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Sample records for pigs experimentally infected

  1. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs.

  2. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread.

  3. Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-02-24

    Pigs are considered to be the main amplifying host for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and their infection can correlate with human cases of disease. Despite their importance in the ecology of the virus as it relates to human cases of encephalitis, the pathogenesis of JEV in pigs remains obscure. In the present study, the localization and kinetics of virus replication were investigated in various tissues after experimental intravenous infection of pigs. The data demonstrate a rapid and broad spreading of the virus to the central nervous system (CNS) and various other organs. A particular tropism of JEV in pigs not only to the CNS but also for secondary lymphoid tissue, in particular the tonsils with the overall highest viral loads, was observed. In this organ, even 11 days post infection, the latest time point of the experiment, no apparent decrease in viral RNA loads and live virus was found despite the presence of a neutralizing antibody response. This was also well beyond the clinical and viremic phase. These results are of significance for the pathogenesis of JEV, and call for further experimental studies focusing on the cellular source and duration of virus replication in pigs.

  4. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  5. Respiratory disease in growing pigs after Porcine rubulavirus experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the pathogenicity and distribution of Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) in the respiratory tract of experimentally infected pigs. Nine 6-week-old pigs were infected with PorPV and examined clinically. Blood, nasal swab, and tissue samples were collected on different days post-infection (DPI). The humoral immune responses and viral loads were evaluated. The infected pigs exhibited an increase in the respiratory clinical signs. In addition, the excretion of PorPV was extended to 23 DPI in the nasal fluid. The distribution of PorPV in the respiratory tract tissues was extended until the end of the experiment; soft palate tonsil and lymph nodes exhibited high viral loads. The major microscopic lesions observed in the lungs corresponded to interstitial pneumonia and hyperplasia of the associated lymphoid tissue. In conclusion, PorPV infection causes a pneumonic disease characterized by a prolonged virus excretion and high viral load in the lymphoid tissues.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in pigs infected experimentally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Andrada, M; Quesada-Canales, O; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Paz-Sánchez, Y; Espinosa de Los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F

    2014-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia, primarily caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh), is a contagious disease characterized by catarrhal bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Previous studies have evaluated immunohistochemically the distribution of Mh, different cellular populations and cytokines during Mh-induced pneumonia. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is overexpressed during inflammatory responses by different cell types in the lung. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of COX-2 in the pathogenesis of porcine enzootic pneumonia. COX-2 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lung tissues from 10 pigs infected experimentally with Mh. Ten pigs were inoculated intranasally with Mh and killed in pairs weekly from 1 to 5 weeks post inoculation. Three Mh-free pigs were taken as controls. Bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells, bronchial submucosal glands and a small number of macrophages in the bronchoalveolar exudate expressed COX-2. COX-2 protein was always associated with areas of pneumonia and expression was minimal in lungs from control pigs. These results suggest that COX-2 plays a role in the pathogenesis of Mh-infection.

  7. PSITTACOSIS : III. EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED INFECTIONS IN RABBITS AND GUINEA PIGS.

    PubMed

    Rivers, T M; Berry, G P

    1931-06-30

    1. Rabbits and guinea pigs are susceptible to psittacosis virus introduced intracerebrally. By means of brain to brain passages in these animals the active agent is capable of propagation indefinitely. 2. Serial passages of the virus through rabbits and guinea pigs do not cause the active agent to lose its pathogenicity for parrots and mice. 3. The chief clinical evidences of infection in rabbits and guinea pigs following intracranial inoculation of the virus are fever and loss of weight. The pathological changes are characterized by a mild meningo-encephalitis, and fatty degeneration, focal necrosis, and infarction of the liver. 4. Rabbits upon recovery from an attack of psittacosis are actively immune. 5. Two strains of virus, human and parrot, were found to be immunologically similar. 6. No evidence was obtained to show that human convalescent serum possesses an appreciable amount of neutralizing substances.

  8. Vesicular Disease in 9-Week-Old Pigs Experimentally Infected with Senecavirus A

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Nestor; Buckley, Alexandra; Guo, Baoqing; Kulshreshtha, Vikas; VanGeelen, Albert; Hoang, Hai; Rademacher, Christopher; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Senecavirus A has been infrequently associated with vesicular disease in swine since 1988. However, clinical disease has not been reproduced after experimental infection with this virus. We report vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs after Sencavirus A infection by the intranasal route under experimental conditions. PMID:27315363

  9. Vesicular Disease in 9-Week-Old Pigs Experimentally Infected with Senecavirus A

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Nestor; Buckley, Alexandra; Guo, Baoqing; Kulshreshtha, Vikas; VanGeelen, Albert; Hoang, Hai; Rademacher, Christopher; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Lager, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    Senecavirus A has been infrequently associated with vesicular disease in swine since 1988. However, clinical disease has not been reproduced after experimental infection with this virus. Here we report vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs after Sencavirus A infection by the intranasal route under experimental conditions.

  10. Effects of atmospheric ammonia on young pigs experimentally infected with Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Simon, J.; Norton, H.W.

    1981-06-01

    Effects of atmospheric ammonia at 69.4 mg/m3 (100 ppm) on productive performance and respiratory tract health of young pigs (starting body weight averaged 7.5 kg) experimentally infected with Ascaris suum (50,000 embryonated ova administered by gavage when pigs were 5 weeks of age) were studied in 5 trials of 4 weeks each (when pigs were 5 to 9 weeks of age). Effects of atmospheric-ammonia exposure and ascarid infection on growth were additive. Compared with controls, percentage reductions in average daily gain were 32%, 28%, and 61% for ammonia-exposed, ascarid-infected, and combined ammonia plus ascarid groups, respectively. Ammonia exposure or ascarid infection alone depressed feed disappearance by 18%. Effects of the 2 factors were additive, resulting in a 35% reduction in feed disappearance. Pigs exposed to the combined factors had an average gain/feed ratio of 0.518, which was less than that of control pigs (0.546), but was greater than that of pigs exposed to atmospheric ammonia (0.489) or pigs infected with ascarids (0.501) alone. Liver scarring, due to larval migration, was not affected by ammonia exposure. Larval migration through the respiratory tract was not confirmed histopathologically in pigs killed 4 weeks after inoculation. A supplementary experiment was conducted which demonstrated that residual evidence of previous pulmonary larval migration was present 2 weeks after inoculation.

  11. The effect of fermentable carbohydrates on experimental swine dysentery and whip worm infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lisbeth E; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jensen, Tim K; Christensen, Anja S; Møller, Kristian; Roepstorff, Allan

    2007-01-31

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of diets with contrasting fermentability in the large intestine on experimental infections with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery, and the whip worm, Trichuris suis, in pigs. Two diets with organically grown ingredients were composed. Both diets were based on triticale and barley and supplemented with either rape seed cake (Diet 1) or dried chicory root and sweet lupins (Diet 2). The study had a three-factorial design, with eight groups of pigs receiving Diet 1 or Diet 2, +/-B. hyodysenteriae, and +/-T. suis. Pigs fed Diet 2 and challenged with B. hyodysenteriae did not develop swine dysentery and B. hyodysenteriae was not demonstrated in any of the pigs during the study. In contrast, 94% of the B. hyodysenteriae challenged pigs fed Diet 1 showed clinical symptoms of swine dysentery and all the pigs were shedding B. hyodysenteriae in faeces at some points in time during the experiment. The number of T. suis was lower in pigs fed Diet 2 compared to pigs fed Diet 1, but the differences were not significant. Pigs on Diet 1 and challenged with both pathogens showed clinical symptoms of SD for a longer period than pigs inoculated with B. hyodysenteriae only. The study showed that diets supplemented with highly fermentable carbohydrates from dried chicory roots and sweet lupins can protect pigs against developing swine dysentery, but do not have any significant influence on T. suis.

  12. Monitoring of behavior using a video-recording system for recognition of Salmonella infection in experimentally infected growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S T; Mun, H-S; Yoe, H; Yang, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Behavior is one of the most commonly used indicators of illness; however, few studies have investigated how different common diseases affect animal behavior. This experiment was conducted to investigate behavioral and clinical alterations in growing pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella spp. during a 4-week post-infection period. A total of 48 growing pigs were divided into one of the three treatment groups (1) control, (2) infection with Salmonella Typhimurium or (3) infection with Salmonella Enteritidis. Individual pigs' behavior was recorded daily (0900 to 1100 and 1600 to 1800 h) using a video-recording system. Pigs in both infected groups had lower weight gain and feed intake during week 0 to 2 and 0 to 4 experimental period. Bacteriological data revealed that pigs in both infected groups persistently shed bacteria throughout the period of study. Oral infection of growing pigs with S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis significantly reduced the frequency of morning large (except week 1) and small movement throughout the study period. In the evening, significantly lowest frequency of movements were observed in the S. Enteritidis-infected group compared with the control. The standing and sitting frequency were significantly lower in both infected groups only at the morning of week 4. Infection with Salmonella spp. led to a significant reduction in the frequency and duration of morning eating and drinking throughout the experimental period, with the exception of 4th week drinking duration. The lowest frequency of evening eating during week 1 and 4 was recorded in both infected groups; whereas, the duration differed only at week 1. The evening drinking frequency only tended to decrease in response to S. Typhimurium infection at week 1. This study shows that, pigs infected with Salmonella spp. had poor performance, shedding high levels of Salmonella with their feces and reduced feeding and drinking activity, which are adaptive responses to infection and may help

  13. Experimental Infection of Domestic Pigs with African Swine Fever Virus Lithuania 2014 Genotype II Field Isolate.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Cano, C; Pelayo, V; Sánchez, M A; Pridotkas, G; Fernandez-Pinero, J; Briones, V; Arias, M

    2017-02-01

    An experimental infection was conducted to evaluate horizontal transmission, clinical, virological and humoral response induced in domestic pigs infected with African swine fever (ASF) genotype II virus circulating in 2014 into the European Union (EU). Ten naive pigs were placed in contact with eight pigs experimentally inoculated with the Lithuanian LT14/1490 ASF virus (ASFV) responsible for the first ASF case detected in wild boar in Lithuania in January 2014. Clinical examination and rectal temperature were recorded each day. Blood sampling from every animal was carried out twice weekly. Blood samples were examined for presence of ASF virus-specific antibodies and for determining the ASFV viral load. From the obtained results, it was concluded that the Lithuanian ASFV induced an acute disease which resulted in 94, 5% mortality. The disease was easily detected by real-time PCR prior to the onset of clinical signs and 33% of the animals seroconverted. All findings were in accordance with observations previously made in domestic pigs and wild boar when infected with ASF genotype II viruses characterized by a high virulence. One in-contact pig remained asymptomatic and survived the infection. The role of such animals in virus transmission would need further investigation.

  14. Immunological, physiological and behavioral effects of Salmonella enterica carriage and shedding in experimentally infected finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. This study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and associated immunological, physiological, and behavioral alterations, by longitudinally ...

  15. Experimental Salmonella typhi infection in the domestic pig, Sus scrofa domestica.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, E S; Almond, G W; Routh, P A; Horton, J R; Dillman, R C; Orndorff, P E

    2000-08-01

    The domestic pig, Sus scrofa domestica, was examined as a model for typhoid fever, a severe and systemic disease of humans caused by Salmonella typhi. Six pigs were inoculated 1 week post-weaning with approximately 10(10)colony forming units (cfu) of wild type Salmonella typhi strain ISP1820 intranasally and observed for 3 weeks. S. typhi was cultured from the tonsils of 50% of the pigs at necropsy. Cultures from all other organs analysed (ileum, colon, spleen and liver) were negative. No clinical or histopathological signs of disease were observed. Pigs inoculated in parallel with swine-virulent S. choleraesuis all exhibited signs of systemic salmonellosis indicating that the parameters of the experimental infection with S. typhi (e.g. route) were appropriate. Whereas the pig has a gastrointestinal tract that is very similar to humans, our results indicated that the unique features of host and microbe interaction needed to produce typhoid fever were not mimicked in swine. Nevertheless, our observation of tonsillar involvement was consistent with former observations of S. choleraesuis and S. typhimurium infections in swine and supports a role for the tonsil in all porcine salmonella infections.

  16. Enhancement of immunohistochemical detection of Salmonella in tissues of experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Janczyk, P; Hünigen, H; Plendl, J

    2015-07-09

    Salmonella Typhimurium is one of the main pathogens compromising porcine and human health as well as food safety, because it is a prevailing source of foodborne infections due to contaminated pork. A prominent problem in the management of this bacteriosis is the number of subclinically infected carrier pigs. As very little is known concerning the mechanisms allowing Salmonella to persist in pigs, the objective of this study was to develop an immunohistochemical approach for the detection of salmonellae in tissue of pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Samples were obtained from a challenge trial in which piglets of the German Landrace were intragastrically infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (1.4-2.1x1010 CFU). Piglets were sacrificed on days 2 and 28 post infection. Tissue samples of jejunum, ileum, colon, ileocecal mesenteric lymph nodes (Lnn. ileocolici), and tonsils (Tonsilla veli palatini) were fixed in Zamboni's fixative and paraffin-embedded. Different immunohistochemical staining protocols were evaluated. Salmonella was detected in varying amounts in the tissues. Brown iron-containing pigments in the lymph nodes interfered with the identification of Salmonella if DAB was used as a staining reagent. Detergents like Triton X-100 or Saponin enhanced the sensitivity. It seems advisable not to use a detection system with brown staining for bacteria in an experimental setup involving intestinal damage including haemorrhage. The use of detergents appears to result in a higher sensitivity in the immunohistochemical detection of salmonellae.

  17. Influence of diet on the experimental infection of pigs with Brachyspira pilosicoli.

    PubMed

    Lindecrona, R H; Jensen, T K; Møller, K

    2004-02-28

    The effects of five different diets on the experimental infection of pigs with a Danish field isolate of Brachyspira pilosicoli were investigated. The diets tested were a pelleted and a non-pelleted standard diet based on wheat and barley, the standard diet supplemented with 2 per cent lactic acid, a fermented liquid feed and a diet based on cooked rice. Two trials were conducted, each with six groups of six pigs; in each, two of the groups were fed the standard diet. One of these groups and the other four groups were challenged after two weeks on the diets and euthanased four weeks later. The clinical signs of B pilosicoli infection varied from loose stools to watery, mucoid diarrhoea. The group fed the rice diet excreted B pilosicoli in their faeces for a significantly shorter period than the group fed the standard diet (P < 0.01), and fewer of them excreted the organism (P < 0.05). All the pigs fed the pelleted diet excreted B pilosicoli in their faeces, and significantly more of them showed clinical signs of disease than the pigs fed the standard diet (P < 0.05). The fermented liquid feed and the diet containing lactic acid had no significant effect on the excretion of B pilosicoli or on the numbers of pigs showing clinical signs of disease.

  18. Effects of atmospheric ammonia on young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Meyer, R.C.; Simon, J.; Norton, H.W.

    1981-06-01

    Effects of atmospheric ammonia on performance and respiratory tract health of young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica were studied. Treatments were: (1) control, (2) Bordetella inoculation (approx 10(9) bacteria/naris) alone, (3) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 34.7 mg/m3 (50 ppm), and (4) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 69.4 mg/m3 (100 ppm). Pigs weighted 8.01 kg (av) at start of treatment. Body weight and feed disappearance were measured weekly. After 4 weeks, all pigs were killed and examined grossly, and appropriate specimens were obtained for histopathologic examination. Regression models were fitted to growth, feed disappearance, and gain-to-feed data. The growth model indicated that Bordetella-inoculated pigs gained 26% less body weight than did controls, regardless of atmospheric ammonia concentration. Bordetella inoculation, regardless of ammonia exposure, reduced feed disappearance 12% below the control rate. Treatment difference was not noted in gain/feed data. Shrunken turbinates were observed in Bordetella-inoculated pigs. Shrinkage also appeared to be related directly to ammonia concentration. Rhinitis was confirmed histopathologically, and its severity was related with atmospheric ammonia concentration, but no difference was seen in the osseous core of the turbinates.

  19. Lack of effect of feeding citrus by-products in reducing Salmonella in experimentally infected weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current research was to determine if feeding citrus by-products D’Limonene (DL) and citrus molasses (MOL) would reduce the concentration and prevalence of Salmonella in weanling pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella Typhimurium. Twenty crossbred weanling pigs (avg. BW = ...

  20. Evaluation of hemostaseological status of pigs experimentally infected with African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Karalova, Elena; Voskanyan, Henrik; Ter-Pogossyan, Zarine; Nersisyan, Narek; Hakobyan, Astghik; Saroyan, David; Karalyan, Zaven

    2014-11-07

    African swine fever is a highly contagious hemorrhagic disease of pigs caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). Hemorrhages are the most frequently reported lesions in acute and subacute forms of ASF. Hemorrhagic lesions are accompanied by impaired hemostasis, which includes thrombocytopenia and changes in the coagulation system. In the present study, experimental infection was conducted to elucidate whether a highly virulent ASFV genotype II circulating in the Trans-Caucasus and Eastern Europe affects the hemostasis of infected pigs. Platelet count changes and platelet size, as well as coagulation parameters were evaluated upon experimental infection. In contrast to other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II showed a significant decrease in the number of platelets from 3rd dpi onwards. Furthermore, a decrease in platelet size was observed throughout the entire period of experiment. A significant increase in the number of platelet aggregates was observed from the beginning of infection. Unlike other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II induced a slight shortening of an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the experiment. Thrombin time (TT) was prolonged from day 5 onwards, whereas no changes in prothrombin time (PT) were found upon infection. The level of d-dimers was permanently higher than in control with a peak on day 3 post-infection. ASFV induced a significant decrease in the level of fibrinogen from day 5 till the end of experiment. Thus, it can be concluded that ASFV genotype II isolated in Armenia affects the hemostasis of infected pigs and causes changes that differ from that of other ASFV strains described previously.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL ENTERIC SHIGELLA AND VIBRIO INFECTIONS IN MICE AND GUINEA PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Freter, Rolf

    1956-01-01

    A method has been devised for inhibiting the normal enteric flora, permitting long term asymptomatic enteric infections of mice and guinea pigs with streptomycin-resistant strains of Shigella flexneri or Vibrio cholerae. Introduction of a streptomycin-resistant strain of E. coli into the intestinal tract of experimental animals resulted in a rapid elimination of the enteric pathogens studied. No in vitro production of antibiotic substances by this coli strain could be demonstrated. Active and oral passive immunization did not noticeably influence the number of Shigella or Vibrio organisms recoverable from the feces of infected animals. PMID:13357693

  2. Scanning electron microscopy of experimental Trichophyton mentagrophytes infections in guinea pig skin.

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, R D; Kerbs, S; Yee, K

    1978-01-01

    Trichophyton mentagrophytes invasion of guinea pig skin was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Biopsies were obtained daily for 12 days from experimental infection sites. Dermatophyte invasion, examined in detail by scanning electron microscopy of cross-sectioned, prefixed skin was evidenced by: the appearance of hyphae within the stratum corneum; follicular invasion by hyphae, which remained initially within the follicle wall; emergence of the hyphae from the wall into the follicular canal; proliferation of the fungus down the follicle, with furrowing of the follicle wall and hair shaft cuticle; penetration of hyphae into the hair shaft by subcuticular and transcuticular routes; and massive peripilar hyphal proliferation with arthrosporogenesis. A three-dimensional perception of the invasion sequence of a dermatophyte in guinea pig skin was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Images PMID:711318

  3. Dietary aluminosilicate supplement enhances immune activity in mice and reinforces clearance of porcine circovirus type 2 in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Cho, Sun-Ju; Ko, Jae-hyung; Jung, Yeon-Kwon; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2010-07-14

    Aluminosilicate is the major component of clay minerals such as zeolite, bentonite and clinoptilolite. The minerals possess a number of beneficial activities, especially in regulating the immune system. The aims of the present study were to evaluate immune enhancing effects of dietary aluminosilicate supplement (DAS) in mice, and to demonstrate clearance effects of DAS against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of an antibiotic substitute for use in pigs. Relative messenger RNA expression levels of interferon-gamma, interleukin-4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phagocytic activities of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, serum antibody production level and spleen B cell ratio were significantly increased in the DAS groups of mice compared with the control group (each feeding group had three replications with 5 mice each). The results indicated that general immune activity including cellular and humoral immunity could be enhanced by DAS in mice. In experimentally PCV2-infected pigs, the load of viral genome in nasal swab, serum and lung of the DAS group of pigs was significantly decreased compared with the control group at 28 days post-infection (each group three pigs). Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that pigs in the DAS group displayed mild and less severe abnormal changes compared with the control group, indicating that DAS reinforces clearance of PCV2 in experimentally infected pigs. This may relate to general immune enhancing effects of DAS in mice. Therefore DAS will help the health of animal, especially in swine.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH Toxocara cati IN PIGS: MIGRATORY PATTERN AND PATHOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN EARLY PHASE

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, Irma Estela; Duchene, Adriana; Daprato, Betina; Lopez, Clara María; Cardillo, Natalia; Franco, Aníbal Juan

    2014-01-01

    Experimental inoculations of approximately 100,000 infective Toxocara cati larval eggs were done in twelve pigs. The T. cati eggs used for inoculation were collected from cat's feces. Another group of three pigs served as an uninfected control. Groups of infected pigs were euthanized at seven, 14, 21, and 28 days post-inoculation (dpi). Tissue samples were taken for digestion and histopathology changes in early phase. The number of larvae recovered from the lungs peaked at seven and 14 dpi and were also present at 21, and 28 dpi. Larvae of T. cati were present in the lymph nodes of the small and large intestine at seven, 14, and 28 dpi and at seven, 14, 21, and 28 dpi respectively. In other studied tissues, no larvae or less than one larva per gram was detected. The pathological response observed in the liver and lungs at seven and 14 dpi, showed white spots on the liver surface and areas of consolidation were observed in the lungs. The lungs showed an inflammatory reaction with larvae in center at 28 dpi. In the liver we observed periportal and perilobular hepatitis. The lymph nodes of the intestines displayed eosinophil lymphadenitis with reactive centers containing parasitic forms in some of them. The granulomatous reaction was not observed in any tissues. The role of the other examined tissues had less significance. The relevance of this parasite as an etiological agent that leads to disease in paratenic hosts is evident. PMID:25076437

  5. Experimental infection with Toxocara cati in pigs: migratory pattern and pathological response in early phase.

    PubMed

    Sommerfelt, Irma Estela; Duchene, Adriana; Daprato, Betina; Lopez, Clara María; Cardillo, Natalia; Franco, Aníbal Juan

    2014-01-01

    Experimental inoculations of approximately 100,000 infective Toxocara cati larval eggs were done in twelve pigs. The T. cati eggs used for inoculation were collected from cat's feces. Another group of three pigs served as an uninfected control. Groups of infected pigs were euthanized at seven, 14, 21, and 28 days post-inoculation (dpi). Tissue samples were taken for digestion and histopathology changes in early phase. The number of larvae recovered from the lungs peaked at seven and 14 dpi and were also present at 21, and 28 dpi. Larvae of T. cati were present in the lymph nodes of the small and large intestine at seven, 14, and 28 dpi and at seven, 14, 21, and 28 dpi respectively. In other studied tissues, no larvae or less than one larva per gram was detected. The pathological response observed in the liver and lungs at seven and 14 dpi, showed white spots on the liver surface and areas of consolidation were observed in the lungs. The lungs showed an inflammatory reaction with larvae in center at 28 dpi. In the liver we observed periportal and perilobular hepatitis. The lymph nodes of the intestines displayed eosinophil lymphadenitis with reactive centers containing parasitic forms in some of them. The granulomatous reaction was not observed in any tissues. The role of the other examined tissues had less significance. The relevance of this parasite as an etiological agent that leads to disease in paratenic hosts is evident.

  6. Parasitological and histopathological effects of immunosuppression in guinea-pigs (Cavia porcellus) experimentally infected with Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    Okeke, O C; Ubachukwu, P O; Okafor, F C; Shoyinka, S V O

    2012-12-01

    The parasitological and histopathological effects of immunosuppression in guinea-pigs (Cavia porcellus) experimentally infected with Schistosoma haematobium were studied. A total of 16 guinea-pigs were divided into four groups (four per group): non-immunosuppressed, non-infected group (NN); immunosuppressed, non-infected group (IN); immunosuppressed, infected group (II); non-immunosuppressed, infected group (NI). The IN and II groups were immunosuppressed with 5 mg/kg prednisolone while the II and NI animals were infected with 200-300 S. haematobium cercariae. Excretion of eggs in urine/faeces, worm burden and histopathology of some vital organs of the guinea-pigs were studied. Eggs of S. haematobium were observed in the urine of the NI and II groups from 9 weeks post-infection and in faeces from 10 and 13 weeks post-infection for the NI and II groups, respectively. However, II animals excreted more viable eggs in urine and faeces than those of the NI group. Worm recovery at 14 weeks post-infection showed that NI and II guinea-pigs had more female worms than male worms and a greater proportion of worm recovery for NI animals was of immature worms. Significant differences (P < 0.05) existed between female, male and immature worm burden of the two groups but not in their total worm burden (P>0.05). Histological changes, which were notably reactions to adult S. haematobium worms, were observed in the organs of the NI and II groups but these changes were seen more in the organs of the immunosuppressed, infected (II) than in the non-immunosuppressed, infected (NI) guinea-pigs. The results suggest that immunosuppression before infection increased worm survival and had a moderate effect on liver and bladder histology of S. haematobium infected guinea-pigs.

  7. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  8. Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104 infection in experimentally challenged weaned pigs fed a lactobacillus-fermented feed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fugui; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Wang, Qi Chuck; Yu, Hai; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Friendship, Robert; Gong, Joshua

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium is a foodborne pathogen and commonly present on pig farms. Probiotics have shown potential as a means of reducing Salmonella shedding in pigs. Three experimental challenge trials were conducted to investigate the potential application of newly isolated Lactobacillus isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in pigs. In each trial, 16 Yorkshire piglets (28-d old) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments: (1) basal diet (BD), (2) naturally fermented (NF) feed, (3) Lactobacillus zeae-fermented (LZ-F) feed, and 4) Lactobacillus casei-fermented (LC-F) feed. All pigs consumed their assigned diets for 3 d prior to the challenge of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (approximately 6 log colony-forming units/pig) through gavage. Pediococcus pentosaceus, L. zeae, and L. casei were most abundant in NF, LZ-F, and LC-F feed, respectively. After the challenge, pigs on fermented feed had lower rectal temperature, diarrhea scores, serum haptoglobin concentrations, and intestinal Salmonella counts than the control group (BD) (p ≤ 0.01). Salmonella spp. were detected in both ileocecal lymph nodes (ICLN) and spleens from all pigs on BD, NF, and LC-F, but only 50% of spleens from pigs on LZ-F. Pigs had a dynamic spatial and temporal immune response to Salmonella infection and dietary treatments, as indicated by up- and downregulation in gene expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor) in the ileum, ICLN, and spleen. The alternation in cytokine expression by fermented feed, particularly LZ-F, appeared to benefit pigs in combating Salmonella infection.

  9. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; de Souza, Diogo Benchimol; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; de Oliveira, Fábio Conceição; de Melo, João Cardoso; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz; de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues; de Souza, Wanderley; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis. PMID:25742268

  10. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; Oliveira, Fábio Conceição de; Melo, João Cardoso de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz de; Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues de; Souza, Wanderley de; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis.

  11. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; Oliveira, Fábio Conceição de; Melo, João Cardoso de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz de; Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues de; Souza, Wanderley de; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-02-03

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis.

  12. Effect of vaccination of pigs against experimental infection with high and low virulence Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, I; Maes, D; Vranckx, K; Calus, D; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F

    2011-02-17

    This study investigated the infection pattern and lung lesion development in pigs caused by a low and highly virulent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain at 4 and 8 weeks (w) post infection (PI). It also determined the efficacy of a commercial inactivated whole-cell vaccine against infection with each one of these M. hyopneumoniae strains. Ninety piglets free of M. hyopneumoniae were selected, and 40 of them were randomly vaccinated during their first week of life. At weaning, all piglets were allocated to 10 different groups and housed in pens with absolute filters. At 4 weeks of age, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with either a highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain, a low virulent strain or with sterile culture medium. Half of all animals were euthanized at 4 w PI, while the remaining half was euthanized at 8 w PI. Coughing was assessed daily, and lung lesions, immunofluorescence (IF), bacteriological analysis and nested PCR were assessed after necropsy. It was demonstrated that contrary to the highly virulent strain, the low virulent strain required more than 4 weeks PI (commonly accepted as the standard infection model) to reach maximum clinical symptoms. Vaccination significantly reduced clinical symptoms, macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions in pigs infected with the highly virulent strain. This effect was more pronounced at 4 than at 8 weeks PI. Protective efficacy was also observed in pigs infected with the low virulent strain, but the effect was less pronounced than on the highly virulent strain.

  13. Growth performance and whole-body composition of pigs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Escobar, J; Van Alstine, W G; Baker, D H; Johnson, R W

    2002-02-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) is the primary infectious pathogen responsible for enzootic pneumonia in pigs. Although Mh is thought to impair growth performance, whole-body composition, and fat and protein accretion in pigs with pneumonia have not been reported and the mechanism through which Mh reduces growth is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of Mh on growth performance, whole-body composition, and protein and fat accretion in nursery pigs and to determine whether Mh infection increases the expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Sixty-four 2-wk-old Mh-free pigs were used (two trials) in a randomized complete block design. In each trial, two pigs were housed in each of 16 disease-containment chambers. At 4 wk of age, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with 3 mL of Mh broth (P5722-3, 10(7) cfu/mL) or sterile Friis culture medium. Clinical signs of disease and feed intake were monitored daily and body weight was determined weekly for 4 wk. Whole-body composition was determined from pigs killed 0, 14, and 28 d after inoculation, and the comparative slaughter technique was used to estimate protein and fat accretion. At death, gross lung lesions were quantified, and lung tissue was collected to verify the presence or absence of Mh, and to determine cytokine mRNA levels. Control pigs displayed no overt signs of infection and were Mh-negative and free of pulmonary lesions. Pigs inoculated with Mh showed pneumonic coughing (P < 0.005), were Mh-positive, and had pulmonary lesions that affected 4.5% (P < 0.01) and 14.1% (P < 0.001) of total lung surface area at 14 and 28 d, respectively, after inoculation. Ribonuclease protection assays revealed increased IL-1beta (P < 0.04) and TNF-alpha (P < 0.06) mRNA in lung tissue collected from a lesion site compared with tissue collected 10 cm from a lesion site or from control pigs. Interestingly, Mh did not depress weight gain or feed efficiency

  14. Antiviral effect of dietary germanium biotite supplementation in pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    Germanium biotite (GB) is an aluminosilicate mineral containing 36 ppm germanium. The present study was conducted to better understand the effects of GB on immune responses in a mouse model, and to demonstrate the clearance effects of this mineral against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in experimentally infected pigs as an initial step towards the development of a feed supplement that would promote immune activity and help prevent diseases. In the mouse model, dietary supplementation with GB enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation and increased the percentage of CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes. In pigs experimentally infected with PRRSV, viral titers in lungs and lymphoid tissues from the GB-fed group were significantly decreased compared to those of the control group 12 days post-infection. Corresponding histopathological analyses demonstrated that GB-fed pigs displayed less severe pathological changes associated with PRRSV infection compared to the control group, indicating that GB promotes PRRSV clearance. These antiviral effects in pigs may be related to the ability of GB to increase CD3+CD8+ T lymphocyte production observed in the mice. Hence, this mineral may be an effective feed supplement for increasing immune activity and preventing disease.

  15. Detection of airborne influenza a virus in experimentally infected pigs with maternally derived antibodies.

    PubMed

    Corzo, C A; Allerson, M; Gramer, M; Morrison, R B; Torremorell, M

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed whether recently weaned piglets with maternally derived antibodies were able to generate infectious influenza aerosols. Three groups of piglets were assembled based on the vaccination status of the dam. Sows were either non-vaccinated (CTRL) or vaccinated with the same (VAC-HOM) strain or a different (VAC-HET) strain to the one used for challenge. Piglets acquired the maternally derived antibodies by directly suckling colostrum from their respective dams. At weaning, pigs were challenged with influenza virus by direct contact with an infected pig (seeder pig) and clinical signs evaluated. Air samples, collected using a liquid cyclonic air collector, and individual nasal swabs were collected daily for 10 days from each group and tested by matrix real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) assay. Virus isolation and titration were attempted for air samples on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. All individual pigs from both VAC-HET and CTRL groups tested positive during the study but only one pig in the VAC-HOM group was positive by nasal swab RRT-PCR. Influenza virus could not be detected or isolated from air samples from the VAC-HOM group. Influenza A virus was isolated from 3.2% and 6.4% air samples from both the VAC-HET and CTRL groups, respectively. Positive RRT-PCR air samples were only detected in VAC-HET and CTRL groups on day 7 post-exposure. Overall, this study provides evidence that recently weaned pigs with maternally derived immunity without obvious clinical signs of influenza infection can generate influenza infectious aerosols which is relevant to the transmission and the ecology of influenza virus in pigs.

  16. Experimental Infection of the Pig with Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Novel Model for Studying the Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Ricklin, Meret E.; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a slowly progressing, necrotising disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Non-ulcerative manifestations are nodules, plaques and oedema, which may progress to ulceration of large parts of the skin. Histopathologically, BU is characterized by coagulative necrosis, fat cell ghosts, epidermal hyperplasia, clusters of extracellular acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the subcutaneous tissue and lack of major inflammatory infiltration. The mode of transmission of BU is not clear and there is only limited information on the early pathogenesis of the disease available. Methodology/Principal Findings For evaluating the potential of the pig as experimental infection model for BU, we infected pigs subcutaneously with different doses of M. ulcerans. The infected skin sites were excised 2.5 or 6.5 weeks after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. With doses of 2×107 and 2×106 colony forming units (CFU) we observed the development of nodular lesions that subsequently progressed to ulcerative or plaque-like lesions. At lower inoculation doses signs of infection found after 2.5 weeks had spontaneously resolved at 6.5 weeks. The observed macroscopic and histopathological changes closely resembled those found in M. ulcerans disease in humans. Conclusion/Significance Our results demonstrate that the pig can be infected with M. ulcerans. Productive infection leads to the development of lesions that closely resemble human BU lesions. The pig infection model therefore has great potential for studying the early pathogenesis of BU and for the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:25010421

  17. Effects of ketoprofen and flunixin in pigs experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, J M; Pijpers, A; Vernooy, J C; Van Nes, A; Verheijden, J H

    1994-08-01

    The antipyretic effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ketoprofen (3 mg/kg) and flunixin (2 mg/kg) were studied in pigs. The drugs were administered intramuscularly at 8 and 32 h following endobronchial challenge with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Infected (non-medicated) and non-infected (non-medicated) controls were used. Endobronchial challenge with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induced laboured breathing, coughing, fever, reduced food and water consumption and increased white blood cell counts. At autopsy, pleuropneumonia was evident. Ketoprofen showed a highly significant antipyretic effect but flunixin did not. The decrease in food consumption of ketoprofen-treated pigs was significantly less than that of the infected (non-medicated) controls. Blood parameters were not significantly influenced by either NSAID and, at necropsy, gastric and renal side-effects were not observed for either drug.

  18. Pathological features of experimental gonococcal infection in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, F W; Kraus, S J; Watts, J C

    1976-01-01

    The histopathological and immunofluorescent findings in tissues within and surrounding artificially created subcutaneous tissue cavities infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae for 1 to 30 days were studied in mice and guinea pigs. Findings in the tissue cavities of the animal models were similar to the findings of disseminated gonococcal infection in humans. These similarities included an intense persistent polymorphonuclear leukocytic response with tissue necrosis, hemorrhage into the early lesion, a perivascular leukocytic response in adjacent tissue, difficulty in detecting large numbers of discrete morphologically typical gonococci by the tissue Gram stain and direct fluorescent antibody techniques, a decrease in the number of identifiable gonococci with duration of the infection, and moderate amounts of extracellular and intracellular immunofluorescent gonococcal debris. Studies into the pathogenesis of the animal infections may enhance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism (s) associated with gonococcal infection in humans. Images PMID:818019

  19. Experimental dual infection of pigs with an H1N1 swine influenza virus (A/Sw/Hok/2/81) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Shigeto; Okada, Munenori; Ono, Masaaki; Fujii, Seiichi; Okuda, Yo; Shibata, Isao; Kida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-05

    Dual infection of pigs with swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was carried out to compare the clinical and pathological effects of dual infection in caesarian derived and colostrums deprived (CDCD) pigs, with that of a single infection with M. hyopneumoniae. In Experiment 1, 40-day-old CDCD pigs were inoculated only with SIV (A/Sw/Hok/2/81, H1N1). The virus was isolated from nasal swabs for 5-6 days. None of these pigs showed clinical signs of infection throughout the experimental period. These results suggested that this strain can infect pigs but is only slightly pathogenic when it is inoculated singly to a CDCD pig. In Experiment 2, 60-day-old CDCD pigs were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and then were inoculated with SIV (A/Sw/Hok/2/81) at 1 week (MHYO-7d-SIV-7d group) or 3 weeks (MHYO-21d-SIV-7d group) after M. hyopneumoniae inoculation. Macroscopically, dark red-to-purple lung lesions were observed in all of pigs at 14 or 28 days post-inoculation. Percentages of dark red-to-purple lung lesions in dual infection groups (MHYO-7d-SIV-7d group: 18.7 +/- 4.2%, MHYO-21d-SIV-7d group: 23.0 +/- 8.0%) were significantly (P < 0.05) increased compared to those of each control group in which pigs were inoculated only with M. hyopneumoniae (MHYO-14d group: 4.7 +/- 2.9%, MHYO-28 group: 3.3 +/- 2.4%). Microscopically, bronchial epithelial lesions (epithelial disruption, degeneration, hyperplasia and formation of microabscess) were frequently observed in dark red-to-purple lung lesions of only the dual infection groups. These results demonstrate that the lung lesion of pigs inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and SIV is more severe than that of pigs inoculated only with M. hyopneumoniae.

  20. Experimental infection of pigs with the human 1918 pandemic influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Albrecht, Randy A; Lager, Kelly M; Babiuk, Shawn; Marszal, Peter; Neufeld, James; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Tumpey, Terrence M; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Richt, Jürgen A

    2009-05-01

    Swine influenza was first recognized as a disease entity during the 1918 "Spanish flu" pandemic. The aim of this work was to determine the virulence of a plasmid-derived human 1918 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (reconstructed 1918, or 1918/rec, virus) in swine using a plasmid-derived A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 H1N1 virus (1930/rec virus), representing the first isolated influenza virus, as a reference. Four-week-old piglets were inoculated intratracheally with either the 1930/rec or the 1918/rec virus or intranasally with the 1918/rec virus. A transient increase in temperature and mild respiratory signs developed postinoculation in all virus-inoculated groups. In contrast to other mammalian hosts (mice, ferrets, and macaques) where infection with the 1918/rec virus was lethal, the pigs did not develop severe respiratory distress or become moribund. Virus titers in the lower respiratory tract as well as macro- and microscopic lesions at 3 and 5 days postinfection (dpi) were comparable between the 1930/rec and 1918/rec virus-inoculated animals. In contrast to the 1930/rec virus-infected animals, at 7 dpi prominent lung lesions were present in only the 1918/rec virus-infected animals, and all the piglets developed antibodies at 7 dpi. Presented data support the hypothesis that the 1918 pandemic influenza virus was able to infect and replicate in swine, causing a respiratory disease, and that the virus was likely introduced into the pig population during the 1918 pandemic, resulting in the current lineage of the classical H1N1 swine influenza viruses.

