included economic and technical factors as well as antibiotic administration. Data were statistically analyzed for factors associated with antibiotic use, both for fattening pig and sow farms (piglets only), separately. The response variable was the average number of daily dosages per average pig year. Statistical analysis was performed on 16 and 19 potential explanatory factors for the fattening pig and sow farms, respectively. The results showed that, both on the fattening pig and sow farms, the average use of antibiotics increased from 2004 to 2006, but decreased during 2007, but the effect of year was not significant (P > 0.05). Use of antibiotics varied between individual farms. Large farm repeatability for the use of antibiotics in the different years was found. Factors associated (P < 0.05) with the use of antibiotics included: farm system, number of pigs, and population density in the region of the farm (for sow farms only). As these factors are easy to collect and to register, they can be used to specify farm advice and investigation, as well as for policy making. The majority of the technical and economic factors were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to the on-farm use of antibiotics. Therefore, it is recommended to focus future research on the potential role of socioeconomic factors associated with antibiotic use on pig farms. PMID:21606448

  3. Effect of production batches of antibiotics on in vitro selection criterion for potential probiotic candidates.

    PubMed

    Ogunshe, Adenike A O

    2008-12-01

    Fifty-four potential probiotic candidates were assayed for their phenotypic susceptibility to two batches of antibiotics manufactured by the same company, using the agar disc diffusion method on de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) agar. Cloxacillin was generally resisted (40.0-100%), while gentamicin (3.85-20.0%) was the least resisted antibiotic. The overall percentage differences among the potential probiotics in both batches of antibiotics were 76.5% in fermented foods, 67.3% in fermented beverages, and 53.9% in infantile fecal samples, respectively. There was slightly more overall resistance in batch 1 (46.1% and 46.7%) than in batch 2 (38.4% and 40.0%) of the test antibiotics except in the multiresistance of infantile probiotic candidates (53.8% and 61.5%, respectively). Six of the probiotic candidates did not have any corresponding matching similarity profile, while none of the 54 potential probiotics had 100% antibiogram similarity profiles in both batches of the test antibiotics, despite the fact that they met some other selection criteria such as inhibition of pathogenic bacteria and survival in simulated gastric and intestinal juices and bile. It is therefore suggested that, though routine antibiotic susceptibility testing has been advocated as an essential selection criterion for potential probiotic candidates, more than one batch of antibiotic discs be used in the phenotypic antibiotic screening in developing countries like Nigeria, in order not to lose the most promising indigenous probiotic candidates, since most of the antibiotics used for antibiotic susceptibility studies are imported into the country and their origin cannot be currently fully ascertained.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  5. Screening of industrial wastewaters as feedstock for the microbial production of oils for biodiesel production and high-quality pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Teresa; Graeff-Honninger, Simone; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Claupein, Wilhelm; Holmes, William E.; Merkt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The production of biodiesel has notably increased over the past decade. Currently, plant oil is the main feedstock for biodiesel production, but, due to concerns related to the competition with food production, alternative oil feedstocks have to be found. Oleaginous yeasts are known to produce high amounts of lipids, but no integrated process from microbial fermentation to final biodiesel production has reached commercial realization yet due to economic constraints. Therefore, growth and lipid production of red yeast Rhodotorula glutinis was tested on low-cost substrates, namely, wastewaters from potato, fruit juice, and lettuce processing. Additionally, the production of carotenoids as high-value by-products was examined. All evaluated wastewaters met the general criteria for microbial lipid production. However, no significant increase in lipid content was observed, probably due to lack of available carbon in wastewaters from fruit juice and lettuce processing, and excess of available nitrogen in potato processing wastewater, respectively. During growth on wastewaters from fruit juice and lettuce processing the carotenoid content increased significantly in the first 48 hours. The relations between carbon content, nitrogen content, and carotenoid production need to be further assessed. For economic viability, lipid and carotenoid production needs to be increased significantly. Lastly, the screening of feedstocks should be extended to other wastewaters.

  6. Screening of industrial wastewaters as feedstock for the microbial production of oils for biodiesel production and high-quality pigments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneider, Teresa; Graeff-Honninger, Simone; French, William Todd; Hernandez, Rafael; Claupein, Wilhelm; Holmes, William E.; Merkt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    The production of biodiesel has notably increased over the past decade. Currently, plant oil is the main feedstock for biodiesel production, but, due to concerns related to the competition with food production, alternative oil feedstocks have to be found. Oleaginous yeasts are known to produce high amounts of lipids, but no integrated process from microbial fermentation to final biodiesel production has reached commercial realization yet due to economic constraints. Therefore, growth and lipid production of red yeast Rhodotorula glutinis was tested on low-cost substrates, namely, wastewaters from potato, fruit juice, and lettuce processing. Additionally, the production of carotenoids as high-valuemore » by-products was examined. All evaluated wastewaters met the general criteria for microbial lipid production. However, no significant increase in lipid content was observed, probably due to lack of available carbon in wastewaters from fruit juice and lettuce processing, and excess of available nitrogen in potato processing wastewater, respectively. During growth on wastewaters from fruit juice and lettuce processing the carotenoid content increased significantly in the first 48 hours. The relations between carbon content, nitrogen content, and carotenoid production need to be further assessed. For economic viability, lipid and carotenoid production needs to be increased significantly. Lastly, the screening of feedstocks should be extended to other wastewaters.« less

  7. Assessment Of The Production Of Antiquity Pigments Through Experimental Treatment Of Ochres And Other Iron Based Precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrotheodoros, G.; Beltsios, K. G.; Zacharias., N.

    In this work we explore the effects of various grinding and thermal-oxidative treatments applied to natural and artificial iron-based materials available (or related to those available) during GraecoRoman antiquity. The raw materials examined are: (a) commercial natural iron pigments (ochres, natrojarosite, caput mortum), (b) artificial melanterite (FeSO4.7H2O), (c) mineral pyrite (FeS2) and mineral metallic hematite. Additionally explored are: (a) the non-attested in surviving sources, yet highly probable during antiquity, route of pigment preparation from iron (or steel) plates exposed to vinegar vapors, (b) a Vitruvius recipe for purplish pigment via vinegar quenching of hot ochre. We obtain oxide pigments with colors ranging from yellowish and red to brownish and purplish. The puzzling variation of colors obtained by subjecting iron-oxide containing materials to identical oxidative heat treatments is found to be explainable on the basis of starting grain size and possible size modifications. We also show, by using highly purity starting materials, that purplish colors obtainable in certain cases by heat treatment do not necessitate, as often claimed, the presence of impurities such as manganese etc. A framework of antiquity color possibilities for iron-oxide based pigments obtainable under the conditions explored is included. All samples prepared are examined via scanning electron microscopy for micromorphology coupled with EDAX for composition, and X-Rays Diffraction for mineralogy.

  8. Black tattoo inks induce reactive oxygen species production correlating with aggregation of pigment nanoparticles and product brand but not with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content.

    PubMed

    Høgsberg, Trine; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Clausen, Per Axel; Serup, Jørgen

    2013-07-01

    Black tattoo inks are composed of carbon nanoparticles, additives and water and may contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We aimed to clarify whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by black inks in vitro is related to pigment chemistry, physico-chemical properties of the ink particles and the content of chemical additives and contaminants including PAHs. The study included nine brands of tattoo inks of six colours each (black, red, yellow, blue, green and white) and two additional black inks of different brands (n = 56). The ROS formation potential was determined by the dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) assay. A semiquantitative method was developed for screening extractable organic compounds in tattoo ink based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Two black inks produced high amounts of ROS. Peroxyl radicals accounted for up to 72% of the free radicals generated, whereas hydroxyl radicals and H₂O₂ accounted for <14% and 16%, respectively. The same two inks aggregated strongly in water in contrast to the other black inks. They did not exhibit any shared pattern in PAHs and other organic substances. Aggregation was exclusively shared by all ink colours belonging to the same two brands. Ten of 11 black inks had PAH concentrations exceeding the European Council's recommended level, and all 11 exceeded the recommended level for benzo(a)pyrene. It is a new finding that aggregation of tattoo pigment particles correlates with ROS production and brand, independently of chemical composition including PAHs. ROS is hypothesized to be implicated in minor clinical symptoms.

  9. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons.

  10. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons. PMID:25674822

  11. Bioprocess intensification of antibiotic production by Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) in micro-porous culture.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, T M; Ward, A C; Glassey, J; Eskildsen, J; Akay, G

    2015-04-01

    A novel functionalized micro-porous matrix was developed with well-controlled physicochemical proprieties such as pore size and surface chemistry. The matrix was used as a solid support in the growth of "Streptomyces coelicolor" A3(2) to enhance the production of antibiotics. The results shown support a higher production of prodigiosin and actinorhodin with overall production increase of 2-5 and 6-17, respectively, compared to conventional submerged liquid culture, offering a potential improvement in volumetric productivity. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate pore size as well as bacterial adhesion, penetration, proliferation and migration within the micro-porous matrix.

  12. Taguchi's experimental design for optimizing the production of novel thermostable polypeptide antibiotic from Geobacillus pallidus SAT4.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia; Ismail, Tariq; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Polypeptide antimicrobials used against topical infections are reported to obtain from mesophilic bacterial species. A thermophilic Geobacillus pallidus SAT4 was isolated from hot climate of Sindh Dessert, Pakistan and found it active against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 49189. The current experiment was designed to optimize the production of novel thermostable polypeptide by applying the Taguchi statistical approach at various conditions including the time of incubation, temperature, pH, aeration rate, nitrogen, and carbon concentrations. There were two most important factors that affect the production of antibiotic including time of incubation and nitrogen concentration and two interactions including the time of incubation/pH and time of incubation/nitrogen concentration. Activity was evaluated by well diffusion assay. The antimicrobial produced was stable and active even at 55°C. Ammonium sulphate (AS) was used for antibiotic recovery and it was desalted by dialysis techniques. The resulted protein was evaluated through SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that novel thermostable protein produced by Geobacillus pallidus SAT4 is stable at higher temperature and its production level can be improved statistically at optimum values of pH, time of incubation and nitrogen concentration the most important factors for antibiotic production.

  13. Acquired genetic mechanisms of a multiresistant bacterium isolated from a treatment plant receiving wastewater from antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R B; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria.

  14. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments. PMID:22629643

  15. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments.

  16. [Contribution of microbiologists of Kirov City to development of penicillin and streptomycin production processes (70 years since development of technology for submerged production of first domestic antibiotics)].

    PubMed

    Bakulin, M K; Tumanov, A S; Bakulin, V M; Kalininskiĭ, V B

    2014-01-01

    The publication is concerned with development of the technological processes for submered production of the first domestic antibiotics 70 years age. The literature data on the contribution of the microbiologists of the Kirov City and mainly the workers of the Red Army Research Institute of Epidemiology and Hygiene (nowadays Central Research Institute No. 48 of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, Kirov), to development of the manufacture processes for production of penicillin and streptomycin are reviewed.

  17. Production and biological activities of a new antifungal antibiotic, TAN-950 A.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, S; Tsubotani, S; Iwasa, T; Suzuki, M; Kondo, M; Harada, S

    1992-06-01

    A novel antifungal antibiotic, TAN-950 complex, was isolated from the culture filtrate of Streptomyces platensis A-136 (IFO 14603, FERM BP-1786). The water-soluble amphoteric substances in this complex were purified by chromatography using ion-exchange resins, QAE-Sephadex and adsorptive resins and were designated TAN-950 A and TAN-950 A-E mixture. The molecular formula of TAN-950 A was determined to be C6H7N2O4Na for the sodium salt. This new amino acid antibiotic showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans in vitro and in vivo, and had low toxicity in mice. PMID:1500350

  18. Deciphering the Regulon of Streptomyces coelicolor AbrC3, a Positive Response Regulator of Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Yepes, Ana; Rodríguez, Héctor; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Smith, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    The atypical two-component system (TCS) AbrC1/C2/C3 (encoded by SCO4598, SCO4597, and SCO4596), comprising two histidine kinases (HKs) and a response regulator (RR), is crucial for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor and for morphological differentiation under certain nutritional conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the RR-encoding gene, abrC3 (SCO4596), results in a dramatic decrease in actinorhodin (ACT) and undecylprodiginine (RED) production and delays morphological development. In contrast, the overexpression of abrC3 in the parent strain leads to a 33% increase in ACT production in liquid medium. Transcriptomic analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis of the ΔabrC3 mutant and the parent strain revealed that AbrC3 directly controls ACT production by binding to the actII-ORF4 promoter region; this was independently verified by in vitro DNA-binding assays. This binding is dependent on the sequence 5′-GAASGSGRMS-3′. In contrast, the regulation of RED production is not due to direct binding of AbrC3 to either the redZ or redD promoter region. This study also revealed other members of the AbrC3 regulon: AbrC3 is a positive autoregulator which also binds to the promoter regions of SCO0736, bdtA (SCO3328), absR1 (SCO6992), and SCO6809. The direct targets share the 10-base consensus binding sequence and may be responsible for some of the phenotypes of the ΔabrC3 mutant. The identification of the AbrC3 regulon as part of the complex regulatory network governing antibiotic production widens our knowledge regarding TCS involvement in control of antibiotic synthesis and may contribute to the rational design of new hyperproducer host strains through genetic manipulation of such systems. PMID:24509929

  19. Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBR-NF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Wei, Yuansong; Cheng, Yutao; Wei, Dongbin; Li, Mingyue

    2015-02-01

    A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBR-NF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 92±5.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBR-NF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4(+)-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34 mg L(-1), respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5 mS cm(-1), respectively; these values meet China's water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBR-NF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate.

  20. A Regulatory Gene SCO2140 is Involved in Antibiotic Production and Morphological Differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingjun; Pan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is the soil-dwelling bacterium with a complex life cycle and a strong ability to produce plenty of secondary metabolites which are strictly regulated by a variety of regulators. Amino acid alignment shows that the deduced protein of SCO2140 belongs to the family of Leucine-responsive regulatory proteins (Lrps). Disruption of SCO2140 significantly decreased the yields of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotics, and the complemented strain restored the antibiotic productions to the wild-type level. In contrast, overexpression of SCO2140 increased the actinorhodin production. In agreement with it, the transcriptions of actII-ORF4 and cdaR remarkably reduced in the SCO2140 disruption mutant. The aerial mycelium formation of the SCO2140 disruption mutant was clearly delayed in R2YE medium due to the decrease of ramS expression while its complemented strain could restore the normal formation of aerial mycelia. These results indicated that SCO2140 was involved in antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). PMID:27113590

  1. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  2. Advanced oxidation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine by UV/H₂O₂: Characterization of its transformation products and ecotoxicological implications.

    PubMed

    García-Galán, Ma Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Comas, Joaquim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate, under lab-scale conditions, the removal and transformation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine (SPY) upon advanced oxidation with UV/H2O2. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analyses by means of an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-linear ion trap high resolution Orbitrap instrument (LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) were carried out in order to elucidate the different transformation products (TPs) generated. The abatement (>99%) of the antibiotic was only achieved after 180 min, highlighting its resilience to elimination and its potential persistence in the environment A total of 10 TPs for SPY were detected and their molecular structures elucidated by means of MS(2) and MS(3) scans. Finally, the combined ecotoxicity at different treatment times was evaluated by means of bioluminescence inhibition assays with the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri. PMID:26789837

  3. Marine myxobacteria as a source of antibiotics--comparison of physiology, polyketide-type genes and antibiotic production of three new isolates of Enhygromyxa salina.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Ozlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1(T) as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE).

  4. Marine myxobacteria as a source of antibiotics--comparison of physiology, polyketide-type genes and antibiotic production of three new isolates of Enhygromyxa salina.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Ozlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1(T) as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). PMID:20948900

  5. Alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters for use in swine production: a review.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, an intensive amount of research has been focused on the development of alternatives to antibiotics to maintain swine health and performance. The most widely researched alternatives include probiotics, prebiotics, acidifiers, plant extracts and neutraceuticals such as copper and zinc. Since these additives have been more than adequately covered in previous reviews, the focus of this review will be on less traditional alternatives. The potential of antimicrobial peptides, clay minerals, egg yolk antibodies, essential oils, eucalyptus oil-medium chain fatty acids, rare earth elements and recombinant enzymes are discussed. Based on a thorough review of the literature, it is evident that a long and growing list of compounds exist which have been tested for their ability to replace antibiotics as feed additives in diets fed to swine. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these compounds produce inconsistent results and rarely equal antibiotics in their effectiveness. Therefore, it would appear that research is still needed in this area and that the perfect alternative to antibiotics does not yet exist. PMID:24034214

  6. Lysozyme as an alternative to growth promoting antibiotics in swine production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a naturally occurring enzyme found in bodily secretions such as tears, saliva, and milk. It functions as an antimicrobial agent by cleaving the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls, which leads to cell death. Antibiotics are also antimicrobials and have been fed at subtherape...

  7. Coevolution of antibiotic production and counter-resistance in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Laskaris, Paris; Tolba, Sahar; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Wellington, Elizabeth M; Wellington, Liz

    2010-03-01

    We present evidence for the coexistence and coevolution of antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis genes in soil bacteria. The distribution of the streptomycin (strA) and viomycin (vph) resistance genes was examined in Streptomyces isolates. strA and vph were found either within a biosynthetic gene cluster or independently. Streptomyces griseus strains possessing the streptomycin cluster formed part of a clonal complex. All S. griseus strains possessing solely strA belonged to two clades; both were closely related to the streptomycin producers. Other more distantly related S. griseus strains did not contain strA. S. griseus strains with only vph also formed two clades, but they were more distantly related to the producers and to one another. The expression of the strA gene was constitutive in a resistance-only strain whereas streptomycin producers showed peak strA expression in late log phase that correlates with the switch on of streptomycin biosynthesis. While there is evidence that antibiotics have diverse roles in nature, our data clearly support the coevolution of resistance in the presence of antibiotic biosynthetic capability within closely related soil dwelling bacteria. This reinforces the view that, for some antibiotics at least, the primary role is one of antibiosis during competition in soil for resources. PMID:20067498

  8. Alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters for use in swine production: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, an intensive amount of research has been focused on the development of alternatives to antibiotics to maintain swine health and performance. The most widely researched alternatives include probiotics, prebiotics, acidifiers, plant extracts and neutraceuticals such as copper and zinc. Since these additives have been more than adequately covered in previous reviews, the focus of this review will be on less traditional alternatives. The potential of antimicrobial peptides, clay minerals, egg yolk antibodies, essential oils, eucalyptus oil-medium chain fatty acids, rare earth elements and recombinant enzymes are discussed. Based on a thorough review of the literature, it is evident that a long and growing list of compounds exist which have been tested for their ability to replace antibiotics as feed additives in diets fed to swine. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these compounds produce inconsistent results and rarely equal antibiotics in their effectiveness. Therefore, it would appear that research is still needed in this area and that the perfect alternative to antibiotics does not yet exist. PMID:24034214

  9. Efficiency Assessment of Using Flammable Compounds from Water Treatment and Methanol Production Waste for Plasma Synthesis of Iron-Containing Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, Anastasia P.; Karengin, Alexander G.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the possibility of applying the low-temperature plasma for obtaining iron-containing pigments from water purification and flammable methanol production waste. In this paper were calculated combustion parameters of water-saltorganic compositions (WSOC) with different consists. Authors determined the modes of energy- efficient processing of the previously mentioned waste in an air plasma. Having considered the obtained results there were carried out experiments with flammable dispersed water-saltorganic compositions on laboratory plasma stand. All the experimental results are confirmed by calculations.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Production in Staphylococcus epidermidis Strains, Isolated from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Contreras, Roberto; Morelos-Ramírez, Rubén; Galicia-Camacho, Ada Nelly; Meléndez-Herrada, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from nosocomial infections represent a serious problem worldwide. In various Mexican states several reports have shown isolates from hospitals with antibiotic resistance to methicillin. In Mexico City, there is scarce information on staphylococcal infections in hospitals. Here, our research findings are shown in a four-year period study (2006–2010) for Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Susceptibility and/or resistance to antibiotics in SE strains were assessed by phenotypic and molecular methods as mecA gene by PCR, as well as the correlation with biofilm production for these isolates and the relationship to the infection site. Out of a total of 161 (66%) negative biofilm SE strains, just 103 (64%) SE strains were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. From 84 (34%) positive biofilm SE strains, 76 (91%) were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. Higher percentages of resistance to antibiotics and higher number of resistance markers were found in biofilm-forming clinical strains (9 to 14) than non-biofilm-forming SE strains (3 to 8). These research findings represent a guide to establish infection control programs for this hospital. PMID:23724338

  11. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review article proposes a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal ...

  12. Killing of Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Aborted Induction of Antibiotic Production by Streptomyces in Combined-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Asamizu, Shumpei; Ozaki, Taro; Teramoto, Kanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Co-culture of Streptomyces with mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MACB), which we termed “combined-culture,” alters the secondary metabolism pattern in Streptomyces and has been a useful method for the discovery of bioactive natural products. In the course of our investigation to identify the inducing factor(s) of MACB, we previously observed that production of pigments in Streptomyces lividans was not induced by factors such as culture extracts or mycolic acids. Although dynamic changes occurred in culture conditions because of MACB, the activation of pigment production by S. lividans was observed in a limited area where both colonies were in direct contact. This suggested that direct attachment of cells is a requirement and that components on the MACB cell membrane may play an important role in the response by S. lividans. Here we examined whether this response was influenced by dead MACB that possess intact mycolic acids assembled on the outer cell membrane. Formaldehyde fixation and γ-irradiation were used to prepare dead cells that retain their shape and mycolic acids of three MACB species: Tsukamurella pulmonis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Rhodococcus opacus. Culturing tests verified that S. lividans does not respond to the intact dead cells of three MACB. Observation of combined-culture by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that adhesion of live MACB to S. lividans mycelia were a significant interaction that resulted in formation of co-aggregation. In contrast, in the SEM analysis, dead cells were not observed to adhere. Therefore, direct attachment by live MACB cells is proposed as one of the possible factors that causes Streptomyces to alter its specialized metabolism in combined-culture. PMID:26544713

  13. Killing of Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Aborted Induction of Antibiotic Production by Streptomyces in Combined-Culture.