  1. Dietary plant extracts alleviate diarrhea and alter immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Almeida, J A S; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2013-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of 3 different plant extracts on diarrhea, immune response, intestinal morphology, and growth performance of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sixty-four weaned pigs (6.3±0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens in disease containment chambers for 15 d: 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2×4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge (toxins: heat-labile toxin, heat-stable toxin b, and Shiga-like toxin 2; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose; daily for 3 d from d 0) and 4 diets [a nursery basal diet (CON) or 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin]. The growth performance was measured on d 0 to 5, 5 to 11, and 0 to 11. Diarrhea score (1, normal, to 5, watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Frequency of diarrhea was the percentage of pig days with a diarrhea score of 3 or greater. Blood was collected on d 0, 5, and 11 to measure total and differential white blood cell counts and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin. On d 5 and 11, half of the pigs were euthanized to measure villi height and crypt depth of the small intestine and macrophage and neutrophil number in the ileum. The E. coli infection increased (P<0.05) diarrhea score, frequency of diarrhea, white blood cell counts, serum TNF-α and haptoglobin, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils but reduced (P<0.05) villi height and the ratio of villi height to crypt depth of the small intestine on d 5. In the challenged group, feeding plant extracts reduced (P<0.05) average diarrhea score from d 0 to 2 and d 6 to 11 and frequency of diarrhea and decreased (P<0.05) TNF-α and haptoglobin on d 5, white blood cell counts and neutrophils on d 11, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils on d 5. Feeding plant extracts increased (P<0

  2. Immune responses of a chimaeric protein vaccine containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens and LTB against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana B; Sácristan, Rubén Del Pozo; Michiels, Annelies; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Maes, Dominiek

    2014-08-06

    A recombinant chimaeric protein containing three Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens (C-terminal portion of P97, heat shock protein P42, and NrdF) fused to an adjuvant, the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTB), was used to immunize pigs against enzootic pneumonia. The systemic and local immune responses, as well as the efficacy of the chimaeric protein in inducing protection against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection were evaluated. In total, 60 male piglets, purchased from a M. hyopneumoniae-free herd, at 4 weeks of age were randomly allocated to six different experimental groups of 10 animals each: recombinant chimaeric protein by intramuscular (IM) (1) or intranasal (IN) (2) administration, commercial bacterin by IM administration (3), and the adjuvant LTB by IM (4, control group A) or IN (5, control group B) administration. All groups were immunized at 24 and 38 days of age and challenged at 52 days of age. The sixth group that was not challenged was used as the negative control (IN [n=5] or IM [n=5] administration of the LTB adjuvant). Compared with the non-challenged group, administration of the chimaeric protein induced significant (P<0.05) IgG and IgA responses against all individual antigens present in the chimaera, but it could not confer a significant protection against M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs. This lack of effectiveness points towards the need for further studies to improve the efficacy of this subunit-based vaccine approach.

  3. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi.

  4. Experimental infection of SPF pigs with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 alone or in association with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Marois, Corinne; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Morvan, Hervé; Fablet, Christelle; Madec, François; Kobisch, Marylène

    2009-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare in SPF pigs, the pathogenicity of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 strain 21 (isolated from the palatine tonsils of a healthy gilt on a French nucleus pig farm, with no clinical signs or lung lesions but a highly positive reaction to A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 antibodies) with a pathogenic A. pleuropneumoniae strain 4915 serotype 9 (isolated in France from an outbreak of porcine pleuropneumonia). The pathogenicity of one Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain alone or associated with A. pleuropneumoniae strain 21 was also compared. Eight groups of 7 pigs were infected (at 6 or 10 weeks of age) and a control group was kept non-infected. Results showed that sensitivity to A. pleuropneumoniae was related to the age of the pig (6 weeks vs 10 weeks) whatever the strain. Surviving pigs infected at 6 weeks of age developed severe clinical signs, lung lesions typical of A. pleuropneumoniae and they seroconverted. In contrast, symptoms and lung lesions were almost non-existent in pigs infected with strain 21 at 10 weeks of age, but a seroconversion was observed with very high ELISA titres. These results were in accordance with those observed in the nucleus pig farm. Infection with M. hyopneumoniae alone induced typical mycoplasmal symptoms, pneumonia and seroconversion. Symptoms and lung lesions were the most noticeable in pigs infected with M. hyopneumoniae at 6 weeks of age and with A. pleuropneumoniae 4 weeks later. Our results show that the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 in a pig herd may be clinically unnoticed and that M. hyopneumoniae may potentiate A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  5. Experimental reproduction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in pigs by dual infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Thacker, E L; Yu, S; Fenaux, M; Meng, X-J; Halbur, P G

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactions between Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and to establish a model for studying the pathogenesis of and testing intervention strategies for the control of PCV2-associated porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Sixty-seven pigs were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 (n=17) pigs served as controls, group 2 (n=17) pigs were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae, group 3 (n=17) pigs were dual infected with M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2, and group 4 (n=16) pigs were inoculated with PCV2. Pigs were inoculated intratracheally with M. hyopneumoniae at 4 weeks of age followed by intranasal inoculation with PCV2 at 6 weeks of age. Dual-infected pigs had moderate dyspnea, lethargy, and reduced weight gain. The overall severity of macroscopic lung lesions, PCV2-associated microscopic lesions in lung and lymphoid tissues, and the amount of PCV2-antigen associated with these lesions were significantly (P <0.05) higher in dual-infected pigs compared with all other groups. Four of 17 (23.5%) dual-infected pigs had decreased growth rate and severe lymphoid depletion and granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with high amounts of PCV2-antigen consistent with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). PCV2-antigen in lung tissue was most often associated with M. hyopneumoniae-induced peribronchial lymphoid hyperplasia, suggesting that this is an important site for PCV2 replication in the lung. This study indicates that M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of PCV2-associated lung and lymphoid lesions, increases the amount and prolongs the presence of PCV2-antigen, and increases the incidence of PMWS in pigs.

  6. Immunization of pigs against experimental Ascaris suum infection by feeding ultraviolet-attenuated eggs.

    PubMed

    Tromba, F G

    1978-08-01

    Pigs fed Ascaris suum eggs attenuated by short-wave ultraviolet radiation developed a resistance to challenge infections that varied according to the protocols used. Two doses of eggs irradiated at total exposures (ET) of 150 muW-min/cm2 resulted in a reduction of adult worm burden in 3 groups challenged with 50, 100, or 500 eggs by 45, 35, and 49%, respectively. However, these results were not statistically significant (P greater than 0.05). Three other groups were fed eggs as follows: Group 1, 3 doses irridated at ET's of 150, 150 and 150; Group 2, 3 doses irradiated at ET's of 150, 150, 100; and Group 3, 3 doses irradiated at ET's of 150, 100, and 75. All of these regimens provided significant protection: Group 1 (P less than 0.02), Group 2 (P less than 0.05), Group 3 (P less than 0.001). An analysis of the lengths of worms recovered showed that in controls fed varying doses of eggs, worm sizes were inversely related to the number of eggs in the challenge dose. Measurements of worms from vaccinated animals showed that 23 of 116 adult worms recovered were probably survivors of one or more of the vaccinating doses. A ratio of 18 female to 5 male worms indicated that males are more susceptible to ultraviolet radiation than females.

  7. 13C-urea breath test for diagnosis of experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in barrier born pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rosberg, K; Gustavsson, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies with Helicobacter pylori infected barrier born pigs indicate that the infection has a patchy distribution, resulting in false negative culture results on endoscopic biopsy specimens. This study aimed to adapt the 13C-urea breath test as used in humans to diagnose H pylori infection in barrier born pigs. The breath test was also performed after bismuth as a single treatment and after triple therapy (bismuth, ampicillin, metronidazole). In control pigs the median excess of 13CO2 in expired air was 2.2 (range 0-12 n = 22) ppm. The infected pigs (n = 4) showed consistently high values (median 23 range 14-43) when examined on four occasions (n = 16) four to 10 weeks after inoculation. Biopsy specimens for culture had lower sensitivity than the breath test. No reduction in excess 13CO2 was seen after three days' single bismuth treatment, but after two weeks' triple therapy the breath test results had returned to normal. This suppression was temporary only, however, as the breath test was positive again four weeks after stopping treatment. In conclusion, the 13C-urea breath test is a simple and reliable test for determining H pylori infection and monitoring treatment effects in barrier born pigs. Because the test can be performed in awake pigs anaesthesia and gastroscopy are unnecessary. Images Figure 1 PMID:8504957

  8. Experimental infection of cattle, sheep and pigs with 'Hobi'-like pestivirus.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Lucente, Maria Stella; Sciarretta, Rossana; Moreno, Ana; Armenise, Carlo; Losurdo, Michele; Camero, Michele; Lorusso, Eleonora; Cordioli, Paolo; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2012-03-23

    To date, limited information is available on the ability of 'Hobi'-like pestiviruses (putative bovine viral diarrhoea 3) to infect and cause disease in animal species traditionally affected by pestiviruses. In order to obtain new insights into host range and pathogenic potential of this atypical pestivirus, BVDV-seronegative calves (n=5), lambs (n=5) and piglets (n=5) were experimentally infected with the European 'Hobi'-like strain Italy-1/10-1, whereas two animals per species served as uninfected controls. Appearance of clinical signs, leukopenia, viremia, viral shedding and seroconversion were monitored for 28 days post-infection. Calves and lambs were successfully infected, displaying respiratory signs (nasal discharge), moderate hyperthermia and leukopenia, viremia and viral shedding through the nasal and faecal routes. Antibody responses were observed in both animal species by ELISA and virus neutralisation assays. In contrast, inoculated piglets did not display any clinical signs nor leukopenia and viral RNA was not detected in any biological samples. Nevertheless, the presence of detectable antibodies by virus neutralisation accounted for a successful, albeit limited infection of these animals.

  9. Commercial PCV2a-based vaccines are effective in protecting naturally PCV2b-infected finisher pigs against experimental challenge with a 2012 mutant PCV2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Gerber, Priscilla F; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Halbur, Patrick G; Matzinger, Shannon R; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-07-23

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are all based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and disease. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in vaccinated herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of three commercial PCV2a-based vaccines administered in the presence of an ongoing PCV2b infection and passively-acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 11 weeks of age. Fifty naturally PCV2b-infected 2-week-old pigs were divided into five treatment groups with 10 pigs each. Pigs were unvaccinated (positive and negative controls) or vaccinated at 3 (VAC-A, VAC-B, VAC-C) and at 5 weeks of age (VAC-C). At 11 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative controls were challenged with a 2012 U.S. strain of mPCV2. The experiment was terminated 21 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas non-vaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, concurrent PCV2b and mPCV2 infection was demonstrated in all positive controls and 3/10 had microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative controls infected with PCV2b alone did not develop PCVAD. The results indicate that concurrent PCV2b/mPCV2 infection can trigger PCVAD development and that commercial vaccines are effective in protecting conventional pigs against emerging mPCV2 strains.

  10. Experimental infection of calves, sheep, goats and pigs with HoBi-like viruses by direct inoculation or exposure to persistently infected calves.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, F V; Falkenberg, S M; Decaro, N; Flores, E F; Ridpath, J F

    2015-12-31

    HoBi-like viruses are an emerging species of pestiviruses associated with respiratory and reproductive disease in cattle and in water buffaloes. Although cattle appear to be the main natural hosts, little is know about the potential for HoBi-like viruses to be transmitted to other livestock. In this study, seronegative calves, goats and pigs, and sheep harboring pestivirus antibodies (probably due to previous exposure to BVDV) were exposed to HoBi-like viruses either by direct inoculation (GIn) or by contact with calves persistently infected with HoBi-like viruses (GEx). Both GIn and GEx groups were monitored for clinical signs, lymphocyte count, virus in buffy coats and nasal swabs up to day 18 post-inoculation (pi). Evidence of transmission of HoBi-like virus by PI calves was observed in all studied species. No difference in clinical presentation was observed between animals in the GIn or GEx groups. Evidence of infection, depending on the species included lymphocyte depletion, fever, viral RNA detection, and/or seroconversion. Depletion of lymphocytes was observed in calves and goats (35% and 50%, respectively) but not in pigs. Seroconversion was observed in at least one animal of each group and for all exposed species. The rate of seroconversion was higher in animals in the GIn experimental groups. In sheep, pre-existing moderate to high neutralizing titers against BVDV did not prevent viral replication and shed. The study demonstrated that naive cattle, goats and pigs, in addition to antibody positive sheep, can be infected by HoBi-like virus via persistently infected calf and potentially transmit the virus.

  11. The Response of Colostrum-Deprived, Specific Pathögen-Free Pigs to Experimental Infection with Teschen Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dardiri, A. H.; Seibold, H. R.; DeLay, P. D.

    1966-01-01

    The clinical response to Teschen disease and the excretion and rate of virus distribution in tissues of colostrum-deprived, specific pathogenfree pigs was determined. Severe, mild, and clinically inapparent responses to the disease were noticed following simultaneous intracranial and intranasal infections. Fourteen-day-old pigs reacted more severely to infection than 21-day-old pigs. The virus was detected in feces 2-3 days following infection but not in stools of surviving pigs 30 days after infection. The highest concentration of virus occurred during the incubation period and before onset of paralysis; the lowest concentrations were found during terminal disease stages. In tissues collected before or immediately after death of pigs, Teschen disease virus was found in several visceral organs but not in blood, urine or urinary bladder tissue. Virus yield was highest in brain and spinal cord tissues. Highest virus concentration was found in the cervical thoracic portions of the spinal cord, thalamus and cerebellum. Other aspects of the clinical disease are discussed. ImagesFig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:4288041

  12. Vesicular disease in 9-week-old pigs experimentally infected with Senecavirus A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Senecavirus A (SVA), a picornavirus, has been infrequently associated with cases of idiopathic vesicular disease (IVD) in pigs in the US and Canada since 1988. In 2014 and 2015 there was surge of IVD cases in Brazil and US, respectively. SVA was identified in serum, vesicular fluid, an...

  13. Dogs are more permissive than cats or guinea pigs to experimental infection with a human isolate of Bartonella rochalimae.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B; Henn, Jennifer B; Kasten, Rickie W; Nieto, Nathan C; Foley, Janet; Papageorgiou, Sophia; Allen, Claire; Koehler, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    Bartonella rochalimae was first isolated from the blood of a human who traveled to Peru and was exposed to multiple insect bites. Foxes and dogs are likely natural reservoirs for this bacterium. We report the results of experimental inoculation of two dogs, five cats and six guinea pigs with the only human isolate of this new Bartonella species. Both dogs became bacteremic for 5-7 weeks, with a peak of 10(3)-10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/mL blood. Three cats had low bacteremia levels (< 200 CFU/mL) of 6-8 weeks' duration. One cat that remained seronegative had two bacterial colonies isolated at a single culture time point. A fifth cat never became bacteremic, but seroconverted. None of the guinea pigs became bacteremic, but five seroconverted. These results suggest that dogs could be a reservoir of this strain of B. rochalimae, in contrast to cats and guinea pigs.

  14. Updating the proteome of the uncultivable hemotrophic Mycoplasma suis in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Stefanie; Lassek, Christian; Mack, Sarah-Lena; Ritzmann, Mathias; Stadler, Julia; Becher, Dörte; Hoelzle, Katharina; Riedel, Katharina; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to the hemotrophic mycoplasmas that are associated with acute and chronic anemia in a wide range of livestock and wild animals. The inability to culture M. suis in vitro has hindered its characterization at the molecular level. Since the publication of M. suis genome sequences in 2011 only one proteome study has been published. Aim of the presented study was to significantly extend the proteome coverage of M. suis strain KI_3806 during acute infection by applying three different protein extraction methods followed by 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. A total of 404 of 795 M. suis KI_3806 proteins (50.8%) were identified. Data analysis revealed the expression of 83.7% of the predicted ORFs with assigned functions but also highlights the expression of 179 of 523 (34.2%) hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Computational analyses identified expressed membrane-associated hypothetical proteins that might be involved in adhesion or host-pathogen interaction. Furthermore, analyses of the expressed proteins indicated the existence of a hexose-6-phosphate-transporter and an ECF transporter. In conclusion, our proteome study provides a further step toward the elucidation of the unique life cycle of M. suis and the establishment of an in vitro culture. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002294 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002294).

  15. Persistence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in Experimentally Infected Pigs after Marbofloxacin Treatment and Detection of Mutations in the parC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Le Carrou, J.; Laurentie, M.; Kobisch, M.; Gautier-Bouchardon, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to persist despite fluoroquinolone treatments was investigated with pigs. Groups of specific-pathogen-free pigs were experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae strain 116 and treated with marbofloxacin at the therapeutic dose (TD) or half of the therapeutic dose (TD/2) for 3 days. Results showed that, despite tissue penetration of marbofloxacin, particularly in the trachea and the tracheal secretions, the treatments did not have any influence on M. hyopneumoniae recovery from tracheal swabs. Mycoplasmas were also isolated from inner organs and tissues such as liver, spleen, kidneys, and bronchial lymph nodes. Recontamination of pigs via environment could not explain mycoplasma persistence after medication, as decontamination of pigs and allocation to a new disinfected environment did not have any significant effect on the phenomenon. A significant decrease in the susceptibility level to marbofloxacin of 12 mycoplasma clones reisolated after the treatments (TD/2 and TD) was observed. Two point mutations were found in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA topoisomerase IV (Ser80→Phe and Asp84→Asn), and one point mutation was observed just behind the QRDR of ParC (Ala116→Glu). This is the first time that mutations in a gene coding for topoisomerase IV have been described for M. hyopneumoniae after in vivo marbofloxacin treatments in experimentally infected pigs. However, development of resistance is not sufficient to explain M. hyopneumoniae persistence in vivo since (i) marbofloxacin concentrations were above the marbofloxacin MIC of the wild-type strain and (ii) mycoplasmas reisolated after a single injection of marbofloxacin did not display an increased marbofloxacin MIC. PMID:16723552

  16. Persistence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in experimentally infected pigs after marbofloxacin treatment and detection of mutations in the parC gene.

    PubMed

    Le Carrou, J; Laurentie, M; Kobisch, M; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V

    2006-06-01

    The ability of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to persist despite fluoroquinolone treatments was investigated with pigs. Groups of specific-pathogen-free pigs were experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae strain 116 and treated with marbofloxacin at the therapeutic dose (TD) or half of the therapeutic dose (TD/2) for 3 days. Results showed that, despite tissue penetration of marbofloxacin, particularly in the trachea and the tracheal secretions, the treatments did not have any influence on M. hyopneumoniae recovery from tracheal swabs. Mycoplasmas were also isolated from inner organs and tissues such as liver, spleen, kidneys, and bronchial lymph nodes. Recontamination of pigs via environment could not explain mycoplasma persistence after medication, as decontamination of pigs and allocation to a new disinfected environment did not have any significant effect on the phenomenon. A significant decrease in the susceptibility level to marbofloxacin of 12 mycoplasma clones reisolated after the treatments (TD/2 and TD) was observed. Two point mutations were found in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA topoisomerase IV (Ser80-->Phe and Asp84-->Asn), and one point mutation was observed just behind the QRDR of ParC (Ala116-->Glu). This is the first time that mutations in a gene coding for topoisomerase IV have been described for M. hyopneumoniae after in vivo marbofloxacin treatments in experimentally infected pigs. However, development of resistance is not sufficient to explain M. hyopneumoniae persistence in vivo since (i) marbofloxacin concentrations were above the marbofloxacin MIC of the wild-type strain and (ii) mycoplasmas reisolated after a single injection of marbofloxacin did not display an increased marbofloxacin MIC.

  17. Experimental infection with H1N1 European swine influenza virus protects pigs from an infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Busquets, Núria; Segalés, Joaquim; Córdoba, Lorena; Mussá, Tufaria; Crisci, Elisa; Martín-Valls, Gerard E; Simon-Grifé, Meritxell; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Pérez-Maíllo, Monica; Núñez, Jose I; Abad, Francesc X; Fraile, Lorenzo; Pina, Sonia; Majó, Natalia; Bensaid, Albert; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, María

    2010-01-01

    The recent pandemic caused by human influenza virus A(H1N1) 2009 contains ancestral gene segments from North American and Eurasian swine lineages as well as from avian and human influenza lineages. The emergence of this A(H1N1) 2009 poses a potential global threat for human health and the fact that it can infect other species, like pigs, favours a possible encounter with other influenza viruses circulating in swine herds. In Europe, H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes of swine influenza virus currently have a high prevalence in commercial farms. To better assess the risk posed by the A(H1N1) 2009 in the actual situation of swine farms, we sought to analyze whether a previous infection with a circulating European avian-like swine A/Swine/Spain/53207/2004 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as SwH1N1) generated or not cross-protective immunity against a subsequent infection with the new human pandemic A/Catalonia/63/2009 (H1N1) influenza virus (hereafter referred to as pH1N1) 21 days apart. Pigs infected only with pH1N1 had mild to moderate pathological findings, consisting on broncho-interstitial pneumonia. However, pigs inoculated with SwH1N1 virus and subsequently infected with pH1N1 had very mild lung lesions, apparently attributed to the remaining lesions caused by SwH1N1 infection. These later pigs also exhibited boosted levels of specific antibodies. Finally, animals firstly infected with SwH1N1 virus and latter infected with pH1N1 exhibited undetectable viral RNA load in nasal swabs and lungs after challenge with pH1N1, indicating a cross-protective effect between both strains.

  18. Survival of African Swine Fever Virus in Excretions from Pigs Experimentally Infected with the Georgia 2007/1 Isolate.

    PubMed

    Davies, K; Goatley, L C; Guinat, C; Netherton, C L; Gubbins, S; Dixon, L K; Reis, A L

    2017-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a lethal haemorrhagic disease of swine which can be transmitted through direct contact with infected animals and their excretions or indirect contact with contaminated fomites. The shedding of ASFV by infected pigs and the stability of ASFV in the environment will determine the extent of environmental contamination. The recent outbreaks of ASF in Europe make it essential to develop disease transmission models in order to design effective control strategies to prevent further spread of ASF. In this study, we assessed the shedding and stability of ASFV in faeces, urine and oral fluid from pigs infected with the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV isolate. The half-life of infectious ASFV in faeces was found to range from 0.65 days when stored at 4°C to 0.29 days when stored at 37°C, while in urine it was found to range from 2.19 days (4°C) to 0.41 days (37°C). Based on these half-lives and the estimated dose required for infection, faeces and urine would be estimated to remain infectious for 8.48 and 15.33 days at 4°C and 3.71 and 2.88 days at 37°C, respectively. The half-life of ASFV DNA was 8 to 9 days in faeces and 2 to 3 days in oral fluid at all temperatures. In urine, the half-life of ASFV DNA was found to be 32.54 days at 4°C decreasing to 19.48 days at 37°C. These results indicate that ASFV in excretions may be an important route of ASFV transmission.

  19. Weaned pigs experimentally infected with Salmonella display sexually dimorphic innate immune responses without affecting pathogen colonization patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexually dimorphic innate immune responses have been observed in several species, but have not been studied in response to a live pathogen challenge in pigs. This study aimed to elucidate sexually dimorphic innate immune responses along with Salmonella translocation patterns in newly weaned pigs ora...

  20. Experimental Toxoplasma gondii infections in pigs: Humoral immune response, estimation of specific IgG avidity and the challenges of reproducing vertical transmission in sows.

    PubMed

    Basso, Walter; Grimm, Felix; Ruetten, Maja; Djokic, Vitomir; Blaga, Radu; Sidler, Xaver; Deplazes, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Ten pregnant sows were experimentally inoculated per os with T. gondii in order to investigate vertical and galactogenic transmission of the parasite and the evolution and maturation of the specific IgG humoral response in the sows and piglets. Five seronegative sows received 10(4)T. gondii (CZ isolate clone H3) sporulated oocysts during late-pregnancy (Exp. 1), three sows received 10(4) oocysts during mid-pregnancy (Exp. 2) and three sows from Exp. 1 (and two seronegative sows) were re-inoculated with 10(5) oocysts during a further pregnancy (late-pregnancy) (Exp. 3). Besides, six 4.5 week-old piglets inoculated per os with 5×10(3) oocysts were also included in the serological investigations. All animals seroconverted (PrioCHECK Toxoplasma Ab porcine ELISA, Prionics, Switzerland) by 2-3 weeks post inoculation (wpi) and remained seropositive for at least 38 weeks or until euthanasia. Four chronically infected sows from Exp. 1 and 2 were serologically monitored during a further pregnancy and no reactivation, but a decrease of the antibody levels was observed at farrowing (Exp. 4). In all experiments, the specific IgG-avidity was initially low, increased during the course of infection and after re-inoculations. An avidity index (AI) ≥40% could be used to rule out recent infections (<8 weeks) in most (15 of 16) animals. In some piglets (18.6% of 70) delivered by inoculated sows (Exp. 1 and 2), maternal antibodies were still detectable at 2 months (but not by 3 months) of age, with constant high avidity values, comparable to those of the dams at farrowing. In all experiments, the sows remained asymptomatic and delivered non-infected offspring at term. A total of 208 normal and 5 stillborn piglets delivered by the inoculated sows (Exp. 1-4) tested serologically negative before colostrum uptake. Placentas (n=88) from all sows and tissues (brain, liver, lung, heart, and masseter muscle) from 56 delivered piglets were analysed histopathologically and by real-time PCR

  1. Experimental infection of slaughter pigs with classical swine fever virus: transmission of the virus, course of the disease and antibody response.

    PubMed

    Laevens, H; Koenen, F; Deluyker, H; de Kruif, A

    1999-08-28

    The spread of classical swine fever virus was investigated in an isolation unit containing four pens, each containing six slaughter pigs. One pig in the middle pen of three adjacent pens was inoculated intramuscularly and intranasally with the virus. The fourth pen was located in a separate compartment. The pens were visited in a strict order to study, first, the effect of indirect contact via contaminated clothing and footwear on the spread of the virus to adjacent pens and, secondly, the airborne transmission of the virus between compartments. The pigs were examined and blood samples were taken every other day for 62 days for virological and serological analyses. The virus was highly contagious for the five pigs that were in direct contact with the inoculated pig, but spread to the other pens only after all the pigs in the originally infected pen had become viraemic. The spread of the virus was promoted by contaminated clothing and footwear, but airborne transmission contributed considerably to the spread of the virus within the pighouse. The first clinical signs observed after the virus was introduced into a pen were decreased feed intake, increased mean rectal temperature and apathy. Neither the clinical course of the infection, nor the pattern of seroconversion observed over time, was affected by the differences in the intensity of contact with the virus between the pigs in the different pens.

  2. Mimotope peptides selected from phage display combinatorial library by serum antibodies of pigs experimentally infected with Taenia solium as leads to developing diagnostic antigens for human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Gazarian, Karlen; Rowlay, Merril; Gazarian, Tatiana; Vazquez Buchelli, Jorge Enrique; Hernández Gonzáles, Marisela

    2012-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by penetration of the tapeworm Taenia solium larvae into the central nervous system resulting in a diverse range of neurologic complications including epilepsy in endemic areas that globalization spreads worldwide. Sensitive and specific immunodiagnosis is needed for the early detection and elimination of the parasite, but the lack of standardized, readily obtainable antigens is a challenge. Here, we used the phage display for resolving the problem. The rationale of the strategy rests on the concept that the screening of combinatorial libraries with polyclonal serum to pathogens reveals families of peptides mimicking the pathogen most immunodominant epitopes indispensable for the successful diagnosis. The screening of a 7mer library with serum IgG of four pigs experimentally infected with parasite followed by computer aided segregation of the selected sequences resulted in the discovery of four clusters of homologous sequences of which one presented a family of ten mimotopes selected by three infected pig serum IgGs; the common motif sequence LSPF carried by the family was considered to be the core of an immunodominant epitope of the parasite critical for the binding with the antibody that selected the mimotopes. The immunoassay testing permitted to select a mimotope whose synthetic peptide free of the phage with the amino acid sequence Leu-Ser-Fen-Pro-Ser-Val-Val that distinguished well a panel of 21 cerebrospinal fluids of neurocysticercosis patients from the fluids of individuals with neurological complications of other etiology. This peptide is proposed as a lead for developing a novel molecularly defined diagnostic antigen(s) for the neurocysticercosis.

  3. Bakteriologisch-Serologische Untersuchungen an Experimentell mit S. Typhil Infizierten Meerschweinchen (Typhusbakterienausscheider) (Bacteriological and Seriological Investigations on Guinea Pigs, Experimentally Infected with S. Typhi (Bacterial Excretors),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Investigations were carried out on 151 guinea pigs previously infected with Salmonella typhi through the gallbladder. The animals were examined for...their excreting of Salmonella typhi as well as for their agglutination titers. Depending on the duration of the observation period excretion of... Salmonella typhi was demonstrated in the individual groups as long as 103, 114, 208, 302, 315, and 351 days following infection. In a great number of

  4. Detection of leptospiral antigen (L. interrogans serovar copenhageni serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae) by immunoelectron microscopy in the liver and kidney of experimentally infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    De Brito, T.; Prado, M. J.; Negreiros, V. A.; Nicastri, A. L.; Sakata, E. E.; Yasuda, P. H.; Santos, R. T.; Alves, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Guinea-pigs were experimentally infected with L. interrogans serovar copenhageni serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae and their liver and kidney were studied by immunoelectron microscopy using the post embedding indirect immunogold labelling technique. Primary antibody was a purified rabbit anti-serum produced against the same leptospiral strain used in the inoculum. Gold-labelled leptospiral antigen (LAg) was found close to cell membranes of hepatocytes, kidney tubular cells and endothelial cells of the interstitial capillaries of the kidney. Afterwards it was internalized by hepatic and tubular cells, and eventually found in lysosomes. Phagolysosomes of Kupffer cells were also found to contain remnants of degraded leptospires and gold-labelled LAg. Gold-labelled intact leptospires were detected at the enlarged intercellular spaces between hepatocytes at the areas of hepatic cell plate disarray, showing the potential for leptospiral migration during the septicaemic phase of the disease potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of the lesions. The affinity of leptospiral antigenic material for cell membranes suggests an initial interaction with cell surface proteins followed by its internalization and cell damage. The nature of antigenic material detected, however, remains undefined; it may be a toxin, an enzyme or any other factor/s involved in leptospiral virulence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:1419779

  5. Experimental aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jobert, J L; Savoye, C; Cariolet, R; Kobisch, M; Madec, F

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the possible role of aerosol in the transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an experiment including 18 specific pathogen-free (SPF), 10-week-old piglets, randomly distributed into 2 adjacent units, was carried out. In these facilities, air was forced through absolute filters to prevent any contact with infectious agents. During the first 6 d post inoculation, the 2 units were connected by a rectangular opening and the air circulation was forced by the ventilation system from unit A (inoculated pigs) to unit B (non-inoculated pigs). The A. pleuropneumoniae strain (biovar 1 serovar 9) was isolated in France from an outbreak of porcine pleuropneumonia. Two different infecting doses, 10(7) cfu/animal and 10(8) cfu/animal, were inoculated by intranasal route in 6 pigs of unit A. The infection spread quickly from the inoculated pigs to the non-inoculated pigs. Clinical signs were acute during the 4 d post inoculation: hyperthermia, respiratory distress and, sometimes, death (6 pigs of the unit A and 2 pigs of the unit B). All pigs seroconverted against A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 9 within 2 weeks. Lung lesions were severe: fibrinous pleurisy and lung hemorrhages in the acute stage, pleural adherences and focal pulmonary necrosis in the chronic stage. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was isolated from the tonsils and/or lungs in 16 animals. It could be also isolated from the air of the experimental unit. This study showed that A. pleuropneumoniae was readily transmitted through aerosol over a distance of at least 2.5 m. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10680652

  6. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Liao, Jinhu; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Xinjun; Wang, Jianye; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-08-30

    Cattle are the natural hosts of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), which causes mucosal disease, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections, and reproductive problems in cattle. However, BVDV can also infect goats, sheep, deer, and pigs. The prevalence of BVDV infection in pig herds has substantially increased in the last several years, causing increased economic losses to the global pig breeding industry. This article is a summary of BVDV infections in pigs, including a historical overview, clinical signs, pathology, source of infection, genetic characteristics, impacts of porcine BVDV infection for diagnosis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), differentiation of infection with CSFV and BVDV, and future prospects of porcine BVDV infection.

  7. Experimental aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Shamblin, J D; Wollen, S E; Pitt, L M; Sizemore, D R; Ogg, M M; Johnston, S C

    2015-01-01

    Eight guinea pigs were aerosolized with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) and developed lethal interstitial pneumonia that was distinct from lesions described in guinea pigs challenged subcutaneously, nonhuman primates challenged by the aerosol route, and natural infection in humans. Guinea pigs succumbed with significant pathologic changes primarily restricted to the lungs. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in many alveolar macrophages. Perivasculitis was noted within the lungs. These changes are unlike those of documented subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs and aerosolized filoviral infections in nonhuman primates and human cases. Similar to findings in subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs, there were only mild lesions in the liver and spleen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aerosol challenge of guinea pigs with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga). Before choosing this model for use in aerosolized ebolavirus studies, scientists and pathologists should be aware that aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

  8. Salmonella infection and immune response in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Finishing pigs infected with Salmonella pose significant food safety risks by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in finishing pigs, and the immunological alterations that occur in Salmonella-carrier pigs, by longitudinally com...

  9. Comparative efficacy of commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) vaccines in pigs experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2.

    PubMed

    Kim, D; Kim, C H; Han, K; Seo, H W; Oh, Y; Park, C; Kang, I; Chae, C

    2011-04-12

    The efficacies of two commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) vaccines were compared in conventional pigs immunized at different ages based on humoral response, pathological observation, and growth performance from birth to finishing (175 days of age) using a M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2 co-infection challenge model. One-week-old pigs (n=110) were randomly assigned to five groups: three vaccinated and challenged (VC), and one each of non-vaccinated and challenged (NVC) and negative control. A significant difference was found in the number of genomic copies of M. hyopneumoniae in nasal swabs and PCV2 in serum samples, the average daily weight gain (gram/pig/day) between 63 and 133 dpi, gross and histopathological lung lesion scores, histopathological lymph node lesion scores, and the immunohistochemical analysis of PCV2 among the three VC groups. The single dose schedule for M. hyopneumoniae bacterins and PCV2 vaccines have the advantages of (i) improving daily weight gain (122.4%) and slaughter weight (120.5%), and (ii) reducing the incidence of clinical signs and lung and lymph node lesions.

  10. In vivo therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of colistin sulfate in an experimental model of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Thériault, William; Bergeron, Nadia; Beauchamp, Guy; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Fairbrother, John Morris; Letellier, Ann

    2016-05-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC: F4) associated with post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs has developed resistance against several antimicrobial families, leading to increased use of colistin sulfate (CS) for the treatment of this disease. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral CS treatment in experimental PWD due to ETEC: F4 challenge and determine the effect of this challenge on CS intestinal absorption. In this study, 96 pigs were divided into two trials based on CS dose (100 000 or 50 000 IU/kg). Fecal shedding of ETEC: F4, total E. coli, and CS-resistant E. coli, diarrhea scores, and weight changes were evaluated. Colistin sulfate plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. Regardless of the dose, CS treatment resulted in a reduction of fecal ETEC: F4 and total E. coli shedding, and in diarrhea scores but only during the treatment period. However, CS treatment resulted in a slight increase in fecal shedding of CS resistant E. coli and did not prevent weight loss in challenged pigs. In addition, challenge with ETEC: F4 resulted in an increase of CS intestinal absorption. Our study is among the first to demonstrate that under controlled conditions, CS was effective in reducing fecal shedding of ETEC: F4 and total E. coli in experimental PWD. However, CS treatment was associated with a slight selection pressure on E. coli and did not prevent pig weight loss. Further studies are needed in field conditions, to better characterize CS therapeutic regimen efficacy and bacterial resistance dissemination.

  11. Control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D; Segales, J; Meyns, T; Sibila, M; Pieters, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2008-01-25

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. The organism adheres to and damages the ciliated epithelium of the respiratory tract. Affected pigs show chronic coughing, are more susceptible to other respiratory infections and have a reduced performance. Control of the disease can be accomplished in a number of ways. First, management practices and housing conditions in the herd should be optimized. These include all-in/all-out production, limiting factors that may destabilize herd immunity, maintaining optimal stocking densities, prevention of other respiratory diseases, and optimal housing and climatic conditions. Strategic medication with antimicrobials active against M. hyopneumoniae and, preferably, also against major secondary bacteria may be useful during periods when the pigs are at risk for respiratory disease. Finally, commercial bacterins are widely used to control M. hyopneumoniae infections. The main effects of vaccination include less clinical symptoms, lung lesions and medication use, and improved performance. However, bacterins provide only partial protection and do not prevent colonization of the organism. Different vaccination strategies (timing of vaccination, vaccination of sows, vaccination combined with antimicrobial medication) can be used, depending on the type of herd, the production system and management practices, the infection pattern and the preferences of the pig producer. Research on new vaccines is actively occurring, including aerosol and feed-based vaccines as well as subunit and DNA vaccines. Eradication of the infection at herd level based on age-segregation and medication is possible, but there is a permanent risk for re-infections.

  12. Experimental and field studies with thiophanate in pigs.

    PubMed

    Baines, D M; Dalton, S E; Eichler, D A

    1976-08-14

    Thiophanate, administered at a dosage of 50 mg per kg to artifically infected pigs, removed 96 to 99 per cent of adult Oesophagostomum spp, Hyostrongylus rubidus and Trichuris suis. Activity was also high against larval stages of these nematodes, except for 26-day-old T suis. Thiophanate also showed ovicidal and larvicidal activity against H rubidus and Oesophagostomum spp. At 50 mg per kg thiophanate administered alone was inactive against Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus apri, the former species also being refractory at 200 mg per kg. Field trials confirmed these efficacy results in naturally infected animals. Pellet formulations providing mean dosages of 63 mg thiophanate per kg for adult pigs and 75 mg thiophanate per kg with 83 mg piperazine base per kg for growing pigs were highly effective in reducing the faecal output of Oesophagostomum spp, H rubidus and T suis eggs. In growing pigs, A suum was controlled by the thiophanate/piperazine product. No palatability or tolerance problems were observed when thiophanate or thiophanate/piperazine mixtures were administered at recommended dosage or multiples thereof in experimental or field studies.

  13. The influence of diet on Lawsonia intracellularis colonization in pigs upon experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Henriette T; Jensen, Tim K; Schmidt, Anja S; Jensen, Bent B; Jensen, Søren M; Møller, Kristian

    2004-10-05

    The objective of this investigation was to study if different feeding strategies influence experimental infections of pigs with Lawsonia intracellularis, the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. In three sequential trials, a total of 144 weaned pigs were fed five different diets all made from a standard diet based on wheat and barley as carbohydrate source and soybean as protein source. The five diets were: a standard diet (fine ground and pelleted), the standard diet fed as fermented liquid feed, the standard diet added 1.8% formic acid, the standard diet added 2.4% lactic acid and a diet similar to the standard diet (made from the same ingredients), but fed coarse ground. Twenty-four pigs on each diet were orally inoculated with L. intracellularis and growth performance and faecal excretion of bacteria were monitored. Twenty-four pigs fed the standard diet were included as not experimentally infected controls. Pigs in the first two trials were sacrificed 4 weeks post-inoculation, whereas animals in the third trial were sacrificed after 5 weeks. Pigs in all experimentally infected groups excreted L. intracellularis. The fermented liquid diet delayed the excretion of L. intracellularis and furthermore, pigs fed the standard diet supplemented with lactic acid had limited pathological lesions when the intestines were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The growth performance was reduced in pigs experimentally challenged with L. intracellularis, however the prevalence and severity of diarrhea was limited.

  14. Influenza virus infection in guinea pigs raised as livestock, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Grado, Victor H; Mubareka, Samira; Krammer, Florian; Cárdenas, Washington B; Palese, Peter

    2012-07-01

    To determine whether guinea pigs are infected with influenza virus in nature, we conducted a serologic study in domestic guinea pigs in Ecuador. Detection of antibodies against influenza A and B raises the question about the role of guinea pigs in the ecology and epidemiology of influenza virus in the region.

  15. Ascariasis in Japan: is pig-derived Ascaris infecting humans?

    PubMed

    Arizono, Naoki; Yoshimura, Yuta; Tohzaka, Naoki; Yamada, Minoru; Tegoshi, Tatsuya; Onishi, Kotaro; Uchikawa, Ryuichi

    2010-11-01

    Human ascariasis is caused by infection with the common roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides, although the pig roundworm Ascaris suum has also been reported to infect humans and develop into the adult stage. To elucidate whether pig-derived Ascaris infects humans in Japan, 9 Ascaris isolates obtained from Japanese patients and a further 9 Ascaris isolates of pig origin were analyzed to determine their internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences. Six of the 9 clinical isolates showed the Ascaris genotype which predominantly infects humans in endemic countries, while the other 3 clinical isolates and 9 pig-derived isolates showed the genotype predominant in pigs worldwide. These results suggest that at least some cases of human ascariasis in Japan are a result of infection with pig-derived Ascaris.

  16. Taenia solium oncosphere antigens induce immunity in pigs against experimental cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H; Gonzales, Armando; Garcia, Hector Hugo; Gavidia, Cesar; Falcon, Nestor; Bernal, Teresa; Arana, Yanina; Tsang, Victor C W

    2002-08-30

    Immunity to Taenia solium infection was investigated using an experimental intramuscular oncosphere infection assay (IMOA) model in pigs. Three naturally infected pigs with cysticercosis were treated with oxfendazole (OFZ), a drug demonstrated to kill cysts in porcine muscle. These animals were then challenged with oncospheres but did not develop any cysts while three uninfected pigs that were similarly challenged, did develop intramuscular cysts. In another study, two groups of three pigs each were immunized with crude T. solium oncosphere and metacestode antigens, respectively, and tested with the IMOA. Immunization with crude oncosphere antigens (OAs) induced 100% protection, while metacestode antigens provided only partial protection. Immunoblots showed that pigs with complete immune protection to oncosphere intramuscular challenge had antibodies to two OAs at 31.3 and 22.5 kDa, respectively. Antibody to these two antigens was absent in pigs immunized with metacestodes or in uninfected control pigs. This study demonstrated the presence of two antigens that are unique to the oncosphere. Although, antibody to these two antigens is consistently present in pigs that are protected from an oncosphere intramuscular challenge their role in preventing infection by T. solium larval cysts is still hypothetical.