    PubMed

    Asamizu, Shumpei; Ozaki, Taro; Teramoto, Kanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Co-culture of Streptomyces with mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MACB), which we termed "combined-culture," alters the secondary metabolism pattern in Streptomyces and has been a useful method for the discovery of bioactive natural products. In the course of our investigation to identify the inducing factor(s) of MACB, we previously observed that production of pigments in Streptomyces lividans was not induced by factors such as culture extracts or mycolic acids. Although dynamic changes occurred in culture conditions because of MACB, the activation of pigment production by S. lividans was observed in a limited area where both colonies were in direct contact. This suggested that direct attachment of cells is a requirement and that components on the MACB cell membrane may play an important role in the response by S. lividans. Here we examined whether this response was influenced by dead MACB that possess intact mycolic acids assembled on the outer cell membrane. Formaldehyde fixation and γ-irradiation were used to prepare dead cells that retain their shape and mycolic acids of three MACB species: Tsukamurella pulmonis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Rhodococcus opacus. Culturing tests verified that S. lividans does not respond to the intact dead cells of three MACB. Observation of combined-culture by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that adhesion of live MACB to S. lividans mycelia were a significant interaction that resulted in formation of co-aggregation. In contrast, in the SEM analysis, dead cells were not observed to adhere. Therefore, direct attachment by live MACB cells is proposed as one of the possible factors that causes Streptomyces to alter its specialized metabolism in combined-culture. PMID:26544713

  14. Effect of some commonly used pesticides on seed germination, biomass production and photosynthetic pigments in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Shakir, Shakirullah Khan; Kanwal, Memoona; Murad, Waheed; Zia ur Rehman; Shafiq ur Rehman; Daud, M K; Azizullah, Azizullah

    2016-03-01

    Pesticides are highly toxic substances. Their toxicity may not be absolutely specific to the target organisms but can adversely affect different processes in the non-target host plants. In the present study, the effect of over application of four commonly used pesticides (emamectin benzoate, alpha-cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and imidacloprid) was evaluated on the germination, seedling vigor and photosynthetic pigments in tomato. The obtained results revealed that seed germination was decreased by the pesticides and this effect was more prominent at early stages of exposure. All the tested pesticides reduced the growth of tomato when applied in higher concentration than the recommended dose, but at lower doses the pesticides had some stimulatory effects on growth as compared to the control. A similar effect of pesticides was observed on the photosynthetic pigments, i.e. a decrease in pigments concentrations was caused at higher doses but an increase was observed at lower doses of pesticides. The calculation of EC50 values for different parameters revealed the lowest EC50 values for emamectin (ranged as 51-181 mg/L) followed by alpha-cypermethrin (191.74-374.39), lambda-cyhalothrin (102.43-354.28) and imidacloprid (430.29-1979.66 mg/L). A comparison of the obtained EC50 values for different parameters of tomato with the recommended doses revealed that over application of these pesticides can be harmful to tomato crop. In a few cases these pesticides were found toxic even at the recommended doses. However, a field based study in this regard should be conducted to further verify these results.

  15. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27175902

  16. Regulation of the pigment optical density of an algal cell: filling the gap between photosynthetic productivity in the laboratory and in mass culture.

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Franck, Fabrice; Bassi, Roberto

    2012-11-30

    An increasing number of investors is looking at algae as a viable source of biofuels, beside cultivation for human/animal feeding or to extract high-value chemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, present biomass productivities are far below theoretical estimations implying that a large part of the available photosynthetically active radiation is not used in photosynthesis. Light utilisation inefficiency and rapid light attenuation within a mass culture due to high pigment optical density of wild type strains have been proposed as major limiting factors reducing solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency. Analysis of growth yields of mutants with reduced light-harvesting antennae and/or reduced overall pigment concentration per cell, generated by either mutagenesis or genetic engineering, could help understanding limiting factors for biomass accumulation in photobioreactor. Meanwhile, studies on photo-acclimation can provide additional information on the average status of algal cells in a photobioreactor to be used in modelling-based predictions. Identifying limiting factors in solar-to-biomass conversion efficiency is the first step for planning strategies of genetic improvement and domestication of algae to finally fill the gap between theoretical and industrial photosynthetic productivity. PMID:22426090

  17. Impact of alg3 gene deletion on growth, development, pigment production, protein secretion, and functions of recombinant Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Shukla, Anil; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Adney, William S.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Ju, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Baker, Scott E.

    2013-12-01

    ALG3 is a Family 58 glycosyltransferase enzyme involved in early N-linked glycan synthesis. Here, we investigated the effect of the alg3 gene disruption on growth, development, metabolism, and protein secretion in Aspergillus niger. The alg3 gene deletion resulted in a significant reduction of growth on complete (CM) and potato dextrose agar (PDA) media and a substantial reduction of spore production on CM. It also delayed spore germination in the liquid cultures of both CM and PDA media, but led to a significant accumulation of red pigment on both CM and liquid modified minimal medium (MM) supplemented with yeast extract. The relative abundance of 55 proteins of the total 190 proteins identified in the secretome was significantly different as a result of alg3 gene deletion. Comparison of a Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) heterologously expressed in A. niger parental and Δalg3 strains showed that the recombinant Cel7A expressed in the mutant background was smaller in size than that from the parental strains. This study suggests that ALG3 is critical for growth and development, pigment production, and protein secretion in A. niger. Functional analysis of recombinant Cel7A with aberrant glycosylation demonstrates the feasibility of this alternative approach to evaluate the role of N-linked glycosylation in glycoprotein secretion and function.

  18. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa.

  19. Regulation of Motility and Phenazine Pigment Production by FliA Is Cyclic-di-GMP Dependent in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Ling; Shen, Lunda; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Bhuwan, Manish; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chang, Hwan-You

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor FliA, also called sigma 28, is a major regulator of bacterial flagellar biosynthesis genes. Growing evidence suggest that in addition to motility, FliA is involved in controlling numerous bacterial behaviors, even though the underlying regulatory mechanism remains unclear. By using a transcriptional fusion to gfp that responds to cyclic (c)-di-GMP, this study revealed a higher c-di-GMP concentration in the fliA deletion mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa than in its wild-type strain PAO1. A comparative analysis of transcriptome profiles of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its fliA deletion mutant revealed an altered expression of several c-di-GMP-modulating enzyme-encoding genes in the fliA deletion mutant. Moreover, the downregulation of PA4367 (bifA), a Glu-Ala-Leu motif-containing phosphodiesterase, in the fliA deletion mutant was confirmed using the β-glucuronidase reporter gene assay. FliA also altered pyocyanin and pyorubin production by modulating the c-di-GMP concentration. Complementing the fliA mutant strain with bifA restored the motility defect and pigment overproduction of the fliA mutant. Our results indicate that in addition to regulating flagellar gene transcription, FliA can modulate the c-di-GMP concentration to regulate the swarming motility and phenazine pigment production in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27175902

  20. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  1. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Daniel; Koppermann, Stefan; Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin; Ducho, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  2. Fractionation and analysis of veterinary antibiotics and their related degradation products in agricultural soils and drainage waters following swine manure amendment.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Gasser, Marc-Olivier; Coté, Caroline; Généreux, Mylène; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    The fate of antimicrobial active compound residues in the environment, and especially antibiotics used in swine husbandry are of particular interest for their potential toxicity and contribution to antibiotic resistance. The presence of relatively high concentrations of bioactive compounds has been reported in agricultural areas but few information is available on their degradation products. Veterinary antibiotics reach terrestrial environments through many routes, including application of swine manure to soils. The objectives of this project were first, to develop an analytical method able to quantify and identify veterinary antibiotics and their degradation products in manure, soil and water samples; and second, to study the distribution of these target compounds in soils and drainage waters. A brief evaluation of their potential toxicity in the environment was also made. In order to achieve these objectives, liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry was used for its ability to quantify contaminants with sensitivity and selectivity, and its capacity to identify degradation products. Samples of manure, soil and water came from a long-term experimental site where swine manure containing veterinary antibiotics has been applied for many years. In this study, tetracycline antibiotics were found at several hundred μg L(-1) in the swine manure slurry used for fertilization, several hundred of ng L(-1) in drainage waters and several ng g(-1) in soils, while degradation products were sometimes found at concentrations higher than the parent compounds.

  3. Comparison of NF membrane fouling and cleaning by two pretreatment strategies for the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Junya; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-01-01

    The nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies were investigated and compared for treating membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent and MBR-granular activated carbon (GAC) effluent of an antibiotic production wastewater by DK membrane. Results showed that the fouling of treating MBR effluent was more severe than that of treating MBR-GAC effluent. After filtering for 216 h, the difference of membrane flux decline was obvious between MBR effluent and MBR-GAC effluent, with 14.9% and 10.3% flux decline, respectively. Further study showed that organic fouling is the main NF membrane fouling in the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater for both of the two different effluents. Soluble microbial by-product like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components in the foulants, whereas humic-like substances existing in the effluents had little contribution to the NF membrane fouling. A satisfactory efficiency of NF chemical cleaning could be obtained using combination of acid (HCl, pH 2.0-2.5) and alkali (NaOH + 0.3 wt% NaDS, pH 10.0-10.5). The favorable cleaning strategy is acid-alkali for treating the MBR-GAC effluent, while it is alkali-acid for treating the MBR effluent. PMID:27148729

  4. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Fuerst, John A.; Hodson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A “chemical profile” link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time. PMID:25574739

  5. Atpenins, new antifungal antibiotics produced by Penicillium sp. Production, isolation, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tomoda, H; Kimura, K; Zhen, D Z; Kumagai, H; Igarashi, K; Imamura, N; Takahashi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Iwai, Y

    1988-12-01

    Penicillium sp. FO-125, a soil isolate, was found to produce a new antifungal antibiotic complex named atpenin. Three components A4, A5 and B were isolated from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. The molecular formula of atpenins A4, A5 and B were determined to be C15H22NO5Cl, C15H21NO5Cl2 and C15H23NO5, respectively, on the basis of high resolution electron impact mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. They are active against filamentous fungi, especially, Trichophyton sp. PMID:3209470

  6. Aurantimycins, new depsipeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces aurantiacus IMET 43917. Production, isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Schlegel, R; Ritzau, M; Ihn, W; Dornberger, K; Stengel, C; Fleck, W F; Gutsche, W; Härtl, A; Paulus, E F

    1995-02-01

    Aurantimycins A (1), B (2) and C (3) were isolated from the mycelium of Streptomyces aurantiacus JA 4570 as new representatives of the azinothricin group of hexadepsipeptide antibiotics. Their structures were settled by X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline aurantimycin A (1), high field homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR experiments, high-resolution mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Aurantimycins are characterized by a new side chain containing fourteen carbon atoms. They display strong activity against Gram-positive bacteria and cytotoxic effects against L-929 mouse fibroblast cells.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of AbsC, a novel regulator of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Davies, Sîan C.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Lawson, David M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel regulator of antibiotic production in S. coelicolor, AbsC, has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray data to 2.25 Å resolution were collected on station PX 14.1 at Daresbury. Crystals of recombinant AbsC (subunit MW = 18 313 Da; 158 amino acids), a novel regulator of antibiotic production from Streptomyces coelicolor, were grown by vapour diffusion. The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.53, b = 121.30, c = 143.75 Å. Native data to a resolution of 2.25 Å were recorded at station PX 14.1 (Daresbury) from a single crystal. Preliminary analysis of these data suggests that the asymmetric unit contains four copies of the AbsC monomer, giving an estimated solvent content of 47.0%. AbsC belongs to the MarR family of proteins that mediate ligand-responsive transcriptional control.

  8. Mitigation of carbon dioxide by oleaginous microalgae for lipids and pigments production: Effect of light illumination and carbon dioxide feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Thawechai, Tipawan; Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Louhasakul, Yasmi; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2016-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. was selected as potential strain for CO2 mitigation into lipids and pigments. The synergistic effects of light intensity and photoperiod were evaluated to provide the adequate light energy for this strain. The saturation light intensity was 60μmol·photon·m(-2)s(-1). With full illumination, the biomass obtained was 0.850±0.16g·L(-1) with a lipid content of 44.7±1.2%. The pigments content increased with increasing light energy supply. Three main operating factors including initial cell concentration, CO2 content and gas flow rate were optimized through Response Surface Methodology. The feedings with low CO2 content at high gas flow rate gave the maximum biomass but with low lipid content. After optimization, the biomass and lipid production were increased up to 1.30±0.103g·L(-1) and 0.515±0.010g·L(-1), respectively. The CO2 fixation rate was as high as 0.729±0.04g·L(-1)d(-1). The fatty acids of Nannochloropsis sp. lipids were mainly C16-C18 indicating its potential use as biodiesel feedstocks. PMID:27484670

  9. Mitigation of carbon dioxide by oleaginous microalgae for lipids and pigments production: Effect of light illumination and carbon dioxide feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Thawechai, Tipawan; Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Louhasakul, Yasmi; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2016-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. was selected as potential strain for CO2 mitigation into lipids and pigments. The synergistic effects of light intensity and photoperiod were evaluated to provide the adequate light energy for this strain. The saturation light intensity was 60μmol·photon·m(-2)s(-1). With full illumination, the biomass obtained was 0.850±0.16g·L(-1) with a lipid content of 44.7±1.2%. The pigments content increased with increasing light energy supply. Three main operating factors including initial cell concentration, CO2 content and gas flow rate were optimized through Response Surface Methodology. The feedings with low CO2 content at high gas flow rate gave the maximum biomass but with low lipid content. After optimization, the biomass and lipid production were increased up to 1.30±0.103g·L(-1) and 0.515±0.010g·L(-1), respectively. The CO2 fixation rate was as high as 0.729±0.04g·L(-1)d(-1). The fatty acids of Nannochloropsis sp. lipids were mainly C16-C18 indicating its potential use as biodiesel feedstocks.

  10. Incidence, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Toxin Profiles of Bacillus cereus sensu lato Isolated from Korean Fermented Soybean Products.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hong-Seok; Choi, Da-Som; Choi, In-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Korean fermented soybean products, such as doenjang, kochujang, ssamjang, and cho-kochujang, can harbor foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sensu lato). The aim of this study was to characterize the toxin gene profiles, biochemical characteristics, and antibiotic resistance patterns of B. cereus sensu lato strains isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. Eighty-eight samples of Korean fermented soybean products purchased from retails in Seoul were tested. Thirteen of 26 doenjang samples, 13 of 23 kochujang samples, 16 of 30 ssamjang samples, and 5 of 9 cho-kochujang samples were positive for B. cereus sensu lato strains. The contamination level of all positive samples did not exceed 4 log CFU/g of food (maximum levels of Korea Food Code). Eighty-seven B. cereus sensu lato strains were isolated from 47 positive samples, and all isolates carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 34.5%, 98.9%, 57.5%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen strains (17.2%) harbored the emetic toxin gene. Most strains tested positive for salicin fermentation (62.1%), starch hydrolysis (66.7%), hemolysis (98.9%), motility test (100%), and lecithinase production (96.6%). The B. cereus sensu lato strains were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin, penicillin, cefepime, imipenem, and oxacillin. Although B. cereus sensu lato levels in Korean fermented soybean products did not exceed the maximum levels permitted in South Korea (<10(4) CFU/g), these results indicate that the bacterial isolates have the potential to cause diarrheal or emetic gastrointestinal diseases.

  11. Evaluation and validation of a multi-residue method based on biochip technology for the simultaneous screening of six families of antibiotics in muscle and aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie; Hedou, Celine; Soumet, Christophe; Verdon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Evidence Investigator™ system (Randox, UK) is a biochip and semi-automated system. The microarray kit II (AM II) is capable of detecting several compounds belonging to different families of antibiotics: quinolones, ceftiofur, thiamphenicol, streptomycin, tylosin and tetracyclines. The performance of this innovative system was evaluated for the detection of antibiotic residues in new matrices, in muscle of different animal species and in aquaculture products. The method was validated according to the European Decision No. EC/2002/657 and the European guideline for the validation of screening methods, which represents a complete initial validation. The false-positive rate was equal to 0% in muscle and in aquaculture products. The detection capabilities CCβ for 12 validated antibiotics (enrofloxacin, difloxacin, ceftiofur, desfuroyl ceftiofur cysteine disulfide, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, tylosin, tilmicosin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline) were all lower than the respective maximum residue limits (MRLs) in muscle from different animal origins (bovine, ovine, porcine, poultry). No cross-reactions were observed with other antibiotics, neither with the six detected families nor with other families of antibiotics. The AM II kit could be applied to aquaculture products but with higher detection capabilities from those in muscle. The detection capabilities CCβ in aquaculture products were respectively at 0.25, 0.10 and 0.5 of the respective MRL in aquaculture products for enrofloxacin, tylosin and oxytetracycline. The performance of the AM II kit has been compared with other screening methods and with the performance characteristics previously determined in honey. PMID:26612266

  12. Evaluation and validation of a multi-residue method based on biochip technology for the simultaneous screening of six families of antibiotics in muscle and aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie; Hedou, Celine; Soumet, Christophe; Verdon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Evidence Investigator™ system (Randox, UK) is a biochip and semi-automated system. The microarray kit II (AM II) is capable of detecting several compounds belonging to different families of antibiotics: quinolones, ceftiofur, thiamphenicol, streptomycin, tylosin and tetracyclines. The performance of this innovative system was evaluated for the detection of antibiotic residues in new matrices, in muscle of different animal species and in aquaculture products. The method was validated according to the European Decision No. EC/2002/657 and the European guideline for the validation of screening methods, which represents a complete initial validation. The false-positive rate was equal to 0% in muscle and in aquaculture products. The detection capabilities CCβ for 12 validated antibiotics (enrofloxacin, difloxacin, ceftiofur, desfuroyl ceftiofur cysteine disulfide, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, tylosin, tilmicosin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline) were all lower than the respective maximum residue limits (MRLs) in muscle from different animal origins (bovine, ovine, porcine, poultry). No cross-reactions were observed with other antibiotics, neither with the six detected families nor with other families of antibiotics. The AM II kit could be applied to aquaculture products but with higher detection capabilities from those in muscle. The detection capabilities CCβ in aquaculture products were respectively at 0.25, 0.10 and 0.5 of the respective MRL in aquaculture products for enrofloxacin, tylosin and oxytetracycline. The performance of the AM II kit has been compared with other screening methods and with the performance characteristics previously determined in honey.

  13. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  14. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  15. Insights into solar TiO2-assisted photocatalytic oxidation of two antibiotics employed in aquatic animal production, oxolinic acid and oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Pereira, João H O S; Reis, Ana C; Queirós, Daniel; Nunes, Olga C; Borges, Maria T; Vilar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, solar driven TiO2-assisted heterogeneous photocatalytic experiments in a pilot-plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) were carried out to study the degradation of two authorized veterinary antibiotics with particular relevance in finfish aquaculture, oxolinic acid (OXA) and oxytetracycline (OTC), using pure solutions of individual or mixed antibiotics. Firstly, the influence of natural solar photolysis was assessed for each antibiotic. Secondly, photocatalytic degradation kinetic rate constants for individual and mixed antibiotics were compared, using a catalyst load of 0.5 g L(-1) and an initial pH around 7.5. Thirdly, for individually photocatalytic-treated OXA and OTC in the same conditions, the growth inhibition of Escherichia coli DSM 1103 was followed, and the mineralization extent was assessed by the residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC), low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions and inorganic ions concentration. Finally, the effect of inorganic ions, such as chlorides, sulfates, nitrates, phosphates, ammonium and bicarbonates, on the photocatalytic degradation of individual solutions of OXA and OTC was also evaluated and the formation of different reactive oxygen species were probed using selective scavengers. The removal profiles of each antibiotic, both as single component or in mixture were similar, being necessary 2.5 kJ L(-1) of solar UV energy to fully remove them, and 18 kJ(UV) L(-1) to achieve 73% and 81% mineralization, for OXA and OTC, respectively. The remaining organic carbon content was mainly due to low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions. After complete removal of the antibiotics, the remaining degradation by-products no longer showed antibacterial activity. Also, 10% and 55% of the nitrogen content of each antibiotic was converted to ammonium, while no conversion to nitrite or nitrate was detected. The presence of phosphates hindered considerably the removal of both antibiotics, whereas the presence of other inorganic

  16. Increased resveratrol production in wines using engineered wine strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 and relaxed antibiotic or auxotrophic selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Liang, Jing-Long; Kang, Lin-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Li-Qiong; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse beneficial effects on human health. Red wine is the major dietary source of resveratrol but the amount that people can obtain from wines is limited. To increase the resveratrol production in wines, two expression vectors carrying 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL) from Arabidopsis thaliana and resveratrol synthase gene (RS) from Vitis vinifera were transformed into industrial wine strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118. When cultured with 1 mM p-coumaric acid, the engineered strains grown with and without the addition of antibiotics produced 8.249 and 3.317 mg/L of trans-resveratrol in the culture broth, respectively. Resveratrol content of the wine fermented with engineered strains was twice higher than that of the control, indicating that our engineered strains could increase the production of resveratrol during wine fermentation.

  17. Overview of plant pigments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  18. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific to women Antibiotics can lead to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this causes yeast to grow rapidly. Symptoms of a yeast infection ...

  19. Antibiotic Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  20. Auxotrophic markers pyrF and proC can replace antibiotic markers on protein production plasmids in high-cell-density Pseudomonas fluorescens fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jane C; Jenings, Annika F; Mun, Deborah M; McGovern, Patricia M; Chew, Lawrence C

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotic-resistance genes as selectable markers in transgenic organisms is coming under increased scrutiny, for fear that they may spread to human pathogens, thereby reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A current Pseudomonas fluorescens protein expression system uses a tetracycline resistance gene (tetR/tetA) to maintain an expression plasmid under control of a repressible promoter and a kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) to maintain a plasmid carrying a repressor gene. We investigated using auxotrophic markers to replace these two antibiotic resistance genes: pyrF (encoding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase) in place of tetR/tetA and proC (encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase) in place of kanR, complementing their respective precise chromosomal deletions created by allele exchange using a suicide vector carrying pyrF as a counterselectable marker. The resulting strains, devoid of antibiotic-resistance genes, were shown to achieve high productivity of nitrilase and thermostable alpha-amylase equal to that of the former antibiotic-resistant production host. The production plasmids were stable. The pyrF (uracil-dependent) background of the production host strain also allows us to sequentially alter the genome to incorporate other desired genomic changes, deletions, or insertions using 5'-fluoroorotic acid counterselection, restoring the selectable marker after each step.

  1. Production of destomycin-A antibiotic by Streptomyces sp. using rice straw as fermented substrate.

    PubMed

    Atta, H M; Abul-Hamd, A T; Radwan, H G

    2009-01-01

    Hundred and twenty microbial isolates could be isolated from different soil samples collected from different localities in Egypt. One of the actinomycete culture AZ-H-A5 from three cultures was found to produce a wide spectrum antimicrobial agent when cultivated on rice straw. The actinomycete AZ-H-A5 could be isolated from a soil sample collected from Helwan district, Egypt. The nucleotide sequence of the 16s RNA gene (1.5 Kb) of the most potent strain evidenced an 85% similarity with Streptomyces pseudovenezue, EU841712 and Streptomyces galilaeus. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate AZ-H-A5 matches with Streptomyces rimosus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces rimosus, AZ-H-A5. The parameters controlling the biosynthetic process of antimicrobial agent formation including: inoculum size, different pH values, different temperatures, different incubation period, and different carbon and nitrogen sources, potassium nitrate, K2HPO4, MgSO4.7H2O and KCl concentrations were fully investigates. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of the active ingredient and its purification was performed using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. The physicochemical characteristics of the purified antibiotic viz. color, melting point, solubility, elemental analysis, spectroscopic characteristics and chemical reactions have been investigated. This analysis indicates a suggested empirical formula of C20H37N13O13. The minimum inhibition concentrations "MICs" of the purified antimicrobial agent were also determined. The purified antimicrobial agent was suggestive of being belonging to Destomycin-A antibiotic produced by Streptomyces rimosus, AZ-H-A5. PMID:20222575

  2. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii

    PubMed Central

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial. PMID:26635240

  3. In vitro activities of arylomycin natural-product antibiotics against Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter A; Powers, Michael E; Roberts, Tucker C; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2011-03-01

    The arylomycins are a class of natural-product antibiotics that act via the inhibition of type I signal peptidase (SPase), and we have found in diverse bacteria that their activity is limited by the presence of a resistance-conferring Pro residue in SPase that reduces inhibitor binding. We have also demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis, which lacks this Pro residue, is extremely susceptible to the arylomycins. Here, to further explore the potential utility of the arylomycins, we report an analysis of the activity of a synthetic arylomycin derivative, arylomycin C₁₆, against clinical isolates of S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from distinct geographical locations. Against many important species of CoNS, including S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, and S. hominis, we find that arylomycin C₁₆ exhibits activity equal to or greater than that of vancomycin, the antibiotic most commonly used to treat CoNS infections. While the susceptibility was generally correlated with the absence of the previously identified Pro residue, several cases were identified where additional factors also appear to contribute.

  4. High level of antibiotic production in a double polyphosphate kinase and phosphate-binding protein mutant of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Margarita; Sevillano, Laura; Rico, Sergio; Lombo, Felipe; Braña, Alfredo F; Salas, Jose A; Mendez, Carmen; Santamaría, Ramón I

    2013-05-01

    Phosphate metabolism regulates most of the life processes of microorganisms. In the present work we obtained and studied a Streptomyces lividans ppk/pstS double mutant, which lacks polyphosphate kinase (PPK) and the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein (PstS), impairing at the same time the intracellular storage of polyphosphate and the intake of new inorganic phosphate from a phosphate-limited medium, respectively. In some of the aspects analyzed, the ppk/pstS double mutant was more similar to the wt strain than was the single pstS mutant. The double mutant was thus able to grow in phosphate-limited media, whereas the pstS mutant required the addition of 1 mM phosphate under the assay conditions used. The double mutant was able to incorporate more than one fourth of the inorganic phosphate incorporated by the wt strain, whereas phosphate incorporation was almost completely impaired in the pstS mutant. Noteworthy, under phosphate limitation conditions, the double ppk/pstS mutant showed a higher production of the endogenous antibiotic actinorhodin and the heterologous antitumor 8-demethyl-tetracenomycin (up to 10-fold with respect to the wt strain), opening new possibilities for the use of this strain in the heterologous expression of antibiotic pathways.

  5. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

    PubMed

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-12-04

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial.

  6. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  7. A primer on pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G

    2015-01-01

    There is at least a temporary loss of skin pigmentation with all but first-degree burns. Commonly, pigment changes persist for months, and sometimes, permanent changes in skin color add to the ultimate change in appearance that commonly affects burn patients. There are many different treatment modalities for the treatment of pigment changes, but most of them have little scientific basis and often lead to disappointing results. The purpose of this review is to discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms of skin pigmentation, mechanisms of repigmentation after burns, treatment options for dealing with pigmentation changes, and advice for dealing with the sun after burn injury. PMID:25501768

  8. A primer on pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G

    2015-01-01

    There is at least a temporary loss of skin pigmentation with all but first-degree burns. Commonly, pigment changes persist for months, and sometimes, permanent changes in skin color add to the ultimate change in appearance that commonly affects burn patients. There are many different treatment modalities for the treatment of pigment changes, but most of them have little scientific basis and often lead to disappointing results. The purpose of this review is to discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms of skin pigmentation, mechanisms of repigmentation after burns, treatment options for dealing with pigmentation changes, and advice for dealing with the sun after burn injury.

  9. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci from spontaneously fermented meat products and safety assessment for new starters.

    PubMed

    Marty, Esther; Bodenmann, Chantal; Buchs, Jasmin; Hadorn, Ruedi; Eugster-Meier, Elisabeth; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-10-01

    To provide new meat starter strains lacking antibiotic (AB) resistances, we explored the AB susceptibility in 116 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) isolates from traditionally fermented sausages (n=40) manufactured with meat from conventional animal breeding, and from meat products (n=76) made from meat of animals raised in natural habitats under low- or no-antibiotic pressure. Less than 50% of these CNS isolates showed phenotypic resistances to at least one antibiotic (AB) by using microdilution assay. Resistances to penicillins and tetracycline were most often observed and could be traced back to blaZ and tet(K) genes. Prevalence of AB resistances was species-dependent and mainly found in isolates of Staphylococcus warneri (78%), Staphylococcus capitis (75%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (67%), but only sporadically detected in Staphylococcus carnosus (27%) and Staphylococcus equorum (18%). AB resistances were more often observed in S. xylosus isolates originating from natural habitats compared to traditionally fermented sausages made from conventional meat. A selection of 101 isolates belonging to S. xylosus (n=63), S. carnosus (n=21) and S. equorum (n=17) were subsequently grouped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) into strain clusters. No S. carnosus and only five S. xylosus strains were lacking AB resistances and exhibited a PFGE genotype different from commercial starters. These strains, together with 17 S. equorum strains, were further studied for safety and technological characteristics. The ability to produce biogenic amines was not detected in any strain. PCR amplifications for enterotoxin encoding genes seg-sej were detected in one, and for δ-hemolysin encoding gene hld in four S. equorum strains, but phenotypic hemolytic activity was visible for three S. xylosus and 15 S. equorum strains. Catalase and nitrate reductase activity was observed in all isolates tested; particularly S. equorum showed high nitrate reduction. In conclusion, we

  10. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  11. IL-33 is induced by amyloid-β stimulation and regulates inflammatory cytokine production in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Cui; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Jian, Cong-Xiang; Li, Chen-Jun; He, Shou-Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the predominant cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly population. Despite intensive basic and clinical research, its pathogenesis remains unclear. However, evidence suggests that immunological and inflammatory factors contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. A newly identified cytokine, IL-33, appears to be an important pro-inflammatory cytokine promoting tissue inflammation. In this study, IL-33 was increased through amyloid-beta(1-40) (Aβ(1-40)) stimulation and regulated inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α secretion using different signaling pathways in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Furthermore, ST2L, the important component of the IL-33 receptor, was significantly increased following recombinant human IL-33 stimulation in RPE cells. These findings suggest that IL-33-mediated inflammatory responses in RPE cells are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. Greater understanding of the inflammatory effect of IL-33 and its role in RPE cells should aid the development of future clinical therapeutics and enable novel pharmacological approaches towards the prevention of AMD.

  12. Estimating phycocyanin pigment concentration in productive inland waters using Landsat measurements: a case study in Lake Dianchi.

    PubMed

    Sun, Deyong; Hu, Chuanmin; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Shi, Kun

    2015-02-01

    Using remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ), sr(-1)) and phycocyanin (PC, mg m(-3)) pigment data as well as other bio-optical data collected from two cruises in September and December 2009 in Lake Dianchi (a typical plateau lake of China), we developed a practical approach to estimate PC concentrations that could be applied directly to Landsat measurements. The visible and near-IR bands as well as their band ratios of simulated Landsat data were used as inputs to the algorithms, where the algorithm coefficients for each Landsat sensor were determined through multivariate regressions. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) between the R(rs)-modeled and measured PC were all > 0.97 for the spectral bands corresponding to Landsat 8 OLI, Landsat 7 ETM + , Landsat 5 TM, and Landsat 4 TM, with mean absolute percentage errors (MAPE) < 10% for PC ranging between ~80 and 700 mg m(-3) (n = 14). The algorithms were further evaluated using an independent data set (n = 14), yielding larger but still acceptable MAPE (~30%) for PC ranging between ~80 and 500 mg m(-3). Application of the approach to Landsat 8 measurements over Lake Dianchi suggests potential use of the approach for periodical assessment of the lake's bloom conditions, yet its empirical nature together with the lack of specific narrow bands on Landsat sensors to explicitly account for the PC absorption around 625 nm calls for extra caution when applied to other eutrophic lakes.

  13. Estimating phycocyanin pigment concentration in productive inland waters using Landsat measurements: a case study in Lake Dianchi.

    PubMed

    Sun, Deyong; Hu, Chuanmin; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Shi, Kun

    2015-02-01

    Using remote sensing reflectance (R(rs)(λ), sr(-1)) and phycocyanin (PC, mg m(-3)) pigment data as well as other bio-optical data collected from two cruises in September and December 2009 in Lake Dianchi (a typical plateau lake of China), we developed a practical approach to estimate PC concentrations that could be applied directly to Landsat measurements. The visible and near-IR bands as well as their band ratios of simulated Landsat data were used as inputs to the algorithms, where the algorithm coefficients for each Landsat sensor were determined through multivariate regressions. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) between the R(rs)-modeled and measured PC were all > 0.97 for the spectral bands corresponding to Landsat 8 OLI, Landsat 7 ETM + , Landsat 5 TM, and Landsat 4 TM, with mean absolute percentage errors (MAPE) < 10% for PC ranging between ~80 and 700 mg m(-3) (n = 14). The algorithms were further evaluated using an independent data set (n = 14), yielding larger but still acceptable MAPE (~30%) for PC ranging between ~80 and 500 mg m(-3). Application of the approach to Landsat 8 measurements over Lake Dianchi suggests potential use of the approach for periodical assessment of the lake's bloom conditions, yet its empirical nature together with the lack of specific narrow bands on Landsat sensors to explicitly account for the PC absorption around 625 nm calls for extra caution when applied to other eutrophic lakes. PMID:25836166

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of AbsC, a novel regulator of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Davies, Sîan C.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Lawson, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of recombinant AbsC (subunit MW = 18 313 Da; 158 amino acids), a novel regulator of antibiotic production from Streptomyces coelicolor, were grown by vapour diffusion. The protein crystallizes in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.53, b = 121.30, c = 143.75 Å. Native data to a resolution of 2.25 Å were recorded at station PX 14.1 (Daresbury) from a single crystal. Preliminary analysis of these data suggests that the asymmetric unit contains four copies of the AbsC monomer, giving an estimated solvent content of 47.0%. AbsC belongs to the MarR family of proteins that mediate ligand-responsive transcriptional control. PMID:17329821

  15. Antibiotic Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Meat-Processing Environments, Beef Products, and Clinical Cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Castilho, Natalia Parma Augusto; da Silva, Danilo Augusto Lopes; Vallim, Deyse Christina; Hofer, Ernesto; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and the presence of virulence markers in 137 Listeria monocytogenes isolates obtained from meat-processing environments, beef products, and clinical cases. All isolates were subject to molecular serogrouping and their antibiotic resistance profiles were assessed against 12 antimicrobials. In addition, isolates were subjected to detection of virulence marker genes (inlA, inlC, inlJ). The isolates were classified into serogroups 4b, 4d, 4a, or 4c (46%), 1/2c or 3c (27%), 1/2a or 3a (13.9%), and 1/2b or 3b (13.1%). All tested isolates presented sensitivity to the majority of the tested antimicrobials, but most of them presented resistance or intermediate resistance to clindamycin (88.3%) and oxacillin (73.7%). Virulence markers were detected in all isolates, demanding further analysis to better characterize their pathogenic potential.

  16. Enhanced production of prodigiosin-like pigment from Serratia marcescens SMdeltaR by medium improvement and oil-supplementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Hong; Chen, Wei-Chuan

    2005-06-01

    Serratia marcescens SMdeltaR, an SpnR-defective isogenic mutant of S. marcescens SS-1, was used to produce a prodigiosin-like pigment (PLP). Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, frequently used for prodigiosin biosynthesis with S. marcescens strains, was modified by increasing the concentrations of tryptone and yeast extract while completely removing NaCl from the medium. The resulting modified LB (MLB) medium achieved an almost 3.0-fold increase in PLP yield (152 mg l(-1)) when compared with the original LB broth. The addition of vegetable oils (2-6% [v/v]) to the fermentation broth markedly enhanced PLP production. PLP yields of 525, 579, and 790 mg l(-1) were obtained when the MLB medium was supplemented with 4% soybean oil, 4% olive oil and 6% sunflower oil, respectively. PLP production was found to be positively correlated with extracellular surface emulsification activity, suggesting a link between the PLP production and the presence of biosurfactant. This work shows that the optimal medium for PLP yield was sunflower oil (6%)-supplemented MLB medium, which resulted in an approximately 14-fold higher PLP yield than that in LB broth. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis indicated that the PLP product is a prodigiosin derivative, called undecylprodigiosin.

  17. Developing fungal pigments for "painting" vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sara C

    2012-02-01

    The use of fungal pigments as color additives to wood as a method to increase forest revenue is a relatively new, but quickly developing field. Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is currently the primary utilized hardwood for spalting and appears to be the best suited North American hardwood for such purposes. The combination of Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera adusta has been identified in several instances as a strong fungal pairing for zone line production; however, Xylaria polymorpha is capable of creating zone lines without the antagonism of a secondary fungus. Few fungal pigments have been developed for reliable use; Scytalidium cuboideum is capable of producing a penetrating pink/red stain, as well as a blue pigment after extended incubation, and Chlorociboria sp. produces a blue/green pigment if grown on aspen (Populus tremuloides). Several opportunities exist for stimulation of fungal pigments including the use of copper sulfate and changes in wood pH. PMID:22237673

  18. Prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and/or biocides on meat processing plant surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2013-02-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of resistant bacteria to biocides and/or antibiotics throughout meat chain production from sacrifice till end of production line, samples from various surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse representative of the region were analyzed by the culture dependent approach. Resistant Psychrotrophs (n=255 strains), Pseudomonas sp. (n=166 strains), E. coli (n=23 strains), Staphylococcus sp. (n=17 strains) and LAB (n=82 represented mainly by Lactobacillus sp.) were isolated. Resistant psychrotrophs and pseudomonads (47 and 29%, respectively) to different antimicrobials were frequently detected in almost all areas of meat processing plant regardless the antimicrobial used, although there was a clear shift in the spectrum of other bacterial groups and for this aim such resistance was determined according to several parameters: antimicrobial tested, sampling zone and the bacterial group. Correlation of different parameters was done using a statistical tool "Principal component analysis" (PCA) which determined that quaternary ammonium compounds and hexadecylpyridinium were the most relevant biocides for resistance in Pseudomonas sp., while ciprofloxacin and hexachlorophene were more relevant for psychrotrophs, LAB, and in lesser extent Staphylococcus sp. and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, PCA of sampling zones determined that sacrifice room (SR) and cutting room (CR) considered as main source of antibiotic and/or biocide resistant bacteria showed an opposite behaviour concerning relevance of antimicrobials to determine resistance being hexadecylpyridinium, cetrimide and chlorhexidine the most relevant in CR, while hexachlorophene, oxonia 6P and PHMG the most relevant in SR. In conclusion, rotational use of the relevant biocides as disinfectants in CR and SR is recommended in an environment which is frequently disinfected. PMID:23279818

  19. Production of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A using soybean curd residue cultivated with Bacillus subtilis in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2006-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS, which suppresses the growth of various plant pathogens in vitro by producing the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A, was cultured using soybean curd residue, okara, a by-product of tofu manufacture in solid-state fermentation. After 4 days incubation, iturin A production reached 3,300 mg/kg wet solid material (14 g/kg dry solid material), which is approximately tenfold higher than that in submerged fermentation. When the okara product cultured with RB14-CS was introduced into soil infested with Rhizoctonia solani, which is a causal agent of damping-off of tomato, the disease occurrence was significantly suppressed. After 14 days, the number of RB14-CS cells remained in soil at the initial level, whereas almost no iturin A was detected in soil. As the okara cultured with RB14-CS exhibited functions of both plant disease suppression and nutritional effect on tomato seedlings, this product is expected to contribute to the recycling of the soybean curd residue. PMID:16575567

  20. Production of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A using soybean curd residue cultivated with Bacillus subtilis in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2006-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS, which suppresses the growth of various plant pathogens in vitro by producing the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A, was cultured using soybean curd residue, okara, a by-product of tofu manufacture in solid-state fermentation. After 4 days incubation, iturin A production reached 3,300 mg/kg wet solid material (14 g/kg dry solid material), which is approximately tenfold higher than that in submerged fermentation. When the okara product cultured with RB14-CS was introduced into soil infested with Rhizoctonia solani, which is a causal agent of damping-off of tomato, the disease occurrence was significantly suppressed. After 14 days, the number of RB14-CS cells remained in soil at the initial level, whereas almost no iturin A was detected in soil. As the okara cultured with RB14-CS exhibited functions of both plant disease suppression and nutritional effect on tomato seedlings, this product is expected to contribute to the recycling of the soybean curd residue.

  1. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  2. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  3. A Multi-Decadal 11.5 ka Sedimentary Pigment Record of Aquatic Productivity and Landscape Stability from Torfadalsvatn, North Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C. R.; Miller, G. H.; Geirsdottir, A.

    2014-12-01

    North Iceland is located in a climatically sensitive region at the interface between the warm Irminger Current and the cold East Greenland Current. Torfadalsvatn (66° 3'41.73"N, 20°23'14.26"W) is a relatively small (0.4 km2) and shallow (z=5.8 m) lake that lies on the Skagi peninsula of northern Iceland approximately 0.5 km from the modern coastline and is ideally situated to compare with regional climate records of nearby marine cores from the North Iceland Shelf. We have employed a multi-proxy approach to reconstruct Holocene terrestrial climate from an 8.4 m sediment core at 15-30 year resolution using sedimentary pigments, organic carbon flux, C:N and their stable isotopes, and biogenic silica measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Several proxies show peak values shortly after 8 ka suggesting peak Holocene warmth may have occurred at this time. Elevated canthaxanthin, produced by cyanobacteria, and lutein (green algae and higher plants), along with less negative δ13C and high C:N suggest a productive aquatic environment with abundant aquatic macrophytes. The mid Holocene is characterized by elevated diatom pigment concentration, reduced C:N and lutein concentration suggesting a shift toward a diatom dominated system with continued high aquatic productivity. At ~1.5 ka influx of terrestrial organic matter increases associated with a decrease in aquatic productivity. Terrestrial organic matter continues to increase during the late Holocene, peaking at ~1750 AD potentially associated with minimum local Little Ice Age temperatures. Aquatic productivity, however, continues to decrease until ~1900 AD suggesting that the landscape destabilization signal may have become saturated before minimum temperatures occurred. A comparison of the data from this core with other high-resolution regional climate records will not only increase our understanding of differences in climate histories between north and south Iceland, but will also allow for a better

  4. A dominant negative mutant of an Arabidopsis R2R3 Myb (AtMyb90) blocks flower pigment production in tobacco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A spontaneous mutation converted a hyper-pigmented (anthocyanins), CaMV-35S-pro::AtMYB90 containing, transgenic tobacco line into one displaying wild-type pigmentation in all tissues except for flower petals, which, counter-intuitively, showed anthocyanin levels dramatically below wild-type in the p...

  5. Diversity, Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces and Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W.; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated ‘hot spots.’ The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  6. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated 'hot spots.' The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination.

  7. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated 'hot spots.' The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  8. afsR is a pleiotropic but conditionally required regulatory gene for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Floriano, B; Bibb, M

    1996-07-01

    The N-terminal region of AfsR, a putative pleiotropic regulatory protein for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), is homologous to RedD and Actil-ORF4, pathway-specific regulatory proteins required for the production of the antibiotics undecylprodigiosin (Red) and actinorhodin (Act), respectively. The recent identification of afsS, which lies immediately 3' of afsR and which stimulates antibiotic production when cloned at high copy number, questioned whether afsR was a pleiotropic regulatory gene. In this study we demonstrate that multiple copies of afsR can stimulate both Act and Red production and that, despite its homology, it cannot substitute for the pathway-specific regulatory genes. Moreover, an in-frame deletion that removed most of the afsR coding sequence resulted in loss of Act and Red production, and a marked reduction in the synthesis of the calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA), but only under some (non-permissive) nutritional conditions. Although additional copies of afsR resulted in elevated levels of the actII-ORF4 and redD transcripts, transcription of the pathway-specific regulatory genes under non-permissive conditions was unaffected by deletion of afsR. While afsR may operate independently of the pathway-specific regulatory proteins to influence antibiotic production, the activity of ActII-ORF4 and of RedD under non-permissive conditions could depend on interaction with, or modification by, AfsR.

  9. Process design and evaluation of production of bioethanol and β-lactam antibiotic from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2014-11-01

    To design biorefinery processes producing bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass with dilute acid pretreatment, biorefinery processes were simulated using the SuperPro Designer program. To improve the efficiency of biomass use and the economics of biorefinery, additional pretreatment processes were designed and evaluated, in which a combined process of dilute acid and aqueous ammonia pretreatments, and a process of waste media containing xylose were used, for the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. Finally, the productivity and economics of the designed processes were compared.