  17. Clinical and haematological characterisation of Mycoplasma suis infections in splenectomised and non-splenectomised pigs.

    PubMed

    Stadler, J; Jannasch, C; Mack, S L; Dietz, S; Zöls, S; Ritzmann, M; Hoelzle, K; Hoelzle, L E

    2014-08-06

    Mycoplasma suis causes infectious anaemia in pigs (IAP), which can manifest in various degrees of severity depending on the virulence and the host's susceptibility. As M. suis cannot be cultured in vitro experimental infections of splenectomised animals play an essential role for pathogenesis research. The aim of the present study was to characterise the course of experimental infection using the highly virulent and red blood cell (RBC-) invasive M. suis strain KI3806, to compare the experimental course in splenectomised and non-splenectomised pigs and to correlate clinical and haematological parameters with M. suis blood loads. All infected splenectomised pigs (n=7) were PCR-positive 2 days post infection (DPI) with maximum mean bacterial loads of 1.61 × 10(10)M. suis/mL on 8 DPI. They developed severe anaemia and massive hypoglycaemia by 8 DPI and had to be euthanised preterm (until 8 DPI) without seroconversion. The non-splenectomised pigs (n=7) became PCR-positive within 23 DPI and reached a maximum mean M. suis load of 1.64 × 10(5)M. suis/mL on 8 DPI. They developed mild anaemia, massive skin alterations with petechiae and haemorrhagic diathesis and seroconverted within 35 DPI. The study demonstrated that experimental infection of splenectomised pigs with the highly virulent M. suis strain KI3806 induces a fulminant course of infection. In contrast, M. suis strain KI3806 induces a mild course of disease in non-splenectomised pigs, which resembles the situation in naturally infected pigs. Therefore, these infection models are valuable for future pathogenesis studies on acute and chronic M. suis infections.

  18. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Infections Associated with Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrea; Levine, Seth J.; Garvin, Joseph P.; Brown, Susan; Turner, Lauren; Fritzinger, Angela; Gertz, Robert E.; Murphy, Julia M.; Vogt, Marshall; Beall, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is a known zoonotic pathogen. In this public health investigation conducted in Virginia, USA, in 2013, we identified a probable family cluster of S. zooepidemicus cases linked epidemiologically and genetically to infected guinea pigs. S. zooepidemicus infections should be considered in patients who have severe clinical illness and report guinea pig exposure. PMID:25531424

  19. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  20. Severe seizures in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Chiara; Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Forkman, Björn; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-04-15

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) caused by Taenia solium is a serious neurological disease. In humans neurological symptoms have been thoroughly studied and documented, however, there is limited information on clinical signs in pigs infected with T. solium cysticerci. Among the scientific community, it is in fact believed that pigs with NCC rarely show neurological signs. The aim of this study was to describe clinical manifestations associated with NCC in pigs and correlate the manifestations to the number and distribution of cysticerci in brains of naturally infected pigs in Tanzania. Sixteen infected and 15 non-infected control pigs were observed for 14 days during daylight hours, and subsequently videotaped for another 14 consecutive days using close circuit television cameras. All occurrences of abnormal behaviour (trembling, twitching, mouth and ear paralysis, ataxia, dribbling, salivating, eye blinking, walking in circles) were recorded. At the end of the recording period, pigs were slaughtered and their brains dissected, cysticerci counted and locations noted. During the recording period, two infected pigs were observed having seizures. Some of the observed autonomic signs during a seizure were chewing motions with foamy salivation and ear stiffening. Motor signs included tonic muscle contractions followed by a sudden diminution in all muscle function leading to collapse of the animal. Stereotypic walking in circles was observed on several occasions. At dissection, both pigs had a high number of brain cysticerci (241 and 247 cysticerci). The two pigs with seizures were also older (36 months) compared to the others (18.3 months, ± 8.2 standard deviation). Results of this study have shown that pigs with NCC can develop clinical signs and suffer from seizures like humans with symptomatic NCC. Results of this study could potentially open up a new experimental pathway to explore the aetiology of neurological symptoms in humans with NCC associated epilepsy.

  1. Severe seizures in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Chiara; Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Forkman, Björn; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) caused by Taenia solium is a serious neurological disease. In humans neurological symptoms have been thoroughly studied and documented, however, there is limited information on clinical signs in pigs infected with T. solium cysticerci. Among the scientific community, it is in fact believed that pigs with NCC rarely show neurological signs. The aim of this study was to describe clinical manifestations associated with NCC in pigs and correlate the manifestations to the number and distribution of cysticerci in brains of naturally infected pigs in Tanzania. Sixteen infected and 15 non-infected control pigs were observed for 14 days during daylight hours, and subsequently videotaped for another 14 consecutive days using close circuit television cameras. All occurrences of abnormal behaviour (trembling, twitching, mouth and ear paralysis, ataxia, dribbling, salivating, eye blinking, walking in circles) were recorded. At the end of the recording period, pigs were slaughtered and their brains dissected, cysticerci counted and locations noted. During the recording period, two infected pigs were observed having seizures. Some of the observed autonomic signs during a seizure were chewing motions with foamy salivation and ear stiffening. Motor signs included tonic muscle contractions followed by a sudden diminution in all muscle function leading to collapse of the animal. Stereotypic walking in circles was observed on several occasions. At dissection, both pigs had a high number of brain cysticerci (241 and 247 cysticerci). The two pigs with seizures were also older (36 months) compared to the others (18.3 months, ± 8.2 standard deviation). Results of this study have shown that pigs with NCC can develop clinical signs and suffer from seizures like humans with symptomatic NCC. Results of this study could potentially open up a new experimental pathway to explore the aetiology of neurological symptoms in humans with NCC associated epilepsy. PMID:26995723

  2. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  3. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-04-26

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 10(4) genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization.

  4. [Effect of the Stellamune Mycoplasma vaccine on growth, energy conversion, death, and medication use in fattening pigs on a pig farm chronically infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Bouwkamp, F T; Elbers, A R; Hunneman, W A; Klaassen, C H

    2000-07-15

    The effect of Stellamune Mycoplasma vaccine, administered to piglets aged 2-15 days and then 13-15 days later, on daily weight gain, energy conversion, and use of medication was examined in fattening pigs on a chronically Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infected pig farm. Half of the piglets were vaccinated and the other half acted as controls. In the study design, half of the pens in the fattening unit were allocated to vaccinated pigs; the other half to non-vaccinated pigs, pen was the experimental unit. In the fattening pens sows and castrated boars were separated. The study consisted of a total of 37 pens with vaccinated, and 37 pens with non-vaccinated pigs in 12 different compartments within the pig herd. In the finishing period, mean growth performance and mean energy conversion (EV/kg) of vaccinated animals was 65 grams/day higher and 0.07 EV/kg lower than in control pigs. Furthermore, the incidence of individual curative medication against respiratory problems was more than 4 times higher in control pigs than in vaccinated pigs. There was a tendency for a higher number of group medications against respiratory problems in control pigs than in vaccinated pigs. It is concluded that, in this herd, vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae was successful from an economic point of view.

  5. Infectivity and Transmissibility of Avian H9N2 Influenza Viruses in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Maocai; Hong, Wenshan; Fan, Xiaohui; Chen, Rirong; Zheng, Zuoyi; Zeng, Yu; Huang, Ren; Zhang, Yu; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Smith, David K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The H9N2 influenza viruses that are enzootic in terrestrial poultry in China pose a persistent pandemic threat to humans. To investigate whether the continuous circulation and adaptation of these viruses in terrestrial poultry increased their infectivity to pigs, we conducted a serological survey in pig herds with H9N2 viruses selected from the aquatic avian gene pool (Y439 lineage) and the enzootic terrestrial poultry viruses (G1 and Y280 lineages). We also compared the infectivity and transmissibility of these viruses in pigs. It was found that more than 15% of the pigs sampled from 2010 to 2012 in southern China were seropositive to either G1 or Y280 lineage viruses, but none of the sera were positive to the H9 viruses from the Y439 lineage. Viruses of the G1 and Y280 lineages were able to infect experimental pigs, with detectable nasal shedding of the viruses and seroconversion, whereas viruses of the Y439 lineage did not cause a productive infection in pigs. Thus, adaptation and prevalence in terrestrial poultry could lead to interspecies transmission of H9N2 viruses from birds to pigs. Although H9N2 viruses do not appear to be continuously transmissible among pigs, repeated introductions of H9 viruses to pigs naturally increase the risk of generating mammalian-adapted or reassorted variants that are potentially infectious to humans. This study highlights the importance of monitoring the activity of H9N2 viruses in terrestrial poultry and pigs. IMPORTANCE H9N2 subtype of influenza viruses has repeatedly been introduced into mammalian hosts, including humans and pigs, so awareness of their activity and evolution is important for influenza pandemic preparedness. However, since H9N2 viruses usually cause mild or even asymptomatic infections in mammalian hosts, they may be overlooked in influenza surveillance. Here, we found that the H9N2 viruses established in terrestrial poultry had higher infectivity in pigs than those from aquatic birds, which

  6. Emerging Trichinella britovi infections in free ranging pigs of Greece.

    PubMed

    Boutsini, S; Papatsiros, V G; Stougiou, D; Marucci, G; Liandris, E; Athanasiou, L V; Papadoudis, A; Karagiozopoulos, E; Bisias, A; Pozio, E

    2014-01-31

    Trichinella infections in humans and pigs have been documented in Greece since 1945 and a high prevalence of infection in pigs occurred in the 1950s. Up to 1984 only sporadic infections in humans were documented, and this zoonosis was not considered as a public health problem until 2009 when a human outbreak caused by the consumption of pork from an organic pig farm occurred. In the present study, we describe the re-emergence of Trichinella spp. infections in free-ranging pigs from organic farms of 3 counties (Dramas, Evros and Kavala) in Northern-Eastern Greece during the period 2009-2012. Totally 37 out of 12,717 (0.29%) free-ranging pigs which were tested during the period in question, were positive for Trichinella spp. larvae. The etiological agent was identified as Trichinella britovi. The average larval burden was 13.7 in the masseter, 6.2 in the foreleg muscles and 7.5 in the diaphragm. The 37 positive animals originated from seven free range pig farms. The practice of organic pig production systems in Greece has grown in popularity over the last years due to the increasing interest of consumers for products considered as traditional. However, this type of pig production increases the risk for Trichinella spp. infections, since animals can acquire the infection by feeding on carcasses or the offal of hunted or dead wild animals. The awareness and education of hunters and farmers is extremely important to reduce the transmission among free ranging pigs and the risk for humans.

  7. Pathogenesis of Lassa Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    virus , an arenavirus distantly related to Lassa Lassa fever ...other arenaviruses in animal models (5. 6). In VOL. 37, 1982 LASSA VIRUS INFECTION IN GUINEA PIGS 777S[ iU FIG. 6. (A) Lassa viral antigens in...resem- ent with the hemoconcentration associated with bles human and primate Lassa virus infection other human hemorrhagic fever virus infections. than

  8. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection.

  9. [Immunosuppression in dogs and pigs infected with canine distemper virus].

    PubMed

    Sereda, A D; Nogina, I V

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppression manifesting itself as leukopenia and a considerably lower lymphocyte proliferative response to T- and B-cell mitogens develops in pigs and dogs within 2-3 weeks after intramuscular or oral infection with canine distemper virus (CDV). CDV antigens are detectable in the oral secretions of the animals within 2-2.5 week after infection.

  10. Salmonella infection in a remote, isolated wild pig population.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael P; Cowled, Brendan D; Galea, Francesca; Garner, M Graeme; Laffan, Shawn W; Marsh, Ian; Negus, Katherine; Sarre, Stephen D; Woolnough, Andrew P

    2013-03-23

    Although wild pig populations are known to sometimes be infected by Salmonella, the situation in Australia has received little attention and few population-based, planned studies have been conducted. Understanding the distribution of Salmonella infections within wild pig populations allows the potential hazard posed to co-grazing livestock to be assessed. We sampled a remote and isolated wild pig population in northwestern Australia. Faecal and mesenteric lymph node samples were collected from 651 wild pigs at 93 locations and cultured for Salmonella. The population sampled was typical of wild pig populations in tropical areas of Australia, and sampling occurred approximately halfway through the population's breeding season (38% of the 229 adult females were pregnant and 35% were lactating). Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella infection based on culture of 546 freshly collected faecal samples was 36.3% (95% CI 32.1-40.7%), and based on culture of mesenteric lymph nodes was 11.9% (95% CI, 9.4-15.0%). A total of 39 serovars (139 isolates) were identified--29 in faecal samples and 24 in lymph node samples--however neither Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium nor Salmonella Cholerasuis were isolated. There was a significant (p<0.0001) disagreement between faecal and lymph node samples with respect to Salmonella isolation, with isolation more likely from faecal samples. Prevalence differed between age classes, with piglets being less likely to be faecal-positive but more likely to be lymph node positive than adults. The distribution of faecal-positive pigs was spatially structured, with spatial clusters being identified. Study results suggest that this population of wild pigs is highly endemic for Salmonella, and that Salmonella is transmitted from older to younger pigs, perhaps associated with landscape features such as water features. This might have implications for infection of co-grazing livestock within this environment.

  11. Chronically infected wild boar can transmit genotype 3 hepatitis E virus to domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Josephine; Vina-Rodriguez, Ariel; Fast, Christine; Groschup, Martin H; Eiden, Martin

    2015-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute hepatitis E in humans in developing countries, but sporadic and autochthonous cases do also occur in industrialized nations. In Europe, food-borne zoonotic transmission of genotype 3 (gt3) has been associated with the consumption of raw and undercooked products from domestic pig and wild boar. As shown recently, naturally acquired HEV gt3 replicates efficiently in experimentally infected wild boar and is transmissible from a wild boar to domestic pigs. Generally, following an acute infection swine suffer from a transient febrile illness and viremia in connection with fecal virus shedding. However, little is known about sub-acute or chronic HEV infections in swine, and how and where HEV survives the immune response. In this paper, we describe the incidental finding of a chronic HEVgt3 infection in two naturally infected European wild boar which were raised and housed at FLI over years. The wild boar displayed fecal HEV RNA excretion and viremia over nearly the whole observation period of more than five months. The animal had mounted a substantial antibody response, yet without initial clearance of the virus by the immune system. Further analysis indicated a subclinical course of HEV with no evidence of chronic hepatitis. Additionally, we could demonstrate that this chronic wild boar infection was still transmissible to domestic pigs, which were housed together with this animal. Sentinel pigs developed fecal virus shedding accompanied by seroconversion. Wild boar should therefore be considered as an important reservoir for transmission of HEV gt3 in Europe.

  12. Does meatiness of pigs depend on the level of gastro-intestinal parasites infection?

    PubMed

    Knecht, Damian; Popiołek, Marcin; Zaleśny, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present paper was to determine an influence of the presence and a level of intestine parasites infection on the quality of pork carcass expressed by the content of meat in carcass (meatiness) in pigs. The experimental part of the study was conducted on pigs farm produced in a closed cycle. The population in the study included 120 fattening pigs maintained in two keeping systems: group I--60 individuals kept on slatted floor, and group II--60 individuals kept on deep litter. All the experimental animals were treated in the same manner. The analysed fatteners were slaughtered in Meat Processing Plant when their body mass reached 110 kg, and the post-slaughter assessment was conducted according to the EUROP classification of pigs carcass using the Ultra-Fom 300 device. The study concerning the internal parasites were conducted basing on coproscopic quantitative McMaster method. As a results, the eggs of three nematode taxa were isolated and identified: Oesophagostomum spp., Ascaris suum and Strongyloides ransomi. Overall prevalence of infection of fatteners kept on litter was lower (25%±11.2) as compared to those kept on slatted floor (38.3%±12.6), however the differences were not statistically significant (χ(2)=2.465; df=1; P=0.116). The mean value of meatiness for pigs free from parasites was 53.68, while in the case of infected pigs the meatiness was statistically lower and was 52.12 (t=2.35; P=0.02). The analysed pigs were classified into three categories and conducted analysis of an influence of parasites on meatiness demonstrate the relationship that is statistically significant. The analysis of correlation between meatiness and an average number of helminth eggs also demonstrated the negative, statistically significant, relationship (F=5.52; P=0.020), i.e. in fatteners with higher EPG value the meatiness was lower.

  13. Parasite population dynamics in pigs infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi Huus; Andreasen, Annette; Kringel, Helene; Roepstorff, Allan; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2014-01-17

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the population dynamics and potential interactions between Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum in experimentally co-infected pigs, by quantification of parasite parameters such as egg excretion, worm recovery and worm location. Forty-eight helminth naïve pigs were allocated into four groups. Group O was inoculated with 20 O. dentatum L3/kg/day and Group T with 10 T. suis eggs/kg/day. Group OT was inoculated with both 20 O. dentatum L3/kg/day and 10 T. suis eggs/kg/day, while Group C was kept as an uninfected control group. All inoculations were trickle infections administered twice weekly and were continued until slaughter. Faecal samples were collected from the rectum of all pigs at day 0, and twice weekly from 2 to 9 weeks post first infection (wpi). Six pigs from each group were necropsied 5 wpi and the remaining 6 pigs from each group were necropsied 10 wpi. The faecal egg counts (FEC) and total worm burdens of O. dentatum were dramatically influenced by the presence of T. suis, with significantly lower mean FECs and worm burdens at 5 and 10 wpi compared to single infected pigs. Furthermore, in the presence of T. suis we found that O. dentatum was located more posteriorly in the gut. The changes in the Trichuris population were less prominent, but faecal egg counts, worm counts 5 wpi (57% recovered vs. 39%) and the proportion of infected animals at 10 wpi were higher in Group OT compared to Group T. The location of T. suis was unaffected by the presence of O. dentatum. These results indicate an antagonistic interaction between T. suis and O. dentatum which is dominated by T. suis.

  14. Porcine rubulavirus LPMV RNA persists in the central nervous system of pigs after recovery from acute infection.

    PubMed

    Wiman, A C; Hjertner, B; Linné, T; Herron, B; Allan, G; McNeilly, F; Adair, B; Moreno-López, J; Berg, M

    1998-10-01

    In order to study persistence of the porcine rubulavirus LPMV, we examined tissue samples collected from pigs 53 days after experimental infection. These pigs survived the initial infection and could clinically be considered to have recovered from the infection. Two of the pigs used in this study were chemically immunosuppressed during the last 4 days before necropsy. No infectious virus or viral antigen could be detected in any tissue using standard methods for virus isolation and detection. However, the presence of viral genomic RNA and mRNA could be demonstrated in the mid brain of the convalescent pig using an optimised RT-nested PCR. Mid brain, forebrain and lung were all shown to contain LPMV RNA in the immunosuppressed convalescent pigs. In addition we examined the P-gene editing in the recovered pigs and conclude that the viral genome is transcriptionally active in these pigs. The relevance of the persistence of LPMV for maintenance and spread within and/or between pig populations is discussed.

  15. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic pigs in Durango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known concerning the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pigs in Mexico. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 1,077 domestic pigs in Durango, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Two groups (A, B) of pigs were sampled: Group A pigs (n=555) were raised in 3 geo...

  16. Impact of test sensitivity and specificity on pig producer incentives to control Mycobacterium avium infections in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    van Wagenberg, Coen P A; Backus, Gé B C; Wisselink, Henk J; van der Vorst, Jack G A J; Urlings, Bert A P

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we analyze the impact of the sensitivity and specificity of a Mycobacterium avium (Ma) test on pig producer incentives to control Ma in finishing pigs. A possible Ma control system which includes a serodiagnostic test and a penalty on finishing pigs in herds detected with Ma infection was modelled. Using a dynamic optimization model and a grid search of deliveries of herds from pig producers to slaughterhouse, optimal control measures for pig producers and optimal penalty values for deliveries with increased Ma risk were identified for different sensitivity and specificity values. Results showed that higher sensitivity and lower specificity induced use of more intense control measures and resulted in higher pig producer costs and lower Ma seroprevalence. The minimal penalty value needed to comply with a threshold for Ma seroprevalence in finishing pigs at slaughter was lower at higher sensitivity and lower specificity. With imperfect specificity a larger sample size decreased pig producer incentives to control Ma seroprevalence, because the higher number of false positives resulted in an increased probability of rejecting a batch of finishing pigs irrespective of whether the pig producer applied control measures. We conclude that test sensitivity and specificity must be considered in incentive system design to induce pig producers to control Ma in finishing pigs with minimum negative effects.

  17. Quantification of classical swine fever virus in aerosols originating from pigs infected with strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2009-03-30

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), the route of virus introduction into a farm is often unclear. One of the suggested routes is via the air. Under experimental conditions, airborne transmission over a short distance seems possible, but analysis of outbreak data is still inconclusive. For a better understanding of the role of airborne transmission, quantitative information is needed on concentrations of virus emitted by infected pigs. This was studied in four groups of 10 pigs in which three pigs were inoculated with either a low virulent strain (Zoelen), a low or high dose of a moderately virulent strain (Paderborn), or a highly virulent strain (Brescia). The other seven pigs in each group served as contact pigs. At several moments after infection, air samples were obtained using gelatine filters. Infectious virus and viral RNA were detected in the air of rooms housing the pigs infected with the moderately and highly virulent strains with titres of 10(1.2) to 10(3.0)TCID(50)/m(3) of infectious virus, and 10(1.6) to 10(3.8)TCID(50)equiv./m(3) of viral RNA. It was observed that the higher the dose or virulence of the virus strain used for inoculation of the pigs, the sooner virus could be detected in the air samples. This is the first study describing the quantification of (infectious) CSFV in air samples of rooms housing infected pigs, enabling to quantify the contribution of individual infected pigs to virus concentrations in aerosols. This can be used as input for quantitative models of airborne spread over large distances.

  18. Cytokine Expression in the Tracheobronchial Lymph Nodes of Pigs Infected with Pseudorabies Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus that produces fatal encephalitis in newborn pigs, respiratory disorders in fattening pigs and reproductive failure in sows. Infection of the respiratory tract by PRV, involves mononuclear cells in draining tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN)...

  19. Experimental infection of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, using experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Piranda, Eliane M; Faccini, João Luiz H; Pinter, Adriano; Pacheco, Richard C; Cançado, Paulo H D; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated if Rickettsia rickettsii-experimentally infected dogs could serve as amplifier hosts for hipicephalus sanguineus ticks. In addition, we checked if Rh. sanguineus ticks that acquired Ri. rickettsii from dogs could transmit the bacterium to susceptible hosts (vector competence), and if these ticks could maintain the bacterium by transstadial and transovarial transmissions. Uninfected larvae, nymphs, and adults of Rh. sanguineus were allowed to feed upon three groups of dogs: groups 1 (G1) and 2 (G2) composed of Ri. rickettsii-infected dogs, infected intraperitoneally and via tick bites, respectively, and group 3 composed of uninfected dogs. After larval and nymphal feeding on rickettsemic dogs, 7.1-15.2% and 35.8-37.9% of the molted nymphs and adults, respectively, were shown by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to be infected by Ri. rickettsii, confirming that both G1 and G2 dogs were efficient sources of rickettsial infection (amplifier host), resulting in transstadial transmission of the agent. These infected nymphs and adults successfully transmitted Ri. rickettsii to guinea pigs, confirming vector competence after acquisition of the infection from rickettsemic dogs. Transovarial transmission of Ri. rickettsii was observed in engorged females that had been infected as nymphs by feeding on both G1 and G2 dogs, but not in engorged females that acquired the infection during adult feeding on these same dogs. In the first case, filial infection rates were generally <50%. No tick exposed to G3 dogs was infected by rickettsiae in this study. No substantial mortality difference was observed between Ri. rickettsii-infected tick groups (G1 and G2) and uninfected tick group (G3). Our results indicate that dogs can be amplifier hosts of Ri. rickettsii for Rh. sanguineus, although only a minority of immature ticks (<45%) should become infected. It appears that Rh. sanguineus, in the absence of horizontal transmission, would not maintain Ri. rickettsii through

  20. Influenza infection in humans and pigs in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; He, S; Zhang, T; Zou, W; Shu, L; Sharp, G B; Webster, R G

    1996-01-01

    The three last pandemic strains of influenza A virus-Asian/57, Hong Kong/68 and Russian/77-are believed to have originated in China. The strains responsible for the 1957 and 1968 human pandemics were reassortants incorporating both human and avian influenza viruses, which may have arisen in pigs. We therefore undertook a population-based study in the Nanchang region of Central China to establish the prevalence, types and seasonal pattern of human influenza infection and to screen serum samples from animals and humans for evidence of interspecies transmission of influenza viruses. Two definite influenza seasons were demonstrated, one extending from November to March and the other July to September. The profile of antibodies to commonly circulating human influenza viruses was no different in Nanchang and neighboring rural communities than in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. In particular, Chinese women who raised pigs in their homes were no more likely to have been exposed to influenza virus than were subjects who seldom or never had contact with pigs. However, we did obtain evidence using isolated H7 protein in an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for infection of pig farmers by an avian H7 influenza virus suggesting that influenza. A viruses may have been transmitted directly from ducks to humans. The results of the serological survey also indicated that pigs in or near Nanchang were infected by human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza viruses, but not with typical swine viruses. We found no serological evidence for H2 influenza viruses in humans after 1968.

  1. Cytokine gene expression in skin of susceptible guinea-pig infected with Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, V; Scarozza, A M; Ramsingh, A I; Wicher, K

    1998-01-01

    Using a semi-quantitative multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay, we examined cytokine mRNA expression for interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in skin samples obtained from C4-deficient (C4D) guinea-pigs inoculated intradermally with virulent Treponema pallidum (VTP). Controls included unmanipulated animals, guinea-pigs injected with T. pallidum-free rabbit inflammatory testicular fluid (ITF) alone, or mixed with heat-killed organisms (HKTP). The expression of IL-1alpha, IL-12p40, and TNF-alpha mRNA [T helper type 1 (Th1)] remained within the normal range in both infected and control animals throughout the experimental period. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) in IL-10 mRNA (Th2) was found exclusively in the VTP-inoculated animals from 3 to 30 days post-infection. Another unique characteristic of the inflammatory response in infected guinea-pigs was the appearance, between 11 and 30 days post-inoculation, of a substantial number of eosinophils in addition to infiltrating mononuclear cells. The results showed a local Th2 response which is consistent with an inadequate immune response. This is reflected by the lengthy and incomplete clearance of the pathogen from the local site of entry and the chronic infection of distant organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9824482

  2. Experimental Aujeszky's disease in pigs: excretion, survival and transmission of the virus.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, A I; Wardley, R C; Martin, S; Ferris, N P

    1983-11-19

    Airborne Aujeszky's disease virus was recovered from looseboxes containing groups of pigs infected with virus strains from England, Northern Ireland and Denmark from days 1 to 7 after infection. Pigs sampled individually excreted most airborne virus on days 2 and 3 after infection. On a 24 hour basis the maximum amount of airborne virus excreted per pig was log10 5.3 TCID50. Subclinical infection was transmitted from a clinically affected group of pigs to a seronegative group held in separate looseboxes when air was drawn through ducting connecting one box with the other. Tissues taken from pigs killed at varying times after infection showed that the main sites of virus replication were in the head and neck region. Aujeszky's disease virus was detected for up to 40 days in a range of tissues taken from pigs at the acute stage of disease and stored at -20 degrees C.

  3. Pathogenesis of highly virulent African swine fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Howey, Erin B; O'Donnell, Vivian; de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Borca, Manuel V; Arzt, Jonathan

    2013-12-26

    To investigate the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV), domestic pigs (n=18) were challenged with a range (10(2)-10(6) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50)) of the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain by inoculation via the intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), or intramuscular (IM) routes. A subsequent contact challenge experiment was performed in which six IOP-inoculated donor pigs were allowed to have direct contact (DC) with six naïve pigs for exposure times that varied from 24 to 72 h. All challenge routes resulted in clinical progression and postmortem lesions similar to those previously described in experimental and natural infection. The onset of clinical signs occurred between 1 and 7 days post inoculation (dpi) and included pyrexia with variable progression to obtundation, hematochezia, melena, moribundity and death with a duration of 4-11 days. Viremia was first detected between 4 and 5 dpi in all inoculation groups whereas ASFV shedding from the nasal cavity and tonsil was first detected at 3-9 dpi. IM and DC were the most consistent modes of infection, with 12/12 (100%) of pigs challenged by these routes becoming infected. Several clinical and virological parameters were significantly different between IM and DC groups indicating dissimilarity between these modes of infection. Amongst the simulated natural routes, INP inoculation resulted in the most consistent progression of disease across the widest range of doses whilst preserving simulation of natural exposure and therefore may provide a superior system for pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy investigation.

  4. Seroprevalence and correlates of Toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic pigs in Veracruz State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in pigs has epidemiological concern for its contributing role in human infections. We determined seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 402 domestic pigs raised in backyards in Veracruz State, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25); 182...

  5. Seroprevalence of Rotavirus infection in pig population of Arunachal Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Garam, G. B.; Bora, D. P.; Borah, B.; Bora, M.; Das, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to find out the seroprevalence of Rotavirus(RV) infection among the pig population of Arunachal Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Serums samples were collected from piglets of age ranging from 1 week to 6 months and the sows associated with the piglets that were reared under organized and unorganized system of management in six different districts of Arunachal Pradesh. The prevalence of RV specific antibodies was detected using a polyclonal antibody-based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (i-ELISA). Results: The study revealed that out of 394 serum samples, 255 (64.72%) samples were found to be positive for RV-specific antibody in i-ELISA. Considering the samples from different districts, Papumpare district of Arunachal Pradesh showed highest numbers of seropositive animals (68.75%) followed by upper Subansiri (64.91%) while West Siang district showed lowest positivity rate (61.22%). Conclusion: As considerable seropositivity was recorded among pig population of Arunachal Pradesh in this study, there is urgent need to establish high-impact and cost-effective public health intervention tools, key among them being the introduction of strict hygiene practice and RV vaccination program, to greatly reduce the number of deaths due to diarrheal diseases. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on the prevalence of RV infection from pigs of Arunachal Pradesh. PMID:27956785

  6. An experimental model to evaluate Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae transmission from asymptomatic carriers to unvaccinated and vaccinated sentinel pigs.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Maria; Fano, Eduardo; Pijoan, Carlos; Dee, Scott

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vaccinating susceptible animals on the transmission of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae from experimentally infected pigs during the chronic phase of infection. Thirty-six seeder pigs were experimentally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. Eighty and 200 d post-infection (dpi) 18 seeder pigs were placed in direct contact with 15 vaccinated and 15 unvaccinated age-matched naïve animals. Direct animal contact occurred over 14 d. Pigs were euthanized at the end of the contact period and bronchial swabs were collected and lung tissue examined. At 94 dpi, 15 out of 15 unvaccinated sentinels and 14 out of 15 vaccinated sentinels tested positive for M. hyopneumoniae by nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR). At 214 dpi, M. hyopneumoniae DNA was detected by PCR in 8 out of 15 unvaccinated and 6 out of 15 vaccinated sentinels. Vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae did not prevent colonization of sentinels in contact with infected animals. Transmission of M. hyopneumoniae from asymptomatic carriers to unvaccinated and vaccinated sentinels was not different.

  7. Experimental Bacterial and Viral Diarrhea (Experimental Viral Diarrhea in Pigs).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    sucrose, thehalose, isomaltose, and cellubiose as substrate All enzymes were greatly reduced at 24 and 48 hrs. after oral infection. Lactase activity...greatly reduced at 24 and 48 hrs. after oral infection. Lactase activity was reduced to less than 25,percent of control levels. Jejunum was the region of...than from the controls (Fig. 1). Lactase activity was sharply reduced at 24 hrs. Maltase was moderately reduced at 24 hrs., but the effect was very

  8. Experimental Transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) Low Virulent Isolate NH/P68 by Surviving Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Sánchez, M A; Martins, C; Pelayo, V; Carrascosa, A; Revilla, Y; Simón, A; Briones, V; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Arias, M

    2015-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has persisted in Eastern Europe since 2007, and two endemic zones have been identified in the central and southern parts of the Russian Federation. Moderate- to low-virulent ASF virus isolates are known to circulate in endemic ASF-affected regions. To improve our knowledge of virus transmission in animals recovered from ASF virus infection, an experimental in vivo study was carried out. Four domestic pigs were inoculated with the NH/P68 ASF virus, previously characterized to develop a chronic form of ASF. Two additional in-contact pigs were introduced at 72 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the same box for virus exposure. The inoculated pigs developed a mild form of the disease, and the virus was isolated from tissues in the inoculated pigs up to 99 dpi (pigs were euthanized at 36, 65, 99 and 134 dpi). In-contact pigs showed mild or no clinical signs, but did become seropositive, and a transient viraemia was detected at 28 days post-exposure (dpe), thereby confirming late virus transmission from the inoculated pigs. Virus transmission to in-contact pigs occurred at four weeks post-exposure, over three months after the primary infection. These results highlight the potential role of survivor pigs in disease maintenance and dissemination in areas where moderate- to low-virulent viruses may be circulating undetected. This study will help design better and more effective control programmes to fight against this disease.

  9. Age at vaccination and timing of infection do not alter vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease in influenza A virus infected pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines are widely used in the swine industry to reduce clinical disease against homologous influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In pigs experimentally challenged with antigenically distinct heterologous IAV of the same hemagglutinin subtype, WIV vaccinates have been sho...

  10. Predominant involvement of the cerebellum in guinea pigs infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Horiuchi, M; Yamakawa, Y; Sata, T

    2011-05-01

    This study reports the experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to guinea pigs and describes the cerebellar lesions in these animals. Guinea pigs were inoculated intracerebrally with 10% brain homogenates from BSE-affected cattle. These animals were designated as the first passage. Second and third passages were subsequently performed. All guinea pigs developed infection at each passage. The mean incubation period of the first passage was 370 days post-infection (dpi) and this decreased to 307 dpi and 309 dpi for the second and third passages, respectively. Mild to severe spongiform degeneration and gliosis were observed in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem. In addition, the affected animals had marked pathological changes in the cerebellum characterized by severe cortical atrophy associated with Bergmann radial gliosis of the molecular layer and reduction in the width of the granular cell layer. Immunohistochemically, intense PrP(Sc) deposition and scattered plaque-like deposits were observed in the molecular and granular cell layers. Cerebellar lesions associated with severe atrophy of the cortex have not been reported in animal prion diseases, including in the experimental transmission of PrP(Sc) to small rodents. These lesions were similar to the lesions of human kuru or the VV2 variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although typical kuru plaques or florid plaques were not observed in the affected animals.

  11. Efficacy of oral vaccination against swine erysipelas in growing-finishing pigs in a clinically infected Slovakian pig herd.

    PubMed

    Friendship, C R; Bilkei, G

    2007-01-01

    In a large Slovakian growing-finishing pig production unit, the effects of oral vaccination against swine erysipelas (SE) were investigated in three groups of pigs of 10 weeks of age. In group 1, the pigs were vaccinated intramuscularly at 1 and 3 weeks after arrival in the growing-finishing barn using an Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacterin. Group 2 pigs were vaccinated at the same time as group 1 using an oral avirulent live SE vaccine administered through drinking water; the pigs in the third group were placebo treated. Clinical signs of acute SE, arthritic changes, average daily weight gain (ADG), feed conversion ratio, and mortality were evaluated. None of the pigs in groups 1 and 2 but 31.7% of the control animals (group 3) showed typical clinical signs of acute SE. More (P<0.01) non-vaccinated pigs had chronic arthritic changes compared with groups 1 and 2. No significant differences in mortality were recorded between the groups. Groups 1 and 2 had higher (P<0.05) ADG and lower feed conversion ratios compared with group 3 pigs. The results demonstrated that the oral avirulent live culture was efficacious in significantly reducing the clinical symptoms caused by E. rhusiopathiae infection, so enhancing the pigs' performance.

  12. Experimental pathogenicity and complete genome characterization of a pig origin Pasteurella multocida serogroup F isolate HN07.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhong; Liang, Wan; Wang, Yuanguo; Liu, Wenjing; Zhang, Hongfeng; Yu, Teng; Zhang, Anding; Chen, Huanchun; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida serotype F isolates are predominately prevalent in avian hosts, but rarely seen in pigs. However, we isolated several strains of P. multocida serotype F from clinical samples of pigs in China. To understand the pathogenicity of these strains, one of the serotype F isolates designated HN07, was used to challenge experimental chickens, as P. multocida of this serotype is predominately prevalent in avian hosts. However, strain HN07 could not resulted in significant clinical signs in experimental chickens even at an infective dose of ∼10(9) CFU, suggesting the isolate was avirulent to chickens and therefore raising the possibility that the porcine serotype F isolate is not transmitted by chickens. We then used HN07 to challenge experimental pigs, as this strain was isolated from pigs. As expected, the strain led to the clinical signs and the pathological lesions in experimental pigs that are similar to the pasteurellosis disease. We then determined the complete genome sequence of the pig origin serogroup F isolate HN07 for the first time. Genome comparison between HN07 and the avian serotype F P. multocida Pm70 identified a novel integrative conjugative element (ICE) ICEpmcn07 which was likely to harbor a series of genes responsible for a putative type IV secretion system (T4SS) in HN07. This is the first time that we determined an ICE carrying a T4SS in P. multocida. Besides, comparative analysis also defined a number of virulence-associated genes in HN07 but absent in Pm70 which may have a contribution to the pathogenicity of the strain. This is the first report of the pathogenicity and genome characterization of a pig origin Pasteurella multocida serogroup F isolate. The pathogenic and genomic definition of the pig origin P. multocida serogroup F in our study would have significance on the pathogenesis and genetic diversity and virulence variability of P. multocida.

  13. Pathogenesis of a genotype C strain of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Cai, Hong; Ma, Lei; Wang, Shu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-08-08

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory tract agents of both young and adult cattle and widespread among cattle around the world. Up to present, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis and only limited studies on the pathogenesis of the genotype A of BPIV3 infection in calves and laboratory animals have been performed. The report about experimental infections of the genotypes B and C of BPIV3 in laboratory animals and calves was scant. Therefore, an experimental infection of guinea pigs with the Chinese BPIV3 strain SD0835 of the genotype C was performed. Sixteen guinea pigs were intranasally inoculated with the suspension of SD0835, while eight control guinea pigs were also intranasally inoculated with the same volume of supernatant from uninfected MDBK cells. The virus-inoculated guinea pigs displayed a few observable clinical signs that were related to the respiratory tract disease and two of the sixteen experimentally infected guinea pigs died at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (PI), respectively, and apparent gross pneumonic lesions were observed at necropsy. The gross pneumonic lesions in guinea pigs inoculated with SD0835 consisted of dark red, slightly depressed, irregular areas of consolidation in the lung lobes from the second to 9th day of infection at necropsy, and almost complete consolidation and atelectasis of the lung lobes were seen at 7 days PI. Histopathological changes including alveoli septa thickening and focal cellulose pneumonia were also observed in the lungs of guinea pigs experimentally infected with SD0835. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in the respiratory tissues of guinea pigs as early as 24h after intranasal inoculation with SD0835. The results of virus isolation and titration showed that guinea pigs were permissive for

  14. Experimental Trichinella infection in seals.

    PubMed

    Kapel, C M O; Measures, L; Møller, L N; Forbes, L; Gajadhar, A

    2003-11-01

    The susceptibility of seals to infection with Trichinella nativa and the cold tolerant characteristics of muscle larvae in seal meat were evaluated. Two grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, were inoculated with 5000 (100 larvae/kg) T. nativa larvae and two grey seals with 50000 (1000 larvae/kg). One seal from each dose group and two control seals were killed at 5 and 10 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.). At 5 weeks p.i., infection was established in both low and high dose seals with mean larval densities of 68 and 472 larvae per gram (lpg), respectively, using eight different muscles for analyses. At 10 weeks p.i., mean larval densities were 531 and 2649 lpg, respectively, suggesting an extended persistence of intestinal worms. In seals with high larval density infections, the distribution of larvae in various muscles was uniform, but in one seal with a low larval density infection, predilection sites of larvae included muscle groups with a relative high blood flow, i.e. diaphragm, intercostal and rear flipper muscles. Trichinella-specific antibody levels, as measured by ELISA, increased during the 10 week experimental period. Infected seal muscle was stored at 5, -5 and -18 degrees C for 1, 4 and 8 weeks. Muscle larvae released from stored seal muscle by artificial digestion were inoculated into mice to assess viability and infectivity. Larvae from seal muscle 10 weeks p.i. tolerated -18 degrees C for 8 weeks but larvae from seal muscle 5 weeks p.i. tolerated only 1 week at -18 degrees C, supporting the hypothesis that freeze tolerance increases with the age of the host-parasite tissue complex. The expressed susceptibility to infection, extended production of larvae, antibody response and freeze tolerance of T. nativa in seals are new findings from the first experimental Trichinella infection in any marine mammal and suggest that pinnipeds (phocids, otariiids or walrus) may acquire Trichinella infection by scavenging even small amounts of infected tissue left by hunters or

  15. Early Detection of Infection in Pigs through an Online Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Avilés, M; Fernández-Carrión, E; López García-Baones, J M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2017-04-01

    Late detection of emergency diseases causes significant economic losses for pig producers and governments. As the first signs of animal infection are usually fever and reduced motion that lead to reduced consumption of water and feed, we developed a novel smart system to monitor body temperature and motion in real time, facilitating the early detection of infectious diseases. In this study, carried out within the framework of the European Union research project Rapidia Field, we tested the smart system on 10 pigs experimentally infected with two doses of an attenuated strain of African swine fever. Biosensors and an accelerometer embedded in an eartag captured data before and after infection, and video cameras were used to monitor the animals 24 h per day. The results showed that in 8 of 9 cases, the monitoring system detected infection onset as an increase in body temperature and decrease in movement before or simultaneously with fever detection based on rectal temperature measurement, observation of clinical signs, the decrease in water consumption or positive qPCR detection of virus. In addition, this decrease in movement was reliably detected using automatic analysis of video images therefore providing an inexpensive alternative to direct motion measurement. The system can be set up to alert staff when high fever, reduced motion or both are detected in one or more animals. This system may be useful for monitoring sentinel herds in real time, considerably reducing the financial and logistical costs of periodic sampling and increasing the chances of early detection of infection.

  16. Recognition of Highly Diverse Type-1 and -2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses (PRRSVs) by T-Lymphocytes Induced in Pigs after Experimental Infection with a Type-2 PRRSV Strain

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Sang-Ho; Grimm, Amanda L.; Chung, Grace; Gibson, Kathleen A.; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Parish, Steven M.; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Live attenuated vaccines confer partial protection in pigs before the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, suggesting the contribution of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). However, PRRSV-specific T-lymphocyte responses and protective mechanisms need to be further defined. To this end, the hypothesis was tested that PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes induced by exposure to type-2 PRRSV can recognize diverse isolates. Methods An IFN-gamma ELISpot assay was used to enumerate PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes from PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts and piglets born after in utero infection against 12 serologically and genetically distinct type-1 and -2 PRRSV isolates. The IFN-gamma ELISpot assay using synthetic peptides spanning all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 was utilized to localize epitopes recognized by T-lymphocytes. Virus neutralization tests were carried out using the challenge strain (type-2 PRRSVSD23983) and another strain (type-2 PRRSVVR2332) with high genetic similarity to evaluate cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies in gilts after PRRSVSD23983 infection. Results At 72 days post infection, T-lymphocytes from one of three PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts recognized all 12 diverse PRRSV isolates, while T-lymphocytes from the other two gilts recognized all but one isolate. Furthermore, five of nine 14-day-old piglets infected in utero with PRRSVSD23983 had broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, including one piglet that recognized all 12 isolates. Overlapping peptides encompassing all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 were used to identify ≥28 peptides with T-lymphocyte epitopes from 10 viral proteins. This included one peptide from the M protein that was recognized by T-lymphocytes from all three gilts representing two completely mismatched MHC haplotypes. In contrast to the broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, neutralizing antibody responses were specific to the infecting PRRSVSD23983 isolate. Conclusion These results demonstrated that T-lymphocytes recognizing

  17. Quantification of airborne African swine fever virus after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Weesendorp, E; Quak, S; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2013-08-30

    Knowledge on African Swine Fever (ASF) transmission routes can be useful when designing control measures against the spread of ASF virus (ASFV). Few studies have focused on the airborne transmission route, and until now no data has been available on quantities of ASF virus (ASFV) in the air. Our aim was to validate an air sampling technique for ASF virus (ASFV) that could be used to detect and quantify virus excreted in the air after experimental infection of pigs. In an animal experiment with the Brazil'78, the Malta'78 and Netherlands'86 isolates, air samples were collected at several time points. For validation of the air sampling technique, ASFV was aerosolised in an isolator, and air samples were obtained using the MD8 air scan device, which was shown to be suitable to detect ASFV. The half-life of ASFV in the air was on average 19 min when analysed by PCR, and on average 14 min when analysed by virus titration. In rooms with infected pigs, viral DNA with titres up to 10(3.2) median tissue culture infective dose equivalents (TCID50eq.)/m(3) could be detected in air samples from day 4 post-inoculation (dpi 4) until the end of the experiments, at dpi 70. In conclusion, this study shows that pigs infected with ASFV will excrete virus in the air, particularly during acute disease. This study provides the first available parameters to model airborne transmission of ASFV.

  18. Antimicrobial therapy of experimental Legionella micdadei pneumonia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Pasculle, A W; Dowling, J N; Frola, F N; McDevitt, D A; Levi, M A

    1985-01-01

    Several antimicrobial agents were evaluated for activity against experimental Legionella micdadei pneumonia in guinea pigs. Erythromycin, rifampin, doxycycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim produced significant reductions in mortality. Penicillin, cefazolin, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, and gentamicin were not efficacious even though, at the doses administered, the peak concentrations of these agents in serum substantially exceeded their MICs for the test strain. It is suggested that the poor performance of the latter group of agents resulted from poor penetration into cells in which L. micdadei was multiplying. PMID:3878688

  19. Acquired chemotactic inhibitors during infection with guinea pig cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, R; Myers, M G

    1983-01-01

    Factors involved in neutrophil and monocyte migrations were serially studied in strain 2 guinea pigs undergoing initial cytomegalovirus infection and sham-inoculated controls. All studies remained unchanged in uninfected animals. Monocyte migrations and neutrophil spontaneous migration remained unchanged in infected animals. However, transient abnormalities occurred early in infection, comprising a decrease in neutrophil-directed migration towards C5-derived chemotactic fractions (C5-fr) and a decrease in the chemotactic activity of zymosan-activated plasma. Consequently, the presence of neutrophil- and chemotaxin-directed inhibitors in plasma was investigated. Normal neutrophils, C5-fr, Escherichia coli-derived bacterial factor, and the synthetic peptide F-met-leu-phe were first incubated with control or infected plasmas and then assayed for directed migration and lysosomal enzyme release. Results indicated the de novo appearance of both neutrophil- and chemotaxin-directed inhibitory activities in plasma during early infection. The neutrophil-directed inhibition was heat stable (56 degrees C for 120 min) and nonspecific (responses to all chemotaxins were inhibited). The chemotaxin-directed inhibition was heat stable and C5-fr specific. The cytomegalovirus-induced inhibitors may be important in the enhanced susceptibility to concurrent opportunistic infections. PMID:6305847

  20. The effect of dietary carbohydrates and Trichuris suis infection on pig large intestine tissue structure, epithelial cell proliferation and mucin characteristics.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L E; Knudsen, K E Bach; Hedemann, M S; Roepstorff, A

    2006-11-30

    Two experiments (Exps. 1 and 2) were performed to study the influence of Trichuris suis infection and type of dietary carbohydrates on large intestine morphology, epithelial cell proliferation and mucin characteristics. Two experimental diets based on barley flour were used; Diet 1 was supplemented with resistant carbohydrates from oat hull meal, while Diet 2 was supplemented with fermentable carbohydrates from sugar beet fibre and inulin. In Experiment 1, 32 pigs were allocated randomly into four groups. Two groups were fed Diet 1 and two groups Diet 2. Pigs from one of each diet group were inoculated with a single dose of 2000 infective T. suis eggs and the other two groups remained uninfected controls. In Experiment 2, 12 pigs were allocated randomly into two groups and fed Diet 1 or Diet 2, respectively, and inoculated with a single dose of 2000 infective T. suis eggs. All the pigs were slaughtered 8 weeks post inoculation (p.i.). The worm counts were lower in pigs fed Diet 2 in both experiments, but not significantly so. Both diet and infection status significantly influenced the tissue weight of the large intestine. In both experiments, pigs fed Diet 2 had heavier large intestines than pigs fed Diet 1 and in Experiment1 the infected pigs of both diets had heavier large intestines than their respective control groups. Diet and infection also significantly affected the morphological architecture and mucin production in both experiments. Pigs fed Diet 1 had larger crypts both in terms of area and height than pigs fed Diet 2 and T. suis infected pigs on both diets in Experiment 1 had larger crypts than their respective control groups. The area of the mucin granules in the crypts constituted 22-53% of the total crypt area and was greatest in the T. suis infected pigs fed Diet 1. Epithelial cell proliferation was affected neither by diet nor infection in any of the experiments. The study showed that both T. suis infection and dietary carbohydrates significantly

  1. Immune and inflammatory responses in pigs infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate parasite induced immune responses in pigs co-infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum as compared to mono-species infected pigs. T. suis is known to elicit a strong immune response leading to rapid expulsion, and a strong antagonistic ...

  2. Cytokine Protein Expression Levels in Tracheobronchial Lymph Node Homogenates of Pigs Infected with Pseudorabies Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a neurotropic alphaherpesvirus that produces fatal encephalitis in newborn pigs, respiratory disorders in fattening pigs and reproductive failure in sows. Following primary infection of the respiratory tract, PRV can develop into a systemic infection with dispersion of t...

  3. A Comparison of Diets Supplemented with a Feed Additive Containing Organic Acids, Cinnamaldehyde and a Permeabilizing Complex, or Zinc Oxide, on Post-Weaning Diarrhoea, Selected Bacterial Populations, Blood Measures and Performance in Weaned Pigs Experimentally Infected with Enterotoxigenic E. coli †

    PubMed Central

    Stensland, Ingunn; Kim, Jae Cheol; Bowring, Bethany; Collins, Alison M.; Mansfield, Josephine P.; Pluske, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This experiment was conducted to assess the effects of three diets on diarrhoea, performance (weight change, feed intake and feed conversion ratio), selected bacterial populations and blood measures of weaner pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli. The three diets were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds), base diet containing zinc oxide, and base diet containing a feed additive (blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex). Only feeding zinc oxide decreased diarrhoea, with zinc oxide-fed pigs performing better than base diet-fed pigs. Zinc oxide-fed pigs performed similarly to pigs fed the organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and permeabilizing complex. Significant interactions between treatment and day after weaning were found for some bacterial populations, although the implications of such findings require further examination. Abstract The effects of feeding a diet supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) or a blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and a permeabilizing complex (OACP) on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) and performance in pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were examined. Additionally, changes in selected bacterial populations and blood measures were assessed. A total of 72 pigs weaned at 22 d of age and weighing 7.2 ± 1.02 kg (mean ± SEM) was used. Treatments were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds); base diet + 3 g ZnO/kg; base diet + 1.5 g OACP/kg. Dietary treatments started on the day of weaning and were fed ad libitum for 3 weeks. All pigs were infected with an F4 ETEC on d 4, 5 and 6 after weaning. The incidence of PWD was lower in pigs fed ZnO (p = 0.026). Overall, pigs fed ZnO grew faster (p = 0.013) and ate more (p = 0.004) than the base diet-fed pigs, with OACP-fed pigs performing the same (p > 0.05) as both the ZnO- and base diet-fed pigs. Feed conversion ratio was similar for all diets (p > 0.05). The percentage of E. coli with F4 fimbriae was affected a day by treatment interaction (p

  4. Cross-Species Infectivity of H3N8 Influenza Virus in an Experimental Infection in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Solórzano, Alicia; Foni, Emanuela; Córdoba, Lorena; Baratelli, Massimiliano; Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Bilato, Dania; Martín del Burgo, María Ángeles; Perlin, David S.; Martínez, Jorge; Martínez-Orellana, Pamela; Fraile, Lorenzo; Chiapponi, Chiara; Amadori, Massimo; del Real, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian influenza A viruses have gained increasing attention due to their ability to cross the species barrier and cause severe disease in humans and other mammal species as pigs. H3 and particularly H3N8 viruses, are highly adaptive since they are found in multiple avian and mammal hosts. H3N8 viruses have not been isolated yet from humans; however, a recent report showed that equine influenza A viruses (IAVs) can be isolated from pigs, although an established infection has not been observed thus far in this host. To gain insight into the possibility of H3N8 avian IAVs to cross the species barrier into pigs, in vitro experiments and an experimental infection in pigs with four H3N8 viruses from different origins (equine, canine, avian, and seal) were performed. As a positive control, an H3N2 swine influenza virus A was used. Although equine and canine viruses hardly replicated in the respiratory systems of pigs, avian and seal viruses replicated substantially and caused detectable lesions in inoculated pigs without previous adaptation. Interestingly, antibodies against hemagglutinin could not be detected after infection by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) test with avian and seal viruses. This phenomenon was observed not only in pigs but also in mice immunized with the same virus strains. Our data indicated that H3N8 IAVs from wild aquatic birds have the potential to cross the species barrier and establish successful infections in pigs that might spread unnoticed using the HAI test as diagnostic tool. IMPORTANCE Although natural infection of humans with an avian H3N8 influenza A virus has not yet been reported, this influenza A virus subtype has already crossed the species barrier. Therefore, we have examined the potential of H3N8 from canine, equine, avian, and seal origin to productively infect pigs. Our results demonstrated that avian and seal viruses replicated substantially and caused detectable lesions in inoculated pigs without previous adaptation

  5. A Comparison of Diets Supplemented with a Feed Additive Containing Organic Acids, Cinnamaldehyde and a Permeabilizing Complex, or Zinc Oxide, on Post-Weaning Diarrhoea, Selected Bacterial Populations, Blood Measures and Performance in Weaned Pigs Experimentally Infected with Enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Stensland, Ingunn; Kim, Jae Cheol; Bowring, Bethany; Collins, Alison M; Mansfield, Josephine P; Pluske, John R

    2015-11-23

    The effects of feeding a diet supplemented with zinc oxide (ZnO) or a blend of organic acids, cinnamaldehyde and a permeabilizing complex (OACP) on post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) and performance in pigs infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) were examined. Additionally, changes in selected bacterial populations and blood measures were assessed. A total of 72 pigs weaned at 22 d of age and weighing 7.2 ± 1.02 kg (mean ± SEM) was used. Treatments were: base diet (no antimicrobial compounds); base diet + 3 g ZnO/kg; base diet + 1.5 g OACP/kg. Dietary treatments started on the day of weaning and were fed ad libitum for 3 weeks. All pigs were infected with an F4 ETEC on d 4, 5 and 6 after weaning. The incidence of PWD was lower in pigs fed ZnO ( p = 0.026). Overall, pigs fed ZnO grew faster ( p = 0.013) and ate more ( p = 0.004) than the base diet-fed pigs, with OACP-fed pigs performing the same ( p > 0.05) as both the ZnO- and base diet-fed pigs. Feed conversion ratio was similar for all diets ( p > 0.05). The percentage of E. coli with F4 fimbriae was affected a day by treatment interaction ( p = 0.037), with more E. coli with F4 fimbriae found in pigs fed ZnO on d 11 ( p = 0.011) compared to base diet-fed pigs. Only significant time effects ( p < 0.05) occurred for blood measures. Under the conditions of this study, inclusion of OACP gave statistically similar production responses to pigs fed ZnO, however pigs fed ZnO had less PWD compared to OACP- and the base diet-fed pigs.

  6. Efficacy of combined vaccination against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Bourry, Olivier; Fablet, Christelle; Simon, Gaëlle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2015-11-18

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is one of the main causes of economic losses for swine producers. This complex is due to a combination of different pathogens and their interactions. Two major pathogens involved in PRDC are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The objectives of this study were (i) to develop an experimental model of dual Mhp/PRRSV infection in SPF pigs with European strains of Mhp and PRRSV and (ii) to assess and compare the effects of single Mhp, single PRRSV or combined Mhp/PRRSV vaccination against this dual infection. Pigs dually infected with Mhp and PRRSV showed a combination of symptoms characteristic of each pathogen but no significant exacerbation of pathogenicity. Thus, the co-infected pigs displayed coughing and pneumonia typical of Mhp infection in addition to PRRSV-related hyperthermia and decrease in average daily gain (ADG). Hyperthermia was reduced in PRRSV vaccinated animals (single or combined vaccination), whereas ADG was restored in Mhp/PRRSV vaccinated pigs only. Regarding respiratory symptoms and lung lesions, no vaccine decreased coughing. However, all vaccines reduced the pneumonia score but more so in animals receiving the Mhp vaccine, whether single or combined. This vaccine also decreased the Mhp load in the respiratory tract. In conclusion, combined vaccination against both Mhp and PRRSV efficiently pooled the efficacy of each single PRRSV and Mhp vaccination and could be an interesting tool to control PRDC in European swine production.

  7. Intranasal immunization with an adenovirus vaccine protects guinea pigs from Ebola virus transmission by infected animals.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Richardson, Jason S; Cutts, Todd; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2015-04-01

    Experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccines have previously been shown to protect animals against a high dose intramuscular (IM) challenge, which is seen as a stringent challenge model. However, the protective efficacy against other modes of infection, such as contact with infectious hosts, is unknown. Using a previously established EBOV transmission animal model, we evaluated the efficacy of an adenovirus-based EBOV vaccine given to guinea pigs (gps) 4weeks before direct contact with untreated, infectious animals. Prior vaccination resulted in robust levels of EBOV-specific antibodies and conferred complete protection in gps. These results support the use of vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission between hosts.

  8. Effect of fenbendazole in water on pigs infected with Ascaris suum in finishing pigs under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Oliviero, Claudio; Orro, Toomas; Jukola, Elias; Laurila, Tapio; Haimi-Hakala, Minna; Heinonen, Mari

    2017-03-06

    The husbandry of pigs for meat production is a constantly developing industry. Most studies on the effects of Ascaris suum infection in pigs and its prevention with anthelmintics are over a decade old. We examined the effect of 2.5mg fenbendazole per kg bodyweight administered in drinking water for two consecutive days on A. suum infection 1 and 6 weeks after pigs arrived to fattening units. We hypothesised that the treatment would reduce the presence of A. suum-infections, improve the average daily weight gain of pigs, reduce the percentage of liver rejections in pens by 50% and increase the lean meat percentage at slaughter by 1%. The study included a placebo group (427 pigs) and a treatment group (420 pigs) spanning four different farms previously reporting ≥15% liver rejection. The treatment was given for 2 consecutive days 1 and 6 weeks after the pigs arrived to the fattening unit. Faecal samples were collected during weeks 1, 6 and 12 from all pigs and examined for A. suum eggs. Blood was collected during weeks 1 and 12 from a subgroup of the pigs and examined for anti-A. suum antibodies and clinical blood parameters. Data on liver rejection and lean meat percentage were collected post-mortem. The proportion of Ascaris seropositive pigs changed from 8.6% to 22.2% and 20.3% to 16.3% in the placebo and treatment group respectively. Fenbendazole reduced the presence of A. suum eggs in faeces the percentage of liver rejections by 69.8%. The treatment did not affect daily weight gain or lean meat percentage. Pigs with A. suum eggs in faeces at week 6 had a lower average daily weight gain of 61.8g/day compared with pigs without parasite eggs. Fenbendazole treatment may be a useful option for farms struggling with persistent A. suum problems and demonstrate a beneficial effect on the weight gain of the animals shedding eggs in faeces and result in fewer condemned livers at slaughter.

  9. Experimental parvovirus infection in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L N; Jones, J B; Patton, C S; Webb-Martin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Five eight week old dogs were inoculated orally and intranasally with cell culture origin canine parvovirus. Three dogs became depressed and anorectic and developed a mild (one dog) to severe diarrhea five days postinfection. The remaining dogs had subclinical infections but developed a lymphopenia followed by a transient lymphocytosis. The ill dogs developed mild (one dog) to severe neutropenia and a moderate lymphopenia. One died nine days postinfection. Recovery was associated with cessation of viral excretion and with lymphocytosis and antibody production. Two of three dogs challenged intragastrically developed mild clinical signs and a moderate panleukopenia four to eight days postinfection. The pathological changes of the experimental disease were very similar to that of spontaneous disease. Bone marrow changes included a severe granulocytic and mild erythroid depletion. The pathogenesis of canine parvovirus infection is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7340906

  10. Experimental pig-to-pig transmission dynamics for African swine fever virus, Georgia 2007/1 strain.

    PubMed

    Guinat, C; Gubbins, S; Vergne, T; Gonzales, J L; Dixon, L; Pfeiffer, D U

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) continues to cause outbreaks in domestic pigs and wild boar in Eastern European countries. To gain insights into its transmission dynamics, we estimated the pig-to-pig basic reproduction number (R 0) for the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain using a stochastic susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) model with parameters estimated from transmission experiments. Models showed that R 0 is 2·8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·3-4·8] within a pen and 1·4 (95% CI 0·6-2·4) between pens. The results furthermore suggest that ASFV genome detection in oronasal samples is an effective diagnostic tool for early detection of infection. This study provides quantitative information on transmission parameters for ASFV in domestic pigs, which are required to more effectively assess the potential impact of strategies for the control of between-farm epidemic spread in European countries.

  11. Age-dependent variation in innate immune responses to porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection in suckling versus weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Thavamathi; Saif, Linda J; Lu, Zhongyan; Jung, Kwonil

    2015-12-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is an enteric coronaviral infection that causes severe morbidity and mortality in suckling pigs, but less severe disease in older pigs. Consequently, it causes significant economic losses to the pork industry. There are limited studies on the innate immune responses to PED virus (PEDV) in pigs. The aims of our study were to investigate differences in innate immune responses to PEDV infection in suckling and weaned pigs and to examine if disease severity coincides with reduced innate immune responses. Weaned 26-day-old pigs (n=20) and 9-day-old nursing pigs (n=20) were assigned to PEDV inoculated or uninoculated control groups. The pigs were observed daily for clinical signs, virus shedding and were euthanized at post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1 and 5 to assay immune responses. Blood samples were collected at PIDs 1, 3 and 5. The natural killer (NK) cell frequencies, NK cell activities (lysis of target K562 tumor cells in vitro), CD3+CD4+ T cell and CD3+CD8+ T cell frequencies were measured in blood and ileum at PIDs 1 and 5. The PEDV infected suckling pigs showed severe diarrhea and vomiting at PID 1, whereas the PEDV infected weaned pigs showed milder clinical signs starting at PID 3. PEDV infected suckling pigs had significantly higher diarrhea scores, earlier fecal PEDV RNA shedding and significantly higher viremia (viral RNA in serum) compared to weaned pigs. There was no mortality in either infected suckling or infected weaned pigs. The control pigs not inoculated with PEDV did not show any clinical signs and no detectable fecal or serum PEDV RNA. Strikingly, PEDV infected suckling pigs had significantly lower NK cell frequencies, undetectable NK cell activity and lower IFNγ producing NK cells in blood and ileum compared to PEDV infected weaned pigs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine profiles of PEDV infected suckling pigs differed from those of PEDV infected weaned pigs and coincided with onset of fecal PEDV RNA shedding and serum PEDV

  12. Introduction of infected animals to herds is an important route for the spread of Yersinia enterocolitica infection between pig farms.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, S; Nikunen, S; Korkeala, H

    2014-01-01

    Altogether, 369 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica isolates from 1,118 fecal samples collected from 22 pig farms of different production types were characterized by biotyping, serotyping, and genotyping using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeats analysis. We investigated the distribution of the different genotypes at the farm level and their association with different farm conditions. Pigs were found to carry and transmit Y. enterocolitica between farms, because the same genotypes were found on farms that had previously transported the pigs between them. The purchase of new animals for the farms associated significantly with the number of different multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeats analysis types of Y. enterocolitica found within a farm. Some genotypes seemed to persist on farms for years. The results of this study show that pigs purchased from infected herds transmit Y. enterocolitica infection between farms. Certain pig farms may act as long-term sources of infection.

  13. Effect of attenuated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine in pigs infected with porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sakano, T; Shibata, I; Namimatsu, T; Mori, M; Ono, M; Uruno, K; Osumi, T

    1997-11-01

    Twenty 2nd specific pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups: Group A were infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus at 6 weeks of age and treated with available swine erysipelas and swine fever combined vaccine (vaccinated) at 7 weeks of age; Group B were vaccinated at 7 weeks of age and infected with PRRS virus at 8 weeks of age; Group C were vaccinated at 7 weeks of age: Group D were neither vaccinated nor infected with PRRS virus. All pigs were challenged to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae C42 strain at 10 weeks of age. No clinical signs appeared after vaccination of group A and B pigs, thus confirming that the safety of the vaccine was not influenced by infection with PRRS virus. None of the pigs in Groups A and C developed erysipelas after challenge exposure to E. rhusiopathiae. In contrast, fever and/or urticaria appeared transiently in all pigs of Group B after challenge exposure. At the time of challenge exposure to E. rhusiopathiae, the PRRS virus titer was high in sera of Group B, but was low in those from Group A. However, vaccination of pigs with attenuated E. rhusiopathiae was effective in dual infection with PRRS virus and E. rhusiopathiae, because the clinical signs were milder and the E. rhusiopathiae strain was less recovered from these pigs compared to pigs of group D.

  14. Multiple models of porcine teschovirus pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Ya-Mei; Hu, Shu-Chia; Chiu, Kuo-Chao; Lin, Yi-Chien; Chang, Chia-Yi; Wang, Fun-In

    2014-01-10

    Porcine teschoviruses (PTVs) belong to the genus Teschovirus within the family Picornaviridae. PTVs are universal contaminants in pig herds in endemic and multi-infection status. To further the understanding of PTV pathogenesis in endemically infected pigs, a set of samples was studied by real time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) to quantitate viral loads in tissues and by in situ hybridization (ISH) to locate PTV signals in target cells, both targeting the 5'-NTR. cRNA of PTV-1 and PTV-7, in vitro transcribed from cloned fragments of 5'-NTR of 2 viruses, was used to construct standard curves and to run parallel in qRT-PCR, which had detection limits of 10(1) copies/per reaction, with a linearity in between 10(1) and 10(7) copies/per reaction and correlation coefficients of 0.997-0.9988. The qRT-PCR specifically amplified RNA from PTV-1 to -11, while excluding those of Sapelovirus, PEV-9 and PEV-10. Inguinal lymph node (LN) had the highest viral load of all (assuming 100%), followed by ileac LN (89-91%), tonsil (66-68%), ileum (59-60%), spleen (38-40%), and kidney (30-31%), with the least in brain (22.9%) of the inguinal LN. The 22.9% load in brain was higher than that anticipated from a simple fecal-oral-viremia operative model. The results suggested in addition that intranasal infection and retrograding axonal infection from the tonsils were equally operative and significant. ISH revealed PTV signals in a wider variety of tissue cell types than before. PTV signals were noted most impressively in neurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and in the dark zone of the germinal center and adjacent paracortex of regional LN. Multiple operative models indicated that PTVs seemed to have no difficulty invading the brain. The key to whether encephalitis would ensue resided in the animal's immune status and topographic differences of neurons' susceptibilities to PTVs. When common co-infected agents are present, as is typical in the field, PTVs may synergize in

  15. Chlamydia caviae infection alters abundance but not composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Neuendorf, Elizabeth; Gajer, Pawel; Bowlin, Anne K.; Marques, Patricia X.; Ma, Bing; Yang, Hongqiu; Fu, Li; Humphrys, Michael S.; Forney, Larry J.; Myers, Garry S.A.; Bavoil, Patrik M.; Rank, Roger G.; Ravel, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the vaginal microbiota is thought to be the first line of defense again pathogens including Chlamydia trachomatis. The guinea pig has been extensively used as a model to study chlamydial infection because it shares anatomical and physiological similarities with humans, such as a squamous vaginal epithelium as well as some of the long-term outcomes caused by chlamydial infection. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the guinea pig-C. caviae model of genital infection as a surrogate for studying the role of the vaginal microbiota in the early steps of C. trachomatis infection in humans. We used culture-independent molecular methods to characterize the relative and absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes in the guinea pig vaginal microbiota in animals non-infected, mock-infected or infected by C. caviae. We showed that the guinea pig and human vaginal microbiotas are of different bacterial composition and abundance. Chlamydia caviae infection had a profound effect on the absolute abundance of bacterial phylotypes but not on the composition of the guinea pig vaginal microbiota. Our findings compromise the validity of the guinea pig-C. caviae model to study the role of the vaginal microbiota during the early steps of sexually transmitted infection. PMID:25761873

  16. Rapid Accumulation of Eosinophils in Lung Lesions in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasco, Todd M.; Turner, Oliver C.; Cassone, Lynne; Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophils were positively identified in bronchoalveolar lavage populations and in the lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs. It is possible that the rapid influx of these cells, and their subsequent degranulation during acute pulmonary tuberculosis, may play a key role in the susceptibility of this animal model. PMID:14742563

  17. Occurrence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in suckling and nursery pigs in a region of high pig density.

    PubMed

    Nathues, H; Kubiak, R; Tegeler, R; grosse Beilage, E

    2010-02-13

    The occurrence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in young pigs was surveyed in a retrospective study of 1122 datasets obtained from routine diagnostics where either suckling or nursery pigs were examined for M hyopneumoniae in lung tissue. Findings were correlated with the presence of lung lesions, detection of other respiratory pathogens, vaccination history and parameters describing the herd of origin. The prevalence of M hyopneumoniae in lung tissue from 201 suckling pigs was 2.0 per cent and, therefore, significantly lower than in lung tissue from 921 nursery pigs, which was 9.3 per cent. Previous use of antimicrobials and the vital status of the pigs when delivered for postmortem examination did not influence the detection of M hyopneumoniae infection. The presence of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-EU genotype, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis, Mycoplasma hyorhinis or Streptococcus suis was correlated with a higher probability of also finding M hyopneumoniae. The history of vaccination, the time of the first or second application, and the type of vaccine (one- versus two-shot) did not influence the detection of M hyopneumoniae. A correlation between the type of herd and the presence of M hyopneumoniae was statistically insignificant and no effect of farrowing rhythm could be confirmed.

  18. Acute phase protein response during subclinical infection of pigs with H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2012-10-12

    In the present study acute phase proteins (APPs) responses in pigs after subclinical infection with H1N1 swine influenza virus (SwH1N1) were evaluated. Fourteen 5 weeks old, seronegative piglets, both sexes were used. Ten of them were infected intranasally with SwH1N1. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and pig major acute phase protein (Pig-MAP) concentrations in serum were measured using commercial ELISAs. No significant clinical signs were observed in any of the infected pigs, however, all infected animals developed specific antibodies against SwH1N1 and viral shedding was observed from 2 to 5 dpi. Only concentrations of Hp and SAA were significantly induced after infection, with mean maximum levels from days 1 to 2 post infection (dpi). The concentrations of CRP and Pig-MAP remained generally unchanged, however in half of infected pigs the concentration of CRP tended to increase at 1 dpi (but without statistical significance). The results of our study confirmed that monitoring of APPs may be useful for detection of subclinically infected pigs. The use of SAA or Hp and Pig-MAP may be a valuable in combination [i.e. Hp (increased concentration) and Pig-MAP (unchanged concentration)] to detect subclinically SIV infected pigs, or to identify pigs actually producing a large amount of virus. Additional studies need to be done in order to confirm these findings.

  19. Cavia porcellus as a Model for Experimental Infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Yauri, Verónica; Angulo, Noelia; Verastegui, Manuela; Velásquez, Daniel E.; Sterling, Charles R.; Martin, Diana; Bern, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    The guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) is a natural reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi but has seldom been used as an experimental infection model. We developed a guinea pig infection model for acute and chronic Chagas disease. Seventy-two guinea pigs were inoculated intradermally with 104 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi strain Y (experimental group); 18 guinea pigs were used as control group. Eight animals from the experimental group and two from the control group were sacrificed 5, 15, 20, 25, 40, 55, 115, 165, and 365 days after inoculation. During the acute phase (15 to 55 days), we observed parasitemia (with a peak on day 20) and positive IgM and IgG Western blots with anti-shed acute-phase antigen bands. The cardiac tissue showed vasculitis, necrosis (on days 40 to 55), moderate to severe inflammation, and abundant amastigote nests. Smaller numbers of amastigote nests were also present in kidney, brain, and other organs. In the early chronic phase (115 to 165 days), parasitemia disappeared and anti–T. cruzi IgG antibodies were still detectable. In cardiac tissue, the number of amastigote nests and the grade of inflammation decreased. In the chronic phase (365 days), the cardiac tissue showed vasculitis and fibrosis; detectable parasite DNA was associated with higher grades of inflammation. The experimental T. cruzi infection model in guinea pigs shows kinetics and pathologic changes similar to those of the human disease. PMID:21703410

  20. Use of a Guinea Pig-Specific Transcriptome Array for Evaluation of Protective Immunity against Genital Chlamydial Infection following Intranasal Vaccination in Guinea Pigs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-11

    2008) Guinea pig model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent/dormant infection . Microbes and Infection 10: 1469–1476. 54. Smith DW, Balasubramanian V...RESEARCH ARTICLE Use of a Guinea Pig-Specific Transcriptome Array for Evaluation of Protective Immunity against Genital Chlamydial Infection ...Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases and Center of Excellence in Infection Genomics, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio

  1. Natural infection of guinea pigs exposed to patients with highly drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Ashwin S.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Van Der Walt, Martie L.; Weyer, Karin; Mphahlele, Matsie; Venter, Kobus; Jensen, Paul A.; First, Melvin W.; Parsons, Sydney; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.; Nardell, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    A natural TB infection model using guinea pigs may provide useful information for investigating differences in transmission efficiency and establishment of active disease by clinical TB strains in a highly susceptible host under controlled environmental conditions. We sought to examine the capacity of naturally transmitted multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis to establish infection and produce active disease in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed for 4 months to the exhaust air of a 6-bed multidrug-resistant tuberculosis inpatient hospital ward in South Africa. Serial tuberculin skin test reactions were measured to determine infection. All animals were subsequently evaluated for histologic disease progression at necropsy. Although 75% of the 362 exposed guinea pigs had positive skin test reactions [≥6mm], only 12% had histopathologic evidence of active disease. Reversions (≥ 6 mm change) in skin test reactivity were seen in 22% of animals, exclusively among those with reactions of 6 to 13 mm. Only two of 86 guinea pigs with reversion had histological evidence of disease compared to 47% (31/66) of guinea pigs with large, non-reverting reactions. Immunosuppression of half the guinea pigs across all skin test categories did not significantly accelerate disease progression. In guinea pigs that reverted a skin test, a second positive reaction in 27 (33%) of them strongly suggested re-infection due to ongoing exposure. These results show that a large majority of guinea pigs naturally exposed to human-source strains of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis became infected, but that many resolved their infection and a large majority failed to progress to detectable disease. PMID:21478054

  2. Large-scale screening and characterization of enteroviruses and kobuviruses infecting pigs in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Van Dung, Nguyen; Anh, Pham Hong; Van Cuong, Nguyen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Hien, Vo Be; Sharp, C.; Rabaa, M.; Berto, A.; Campbell, James; Baker, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy; Woolhouse, Mark E.; Bryant, Juliet E.

    2016-01-01

    A recent survey of pigs in Dong Thap province, Vietnam identified a high frequency of enterovirus species G (EV-G) infection (144/198; 72.7 %). Amongst these was a plethora of EV-G types (EV-G1, EV-G6 and four new types EV-G8–EV-G11). To better characterize the genetic diversity of EV-G and investigate the possible existence of further circulating types, we performed a larger-scale study on 484 pig and 45 farm-bred boar faecal samples collected in 2012 and 2014, respectively. All samples from the previous and current studies were also screened for kobuviruses. The overall EV infection frequency remained extremely high (395/484; 81.6 %), but with comparable detection rates and viral loads between healthy and diarrhoeic pigs; this contrasted with less frequent detection of EV-G in boars (4/45; 8.9 %). EV was most frequently detected in pigs ≤ 14 weeks old (∼95 %) and declined in older pigs. Infections with EV-G1 and EV-G6 were most frequent, whilst less commonly detected types included EV-G3, EV-G4 and EV-G8–EV-G11, and five new types (EV-G12–EV-G16). In contrast, kobuvirus infection frequency was significantly higher in diarrhoeic pigs (40.9 versus 27.6 %; P = 0.01). Kobuviruses also showed contrasting epizootiologies and age associations; a higher prevalence was found in boars (42 %) compared with domestic pigs (29 %), with the highest infection frequency amongst pigs >52 weeks old. Although genetically diverse, all kobuviruses identified belonged to the species Aichivirus C. In summary, this study confirms infection with EV-G was endemic in Vietnamese domestic pigs and exhibits high genetic diversity and extensive inter-type recombination. PMID:26653281

  3. Large-scale screening and characterization of enteroviruses and kobuviruses infecting pigs in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van Dung, Nguyen; Anh, Pham Hong; Van Cuong, Nguyen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Hien, Vo Be; Sharp, C; Rabaa, M; Berto, A; Campbell, James; Baker, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy; Woolhouse, Mark E; Bryant, Juliet E; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-02-01

    A recent survey of pigs in Dong Thap province, Vietnam identified a high frequency of enterovirus species G (EV-G) infection (144/198; 72.7%). Amongst these was a plethora of EV-G types (EV-G1, EV-G6 and four new types EV-G8-EV-G11). To better characterize the genetic diversity of EV-G and investigate the possible existence of further circulating types, we performed a larger-scale study on 484 pig and 45 farm-bred boar faecal samples collected in 2012 and 2014, respectively. All samples from the previous and current studies were also screened for kobuviruses. The overall EV infection frequency remained extremely high (395/484; 81.6%), but with comparable detection rates and viral loads between healthy and diarrhoeic pigs; this contrasted with less frequent detection of EV-G in boars (4/45; 8.9%). EV was most frequently detected in pigs ≤ 14 weeks old (∼ 95%) and declined in older pigs. Infections with EV-G1 and EV-G6 were most frequent, whilst less commonly detected types included EV-G3, EV-G4 and EV-G8-EV-G11, and five new types (EV-G12-EV-G16). In contrast, kobuvirus infection frequency was significantly higher in diarrhoeic pigs (40.9 versus 27.6%; P = 0.01). Kobuviruses also showed contrasting epizootiologies and age associations; a higher prevalence was found in boars (42%) compared with domestic pigs (29%), with the highest infection frequency amongst pigs >52 weeks old. Although genetically diverse, all kobuviruses identified belonged to the species Aichivirus C. In summary, this study confirms infection with EV-G was endemic in Vietnamese domestic pigs and exhibits high genetic diversity and extensive inter-type recombination.

  4. Persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; García-Contreras, Adelfa Del Carmen; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-03-23

    Porcine rubulavirus is the etiological agent of blue eye disease in pigs. In boars, this virus causes orchitis and epididymitis and reduces seminal quality. The objective of this study was to determine the persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars. Nine 12-month-old boars were infected with 5 ml of the PAC-3 strain of porcine rubulavirus at 1 × 10(5) TCID(50)/ml and held for 142 days post infection (DPI) to evaluate humoral immune response. The virus was isolated in cell cultures and detected by RT-PCR. Infection with porcine rubulavirus produced clinical signs beginning at 5 DPI. Necropsy results showed that 3 boars had lesions in the testicles and epididymes. Histological analysis showed the characteristic lesions in all infected boars. Porcine rubulavirus antibodies were detected in the second week post infection and increased significantly (P<0.05) over time. Isolation of the virus from semen was achieved between 5 DPI and 48 DPI and from the testicles and epididymes between 64 DPI and 142 DPI. Viral RNA was detected in the serum between 2 DPI and 64 DPI and in the semen until 142 DPI. These results confirm that the RNA of the porcine rubulavirus persists in the semen and that this virus remains in the reproductive tract for prolonged periods of infection. Semen of persistently infected boars, therefore, represents an important source of the virus and a risk factor for the spread of blue eye disease in swine populations.

  5. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  6. Ascaris suum infection negatively affects the response to a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination and subsequent challenge infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Steenhard, Nina R; Jungersen, Gregers; Kokotovic, Branko; Beshah, Ethiopia; Dawson, Harry D; Urban, Joseph F; Roepstorff, Allan; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2009-08-13

    Since their first introduction more than a century ago, vaccines have become one of the most cost-effective tools to prevent and manage infectious diseases in human and animal populations. It is vital to understand the possible mechanisms that may impair optimal vaccine efficacy. The hypothesis posed in this study was that a concurrent Ascaris suum infection of pigs vaccinated with a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) vaccine would modulate the protective immune response to a subsequent challenge infection. Four groups of pigs were either (1) untreated (group C), (2) vaccinated against Mh 3 weeks after the start of the study (group V), (3) given a trickle infection with A. suum throughout the study (group A), or (4) given a trickle infection with A. suum and vaccinated against Mh (group AV). All pigs were subsequently inoculated with live Mh bacteria 4 weeks after the Mh vaccination and necropsied after another 4 weeks. All pigs in group V sero-converted 3 weeks after vaccination (100%), as opposed to only 33% of group AV pigs that were Mh-vaccinated and given A. suum. At the end of the study, only 78% of pigs in group AV had sero-converted. Pigs in group AV had a higher mean percentage of lung pathology and the variation was significantly higher in these pigs compared to pigs in group V. The pattern of gene expression in the lungs and draining lymph nodes indicated a local Th2-skewed response induced by A. suum. Our study indicated that A. suum significantly compromised the effect of Mh vaccination. The impact of reduced vaccine efficacy caused by a common gastrointestinal helminth emphasises the importance of parasite control. More focus should be put into this area of research to outline the practical consequences of this interaction, and to be able to predict, prevent and correct negative interactions.