  10. The phzI gene of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is responsible for the production of a diffusible signal required for phenazine antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Wood, D W; Pierson, L S

    1996-02-01

    The production of phenazine (Ph) antibiotics in Pseudomonas aureofaciens (Pau) 30-84 is positively regulated by PhzR, a protein belonging to the LuxR family of transcriptional activators. We have now identified phzI, a second gene required for PH production. The product of phzI is a member of the LuxI family of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (N-acyl-HSL) synthases. Inactivation of phzI results in the loss of Ph production in Pau 30-84. The presence of phzI in Escherichia coli is sufficient for the production of a diffusible signal which activates phzB expression in Pau 30-84 and traA expression in a N-acyl-HSL-dependent reporter strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In addition, synthetic N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-HSL induces phzB expression in Pau 30-84. These results suggest that Pau 30-84 produces a N-acyl-HSL signal that regulates Ph production, and that phzI plays a central role in this signaling pathway.

  11. [Investigation of the serotype distribution, biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibilities of group B streptococci isolated from urinary samples].

    PubMed

    Baba, Sevinç; Aydın, Mustafa Derya

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS), a member of normal flora of human gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, is a leading cause of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia particularly in newborn. GBS can also cause severe infections in pregnant women and adults with underlying disease, as well as mild diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). GBS strains exhibit 10 different serotypes, and the identification of serotype distribution is important epidemiologically. The role of biofilm production is one of the virulence factors that has been discussed in the pathogenesis of GBS infections. Although resistance to penicillin and ampicillin has not been documented in GBS, different rates of resistance has been reported for the alternative antibiotics to penicillin. The aim of this study was to investigate the serotype distribution, the ability of biofilm formation and the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.agalactiae strains isolated from urine cultures. A total of 60 strains were included in the study, 40 of them were isolated from patients (38 female 2 male; mean age: 36.7 years) with urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded single type of colonies in the number of ≥ 50.000 cfu/ml, whereas 20 of them were isolated from patients (19 female 1 male; mean age: 37.2 years) without urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded mixed colonies in the number of ≤ 20.000 cfu/ml. Chromogenic media were used for the isolation and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. The isolates were then serotyped by latex agglutination method and their antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion method recommended by CLSI documents. Biofilm formation of the strains were investigated by microplate and Congo red agar (CRA) methods. In our study, the most frequently detected serotypes were V (n= 18; 30%) and II (n= 14; 23.3%), followed by serotype Ia (n= 10; 16.7%), III (n= 9; 15%), Ib (n= 3; 5%), VI (n= 1; 1.7%) and VII (n

  12. Genetic diversity and virulence gene determinants of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella isolated from preharvest turkey production sources.

    PubMed

    Nayak, R; Stewart, T; Wang, R-F; Lin, J; Cerniglia, C E; Kenney, P B

    2004-02-15

    This study evaluated the molecular diversity of 29 Salmonella serotypes isolated from turkey ceca and the production environment. Isolates were resistant to bacitracin (100%), erythromycin (100%), novobiocin (100%), rifampin (100%), streptomycin (62%), gentamicin (52%), spectinomycin (48%), tetracycline (31%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT) (3%) and tobramycin (3%). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 32 to >/=1024 microg/ml. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping patterns were identical within each of the serotypes Heidelberg, Worthington and Muenster. The plasmid profiles were identical within each of the Salmonella serotypes. Two different clones of Salmonella anatum were differentiated by PFGE typing but not by ribotyping. Heidelberg isolates from nine turkey ceca and three drinker samples had identical antibiotic resistance, PFGE, ribotype and plasmid patterns, suggesting that transmission of this particular clone may have occurred between the birds and the drinkers. Identical PFGE, ribotype and plasmid patterns were observed in one Salmonella worthington isolate from turkey ceca in one flock and two S. worthington isolates from feeder contents and drinkers from a subsequent flock, suggesting transmission of this pathogen between flocks. Individual and multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed the presence of the virulence genes invA, aceK and sopB and the absence of the h-1i gene in all isolates. A combination of genotypic and phenotypic markers can be useful in studying genetic variation among natural salmonellae populations in turkey production and delineating possible transmission pathways.

  13. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species.

  14. Monitoring and determination of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansomboon, Worawat; Boontanon, Suwanna Kitpati; Boontanon, Narin; Polprasert, Chongrak; Thi Da, Chau

    2016-12-01

    This research aimed to monitor the concentrations of sulfamethoxydiazine (SMD), sulfamethazine (SMT), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfadiazine (SDZ) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand. The residues of the four sulfonamides (SAs) were analyzed by extraction process and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The highest concentrations found were 10.97ng/g for SMD, 6.23ng/g for SMT, 11.13ng/g for SDZ and 245.91ng/g for SMX, which was higher than the European Union (EU) standard (100ng/g). Moreover, all samples contaminated with SMX also contained SMT, indicating that more than one antibiotic was used for production in the country of origin. Because Thai standards for antibiotics in food have not been completely set, all contaminated discovered would not be considered to be an illegal food, in which antibiotic residues may affect human health in the long term. Therefore, antibiotic residues in Pangasius catfish products should be continually regulated and monitored. PMID:27374578

  15. Work plan for determining the occurrence of glyphosate, its transformation product AMPA, other herbicide compounds, and antibiotics in midwestern United States streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of glyphosate and its primary transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in midwestern streams during post-application and harvest-season runoff events. Water samples will be collected in 2002 during two post-herbicide-application runoff events and one harvest-season runoff event from 53 sites on streams in the Midwestern United States. All samples will be analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides. Samples will also be analyzed for a glyphosate transformation product (AMPA) and 26 other herbicide transformation products, using GC/MS or HPLC/MS. Selected samples will be analyzed for 36 antibiotics or antibiotic transformational products. Results from this study will represent the first broad-scale investigation of glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. water resources.

  16. [The possibility for obtaining sorbents from the mycelial wastes of antibiotic production].

    PubMed

    Iakubova, A R; Lagunov, V M; Faĭngol'd, Z L

    1995-05-01

    A technological process for production of a sorbent based on the mycelial waste of penicillin manufacture was developed. The process and its parameters are described. The exploitation conditions determine whether a strong sorbent with low sorption properties or a sorbent with higher sorption properties and lower granule strength is prepared.

  17. Diversity, Community Composition, and Dynamics of Nonpigmented and Late-Pigmenting Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria in an Urban Tap Water Production and Distribution System

    PubMed Central

    Dubrou, S.; Konjek, J.; Macheras, E.; Welté, B.; Guidicelli, L.; Chignon, E.; Joyeux, M.; Gaillard, J. L.; Heym, B.; Tully, T.

    2013-01-01

    Nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have been reported to commonly colonize water production and distribution systems. However, there is little information about the nature and distribution of RGM species within the different parts of such complex networks or about their clustering into specific RGM species communities. We conducted a large-scale survey between 2007 and 2009 in the Parisian urban tap water production and distribution system. We analyzed 1,418 water samples from 36 sites, covering all production units, water storage tanks, and distribution units; RGM isolates were identified by using rpoB gene sequencing. We detected 18 RGM species and putative new species, with most isolates being Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium llatzerense. Using hierarchical clustering and principal-component analysis, we found that RGM were organized into various communities correlating with water origin (groundwater or surface water) and location within the distribution network. Water treatment plants were more specifically associated with species of the Mycobacterium septicum group. On average, M. chelonae dominated network sites fed by surface water, and M. llatzerense dominated those fed by groundwater. Overall, the M. chelonae prevalence index increased along the distribution network and was associated with a correlative decrease in the prevalence index of M. llatzerense, suggesting competitive or niche exclusion between these two dominant species. Our data describe the great diversity and complexity of RGM species living in the interconnected environments that constitute the water production and distribution system of a large city and highlight the prevalence index of the potentially pathogenic species M. chelonae in the distribution network. PMID:23835173

  18. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  19. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  20. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  1. Zeo-pigment for traditional ceramic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, J.J.P.; Rodriguez, A.V.; Caraballo, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In the present work the possibility of using natural zeolites mixed with soluble salts for ceramic pigment elaboration (further named zeo-pigment) is studied. The mixture of zeolite with salts is thermally treated to produce the pigment, this procedure was followed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The obtained zeo-pigments were used to colour the porcelanized ceramic stoneware tiles at the experimental production. As it is known, it is possible to prepare a wide range of colours in these type of tiles by adding specific stains to the mixture of raw materials during grinding in the amount of 0.5 to 5 %, in this way any product called marbleized, mottled, granite, etc. ware is obtained. It is important to remember that when stains are added to the basic white body in order to produce one-color porcelanized ceramic stoneware, this does not involve great problems for the production. The physical properties of experimental produced ceramics, coloured by zeo-pigments, were studied according to European standard test. The present work is intended to be useful from the point of view of pollution prevention and waste minimization, regarding the utilization of soluble salts contained in some industrial wastes for the elaboration of ceramic pigments.

  2. Contribution of enterococci to the spread of antibiotic resistance in the production chain of swine meat commodities.

    PubMed

    Rizzotti, Lucia; Simeoni, Desj; Cocconcelli, Piersandro; Gazzola, Simona; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    Thirty-six samples, including fecal specimens, dry feedstuffs, raw and processed pork meat products, and dry fermented sausages, were collected from two production chains of swine meat commodities and analyzed for the presence of 11 antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Specific PCR assays carried out on DNA extracted directly from the samples revealed a high incidence of the genes tet(K) (80.5%), ermB (66.7%), and tet(M) (66.7%). Feces and feedstuffs gave the largest number of positive amplifications. To elucidate the contribution of enterococci to the occurrence and spread of AR, 146 resistant enterococci were isolated, and their identity, genetic fingerprints, and AR gene profiles were determined by means of molecular techniques. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were the predominant isolated species (43.8 and 38.4%, respectively); Other Enterococcus species identified were E. durans (8.9%), E. hirae (2.7%), E. gallinarum (2.1%), E. mundtii (2.1%), and E. casseliflavus (2.1%). A number of isolates displayed a complex AR gene profile comprising up to four different resistance determinants. The genes tet(M) and ermB were highly diffused, being present in 86.9 and 84.9%, respectively, of the isolates. The application of amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting was particularly valuable to monitor the resistant enterococcal isolates along the production chain and to individuate steps in which contamination might occur. In fact, isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium showing the same amplified fragment length polymorphism profile and AR gene pattern were detected in samples taken at different steps of the food chain suggesting three cases of bacterial clonal spread. PMID:15895727

  3. DNA sequence and mutational analysis of genes involved in the production and resistance of the antibiotic peptide trifolitoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Breil, B T; Ludden, P W; Triplett, E W

    1993-01-01

    The 7.1-kb fragment of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii T24 DNA which confers trifolitoxin production and resistance to nonproducing, sensitive Rhizobium strains (E. W. Triplett, M. J. Schink, and K. L. Noeldner, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 2:202-208, 1989) was subcloned, sequenced, and mutagenized with a transcriptional fusion cassette. The sequence of this fragment revealed seven complete open reading frames, tfxABCDEFG, all transcribed in the same direction. TfxA has an 11-amino-acid carboxy terminus identical to the known amino acid sequence of the trifolitoxin backbone, DIGGSRXGCVA, where X is an UV-absorbing chromophore. This is evidence that trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally as a prepeptide that is posttranslationally modified to yield the active peptide. TfxB shows 27.6% identity with McbC, a protein required for the production of the ribosomally synthesized antibiotic microcin B17. Tn3GUS transcriptional fusion insertions in tfxA, tfxB, tfxD, or tfxF caused a nonproducing, trifolitoxin-resistant phenotype and confirmed the direction of transcription of these frames. No insertion mutations were found in tfxE or tfxG. Sequence analysis along with insertion and deletion mutation analysis suggest that (i) trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally from tfxA; (ii) tfxA, tfxE, and tfxG have their own promoters; (iii) TfxG is required for immunity; (iv) TfxB, TfxD, and TfxF are required for trifolitoxin production; and (v) the UV-absorbing chromophore is derived from glutamine. PMID:8509324

  4. Color me bad: microbial pigments as virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, George Y.; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark feature of several pathogenic microbes is the distinctive color of their colonies when propagated in the clinical laboratory. Such pigmentation comes in a variety of hues, and has often proven useful in presumptive clinical diagnosis. Recent advances in microbial pigment biochemistry and the genetic basis of pigment production has sometimes revealed a more sinister aspect to these curious materials that change the color of reflected light by selective light absorbance. In many cases, the microbial pigment contributes to disease pathogenesis by interfering with host immune clearance mechanisms or by exhibiting pro-inflammatory or cytotoxic properties. Here, we review several examples of pigments that promote microbial virulence, including the golden staphyloxanthin of Staphylococcus aureus, the blue-green pyocyanin of Pseudomonas spp., and the dark brown or black melanin pigments of Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus spp. Targeted pigment neutralization may represent a viable concept to enhance treatment of certain difficult infectious disease conditions. PMID:19726196

  5. Portuguese tin-glazed earthenware from the 17th century. Part 2: A spectroscopic characterization of pigments, glazes and pastes of the three main production centers.

    PubMed

    Vieira Ferreira, L F; Ferreira, D P; Conceição, D S; Santos, L F; Pereira, M F C; Casimiro, T M; Ferreira Machado, I

    2015-01-01

    Sherds representative of the three Portuguese faience production centers of the 17th century - Lisbon, Coimbra and Vila Nova were studied with the use of mostly non-invasive spectroscopies, namely: ground state diffuse reflectance absorption (GSDR), micro-Raman, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton induced X-ray (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence emission (XRF). X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments were also performed. The obtained results evidence a clear similarity in the pastes of the pottery produced Vila Nova and some of the ceramic pastes from Lisbon, in accordance with documental sources that described the use of Lisbon clays by Vila Nova potters, at least since mid 17th century. Quartz and Gehlenite are the main components of the Lisbon's pastes, but differences between the ceramic pastes were detected pointing out to the use of several clay sources. The spectroscopic trend exhibited Coimbra's pottery is remarkably different, Quartz and Diopside being the major components of these pastes, enabling one to well define a pattern for these ceramic bodies. The blue pigment from the Lisbon samples is a cobalt oxide that exists in the silicate glassy matrix, which enables the formation of detectable cobalt silicate microcrystals in most productions of the second half of the 17th century. No micro-Raman cobalt blue signature could be detected in the Vila Nova and Coimbra blue glazes. This is in accordance with the lower kiln temperatures in these two production centers and with Co(2+) ions dispersed in the silicate matrix. In all cases the white glaze is obtained with the use of tin oxide. Hausmannite was detected as the manganese oxide mineral used to produce the purple glaze (wine color "vinoso") in Lisbon. PMID:25965511

  6. Portuguese tin-glazed earthenware from the 17th century. Part 2: A spectroscopic characterization of pigments, glazes and pastes of the three main production centers.

    PubMed

    Vieira Ferreira, L F; Ferreira, D P; Conceição, D S; Santos, L F; Pereira, M F C; Casimiro, T M; Ferreira Machado, I

    2015-01-01

    Sherds representative of the three Portuguese faience production centers of the 17th century - Lisbon, Coimbra and Vila Nova were studied with the use of mostly non-invasive spectroscopies, namely: ground state diffuse reflectance absorption (GSDR), micro-Raman, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton induced X-ray (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence emission (XRF). X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments were also performed. The obtained results evidence a clear similarity in the pastes of the pottery produced Vila Nova and some of the ceramic pastes from Lisbon, in accordance with documental sources that described the use of Lisbon clays by Vila Nova potters, at least since mid 17th century. Quartz and Gehlenite are the main components of the Lisbon's pastes, but differences between the ceramic pastes were detected pointing out to the use of several clay sources. The spectroscopic trend exhibited Coimbra's pottery is remarkably different, Quartz and Diopside being the major components of these pastes, enabling one to well define a pattern for these ceramic bodies. The blue pigment from the Lisbon samples is a cobalt oxide that exists in the silicate glassy matrix, which enables the formation of detectable cobalt silicate microcrystals in most productions of the second half of the 17th century. No micro-Raman cobalt blue signature could be detected in the Vila Nova and Coimbra blue glazes. This is in accordance with the lower kiln temperatures in these two production centers and with Co(2+) ions dispersed in the silicate matrix. In all cases the white glaze is obtained with the use of tin oxide. Hausmannite was detected as the manganese oxide mineral used to produce the purple glaze (wine color "vinoso") in Lisbon.

  7. The stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, regulates the production of a carbapenem antibiotic, a bioactive prodigiosin and virulence in the enterobacterial pathogen Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Nabil M; Salmond, George P C

    2012-03-01

    Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006) is a Gram-negative bacterium that is virulent in plant (potato) and invertebrate animal (Caenorhabditis elegans) models. It produces two secondary metabolite antibiotics, a prodigiosin and a carbapenem, and the exoenzymes pectate lyase and cellulase. We showed previously that deletion of the RNA chaperone Hfq abolished antibiotic production and attenuated virulence in both animal and plant hosts. Hfq and dependent small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to regulate the post-transcriptional expression of rpoS, which encodes σ(S), the stationary phase sigma factor subunit of RNA polymerase. An S39006 hfq deletion mutant showed decreased transcript levels of rpoS. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether the phenotypes regulated by Hfq were mediated through its control of rpoS. Whereas loss of Hfq abolished prodigiosin and carbapenem production and attenuated virulence in both C. elegans and potato, characterization of an S39006 rpoS mutant showed unexpectedly elevated prodigiosin and carbapenem production. Furthermore, the rpoS mutant exhibited attenuated animal pathogenesis, but not plant pathogenesis. Additionally, a homologue of the Hfq-dependent sRNA, RprA, was identified and shown to regulate prodigiosin production in a manner consistent with its role in positively regulating translation of rpoS mRNA. Combined, these results demonstrate that Hfq regulation of secondary metabolism and plant pathogenesis is independent of RpoS and establishes RpoS and RprA as regulators of antibiotic production.

  8. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  9. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  10. More than anticipated - production of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Koumoutsi, Alexandra; Scholz, Romy; Borriss, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The genome of environmental Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 harbors numerous gene clusters involved in synthesis of antifungal and antibacterial acting secondary metabolites. Five gene clusters, srf, bmy, fen, nrs, dhb, covering altogether 137 kb, direct non-ribosomal synthesis of the cyclic lipopeptides surfactin, bacillomycin, fengycin, an unknown peptide, and the iron siderophore bacillibactin. Bacillomycin and fengycin were shown to act against phytopathogenic fungi in a synergistic manner. Three gene clusters, mln, bae, and dif, with a total length of 199 kb were shown to direct synthesis of the antibacterial acting polyketides macrolactin, bacillaene, and difficidin. Both, non-ribosomal synthesis of cyclic lipopeptides and synthesis of polyketides are dependent on the presence of a functional sfp gene product, 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase, as evidenced by knockout mutation of the sfp gene resulting in complete absence of all those eight compounds. In addition, here we present evidence that a gene cluster encoding enzymes involved in synthesis and export of the antibacterial acting dipeptide bacilysin is also functional in FZB42. In summary, environmental FZB42 devoted about 340 kb, corresponding to 8.5% of its total genetic capacity, to synthesis of secondary metabolites useful to cope with other competing microorganisms present in the plant rhizosphere. PMID:18957859

  11. Identification of the Main Regulator Responsible for Synthesis of the Typical Yellow Pigment Produced by Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Derntl, Christian; Rassinger, Alice; Srebotnik, Ewald; Mach, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The industrially used ascomycete Trichoderma reesei secretes a typical yellow pigment during cultivation, while other Trichoderma species do not. A comparative genomic analysis suggested that a putative secondary metabolism cluster, containing two polyketide-synthase encoding genes, is responsible for the yellow pigment synthesis. This cluster is conserved in a set of rather distantly related fungi, including Acremonium chrysogenum and Penicillium chrysogenum. In an attempt to silence the cluster in T. reesei, two genes of the cluster encoding transcription factors were individually deleted. For a complete genetic proof-of-function, the genes were reinserted into the genomes of the respective deletion strains. The deletion of the first transcription factor (termed yellow pigment regulator 1 [Ypr1]) resulted in the full abolishment of the yellow pigment formation and the expression of most genes of this cluster. A comparative high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of supernatants of the ypr1 deletion and its parent strain suggested the presence of several yellow compounds in T. reesei that are all derived from the same cluster. A subsequent gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis strongly indicated the presence of sorbicillin in the major HPLC peak. The presence of the second transcription factor, termed yellow pigment regulator 2 (Ypr2), reduces the yellow pigment formation and the expression of most cluster genes, including the gene encoding the activator Ypr1. IMPORTANCE Trichoderma reesei is used for industry-scale production of carbohydrate-active enzymes. During growth, it secretes a typical yellow pigment. This is not favorable for industrial enzyme production because it makes the downstream process more complicated and thus increases operating costs. In this study, we demonstrate which regulators influence the synthesis of the yellow pigment. Based on these data, we also provide indication as to which genes are under the control

  12. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viruses b) Bacteria c) Viruses and Bacteria 2. Bacteria are germs that cause colds and flu. a) ... The Flu c) Cold d) Strep Throat 4. Bacteria that cause infections can become resistant to antibiotics. ...

  13. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  14. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine.