  7. A Phosphorylcholine-Containing Glycolipid-like Antigen Present on the Surface of Infective Stage Larvae of Ascaris spp. Is a Major Antibody Target in Infected Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Masure, Dries; Wang, Tao; Nejsum, Peter; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Geldhof, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The pig parasite Ascaris suum plays and important role in veterinary medicine and represents a suitable model for A. lumbricoides, which infects over 800 million people. In pigs, continued exposure to Ascaris induces immunity at the level of the gut, protecting the host against migrating larvae. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize parasite antigens targeted by this local immune response that may be crucial for parasite invasion and establishment and to evaluate their protective and diagnostic potential. Methodology/Principal Findings Pigs were immunized by trickle infection for 30 weeks, challenged with 2,000 eggs at week 32 and euthanized two weeks after challenge. At necropsy, there was a 100% reduction in worms recovered from the intestine and a 97.2% reduction in liver white spots in comparison with challenged non-immune control animals. Antibodies purified from the intestinal mucus or from the supernatant of cultured antibody secreting cells from mesenteric lymph nodes of immune pigs were used to probe L3 extracts to identify antibody targets. This resulted in the recognition of a 12kDa antigen (As12) that is actively shed from infective Ascaris L3. As12 was characterized as a phosphorylcholine-containing glycolipid-like antigen that is highly resistant to different enzymatic and chemical treatments. Vaccinating pigs with an As12 fraction did not induce protective immunity to challenge infection. However, serological analysis using sera or plasma from experimentally infected pigs or naturally infected humans demonstrated that the As12 ELISA was able to detect long-term exposure to Ascaris with a high diagnostic sensitivity (98.4% and 92%, respectively) and specificity (95.5% and 90.0%) in pigs and humans, respectively. Conclusions/Significance These findings show the presence of a highly stage specific, glycolipid-like component (As12) that is actively secreted by infectious Ascaris larvae and which acts as a major antibody

  8. Genetic diversity of Taenia solium cysticerci from naturally infected pigs of central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Raúl J; Fragoso, Gladis; Reyes-Montes, María del Rocio; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Vega, Rodrigo; de Aluja, Aline S; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Morales, Julio; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2010-02-26

    This study was designed to explore if each individual case of naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis, living in different geographic rural areas of central Mexico, is caused by one or more different specimens of Taenia solium tapeworm. The genetic variability among cysticerci from the same pig and that from different pigs was assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA markers (RAPDs), through the percentage of polymorphic loci, the number of effective alleles, the expected heterozygosity and the Shannon index. The parasite population's reproductive structure was estimated through the association index (I(A)), and the degree of genetic differentiation and variation was determined using AMOVA. Using six different random primers, and a total of 181 cysticerci from 14 pigs, 88 different loci were amplified: 85% were polymorphic between pigs and 24% within pigs. The phenogram grouped the cysticerci into eight major clusters, with differences in the genetic distances among all cysticerci from 14 pigs ranging from 0.78 to 1. Most of the cysticerci grouped in accord with their different geographical origin and with their pig of origin. The similarity matrix produced from the phenogram (obtained by UPGMA) and the original similarity matrix yielded a good cophenetic correlation (r=0.82317, P=0.0004), which suggests that the phenogram accurately represents the original genetic similarities between isolates. The combination of I(A) (0.0-0.089) with the genetic diversity index (0.009-0.073) supports the idea that DNA diversity in T. solium cysticerci of naturally infected pigs is within the range expected from a recombination process occurring during sexual reproduction. The small genetic diversity found within the cysticerci of each pig (33.81%), when compared with that between pigs (66.19%), indicates that pigs are rarely infected by different tapeworms. It would then appear that porcine cysticercosis courses with effective concomitant immunity, as occurs in ovine

  9. Experimental Colibacillosis in Gnotobiotic Baby Pigs I. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Christie, B. R.; Waxler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Sixty-two gnotobiotic pigs were used in three experiments to determine the means whereby two related strains of Escherichia coli colonized the intestinal tract. Pigs were exposed by a method simulating neonatal contamination of the umbilical stump. Bacteremia was produced within one and one half hours, and by 24 hours the infection was generally well established in the gastrointestinal tract. By 48 hours after exposure, the bacteremia had subsided so that only an occasional isolation from organs other than the gastrointestinal tract was made. Oral exposure of one litter of germfree pigs produced heavy colonization of the entire gastrointestinal tract within four hours. Evidence of intermittent bacteremia was present in pigs of this litter. Diarrhea appeared earlier when pigs were exposed orally than when they were exposed by way of the umbilical stump. PMID:4270433

  10. Co-infection of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; De la Luz-Armendáriz, Jazmín; Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Jasso-Escutia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Ivan; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-02-29

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) and swine influenza virus infection causes respiratory disease in pigs. PorPV persistent infection could facilitate the establishment of secondary infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the pathogenicity of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus (swH1N1) in growing pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus. Conventional six-week-old pigs were intranasally inoculated with PorPV, swH1N1, or PorPV/swH1N1. A mock-infected group was included. The co-infection with swH1N1 was at 44 days post-infection (DPI), right after clinical signs of PorPV infection had stopped. The pigs of the co-infection group presented an increase of clinical signs compared to the simple infection groups. In all infected groups, the most recurrent lung lesion was hyperplasia of the bronchiolar-associated lymphoid tissue and interstitial pneumonia. By means of immunohistochemical evaluation it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the two viral agents infecting simultaneously the bronchiolar epithelium. Viral excretion of PorPV in nasal and oral fluid was recorded at 28 and 52 DPI, respectively. PorPV persisted in several samples from respiratory tissues (RT), secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). For swH1N1, the viral excretion in nasal fluids was significantly higher in single-infected swH1N1 pigs than in the co-infected group. However, the co-infection group exhibited an increase in the presence of swH1N1 in RT, SLO, and BALF at two days after co-infection. In conclusion, the results obtained confirm an increase in the clinical signs of infection, and PorPV was observed to impact the spread of swH1N1 in analysed tissues in the early stage of co-infection, although viral shedding was not enhanced. In the present study, the interaction of swH1N1 infection is demonstrated in pigs persistently infected with PorPV.

  11. The laryngeal mask airway in experimental pig anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wemyss-Holden, S A; Porter, K J; Baxter, P; Rudkin, G E; Maddern, G J

    1999-01-01

    The pig is used as a large animal model in many research projects. Standard practice for airway maintenance under general anaesthesia is using endotracheal (ET) intubation after intravenous induction to a near surgical plane. This is a technically demanding skill, requiring the assistance of an experienced technician. A technique is required which simplifies pig anaesthesia. This study examined the feasibility and potential advantages of using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in 10 pigs during laparotomy under spontaneous breathing anaesthesia. The results show that the LMA can be inserted rapidly, with minimal time for airway control by researchers relatively inexperienced in anaesthesia and is associated with few complications. By removing the need for intravenous induction, an entire step in the anaesthetic process is removed. The LMA designed for humans fits well in the pig hypopharynx; all pigs could be manually ventilated with no detectable gas leak. Although the pigs in this study were spontaneously breathing it is proposed that the LMA should be further investigated in studies of artificially ventilated pigs.

  12. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  13. Simultaneous infections by different Salmonella strains in mesenteric lymph nodes of finishing pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonellosis is a major worldwide zoonosis, and Salmonella-infected finishing pigs are considered one of the major sources of human infections in developed countries. Baseline studies on salmonellosis prevalence in fattening pigs in Europe are based on direct pathogen isolation from mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). This procedure is considered the most reliable for diagnosing salmonellosis in apparently healthy pigs. The presence of simultaneous infections by different Salmonella strains in the same animal has never been reported and could have important epidemiological implications. Results Fourteen finishing pigs belonging to 14 farms that showed high salmonellosis prevalence and a variety of circulating Salmonella strains, were found infected by Salmonella spp, and 7 of them were simultaneously infected with strains of 2 or 3 different serotypes. Typhimurium isolates showing resistance to several antimicrobials and carrying mobile integrons were the most frequently identified in the colonized MLN. Four animals were found infected by Salmonella spp. of a single serotype (Rissen or Derby) but showing 2 or 3 different antimicrobial resistance profiles, without evidence of mobile genetic element exchange in vivo. Conclusion This is the first report clearly demonstrating that pigs naturally infected by Salmonella may harbour different Salmonella strains simultaneously. This may have implications in the interpretation of results from baseline studies, and also help to better understand human salmonellosis outbreaks and the horizontal transmission of antimicrobial resistance genes. PMID:24606823

  14. Infected Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Transmit Latent Varicella Zoster Virus Infection to the Guinea Pig Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gershon, Anne A.

    2014-01-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS. PMID:24965252

  15. The impact of gastrointestinal parasites infection on slaughter efficiency in pigs.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Damian; Jankowska, Anna; Zaleśny, Grzegorz

    2012-03-23

    The aim of the present study was to determine an influence of parasites invasion on fodder consumption and slaughter yield of fatteners in three different maintenance systems. The experimental part of the study was conducted on pigs farm producing in a close cycle. The study on internal parasites of fatteners were conducted based on coproscopic methods. In order to describe the relationship between following variables: meatiness, slaughter yield, fodder consumption and mean EPG value, the principal component analysis (PCA) was used. The analysis between fodder consumption and maintenance system and fodder consumption and helminths infection did not demonstrate any significant relationship. The analysis between slaughter yield and meatiness and an infection demonstrated in turn a decrease in both parameters values in the two maintenance systems, i.e. in fatteners kept on litter meatiness decrease in infected fatteners of 4.2% and yield of 1.7%. On slatted floor meatiness decrease in infected fatteners of 6.1% and yield of 2.7%. The decreasing tendency in meat content (3.7%) and in slaughter yield (1.1%) was also observed in fatteners maintained on deep litter, however the values were not significant statistically.

  16. Protection of Lassa virus-infected guinea pigs with Lassa-immune plasma of guinea pig, primate, and human origin.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B

    1983-01-01

    Lassa virus-immune plasma has been used to treat human Lassa fever patients; however, criteria for plasma selection were based arbitrarily on available serologic tools and protective efficacy was never directly assessed. To test the validity of plasma therapy for Lassa virus infections in an animal model, and to develop biologically relevant criteria for selection of protective immune plasma, inbred, strain 13 guinea pigs were infected with a lethal dose of Lassa virus and treated with various Lassa-immune plasmas obtained from guinea pigs, primates, and convalescent human patients. Neutralizing antibody titers were determined in a virus dilution, plaque reduction test, and were expressed as a log10 plaque-forming units (PFU) neutralization index (LNI). All guinea pigs treated with immune plasma 6 ml/kg/treatment on days 0, 3, and 6 after virus inoculation were protected, provided the LNI exceeded 2.0. Plasmas obtained from donors in early convalescence (32-45 days) had low titers of N-antibody (LNI less than 2) and failed to confer protection, despite high titers of Lassa antibody measured in the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test. Higher doses of marginally titered plasma conferred increased protection. The degree of protection and suppression of viremia was closely associated with LNI an not IFA titers. Administration of low-titered plasma did not result in immune enhancement. A high dose of human plasma from Liberia (12 ml/kg/treatment) was required to confer complete protection to guinea pigs infected with a Lassa virus strain from Sierra Leone (LNI = 1.6), while a lower dose (3 ml/kg/treatment) was sufficient for protection against a Liberian strain (LNI = 2.8), suggesting that a geographic matching of immune plasma and Lassa virus strain origin may increase treatment success. These studies support the concept of plasma therapy for Lassa infection and suggest that the plaque reduction neutralization test is more appropriate than the IFA test for

  17. Protein A Suppresses Immune Responses during Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity. Importance  Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections; however, a vaccine with clinical efficacy is not available. Using mice to model staphylococcal infection, earlier work identified protective antigens; however, corresponding human clinical trials did not reach their endpoints. We show that B cell receptor (IgM) cross-linking by protein A is an important immune evasion strategy of S. aureus that can be monitored in a guinea pig model of bloodstream infection. Further, immunization with nontoxigenic protein A enables infected guinea pigs to elicit antibody responses that are protective against S. aureus. Thus, the guinea pig model may support preclinical development of staphylococcal vaccines. PMID:25564466

  18. Use of a Guinea pig-specific transcriptome array for evaluation of protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection following intranasal vaccination in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wali, Shradha; Gupta, Rishein; Veselenak, Ronald L; Li, Yansong; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Cap, Andrew P; Guentzel, M Neal; Chambers, James P; Zhong, Guangming; Rank, Roger G; Pyles, Richard B; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2014-01-01

    Guinea pigs have been used as a second animal model to validate putative anti-chlamydial vaccine candidates tested in mice. However, the lack of guinea pig-specific reagents has limited the utility of this animal model in Chlamydia sp. vaccine studies. Using a novel guinea pig-specific transcriptome array, we determined correlates of protection in guinea pigs vaccinated with Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae) via the intranasal route, previously reported by us and others to provide robust antigen specific immunity against subsequent intravaginal challenge. C. caviae vaccinated guinea pigs resolved genital infection by day 3 post challenge. In contrast, mock vaccinated animals continued to shed viable Chlamydia up to day 18 post challenge. Importantly, at day 80 post challenge, vaccinated guinea pigs experienced significantly reduced genital pathology - a sequelae of genital chlamydial infections, in comparison to mock vaccinated guinea pigs. Sera from vaccinated guinea pigs displayed antigen specific IgG responses and increased IgG1 and IgG2 titers capable of neutralizing GPIC in vitro. Th1-cellular/inflammatory immune genes and Th2-humoral associated genes were also found to be elevated in vaccinated guinea pigs at day 3 post-challenge and correlated with early clearance of the bacterium. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of guinea pig-specific genes involved in anti-chlamydial vaccination and illustrates the enhancement of the utility of this animal model in chlamydial pathogenesis.

  19. Experimental infection of specific pathogen free piglets with French strains of Streptococcus suis capsular type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot-Hérault, F; Cariolet, R; Labbé, A; Gottschalk, M; Cardinal, J Y; Kobisch, M

    2001-01-01

    A standardized model of Streptococcus suis type 2 infection in specific-pathogen-free piglets, housed in high-security barns, was used to compare the virulence of 3 French field strains of S. suis serotype 2 isolated from tonsils of a healthy pig (strain 65) or from diseased pigs (meningitis, strain 166', or septicemia, strain 24). In one of the 2 trials, 7-week-old pigs, in 3 groups of 8, were inoculated intravenously with 2 x 10(8) colony-forming units of S. suis type 2. In each group, 1 uninfected animal was a sentinel. Eight animals were also used as negative control group. The experiment was repeated under similar conditions with strains 65 and 166'. Virulence differed markedly among these S. suis strains when clinical signs, zootechnical performances, lesions, and bacteriological data were analyzed. Strain 65 did not induce clinical signs in inoculated pigs. In contrast, pigs infected with the other 2 strains exhibited clinical signs and typical lesions of S. suis type 2 infections. Differences in virulence were also observed between the 2 virulent strains. Sentinel animals exhibited the same manifestations as those recorded in inoculated piglets. Results were similar in the second trial, indicating that under the present experimental conditions, results were reproducible. The standardized conditions described in this study could be a useful tool to further study about the S. suis infection. PMID:11480526

  20. Transcript Expression Analysis in Tracheobronchial Lymph Nodes of Pseudorabies Virus Infected Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study addresses the critical relationship between Pseudorabies virus (PRV) and its host at a transcriptional level during the course of an infection. RNA isolated from draining tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) specimens from 5-week old pigs clinically infected with a feral isolate of PRV (FS...

  1. Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; White, H J; Hough, A J; Pasley, J N; Barron, A L

    1982-11-01

    Female guinea pigs were treated daily with 1 mg of beta-estradiol-3-benzoate intramuscularly beginning 14 days before intravaginal inoculation with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and continuing during the course of the infection. Treatment with estradiol was found to markedly influence the course of genital infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, producing infections of greater intensity and longer duration than those in control animals. Moreover, pathogenesis was altered in that ascending infection was observed, resulting in endometritis, cystic salpingitis, and cystitis. Infection in the controls was limited to the cervix and vagina. Estradiol treatment increased the apparent number of infected cells in the cervix and vagina as detected by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis were comparable in estradiol-treated and untreated animals. These data indicate that hormonal manipulation may have profound effects on the course of chlamydial genital infections.

  2. Experimental treatment of Curvularia infection.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Katihuska; Capilla, Javier; Sutton, Deanna A; Mayayo, Emilio; Fothergill, Annette W; Guarro, Josep

    2014-08-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole in immunosuppressed murine models of disseminated infection by Curvularia spicifera and Curvularia hawaiiensis. The 3 antifungals improved survival of mice in comparison to controls; however, only the 2 azoles were able to reduce significantly the fungal load.

  3. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris: Heritabilities and associations with parasitological findings.

    PubMed

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus; Göring, Harald Heinz Herbert; Skallerup, Per; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-07-30

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens or egg excretion with specific antibody levels. We set out to investigate the association between worm load and T. suis and A. suum specific serum antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) against excretory-secretory products of adults and third stage larvae, respectively, measured at 0, 7 and 14 weeks p.i. in a trickle-infected F1-resource-population of crossbred pigs (n=195). Furthermore, we wanted to determine the heritability of these antibody isotypes during the course of infection. Most pigs remained infected with A. suum throughout the experiment while they expelled T. suis between 7 and 14 weeks post infection (p.i.). Parasite specific IgG1 and IgA were significantly (P<0.001) elevated after 7 and 14 weeks of infection, whereas parasite specific IgG2 levels only changed slightly at 14 weeks p.i.. However, the observed association between specific antibody isotype levels and faecal egg counts and macroscopic worm load was weak. The relative heritabilities of the different parasite specific isotypes were assessed and resulted in significant heritability estimates for parasite specific IgG1 and IgA. The highest heritabilities were found for A. suum specific IgG1 (h(2)=0.41 and 0.46 at 7 and 14 weeks p.i., respectively). Thus, the present study demonstrates that host genetic factors influence the IgG1 and IgA antibody isotype responses specific to two of the most common gastrointestinal nematodes of swine whereas specific antibody levels were poorly associated with egg excretion and the presence of macroscopic worms.

  4. Infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells transmit latent varicella zoster virus infection to the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2014-10-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS.

  5. Echinococcosis in pigs and intestinal infection with Echinococcus spp. in dogs in southwestern Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Bruzinskaite, R; Sarkūnas, M; Torgerson, P R; Mathis, A; Deplazes, P

    2009-03-23

    Cystic echinococcosis is a major emerging zoonosis in many Eastern European and Asian countries. Post slaughter examinations of 684 pig livers in Lithuania revealed significantly higher numbers of Echinococcus granulosus infections in animals from family farms (13.2%; 95% CI 10.7-16.2) as compared with those from industrial farms (4.1%; 95% CI 0.8-11.5). The prevalence was also significantly higher in pigs older than 1 year than in younger ones. In addition, in 0.5% of the pigs from the family farms, infertile and calcified E. multilocularis lesions were identified by PCR. Faecal samples from rural dogs (n=240) originating from 177 family farms in 12 villages were investigated for taeniid eggs with two methods. Significantly more dogs excreting taeniid eggs were diagnosed with the flotation/sieving method (n=34) as compared to the modified McMaster method (n=12). Multiplex PCR performed with DNA from taeniid eggs isolated from faeces of 34 dogs revealed 26 infections with Taenia spp., 9 with E. granulosus and 2 with E. multilocularis (4 cases with concurrent Taenia spp. and E. granulosus or E. multilocularis infections). Genotyping of E. granulosus cyst tissues from 7 pigs, 1 head of cattle and from E. granulosus eggs from 8 dog faeces revealed the genotype G6/7 ('pig/camel strain') in all cases. The high infection pressure with Echinococcus spp. in family farms necessitates initiating control programs.

  6. Prevalence of Hepatitis E Virus Infection in Pigs at the Time of Slaughter, United Kingdom, 2013.

    PubMed

    Grierson, Sylvia; Heaney, Judith; Cheney, Tanya; Morgan, Dilys; Wyllie, Stephen; Powell, Laura; Smith, Donald; Ijaz, Samreen; Steinbach, Falko; Choudhury, Bhudipa; Tedder, Richard S

    2015-08-01

    Since 2010, reports of infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) have increased in England and Wales. Despite mounting evidence regarding the zoonotic potential of porcine HEV, there are limited data on its prevalence in pigs in the United Kingdom. We investigated antibody prevalence, active infection, and virus variation in serum and cecal content samples from 629 pigs at slaughter. Prevalence of antibodies to HEV was 92.8% (584/629), and HEV RNA was detected in 15% of cecal contents (93/629), 3% of plasma samples (22/629), and 2% of both (14/629). However, although HEV is prevalent in pigs in the United Kingdom and viremic pigs are entering the food chain, most (22/23) viral sequences clustered separately from the dominant type seen in humans. Thus, pigs raised in the United Kingdom are unlikely to be the main source of human HEV infections in the United Kingdom. Further research is needed to identify the source of these infections.

  7. BCG vaccination enhances resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs fed a low casein diet.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    In order to examine the relationship between malnutrition and tuberculosis development in vivo, a malnourished guinea pig model fed with a low casein (5%) diet was developed. After being fed with the low casein diet, the guinea pigs were infected with Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis Kurono strain by aerosol infection, and seven weeks later were subjected to histopathologic examination, colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-12 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA. Another group of guinea pigs were vaccinated subcutaneously with 10(6) CFU BCG Tokyo for three weeks and then similarly infected by aerosol. Eighty-eight% (7/8) of the malnourished guinea pigs succumbed to mycobacterial infection within 85 days after infection, while the malnourished guinea pigs vaccinated with BCG Tokyo survived. CFU assay showed that lung and splenic CFUs were higher in the low casein diet-fed groups than in the control diet (20% casein)-fed groups, although both groups had significantly lower CFUs after vaccination with BCG Tokyo (p<0.01). Examination of lung histopathology revealed that pulmonary granulomas were large and disorganized in the groups fed the low casein diet. The number of visible lesions on the surfaces of the fixed lungs in guinea pigs fed control diet+BCG and low casein diet+BCG was low significantly. Pan T-, CD4-, CD8- and Mac antigen-positive cells were also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and Pan T-, CD4- and Mac antigen-positive cells increased after vaccination with BCG Tokyo. Expression of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-12 and iNOS mRNA was also recognized in the infected lung tissues of low casein-fed guinea pigs and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha mRNA expression was enhanced with BCG vaccination. These results indicate that

  8. Cross-Sectional Study of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Pig Farms in England.

    PubMed

    Limon, Georgina; Beauvais, Wendy; Dadios, Nikolaos; Villena, Isabelle; Cockle, Charlotte; Blaga, Radu; Guitian, Javier

    2017-02-10

    Ingestion of undercooked meat has been proposed as an important source of human Toxoplasma gondii infection. To ascertain the contribution of meat consumption to the risk of human infection, estimates of the prevalence of infection in meat-producing animals are required. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess T. gondii infection in pigs raised in England, to identify risk factors for infection, and to compare performance of two serological tests: modified agglutination test (MAT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Blood samples from 2071 slaughter pigs originating from 131 farms were collected and 75 (3.6%) were found to be positive by MAT. Positive pigs originated from 24 farms. A subset of samples (n = 492) were tested using ELISA, and a significant disagreement (p < 0.001) was found between the two tests. An empirical Bayes approach was used to estimate the farm-level prevalence and the probability of each individual farm having at least one positive animal, considering the uncertainty arising from the sampling strategy and the imperfect test performance. The adjusted farm-level prevalence was 11.5% (95% credible interval of positive farms 8.4-16.0%). Two different criteria were used for classifying farms as infected: (1) ≥50% probability of having at least one infected pig (n = 5, 6.8%) and (2) ≥10% probability (n = 15, 20.5%). Data on putative risk factors were obtained for 73 farms. Using a 10% cutoff, the relative risk (RR) of infection was higher in farms where cats have direct access to pigs' food (RR = 2.6; p = 0.04), pigs have outdoor access (RR = 3.0; p = 0.04), and farms keeping ≤200 pigs (RR = 3.9; p = 0.02), with strong collinearity between the three variables. The findings suggest a low level of T. gondii infection in the farms studied, most of which are likely to send to slaughter batches comprising 100% uninfected pigs. These results provide key inputs to quantitatively assess the

  9. In vitro inactivation of complement by a serum factor present in Junin-virus infected guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; de Bracco, M M

    1980-01-01

    A serum factor(s) of guinea-pigs infected with Junin virus, the etiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever, is endowed with a potent anticomplementary activity. It is resistant to heat (56 degrees, 30 min) and elutes from a Sephadex G-200 column between albumin and haemoglobin. It is ineffective in the presence of EDTA or EGTA and does not sediment at 82,000 g. It has no direct effect on C4 unless functional Cl is present. However, it induces Cl activation that consumes C4 haemolytic activity in normal human and guinea-pig sera. The evidence presented in this report demonstrates that the complement activation observed in experimental Argentine haemorrhagic fever is at least in part due to a direct effect of this serum factor on the classical complement pathway. PMID:6247264

  10. Disruption of the blood–brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Balboa, Diana; Orrego, Miguel Ángel; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; García, Hector H.; González, Armando E.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected into 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120 h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis. PMID:23684909

  11. A neonatal gnotobiotic pig model of human enterovirus 71 infection and associated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Kocher, Jacob; Jortner, Bernard S; Vonck, Marlice; Pelzer, Kevin; Deng, Jie; Zhu, Runan; Li, Yuyun; Qian, Yuan; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development and pathogenesis studies for human enterovirus 71 are limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report the development of a novel neonatal gnotobiotic pig model using the non-pig-adapted neurovirulent human enterovirus 71 strain BJ110, which has a C4 genotype. Porcine small intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural cells were infected in vitro. Oral and combined oral–nasal infection of 5-day-old neonatal gnotobiotic pigs with 5×108 fluorescence forming units (FFU) resulted in shedding up to 18 days post-infection, with viral titers in rectal swab samples peaking at 2.22×108 viral RNA copies/mL. Viral capsid proteins were detected in enterocytes within the small intestines on post-infection days (PIDs) 7 and 14. Additionally, viral RNA was detected in intestinal and extra-intestinal tissues, including the central nervous system, the lung and cardiac muscle. The infected neonatal gnotobiotic pigs developed fever, forelimb weakness, rapid breathing and some hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms. Flow cytometry analysis revealed increased frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-γ-producing T cells in the brain and the blood on PID 14, but reduced frequencies were observed in the lung. Furthermore, high titers of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies were generated in both orally and combined oral–nasally infected pigs on PIDs 7, 14, 21 and 28. Together, these results demonstrate that neonatal gnotobiotic pigs represent a novel animal model for evaluating vaccines for human enterovirus 71 and for understanding the pathogenesis of this virus and the associated immune responses. PMID:26038741

  12. Toxoplasma gondii infection in slaughter pigs in Serbia: seroprevalence and demonstration of parasites in blood

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A seroepizootiological study of Toxoplasma gondii infection involving a total of 488 slaughter pigs (468 market-weight pigs and 20 sows) in the Belgrade area, also included examination of the presence of T. gondii in the blood. Blood sampled at the slaughter line was examined for specific antibodies by modified direct agglutination, and blood clots of those seropositive at titres of 1:50-1:12800 were bioassayed in mice. The overall seroprevalence was 9.2%, significantly higher (p = 0.0063) in sows (30.0%) than in market-weight pigs (8.3%). Amongst the 22 bioassays performed, a total of 16 (72.7%) were positive, by observation of T. gondii cysts (12), seropositivity (7, including 3 in which cysts were not detected), and/or detection of T. gondii DNA by real-time PCR (12, including one otherwise negative). The positive bioassays originated from the blood of 12 market-weight pigs and 4 sows. Despite a general increase in the rate of demonstration of T. gondii with the increase in the specific antibody level, the association was not significant (p = 0.101). The risk of infection was 41-fold increased in sows vs market-weight pigs, and 15-fold in pigs from smallholders' finishing type farms vs those from large farrow-to-finish farms. The presence of viable T. gondii in a proportion of the samples indicates that some of the pigs had an active parasitaemia at the time of slaughter, which, along with the seroprevalence established, points to a potential source of human infection in Serbia. This is the first report on parasitaemia in naturally infected swine. PMID:21314900

  13. Seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection in pigs in Jiangxi province, South-Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H H; Huang, S Y; Zhang, W B; Zhao, L; Xu, C M; Deng, S Z; Zhu, X Q

    2013-12-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative obligate bacteria that cause a wide range of diseases in humans and animals. To assess the risk of zoonosis posed by pigs, a total of 920 serum samples were collected from pigs in 11 administrative cities in Jiangxi province, south-eastern China, and the seroprevalence of Chlamydia antibodies was investigated by an indirect haemagglutination assay. The pathogen-specific antibodies were detected in 539 (58.59 %) pigs with seroprevalence ranging from 33.33 % (Jingdezhen) to 90.91 % (Pingxiang) among different cities (P<0.05). The highest prevalence was found in pregnant sows (80.89 %, 127/157), followed by breeding boars (79.37 %, 50/63), suckling sows (77.01 %, 67/87), fattening pigs (69.32 %, 61/88) and non-pregnant sows (62.5 %, 180/288). Piglets had the lowest prevalence of 22.78 % (54/237). The seroprevalence of Chlamydia infection among different categories of pigs was also significantly different (P<0.05). These results indicate that Chlamydia is highly prevalent in pigs in Jiangxi province and our results indicate that the presence of Chlamydia exposure in pigs may pose a potential threat to human health.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor and the pathogenesis of Pichinde virus infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J F; Herzog, N K; Jerrells, T R

    1995-03-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection; TNF alpha mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNF alpha mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease.

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor and the Pathogenesis of Pichinde Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Judith F.; Herzog, Norbert K.; Jerrells, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    Pichinde virus (PIC) is a reticuloendothelial arenavirus of the New World tropics. A guinea pig passage–adapted strain of this virus (adPIC) is uniformly lethal for inbred guinea pigs, while the related, prototype strain (PIC3739) has attenuated virulence. The abilities of adPIC and PIC3739 to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vivo and in cultured macrophages were compared. Infection with adPIC, but not PIC3739, was associated with detectable serum TNF that peaked in week 2 of infection. Tumor necrosis factor was found in the spleens of adPIC- and PIC3739-infected animals in week 1 of infection ; TNFα mRNA levels in spleens and livers of adPIC infected animals increased and remained high throughout infection, whereas PIC3739-infected organs showed down regulation of TNFα mRNA late in infection. Peritoneal macrophages explanted from adPIC-infected animals showed enhanced lipopolysaccharide-inducible TNF production. Altered regulation of TNF production may play a role in the pathogenesis of guinea pig arenavirus disease. PMID:7694969

  16. Experimental anisakid infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Vericimo, M A; Figueiredo, I; Teixeira, G A P B; Clemente, S C São

    2015-09-01

    Anisakidosis is a human parasitic disease caused by infections with members of the Anisakidae family. Accidental infection after fish intake affects the gastrointestinal tract as a consequence of mechanical damage caused by migrating larvae. Infections can also trigger allergies, hives, severe asthma or anaphylaxis with angioedema. Although mouse models of intraperitoneal antigenic stimulation exist, enabling immunological studies, few models using gastric introduction of live larvae are available for the study of immunological and gastrointestinal damage in mice. This study was designed to characterize serum reactivity against Anisakis spp. and Contracaecum spp. in Balb/c mice following orogastric inoculation and to assess gastrointestinal damage. These anisakid species were classified at the Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF) School of Veterinary Medicine and materials for live larval inoculation were developed at the UFF Immunobiology laboratory. Live larvae were inoculated following injection with a NaCl solution. Blood samples were collected and sera screened for immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG anti-larva responses to both nematodes, specific for somatic and excretory/secretory antigens, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The means of the optical densities were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post-hoc test and the general linear model. This analysis identified the presence of anti-IgG seroreactivity to both somatic and excretory/secretory Anisakis antigens in inoculated animals compared with controls (P< 0.001), and no gastric or intestinal damage was observed. These experiments demonstrated that introduction of live Contracaecum spp. into the gastrointestinal tract did not elicit serum sensitization in animals.

  17. Coprological survey of parasitic infections in pigs and cattle in slaughterhouse in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kita, Toshimasa; Narushima, Tsuguto; Kimata, Isao; Tani, Hiroyuki; Sasai, Kazumi; Baba, Eiichiroh

    2009-08-01

    A coprological survey was performed at a slaughterhouse in Osaka, Japan, from 2004 to 2007 on 129 pigs reared in 8 prefectures, and on 213 cattle reared in 21 prefectures. Eimeria spp., Trichuris suis, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus spp. infections were found in 52 (40.3%), 32 (24.8%), 19 (14.7%) and 3 pigs (2.3%), respectively, while Eimeria spp., Capillaria bovis and Trichuris sp. infections were detected in 163 (76.5%), 15 (7.0%) and 8 cattle (3.8%), respectively. Our results suggest that environmentally resistant oocysts and eggs of parasites could be widespread at the farms examined.

  18. Comparison of sow and/or piglet vaccination of 3 commercial porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) single-dose vaccines on pigs under experimental PCV2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yeonsu; Seo, Hwi Won; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-08-27

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of sow and/or piglet vaccination regimen by three commercial porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccines on pigs experimentally challenged with PCV2 at 84 days of age based on immunological, virological, and pathological evaluation. One hundred and nineteen piglets born to vaccinated or non-vaccinated sows were divided into 17 groups. A portion of the pigs with or without passively acquired immunity was vaccinated at 21 or 49 days of age. Regardless of the PCV2 vaccine, the combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations significantly (P<0.05) reduced PCV2 viremia, induced higher log2 transformed neutralizing antibody titers, and resulted in higher proportion of CD4(+)CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) lymphocyte subsets than the sow vaccination alone, the pig (21 or 49 days of age) vaccination alone, and the combination of sow and pig (21 days of age) vaccinations at various days post challenge. The results showed a significant negative correlation between maternally derived antibodies at the day of vaccination and the increment of antibody titers to PCV2 at 28 days post vaccination in the combination of sow and pig (21 days of age) vaccinations but not the combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations. The combination of sow and pig (49 days of age) vaccinations could be more effective for controlling PCV2 infection if PCV2 the infection occurs during the growing-finishing period in herds. Optimal vaccination strategies must balance the advantage of delayed vaccination with the need to induce immunity prior to exposure to pathogens under field conditions.

  19. Experimental Chagas' disease in complement-deficient mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, A P; Jarvinen, J A

    1980-01-01

    The course of infection with trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi (House 510 strain) in mice and guinea pigs with genetic complement deficiencies was compared with that in normocomplementemic animals. Parasitemias in a mouse strain (B10.D2/old) genetically deficient in C5 and therefore unable to sustain lysis were similar to or lower than in a congenic normocomplementemic strain (B10.D2/new). The levels of C3 measured immunochemically were generally unaffected. There were no significant differences in mortality rates. These results indicate that, in mice, complement-mediated lysis does not play a significant role in the control of T. cruzi (House 510) infections. Studies were also performed in normocomplementemic guinea pigs and in guinea pigs genetically deficient in the fourth component of complement and thus unable to support functions mediated by the classical pathway of complement activation. No significant differences were noted between the two strains in the course of infection, persistence of subpatent infection, or rate of mortality, indicating that if the classical complement pathway plays a role in resistance to T. cruzi (House 510) in guinea pigs, this role must be a small one. PMID:6772558

  20. Ascaris suum infection negatively affects the response to a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination and subsequent challenge infection in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is vital to understand the possible mechanisms that may impair optimal vaccine efficacy. The hypothesis posed in this study was that a concurrent Ascaris suum infection of pigs vaccinated with a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) vaccine would modulate the protective immune response to a subsequent ch...

  1. Worm recovery and precipitin antibody response in guinea pigs and rats infected with Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Su, K E; Wang, F Y; Chi, P Y

    1998-12-01

    Guinea pigs (Hartley strain) and rats (Wistar strain) were each fed 200 and 100 Clonorchis sinensis metacercariae, respectively. Five animals from each species were sacrificed weekly between 1-8 weeks postinfection (WPI) and then at 12, 16, 20 and 30 WPI for collection of worms, bile and sera. The overall worm recovery rates for guinea pigs and rats were 18.7% and 12.4%, respectively. Only one of the five rats examined at 20 WPI still harbored one worm, while all were worm-free at 30 WPI. By a double diffusion test, no antibodies were detected against C. sinensis adult antigens in the bile juice. Serum antibodies were detected in at least 95% of the infected guinea pigs between 4-30 WPI and rats between 3-16 WPI. Precipitin antibodies seemed to be correlated with the presence of live worms in rats that had been infected for more than 12 weeks.

  2. Experimental animal infections with Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, S J; Jacobs, N F; Chandler, F W; Arum, E S

    1977-01-01

    Subcutaneous tissue cavities in mice and guinea pigs were infected with human isolates of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis. The minimal infective dose for M. hominis was as low as less than 10 color-changing units (CCU) for mice and 10(2) CCU for guinea pigs. The minimal infective dose for U. urealyticum was as low as less than 10 CCU for mice and 10(4) CCU for guinea pigs. Mouse infections with either U. urealyticum or M. hominis persisted for 1 day to greater than 4 months. Guinea pigs remained infected for up to 4 weeks. Two M. hominis isolates were similar in their ability to infect subcutaneous tissue cavities but two U. urealyticum isolates varied in their ability to infect the cavities. The histopathology of the M. hominis and U. urealyticum infections was similar: an initial intense polymorphonuclear response with giant cells, followed in 4 weeks by histiocytes and giant cells with some plasma cells and lymphocytes. Images PMID:873611

  3. Mycobacterium bovis infections in slaughter pigs in Mubende district, Uganda: a public health concern

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis is primarily a disease of ruminants, particularly cattle (Bos primigenius) and buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and is endemic in most developing countries. To date, studies done in Uganda have documented the prevalence of M. bovis in cattle, humans and wild life, in addition to non-tuberculous mycobacteria in pigs. Pigs are increasingly becoming an important component of the livestock sector and share the human ecosystem in rural Uganda. It is therefore of public health interest that they are not a source of human infections. As a follow up to previously published findings on mycobacteria in pigs, this study was aimed at investigating the occurrence and molecular characteristics of M. bovis detected in slaughter pigs in Mubende district, Uganda. One hundred fifty mesenteric lymph nodes with lesions suggestive of mycobacterial infections were collected from approximately one thousand slaughtered pigs in Mubende district over a period of five months. The isolation and identification of M. bovis was done using conventional mycobacteriological methods. Mycobacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) were identified to species level using deletion analysis. Molecular typing was done using Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR analysis. Molecular data were analysed and interpreted using MIRU-VNTR plus, SpolDB4.0 and the Mycobacterium bovis spoligo database. Results Of the examined animals, one boar and two sows from Madudu Sub County were infected with M. bovis which presented as lesions of a deep yellow colour and a grit-like texture in the mesenteric lymph nodes. This represents 2% (3/150) of the lymph nodes where lesions suggestive of mycobacterial infections were detected. Molecular analysis revealed that the isolates from the infected pigs showed identical MIRU-VNTR profile and spoligotype (SB1469). Conclusions This is the first study documenting the occurrence of M. bovis in slaughter pigs in

  4. Prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in landrace and mixed breed pigs slaughtered in Baja California Sur State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Vazquez-Morales, Renata Fabiola; Colado-Romero, Edgar Eusebio; Guzmán-Sánchez, Ramiro; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Dubey, Jitender P

    2015-03-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 308 domestic pigs slaughtered in La Paz, Baja California Sur State, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25). Forty (13%) of the 308 pigs were seropositive with MAT titers of 1:25 in 16, 1:50 in 5, 1:100 in 4, 1:200 in 5, 1:400 in 3, 1:800 in 3, 1:1600 in 2, and 1:3200 in 2. Multivariate analysis of pigs' characteristics showed that seropositivity to T. gondii was negatively associated with mixed breed (OR = 0.02; 95% CI: 0.003-0.26; P = 0.001). Other variables including sex, type of raising, and municipality did not show an association with T. gondii seropositivity by multivariate analysis. The frequency of high antibody titers (≥1:400) was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in Landrace pigs than mixed breed pigs. The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in pigs for slaughter in Baja California Sur State is low compared with seroprevalences reported in pigs in other Mexican states. Landrace pigs demonstrated higher seroprevalence rates and antibody levels than mixed breed pigs. This is the first report of T. gondii infection in pigs raised in a desert climate.

  5. Florfenicol feed supplemented decrease the clinical effects of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae experimental infection in swine in México.

    PubMed

    Ciprián, A; Palacios, J M; Quintanar, D; Batista, L; Colmenares, G; Cruz, T; Romero, A; Schnitzlein, W; Mendoza, S

    2012-04-01

    The therapeutic value of Florfenicol feed supplemented was evaluated in conventional pigs to eliminate consequences of chronic infection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. The experimental animals were pigs with an average of 16 kg, after intratracheally inoculation with M. hyopneumoniae they were divided in two experimental groups: (a) the non-medicated; and (b) the feed supplemented group (20 g Florfenicol/ton of feed) during the ensuing 35 days. The average daily weight gain of the Florfenicol-treated pigs (0.33±0.14 kg/day) was significantly higher than that of the non-treated ones (0.21±0.10 kg/day). In medicated animals was still impaired relative to that of the uninfected ones control group (0.39±0.02 kg/day). The average percentage of pneumonic gross lesions extensions' of the pigs groups was: 13.99% for M. hyopneumoniae infected non-medicated group; 1.79% M. hyopneumoniae infected, Florfenicol-treated group and, 0.56% of the uninfected control group. M. hyopneumoniae; colonization was detected at these levels in 7 and 9 members of the respective infected groups. The extent of the pneumonic lesions and M. hyopneumoniae generally was greater in the non-medicated pigs. Therefore, oral administration of Florfenicol via feed ingestion seemed to be somewhat effective in ameliorating the clinical effects of M. hyopneumoniae infection of swine.

  6. Prevalence of Chlamydial Infections in Fattening Pigs and Their Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolin; Schott, Franziska; Donati, Manuela; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Hässig, Michael; Wanninger, Sabrina; Sidler, Xaver; Borel, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydial infections in pigs are associated with respiratory disease, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and other pathologies. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of Chlamydiaceae in Swiss fattening pigs by applying sensitive and specific detection methods and to correlate prior antibiotic treatment and farm related factors with differences in prevalence. Conjunctival and fecal swabs were collected from 636 pigs in 29 Swiss fattening pig farms with and without antibiotic treatment, at the beginning and the end of the fattening period. The swabs were screened by real-time PCR for Chlamydiaceae. For the chlamydial detection and species-identification, a DNA-microarray analysis was performed. All farms were positive for Chlamydiaceae with 94.3 and 92.0% prevalence in fecal swabs as well as 45.9 and 32.6% in conjunctival swabs at the first and second time points, respectively. Antibiotic treatment could not clear the infection on herd level. Potential contact with wild boars was a significant risk factor, while hygiene criteria did not influence chlamydial prevalence. A correlation of chlamydial positivity to diarrhea, but not to conjunctivitis was evident. Chlamydia suis was the predominant species. Mixed infections with C. suis and C. pecorum were common, with a substantial increase in C. pecorum positivity at the end of the fattening period, and this finding was associated with ruminant contact. C. abortus was detected in one conjunctival swab. In this study, C. suis inhabited the intestinal tract of nearly all examined pigs, implying a long-term infection. C. pecorum was also common and might be transmitted to pigs by ruminants. PMID:26619187

  7. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  8. Clinical chemical responses to experimental airborne legionellosis in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, P.; Bailey, N. E.; Fitzgeorge, R. B.; Baskerville, A.

    1985-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila infection of guinea-pigs by the aerosol route with either of two strains, one (serogroup I) giving an acute the other (serogroup 3) giving a protracted illness, induced a pyrexia and similar pneumonic lesions. With both strains there was a bacteraemia with early decreases in serum iron and zinc and increases in serum copper concentrations. Marked changes in other serum components were evident only in those animals which had protracted illness (serogroup 3-infected animals). These included transient increases in aminotransferase, creatine kinase and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities and triglyceride levels, together with gradual decreases in alkaline phosphatase and leucine aminopeptidase activities. Serum lysozyme activity and acute-phase protein synthesis increased, as did the ratio of phenylalanine to tyrosine. The findings confirm the relevance of the aerosol-infected guinea-pig model for the investigation of the disease processes and evaluation of therapeutic measures for use in man. PMID:2580546

  9. Vaccination of pigs reduces Torque teno sus virus viremia during natural infection.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Melsió, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Fernando; Darji, Ayub; Segalés, Joaquim; Cornelissen-Keijsers, Vivian; van den Born, Erwin; Kekarainen, Tuija

    2015-07-09

    Anelloviruses are a group of single-stranded circular DNA viruses infecting several vertebrate species. Four species have been found to infect swine, namely Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV) 1a and 1b (TTSuV1a, TTSuV1b; genus Iotatorquevirus), TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b (genus Kappatorquevirus). TTSuV infection in pigs is distributed worldwide, and is characterized by a persistent viremia. However, the real impact, if any, on the pig health is still under debate. In the present study, the impact of pig immunization on TTSuVk2a loads was evaluated. For this, three-week old conventional pigs were primed with DNA vaccines encoding the ORF2 gene and the ORF1-A, ORF1-B, and ORF1-C splicing variants and boosted with purified ORF1-A and ORF2 Escherichia coli proteins, while another group served as unvaccinated control animals, and the viral load dynamics during natural infection was observed. Immunization led to delayed onset of TTSuVk2a infection and at the end of the study when the animals were 15 weeks of age, a number of animals in the immunized group had cleared the TTSuVk2a viremia, which was not the case in the control group. This study demonstrated for the first time that TTSuV viremia can be controlled by a combined DNA and protein immunization, especially apparent two weeks after the first DNA immunization before seroconversion was observed. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms behind this and its impact for pig producers.

  10. [Experimental infection of 2 species of laboratory rodents with invasive larvae of Elaphostrongylus cervi (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea)].

    PubMed

    Demiaszkiewicz, A W

    1989-01-01

    Single doses (from 300 to 1000 larvi per an animal) of invasive larvae E. cervi Cameron, 1931, obtained from experimentally infected snails Helix pomatia L. were given to 17 guinea pigs and 17 golden hamsters. Clinical nervous symptoms in the form of paresis and paralysis of limbs occurred only in the guinea pigs which were given a dose of 1000 larvi. These animals died in the period from the 75th to 117th day of infection. From their central nervous system single adult males and females of E. cervi were isolated. In the lungs and mesenteries of 2 dead pigs live larvae of E. cervi were found. This fact proves that the guinea pig can fulfil the role of a final and a paratenic host of E. cervi. No clinical symptoms were noticed in any hamster. In hamsters dissected on the 7th day of infection live larvae of E. cervi were found in the mesentery and in the fleshy part of the diaphgram. After 14 days the larvae found both in the mesentery and in the diaphragm were dead and surrounded by cellular infiltration. A strong tissue reaction of the hamster after the administration of E. cervi larvae is responsible for the larvae destruction and resorption.

  11. Down-regulation of mechanisms involved in cell transport and maintenance of mucosal integrity in pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular bacterium, responsible for the disease complex known as proliferative enteropathy (PE). L. intracellularis is associated with intestinal crypt epithelial cell proliferation but the mechanisms responsible are yet to be defined. Microarray analysis was used to investigate the host-pathogen interaction in experimentally infected pigs to identify pathways that may be involved. Ileal samples originating from twenty-eight weaner pigs experimentally challenged with a pure culture of L. intracellularis (strain LR189/5/83) were subjected to microarray analysis. Microarray transcriptional signatures were validated using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR of selected genes at various time points post challenge. At peak of infection (14 days post challenge) 86% of altered transcripts were down regulated, particularly those involved in maintenance of mucosal integrity and regulation of cell transport. Among the up-regulated transcripts, CD163 and CDK1 were novel findings and considered to be important, due to their respective roles in innate immunity and cellular proliferation. Overall, targeted cellular mechanisms included those that are important in epithelial restitution, migration and protection; maintenance of stable inter-epithelial cell relationships; cell transport of nutrients and electrolytes; innate immunity; and cell cycle. PMID:24885874

  12. Experimental infection of Philippine Taenia in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Fan, P C; Lin, C Y; Chung, W C

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, six 34-44-day-old Small-Ear-Miniature pigs and one 14-day-old Holstein calf were each fed 10,000 Philippine Taenia eggs and sacrificed 27-43 days after inoculation. The infection rate was 100% for both pigs and calf with cysticerci recovery rates of 11 and 6%, respectively. A total of 6431 cysticerci were recovered only from the livers of the six pigs and 597 only from the liver of the calf; more occurred in the parenchyma (pigs 75%, calf 83%) than on the surface (pigs 25%, calf 17%). Mature cysticerci were found in four of the six pigs. A total of 317 cysticerci recovered from the pig livers were mature and the rest were either immature (926), degenerate or calcified (5188). All 597 cysticerci recovered from the liver of the calf were degenerate or calcified. Measurements of length, width, diameter of protoscolex, rostellum, and sucker and hooklet pattern indicated that Philippine Taenia is very similar to Taenia from Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia and Thailand and very different from classical T. saginata and T. solium.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE (EATON'S AGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Clyde, Wallace A.; Denny, Floyd W.

    1965-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was studied in the Syrian hamster with qualitative and quantitative culture methods and special histopathologic techniques. The animals were readily infected with the mycoplasma, which multiplied throughout the respiratory tract. Sensitivity of this experimental host to infection was indicated by the 50 per cent infective dose, which was 10 colony-forming units of the organism. Inoculation consistently resulted in the production of peribronchial pneumonitis which was induced by the mycoplasma. The organisms were visualized in a superficial location in the mucosa of involved bronchi, by means of indirect fluorescent antibody staining and by a modification of the Brown and Brenn technique. The data indicate applicability of the hamster to the study of problems concerned with M. pneumoniae disease which are impractical or impossible to resolve in the human host. PMID:14319403

  14. Swine influenza virus infection dynamics in two pig farms; results of a longitudinal assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the dynamics of influenza virus infection in pigs, serological and virological follow-ups were conducted in two whole batches of pigs from two different farms (F1 and F2), from 3 weeks of age until market age. Anti-swine influenza virus (SIV) antibodies (measured by ELISA and hemagglutination inhibition) and nasal virus shedding (measured by RRT-PCR and isolation in embryonated chicken eggs and MDCK cells) were carried out periodically. SIV isolates were subtyped and hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were partially sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. In F1, four waves of viral circulation were detected, and globally, 62/121 pigs (51.2%) were positive by RRT-PCR at least once. All F1 isolates corresponded to H1N1 subtype although hemagglutination inhibition results also revealed the presence of antibodies against H3N2. The first viral wave took place in the presence of colostral-derived antibodies. Nine pigs were positive in two non-consecutive sampling weeks, with two of the animals being positive with the same isolate. Phylogenetic analyses showed that different H1N1 variants circulated in that farm. In F2, only one isolate, H1N2, was detected and all infections were concentrated in a very short period of time, as assumed for a classic influenza outbreak. These findings led us to propose that influenza virus infection in pigs might present different patterns, from an epidemic outbreak to an endemic form with different waves of infections with a lower incidence. PMID:22452923

  15. Absence of progesterone effects on chlamydial genital infection in female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of progesterone alone and in combination with estradiol was investigated in ovariectomized and gonadally intact female guinea pigs infected with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). The course of the infection, as determined by the percentage of cells with GPIC (chlamydia) inclusions in Giemsa-stained vaginal scrapings, was not affected in animals receiving 5.0 mg of progesterone daily. Progesterone had no influence on the enhancement of infection by estradiol. In comparison with sesame oil-treated controls, infection was prolonged by four to six days (P less than .05) in animals receiving a combination of 5.0 mg of progesterone plus 1.0 microgram of estradiol or 1.0 microgram of estradiol alone each day. In ovariectomized animals, estradiol delayed the appearance of IgA antibody in genital secretions, whereas progesterone alone had no effect. Guinea pigs treated with estradiol or progesterone plus estradiol manifested an acute endometritis not observed in animals treated with progesterone alone or in controls receiving sesame oil. Although cervical ectopy, analogous to that seen in women with high levels of progesterone, was identified by histopathology in animals treated with progesterone, no enhancement of the chlamydial infection was observed.

  16. Antibody response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in vaccinated pigs with or without maternal antibodies induced by sow vaccination.

    PubMed

    Martelli, P; Terreni, M; Guazzetti, S; Cavirani, S

    2006-06-01

    Vaccination with bacterins is an important tool for the control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection of pigs. Because such vaccination often involves piglets that have suckled M. hyopneumoniae antibody-positive dams it is important to understand the effect of pre-existing (passively acquired) antibody on vaccine-induced immunity. To investigate this issue experimentally, 20 sows that were seronegative for M. hyopneumoniae were selected from a M. hyopneumoniae-infected herd and then randomly allocated to one of four treatment groups (five sows/group): Group A, vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group B, vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets; Group C, non-vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group D, non-vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets. Sows (Groups A and B) were vaccinated 14 days before farrowing and seroconverted within the next 14 days. Conversely, none of the non-vaccinated sows was seropositive at farrowing. Piglets (Groups A and C) were vaccinated when they were 7 days of age. Regardless of treatments none of the piglets had any evidence of an active immune response until many of those of Groups A and C and a few of those of Groups B and D seroconverted after it had been shown that at least some pigs of all groups had been naturally infected with a field strain of M. hyopneumoniae. This pattern of immune responsiveness (i.e. the collective results of Groups A, B, C and D) suggested that vaccination of pigs had primed their immune system for subsequent exposure to M. hyopneumoniae, and that passively acquired antibody had little or no effect on either a vaccine-induced priming or a subsequent anamnestic response. According to the statistical analysis sow serological status did not interfere with the antibody response in early vaccinated piglets. In conclusion, the results pointed out that early vaccination of piglets may assist M. hyopneumoniae control independently from the serological status of sows.

  17. Clinical and pathological responses of pigs from two genetically diverse commercial lines to porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The response to infection from porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) for two genetically diverse commercial pig lines was investigated. Seventy two pigs from each line, aged 6 weeks, were challenged with PRRSV VR-2385, and 66 littermates served as control. The clinical response...

  18. Whole blood microarray analysis of pigs showing extreme phenotypes after a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Observed variability in pig response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) infection, and recently demonstrated genetic control of such responses, suggest that it may be possible to reduce the economic impact of this disease by selecting more disease-resistant pig...

  19. Prevalence of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in landrace and mixed breed pigs slaughtered in Baja California Sur state, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 308 domestic pigs slaughtered in La Paz, Baja California Sur State, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT, cut off 1:25). Results Forty (13%) of the 308 pigs were seropositive ...

  20. Quantitative PCR analysis of Mycoplasma suis shedding patterns during experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Stefanie; Mack, Sarah-Lena; Hoelzle, Katharina; Becker, Katja; Jannasch, Carolin; Stadler, Julia; Ritzmann, Mathias; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2014-08-27

    The uncultivable hemotrophic bacterium Mycoplasma suis causes infectious anemia in pigs worldwide. The mechanisms by which M. suis is transmitted from pig to pig are largely unknown. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating urine, feces, saliva, nasal and vaginal secrets as well as environmental samples for the presence of M. suis DNA to get insights into potential transmission routes. Seven pigs were experimentally infected with M. suis KI3806. Samples were taken for 8 days post infection (p.i.). A quantitative LightCycler msg1 PCR was used to detect and quantify M. suis. Shedding was found in saliva as well as nasal and vaginal secrets from day 6 p.i. on with a quantity of 3.4 × 10(2) to 2.7 × 10(5)M. suis/swab. In urine M. suis DNA could be detected in 100.0% of the samples from day 6 p.i. on with a quantity of 4.7 × 10(2) to 6.3 × 10(5)M. suis per mL. When shedding patterns were correlated to the median bacterial blood loads shedding was observed at loads of 2.0 × 10(9)-7.0 × 10(10)M. suis per mL blood. No M. suis DNA could be amplified from feces. Dust and water samples of the pig drinking troughs were positive for M. suis on days 2 and 6 post infection, air samples were M. suis-negative throughout the experiment. Our results indicate that blood independent direct transmission as well as indirect transmission via environmental contamination could play a role in the epidemiology of M. suis infections.

  1. [An experimental model of hepatointestinal transplant in the pig with clinical applications].

    PubMed

    López Santamaría, M; Gámez, M; Murcia, J; Bueno, J; Paz, J A; Canser, E; Reinoso, F; Muñoz, J; Lobato, R; Martínez, L; de Miguel, E; Polanco, I; Jara, P; Tovar, J

    1996-10-01

    A model of experimental hepatointestinal transplant in pigs, with clinical applications is presented. Ten animals received a graft composed by the liver and the full length of the small bowel. Two pigs died during the transplant and in eight the surgical procedure was well tolerated with a good revascularization of the grafts. The coagulation parameters were normal after the transplant and only minor biochemical disturbances were found. The main difficulties of the surgical technique are related with the poor tolerance of the pig to the portal and caval clamping, and the close relationships of the duodenum, pancreas and distal colon, produced by the 360 degrees anti-clockwise bowel rotation around the mesenteric vessels. Clamping the supraceliac aorta during the implant of the graft keeps the animal hemodynamically stable and makes unnecessary the use of the more complicated veno venous shunt.

  2. Activity of terbinafine in experimental fungal infections of laboratory animals.

    PubMed Central

    Petranyi, G; Meingassner, J G; Mieth, H

    1987-01-01

    The allylamine derivative terbinafine is the first antifungal agent with primary fungicidal properties against dermatophytes which acts systemically after oral application as well as locally after topical application. Comparative oral studies carried out with griseofulvin and ketoconazole in model infections such as guinea pig trichophytosis and microsporosis revealed terbinafine to be superior to the reference compounds both clinically and mycologically. An excellent antimycotic activity of terbinafine was also demonstrable after topical treatment of guinea pig dermatophytoses caused by Trichophyton mentagrophytes or Microsporum canis. Results of comparative chemotherapeutic studies carried out with econazole and tolnaftate demonstrated superior efficacy of terbinafine in the treatment of both trichophytosis and microsporosis. Skin infections of guinea pigs caused by Candida albicans and vaginal candidiasis in rats proved to be responsive to a topical application of terbinafine also. However, the reference compounds, clotrimazole and miconazole, exhibited activity superior to that of terbinafine in both models. PMID:3435103

  3. Embryonation and infectivity of Ascaris suum eggs isolated from worms expelled by pigs treated with albendazole , pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin or piperazine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Boes, J; Eriksen, L; Nansen, P

    1998-02-28

    The effect of anthelmintic treatment of pigs on the embryonation and infectivity of Ascaris suum eggs isolated from expelled worms was investigated. Four groups of two naturally infected pigs were dosed with albendazole, pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin or piperazine dihydrochloride, respectively. Following worm expulsion, the eggs were removed from the uteri of female worms and embryonated in sulphuric acid. The infectivity of the embryonated eggs was tested through mouse inoculation. Egg development appeared normal in cultures from worms of the piperazine. pyrantel and ivermectin treated groups. In the albendazole cultures, egg development was largely arrested at the one-cell stage (81%). Where development occurred, irregular cell division was observed and only 7% of the eggs in the culture developed into fullgrown larvae. Following mouse inoculation with 2500 embryonated eggs, significantly lower lung larval counts on day 8 post inoculation (p.i.) were observed for mice in the piperazine and pyrantel treated groups (P < 0.01) compared to untreated controls. The larvae that developed in the eggs from ivermectin and albendazole treated groups appeared fully infective for mice. It was concluded that ovicidal activity of albendazole in vivo inhibits subsequent A. suum egg development in vitro; albendazole is, therefore, not suitable to obtain worms for egg embryonation to produce experimental inoculums. The anthelmintic treatment of pigs with ivermectin had only a limited effect on both embryonation and infectivity of A. suum eggs isolated from expelled worms.

  4. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; ...

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore » cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  5. Experimental infection in gerbils by Conidiobolus lamprauges.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Isabela; de Campos, Camila Gonçalves; Pescador, Caroline Argenta; Galceran, João Vitor Amorim; Cândido, Stéfhano Luis; Dutra, Valéria; Nakazato, Luciano

    2017-02-28

    Conidiobolomycosis is an emerging entomophthoramycosis caused by fungi Conidiobolus spp. Animal models are essential for the study of infectious disease in various areas such as pathogenesis, diagnostic methods, treatment and prevention. There is not currently an animal model for conidiobolomycosis. The aim of this study was to create an experimental infection protocol for Conidiobolus lamprauges in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). The study animals were randomly divided into four groups of four animals: immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and infected with C. lamprauges (G1), immunocompetent and infected with C. lamprauges (G2), immunosuppressed with CPA (G3), and an immunocompetent control group (G4). Clinical signs were observed only in G1 animals, where the mortality rate reached 75% by day 7 after infection (AI) with a median survival of 2 days. C. lamprauges was detected only in G1, both by PCR and by isolation. Necropsies of the G1 animals showed lesions in the nasal cavity and lung tissue. These lesions were characterized by polymorphonuclear infiltrate cells and by the presence of hyphal structures under silver staining. This animal model will be useful for further investigation of diseases caused by C. lamprauges, particularly of those associated with immunosuppression factors in naturally occurring animal infections.

  6. Taenia crassiceps infection abrogates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett F; González, Marisol I; Verdin, Leticia; Terrazas, Luis I

    2011-01-01

    Helminth infections induce strong immunoregulation that can modulate subsequent pathogenic challenges. Taenia crassiceps causes a chronic infection that induces a Th2-biased response and modulates the host cellular immune response, including reduced lymphoproliferation in response to mitogens, impaired antigen presentation and the recruitment of suppressive alternatively activated macrophages (AAMФ). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of T. crassiceps to reduce the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Only 50% of T. crassiceps-infected mice displayed EAE symptoms, which were significantly less severe than uninfected mice. This effect was associated with both decreased MOG-specific splenocyte proliferation and IL-17 production and limited leukocyte infiltration into the spinal cord. Infection with T. crassiceps induced an anti-inflammatory cytokine microenvironment, including decreased TNF-α production and high MOG-specific production of IL-4 and IL-10. While the mRNA expression of TNF-α and iNOS was lower in the brain of T. crassiceps-infected mice with EAE, markers for AAMФ were highly expressed. Furthermore, in these mice, there was reduced entry of CD3(+)Foxp3(-) cells into the brain. The T. crassiceps-induced immune regulation decreased EAE severity by dampening T cell activation, proliferation and migration to the CNS.

  7. First case of natural infection in pigs. Review of Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Schettino, P M; Bucio, M I; Cabrera, M; Bautista, J

    1997-01-01

    An epidemiological research project was performed in the State of Morelos including collection of samples for blood smears and culture, serological tests, and xenodiagnoses from a total of 76 domestic and peridomestic mammals. Two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated by haemocultures; one from a pig (Sus scrofa), the first case of natural infection reported in Mexico, and the other from a dog (Canis familiaris). This study summarizes current information in Mexico concerning confirmed reservoirs of T. cruzi.

  8. Intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Fabio Augusto; Borges, Elizabeth Lage; de Oliveira, Juliana Saes Vilaça; Guedes, Roberto Mauricio Carvalho

    2010-10-26

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the intestinal absorption and histomorphometry of hamsters experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis and correlate these parameters with severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Sixty hamsters were equally divided into control and inoculated groups which were orally infected with intestinal mucosa homogenate from pigs naturally infected with L. intracellularis. The intestinal absorption of glucose, sodium, potassium and chloride was evaluated in live animals (25 inoculated and 25 control) on day 26 after inoculation. In this procedure, a standard solution was infused into the cranial jejunum and collected at the terminal ileum. The experimental infection was confirmed by gross and histopathological examination and L. intracellularis antigen labeling by immunohistochemistry. Histomorphometry analysis demonstrated positive correlation between intestinal crypt depth and severity of infection based on immunohistochemistry. Infected animals had significantly lower intestinal absorption of glucose, potassium and chloride. These results indicate a lower intestinal absorption as an important mechanism of diarrhea in hamsters experimentally infected with L. intracellularis. Therefore, malabsorption should be considered as the main mechanism involved in the physiopathology of the diarrhea in L. intracellularis infected animals.

  9. Infectious dose and repeated infections are key factors influencing immune response characteristics in guinea pig ocular chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Belij-Rammerstorfer, Sandra; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Stojanovic, Marijana; Marinkovic, Emilija; Lukic, Ivana; Stein, Elisabeth; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Bintner, Nora; Schürer, Nadine; Ghasemian, Ehsan; Kundi, Michael; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether infectious dose of Chlamydia caviae after repeated infections influences the immunological responses and subsequent clearance of pathogen at the ocular surface of guinea pigs. Animals were infected three times via the conjunctiva at six- and twelve-week intervals by applying either 1 × 10(4) or 1 × 10(6) inclusion-forming units (IFUs) of C. caviae. Ocular pathology, infection course, C. caviae-specific serum IgG levels and their capacity to bind and neutralize infection ex vivo were assessed. Animals infected with 1 × 10(4) IFUs had completely diminished ocular infection and pathology after the 2nd infection with increased levels of C. caviae-specific serum IgG and their effective capacity to bind and neutralize C. caviae. Only partial protection was observed in animals infected with 1 × 10(6) IFUs after the 2nd and 3rd infections. Our findings show that full protection was observed in animals repeatedly infected with the lower dose. The lower dose appeared not to compromise the host immune system, thereby enabling fast clearance of the pathogen and the establishment of competent neutralizing antibodies.

  10. Desferoxamine and iron dextran in acute Salmonella cholerae-suis infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kramer, T T; Saucke, L; Griffith, R W; Kunesh, J P

    1986-07-01

    Serum iron (SI)-related and hematologic changes were evaluated in a herd of weaned pigs inoculated with a strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis, causing 83% mortality within 22 days after inoculation was done. Serum iron concentrations decreased to 35% of base-line values 2 days after inoculation was done, but recovered to near base line subsequently. Total SI-binding capacity (TIBC) decreased gradually for 14 days after inoculation was done. Transferrin (TF) concentrations decreased to near half the base line throughout the postinoculation observation period. The calculated SI saturation coefficient decreased to half the base line, but recovered to or above the base-line value subsequently. Combined observations of SI, TIBC, TF, and SI saturation coefficient concentrations indicated that there was higher saturation of host iron-binding proteins and recruitment of additional iron-binding systems subsequent to 2 days after inoculation was done. Day 2 after inoculation seemed to be a critical period for host iron metabolism. Injection of supplemental iron dextran simultaneously with Salmonella infection resulted in lower mortality of iron-injected pigs (P less than 0.005). A highly significant negative correlation was observed between SI concentration and rectal temperatures after pigs were inoculated with Salmonella (r = -0.54; P less than 0.0001). Hemoglobin concentrations, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin were not significantly affected by Salmonella infection or iron injection concurrent with Salmonella infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. A model of latent adenovirus 5 infection in the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Vitalis, T Z; Keicho, N; Itabashi, S; Hayashi, S; Hogg, J C

    1996-03-01

    A model of adenovirus 5 (Ad5) infection was developed in guinea pigs to begin to study its role in the pathogenesis of peripheral lung inflammation. Forty animals were inoculated intranasally with 10(7.0) pfu of Ad5/animal, and 15 animals inoculated with sterile culture media served as controls. Viral titres were 10(4.4), 10(6.1), 10(5.2), and 10(2.9) pfu/animal, on days 1, 3, 4, and 7 after infection, respectively. In situ hybridization to viral DNA and immunocytochemistry for Ad5 E1A protein localized the virus to airway and alveolar epithelial cells. Histologic examination showed an extensive inflammatory cell infiltration around the airways, with epithelial necrosis and an alveolar exudate that caused localized alveolar collapse in the infected areas. Immunocytochemistry identified the cells in the infiltrate as cytotoxic T cells. Although all animals 20 and 47 days after infection had seroconverted to Ad5, virus was not detected in these groups either by viral plaque assay or in situ hybridization. Ad5 E1A DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in five of six animals 20 days after infection and in five of five animals 47 days after infection. In these same animals, E1A protein was detected 20 days after infection in two and 47 days after infection in one while persistent bronchiolitis was observed in four and three animals 20 and 47 days after infection, respectively. These results demonstrate that the guinea pig provides a useful model to study the role of Ad5 infection in chronic airway inflammation.

  12. Occurrence, clinical involvement and zoonotic potential of endoparasites infecting Swiss pigs.

    PubMed

    Schubnell, Fabienne; von Ah, Sereina; Graage, Robert; Sydler, Titus; Sidler, Xaver; Hadorn, Daniela; Basso, Walter

    2016-12-01

    In order to estimate the diversity, clinical involvement and zoonotic potential of parasites in pigs submitted for diagnosis to the PathoPig project of the Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office, faeces (n=125) from suckling piglets (n=39), weaners (n=60) and piglets beginning fattening (n=26) from 74 Swiss farms were examined by 3 coproscopical methods (i.e. sedimentation/zinc chloride-flotation; SAFC and Ziehl-Neelsen staining). Samples microscopically positive for Cryptosporidium were further tested by PCR/sequencing for species assessment. The most frequently detected parasite was Balantidium coli, a facultative pathogenic ciliate with zoonotic potential, in 5.1, 36.7 and 50.0% of suckling, weaners and fatteners and 43.2% of farms; however, no association with disease was observed. Isospora (syn. Cystoisospora) suis infections were detected in 13.3 and 11.1% of suckling piglets with and without diarrhoea, and in 10.0 and 13.3% of weaners and fatteners with diarrhoea, respectively, and were significant associated with emaciation. Cryptosporidium infections were detected in 10.3, 15.0 and 19.2% of sucklings, weaners and fatteners, respectively, and in 18.9% of the farms. Interestingly, two age-related species were identified: C. suis in younger piglets (2 to 6weeks) and C. scrofarum in older ones (6 to 17weeks). None of the pigs infected with C. scrofarum (n=8), but 3 of 4 piglets infected with C. suis (co-infection with I. suis in 2 cases) had diarrhoea. The zoonotic species C. parvum was not detected, nevertheless, sporadic cases of human infection with the porcine-adapted species have been reported. Ascaris suum, Trichuris suis and Strongylida were rarely detected (<4%) in all age categories.

  13. Fatal bronchopneumonia in a Metastrongylus elongatus and Porcine circovirus type 2 co-infected pig.

    PubMed

    Marruchella, G; Paoletti, B; Speranza, R; Di Guardo, G

    2012-08-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection is distributed worldwide and PCV2-associated disease (PCVAD) is considered among the most economically relevant ones to the global swine industry. PCV2 is known to play a causal role in the porcine respiratory disease complex, usually in close association with a large plethora of other biologic agents. We describe herein a case of fatal parasitic bronchopneumonia by Metastrongylus elongatus in a PCV2-infected pig. Metastrongylosis may still represent a major concern for outdoor herds. Our recent experience suggests that a concurrent PCVAD condition may trigger metastrongylosis, which may subsequently result, at its turn, in severe, sometimes fatal, pulmonary disease.

  14. Longitudinal serological responses to Salmonella enterica of growing pigs in a subclinically infected herd.

    PubMed

    Beloeil, P A; Chauvin, C; Proux, K; Rose, N; Queguiner, S; Eveno, E; Houdayer, C; Rose, V; Fravalo, P; Madec, F

    2003-08-28

    A longitudinal survey was conducted in France in a subclinically Salmonella-infected farrow-to-finish pig farm to describe the time-course of the serological response to Salmonella enterica in growing pigs. We used three batches of sows and their corresponding litters (n = 31 litters). Among these, 256 pigs randomly selected and individually identified were followed from the first week of age until slaughter. Serial individual blood samples were submitted to indirect Salmonella-ELISA testing. Salmonella shedding was investigated by bacteriological testing of faecal material regularly collected from the sows and pigs and by environment swabs taken from the pens. Caecal contamination was checked at the slaughterhouse. Information about litter composition (filiation), location of the pigs in post-weaning and fattening pens, sanitary events, sex and body weights was recorded. 11.6% of the pigs shed S. enterica; 52% of pigs seroconverted before slaughter. The age-related variation of the natural logarithm of calibrated optical densities (COD) of pigs was described with two linear mixed models. From 8 to 61 days of age, the decrease in COD with age was fitted with a model including random effects of the animal and the dam on the intercept and slope, a batch random effect on the intercept and an individual birth-weight fixed effect on the intercept. The dam random effect was explained by the parity of the sow, Salmonella shedding by the sow during the farrowing phase and the value of the optical density of colostrum collected at parturition. A second model fitting the increase in COD from 61 days of age until slaughter included the random effect on intercept of the batch and the random effects on slope and intercept of the animal, the dam and the pen in which the followed animals were located during the fattening phase and the environmental contamination as fixed effect. In this second model, no relation was found between individual slaughter-bacteriological results and

  15. Systems infection biology: a compartmentalized immune network of pig spleen challenged with Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Network biology (systems biology) approaches are useful tools for elucidating the host infection processes that often accompany complex immune networks. Although many studies have recently focused on Haemophilus parasuis, a model of Gram-negative bacterium, little attention has been paid to the host's immune response to infection. In this article, we use network biology to investigate infection with Haemophilus parasuis in an in vivo pig model. Results By targeting the spleen immunogenome, we established an expression signature indicative of H. parasuis infection using a PCA/GSEA combined method. We reconstructed the immune network and estimated the network topology parameters that characterize the immunogene expressions in response to H. parasuis infection. The results showed that the immune network of H. parasuis infection is compartmentalized (not globally linked). Statistical analysis revealed that the reconstructed network is scale-free but not small-world. Based on the quantitative topological prioritization, we inferred that the C1R-centered clique might play a vital role in responding to H. parasuis infection. Conclusions Here, we provide the first report of reconstruction of the immune network in H. parasuis-infected porcine spleen. The distinguishing feature of our work is the focus on utilizing the immunogenome for a network biology-oriented analysis. Our findings complement and extend the frontiers of knowledge of host infection biology for H. parasuis and also provide a new clue for systems infection biology of Gram-negative bacilli in mammals. PMID:23339624

  16. Experimental Infection of Pigs with the 1918 Pandemic Influenza Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine influenza was first recognized as a disease during the 1918 "Spanish flu" pandemic suggesting the Spanish flu virus caused swine influenza. The objective of this study was to determine the susceptibility of swine to the Spanish flu virus. A plasmid-derived 1918 pandemic H1N1 (1918/rec) influe...

  17. Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia by lymph node cells in inbred guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Passive transfer of experimental autoimmune myasthenia (EAM) was performed with lymph node cells from donor guinea pigs immunized with purified acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from Torpedo californica. Recipient animals revealed the same clinical signs and electromyographic patterns as observed in actively challenged animals. These phenomena are parallel to the clinical manifestations of the human disease myasthenia gravis, in which cellular response to AChR was recently demonstrated. PMID:1165476

  18. Severe Hemorrhagic Fever in Strain 13/N Guinea Pigs Infected with Lujo Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Brian H.; Dodd, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Albariño, César G.; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; McMullan, Laura K.; Bergeron, Eric; Ströeher, Ute; Cannon, Deborah; Martin, Brock; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2012-01-01

    Lujo virus (LUJV) is a novel member of the Arenaviridae family that was first identified in 2008 after an outbreak of severe hemorrhagic fever (HF). In what was a small but rapidly progressing outbreak, this previously unknown virus was transmitted from the critically ill index patient to 4 attending healthcare workers. Four persons died during this outbreak, for a total case fatality of 80% (4/5). The suspected rodent source of the initial exposure to LUJV remains a mystery. Because of the ease of transmission, high case fatality, and novel nature of LUJV, we sought to establish an animal model of LUJV HF. Initial attempts in mice failed, but infection of inbred strain 13/N guinea pigs resulted in lethal disease. A total of 41 adult strain 13/N guinea pigs were infected with either wild-type LUJV or a full-length recombinant LUJV. Results demonstrated that strain 13/N guinea pigs provide an excellent model of severe and lethal LUJV HF that closely resembles what is known of the human disease. All infected animals experienced consistent weight loss (3–5% per day) and clinical illness characterized by ocular discharge, ruffled fur, hunched posture, and lethargy. Uniform lethality occurred by 11–16 days post-infection. All animals developed disseminated LUJV infection in various organs (liver, spleen, lung, and kidney), and leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and elevated transaminase levels. Serial euthanasia studies revealed a temporal pattern of virus dissemination and increasing severity of disease, primarily targeting the liver, spleen, lungs, and lower gastrointestinal tract. Establishing an animal LUJV model is an important first step towards understanding the high pathogenicity of LUJV and developing vaccines and antiviral therapeutic drugs for this highly transmissible and lethal emerging pathogen. PMID:22953019

  19. Understanding Streptococcus suis serotype 2 infection in pigs through a transcriptional approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2) is an important pathogen of pigs. S suis 2 infections have high mortality rates and are characterized by meningitis, septicemia and pneumonia. S. suis 2 is also an emerging zoonotic agent and can infect humans that are exposed to pigs or their by-products. To increase our knowledge of the pathogenesis of meningitis, septicemia and pneumonia in pigs caused by S. suis 2, we profiled the response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), brain and lung tissues to infection with S. suis 2 strain SC19 using the Affymetrix Porcine Genome Array. Results A total of 3,002 differentially expressed transcripts were identified in the three tissues, including 417 unique genes in brain, 210 in lung and 213 in PBMC. These genes showed differential expression (DE) patterns on analysis by visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID). The DE genes involved in the immune response included genes related to the inflammatory response (CD163), the innate immune response (TLR2, TLR4, MYD88, TIRAP), cell adhesion (CD34, SELE, SELL, SELP, ICAM-1, ICAM-2, VCAM-1), antigen processing and presentation (MHC protein complex) and angiogenesis (VEGF), together with genes encoding cytokines (interleukins). Five selected genes were validated by qRT-PCR analysis. Conclusions We studied the response to infection with S. suis 2 strain SC19 by microarray analysis. Our findings confirmed some genes identified in previous studies and discovered numerous additional genes that potentially function in S. suis 2 infections in vivo. This new information will form the foundation of future investigations into the pathogenesis of S. suis. PMID:21599948

  20. Characterization of Chlamydial Genital Infection Resulting from Sexual Transmission from Male to Female Guinea Pigs and Determination of Infectious Dose

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Roger G.; Bowlin, Anne K.; Reed, Ronald L.; Darville, Toni

    2003-01-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 104, 103, 102, and 101 inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 102 IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 104 or 103 IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 102 IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 104 and 103 IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 102 IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 102-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 102 IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female. Immunization of females

  1. Characterization of chlamydial genital infection resulting from sexual transmission from male to female guinea pigs and determination of infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Bowlin, Anne K; Reed, Ronald L; Darville, Toni

    2003-11-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 10(4), 10(3), 10(2), and 10(1) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 10(2) IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 10(4) or 10(3) IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 10(2) IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 10(4) and 10(3) IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 10(2) IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 10(2)-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 10(2) IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female

  2. The Concentration of Apolipoprotein A-I Decreases during Experimentally Induced Acute-Phase Processes in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Carpintero, R.; Piñeiro, M.; Andrés, M.; Iturralde, M.; Alava, M. A.; Heegaard, P. M. H.; Jobert, J. L.; Madec, F.; Lampreave, F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) was purified from pig sera. The responses of this protein after sterile inflammation and in animals infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae or Streptococcus suis were investigated. Decreases in the concentrations of ApoA-I, two to five times lower than the initial values, were observed at 2 to 4 days. It is concluded that ApoA-I is a negative acute-phase protein in pigs. PMID:15845530

  3. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel; Leifsson, Pall S; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2013-10-18

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected to histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and immunohistochemistry using caspase-3 antibodies. Histopathological evaluation revealed lesions of stage I which was characterized by presence of viable parasite surrounded with minimal to moderate inflammatory cells and stage III characterized by the presence of a disintegrating parasite surrounded with high inflammatory cells. The results of immunohistochemistry indicated caspase-3 positive cells interspaced between inflammatory infiltrate mainly in stage I lesions, indicating the presence of cysteine protease. This result confirms the earlier hypothesis that cysteine protease may play a role in inducing immune evasion through apoptosis around viable T. solium cysts.

  4. Retrospective serological study on hepatitis E infection in pigs from 1985 to 1997 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Casas, Maribel; Pujols, Joan; Rosell, Rosa; de Deus, Nilsa; Peralta, Bibiana; Pina, Sonia; Casal, Jordi; Martín, Marga

    2009-03-30

    The objective of the present work was to ascertain the date in which hepatitis E virus (HEV) was introduced in the Spanish pig population. For this, a serological retrospective study was carried out using archived sera. A total of 2871 serum samples gathered between 1985 and 1997 and collected in 208 farms of Spain were tested for anti-HEV IgG by an in-house ELISA. Of the 2871 sera analyzed by ELISA, 1390 were positive for anti-HEV antibodies (48.4%, 95% CI: 46.9-49.9%) and that corresponded to 204/208 farms (98%, 95% CI: 96.1-99.9%) having at least one positive pig. Our results show that HEV was present and widespread in Spanish swine farms at least since 1985. Any significant changes in prevalence were detected from 1 year to another and therefore, HEV infection in swine should be considered endemic in Spain.