  15. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Alison A.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    microbiota, allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  16. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  17. Isolation and molecular characterization of antibiotic-resistant lactic acid bacteria from poultry and swine meat products.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Lucia; Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Silvestri, Gloria; Vignaroli, Carla; Clementi, Francesca

    2007-03-01

    The transfer via the food chain from animals to humans of microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents is of increasing concern. To determine the contributions of nonpathogenic microflora to the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in the food chain, 123 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 29 samples of raw and processed pork and chicken meat products that had previously tested positive for one or more AR genes that encode clinically relevant ARs: tet(M), tet(O), tet(K), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), aac (6')-Ie aph (2")-Ia, mecA, and blaZ. All of the isolates were initially tested for their AR gene profiles by PCR. The 59 isolates carrying a tet, erm, or blaZ gene were taken through molecular identification, analyzed by determination of the MIC, and subjected to genetic fingerprinting. Lactococcus garvieae was the predominant species (28 isolates), followed by Lactobacillus plantarum (11 isolates) and L. salivarius (6 isolates), whereas Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. crispatus, and L. brevis were identified at lower frequencies. The tet(M) and erm(B) genes were the most frequently detected. Assessment of multiple resistances in 18 tet positive (tet+) isolates revealed that tet(M) plus erm(B) and tet(K) plus erm(B) were the most frequent AR gene patterns. Partial sequencing of the tet(M) open reading frame of three selected strains showed high sequence similarities (> 99%) with tet(M) genes previously found in human pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Neisseria meningitidis). Southern hybridization with plasmid profiles revealed these strains contained tet(M)-carrying plasmids. PMID:17388042

  18. Correlation between antibiotic and biocide resistance in mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from slaughterhouse surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biocide susceptibility in mesophilic and psychrotrophic pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which was representative of the region. To determine biocide resistance in pseudomonads, we determined for the first time the epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) of benzalkonium, cetrimide, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene, P3 oxonia, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG), topax 66 and triclosan being generally very similar in different Pseudomonas spp. with some exceptions. Thus, resistance of pseudomonads was mainly shown to triclosan, and in lesser extent to cetrimide and benzalkonium chloride depending on the species, however they were highly susceptible to industrial formulations of biocides. By means of statistical analysis, positive correlations between antibiotics, biocides and both antimicrobials in pseudomonads were detected suggesting a co- or cross resistance between different antimicrobials in goat and lamb slaughterhouse environment. Cross-resistance between biocides and antibiotics in pseudomonads were especially detected between PHMG or triclosan and different antibiotics depending on the biocide and the population type. Thus, the use of those biocides as disinfectant in slaughterhouse zones must be carefully evaluated because of the selection pressure effect of antimicrobials on the emergence of resistant bacteria which could be spread to the consumer. It is noteworthy that specific industrial formulations such as topax 66 and oxonia P3 showed few correlations with antibiotics (none or 1-2 antibiotics) which should be taken into consideration for disinfection practices in goat and lamb slaughterhouse. PMID:26187825

  19. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    PubMed

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (P<0·05), the frequency of episodes 17%, 7% and 27% (n.s.), and the change in total symptoms score before antibiotics treatment was -1·4 ± 1·1, -1·2 ± 1·1, 2·6 ± 1·1 points/four weeks (P<0·05). All milk products decreased Helicobacter activity by 18 to 45% without significant differences between groups. The observed decrease in Hel. pylori activity seems to be not or not only due to probiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  20. Individual use of antibiotics and prevalence of beta-lactamase production among bacterial pathogens from middle ear fluid.

    PubMed

    Thrane, N; Olesen, C; Sørensen, H T; Schønheyder, H C

    2001-02-01

    Prescription data and clinical laboratory data were analysed to assess the influence of previous antibiotic therapy on the prevalence of beta-lactamase in isolates of Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis from primary specimens of middle ear fluid from 2129 children aged 0-5 years. The prevalence of beta-lactamase-positive H. influenzae was 6.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.5-9.8%] in children who received antibiotics 5-90 days before isolation of the organism compared with 7.0% (95% CI: 3.9-10.2%) in those who did not. The prevalence of beta-lactamase-positive M. catarrhalis was 90.9% (95% CI: 84.0-97.8%) in children who received antibiotics compared with 86.7% (95% CI: 79.0-94.4%) in those who did not.

  1. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  2. Cephamycins, a new family of beta-lactam antibiotics. I. Production by actinomycetes, including Streptomyces lactamdurans sp. n.

    PubMed

    Stapley, E O; Jackson, M; Hernandez, S; Zimmerman, S B; Currie, S A; Mochales, S; Mata, J M; Woodruff, H B; Hendlin, D

    1972-09-01

    A number of actinomycetes isolated from soil were found to produce one or more members of a new family of antibiotics, the cephamycins, which are structurally related to cephalosporin C. The cephamycins were produced in submerged fermentation in a wide variety of media by one or more of eight different species of Streptomyces, including a newly described species, S. lactamdurans. These antibiotics exhibit antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria which includes many that are resistant to the cephalosporins and penicillins. PMID:4790552

  3. Safely coupling livestock and crop production systems: how rapidly do antibiotic resistance genes dissipate in soil following a commercial application of swine or dairy manure?

    PubMed

    Marti, Romain; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Scott, Andrew; Sabourin, Lyne; Topp, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Animal manures recycled onto crop production land carry antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated the fate in soil of selected genes associated with antibiotic resistance or genetic mobility in field plots cropped to vegetables and managed according to normal farming practice. Referenced to unmanured soil, fertilization with swine or dairy manure increased the relative abundance of the gene targets sul1, erm(B), str(B), int1, and IncW repA. Following manure application in the spring of 2012, gene copy number decayed exponentially, reaching background levels by the fall of 2012. In contrast, gene copy number following manure application in the fall of 2012 or spring of 2013 increased significantly in the weeks following application and then declined. In both cases, the relative abundance of gene copy numbers had not returned to background levels by the fall of 2013. Overall, these results suggest that under conditions characteristic of agriculture in a humid continental climate, a 1-year period following a commercial application of raw manure is sufficient to ensure that an additional soil burden of antibiotic resistance genes approaches background. The relative abundance of several gene targets exceeded background during the growing season following a spring application or an application done the previous fall. Results from the present study reinforce the advisability of treating manure prior to use in crop production systems. PMID:24632259

  4. NsdB, a TPR-like-domain-containing protein negatively affecting production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Wen-Cheng; Zhao, Chun-Hua; Chater, Keith F; Tao, Mei-Feng

    2007-10-01

    Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains usually mediate protein-protein interactions. NsdA, one of the 70 proteins containing TPR-like domains in Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2), was previously found to negatively control sporulation and antibiotic production. Here we show that elimination of SCO7252, which encodes another of these proteins, also caused overproduction of two antibiotics, actinorhodin and CDA, but did not affect morphological differentiation. Disruption of SCO1593, encoding another of the family, had no obvious phenotypic effects. In surface-grown cultures, expression of SCO7252, which was named nsdB, was initiated at about 30 h, like that of nsdA. Analysis in silico of the 70 predicted TPR-like-containing proteins of S. coelicolor showed that 32 of them contained only TPR-like domains, and 25 of the remainder contained additional DNA-binding domains, implying that they might control gene expression directly.

  5. Controlling composition and color characteristics of Monascus pigments by pH and nitrogen sources in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kan; Song, Da; Chen, Gong; Pistolozzi, Marco; Wu, Zhenqiang; Quan, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Submerged fermentations of Monascus anka were performed with different nitrogen sources at different pH in 3 L bioreactors. The results revealed that the Monascus pigments dominated by different color components (yellow pigments, orange pigments or red pigments) could be selectively produced through pH control and nitrogen source selection. A large amount of intracellular pigments dominated by orange pigments and a small amount of water-soluble extracellular yellow pigments were produced at low pH (pH 2.5 and 4.0), independently of the nitrogen source employed. At higher pH (pH 6.5), the role of the nitrogen source became more significant. In particular, when ammonium sulfate was used as nitrogen source, the intracellular pigments were dominated by red pigments with a small amount of yellow pigments. Conversely, when peptone was used, intracellular pigments were dominated by yellow pigments with a few red pigments derivatives. Neither the presence of peptone nor ammonium sulfate promoted the production of intracellular orange pigments while extracellular pigments with an orangish red color were observed in both cases, with a higher yield when peptone was used. Two-stage pH control fermentation was then performed to improve desirable pigments yield and further investigate the effect of pH and nitrogen sources on pigments composition. These results provide a useful strategy to produce Monascus pigments with different composition and different color characteristics.

  6. Sensitivity of antibiotic resistant and antibiotic susceptible Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains against ozone.

    PubMed

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains from clinical and wastewater samples against ozone was tested to investigate if ozone, a strong oxidant applied for advanced wastewater treatment, will affect the release of antibiotic resistant bacteria into the aquatic environment. For this purpose, the resistance pattern against antibiotics of the mentioned isolates and their survival after exposure to 4 mg/L ozone was determined. Antibiotic resistance (AR) of the isolates was not correlating with higher tolerance against ozone. Except for ampicillin resistant E. coli strains, which showed a trend towards increased resistance, E. coli strains that were also resistant against cotrimoxazol, ciprofloxacin or a combination of the three antibiotics were similarly or less resistant against ozone than antibiotic sensitive strains. Pigment-producing Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus aureus seemed to be more resistant against ozone than non-pigmented species of these genera. Furthermore, aggregation or biofilm formation apparently protected bacteria in subsurface layers from inactivation by ozone. The relatively large variance of tolerance against ozone may indicate that resistance to ozone inactivation most probably depends on several factors, where AR, if at all, does not play a major role.

  7. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  8. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  9. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. PMID:27470984

  10. Toxin production and antibiotic resistances in Escherichia coli isolated from bathing areas along the coastline of the Oslo fjord.

    PubMed

    Charnock, Colin; Nordlie, Anne-Lise; Hjeltnes, Bjarne

    2014-09-01

    The presence of enterovirulent and/or antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli in recreational bathing waters would represent a clear health issue. In total, 144 E. coli isolated from 26 beaches along the inner Oslo fjord were examined for virulence determinants and resistance to clinically important antibiotics. No isolates possessed the genetic determinants associated with enterotoxigenic strains and none showed the prototypic sorbitol negative, O157:H7 phenotype. A small number (∼1 %) produced alpha-hemolysin. Occurrences and patterns of antibiotic resistances were similar to those of E. coli isolated previously from environmental samples. In total, 6 % of the strains showed one or more clinically relevant resistances and 1.4 % were multi-drug resistant. Microarray analyses suggested that the resistance determinants were generally associated with mobile genetic elements. Resistant strains were not clonally related, and were, furthermore not concentrated at one or a few beach sites. This suggests that these strains are entering the waters at a low rate but in a widespread manner. The study demonstrates that resistant E. coli are present in coastal bathing waters where they can come into contact with bathers, and that the resistance determinants are potentially transferable. Some of the resistances registered in the study are to important antibiotics used in human medicine such as fluoroquinolones. The spread of antibiotic resistant genes, from the clinical setting to the environment, has clear implications with respect to the current management of bacterial infections and the long term value of antimicrobial therapy. The present study is the first of its kind in Norway.

  11. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  12. Antibiotics in dentistry: Bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis, and antibiotic misuse.

    PubMed

    Dinsbach, Nathan A

    2012-01-01

    What is known regarding bacteremia? How effective is antibiotic prophylaxis for distant-site infections (late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis)? Antibiotic resistance poses a growing danger to mankind. The misuse of antibiotics is a main cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The author undertook a Medline search and a hand search of the literature regarding bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis for late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis, antibiotic misuse, and antibiotic resistance. The findings indicate a clearer understanding of bacteremia emerging in the past 30 years, which has led to recent changes in antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. Dentists should understand how bacteremia affects their at-risk patients, the rationale for antibiotic prophylaxis, and how antibiotic misuse poses a threat to all.

  13. Identification of an Alternative Splicing Product of the Otx2 Gene Expressed in the Neural Retina and Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Christo; Berdugo, Naomi; Da Silva, Corinne; Aït-Ali, Najate; Millet-Puel, Géraldine; Pagan, Delphine; Blond, Frédéric; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Fontaine, Valérie; Wincker, Patrick; Zack, Donald J.; Sahel, José-Alain; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the complexity of alternative splicing in the retina, we sequenced and analyzed a total of 115,706 clones from normalized cDNA libraries from mouse neural retina (66,217) and rat retinal pigmented epithelium (49,489). Based upon clustering the cDNAs and mapping them with their respective genomes, the estimated numbers of genes were 9,134 for the mouse neural retina and 12,050 for the rat retinal pigmented epithelium libraries. This unique collection of retinal of messenger RNAs is maintained and accessible through a web-base server to the whole community of retinal biologists for further functional characterization. The analysis revealed 3,248 and 3,202 alternative splice events for mouse neural retina and rat retinal pigmented epithelium, respectively. We focused on transcription factors involved in vision. Among the six candidates suitable for functional analysis, we selected Otx2S, a novel variant of the Otx2 gene with a deletion within the homeodomain sequence. Otx2S is expressed in both the neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, and encodes a protein that is targeted to the nucleus. OTX2S exerts transdominant activity on the tyrosinase promoter when tested in the physiological environment of primary RPE cells. By overexpressing OTX2S in primary RPE cells using an adeno associated viral vector, we identified 10 genes whose expression is positively regulated by OTX2S. We find that OTX2S is able to bind to the chromatin at the promoter of the retinal dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) gene. PMID:26985665

  14. The global role of ppGpp synthesis in morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Andrew; Chen, Wenqiong Joan; Ryding, Jamie; Chang, Sherman; Bibb, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulation of production of the translational apparatus via the stringent factor ppGpp in response to amino acid starvation is conserved in many bacteria. However, in addition to this core function, it is clear that ppGpp also exhibits genus-specific regulatory effects. In this study we used Affymetrix GeneChips to more fully characterize the regulatory influence of ppGpp synthesis on the biology of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), with emphasis on the control of antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological differentiation. Results Induction of ppGpp synthesis repressed transcription of the major sigma factor hrdB, genes with functions associated with active growth, and six of the thirteen conservons present in the S. coelicolor genome. Genes induced following ppGpp synthesis included the alternative sigma factor SCO4005, many for production of the antibiotics CDA and actinorhodin, the regulatory genes SCO4198 and SCO4336, and two alternative ribosomal proteins. Induction of the CDA and actinorhodin clusters was accompanied by an increase in transcription of the pathway regulators cdaR and actII-ORF4, respectively. Comparison of transcriptome profiles of a relA null strain, M570, incapable of ppGpp synthesis with its parent M600 suggested the occurrence of metabolic stress in the mutant. The failure of M570 to sporulate was associated with a stalling between production of the surfactant peptide SapB, and of the hydrophobins: it overproduced SapB but failed to express the chaplin and rodlin genes. Conclusion In S. coelicolor, ppGpp synthesis influences the expression of several genomic elements that are particularly characteristic of streptomycete biology, notably antibiotic gene clusters, conservons, and morphogenetic proteins. PMID:17683547

  15. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  16. Inadvertent polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial paint pigments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2010-04-15

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) that was not produced as part of the Aroclor mixtures banned in the 1980s was recently reported in air samples collected in Chicago, Philadelphia, the Arctic, and several sites around the Great Lakes. In Chicago, the congener 3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl or PCB11 was found to be the fifth most concentrated congener and ubiquitous throughout the city. The congener exhibited strong seasonal concentration trends that suggest volatilization of this compound from common outdoor surfaces. Due to these findings and also the compound's presence in waters that received waste from paint manufacturing facilities, we hypothesized that PCB11 may be present in current commercial paint. In this study we measured PCBs in paint sold on the current retail market. We tested 33 commercial paint pigments purchased from three local paint stores. The pigment samples were analyzed for all 209 PCB congeners using gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). More than 50 PCB congeners including several dioxin-like PCBs were detected, and the PCB profiles varied due to different types of pigments and different manufacturing processes. PCB congeners were detected in azo and phthalocyanine pigments which are commonly used in paint but also in inks, textiles, paper, cosmetics, leather, plastics, food and other materials. Our findings suggest several possible mechanisms for the inadvertent production of specific PCB congeners during the manufacturing of paint pigments.

  17. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  18. Collective antibiotic tolerance: Mechanisms, dynamics, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Lee, Anna J.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at an alarming rate, considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics, and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. In contrast, a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming, and inter-population interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment, and provide a time window for otherwise susceptible bacteria to acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy. PMID:25689336

  19. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  20. Photooxidations in pigmented Blepharisma.

    PubMed

    GIESE, A C; ZEUTHEN, E

    1949-03-20

    1. Blepharisma undulans, a protozoan with a reddish pigment, shows increased oxygen consumption under the influence of light. 2. If the light intensity is high, the animals are killed during a burst of oxygen consumption. 3. If the blepharismas are first bleached by exposure to light of low intensity they show only slightly increased oxygen consumption under the influence of light and they are not killed. 4. A preparation in which the animals are killed by heat still shows the increase in oxygen consumption on illumination with brilliant light. The supernatant solution does so as well, as does an alcohol extract of the dye. 5. The conclusion is drawn that the blepharismas are killed during photooxidation of the pigment, but the mechanism of action is not clear. Several possibilities are considered in the discussion.

  1. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds

    PubMed Central

    Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  2. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds.

    PubMed

    Bonnedahl, Jonas; Järhult, Josef D

    2014-05-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  3. Antibiotic resistance versus antimicrobial substances production by gram-negative foodborne pathogens isolated from minas frescal cheese: heads or tails?

    PubMed

    Damaceno, Hugo Figueiredo Botelho; de Freitas J, Claudinei Vieira; Marinho, Iuri Lourenço; Cupertino, Thomaz Rocha; Costa, Leonardo Emanuel de Oliveira; Nascimento, Janaína dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 15 Gram-negative isolates from Minas Frescal cheese sold in commercial establishments in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were able to produce antimicrobial substances (AMSs). Seven, four, two, one, and one isolates identified as Yersinia, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, and Hafnia genera, respectively, were considered potentially pathogenic. All 15 AMS(+) isolates were resistant to at least 1 antibiotic; however, 7 strains presented resistance to at least 3 antibiotics from different classes, exhibiting multiresistance profiles. The strains were also subjected to plasmid profile analysis. All isolates presented different plasmid forms with most ranging in size from 1 to 10 kb. Activity against various pathogens associated with food was tested and all 15 AMS(+) showed the same activity spectrum, inhibiting all Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains that were tested. Although restricted, the action spectrum of AMS-producing strains is extremely relevant to the food industry because Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli and Salmonella spp. are most often associated with foodborne illnesses. The findings of this study reveal that even AMS produced by pathogens can have potential applications against other foodborne pathogens. PMID:25622265

  4. Raman Spectroscopy for the Investigation of Carbon Based Black Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccato, A.; Jehlicka, J.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon based black pigments play an important role among artists' materials. The disordered structure of these materials is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, which helps in the comprehension of their production processes.

  5. Hydrochloric acid/pumice microabrasion technique for the removal of enamel pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, N M; Welbury, R R

    1993-04-01

    Products for lightening teeth are appearing on the market with ever-increasing frequency. Heavy advertising, coupled with heightened public awareness and expectations of an aesthetically pleasing smile, have resulted in increased patient demand for treatment to improve all types of tooth discoloration. Although it is the role of the dental profession to provide the services demanded by the consumer, it is also our duty to be discerning and to re-assess continually the techniques we use, for both efficacy and safety. To do this, long-term follow up of clinical techniques is essential. This paper contains the clinical results of teeth treated over 4.5 years using the hydrochloric acid/pumice microabrasion technique to remove enamel opacities and pigmentation. The subject under discussion is that of enamel discoloration: intrinsic staining with its origins in dentine, such as that caused by the ingestion of tetracycline antibiotics during odontogenesis, is not amenable to this form of surface treatment.

  6. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Cost Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children is of particular concern ...

  7. The bioefficacy of microemulsified natural pigments in egg yolk pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Chow, P Y; Gue, S Z; Leow, S K; Goh, L B

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that microemulsified carotenoid products show improved bioavailability over corresponding regular preparations, leading to greater yolk pigmentation at lower dosages. 2. The first trial was conducted using a maize-soya bean basal diet supplemented with either 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 g/kg of microemulsified Red or non-microemulsified Red. The second trial involved feeding microemulsified Yellow or non-microemulsified Yellow using a similar dosage range. The layers were divided into 4 replicates of 8 layers each (32 layers per treatment). The 8 cages of layers were fed from a single feed trough. Feed and water were provided ad libitum throughout the trial. Each week, the eggs were collected. The whole liquid egg colour was determined by means of a commercially available yolk colour fan. Where required, HPLC-(high-performance liquid chromatography) based analysis of trans-capsanthin or trans-lutein equivalents using the Association of Analytical Communities method was carried out. Data were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA method using Statgraphics. 3. Results showed that the colour and carotenoid content of the egg yolk increased with increasing amount of carotenoids in the diet. The colour of egg yolks from layers fed similar concentrations of microemulsified versus the regular preparation was significantly different. At the commercial recommended dose of one g/kg regular Yellow or Red product, the microemulsified pigmenter is able to provide the equivalent yolk colour at a 20-30% lower dose. 4. In conclusion, the trial results supported the hypothesis that a desired yolk colour score is achievable at a significantly lower inclusion rate when carotenoid molecules are emulsified using the microemulsion nanotechnology.

  8. Changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of pink chicken eggshells with different pigment intensity during incubation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Li, Zhanming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of chicken eggshells with different intensities of pink pigment during the incubation period. We also investigated the effects of the region (small pole, equator and large pole) and pink pigment intensity of the chicken eggshell on the percent transmission of light passing through the chicken eggshells. Method. Eggs of comparable weight from a meat-type breeder (Meihuang) were used, and divided based on three levels of pink pigment (light, medium and dark) in the eggshells. During the incubation (0–21 d), the values of the eggshell pigment (ΔE, L∗, a∗, b∗) were measured. The percent transmission of light for different regions and intensities of eggshell pigmentation was measured by using the visible wavelength range of 380–780 nm. Result. Three measured indicators of eggshell color, ΔE, L∗ and a∗, did not change significantly during incubation. Compared with other regions and pigment intensities, eggshell at the small pole and with light pigmentation intensity showed the highest percent transmission of light. The transmission value varied significantly (P < 0.001) with incubation time. The element analysis of eggshells with different levels of pink pigment showed that the potassium content of the eggshells for all pigment levels decreased significantly during incubation. Conclusion. In summary, pigment intensity and the region of the eggshell influenced the percent transmission of light of eggshell. Differences in the spectral characteristics of different eggshells may influence the effects of photostimulation during the incubation of eggs. All of these results will be applicable for perfecting the design of light intensity for lighted incubation to improve productivity. PMID:27019785

  9. Changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of pink chicken eggshells with different pigment intensity during incubation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Li, Zhanming; Pan, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in pigment, spectral transmission and element content of chicken eggshells with different intensities of pink pigment during the incubation period. We also investigated the effects of the region (small pole, equator and large pole) and pink pigment intensity of the chicken eggshell on the percent transmission of light passing through the chicken eggshells. Method. Eggs of comparable weight from a meat-type breeder (Meihuang) were used, and divided based on three levels of pink pigment (light, medium and dark) in the eggshells. During the incubation (0-21 d), the values of the eggshell pigment (ΔE, L (∗), a (∗), b (∗)) were measured. The percent transmission of light for different regions and intensities of eggshell pigmentation was measured by using the visible wavelength range of 380-780 nm. Result. Three measured indicators of eggshell color, ΔE, L (∗) and a (∗), did not change significantly during incubation. Compared with other regions and pigment intensities, eggshell at the small pole and with light pigmentation intensity showed the highest percent transmission of light. The transmission value varied significantly (P < 0.001) with incubation time. The element analysis of eggshells with different levels of pink pigment showed that the potassium content of the eggshells for all pigment levels decreased significantly during incubation. Conclusion. In summary, pigment intensity and the region of the eggshell influenced the percent transmission of light of eggshell. Differences in the spectral characteristics of different eggshells may influence the effects of photostimulation during the incubation of eggs. All of these results will be applicable for perfecting the design of light intensity for lighted incubation to improve productivity.

  10. Chemical fingerprinting of ready-mixed house paints of relevance to artistic production in the first half of the twentieth century. Part I: Inorganic and organic pigments.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Gwénaëlle; Bezur, Anikó; Muir, Kimberley; Casadio, Francesca; Fiedler, Inge

    2009-06-01

    This study reports the multi-analytical investigation of ready-mixed house paints used by artists such as Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) in the first half of the twentieth century. The pigment composition of paint swatches on four historic paint sample cards from the Art Institute of Chicago reference collection was characterized by thorough screening using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopies, followed by Raman spectroscopy when necessary. Spectroscopic investigations highlighted the dominance of zinc-based whites, the consistent choice of particular pigments or their mixtures, as well as the avoidance of others to achieve the various hues on the sample cards. Notable findings included the documentation of strong spectroscopic signatures of metal soaps. Given the similarities in composition of early twentieth century artists' and house paints, the results indicate that the identification of house paints in works by Pablo Picasso and others must be based on a combination of parameters rather than the detection of a single chemical marker. Results have been applied to the case study of Picasso's 1935 sculpture Figure (AIC 1988.428), which incorporates direct evidence of the use of house paint by the artist.

  11. Antibiotic resistance, virulence determinants and production of biogenic amines among enterococci from ovine, feline, canine, porcine and human milk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that mammalian milk represents a continuous supply of commensal bacteria, including enterococci. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of enterococci in milk of different species and to screen them for several genetic and phenotypic traits of clinical significance among enterococci. Results Samples were obtained from, at least, nine porcine, canine, ovine, feline and human healthy hosts. Enterococci could be isolated, at a concentration of 1.00 × 102 -1.16 × 103 CFU/ml, from all the porcine samples and, also from 85, 50, 25 and 25% of the human, canine, feline and ovine ones, respectively. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus durans. Among the 120 initial enterococcal isolates, 36 were selected on the basis of their different PFGE profiles and further characterized. MLST analysis revealed a wide diversity of STs among the E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, including some frequently associated to hospital infections and novel STs. All the E. faecalis strains possessed some of the potential virulence determinants (cad, ccf, cob, cpd, efaAfs, agg2, gelE, cylA, espfs) assayed while the E. faecium ones only harboured the efaAfm gene. All the tested strains were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin, and produced tyramine. Their susceptibility to the rest of the antimicrobials and their ability to produce other biogenic amines varied depending on the strain. Enterococci strains isolated from porcine samples showed the widest spectrum of antibiotic resistance. Conclusions Enterococci isolated from milk of different mammals showed a great genetic diversity. The wide distribution of virulence genes and/or antibiotic resistance among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates indicates that they can constitute a reservoir of such traits and a risk to animal and human health. PMID:24325647

  12. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  13. Antibiotic Multiresistance Analysis of Mesophilic and Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces throughout the Meat Production Process

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and ceftazidime (especially mesophiles), as well as colistin and tetracycline (especially psychrotrophes). However, they generally were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, and kanamycin regardless of species identity. Worryingly, in the present study, we found multidrug resistance (MDR) to up to 13 antibiotics, which was related to intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, a link between various antimicrobial resistance genes was shown for beta-lactams and tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides. The distribution and resistome-based analysis of MDR pseudomonads in different slaughterhouse zones indicated that the main sources of the identical or related pseudomonad strains were the animals (feet and wool) and the slaughterhouse environment, being disseminated from the beginning, or entrance environment, to the environment of the finished meat products. Those facts must be taken into consideration to avoid cross-contamination with the subsequent flow of mobile resistance determinants throughout all slaughterhouse zones and then to humans and the environment by the application of adequate practices of hygiene and disinfection measures, including those for animal wool and feet and also the entrance environment. PMID:25172860

  14. Repression of Antibiotic Production and Sporulation in Streptomyces coelicolor by Overexpression of a TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Delin; Seghezzi, Nicolas; Esnault, Catherine; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2010-01-01

    The overexpression of a regulatory gene of the TetR family (SCO3201) originating either from Streptomyces lividans or from Streptomyces coelicolor was shown to strongly repress antibiotic production (calcium-dependent antibiotic [CDA], undecylprodigiosin [RED], and actinorhodin [ACT]) of S. coelicolor and of the ppk mutant strain of S. lividans. Curiously, the overexpression of this gene also had a strong inhibitory effect on the sporulation process of S. coelicolor but not on that of S. lividans. SCO3201 was shown to negatively regulate its own transcription, and its DNA binding motif was found to overlap its −35 promoter sequence. The interruption of this gene in S. lividans or S. coelicolor did not lead to any obvious phenotypes, indicating that when overexpressed SCO3201 likely controls the expression of target genes of other TetR regulators involved in the regulation of the metabolic and morphological differentiation process in S. coelicolor. The direct and functional interaction of SCO3201 with the promoter region of scbA, a gene under the positive control of the TetR-like regulator, ScbR, was indeed demonstrated by in vitro as well as in vivo approaches. PMID:20935121

  15. Antibiotic multiresistance analysis of mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces throughout the meat production process.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and ceftazidime (especially mesophiles), as well as colistin and tetracycline (especially psychrotrophes). However, they generally were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, and kanamycin regardless of species identity. Worryingly, in the present study, we found multidrug resistance (MDR) to up to 13 antibiotics, which was related to intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, a link between various antimicrobial resistance genes was shown for beta-lactams and tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides. The distribution and resistome-based analysis of MDR pseudomonads in different slaughterhouse zones indicated that the main sources of the identical or related pseudomonad strains were the animals (feet and wool) and the slaughterhouse environment, being disseminated from the beginning, or entrance environment, to the environment of the finished meat products. Those facts must be taken into consideration to avoid cross-contamination with the subsequent flow of mobile resistance determinants throughout all slaughterhouse zones and then to humans and the environment by the application of adequate practices of hygiene and disinfection measures, including those for animal wool and feet and also the entrance environment.

  16. The bldD Gene of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2): a Regulatory Gene Involved in Morphogenesis and Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Marie; Damji, Farzana; Passantino, Rosa; Chater, Keith; Leskiw, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    The bld mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) are blocked at the earliest stage of sporulation, the formation of aerial hyphae, and are pleiotropically defective in antibiotic production. Using a phage library of wild-type S. coelicolor DNA, we isolated a recombinant phage which restored both sporulation and antibiotic production to strains carrying the single known bldD mutation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 1.3-kb complementing subclone identified an open reading frame, designated bldD, encoding a translation product of 167 amino acid residues. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the bldD-containing fragment amplified from the chromosome of a bldD mutant strain revealed a point mutation changing a tyrosine residue at amino acid position 62 to a cysteine. Although a comparison of the BldD sequence to known proteins in the databases failed to show any strong similarities, analysis of the BldD sequence for secondary structural elements did reveal a putative helix-turn-helix, DNA recognition element near the C terminus of the protein. A comparison of bldD transcript levels in the bldD+ and bldD mutant strains using both Northern blot analysis and S1 nuclease protection studies showed vast overexpression of bldD transcripts in the mutant, suggesting that BldD negatively regulates its own synthesis. High-resolution S1 nuclease mapping identified the transcription start point as a G residue 63 nucleotides upstream from the bldD start codon and 7 nucleotides downstream from −10 and −35 sequences resembling E. coli-like streptomycete promoters. PMID:9515925

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  18. Black-pigmented sputum

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Mosquera-Martínez, Joaquín; Martínez-Torre, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Black-pigmented sputum, also called “melanoptysis,” is a symptom that may be observed in certain pathologies such us coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (anthracosis). The cavitation and liquefaction of a fibrosed mass by an infectious process (tuberculosis, infections by anaerobes, etc.) or by ischemic necrosis may cause expectoration of a blackish secretion. We report the case of a patient with labor precedents as a coal worker, from whom abundant black sputum was obtained in the course of an incidental expectoration. Cyto-histological findings are shown and a differential diagnosis is established. PMID:24648674

  19. Fate and transport of veterinary antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance gene from fields receiving poultry manure during storm events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobials are used in production agriculture to treat disease and promote animal growth, but the presence of antibiotics in the environment raises concern about widespread antibiotic resistance. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin, tetracycline, enterococci resistant to...

  20. The Double Life of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response. “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under-dose himself and by exposing his microbes to nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant.”~Alexander Fleming PMID:24003650

  1. Prodigiosin from Vibrio sp. DSM 14379; a new UV-protective pigment.

    PubMed

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2011-10-01

    Pigments such as melanin, scytonemin and carotenoids protect microbial cells against the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The role in UV protection has never been assigned to the prodigiosin pigment. In this work, we demonstrate that prodigiosin provides a significant level of protection against UV stress in Vibrio sp. DSM 14379. In the absence of pigment production, Vibrio sp. was significantly more susceptible to UV stress, and there was no difference in UV survival between the wild-type strain and non-pigmented mutant. The pigment's protective role was more important at higher doses of UV irradiation and correlated with pigment concentration in the cell. Pigmented cells survived high UV exposure (324 J/m(2)) around 1,000-fold more successfully compared to the non-pigmented mutant cells. Resistance to UV stress was conferred to the non-pigmented mutant by addition of exogenous pigment extract to the growth medium. A level of UV protection equivalent to that exhibited by the wild-type strain was attained by the non-pigmented mutant once the prodigiosin concentration had reached comparable levels to those found in the wild-type strain. In co-culture experiments, prodigiosin acted as a UV screen, protecting both the wild-type and non-pigmented mutants. Our results suggest a new ecophysiological role for prodigiosin.

  2. Mineral resource of the month: iron oxide pigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses iron oxide pigments, which have been used as colorants since human began painting as they resist color change due to sunlight exposure, have good chemical resistance and are stable under normal ambient conditions. Cyprus, Italy and Spain are among the countries that are known for the production of iron oxide pigments. Granular forms of iron oxides and nano-sized materials are cited as developments in the synthetic iron oxide pigment industry which are being used in computer disk drives and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Enhanced production of the nonribosomal peptide antibiotic valinomycin in Escherichia coli through small-scale high cell density fed-batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Jaitzig, Jennifer; Hillig, Friederike; Süssmuth, Roderich; Neubauer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), a large family of natural products, possess numerous pharmaceutically significant bioactivities. However, many native microbial producers of NRPs are not cultivable or have low production yields making mass production infeasible. The recombinant production of natural products in a surrogate host has emerged as a strategy to overcome these limitations. De novo recombinant production of the NRP antibiotic valinomycin in an engineered Escherichia coli host strain was established with the necessary biosynthetic pathway constituents from Streptomyces tsusimaensis. In the present study, the initially modest valinomycin yields could be significantly increased from 0.3 up to 2.4 mg L⁻¹ by switching from a batch to an enzyme-based fed-batch mode in shake flasks. A subsequent design of experiment-driven optimization of parallel fed-batch cultivations in 24-well plates with online monitoring of dissolved oxygen and pH led to valinomycin yields up to 6.4 mg L⁻¹. Finally, repeated glucose polymer feeding to enzyme-based high cell density cultivations in shake flasks resulted in cell densities of OD₆₀₀>50 and a valinomycin titer of appr. 10 mg L⁻¹. This represents a 33-fold improvement compared to the initial batch cultivations and is the highest concentration of a nonribosomal peptide which has been produced in E. coli without feeding of specific precursors so far to our knowledge. Also, such a small-scale optimization under fed-batch conditions may be generally applicable for the development and scale-up of natural product production processes in E. coli.

  4. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  5. The challenges and limitations of chemical analysis of particulate pigments of very low solubility.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    When performing a chemical analysis of colorants in tattoo products, specific degradation products as well as impurity patterns can be predicted. Mislabeling or false declarations can also be avoided using this test. It is notable that pigment identification in tattoo products may serve as a precursory technique to recognize the colorants contained in a patient's tattoo prior to laser removal therapy. In contrast to the analysis of banned pigments, positive identification of pigments will normally require few reference substances. Given the fact that tattoo pigments are nearly insoluble in water and many organic solvents, different chemical pigment analyses are outlined and evaluated. Related publications from the study of art are also mentioned. It is recommended that access to comprehensive pigment standards and spectroscopic databanks should be offered to laboratories dealing with tattoo product analysis in the future.

  6. Antibiotics and production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. A comparison of cefodizime and ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Y; Hosni, R; Dagrosa, E E; Gormand, F; Guibert, B; Chabannes, B; Lagarde, M; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1994-04-01

    Cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) produce both granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). The influence of cefodizime (CAS 69739-16-8), a new broad spectrum cephalosporin with immunostimulatory effects, and ceftriaxone on the production of GM-CSF and IL-8 in HBEC primary cultures was investigated. HBEC were isolated from biopsy specimens obtained during fibreoptic bronchoscopy in 12 patients (most frequent diagnosis: chronic bronchitis). Confluent monolayers of HBEC cultured on collagen were incubated for 24 h in a medium without study drugs (spontaneous production) or containing cefodizime or ceftriaxone at the clinically relevant concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 mg/l, with or without tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha, 100 U/ml). GM-CSF and IL-8 were measured in supernatant by ELISA technique. TNF alpha alone led to a significant (p < 0.005) increase in both GM-CSF and IL-8 production. Cefodizime induced a significant (p < 0.05), dose-dependent increase in GM-CSF release. No additive effect of cefodizime with TNF alpha was observed. Cefodizime did not affect IL-8 production and ceftriaxone had no influence on cytokine production. This is the first report of a stimulatory effect of a beta-lactam antibiotic on cytokine production by epithelial cells. GM-CSF production by epithelial cells is an important immunological step for neutrophil and monocyte recruitment and cell priming during lung defence. Previous studies with cefodizime in immunodepressed subjects have shown activation of phagocytosis and phagocytosis-related functions in non-lung phagocytes. An indirect mechanism of action, similar to that indicated by our results, may have been responsible for these stimulatory effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  8. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data.

  9. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  10. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  11. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  12. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  13. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  14. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  15. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  16. The role of absC, a novel regulatory gene for secondary metabolism, in zinc-dependent antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Andy; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Bibb, Mervyn

    2009-12-01

    The availability of zinc was shown to have a marked influence on the biosynthesis of actinorhodin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Production of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin was abolished when a novel pleiotropic regulatory gene, absC, was deleted, but only when zinc concentrations were low. AbsC was shown to control expression of the gene cluster encoding production of coelibactin, an uncharacterized non-ribosomally synthesized peptide with predicted siderophore-like activity, and the observed defect in antibiotic production was found to result from elevated expression of this gene cluster. Promoter regions in the coelibactin cluster contain predicted binding motifs for the zinc-responsive regulator Zur, and dual regulation of coelibactin expression by zur and absC was demonstrated using strains engineered to contain deletions in either or both of these genes. An AbsC binding site was identified in a divergent promoter region within the coelibactin biosynthetic gene cluster, adjacent to a putative Zur binding site. Repression of the coelibactin gene cluster by both AbsC and Zur appears to be required to maintain appropriate intracellular levels of zinc in S. coelicolor.

  17. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  18. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly.

  19. Characterization of melanin pigment produced by Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, R C R; Lisboa, H C F; Pombeiro-Sponchiado, S R

    2012-04-01

    Although most of the Ascomycetes present DHN-melanin, some reports suggest that A. nidulans does not produce this type of melanin. In this study, we analyzed the pigment extracted from highly melanized strains (MEL1 and MEL2) of Aspergillus nidulans to determine the type of melanin present in this fungus. Our results showed that the pigment produced by MEL1 and MEL2 mutants possesses physical and chemical properties and UV- and IR-spectra very similar to synthetic DOPA-melanin. The characterization of this pigment in terms of its degradation products indicated the presence of indolic units, which were also found in synthetic DOPA-melanin. The analyses of the elemental composition showed that the pigment extracted from these mutants has a high percentage of nitrogen and, therefore, it cannot be DHN-melanin, which presents only trace of nitrogen. This observation was confirmed in the test with tricyclazole because this inhibitor of DHN-melanin biosynthesis did not suppress pigment production in the MEL1 and MEL2 strains. On the other hand, in a medium containing tropolone, an inhibitor of DOPA-melanin biosynthesis, the dark pigmentation of the colonies was not observed indicating that this compound inhibited melanin production in these strains. Taken together, the results obtained in this study indicate that melanin produced by these mutants is DOPA type, representing the first report on characterization of this type of melanin in A. nidulans.

  20. Involvement of AlpV, a New Member of the Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein Family, in Regulation of the Duplicated Type II Polyketide Synthase alp Gene Cluster in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Aigle, Bertrand; Pang, Xiuhua; Decaris, Bernard; Leblond, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    A type II polyketide synthase gene cluster located in the terminal inverted repeats of Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877 was shown to be responsible for the production of an orange pigment and alpomycin, a new antibiotic probably belonging to the angucycline/angucyclinone class. Remarkably, this alp cluster contains five potential regulatory genes, three of which (alpT, alpU, and alpV) encode proteins with high similarity to members of the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family. Deletion of the two copies of alpV (one in each alp cluster located at the two termini) abolished pigment and antibiotic production, suggesting that AlpV acts as a transcriptional activator of the biosynthetic genes. Consistent with this idea, the transcription of alpA, which encodes a ketosynthase essential for orange pigment and antibiotic production, was impaired in the alpV mutant, while the expression of alpT, alpU, and alpZ, another regulatory gene encoding a γ-butyrolactone receptor, was not significantly affected. Real-time PCR experiments showed that transcription of alpV in the wild-type strain increases dramatically after entering the transition phase. This induction precedes that of alpA, suggesting that AlpV needs to reach a threshold level to activate the expression of the structural genes. When introduced into an S. coelicolor mutant with deletions of actII-ORF4 and redD, the SARP-encoding genes regulating the biosynthesis of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin, respectively, alpV was able to restore actinorhodin production only. However, actII-ORF4 did not complement the alpV mutant, suggesting that AlpV and ActII-ORF4 may act in a different way. PMID:15774892

  1. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia Due to Achromobacter spp. in a Geriatric Ward in China: Clinical Characteristic, Genome Variability, Biofilm Production, Antibiotic Resistance and Integron in Isolated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Pan, Fei; Guo, Jun; Yan, Weifeng; Jin, Yi; Liu, Changting; Qin, Long; Fang, Xiangqun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) due to Achromobacter has become a substantial concern in recent years. However, HAP due to Achromobacter in the elderly is rare. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 15 elderly patients with HAP due to Achromobacter spp., in which the sequence types (STs), integrons, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance of the Achromobacter spp. were examined. Results: The mean age of the 15 elderly patients was 88.8 ± 5.4 years. All patients had at least three underlying diseases and catheters. Clinical outcomes improved in 10 of the 15 patients after antibiotic and/or mechanical ventilation treatment, but three patients had chronic infections lasting more than 1 year. The mortality rate was 33.3% (5/15). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, aztreonam, nitrofurantoin, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (except ceftazidime and cefoperazone). Six new STs were detected. The most frequent ST was ST306. ST5 was identified in two separate buildings of the hospital. ST313 showed higher MIC in cephalosporins, quinolones and carbapenems, which should be more closely considered in clinical practice. All strains produced biofilm and had integron I and blaOXA-114-like. The main type was blaOXA-114q. The variable region of integron I was different among strains, and the resistance gene of the aminoglycosides was most commonly inserted in integron I. Additionally, blaPSE-1 was first reported in this isolate. Conclusion: Achromobacter spp. infection often occurs in severely ill elders with underlying diseases. The variable region of integrons differs, suggesting that Achromobacter spp. is a reservoir of various resistance genes. PMID:27242678

  2. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  3. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S; Nett, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  4. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  5. Animal pigment bilirubin discovered in plants.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Cary; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David W

    2009-03-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin-IXalpha is the degradative product of heme, distributed among mammals and some other vertebrates. It can be recognized as the pigment responsible for the yellow color of jaundice and healing bruises. In this paper we present the first example of the isolation of bilirubin in plants. The compound was isolated from the brilliant orange-colored arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the white bird of paradise tree, and characterized by HPLC-ESMS, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as comparison with an authentic standard. This discovery indicates that plant cyclic tetrapyrroles may undergo degradation by a previously unknown pathway. Preliminary analyses of related plants, including S. reginae, the bird of paradise, also revealed bilirubin in the arils and flowers, indicating that the occurrence of bilirubin is not limited to a single species or tissue type. PMID:19206232

  6. Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, Juan L; Guild, Liane S; Armstrong, Roy A; Corredor, Jorge; Zuluaga-Montero, Anabella; Polanco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral's symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5-98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health. PMID:26619210

  7. Relative Pigment Composition and Remote Sensing Reflectance of Caribbean Shallow-Water Corals

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Pérez, Juan L.; Guild, Liane S.; Armstrong, Roy A.; Corredor, Jorge; Zuluaga-Montero, Anabella; Polanco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Reef corals typically contain a number of pigments, mostly due to their symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic dinoflagellates. These pigments usually vary in presence and concentration and influence the spectral characteristics of corals. We studied the variations in pigment composition among seven Caribbean shallow-water Scleractinian corals by means of High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis to further resolve the discrimination of corals. We found a total of 27 different pigments among the coral species, including some alteration products of the main pigments. Additionally, pigments typically found in endolithic algae were also identified. A Principal Components Analysis and a Hierarchical Cluster Analysis showed the separation of coral species based on pigment composition. All the corals were collected under the same physical environmental conditions. This suggests that pigment in the coral’s symbionts might be more genetically-determined than influenced by prevailing physical conditions of the reef. We further investigated the use of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) as a tool for estimating the total pigment concentration of reef corals. Depending on the coral species, the Rrs and the total symbiont pigment concentration per coral tissue area correlation showed 79.5–98.5% confidence levels demonstrating its use as a non-invasive robust technique to estimate pigment concentration in studies of coral reef biodiversity and health. PMID:26619210

  8. A novel IFITM5 mutation in severe atypical osteogenesis imperfecta type VI impairs osteoblast production of pigment epithelium-derived factor.