  5. Interaction of porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines on dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hwi Won; Park, Su-Jin; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccinations on disease severity in an experimental PCV2-M. hyopneumoniae dual challenge model. Vaccine effectiveness was evaluated using microbiological (PCV2 viremia and M. hyopneumoniae nasal shedding), immunological (neutralizing antibodies and interferon-γ-secreting cells), and pathological (gross lung lesions, histopathologic pulmonary and lymphoid lesions, and the presence of PCV2 antigen and M. hyopneumoniae DNA within the lesions) evaluations. Although M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of PCV2-associated lesions and lesion-associated PCV2 antigen in dually challenged pigs, vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone did not reduce PCV2 viremia, PCV2-induced lesions, or PCV2 antigen in dually challenged pigs. In addition, vaccination against PCV2 did not reduce the nasal shedding of M. hyopneumoniae, the M. hyopneumoniae-induced pulmonary lesions or the lesion-associated M. hyopneumoniae DNA in dually challenged pigs. Dual challenge with PCV2 and M. hyopneumoniae did not interfere with the induction of active immunity induced by a previous single vaccination for either PCV2 or M. hyopneumoniae. The results of this study demonstrated that (i) vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone did not decrease the potentiation of PCV2-induced lesions by M. hyopneumoniae and (ii) vaccination against PCV2 alone decreased the potentiation of PCV2-induced lesions by M. hyopneumoniae in dually challenged pigs.

  6. Evaluation of a nonsteroidal topical cream in a guinea pig model of Malassezia furfur infection.

    PubMed

    Nalamothu, Vijendra; O'Leary, Ann L; Kandavilli, Sateesh; Fraser, Joanne; Pandya, Vishvabhavan

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia furfur is an important causal factor for seborrheic dermatitis, and topical antifungal therapy is an effective treatment approach. This study assessed the antifungal activity of Promiseb Topical Cream (Promius Pharma, LLC, Bridgewater, NJ), a novel nonsteroidal prescription medical device cream, in the M furfur-infected skin model for guinea pigs. Guinea pigs (N = 28) were divided into 4 groups and infected with M furfur for 7 days. On day 8, the first group of animals was sacrificed. The scrapings of inoculation site on each animal were tested for the presence of the organism, and the skin was excised for quantitation of M furfur. The second group was left untreated. The remaining 2 groups were treated with one of the test agents (Promiseb) and the positive control product (ciclopirox olamine cream, 0.77%; Loprox, Medicis, Scottsdale, AZ) each once daily for 3 days. At the end of treatment, animals were sacrificed and analyzed similarly to the first group. M furfur was recovered from all animals in the first group. Visual signs of infection, such as erythema and edema, were not observed in the infected animals at the end of the study. In the animals treated for 3 days with the test agents, the M furfur counts were reduced to below the limit of quantitation. Both test agents were equally effective in substantially reducing the density of M furfur compared with the untreated control.

  7. Immune responses to HTLV-I(ACH) during acute infection of pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Therese M; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie; Fultz, Patricia N

    2004-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is causally linked to adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a chronic progressive neurological disease, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A nonhuman primate model that reproduces disease symptoms seen in HTLV-I-infected humans might facilitate identification of initial immune responses to the virus and an understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in HTLV-I-related disease. Previously, we showed that infection of pig-tailed macaques with HTLV-I(ACH) is associated with multiple signs of disease characteristic of both HAM/TSP and ATL. We report here that within the first few weeks after HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques, serum concentrations of interferon (IFN)-alpha increased and interleukin-12 decreased transiently, levels of nitric oxide were elevated, and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and CD16(+) natural killer cells in peripheral blood were observed. HTLV-I(ACH) infection elicited virus-specific antibodies in all four animals within 4 to 6 weeks; however, Tax-specific lymphoproliferative responses were not detected until 25-29 weeks after infection in all four macaques. IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood cells stimulated with a Tax or Gag peptide was detected to varying degrees in all four animals by ELISPOT assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from one animal that developed only a marginal antigen-specific cellular response were unresponsive to mitogen stimulation during the last few weeks preceding its death from a rapidly progressive disease syndrome associated with HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques. The results show that during the first few months after HTLV-I(ACH) infection, activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, limited virus-specific cellular responses, sustained immune system activation, and, in some cases, immunodeficiency were evident. Thus, this animal model might be valuable for understanding early stages of infection

  8. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-02

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms.

  9. The Guinea Pig Sensitized by House Dust Mite: A Model of Experimental Cough Studies.

    PubMed

    Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Mokry, J; Medvedova, I; Kavalcikova-Bogdanova, N; Plevkova, J

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig sensitized by ovalbumin is the most widely used model to study cough experimentally, as the neurophysiology of the vagus nerve in the guinea pig is closest to humans. Nonetheless, the choice of the antigen remains questionable, which influences the translation of results into clinical medicine. The present study seeks to develop an alternative model of cough study using house dust mite sensitization (HDM). Thirty guinea pigs were divided into the HDM group, ovalbumin (OVA) group, and control group based on their cough response to 0.4 M citric acid. In the HDM group animals were sensitized by 0.25 %HDM aerosol, which they inhaled for 5 min over 5 days, followed by inhalation of 0.5 %HDM in the same protocol. Sensitization was confirmed by a skin test. Symptoms of allergic rhinitis were induced by intranasal application of 15 μl 0.5 %HDM and cough challenges with citric acid were performed. Airway resistance was measured in vivo by Pennock's method. We found that both HDM and OVA-sensitized groups showed a significantly enhanced nasal reactivity and cough response compared with controls. The airway resistance data did not show significant differences. We conclude that the HDM cough model replicates functional aspects of the OVA model, which may make it an alternative to the latter. However, the superiority of the HDM model for experimental cough studies remains to be further explored.

  10. Apoptosis in lymph nodes and changes in lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of pigs infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropón, A; Hernández-Jauregui, P; Sánchez-Torres, L; Favila-Castillo, L; Estrada-Parra, S; Moreno-López, J; Kennedy, S

    2003-01-01

    In a first experiment, five pigs were inoculated intranasally with porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) at 5 days of age and killed 7 days post-infection (pi). In a second experiment, four pigs were infected with the same virus at 17 days of age and killed at 9 or 15 days pi. Control piglets in each experiment received uninfected cell culture supernate. All PoRV-infected pigs developed respiratory and nervous signs, and histological lesions of non-suppurative encephalitis and interstitial pneumonia. All control pigs remained clinically normal and did not have histological lesions. Significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) in tonsil and lymph nodes of the pigs infected at 7 days of age and killed at 7 days pi. Significantly increased percentages of CD2(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were also found in peripheral blood of these animals at this time, while the percentages of CD4(+) and MHC class II lymphocytes were significantly reduced. Significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected in lymphoid tissues of the pigs infected at 17 days of age and killed at 9 days pi. The percentages of CD2(+), CD8(+) and MHC class II lymphocytes in peripheral blood were also significantly increased at this time; the percentage of MHC class II lymphocytes remained elevated at 15 days pi. These results indicate that induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of PoRV infection in young pigs, and that this virus induces changes in lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood.

  11. Increased and prolonged human norovirus infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient gnotobiotic pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ryu, Junghyun; Wen, Ke; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Samuel, Helen; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Jiang, Xi; Lee, Kiho; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Application of genetically engineered (GE) large animals carrying multi-allelic modifications has been hampered by low efficiency in production and extended gestation period compared to rodents. Here, we rapidly generated RAG2/IL2RG double knockout pigs using direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 system into developing embryos. RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs were immunodeficient, characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and either absence of or structurally abnormal immune organs. Pigs were maintained in gnotobiotic facility and evaluated for human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. HuNoV shedding lasted for 16 days in wild type pigs, compared to 27 days (until the end of trials) in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs. Additionally, higher HuNoV titers were detected in intestinal tissues and contents and in blood, indicating increased and prolonged HuNoV infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs and the importance of lymphocytes in HuNoV clearance. These results suggest that GE immunodeficient gnotobiotic pigs serve as a novel model for biomedical research and will facilitate HuNoV studies. PMID:27118081

  12. Chronological study of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection, seroconversion and associated lung lesions in vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Sibila, M; Nofrarías, M; López-Soria, S; Segalés, J; Valero, O; Espinal, A; Calsamiglia, M

    2007-05-16

    A field trial was conducted to study Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) infection dynamics by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and serology in pigs of a farm affected by enzootic pneumonia (EP). Moreover, correlation of Mh detection at different respiratory tract sites with presence of EP gross and microscopic lung lesions was assessed. These parameters were studied and compared between vaccinated (two doses at 1 and 3 weeks of age versus one dose at 6 weeks of age) and non-vaccinated pigs. Animals were monitored from birth to slaughter by nPCR from nasal swabs and by serology. From 3 to 22 weeks of age, an average of three pigs per treatment and per batch were necropsied (n = 302). The remaining pigs were sent to the slaughter (n = 103). Nasal, bronchial and tonsillar swabs were taken from the necropsied/slaughtered pigs; gross and microscopic EP-suggestive lung lesions were also assessed. Single and double vaccination resulted in earlier seroconversion and higher percentage of Mh seropositive pigs compared to control group. At slaughter, double vaccinated pigs showed lower percentage of EP-compatible gross lung lesions and lower Mh prevalence at upper respiratory tract sites (nasal cavity and tonsil) than control pigs.

  13. Experimental infection with Paragonimus heterotremus metacercariae in laboratory animals in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, T Shantikumar; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Devi, K Ranjana; Singh, L Deben; Binchai, Sutheewan; Rangsiruji, Achariya

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to find out the host-parasite relationship between Paragonimus heterotremus isolated as metacercariae from mountain crabs, Indochinamon manipurensis, in Manipur, India and laboratory animals such as puppies, albino rats, Swiss mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits, as experimental animals. The animals were fed with the metacercariae. Infected animals were sacrificed 35 to 430 days after feeding to recover worms, which were used to determine the developmental stages. Adult worms (n = 14) were recovered from 3 puppies > or = 70 days after feeding and immature worms (n = 25) were recovered from 2 other puppies 35 or 43 days after infection. The infection rate in puppies was 100%. Juvenile worms were recovered from 3 of 13 rats: 1 of 11 rats whose viscera and cavities were examined and both of two rats whose muscles were examined. Rats were not a suitable animal model for pulmonary infection with P. heterotremus. Mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits were also found to be insusceptible to pulmonary infection with P. heterotremus.

  14. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  15. Cross-species infection of pigs with a novel rabbit, but not rat, strain of hepatitis E virus isolated in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cossaboom, Caitlin M; Córdoba, Laura; Sanford, Brenton J; Piñeyro, Pablo; Kenney, Scott P; Dryman, Barbara A; Wang, Youchun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. In addition to humans, HEV has also been identified in pig, chicken, mongoose, deer, rat, rabbit and fish. There are four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV. Genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans, while genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The recently identified rabbit HEV is a distant member of genotype 3. Here, we first expressed and purified the recombinant capsid protein of rabbit HEV and showed that the capsid protein of rabbit HEV cross-reacted with antibodies raised against avian, rat, swine and human HEV. Conversely, we showed that antibodies against rabbit HEV cross-reacted with capsid proteins derived from chicken, rat, swine and human HEV. Since pigs are the natural host of genotype 3 HEV, we then determined if rabbit HEV infects pigs. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups of four each and intravenously inoculated with PBS, US rabbit HEV, Chinese rabbit HEV, US rat HEV and swine HEV, respectively. Results showed that only half of the pigs inoculated with rabbit HEV had low levels of viraemia and faecal virus shedding, indicative of active but not robust HEV infection. Infection of pigs by rabbit HEV was further verified by transmission of the virus recovered from pig faeces to naïve rabbits. Pigs inoculated with rat HEV showed no evidence of infection. Preliminary results suggest that rabbit HEV is antigenically related to other HEV strains and infects pigs and that rat HEV failed to infect pigs.

  16. Age at Vaccination and Timing of Infection Do Not Alter Vaccine-Associated Enhanced Respiratory Disease in Influenza A Virus-Infected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Carine K.; Rajão, Daniela S.; Loving, Crystal L.; Gauger, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines are widely used in the swine industry to reduce clinical disease against homologous influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In pigs experimentally challenged with antigenically distinct heterologous IAV of the same hemagglutinin subtype, WIV vaccinates have been shown to develop vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). We evaluated the impact of vaccine valency, age at vaccination, and duration between vaccination and challenge on the development of VAERD using vaccine containing δ1-H1N2 and challenge with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus. Pigs were vaccinated with monovalent WIV MN08 (δ1-H1N2) and bivalent (δ1-H1N2–H3N2 or δ1-H1N2–pH1N1) vaccines and then were challenged with pH1N1 at 3 weeks postboost (wpb). Another group was vaccinated with the same monovalent WIV and challenged at 6 wpb to determine if the time postvaccination plays a role in the development of VAERD. In a follow-up study, the impact of age of first WIV vaccination (at 4 versus 9 weeks of age) with a boost 3 weeks later (at 7 versus 12 weeks of age) was evaluated. A monovalent live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccine administered at 4 and 7 weeks of age was also included. All mismatched WIV groups had significantly higher lung lesions than the LAIV, bivalent MN08-CA09, and control groups. Age of first vaccination or length of time between booster dose and subsequent challenge did not alter the development of VAERD in WIV-vaccinated pigs. Importantly, the mismatched component of the bivalent MN08-CA09 WIV did not override the protective effect of the matched vaccine component. PMID:27030585

  17. Influenza A Virus Infection in Pigs Attracts Multifunctional and Cross-Reactive T Cells to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Talker, Stephanie C.; Stadler, Maria; Koinig, Hanna C.; Mair, Kerstin H.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M.; Graage, Robert; Zell, Roland; Dürrwald, Ralf; Starick, Elke; Harder, Timm; Weissenböck, Herbert; Lamp, Benjamin; Hammer, Sabine E.; Ladinig, Andrea; Saalmüller, Armin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses and play a critical role in influenza epidemiology. However, little is known about their influenza-evoked T-cell response. We performed a thorough analysis of both the local and systemic T-cell response in influenza virus-infected pigs, addressing kinetics and phenotype as well as multifunctionality (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and cross-reactivity. A total of 31 pigs were intratracheally infected with an H1N2 swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) and consecutively euthanized. Lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, and blood were sampled during the first 15 days postinfection (p.i.) and at 6 weeks p.i. Ex vivo flow cytometry of lung lymphocytes revealed an increase in proliferating (Ki-67+) CD8+ T cells with an early effector phenotype (perforin+ CD27+) at day 6 p.i. Low frequencies of influenza virus-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells could be detected in the lung as early as 4 days p.i. On consecutive days, influenza virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells produced mainly IFN-γ and/or TNF-α, reaching peak frequencies around day 9 p.i., which were up to 30-fold higher in the lung than in tracheobronchial lymph nodes or blood. At 6 weeks p.i., CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells had accumulated in lung tissue. These cells showed diverse cytokine profiles and in vitro reactivity against heterologous influenza virus strains, all of which supports their potential to combat heterologous influenza virus infections in pigs. IMPORTANCE Pigs not only are a suitable large-animal model for human influenza virus infection and vaccine development but also play a central role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. Although promising candidate universal vaccines are tested in pigs and local T cells are the major correlate of heterologous control, detailed and targeted analyses of T-cell responses at the site of infection are scarce. With the present study, we

  18. Effects of various doses of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection in ovariectomized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of various doses of estradiol on genital tract infection by the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) was investigated in ovariectomized guinea pigs. Prolongation of infection, as determined by chlamydial inclusion counts of cells in Giemsa-stained smears of vaginal scrapings, was observed in animals receiving daily doses of 1.0, 10.0, 100.0, or 1000 micrograms of estradiol. In contrast to controls, ascending infection resulting in endometritis was found in animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram of estradiol per day. Response to estradiol treatment was reflected in an increase in cervical-uterine wet weight and uterine wall thickness. No differences were observed in time of appearance of antibody titers to GPIC in serum, but a delay in appearance of IgA antibody to GPIC in genital secretions was found in estradiol-treated animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram per day.

  19. Does inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha affect chlamydial genital tract infection in mice and guinea pigs?

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Rank, R G

    2000-09-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against chlamydial infection remains unclear. In order to further evaluate the relevance of TNF-alpha to host resistance in chlamydial genital tract infection, we examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in normal C57 mice and in interferon gamma gene-deficient C57 mice infected intravaginally with the mouse pneumonitis agent of Chlamydia trachomatis. Since the guinea pig model of female genital tract infection more closely approximates the human in terms of ascending infection and development of pathology, we also examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in guinea pigs infected intravaginally with the guinea pig strain of Chlamydia psittaci. We successfully blocked the early TNF-alpha response in the respective animal models. This blockade had no effect on the numbers of organisms isolated from the genital tract during the time of TNF-alpha inhibition in mice or guinea pigs. Analysis of interleukin-1beta, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in the mouse model revealed that blockade of the TNF-alpha response did not alter the release of these proinflammatory proteins. Yet, in TNF-alpha-depleted mice, increased numbers of neutrophils were detected in the genital tract, and, in TNF-alpha-depleted guinea pigs, increased numbers of neutrophils as well as infiltrating lymphocytes were seen in the endocervix. Blockade of TNF-alpha does not affect the level of infection in mice or guinea pigs, but it may decrease TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis of infiltrating inflammatory cells.

  20. [Infectivity of the entomopathogenic fungus Verticillium lecanii in mice and guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Mier, T; Rivera, F; Rodríguez-Ponce, M P; Carrillo-Farga, J; Toriello, C

    1994-01-01

    The resistance of plague insects to chemical insecticides as well as the importance of a healthy environment demands an alternative for agricultural plagues. Among others, biological control seems an alternate strategy with fungal entomopathogens playing a relevant role. The hyphomycete Verticillium lecanii is a natural bioregulator of aphids, scales and white-flies that attack different agricultural plantations. Its use in biological control programs must be assessed previously by safety procedures such as its innocuity in mammals and useful animals and plants. The aim of this study was pointed at demonstrating the innocuity of V. lecanii in mice and guinea pigs. Two strains of the fungus were injected intraperitoneally (10(8) conidia/kg of animal weight) to 130 mice and 66 guinea pigs. Two control groups were included, one injected with heat-killed fungi and the other with sterile physiological saline. The animals were killed at 8, 30 and 70 days after infection, and mycological and histopathological studies performed in their organs. Negative results obtained with the live fungus in the same manner as the two control groups, suggest the innocuity of V. lecanii in mice and guinea pigs.

  1. Differential Expression of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Open Reading Frame 5, but not Apoptogenic Cytokines, Contribute to Severe Respiratory Disease in Pigs Infected with Type 2 PRRSV Compared with Pigs Infected with Type 1 PRRSV.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Lee, J; Park, C; Choi, K; Jeong, J; Park, S-J; Kang, I; Chae, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of open reading frame 5 (ORF5) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and apoptogenic cytokines in the lungs from pigs infected with type 1 and type 2 PRRSV. Microscopical lung lesion scores and the mean number of apoptotic cells were significantly (P <0.05) higher in pigs with type 2 PRRSV infection than in those with type 1 PRRSV infection. The score for the mean number of PRRSV ORF5-positive cells per unit area of lung was significantly (P <0.05) higher in pigs with type 2 PRRSV infection. There were no significant differences in the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 in lung tissues between type 1 and type 2 PRRSV-infected pigs. The severity of microscopical lung lesions and the number of apoptotic cells correlated well with the number of PRRSV ORF5-positive cells. Therefore, differential expression of PRRSV ORF5, but not apoptogenic cytokines, may attribute to the severity of lung lesions and apoptosis in lungs in PRRSV infection. These results suggest that expression of PRRSV ORF5 may be a critical determinant for different virulence between PRRSV genotypes in terms of respiratory disease.

  2. Schmallenberg virus experimental infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Bréard, Emmanuel; Bøtner, Anette; Ponsart, Claire; Zientara, Stéphan; Lohse, Louise; Pozzi, Nathalie; Viarouge, Cyril; Sarradin, Pierre; Leroux-Barc, Céline; Riou, Mickael; Laloy, Eve; Breithaupt, Angele; Beer, Martin

    2013-10-25

    Since late 2011, a novel orthobunyavirus, named Schmallenberg virus (SBV), has been implicated in many cases of severely malformed bovine and ovine offspring in Europe. In adult cattle, SBV is known to cause a mild transient disease; clinical signs include short febrile episodes, decreased milk production and diarrhoea for a few days. However, the knowledge about clinical signs and pathogenesis in adult sheep is limited. In the present study, adult sheep of European domestic breeds were inoculated with SBV either as cell culture grown virus or as virus with no history of passage in cell cultures. Various experimental set-ups were used. Sampling included blood collection at different time points during the experimental period and selected organ material at autopsy. Data from this study showed, that the RNAemic period in sheep was as short as reported for cattle; viral genome was detectable for about 3-5 days by real-time RT-PCR. In total, 13 out of 30 inoculated sheep became RNAemic, with the highest viral load in animals inoculated with virus from low cell culture passaged or the animal passaged material. Contact animals remained negative throughout the study. One RNAemic sheep showed diarrhoea for several days, but fever was not recorded in any of the animals. Antibodies were first detectable 10-14 days post inoculation. Viral RNA was detectable in spleen and lymph nodes up to day 44 post inoculation. In conclusion, as described for cattle, SBV-infection in adult sheep predominantly results in subclinical infection, transient RNAemia and a specific antibody response. Maintenance of viral RNA in the lymphoreticular system is observed for an extended period.

  3. Swine torque teno virus (TTV) infection and excretion dynamics in conventional pig farms.

    PubMed

    Sibila, M; Martínez-Guinó, L; Huerta, E; Llorens, A; Mora, M; Grau-Roma, L; Kekarainen, T; Segalés, J

    2009-11-18

    Torque teno virus (TTV) is a non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus infecting human and non-primate species. Two genogroups of TTV (TTV1 and TTV2) have been described in swine so far. In the present study, TTV1 and TTV2 prevalences in serum, and nasal as well as rectal swabs of 55 randomly selected piglets from seven Spanish multi-site farms, were monitored from 1 to 15 weeks of age. Also, blood from their dams (n=41) were taken at 1 week post-farrowing. Samples were tested by means of two TTV genogroup specific PCRs. Although prevalence of TTV1 and TTV2 in sows was relatively high (54% and 32%, respectively), it was not directly associated to their prevalence in the offspring. Percentage of viremic pigs for both TTV genogroups followed similar dynamics, increasing progressively over time, with the highest rate of detection at 11 weeks of age for TTV1 and at 15 weeks for TTV2. Forty-two (76%) and 33 (60%) of the 55 studied pigs were TTV1 and TTV2 PCR positive in serum, respectively, in more than one sampling time. TTV1 and TTV2 viremia lasted in a number of animals up to 15 and 8 weeks, respectively. Co-infection with both TTV genogroups in serum was detected at all sampling points, but at 1 week of age. On the contrary, there were animals PCR negative to both genogroups in serum at all sampling times but at 15 weeks of age. During the study period, TTV1 and TTV2 nasal shedding increased also over time and faecal excretion was intermittent and of low percentage (<20%). In conclusion, the present study describes for the first time the infection dynamics of TTV1 and TTV2 as well as the nasal and faecal excretion throughout the life of pigs from conventional, multi-site farms. Moreover, results indicate that both swine TTV genogroups are able to establish persistent infections in a number of pigs.

  4. Wound ballistics of the pig mandibular angle: a preliminary finite element analysis and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yubin; Miao, Yingyun; Xu, Chuan; Zhang, Gang; Lei, Tao; Tan, Yinghui

    2010-04-19

    To study wound ballistics of the mandibular angle, a combined hexahedral-tetrahedral finite element (FE) model of the pig mandible was developed to simulate ballistic impact. An experimental study was carried out by measuring impact load parameters from 14 fresh pig mandibles that were shot at the mandibular angle by a standard 7.62 mm M43 bullet. FE analysis was executed through the LS-DYNA code under impact loads similar to those obtained from the experimental study. The resulting residual velocity, the transferred energy from the bullet to the mandible, and the surface area of the entrance wound had no statistical differences between the FE simulation and the experimental study. However, the mean surface area of the exit wounds in the experimental study was significantly larger than that in the simulation. According to the FE analysis, the stress concentrated zones were mainly located at the region of impact, condylar neck, coronoid process and mandibular body. The simulation results also indicated that trabecular bone had less stress concentration and a lower speed of stress propagation compared with cortical bone. The FE model is appropriate and conforms to the basic principles of wound ballistics. This modeling system will be helpful for further investigations of the biomechanical mechanisms of wound ballistics.

  5. Isolated Liver Perfusion Using Percutaneous Methods:[ql An Experimental Study in the Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Harnek, Jan; Cwikiel, Wojciech; Bergqvist, Lennart; Persson, Bo; Stridbeck, Hans

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolated perfusion of the liver using radiological methods. Methods: Twenty-one pigs, weighing about 20 kg, were divided into three groups. By transjugular and transfemoral approaches two occlusion balloons were placed in the inferior vena cava cranial and caudal, respectively, to the origin of the hepatic veins. One occlusion balloon was placed transfemorally in the common hepatic artery. Another occlusion balloon was inserted in the main branch of the portal vein via the transjugular-transhepatic approach in 11 pigs (groups 1 and 2), and in 10 pigs (group 3) by a percutaneous transhepatic route. After inflation of the balloons, patency of the isolated liver circulation was evaluated by recirculation of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labelled human albumin during 30 min. Blood tests were obtained after 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min to evaluate leakage from the liver to the systemic circulation. Results: Increasing leakage to the systemic circulation from the isolated liver circulation was observed in groups 1 and 2. In the third group the leakage was less than 10%. Conclusion: In an experimental animal model, isolated perfusion of the liver with minor leakage to the systemic circulation may be achieved using radiological methods.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of AS2077715 against experimental tinea pedis in guinea pigs in comparison with terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Keisuke; Murai, Hidetsugu; Nakamura, Ikko; Watanabe, Masato; Fujie, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    AS2077715 is a novel antifungal metabolite produced by the newly isolated fungal strain Capnodium sp. 339855. This compound has potent inhibitory activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III) and potent fungicidal activity against T. mentagrophytes, as measured in vitro. Here, we compared the effects of AS2077715 and terbinafine in a guinea pig model of tinea pedis. In a treatment regimen started from the day 7 after infection, 10 daily oral doses of 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) AS2077715 and 20 mg kg(-1) of terbinafine significantly decreased fungal colony-forming units (CFUs) in foot pad skin. In a treatment regimen started from the day 11 after infection, 20 mg kg(-1) AS2077715 significantly reduced fungal CFUs in foot pad skin after 7 daily doses in comparison with 20 mg kg(-1) terbinafine-treated guinea pigs. Our findings suggest that in vivo potency and efficacy of AS2077715 are equal to or greater than that of terbinafine, positioning AS2077715 as a good candidate for use in treating trichophytosis.

  7. A study of lymphoid organs and serum proinflammatory cytokines in pigs infected with African swine fever virus genotype II.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Cholakyans, Victorya; Simonyan, Lusine; Misakyan, Alla; Karalova, Elena; Chavushyan, Andranik; Karalyan, Zaven

    2015-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), the causative agent of one of the most important viral diseases of domestic pigs for which no vaccine is available, causes immune system disorders in infected animals. In this study, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as the histological and cellular constitution of lymphoid organs of pigs infected with ASFV genotype II were investigated. The results showed a high degree of lymphocyte depletion in the lymphoid organs, particularly in the spleen and lymph nodes, where ASFV infection led to a twofold decrease in the number of lymphocytes on the final day of infection. Additionally, ASFV-infected pigs had atypical forms of lymphocytes found in all lymphoid organs. In contrast to lymphocytes, the number of immature immune cells, particularly myelocytes, increased dramatically and reached a maximum on day 7 postinfection. The serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were evaluated. Proinflammatory cytokines showed increased levels after ASFV infection, with peak values at 7 days postinfection, and this highlights their role in the pathogenesis of ASFV. In conclusion, this study showed that ASFV genotype II, like other highly virulent strains, causes severe pathological changes in the immune system of pigs.

  8. Experimental joint immobilization in guinea pigs. Effects on the knee joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcondesdesouza, J. P.; Machado, F. F.; Sesso, A.; Valeri, V.

    1980-01-01

    In young and adult guinea pigs, the aftermath experimentally induced by the immobilization of the knee joint in hyperextended forced position was studied. Joint immobilization which varied from one to nine weeks was attained by plaster. Eighty knee joints were examined macro and microscopically. Findings included: (1) muscular hypotrophy and joint stiffness in all animals, directly proportional to the length of immobilization; (2) haemoarthrosis in the first week; (3) intra-articular fibrous tissue proliferation ending up with fibrous ankylosis; (4) hyaline articular cartilage erosions; (5) various degrees of destructive menisci changes. A tentative explanation of the fibrous tissue proliferation and of the cartilage changes is offered.

  9. Development of a peptide-based immunochromatographic strip for differentiation of serotype O Foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected pigs from vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Suzhen; Yang, Jifei; Zhang, Gaiping; Qiao, Songlin; Wang, Xuannian; Zhao, Dong; Li, Xuewu; Deng, Ruiguang; Zhi, Aimin; You, Leiming; Chai, Sujun; Teng, Man

    2010-05-01

    An immunochromatographic strip for discriminating Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infected from vaccinated pigs was developed based on synthetic peptide. Five peptides designed from the amino acid sequences of nonstructural proteins (NSP) of FMDV were synthesized, and pep5 located in NSP 3B reacted strongly with serum from FMDV-infected pigs but did not react with serum samples from healthy vaccinated pigs. An immunochromatographic strip was developed by using colloidal gold labeled with pep5 as the detector. Staphylococcal protein A and rabbit against peptide-conjugated ovalbumin antibody immunoglobulin G were blotted on the nitrocellulose membrane for the test and control lines. In comparison with 2 commercial NSP enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the peptide-based strip showed good specificity and sensitivity. The apparent agreements of this new assay with Ceditest(R) ELISA and UBI(R) ELISA were 98.59% and 96.63%, respectively. These results indicate that the strip can be adequately used to discriminate FMDV-infected animals from vaccinated animals.

  10. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on growth performance and microbiota of weaned pigs during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Price, K L; Totty, H R; Lee, H B; Utt, M D; Fitzner, G E; Yoon, I; Ponder, M A; Escobar, J

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobically fermented yeast products are a rich source of nutritional metabolites, mannanoligosaccharides, and β-glucans that may optimize gut health and immunity, which can translate into better growth performance and a reduced risk of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (Diamond V Original XPC) inclusion in nursery diets on pig performance and gastrointestinal microbial ecology before, during, and after an oral challenge with Salmonella. Pigs (n = 40) were weaned at 21 d of age, blocked by BW, and assigned in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement consisting of diet (control or 0.2% XPC) and inoculation (sterile broth or Salmonella). Pigs were fed a 3-phase nursery diet (0 to 7 d, 7 to 21 d, and 21 to 35 d) with ad libitum access to water and feed. On d 14, pigs were orally inoculated with 10(9) cfu of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 or sterile broth. During d 17 to 20, all pigs were treated with a 5 mg/kg of BW intramuscular injection of ceftiofur-HCl. Growth performance and alterations in the gastrointestinal microbial ecology were measured during preinoculation (PRE; 0 to 14 d), sick (SCK; 14 to 21 d), and postinoculation (POST; 21 to 35 d). Body weight and ADG were measured weekly. Rectal temperature (RT) was measured weekly during PRE and POST, and every 12 h during SCK. Diet had no effect on BW, ADG, or RT during any period (P = 0.12 to 0.95). Inclusion of XPC tended (P < 0.10) to increase Salmonella shedding in feces during SCK. Consumption of XPC altered the composition of the gastrointestinal microbial community, resulting in increased (P < 0.05) populations of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus after Salmonella infection. Pigs inoculated with Salmonella had decreased ADG and BW, and increased RT during SCK (P < 0.001). Furthermore, fecal Salmonella cfu (log(10)) was modestly correlated (P = 0.002) with BW (r = -0.22), ADFI (r = -0.27), ADG (r = -0.36), G:F (r

  11. Immunology of experimental and natural human hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Gaze, S; Bethony, J M; Periago, M V

    2014-08-01

    Human hookworm infection is one amongst the most prevalent of the neglected tropical diseases. An informative experimental animal model, that is, one that parallels a human infection, is not available for the study of human hookworm infection. Much of our current understanding of the human immune response during hookworm infection relies on the studies from experimental infection of hookworm-naïve individuals or the natural infections from individuals residing in hookworm-endemic areas. The experimental human infections tend to be acute, dose-controlled infections, often with a low larval inoculum so that they are well tolerated by human volunteers. Natural hookworm infections usually occur in areas where hookworm transmission is constant and infection is chronic. In cases where there has been drug administration in an endemic area, re-infection often occurs quickly even amongst those who were treated. Hence, although many of the characteristics of experimental and natural hookworm infection differ, both models have elements in common: mainly an intense Th2 response with the production of total and specific IgE as well as elevated levels of eosinophilia, IL-5, IL-10 and TNF. While hookworm infection affects millions of individuals worldwide, much of the human immunology of this infection still needs to be studied and understood.

  12. Interaction between single-dose Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccines on dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Seo, Hwi Won; Park, Changhoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and/or porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccination on dually infected pigs. In total, 72 pigs were randomly divided into nine groups (eight pigs per group), as follows: five vaccinated and challenged groups, three non-vaccinated and challenged groups, and a negative control group. Single-dose vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone decreased the levels of PRRSV viremia and PRRSV-induced pulmonary lesions, whereas single-dose vaccination against PRRSV alone did not decrease nasal shedding of M. hyopneumoniae and mycoplasma-induced pulmonary lesions in the dually infected pigs. The M. hyopneumoniae challenge impaired the protective cell-mediated immunity induced by the PRRSV vaccine, whereas the PRRSV challenge did not impair the protective cell-mediated immunity induced by the M. hyopneumoniae vaccine. The present study provides swine practitioners and producers with efficient vaccination regimes; vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae is the first step in protecting pigs against co-infection with M. hyopneumoniae and PRRSV.

  13. Understanding African Swine Fever infection dynamics in Sardinia using a spatially explicit transmission model in domestic pig farms.

    PubMed

    Mur, L; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Fernández-Carrión, E; Jurado, C; Rolesu, S; Feliziani, F; Laddomada, A; Martínez-López, B

    2017-03-13

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) has been endemic in Sardinia since 1978, resulting in severe losses for local pig producers and creating important problems for the island's veterinary authorities. This study used a spatially explicit stochastic transmission model followed by two regression models to investigate the dynamics of ASFV spread amongst domestic pig farms, to identify geographic areas at highest risk and determine the role of different susceptible pig populations (registered domestic pigs, non-registered domestic pigs [brado] and wild boar) in ASF occurrence. We simulated transmission within and between farms using an adapted version of the previously described model known as Be-FAST. Results from the model revealed a generally low diffusion of ASF in Sardinia, with only 24% of the simulations resulting in disease spread, and for each simulated outbreak on average only four farms and 66 pigs were affected. Overall, local spread (indirect transmission between farms within a 2 km radius through fomites) was the most common route of transmission, being responsible for 98.6% of secondary cases. The risk of ASF occurrence for each domestic pig farm was estimated from the spread model results and integrated in two regression models together with available data for brado and wild boar populations. There was a significant association between the density of all three populations (domestic pigs, brado, and wild boar) and ASF occurrence in Sardinia. The most significant risk factors were the high densities of brado (OR = 2.2) and wild boar (OR = 2.1). The results of both analyses demonstrated that ASF epidemiology and infection dynamics in Sardinia create a complex and multifactorial disease situation, where all susceptible populations play an important role. To stop ASF transmission in Sardinia, three main factors (improving biosecurity on domestic pig farms, eliminating brado practices and better management of wild boars) need to be addressed.

  14. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A.; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a “chemokine storm” in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process. PMID:25621360

  15. Evaluation of a single dose versus a divided dose regimen of amoxycillin in treatment of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, B; Lykkesfeldt, J; Friis, C

    2005-08-01

    The theory of a time-dependent effect of amoxycillin was examined in a model of porcine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap)-infection using clinically relevant dosage regimens. Twenty hours after infection of fourteen pigs, when clinical signs of pneumonia were present, one group of pigs received a single dose of amoxycillin (20 mg/kg, i.m.), whereas another group received four doses of 5 mg/kg injected at 8-h intervals. A similar AUC of the plasma amoxycillin concentration versus time curve was obtained in the two groups, whereas the maximum concentration was threefold higher using the single high dose. Plasma amoxycillin was above the MIC for twice as long using the fractionated dosage scheme. The condition of the animals was evaluated by clinical and haematological observations combined with quantification of biochemical infection markers: C-reactive protein, zinc and ascorbic acid. Within 48 h of treatment, the pigs in both treatment groups recovered clinically. No significant differences in the time-course of clinical observations or plasma concentrations of the biomarkers of infection were observed between the two treatments. In conclusion, the efficacy of these two dosage regimens of amoxycillin was not significantly different in treatment of acute Ap-infection in pigs.

  16. Can Taenia solium latent post-oncospheral stages be found in muscle tissue of cysticercosis-infected pigs (Sus scrofa)?

    PubMed

    Rodrìguez, Mary L; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Verastegui, Manuela; Bernal, Teresa; Jimenez, Juan A; Garcia, Hector H

    2006-02-01

    The existence of latent Taenia solium post-oncospheral stages in the tissues of infected pigs has been postulated. To assess whether such structures exist and can be detected, we examined muscle samples from cysticercosis-infected and uninfected pigs. Pork samples were homogenized, centrifuged, and resuspended in saline solution. Round microscopic structures of approximately 10 microm with variable refringence were found in the pellets of all samples from both infected and uninfected pigs. These became homogeneously red after staining with Sudan IV and disappeared after ether extraction. The only difference between samples from infected and uninfected pigs was the presence of inflammatory cells and tissue necrosis debris in the former group. Taenia solium oncospheres were stained and observed for comparative purposes, before and after inoculation into pork. Control oncospheres were ellipsoidal, had nucleated basophile cells in their interior, and showed red aggregates on their surfaces when stained with 3% Sudan IV. While rounded microscopical structures similar to those previously reported were found, these differed morphologically from oncospheres, were of a lipid nature, and occurred in both infected and uninfected animals. No evidence supporting the presence of latent post-oncospheral stages of Taenia solium was generated in this series of experiments.

  17. Experimental infections using the foot-and-mouth disease virus O/JPN/2010 in animals administered a vaccine preserved for emergency use in Japan

    PubMed Central

    FUKAI, Katsuhiko; NISHI, Tatsuya; SHIMADA, Nobuaki; MORIOKA, Kazuki; YAMADA, Manabu; YOSHIDA, Kazuo; SAKAMOTO, Kenichi; KITANO, Rie; YAMAZOE, Reiko; YAMAKAWA, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of a vaccine preserved for emergency use in Japan was analyzed under experimental conditions using cows and pigs in order to retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of the emergency vaccination performed in the 2010 epidemic in Japan. Cows and pigs were administered a vaccine preserved for emergency use in Japan at 3 or 30 days before virus infection (dbv) and were subsequently infected with the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O/JPN/2010, which was isolated in the 2010 epidemic in Japan. All animals vaccinated at 30 dbv and one of three pigs vaccinated at 3 dbv showed no vesicular lesions during the experimental period. The virus titers and viral RNA loads obtained from clinical samples were lower in the vaccinated cows than in the non-vaccinated cows. The viral excretion periods were shorter in the vaccinated cows than in the non-vaccinated cows. In contrast, in the vaccinated pigs, the virus titers and viral RNA loads obtained from the samples, except for those obtained from sera, were not decreased significantly, and the viral excretion periods were not sufficiently shortened. These results suggest that the vaccine can protect against clinical signs of infection by the FMDV O/JPN/2010 in animals; however, it should be noted that in vaccinated and infected animals, especially pigs, clinical samples, such as saliva and nasal swabs, may contain excreted viruses, even if no clinical signs were exhibited. PMID:27773883

  18. Dynamics of African swine fever virus shedding and excretion in domestic pigs infected by intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Reis, Ana Luisa; Netherton, Christopher L; Goatley, Lynnette; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2014-09-26

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly virulent swine pathogen that has spread across Eastern Europe since 2007 and for which there is no effective vaccine or treatment available. The dynamics of shedding and excretion is not well known for this currently circulating ASFV strain. Therefore, susceptible pigs were exposed to pigs intramuscularly infected with the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain to measure those dynamics through within- and between-pen transmission scenarios. Blood, oral, nasal and rectal fluid samples were tested for the presence of ASFV by virus titration (VT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum was tested for the presence of ASFV-specific antibodies. Both intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission resulted in development of acute disease in all pigs although the experiments indicated that the pathogenesis of the disease might be different, depending on the route of infection. Infectious ASFV was first isolated in blood among the inoculated pigs by day 3, and then chronologically among the direct and indirect contact pigs, by day 10 and 13, respectively. Close to the onset of clinical signs, higher ASFV titres were found in blood compared with nasal and rectal fluid samples among all pigs. No infectious ASFV was isolated in oral fluid samples although ASFV genome copies were detected. Only one animal developed antibodies starting after 12 days post-inoculation. The results provide quantitative data on shedding and excretion of the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain among domestic pigs and suggest a limited potential of this isolate to cause persistent infection.