    PubMed

    Farber, Charles R; Reich, Adi; Barnes, Aileen M; Becerra, Patricia; Rauch, Frank; Cabral, Wayne A; Bae, Alison; Quinlan, Aaron; Glorieux, Francis H; Clemens, Thomas L; Marini, Joan C

    2014-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) types V and VI are caused, respectively, by a unique dominant mutation in IFITM5, encoding BRIL, a transmembrane ifitm-like protein most strongly expressed in the skeletal system, and recessive null mutations in SERPINF1, encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We identified a 25-year-old woman with severe OI whose dermal fibroblasts and cultured osteoblasts displayed minimal secretion of PEDF, but whose serum PEDF level was in the normal range. SERPINF1 sequences were normal despite bone histomorphometry consistent with type VI OI and elevated childhood serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed exome sequencing on the proband, both parents, and an unaffected sibling. IFITM5 emerged as the candidate gene from bioinformatics analysis, and was corroborated by membership in a murine bone co-expression network module containing all currently known OI genes. The de novo IFITM5 mutation was confirmed in one allele of the proband, resulting in a p.S40L substitution in the intracellular domain of BRIL but was absent in unaffected family members. IFITM5 expression was normal in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and BRIL protein level was similar to control in differentiated proband osteoblasts on Western blot and in permeabilized mutant osteoblasts by microscopy. In contrast, SERPINF1 expression was decreased in proband osteoblasts; PEDF was barely detectable in conditioned media of proband cells. Expression and secretion of type I collagen was similarly decreased in proband osteoblasts; the expression pattern of several osteoblast markers largely overlapped reported values from cells with a primary PEDF defect. In contrast, osteoblasts from a typical case of type V OI, with an activating mutation at the 5'-terminus of BRIL, have increased SERPINF1 expression and PEDF secretion during osteoblast differentiation. Together, these data suggest that BRIL and PEDF have a relationship that connects the genes for types V and VI OI and

  9. A Novel IFITM5 Mutation in Severe Atypical Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI Impairs Osteoblast Production of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R; Reich, Adi; Barnes, Aileen M; Becerra, Patricia; Rauch, Frank; Cabral, Wayne A; Bae, Alison; Quinlan, Aaron; Glorieux, Francis H; Clemens, Thomas L; Marini, Joan C

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) types V and VI are caused, respectively, by a unique dominant mutation in IFITM5, encoding BRIL, a transmembrane ifitm-like protein most strongly expressed in the skeletal system, and recessive null mutations in SERPINF1, encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We identified a 25-year-old woman with severe OI whose dermal fibroblasts and cultured osteoblasts displayed minimal secretion of PEDF, but whose serum PEDF level was in the normal range. SERPINF1 sequences were normal despite bone histomorphometry consistent with type VI OI and elevated childhood serum alkaline phosphatase. We performed exome sequencing on the proband, both parents, and an unaffected sibling. IFITM5 emerged as the candidate gene from bioinformatics analysis, and was corroborated by membership in a murine bone co-expression network module containing all currently known OI genes. The de novo IFITM5 mutation was confirmed in one allele of the proband, resulting in a p.S40L substitution in the intracellular domain of BRIL but was absent in unaffected family members. IFITM5 expression was normal in proband fibroblasts and osteoblasts, and BRIL protein level was similar to control in differentiated proband osteoblasts on Western blot and in permeabilized mutant osteoblasts by microscopy. In contrast, SERPINF1 expression was decreased in proband osteoblasts; PEDF was barely detectable in conditioned media of proband cells. Expression and secretion of type I collagen was similarly decreased in proband osteoblasts; the expression pattern of several osteoblast markers largely overlapped reported values from cells with a primary PEDF defect. In contrast, osteoblasts from a typical case of type V OI, with an activating mutation at the 5′-terminus of BRIL, have increased SERPINF1 expression and PEDF secretion during osteoblast differentiation. Together, these data suggest that BRIL and PEDF have a relationship that connects the genes for types V and VI OI and

  10. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development. PMID:26808335

  11. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development.

  12. Selective strategies for antibiotic fermentation, Part II: Effect of aeration on streptomycin production by Streptomyces griseus JB-19.

    PubMed

    Maladkar, N K

    1991-01-01

    The effect of higher aerated fermentation medium which enhanced streptomycin production by Streptomyces griseus JB-19 was found mainly related to the changes in dextrose consumption, inorganic phosphate utilisation and ammonia nitrogen accumulation under optimal and suboptimal supply of soluble vegetative protein.

  13. Long-term effect of the antibiotic cefalexin on methane production during waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueqin; Zhen, Guangyin; Liu, Yuan; Hojo, Toshimasa; Estrada, Adriana Ledezma; Li, Yu-You

    2014-10-01

    Long-term experiments herein were conducted to investigate the effect of cefalexin (CLX) on methane production during waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. CLX exhibited a considerable inhibition in methane production during the initial 25 days while the negative effect attenuated subsequently and methane production recovered depending on CLX doses used (600 and 1000 mg/L). The highest methane yield reached 450 mL at 1000 mg-CLX/L after 157 days of digestion, 63.8% higher than CLX-free one. Stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by CLX served as microbial protecting layers, creating a suitable environment for microbes' growth and fermentation. Further examination via ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectra also verified the elevated slime EPS, LB-EPS and TB-EPS indicated by UV-254 in the presence of CLX. Unlike the commonly accepted adverse effect, this study demonstrated the beneficial role of CLX in methane production, providing new insights into its true environmental impacts.

  14. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  15. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  16. Immune modulation of innate immunity as alternatives-to-antibiotics strategies to mitigate the use of drugs in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, H S; Lee, K W

    2012-06-01

    Following is invited commentary on the symposium "A Crystal Ball Look into the Future of…" delivered July 16, 2011, at the Poultry Science Association's 100th annual meeting, St. Louis, Missouri. The symposium examined various aspects that will impact the future of poultry production over the next 10 to 20 yr. Topics included genetics, nutrition, incubation, and bird health. This paper deals with various aspects of future issues affecting global feeding and nutrition of poultry. PMID:22582284

  17. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  18. A pigmented calcifying odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Soames, J V

    1982-04-01

    A case of the pigmented variant of the calcifying odontogenic cyst occurring in a 15-year-old West Indian girl is reported. Melanin pigment was widely distributed and appeared in greatest amount in cells exhibiting the appearance of stellate reticulum. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated large numbers of melanosomes in these cells but relatively few in epithelial ghost cells. The latter contained thick bundles of tonofilaments. Melanocytes were identified and two forms were distinguished, depending on their content of premelanosomes and fully melanized melanosomes.

  19. [Mercurimetric determination of cephalosporin antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Pospísilová, B; Kubes, J

    1988-04-01

    The conditions for a potenciometric estimation of cefuroxime, cefsulodin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxon with mercury(II) perchlorate after the previous reaction of the antibiotics with hydroxylamine were established. The mercurimetric determination was well reproducible with the relative error of the mean ranging up to 1% and the results are identical with the spectrometric and microbiological determination. There is no need to use a standard. With this technique only the content of effective antibiotic with an intact beta-lactam ring can be estimated. The method did not provide objective results for cefoperazone and cefoxitin. The direct determination of cephalosporin degradation products was verified for cefalexin, cefalothin, cefuroxime, cefsulodin and ceftriaxon.

  20. Reconnaissance data for glyphosate, other selected herbicides, their degradation products, and antibiotics in 51 streams in nine midwestern states, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted periodic reconnaissance studies of streams in the Midwestern United States to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicide compounds. These studies have documented that large amounts of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and their degradation products are flushed into streams during post-application runoff. Additional studies show that peak herbicide concentrations tend to occur during the first runoff after herbicide application and that herbicide flushes can occur during runoff for several weeks to months following application. Since the first stream study conducted in 1989, several significant changes in herbicide use have occurred. The most substantial change is the tripling in the use of glyphosate during the past 5 years. Over this same time period (1997-2001), usage of acetochlor and atrazine increased slightly, whereas alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor usage decreased. During 2002, 154 samples were collected from 51 streams in nine Midwestern States during three periods of runoff. This report provides a compilation of the analytical results of five laboratory methods. Results show that glyphosate was detected in 55 (36 percent) of the samples, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (a degradation product of glyphosate) was detected in 107 (69 percent) of the samples. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide, was found in 93 percent of the samples, followed by metolachlor, found in 73 percent of the samples; metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) were the most frequently detected herbicide degradation products, both being found in more than 95 percent of the samples. The data presented here are valuable for comparison with results from the earlier reconnaissance studies.

  1. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  2. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of Salmonella serovars in integrated crop-livestock farms and their products sold in local markets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Salaheen, Serajus; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Tesfaye, Bezait; Buchanan, Robert; Biswas, Debabrata

    2016-05-01

    Major concern in the Mixed Crop-Livestock (MCL) farms, in which livestock and vegetables grown closely in the same facility, is cross-contamination of zoonotic bacterial pathogens especially Salmonella. To investigate the distribution of Salmonella serovars in MCL and their products, a total of 1287 pre-harvest samples from various farms and 1377 post-harvest samples from retail supermarkets in Maryland and Washington D.C. areas were collected and analysed. A total of 315 Salmonella isolates were recovered, with 17.44% and 5.88%, from MCL and conventional farms samples (P < 0.001). At post-harvest level, the prevalence of Salmonella was 30.95%, 19.83%, and 8.38% in chicken meat (P < 0.001) from farmers, organic, and conventional retail markets respectively, and 16.81% and 6.06% in produce products (P < 0.001) from farmers and organic retail markets, but none from conventional retail markets. From the isolated Salmonella, 34.50% was confirmed S. Typhimurium, followed by S. Heidelberg (10.86%) and S. Enteritidis (9.90%). The overall multi-antibiotic resistance in recovered Salmonella was 23.81% versus 4.55% in conventional and MCL farms (P = 0.004) and 66.67% versus 7.76% in conventional and farmers markets (P < 0.001). Overall the data reveals higher Salmonella risks in MCL farms' environment and their products sold in farmers markets and warrants taking necessary measures to limit Salmonella transmission.

  4. New hydrolysis products of the beta-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin, their pH-dependent formation and search in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hirte, Kristin; Seiwert, Bettina; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is a widespread β-lactam-antibiotic and, together with some of its transformation products (TPs) originating from hydrolysis, a known environmental contaminant. To shed light on the abiotic degradation of AMX and the stability of its known TPs, laboratory hydrolysis experiments of AMX were carried out at pH 3, 7 and 11. Not only the rate of hydrolysis but also the pattern of TPs was strongly pH-dependent. The time courses of the obtained transformation products were analyzed by UPLC-HR-QToF-MS. AMX penicilloic acid (TP 1), AMX 2',5'-diketopiperazine (TP 2), AMX penilloic acid (TP 3) and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazinol (TP 4) were found at neutral pH. Surprisingly, the first three were not stable but transformed into 23 yet unknown TPs within three to four weeks. Seven TPs were tentatively identified, based on their product ion spectra and, where possible, confirmed with reference standards, e.g. penicillamine disulfide, 2-[amino(carboxy)methyl]-5,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid and dehydrocarboxylated amoxicillin penilloic acid. Analysis of samples from municipal wastewater treatment plants confirmed these findings with TP 1 being the dominant TP in the influent and a shift towards TP 2, TP 3 and TP 4 in the effluents. The lab experiments predicted up to 13 consecutive TPs from TP 1, TP 2 and TP 3 under neutral conditions. Their detection from surface waters will be difficult, because their large number and slow formation kinetics will lead to comparatively low environmental concentrations. Nevertheless the abiotic degradation of TP 1, TP 2 and TP 3 to further TPs needs to be considered in future studies of the environmental fate of amoxicillin.

  5. Use of organic acids and competitive exclusion product as an alternative to antibiotic as a growth promoter in the raising of commercial turkeys.

    PubMed

    Milbradt, E L; Okamoto, A S; Rodrigues, J C Z; Garcia, E A; Sanfelice, C; Centenaro, L P; Andreatti Filho, R L

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of organic acids (OA) and competitive exclusion product (CE) on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and concentration of volatile fatty acids in the cecal content. The experiment lasted for 10 wk. Four hundred twenty 1-d-old female commercial cross turkey poults (British United Turkeys, BUT Big 9) were distributed into 4 treatments with 5 replicates/pen of 21 birds each. The birds were fed a basal diet without growth promoter (control), diet with lincomycin (44 mg/kg), diet with organic acids (2 g/kg), and diet with product of CE (10(9) cfu/kg). Dietary levels of other nutrients, housing, and general management practices were similar for all treatments. On the first week (d 0-7), the BW and BW gain of the birds that fed diets with OA were lower than in the control group. In the fattening phase (d 28-70), the feed intake of the OA-treated group was lower than compared with the control. The birds that received diet with OA and CE product presented higher concentrations of propionic acid, at 14 d, and butyric acid in cecal content at 28, 56, and 70 d, compared with the control. Dietary inclusion of additives had no significant effects on intestinal villus height, crypt depth, and villus:crypt ratio. Organic acids had negative effects either on early gain or feed intake throughout the study. Because the test was conducted under controlled experimental conditions, the additives that showed results similar to those found by using antibiotics should be studied further in commercial farms to obtain results that can be incorporated into practice.

  6. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  7. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infectious diseases. back to top Antibiotics Fight Bacteria, Not Viruses Antibiotics are meant to be used ... treat strep throat, which is caused by streptococcal bacteria, and skin infections caused by staphylococcal bacteria. Although ...

  8. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs. PMID:6681678

  9. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  10. Marine Myxobacteria as a Source of Antibiotics—Comparison of Physiology, Polyketide-Type Genes and Antibiotic Production of Three New Isolates of Enhygromyxa salina

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F.; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Özlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M.

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1T as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). PMID:20948900

  11. Genetic Architecture of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael M; Lawrence, Faye; Lyman, Richard F; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-05-01

    Pigmentation varies within and between species and is often adaptive. The amount of pigmentation on the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster is a relatively simple morphological trait, which serves as a model for mapping the genetic basis of variation in complex phenotypes. Here, we assessed natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in 175 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, derived from the Raleigh, NC population. We quantified the proportion of melanization on the two most posterior abdominal segments, tergites 5 and 6 (T5, T6). We found significant genetic variation in the proportion of melanization and high broad-sense heritabilities for each tergite. Genome-wide association studies identified over 150 DNA variants associated with the proportion of melanization on T5 (84), T6 (34), and the difference between T5 and T6 (35). Several of the top variants associated with variation in pigmentation are in tan, ebony, and bric-a-brac1, genes known to affect D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation. Mutational analyses and targeted RNAi-knockdown showed that 17 out of 28 (61%) novel candidate genes implicated by the genome-wide association study affected abdominal pigmentation. Several of these genes are involved in developmental and regulatory pathways, chitin production, cuticle structure, and vesicle formation and transport. These findings show that genetic variation may affect multiple steps in pathways involved in tergite development and melanization. Variation in these novel candidates may serve as targets for adaptive evolution and sexual selection in D. melanogaster.

  12. Genetic Architecture of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dembeck, Lauren M.; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael M.; Lawrence, Faye; Lyman, Richard F.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentation varies within and between species and is often adaptive. The amount of pigmentation on the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster is a relatively simple morphological trait, which serves as a model for mapping the genetic basis of variation in complex phenotypes. Here, we assessed natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in 175 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, derived from the Raleigh, NC population. We quantified the proportion of melanization on the two most posterior abdominal segments, tergites 5 and 6 (T5, T6). We found significant genetic variation in the proportion of melanization and high broad-sense heritabilities for each tergite. Genome-wide association studies identified over 150 DNA variants associated with the proportion of melanization on T5 (84), T6 (34), and the difference between T5 and T6 (35). Several of the top variants associated with variation in pigmentation are in tan, ebony, and bric-a-brac1, genes known to affect D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation. Mutational analyses and targeted RNAi-knockdown showed that 17 out of 28 (61%) novel candidate genes implicated by the genome-wide association study affected abdominal pigmentation. Several of these genes are involved in developmental and regulatory pathways, chitin production, cuticle structure, and vesicle formation and transport. These findings show that genetic variation may affect multiple steps in pathways involved in tergite development and melanization. Variation in these novel candidates may serve as targets for adaptive evolution and sexual selection in D. melanogaster. PMID:25933381

  13. Reversibility of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although theoretically attractive, the reversibility of resistance has proven difficult in practice, even though antibiotic resistance mechanisms induce a fitness cost to the bacterium. Associated resistance to other antibiotics and compensatory mutations seem to ameliorate the effect of antibiotic interventions in the community. In this paper the current understanding of the concepts of reversibility of antibiotic resistance and the interventions performed in hospitals and in the community are reviewed. PMID:24836051

  14. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. PMID:26852849

  15. Assessment of bacterial antibiotic resistance transfer in the gut.

    PubMed

    Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, which results in a vicious circle of treatments and emergence of new antibiotic resistant bacteria. The human gastrointestinal tract is a massive reservoir of bacteria with a potential for both receiving and transferring antibiotic resistance genes. The increased use of fermented food products and probiotics, as food supplements and health promoting products containing massive amounts of bacteria acting as either donors and/or recipients of antibiotic resistance genes in the human GI tract, also contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. This paper deals with the assessment of antibiotic resistance gene transfer occurring in the gut. PMID:21318188

  16. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  17. Early antibiotic selection and efficient rooting and acclimatization improve the production of transgenic plum plants (Prunus domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Padilla, I M; Webb, K; Scorza, R

    2003-08-01

    We describe here an improved system for routinely developing transgenic plum plants (Prunus domestica L.) through the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The production of non-transformed "escapes" has been virtually eliminated, and rates of plant establishment in the greenhouse have been dramatically improved. The system is based on the regeneration of shoots from hypocotyls extracted from mature seed. The shoot regeneration medium is Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and vitamins supplemented with 7.5 microM thidiazuron and 0.25 microM indole-butyric acid. Transferring the explants after co-cultivation to shoot regeneration medium containing 80 mg l(-1) of kanamycin and 300 mg l(-1) of Timentin reduced the total number of regenerated shoots without affecting the transformation rate. Transformation rates using the described system averaged 1.2% of the hypocotyl slices producing transgenic plants, with a range of 0-4.2%. The transgenic shoots rooted at a rate of 90% on half-strength MS salts and vitamins supplemented with 5 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0.01 microM kinetin. Plantlets were transferred to a greenhouse directly from culture tubes with a 90% average survival.

  18. 9 CFR 114.10 - Antibiotics as preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.10 Antibiotics as preservatives. Antibiotics are authorized for use as preservatives for biological products if used within the limitations as to kinds and amounts prescribed in...

  19. Accelerated Detection of Mycolactone Production and Response to Antibiotic Treatment in a Mouse Model of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J.; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <105 CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >105 CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than smear

  20. Accelerated detection of mycolactone production and response to antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed

    Converse, Paul J; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V; Nuermberger, Eric L; Grosset, Jacques H; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <10(5) CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >10(5) CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than

  1. [Historical and Hygienic Aspects on Roles of Quality Requirements for Antibiotic Products in Japan: Part 2--Achievements of Domestic Production of Penicillin and Streptomycin].

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, Morimasa; Foster, Patrick J; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Domestic production of penicillin was initiated in 1946 and that of streptomycin in 1950. In the early days, however, the quality of products was considerably lower and the capacity of production small. Surprisingly, there was a sufficient amount of penicillin preparations, with a purity of 85% or more, satisfying domestic demand within three years (1949). In the case of streptomycin, within three years (1953), preparations with a purity two-fold higher than initially available were produced in amounts sufficient to meet both domestic demand and create a surplus availability for exporting purposes. Such increases in quality and production were considered to be made possible by strict quality control of penicillin and streptomycin preparations, based on "Minimum Requirements for Penicillin" established in May 1947 and "Minimum Requirements for Streptomycin" established in December 1949. These requirements were also amended over time in order to provide even higher quality standards in response to the evolving improvements in production processes. Life-threatening diseases such as septicemia and pneumonia were controlled by the sufficient supply of high-quality penicillin preparations and the mortality rate of tuberculosis, regarded as a national disease at the time, markedly decreased by that of streptomycin preparations. Achievements of domestic production of penicillin and streptomycin were considered important factors that contributed greatly to the maintenance of public health in Japan.

  2. A golden age of human pigmentation genetics.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    The zebrafish golden mutation is characterized by the production of small and irregular-shaped melanin granules, resulting in a lightening of the pigmented lateral stripes of the animal. The recent positional cloning and localization of the golden gene, combined with genotype-phenotype correlations of alleles of its human orthologue (SLC24A5) in African-American and African-Caribbean populations, provide insights into the genetic and molecular basis of human skin colour. SLC24A5 promotes melanin deposition through maturation of the melanosome, highlighting the importance of ion-exchange in the function of this organelle.

  3. Sedimentary pigments on the Pakistan margin: Controlling factors and organic matter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Cowie, Greg L.

    2009-03-01

    Sedimentary pigments can provide information on various aspects of benthic processes and biogeochemistry. In this study, sediments from sites at depths of 140 to 1850 m spanning the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), and representing dramatic contrasts in depositional conditions and benthic communities, were analysed for pigment yields and compositions. This has allowed a rare consideration of how different factors, including oxygen concentration, organic matter (OM) supply and biological activity (e.g., degree of bioturbation) may influence sedimentary pigment distribution in a continental margin environment. It has also allowed one of the first efforts to study the impact of biological activity on pigment concentrations in the natural environment, rather than in a microcosm setting. Total extractable surface sediment pigment concentrations showed a range of ˜1.5-49 μg g -1 of dry sediment. The pigment suite was dominated by pheophytin and pheophorbide (which together constituted ˜75% of total pigments), with minor amounts of chlorophyll- a, alloxanthin, diatoxanthin, zeaxanthin and β-carotene. Low oxygen concentration appeared to influence pigment abundance by increasing the concentration of refractory pigments ultimately buried. In addition, maximal pigment abundances were associated with minimal amounts of sediment mixing by macrofauna, and at one site macrofaunal digestion may have altered the relative dominance of the different pheopigments. In contrast, the lack of a marked increase in pigment concentrations after the summer monsoon plus the lack of a correlation between pigment concentration and water depth suggest that OM supply plays a relatively small role in controlling sedimentary pigments. Pigment concentrations and suites, together with modelled decay half-lives (˜0.8-15 years), suggest that in general OM on the Pakistan margin, despite the low oxygen concentrations and monsoon-driven productivity, is surprisingly degraded compared to

  4. Pigmentation and sporulation are alternative cell fates in Bacillus pumilus SF214.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Nicola; Di Luccia, Blanda; Isticato, Rachele; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; De Felice, Maurilio; Ricca, Ezio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SF214 is a spore forming bacterium, isolated from a marine sample, able to produce a matrix and a orange-red, water soluble pigment. Pigmentation is strictly regulated and high pigment production was observed during the late stationary growth phase in a minimal medium and at growth temperatures lower than the optimum. Only a subpopulation of stationary phase cells produced the pigment, indicating that the stationary culture contains a heterogeneous cell population and that pigment synthesis is a bimodal phenomenon. The fraction of cells producing the pigment varied in the different growth conditions and occurred only in cells not devoted to sporulation. Only some of the pigmented cells were also able to produce a matrix. Pigment and matrix production in SF214 appear then as two developmental fates both alternative to sporulation. Since the pigment had an essential role in the cell resistance to oxidative stress conditions, we propose that within the heterogeneous population different survival strategies can be followed by the different cells.

  5. Agricultural use of antibiotics and the evolution and transfer of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Khachatourians, G G

    1998-11-01

    Microbial Resistance to antibiotics is on the rise, in part because of inappropriate use of antibiotics in human medicine but also because of practices in the agricultural industry. Intensive animal production involves giving livestock animals large quantities of antibiotics to promote growth and prevent infection. These uses promote the selection of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. The resistant bacteria from agricultural environments may be transmitted to humans, in whom they cause disease that cannot be treated by conventional antibiotics. The author reviews trends in antibiotic use in animal husbandry and agriculture in general. The development of resistance is described, along with the genetic mechanisms that create resistance and facilitate its spread among bacterial species. Particular aspects of resistance in bacterial species common to both the human population and the agrifood industry are emphasized. Control measures that might reverse the current trends are highlighted.

  6. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  7. Antibiotics regulate the immune response in both presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide through modulation of Toll-like receptors, cytokine production and phagocytosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bode, Christian; Diedrich, Britta; Muenster, Stefan; Hentschel, Viktoria; Weisheit, Christina; Rommelsheim, Kuno; Hoeft, Andreas; Meyer, Rainer; Boehm, Olaf; Knuefermann, Pascal; Baumgarten, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sepsis is mediated via Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Since TLRs also trigger various immune functions, including phagocytosis, their modulation is a promising strategy in the treatment of sepsis. As antibiotics have immunomodulatory properties, this study examined the effect of commonly used classes of antibiotics on i) the expression of TLRs and cytokines and ii) the phagocytic activity under sepsis-like conditions in vitro. This was achieved by incubating THP-1 monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from patients after open-heart surgery with the addition of LPS and six key antibiotics (piperacillin, doxycycline, erythromycin, moxifloxacin or gentamicin). After 24h, mRNA levels of both cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and TLRs (1, 2, 4, and 6) were monitored and phagocytosis was determined following coincubation with Escherichia coli. Each antibiotic differentially regulated the gene expression of the investigated TLRs and cytokines in monocytes. Erythromycin, moxifloxacin and doxycyclin displayed the strongest effects and changed mRNA-levels of the investigated genes up to 5.6-fold. Consistent with this, antibiotics and, in particular, moxifloxacin, regulated the TLR-and cytokine expression in activated PBMCs obtained from patients after open-heart surgery. Furthermore, piperacillin, doxycyclin and moxifloxacin inhibited the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Our results suggest that antibiotics regulate the immune response by modulating TLR- and cytokine expression as well as phagocytosis under septic conditions. Moxifloxacin, doxycycline and erythromycin were shown to possess the strongest immunomodulatory effects and these antibiotic classes should be considered for future immunomodulatory studies in sepsis. PMID:24239744

  8. [Micromonospora resistence to definite antibiotics and their ability to produce structurally analogous antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Bibikova, M V; Ivanitskaia, L P; Tikhonova, A S

    1980-01-01

    Thirty six cultures of Micromonospora freshly isolated from soil samples were studied with respect to their sensitivity to a number of antibiotics of various structures and modes of action. It was found that all of them were highly sensitive to penicillin, ristomycin, tetracycline, rifampicin, streptomycin, olivomycin, carminomycin and dactinomycin. Significant differences in sensitivity of the Micromonospora cultures were revealed only with respect to gentamicin, tobramicin, erythromycin and lincomycin. Seven cultures were resistant to gentamicin and tobramicin and sensitive to all of the other antibiotics. Broad spectrum antibiotics were isolated from these cultures. The study of the antibiotic chemistry showed that they were 2-desoxystreptamine-containing aminoglycosides. Two cultures proved to be resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. When identified with the use of antibiotic resistant staphylococcal strains, the crude antibiotic substances isolated from these cultures appeared to be not active against staphylococci resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. By their chromatograpi- behaviour the antibiotics were close to macrolides. Therefore, it was found that production of aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics was most characteristic of Micromonospora. A certain correlation between resistance of Micromonospora to these 2 antibiotic groups and capacity for their production was shown. PMID:7356302

  9. Algal pigments in Southern Ocean abyssal foraminiferans indicate pelagobenthic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedhagen, Tomas; Cheah, Wee; Bracher, Astrid; Lejzerowicz, Franck

    2014-10-01

    The cytoplasm of four species of abyssal benthic foraminiferans from the Southern Ocean (around 51°S; 12°W and 50°S; 39°W) was analysed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and found to contain large concentrations of algal pigments and their degradation products. The composition of the algal pigments in the foraminiferan cytoplasm reflected the plankton community at the surface. Some foraminiferans contained high ratios of chlorophyll a/degraded pigments because they were feeding on fresher phytodetritus. Other foraminiferans contained only degraded pigments which shows that they utilized degraded phytodetritus. The concentration of algal pigment and corresponding degradation products in the foraminiferan cytoplasm is much higher than in the surrounding sediment. It shows that the foraminiferans collect a diluted and sparse food resource and concentrate it as they build up their cytoplasm. This ability contributes to the understanding of the great quantitative success of foraminiferans in the deep sea. Benthic foraminiferans are a food source for many abyssal metazoans. They form a link between the degraded food resources, phytodetritus, back to the active metazoan food chains.

  10. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  11. The two kinases, AbrC1 and AbrC2, of the atypical two-component system AbrC are needed to regulate antibiotic production and differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rico, Sergio; Yepes, Ana; Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Antoraz, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Díaz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the most important sensing mechanisms in bacteria. In Streptomyces, TCSs-mediated responses to environmental stimuli are involved in the regulation of antibiotic production. This study examines the individual role of two histidine kinases (HKs), AbrC1 and AbrC2, which form part of an atypical TCS in Streptomyces coelicolor. qRT-PCR analysis of the expression of both kinases demonstrated that both are expressed at similar levels in NB and NMMP media. Single deletion of abrC1 elicited a significant increase in antibiotic production, while deletion of abrC2 did not have any clear effect. The origin of this phenotype, probably related to the differential phosphorylation ability of the two kinases, was also explored indirectly, analyzing the toxic phenotypes associated with high levels of phosphorylated RR. The higher the AbrC3 regulator phosphorylation rate, the greater the cell toxicity. For the first time, the present work shows in Streptomyces the combined involvement of two different HKs in the response of a regulator to environmental signals. Regarding the possible applications of this research, the fact that an abrC1 deletion mutant overproduces three of the S. coelicolor antibiotics makes this strain an excellent candidate as a host for the heterologous production of secondary metabolites. PMID:26029189

  12. Chrysospermins, new peptaibol antibiotics from Apiocrea chrysosperma Ap101.

    PubMed

    Dornberger, K; Ihn, W; Ritzau, M; Gräfe, U; Schlegel, B; Fleck, W F; Metzger, J W

    1995-09-01

    Four new members of peptaibol antibiotics, designated as chrysospermins A, B, C, and D, were isolated from the mycelium of Apiocrea chrysosperma Ap101 by solvent extraction, silica gel chromatography and preparative recycling HPLC. Their structures as new nonadecapeptides were settled by detailed spectroscopic analysis and chemical degradation experiments. The chrysospermins display antibacterial and antifungal activity, and induce pigment formation by the fungus Phoma destructiva.

  13. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  14. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-06-29

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  15. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  16. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  17. Metabolic products of microorganisms. 225. Elloramycin, a new anthracycline-like antibiotic from Streptomyces olivaceus. Isolation, characterization, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Drautz, H; Reuschenbach, P; Zähner, H; Rohr, J; Zeeck, A

    1985-10-01

    Elloramycin (1), a new antibiotic produced by Streptomyces olivaceus strain Tü 2353, was detected by chemical screening. The dark yellow compound, molecular formula C32H36O15, is weakly active against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, especially streptomycetes and against stem cells of L-1210 leukemia. Acidic hydrolysis of the antibiotic liberated elloramycinone (3) as aglycone and 2,3,4-tri-O-methyl-L-rhamnose, which was identified as methyl glycoside 5b. The structure of elloramycin was established by comparison of the spectra (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR) with those of the known tetracenomycin C (2), 3 and the fact that 2 and 3 gave the same tetramethyl ether after permethylation. Elloramycin is an anthracycline-like antibiotic, the aglycone resembles tetracenomycin C, the sugar is connected in a phenolic alpha-glycosidic linkage. PMID:3840789

  18. Metabolic products of microorganisms. 225. Elloramycin, a new anthracycline-like antibiotic from Streptomyces olivaceus. Isolation, characterization, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Drautz, H; Reuschenbach, P; Zähner, H; Rohr, J; Zeeck, A

    1985-10-01

    Elloramycin (1), a new antibiotic produced by Streptomyces olivaceus strain Tü 2353, was detected by chemical screening. The dark yellow compound, molecular formula C32H36O15, is weakly active against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, especially streptomycetes and against stem cells of L-1210 leukemia. Acidic hydrolysis of the antibiotic liberated elloramycinone (3) as aglycone and 2,3,4-tri-O-methyl-L-rhamnose, which was identified as methyl glycoside 5b. The structure of elloramycin was established by comparison of the spectra (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR) with those of the known tetracenomycin C (2), 3 and the fact that 2 and 3 gave the same tetramethyl ether after permethylation. Elloramycin is an anthracycline-like antibiotic, the aglycone resembles tetracenomycin C, the sugar is connected in a phenolic alpha-glycosidic linkage.

  19. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  20. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work.

  1. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. PMID:20510518

  2. Identification and molecular phylogeny of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from Minas Frescal cheese in southeastern Brazil: Superantigenic toxin production and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Casaes Nunes, Raquel Soares; Pires de Souza, Camilla; Pereira, Karen Signori; Del Aguila, Eduardo Mere; Flosi Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Minas Frescal is a typical Brazilian fresh cheese and one of the most popular dairy products in the country. This white soft, semiskimmed, nonripened cheese with high moisture content is obtained by enzymatic coagulation of cow milk using calf rennet or coagulants, usually in industrial dairy plants, but is also manufactured in small farms. Contamination of Minas Frescal by several staphylococci has been frequently reported. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) strains are maybe the most harmful, as they are able to produce heat-stable enterotoxins with super antigenic activities in food matrices, especially in dairy products such as soft cheeses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of CNS strains in Minas Frescal marketed in southeastern Brazil concerning the risk of staphylococci food poisoning by the consumption of improperly manufactured cheese and the possibility of these food matrices being a reservoir of staphylococcal resistance to antimicrobials. Ten distinct CNS strains were found in 6 cheeses from distinct brands. The most frequent species were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (40%), Staphylococcus xylosus (30%), Staphylococcus sciuri (20%), and Staphylococcus piscifermentans (10%). Three strains were identified to the Staphylococcus genera. Three major species groups composed of 3 refined clusters were grouped by phylogenetic analyses with similarities over to 90%. All CNS strains carried multiple enterotoxin genes, with high incidence of sea and seb (90 and 70%, respectively), followed by sec/see, seh/sei, and sed with intermediate incidence (60, 50, and 40%, respectively), and, finally, seg/selk/selq/selr and selu with the lowest incidence (20 and 10%, respectively). Real-time reverse transcription PCR and ELISA assays confirmed the enteroxigenic character of the CNS strains, which expressed and produced the enterotoxins in vitro. The CNS strains showed multiresistance to antimicrobial agents such as β-lactams, vancomycin, and

  3. Anthracyclic products from Streptomyces erythromogenes nov. sp. Biotransformation of daunomycin (Dn) by an acellular preparation and synergism between Dn and some known antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, N M; Devys, M; Barbier, M

    1982-01-01

    The filtrate broth as well as mycelium of the new strain Streptomyces erythrochromogenes nov. sp. isolated from Saudi Arabian soil, produce the antitumor antibiotic daunomycin 1 and two anthracyclic derivatives: 7-deoxy 13-dihydrodaunomycinone 2 and 7-deoxy daunomycinone 4. The biotransformation of 1 to 2 and 4 by an acellular enzyme preparation from the strain was found to be NADPH and/or NADH dependent. Mixtures of daunomycin 1 with chloramphenicol or penicillin showed superior antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis ICC strain, than the individual antibiotics. PMID:7113265

  4. Perstraction of intracellular pigments by submerged cultivation of Monascus in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Qi, Hanshi; Wang, Zhilong

    2012-04-01

    "Milking processing" describes the cultivation of microalgae in a water-organic solvent two-phase system that consists of simultaneous fermentation and secretion of intracellular product. It is usually limited by the conflict between the biocompatibility of the organic solvent to the microorganisms and the ability of the organic solvent to secret intracellular product into its extracellular broth. In the present work, submerged cultivation of Monascus in the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 micelle aqueous solution for pigment production is exploited, in which the fungus Monascus remains actively growing. Permeabilization of intracellular pigments across the cell membrane and extraction of the pigments to the nonionic surfactant micelles of its fermentation broth occur simultaneously. "Milking" the intracellular pigments in the submerged cultivation of Monascus is a perstraction process. The perstractive fermentation of intracellular pigments has the advantage of submerged cultivation by secretion of the intracellular pigments to its extracellular broth and the benefit of extractive microbial fermentation by solubilizing the pigments into nonionic surfactant micelles. It is shown as the marked increase of the extracellular pigment concentration by the submerged cultivation of Monascus in the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 micelle solution. PMID:22228260

  5. Pathogenesis of pigment gallstones in Western societies: the central role of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lygia; Oesterle, Adair L; Erdan, Ihsan; Griffiss, J MacLeod; Way, Lawrence W

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria are traditionally accorded a greater role in pigment gallstone formation in Eastern populations. Stone color is thought to predict the presence of bacteria; that is, black stones (Western predominant) are supposedly sterile and brown stones (Eastern predominant) contain bacteria. We previously reported that, regardless of appearance, most pigment gallstones contain bacteria. This study examined, in a large Western population (370 patients), the incidence, appearance, and chemical composition of pigment stones, and the characteristics of gallstone bacteria. One hundred eighty-six pigment stones were obtained aseptically. Bacteria were detected by means of scanning electron microscopy and gallstone culture. Chemical composition was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Bacteria were tested for slime and beta-glucuronidase production. Seventy-three percent of pigment stones contained bacteria. Choledocholithiasis was associated with gallstone bacteria. Ca-bilirubinate was present in all pigment stones. Ca-palmitate was characteristic of infected stones, and more than 75% Ca-carbonate was characteristic of sterile stones. Neither chemical composition nor stone appearance predicted the presence of bacteria. Ninety-five percent and 67% of infected pigment stones contained bacteria that produced slime and beta-glucuronidase, respectively. Most pigment stones contained bacteria that produced beta-glucuronidase, slime, and phospholipase, factors that facilitate stone formation. Thus bacteria have a major role in Western pigment gallstone formation. Furthermore, gallstone color did not predict composition or bacterial presence.

  6. Solubilization capacity of nonionic surfactant micelles exhibiting strong influence on export of intracellular pigments in Monascus fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Biyu; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Zhenqiang; Qi, Hanshi; Wang, Zhilong

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this study, perstractive fermentation of intracellular Monascus pigments in nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution had been studied. The permeability of cell membrane modified by nonionic surfactant might have influence on the rate of export of intracellular pigments into its extracellular broth while nearly no effect on the final extracellular pigment concentration. However, the solubilization of pigments in nonionic surfactant micelles strongly affected the final extracellular pigment concentration. The solubilization capacity of micelles depended on the kind of nonionic surfactant, the super-molecule assembly structure of nonionic surfactant in an aqueous solution, and the nonionic surfactant concentration. Elimination of pigment degradation by export of intracellular Monascus pigments and solubilizing them into nonionic surfactant micelles was also confirmed experimentally. Thus, nonionic surfactant micelle aqueous solution is potential for replacement of organic solvent for perstractive fermentation of intracellular product. PMID:23425092

  7. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-07-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  8. Identification of new transformation products during enzymatic treatment of tetracycline and erythromycin antibiotics at laboratory scale by an on-line turbulent flow liquid-chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer LTQ-Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Marta; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Couillerot, Olivier; Panigoni, Karine; de Gunzburg, Jean; Bayer, Sally; Czaja, Rico; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the formation of transformation products (TPs) by the enzymatic degradation at laboratory scale of two highly consumed antibiotics: tetracycline (Tc) and erythromycin (ERY). The analysis of the samples was carried out by a fast and simple method based on the novel configuration of the on-line turbulent flow system coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap - high resolution mass spectrometer. The method was optimized and validated for the complete analysis of ERY, Tc and their transformation products within 10 min without any other sample manipulation. Furthermore, the applicability of the on-line procedure was evaluated for 25 additional antibiotics, covering a wide range of chemical classes in different environmental waters with satisfactory quality parameters. Degradation rates obtained for Tc by laccase enzyme and ERY by EreB esterase enzyme without the presence of mediators were ∼78% and ∼50%, respectively. Concerning the identification of TPs, three suspected compounds for Tc and five of ERY have been proposed. In the case of Tc, the tentative molecular formulas with errors mass within 2 ppm have been based on the hypothesis of dehydroxylation, (bi)demethylation and oxidation of the rings A and C as major reactions. In contrast, the major TP detected for ERY has been identified as the "dehydration ERY-A", with the same molecular formula of its parent compound. In addition, the evaluation of the antibiotic activity of the samples along the enzymatic treatments showed a decrease around 100% in both cases.

  9. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  10. Designing Safer and Greener Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Gathergood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Since the production of the first pharmaceutically active molecules at the beginning of the 1900s, drug molecules and their metabolites have been observed in the environment in significant concentrations. In this review, the persistence of antibiotics in the environment and their associated effects on ecosystems, bacterial resistance and health effects will be examined. Solutions to these problems will also be discussed, including the pharmaceutical industries input, green chemistry, computer modeling and representative ionic liquid research. PMID:27029311

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  13. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  14. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  15. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  16. Group B streptococcal haemolysin and pigment, a tale of twins

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Group B streptococcus [(GBS or Streptococcus agalactiae)] is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis and septicaemia. Most clinical isolates express simultaneously a β-haemolysin/cytolysin and a red polyenic pigment, two phenotypic traits important for GBS identification in medical microbiology. The genetic determinants encoding the GBS haemolysin and pigment have been elucidated and the molecular structure of the pigment has been determined. The cyl operon involved in haemolysin and pigment production is regulated by the major two-component system CovS/R, which coordinates the expression of multiple virulence factors of GBS. Genetic analyses indicated strongly that the haemolysin activity was due to a cytolytic toxin encoded by cylE. However, the biochemical nature of the GBS haemolysin has remained elusive for almost a century because of its instability during purification procedures. Recently, it has been suggested that the haemolytic and cytolytic activity of GBS is due to the ornithine rhamnopolyenic pigment and not to the CylE protein. Here we review and summarize our current knowledge of the genetics, regulation and biochemistry of these twin GBS phenotypic traits, including their functions as GBS virulence factors. PMID:24617549

  17. Bacteriocins - exploring alternatives to antibiotics in mastitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Reneé; Todorov, Svetoslav D

    2010-07-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  18. Bacteriocins – Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics in Mastitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pieterse, Reneé; Todorov, Svetoslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease. PMID:24031528

  19. Bioactive Pigments from Marine Bacteria: Applications and Physiological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Soliev, Azamjon B.; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Research into natural products from the marine environment, including microorganisms, has rapidly increased over the past two decades. Despite the enormous difficulty in isolating and harvesting marine bacteria, microbial metabolites are increasingly attractive to science because of their broad-ranging pharmacological activities, especially those with unique color pigments. This current review paper gives an overview of the pigmented natural compounds isolated from bacteria of marine origin, based on accumulated data in the literature. We review the biological activities of marine compounds, including recent advances in the study of pharmacological effects and other commercial applications, in addition to the biosynthesis and physiological roles of associated pigments. Chemical structures of the bioactive compounds discussed are also presented. PMID:21961023

  20. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in retail chicken: comparing conventional, organic, kosher, and raised without antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Retail poultry products are known sources of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli, a major human health concern. Consumers have a range of choices for poultry, including conventional, organic, kosher, and raised without antibiotics (RWA) – designations that are perceived to indicate differences in quality and safety. However, whether these categories vary in the frequency of contamination with antibiotic-resistant E. coli is unknown. We examined the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli on raw chicken marketed as conventional, organic, kosher and RWA. From April – June 2012, we purchased 213 samples of raw chicken from 15 locations in the New York City metropolitan area. We screened E. coli isolates from each sample for resistance to 12 common antibiotics. Although the organic and RWA labels restrict the use of antibiotics, the frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli tended to be only slightly lower for RWA, and organic chicken was statistically indistinguishable from conventional products that have no restrictions. Kosher chicken had the highest frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli, nearly twice that of conventional products, a result that belies the historical roots of kosher as a means to ensure food safety. These results indicate that production methods influence the frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli on poultry products available to consumers. Future research to identify the specific practices that cause the high frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in kosher chicken could promote efforts to reduce consumer exposure to this potential pathogen. PMID:24555073