  19. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation.

  20. Protection of European domestic pigs from virulent African isolates of African swine fever virus by experimental immunisation.

    PubMed

    King, Katherine; Chapman, Dave; Argilaguet, Jordi M; Fishbourne, Emma; Hutet, Evelyne; Cariolet, Roland; Hutchings, Geoff; Oura, Christopher A L; Netherton, Christopher L; Moffat, Katy; Taylor, Geraldine; Le Potier, Marie-Frederique; Dixon, Linda K; Takamatsu, Haru-H

    2011-06-20

    African swine fever (ASF) is an acute haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs for which there is currently no vaccine. We showed that experimental immunisation of pigs with the non-virulent OURT88/3 genotype I isolate from Portugal followed by the closely related virulent OURT88/1 genotype I isolate could confer protection against challenge with virulent isolates from Africa including the genotype I Benin 97/1 isolate and genotype X Uganda 1965 isolate. This immunisation strategy protected most pigs challenged with either Benin or Uganda from both disease and viraemia. Cross-protection was correlated with the ability of different ASFV isolates to stimulate immune lymphocytes from the OURT88/3 and OURT88/1 immunised pigs.

  1. Effects of Sho-seiryu-to on experimental allergic rhinitis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Mase, A; Ikeda, Y; Iizuka, A; Imamura, S; Komatsu, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1999-05-01

    The effects of Sho-seiryu-to, an antiallergic Kampo medicine, on experimental allergic rhinitis were investigated in actively sensitized guinea pigs. The number of sneezes and scratches by the animals after a topical antigen challenge was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with Sho-seiryu-to (1000 mg/kg per os p.o.). The antigen-induced eosinophil infiltration in the nasal mucosa was significantly inhibited by Sho-seiryu-to (1000 mg/kg p.o.). Sho-seiryu-to (100 mg/kg p.o.) also reduced the increase in dye leakage to the nasal cavity induced by the antigen challenge and the antigen-induced decrease in volume of the nasal cavity was inhibited. Moreover, Sho-seiryu-to (1000 mg/kg p.o.) suppressed the volume change in the nasal cavity induced by leukotriene D4. These results demonstrate that Sho-seiryu-to inhibits experimental allergic rhinitis in guinea pigs, confirming that the agent may be beneficial for the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

  2. Hosting infection: experimental models to assay Candida virulence.

    PubMed

    Maccallum, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Although normally commensals in humans, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, and Candida krusei are capable of causing opportunistic infections in individuals with altered physiological and/or immunological responses. These fungal species are linked with a variety of infections, including oral, vaginal, gastrointestinal, and systemic infections, with C. albicans the major cause of infection. To assess the ability of different Candida species and strains to cause infection and disease requires the use of experimental infection models. This paper discusses the mucosal and systemic models of infection available to assay Candida virulence and gives examples of some of the knowledge that has been gained to date from these models.

  3. Use of Oral Fluids for Detection of Virus and Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, C; Bittner, H; Ambagala, A; Lung, O; Babiuk, S; Yang, M; Zimmerman, J; Giménez-Lirola, L G; Nfon, C

    2016-09-15

    The use of swine oral fluid (OF) for the detection of nucleic acids and antibodies is gaining significant popularity. Assays have been developed for this purpose for endemic and foreign animal diseases of swine. Here, we report the use of OF for the detection of virus and antibodies in pigs experimentally infected with swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), a virus that causes a disease clinically indistinguishable from the economically devastating foot-and-mouth disease. Viral genome was detected in OF by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (DPI) to 21 DPI. Virus isolation from OF was also successful at 1-5 DPI. An adapted competitive ELISA based on the monoclonal antibodies 5B7 detected antibodies to SVDV in OF starting at DPI 6. Additionally, using isotype-specific indirect ELISAs, SVDV-specific IgM and IgA were evaluated in OF. IgM response started at DPI 6, peaking at DPI 7 or 14 and declining sharply at DPI 21, while IgA response started at DPI 7, peaked at DPI 14 and remained high until the end of the experiment. These results confirm the potential use of OF for SVD surveillance using both established and partially validated assays in this study.

  4. Pasteurization Procedures for Donor Human Milk Affect Body Growth, Intestinal Structure, and Resistance against Bacterial Infections in Preterm Pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; de Waard, Marita; Christensen, Lars; Zhou, Ping; Jiang, Pingping; Sun, Jing; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; Bering, Stine Brandt; Sangild, Per Torp

    2017-03-15

    Background: Holder pasteurization (HP) destroys multiple bioactive factors in donor human milk (DM), and UV-C irradiation (UVC) is potentially a gentler method for pasteurizing DM for preterm infants.Objective: We investigated whether UVC-treated DM improves gut maturation and resistance toward bacterial infections relative to HP-treated DM.Methods: Bacteria, selected bioactive components, and markers of antioxidant capacity were measured in unpasteurized donor milk (UP), HP-treated milk, and UVC-treated milk (all from the same DM pool). Fifty-seven cesarean-delivered preterm pigs (91% gestation; ratio of males to females, 30:27) received decreasing volumes of parental nutrition (average 69 mL ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1)) and increasing volumes of the 3 DM diets (n = 19 each, average 89 mL ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1)) for 8-9 d. Body growth, gut structure and function, and systemic bacterial infection were evaluated.Results: A high bacterial load in the UP (6×10(5) colony forming units/mL) was eliminated similarly by HP and UVC treatments. Relative to HP-treated milk, both UVC-treated milk and UP showed greater activities of lipase and alkaline phosphatase and concentrations of lactoferrin, secretory immunoglobulin A, xanthine dehydrogenase, and some antioxidant markers (all P < 0.05). The pigs fed UVC-treated milk and pigs fed UP showed higher relative weight gain than pigs fed HP-treated milk (5.4% and 3.5%), and fewer pigs fed UVC-treated milk had positive bacterial cultures in the bone marrow (28%) than pigs fed HP-treated milk (68%) (P < 0.05). Intestinal health was also improved in pigs fed UVC-treated milk compared with those fed HP-treated milk as indicated by a higher plasma citrulline concentration (36%) and villus height (38%) (P < 0.05) and a tendency for higher aminopeptidase N (48%) and claudin-4 (26%) concentrations in the distal intestine (P < 0.08). The gut microbiota composition was similar among groups except for greater proportions of Enterococcus in pigs

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of Tuberculosis Management in Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), through Indirect Surveillance of Mycobacterium bovis Infection Using Released Sentinel Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, G.; Yockney, I. J.; Whitford, E. J.; Cross, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    In New Zealand, wild pigs acquire Mycobacterium bovis infection by scavenging tuberculous carrion, primarily carcasses of the main disease maintenance host, the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula). We investigated the utility of captive-reared, purpose-released pigs as sentinels for tuberculosis (TB) following lethal possum control and subsequent population recovery. Within 2-3 years of possum control by intensive poisoning, TB prevalence and the incidence rate of M. bovis infection in released sentinel pigs were lower than in an adjacent area where possums had not been poisoned. Unexpectedly, TB did not decline to near zero levels among pigs in the poisoned area, a fact which reflected an unanticipated rapid increase in the apparent abundance of possums. Monitoring infection levels among resident wild pigs confirmed that TB prevalence, while reduced due to possum control, persisted in the poisoned area at >20% among pigs born 2-3 years after poisoning, while remaining >60% among resident wild pigs in the nonpoisoned area. When fitted with radio-tracking devices, purpose-released pigs provided precise spatial TB surveillance information and facilitated effective killing of wild pigs when employed as “Judas” animals to help locate residents. Sentinel pigs offer value for monitoring disease trends in New Zealand, as TB levels in possums decline nationally due to large-scale possum control. PMID:24804148

  6. Experimental infection with Rickettsia rickettsii in an Amblyomma dubitatum tick colony, naturally infected by Rickettsia bellii.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Renata K; Costa, Francisco B; Ueno, Tatiana E H; Ramirez, Diego G; Soares, João F; Fonseca, Adivaldo H; Labruna, Marcelo B; Barros-Battesti, Darci M

    2014-10-01

    Amblyomma dubitatum engorged females, naturally infected by Rickettsia bellii, were used to establish a laboratory colony. Larvae, nymphs, and adults were exposed to two strains of Rickettsia rickettsii by feeding on needle-inoculated guinea pigs, and thereafter reared on uninfected guinea pigs. After acquisition feeding, engorged larvae and nymphs molted to nymphs and adults, respectively, which were shown to be infected (confirming transstadial perpetuation), and were able to transmit both strains of R. rickettsii to uninfected animals, as demonstrated by clinical, serological, and molecular analyses. However, the larval, nymphal, and adult stages of A. dubitatum showed to be only partially susceptible to R. rickettsii infection, since in all cases, only part of the ticks became infected by this agent, after being exposed to rickettsemic animals. While transovarial transmission of R. rickettsii was inefficient in the A. dubitatum engorged females of the present study, 100% of these females passed R. bellii transovarially. Because it has been reported that a primary infection by a Rickettsia species would preclude transovarial transmission of a second Rickettsia species, it is likely that the ineffectiveness of A. dubitatum to perpetuate R. rickettsii by transovarial transmission was related to its primary infection by R. bellii; however, it could also be related to unknown factors inherent to A. dubitatum. The relevance of A. dubitatum as a natural vector of R. rickettsii to humans or animals is discussed.

  7. Comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in the ilea of Lawsonia intracellularis-infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Hongyi; ZHANG, Mao; ZHENG, Enqin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the miRNA expression profiles in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected porcine intestines, infected pigs were first identified using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Then, RNA from infected intestines and control tissues were isolated and subjected to microarray analysis and RT-PCR. Results showed that a total of 83 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the infected samples and controls, out of which 53 were upregulated and 30 were downregulated. Validation using RT-PCR showed a high degree of confidence for the obtained data. Using the current miRBase release 21.0, nine groups of miRNAs were located in the same cluster, and three groups of miRNAs were found to belong to the same family. Interestingly, except for ssc-miR-10a-5p, all clustered miRNAs and the family members exhibited the same expression patterns. Pathway analysis of the putative gene targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed that they were involved in the immune response, amino acid metabolism and cell communication/growth/motility. Thus, the results indicate that altered miRNA expression profiles can affect immunity, metabolism and cellular processes. PMID:27916787

  8. Screening of early antigen genes of adult-stage Trichinella spiralis using pig serum from different stages of early infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this work was to identify novel, early antigens present in Trichinella spiralis. To this end, a cDNA library generated from 3-day old adult worms (Ad3) was immunologically screened using serum from a pig infected with 20,000 muscle larvae. The serum was obtained from multiple, time cours...

  9. Experimental intoxication of guinea pigs with Ipomoea carnea: behavioural and neuropathological alterations.

    PubMed

    Cholich, Luciana A; Márquez, Mercedes; Pumarola i Batlle, Martí; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Teibler, Gladys P; Rios, Elvio E; Acosta, Ofelia C

    2013-12-15

    Ipomoea carnea is a toxic plant that affects goats, with symptoms being characterised by nervous disorders and death. Swainsonine and calystegines are the principal toxic components isolated from I. carnea, which also yields lysergic acid derivatives. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical characterisation of experimental intoxication by I. carnea in guinea pigs through the evaluation of behavioural changes and to perform a thorough histopathological analysis of the affected CNS. Leaves of I. carnea were administered to guinea pigs. Open-field gait analysis and monoamine levels were measured. The poisoned animals exhibited increased vocalisation, lethargy, and a reduction in the locomotion frequency after the fourth week of intoxication, as demonstrated in the open-field test. Significant differences were observed in hind-limb gait width by the last week of intoxication. After 65 days, the guinea pigs were euthanised, necropsied, and examined using light and electron microscopy. At the end of the experiment, plasma serotonin decreased. In contrast, dopamine decreased, and noradrenaline increased in urine. Brain sections were evaluated with conventional histological methods and immunohistochemistry (IHC), as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuoles were observed throughout the brain, but they were particularly prominent in the brainstem. In addition, there were PAS-negative regions, and the Nissl substance was dispersed or absent, which was confirmed with the Kluver-Barreda stain. Moderate microgliosis was observed by immunohistochemistry. In the medulla oblongata, numerous ubiquitin-positive spheroids together with neuronal degeneration were observed in the nucleus gracilis/cuneatus. Furthermore, vacuoles were observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and endothelial cells by TEM. Our results showed that the behavioural effects may have been caused by alterations in the brain in conjunction with changes in monoamine levels. This

  10. Immunological variation in Taenia solium porcine cysticercosis: measurement on the variation of the antibody immune response of naturally infected pigs against antigens extracted from their own cysticerci and from those of different pigs.

    PubMed

    Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Larralde, Carlos

    2013-10-18

    Although it is widely assumed that both antigen and host immunological variability are involved in the variable intensity of natural porcine infections by Taenia solium (T. solium) cysticercis and success of immunodiagnostic tests vaccines, the magnitude of such combined variability has not been studied or measured at all. In this paper we report statistical data on the variability of the antibody response of naturally infected pigs against the antigens extracted from the vesicular fluids of their own infecting cysts (variance within pigs) and against antigen samples extracted from cysts of other cysticercotic pigs (variance among pigs). The variation between pigs was greater than the inter-pigs variations, which suggests that a concomitant immunity process prevents the establishment of cysts coming from a subsequent challenge. In so doing, we found that there is not a single antigenic band that was recognized by all hosts and that antigens varied among the cysts within the same pigs as well as among pigs. Our results may be valuable for the improvement of immunodiagnostic tests and of effective vaccines against naturally acquired porcine T. solium cysticercosis.

  11. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura C; Jiang, Zhihua; Sang, Yongming; Harhay, Gregory P; Lager, Kelly M

    2014-06-15

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the current annotation of pig IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, IFITM5, IFITM1L1 and IFITM1L4, manually annotated IFITM1L2, IFITM1L3, IFITM5L, IFITM3L1 and IFITM3L2, and provide expressed sequence tag (EST) and/or mRNA evidence, not contained with the NCBI Reference Sequence database (RefSeq), for the existence of IFITM6, IFITM7 and a new IFITM1-like (IFITM1LN) gene in pigs. Phylogenic analyses showed seven porcine IFITM genes with highly conserved human/mouse orthologs known to have anti-viral activity. Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling (DGETP) of swine tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) of pigs infected with swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus or porcine circovirus type 2 over 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) showed that gene expression abundance differs dramatically among pig IFITM family members, ranging from 0 to over 3000 tags per million. In particular, SIV up-regulated IFITM1 by 5.9 fold at 3 dpi. Bayesian framework further identified pig IFITM1 and IFITM3 as differentially expressed genes in the overall transcriptome analysis. In addition to being a component of protein complexes involved in homotypic adhesion, the IFITM1 is also associated with pathways related to regulation of cell proliferation and IFITM3 is involved in immune responses.

  12. Association of concurrent porcine circovirus (PCV) 2a and 2b infection with PCV associated disease in vaccinated pigs.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Priscilla F; Johnson, John; Shen, Huigang; Striegel, Dave; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    Investigations were performed to characterize porcine circovirus (PCV) 2 infection in 10 week old pigs from a case of apparent vaccine failure. Thirty serum samples were collected from affected or non-affected pigs and tested for anti-PCV2 antibodies and PCV2 DNA. To address potential PCV2 vaccine compliance issues, samples were tested for antibodies against baculovirus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens present in the PCV2 vaccine utilized in this herd. Both PCV2a and PCV2b DNA were detected in 76.6% (90% positive for PCV2a, 86.6% positive for PCV2b), anti-PCV2 IgG in 90%, anti-baculovirus IgG in 50%, and anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgG in 43.3% of the samples. Frequency of baculovirus and M. hyopneumoniae seropositive pigs was significantly lower in affected pigs. The finding that only 50% of the pigs developed a detectable immune response to vaccination suggests poor vaccine compliance or efficacy. Concurrent PCV2a and PCV2b infection was common and may have resulted in enhanced PCV2 replication.

  13. The first lack of evidence of H7N9 avian influenza virus infections among pigs in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fu-Rong; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Lin, Tong; Shao, Jun-Jun; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Yong-Guang; Chang, Hui-Yun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we sought to examine whether evidence existed suggesting that pigs were being infected with the novel H7N9 avian influenza virus. From November 2012 to November 2013, blood was drawn from 1560 pigs from 100 large farms in 4 provinces of eastern China. Many of these pigs were in close proximity to wild birds or poultry. Swine sera were studied using hemagglutinin inhibition (HI) assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) against the H7 antigen derived from the emergent H7N9 avian influenza virus (AIV). Only 29 of the 1560 samples had HI titers of 1:20 when using the H7N9 AIV antigens, and none of the 29 (H7N9 AIV) HI-positive samples were positive when using ELISA, indicating that no samples were positive for H7N9. The negative results were also verified using a novel competitive HA-ELISA. As pigs have been shown to be infected with other avian influenza viruses and as the prevalence of novel influenza A viruses (e.g., H7N9 AIV) may be increasing among poultry in China, similar seroepidemiological studies of pigs should be periodically conducted in the future.

  14. Evidence of hemolysis in pigs infected with highly virulent African swine fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Karalyan, Zaven; Zakaryan, Hovakim; Arakelova, Elina; Aivazyan, Violeta; Tatoyan, Marina; Kotsinyan, Armen; Izmailyan, Roza; Karalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The research was conducted to understand more profoundly the pathogenetic aspects of the acute form of the African swine fever (ASF). Materials and Methods: A total of 10 pigs were inoculated with ASF virus (ASFV) (genotype II) in the study of the red blood cells (RBCs), blood and urine biochemistry in the dynamics of disease. Results: The major hematological differences observed in ASFV infected pigs were that the mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and hematocrits were significantly decreased compared to controls, and the levels of erythropoietin were significantly increased. Also were detected the trends of decrease in RBC count at terminal stages of ASF. Analysis of blood biochemistry revealed that during ASF development, besides bilirubinemia significantly elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase were detected. Analysis of urine biochemistry revealed the presence of bilirubinuria, proteinuria during ASF development. Proteinuria, especially at late stages of the disease reflects a severe kidney damage possible glomerulonefritis. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the characteristics of developing hemolytic anemia observed in acute ASF (genotype II). PMID:28096614

  15. Microbiome associations in pigs with the best and worst clinical outcomes following co-infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)

    DOE PAGES

    Niederwerder, Megan C.; Jaing, Crystal J.; Thissen, James B.; ...

    2016-03-10

    Co-infections involving porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) are common and contribute to a range of polymicrobial disease syndromes in swine and on a world-wide basis. Both viruses compromise host defenses, resulting in increased susceptibility to infections by primary and secondary pathogens that can affect growth performance as well as increased morbidity and mortality. An experimental population of 95 pigs was co-infected with PRRSV and PCV2. At 70 days post-infection (dpi), 20 representative pigs were selected as having the best or worst clinical outcome based on average daily gain (ADG) and the presencemore » of clinical disease. Moreover, the worst clinical outcome pigs had prolonged and greater levels of viremia as measured by qPCR. Serum, lung and fecal samples collected at 70 dpi were analyzed using a comprehensive DNA microarray technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array, to detect over 8000 microbes. Bacterial species, such as Bacillus cereus, were detected at a higher rate in the serum of worst performing pigs. At the level of the fecal microbiome, the overall microbial diversity was lower in the worst clinical outcome group. The results reinforce the importance of pathogen load in determining clinical outcome and suggest an important role of microbial diversity as a contributing factor in disease.« less

  16. Microbiome associations in pigs with the best and worst clinical outcomes following co-infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)

    SciTech Connect

    Niederwerder, Megan C.; Jaing, Crystal J.; Thissen, James B.; Cino-Ozuna, Ada Giselle; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2016-03-10

    Co-infections involving porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) are common and contribute to a range of polymicrobial disease syndromes in swine and on a world-wide basis. Both viruses compromise host defenses, resulting in increased susceptibility to infections by primary and secondary pathogens that can affect growth performance as well as increased morbidity and mortality. An experimental population of 95 pigs was co-infected with PRRSV and PCV2. At 70 days post-infection (dpi), 20 representative pigs were selected as having the best or worst clinical outcome based on average daily gain (ADG) and the presence of clinical disease. Moreover, the worst clinical outcome pigs had prolonged and greater levels of viremia as measured by qPCR. Serum, lung and fecal samples collected at 70 dpi were analyzed using a comprehensive DNA microarray technology, the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array, to detect over 8000 microbes. Bacterial species, such as Bacillus cereus, were detected at a higher rate in the serum of worst performing pigs. At the level of the fecal microbiome, the overall microbial diversity was lower in the worst clinical outcome group. The results reinforce the importance of pathogen load in determining clinical outcome and suggest an important role of microbial diversity as a contributing factor in disease.

  17. Blue eye disease porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) infects pig neurons and glial cells using sialo-glycoprotein as receptor.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Godoy-Martinez, Diana V; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Rodriguez-Peredo, Alejandra; Dueñas-Jimenez, Judith M; Dueñas-Jiménez, Sergio H; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A

    2007-03-01

    Pig neural cells express glycoproteins with sialylated N-linked oligosaccharide chains (SNOC) which are used by the porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) as receptors. Pig neuronal or glial cell cultures were employed to investigate (a) whether PoRv infects such cells using a molecule expressing SNOC, and (b) the role of viral envelope glycoproteins in establishing the infection. Enriched neuronal or glial cell cultures were exposed to PoRv and infection was detected immunocytochemically. Neuronal cultures prepared from neonatal pigs were treated enzymatically to eliminate sialic acid or N-linked oligosaccharide chains. Primary neural cultures were exposed to anti-HN or anti-F preincubated with PoRv to study the role of the viral glycoproteins. In enriched cultures, PoRv infected neurons and glial cells, and sialic acid expressed in N-linked oligosaccharide chains appeared to play a central role in infection. It was concluded that HN and F viral glycoproteins are required to infect neurons and glial cells.

  18. Antitussive effect of naringin on experimentally induced cough in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Li, Peibo; Yang, Hongliang; Fang, Siqi; Su, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of naringin has been investigated in different models of experimentally induced cough in guinea pigs. In contrast to codeine phosphate (6 mg/kg, intravenous administration [i. v.]), naringin (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i. v.) had no central antitussive effect on cough elicited by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Naringin (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 µmol) could not prevent the cough reflex induced by stimulation of the trachea after intracerebroventricular injection (i. c. v.), while codeine phosphate (0.5 µmol) was highly effective. Further characterizing the peripheral mechanism of naringin, we found that its effect (50 mg/kg, i. v.) was not affected by the depletion of sensory neuropeptides, whereas levodropropizine (10 mg/kg, i. v.) lost its capacity to prevent cough in the capsaicin-desensitized guinea pig. Furthermore, pretreatment with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i. p.]) significantly reduced the antitussive effect of pinacidil (5 mg/kg, subcutaneous [s. c.]), but could not antagonize the antitussive effect of naringin (30 mg/kg, s. c.). Our present results suggest that naringin is not a central antitussive drug. And naringin does not exert its peripheral antitussive effect through either the sensory neuropeptides system or the modulation of ATP-sensitive K (+) channels.

  19. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thi Hoa; Tran, Thi Bich Chieu; Tran, Thi Thu Nga; Nguyen, Van Dung; Campbell, James; Pham, Hong Anh; Huynh, Huu Tho; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Bryant, Juliet E; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-03-28

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serotype 2 strains and occupational exposure to pigs or consumption of infected pork. To gain insight into the role of pigs for human consumption as a reservoir for zoonotic infection in southern Vietnam, we determined the prevalence and diversity of S. suis carriage in healthy slaughterhouse pigs. Nasopharyngeal tonsils were sampled from pigs at slaughterhouses serving six provinces in southern Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh City area from September 2006 to November 2007. Samples were screened by bacterial culture. Isolates of S. suis were serotyped and characterized by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and associated genetic resistance determinants, and the presence of putative virulence factors were determined. 41% (222/542) of pigs carried S. suis of one or multiple serotypes. 8% (45/542) carried S. suis serotype 2 which was the most common serotype found (45/317 strains, 14%). 80% of serotype 2 strains belonged to the MLST clonal complex 1,which was previously associated with meningitis cases in Vietnam and outbreaks of severe disease in China in 1998 and 2005. These strains clustered with representative strains isolated from patients with meningitis in PFGE analysis, and showed similar antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor profiles. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of S. suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam. Strict hygiene at processing facilities, and health education programs addressing food safety and proper handling of pork should be encouraged.

  20. Slaughterhouse Pigs Are a Major Reservoir of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Capable of Causing Human Infection in Southern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hoa, Ngo Thi; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Dung, Nguyen Van; Campbell, James; Anh, Pham Hong; Huu Tho, Huynh; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bryant, Juliet E.; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a pathogen of major economic significance to the swine industry and is increasingly recognized as an emerging zoonotic agent in Asia. In Vietnam, S. suis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in adult humans. Zoonotic transmission is most frequently associated with serotype 2 strains and occupational exposure to pigs or consumption of infected pork. To gain insight into the role of pigs for human consumption as a reservoir for zoonotic infection in southern Vietnam, we determined the prevalence and diversity of S. suis carriage in healthy slaughterhouse pigs. Nasopharyngeal tonsils were sampled from pigs at slaughterhouses serving six provinces in southern Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh City area from September 2006 to November 2007. Samples were screened by bacterial culture. Isolates of S. suis were serotyped and characterized by multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles and associated genetic resistance determinants, and the presence of putative virulence factors were determined. 41% (222/542) of pigs carried S. suis of one or multiple serotypes. 8% (45/542) carried S. suis serotype 2 which was the most common serotype found (45/317 strains, 14%). 80% of serotype 2 strains belonged to the MLST clonal complex 1,which was previously associated with meningitis cases in Vietnam and outbreaks of severe disease in China in 1998 and 2005. These strains clustered with representative strains isolated from patients with meningitis in PFGE analysis, and showed similar antimicrobial resistance and virulence factor profiles. Slaughterhouse pigs are a major reservoir of S. suis serotype 2 capable of causing human infection in southern Vietnam. Strict hygiene at processing facilities, and health education programs addressing food safety and proper handling of pork should be encouraged. PMID:21464930

  1. Pre-infection of pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae modifies outcomes of infection with European swine influenza virus of H1N1, but not H1N2, subtype.

    PubMed

    Deblanc, C; Gorin, S; Quéguiner, S; Gautier-Bouchardon, A V; Ferré, S; Amenna, N; Cariolet, R; Simon, G

    2012-05-25

    Swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) are widespread in farms and are major pathogens involved in the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). The aim of this experiment was to compare the pathogenicity of European avian-like swine H1N1 and European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 viruses in naïve pigs and in pigs previously infected with Mhp. Six groups of SPF pigs were inoculated intra-tracheally with either Mhp, or H1N1, or H1N2 or Mhp+H1N1 or Mhp+H1N2, both pathogens being inoculated at 21 days intervals in these two last groups. A mock-infected group was included. Although both SIV strains induced clinical signs when singly inoculated, results indicated that the H1N2 SIV was more pathogenic than the H1N1 virus, with an earlier shedding and a greater spread in lungs. Initial infection with Mhp before SIV inoculation increased flu clinical signs and pathogenesis (hyperthermia, loss of appetite, pneumonia lesions) due to the H1N1 virus but did not modify significantly outcomes of H1N2 infection. Thus, Mhp and SIV H1N1 appeared to act synergistically, whereas Mhp and SIV H1N2 would compete, as H1N2 infection led to the elimination of Mhp in lung diaphragmatic lobes. In conclusion, SIV would be a risk factor for the severity of respiratory disorders when associated with Mhp, depending on the viral subtype involved. This experimental model of coinfection with Mhp and avian-like swine H1N1 is a relevant tool for studying the pathogenesis of SIV-associated PRDC and testing intervention strategies for the control of the disease.

  2. Differential molecular identification of Taeniid spp. and Sarcocystis spp. cysts isolated from infected pigs and cattle.

    PubMed

    González, L M; Villalobos, N; Montero, E; Morales, J; Sanz, R Alamo; Muro, A; Harrison, L J S; Parkhouse, R M E; Gárate, T

    2006-11-30

    In the present work, the species-specific identification of Taeniid spp. cysticerci and sarcocystis cysts isolated from infected pigs and cattle was achieved by PCR. In particular: (i) multiplex-PCR derived from HDP2 DNA fragment, specific for Taenia saginata/Taenia solium; (ii) PCRs and PCR-RFLPs of the rDNA internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2) for the differential diagnosis of taeniids; (iii) PCR derived from the 18S rRNA gene and sequencing, specific for Sarcoystis spp. The combined application of these three PCR protocols provided an unequivocally specific diagnosis of T. saginata, T. solium, T. hydatigena, Sarcocystis hominis and Sarcocystis suihominis, and may have practical application in the identification of calcified degenerating or morphologically dubious cysts, for example in the slaughter house situation or in human biopsy samples.

  3. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  4. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of porcine cysticercosis in naturally infected pigs (Sus scrofa) in Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Chawhan, P; Singh, B; Sharma, R; Gill, P S

    2015-12-01

    Porcine cysticercosis is a serious zoonosis in resource-poor countries. Despite the evidence showing that the disease is endemic in the Punjab region of India, molecular characterisation of Taenia solium cysticercosis from naturally infected pigs has not been carried out. The authors examined a total of 519 pigs slaughtered in small slaughter shops (shops that sell meat from animals that are slaughtered on the premises as the customer waits) in the urban slums of Punjab state in northern India. The expected polymerase chain reaction products with molecular sizes of 286 bp, 420 bp, 1150 bp and 333 bp corresponding to the targeted large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA), cytochrome oxidase 1, internal transcribed spacer 1, and diagnostic antigen Ts14 genes, respectively, were amplified from the cysts collected from all 22 infected carcasses. The detection limits for the respective primers (except those targeting the Ts14 gene) were estimated. The analytical sensitivities of both the TBR and JB primers (targeting the rRNA and cytochrome oxidase genes, respectively) were found to be higher (10 pg) than that of the internal transcribed spacer 1 gene (1 ng) primers. Ten representative samples from cytochrome oxidase 1 gene amplified products were sequenced in both directions for phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing demonstrated that all cysticerci were of the Asian genotype of T. solium and not of the African/Latin American genotype or T. asiatica. The results confirm the presence of T. solium porcine cysticercosis in Punjab state and there is therefore an urgent need for science-based policies for prevention and control of this serious zoonosis.

  5. Water-filtered infrared A reduces chlamydial infectivity in vitro without causing ex vivo eye damage in pig and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Carolin; Marti, Hanna; Frohns, Antonia; Frohns, Florian; Blenn, Christian; Leonard, Cory Ann; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Stein, Elisabeth; Borel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    Repeated ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis trigger the development of trachoma, the most common cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) has shown positive effects on cultured cells and human skin. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of wIRA as a possible non-chemical treatment for trachoma patients. We both modeled ocular chlamydial infections using C. trachomatis B to infect human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE) and studied the effects of wIRA on non-infected ocular structures with two ex vivo eye models. We focused on the temperature development during wIRA irradiation in cell culture and perfused pig eyes to exclude potentially harmful side effects. Furthermore, cell viability of HCjE and cytotoxicity in mouse retina explants was analyzed. We demonstrated a significant wIRA-dependent reduction of chlamydial infectivity in HCjE cells. Moreover, we observed that wIRA treatment of HCjE prior to infection was sufficient to inhibit chlamydial infectivity and that visible light enhances the effect of wIRA. Irradiation did not reduce cell viability and there was no indication of retinal damage post treatment. Additionally, temperatures during wIRA exposure did not markedly exceed physiological eye temperatures, suggesting that hyperthermia-related lesions are unlikely. For clinical applications, further exploration of wIRA as a non-chemical treatment device in an experimental animal model is essential.

  6. Isolation and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from H37Rv infected guinea pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Libin; Ryan, Gavin J; Bhamidi, Suresh; Troudt, JoLynn; Amin, Anita; Izzo, Angelo; Lenaerts, Anne J; McNeil, Michael R; Belisle, John T; Crick, Dean C; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2014-09-01

    Evidence suggests that Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown in vivo may have a different phenotypic structure from its in vitro counterpart. In order to study the differences between in vivo and in vitro grown bacilli, it is important to establish a reliable method for isolating and purifying M. tuberculosis from infected tissue. In this study, we developed an optimal method to isolate bacilli from the lungs of infected guinea pigs, which was also shown to be applicable to the interferon-γ gene knockout mouse model. Briefly, 1) the infected lungs were thoroughly homogenized; 2) a four step enzymatic digestion was utilized to reduce the bulk of the host tissue using collagenase, DNase I and pronase E; 3) residual contamination by the host tissue debris was successfully reduced using percoll density gradient centrifugation. These steps resulted in a protocol such that relatively clean, viable bacilli can be isolated from the digested host tissue homogenate in about 50% yield. These bacilli can further be used for analytical studies of the more stable cellular components such as lipid, peptidoglycan and mycolic acid.

  7. Ocular drug permeation following experimental excimer laser treatment on the isolated pig eye.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Martina; Schründer, Stephan; Gärtner, Sven; Keipert, Sigrid; Hartmann, Christian; Pleyer, Uwe

    2002-04-01

    Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a well-established procedure which is frequently applied to correct myopia. Since structural alterations of the corneal epithelium occur after the treatment, a different drug permeation can be assumed. To investigate the effects of PRK on drug permeation, excimer laser ablations with varying depths were performed on isolated pig eyes. The permeation of lipophilic (diclofenac-sodium; D-Na) and hydrophilic (pilocarpine-hydrochloride; P-HCl model drugs were studied in vitro. Under these experimental conditions, P-HCl demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of permeation in relation to the ablation depth. In contrast, corneal epithelial thickness scarcely influenced the permeation rate of D-Na. Not until removing the entire epithelium did a significantly increased permeability occur, when compared to untreated cornea. These results suggest that PRK may significantly reduce the corneal barrier function and alter pharmacokinetics of topical medication.

  8. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107–179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  9. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp.

  10. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Mycoplasma suis infection in pig farms in central China.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiqi; Zhang, Weijing; Song, Weijiao; Liu, Zehua; Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Fang, Rui; Li, Peng; Zhou, Yanqin; Hu, Min; Zhao, Junlong

    2014-11-01

    Mycoplasma suis, the causative agent of porcine infectious anemia, causes large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted in 69 pig farms in Hubei Province, China, from November 2011 to August 2013 to ascertain the prevalence and associated risk factors of M. suis. Four thousand and four blood samples from pigs of all the age groups were tested for M. suis antibodies using the established rMSG1-ELISA assay. Among these 4004 samples, 1615 blood samples from multiparous sows were examined to identify the association between seroprevalence and different seasons. Information on risk factors collected from farmers or attending veterinarians was recorded on a pre-designed questionnaire. The overall test seroprevalence of M. suis infection at the animal level was 31.9% (1277/4004; 95% CI: 30.5%, 33.4%), whereas at the farm level, this value was 95.65% (66/69; 95% CI: 87.8%, 99.1%). The seroprevalence of M. suis was higher in replacement gilts (40.6%; 95% CI: 35.1%, 46.3%), multiparous sows (48.2%; 95% CI: 45.8%, 50.7%) and boars (44.4%; 95% CI: 34.5%, 54.8%), as compared to piglets (13.0%; 95% CI: 9.4%, 17.3%), weaned-piglets (10.8%; 95% CI: 8.9%, 13.0%), and growing-finishing pigs (25.0%; 95% CI: 22.0%, 28.3%). In terms of seasons, the prevalence of M. suis in pigs was significantly higher in summer (65.3%; 95% CI: 61.0%, 69.5%) and autumn (65.0%; 95% CI: 59.0%, 70.6%) compared to spring (30.1%; 95% CI: 26.0%, 34.4%) and winter (36.4%; 95% CI: 31.4%, 41.5%). Farm-level risk factors were identified by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The associated factors retained in the final multivariable logistic regression model were drug treatment, presence of mosquitoes and flies, and frequency of disinfection. Drug treatment (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.07, 0.88; P=0.031) and frequency of disinfection (OR=0.23; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.90; P=0.035) were protective factors, and the presence of mosquitoes and flies (OR=5.994; 95% CI: 1

  11. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids; Part I. Effects on growth performance, microbial populations and immune status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs (n=88) weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age were used in a 14 d study to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on immune status, Salmonella infection and shedding, and intestinal microbial populations following a Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. Pigs were ch...

  12. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids: Part II. Effects on intestinal histology and active nutrient transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-delivered direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on intestinal morphology and active nutrient absorption in weanling pigs following deliberate Salmonella infection. Pigs (n = 88) were weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age and assigned to one...

  13. Increase in chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2 in blood from pigs infected with high compared to low virulence African swine fever virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Fishbourne, Emma; Hutet, Evelyne; Abrams, Charles; Cariolet, Roland; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Takamatsu, Haru-H; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-10-01

    Modulation of the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in whole blood was compared following infection of pigs with high and low virulence isolates of African swine fever virus. Levels of mRNAs for CCL2, CCL3L1, CCL4, CXCL10, CCR1 and CCR5 were significantly increased in at least one time point following infection in two experiments and CCL5, CCR9 and CXCR4 mRNA were significantly increased in one of the experiments. The results showed that greatest fold increases in mRNAs for CXCL10 and CCL2 were observed following infection of pigs. CXCL10 mRNA was increased by up to 15 fold in infected compared to uninfected pigs. CXCL10 protein was also detected in serum from pigs infected with the high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate. Levels of CCL2 mRNA were increased in pigs infected with high virulence Benin 97/1 isolate compared to low virulence OURT88/3 isolate and this correlated with an increase of greater than 30 fold in levels of CCL2 protein detected in serum from pigs infected with this isolate. An increase in overall chemotaxis active compounds in defibrinated plasma samples from Benin 97/1 infected pigs was observed at 3 days post-infection (dpi) and a decrease by 7 dpi as measured by chemotaxis assay using normal pig leucocytes in vitro. Increased levels of CXCL10 may either contribute to the activation of lymphocyte priming toward the Th1 phenotype or induction of T lymphocyte apoptosis. Increased levels of CCL2, a chemoattractant for macrophages, may result in increased recruitment of monocytes from bone marrow thus increasing the pool of cells susceptible to infection.

  14. Experimental Phage Therapy for Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leang-Chung, Choh; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Mariappan, Vanitha; Li-Yen, Chang; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterial pathogen intrinsically resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Phages have been developed for use as an alternative treatment therapy, particularly for bacterial infections that do not respond to conventional antibiotics. In this study, we investigated the use of phages to treat cells infected with B. pseudomallei. Phage C34 isolated from seawater was purified and characterised on the basis of its host range and morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Phage C34 was able to lyse 39.5% of B. pseudomallei clinical strains. Due to the presence of contractile tail, phage C34 is classified as a member of the family Myoviridae, a tailed double-stranded DNA virus. When 2 × 105 A549 cells were exposed to 2 × 107 PFU of phage C34, 24 hours prior to infection with 2 × 106 CFU of B. pseudomallei, it was found that the survivability of the cells increased to 41.6 ± 6.8% as compared to 22.8 ± 6.0% in untreated control. Additionally, application of phage successfully rescued 33.3% of mice infected with B. pseudomallei and significantly reduced the bacterial load in the spleen of the phage-treated mice. These findings indicate that phage can be a potential antimicrobial agent for B. pseudomallei infections. PMID:27387381

  15. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129

  16. Pathogenesis of Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    infected animals and humans [1-3]. The related alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) also...viruses [4] and experimental studies in animals have demonstrated that all three alphaviruses are infectious by the aerosol route and are considered a...associ- ated with EEEV infection are the most severe of any alphavirus , with an estimated mortality rate in humans of 30% for the North American strains

  17. Immune Response in Male Guinea Pigs Infected with the Guinea Pig Inclusion Conjunctivitis Agent of Chlamydia Psittaci

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    occasionally epididymitis . About 20% of men infected with gonorrhea will have a concomitant chlamydial infection (15). Curiously, men show a lower infection...al. (18) examined the course of chlamydial induced epididymitis . When C. trachomatis, biovar MoPn, was injected into the vas deferens, the organism... epididymitis due to Chlamydia trachomatis in rats. Infect. Immun. 60:2324-2328. 19. Johnson, A. P., M. J. Hare, G. D. Wilbanks, P. Cooper, C. M. Heatherington

  18. Course and transmission characteristics of oral low-dose infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar with a Caucasian African swine fever virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Jana; Guinat, Claire; Beer, Martin; Pronin, Valery; Tauscher, Kerstin; Petrov, Anja; Keil, Günther; Blome, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    In 2007, African swine fever virus (ASFV) was introduced into the Transcaucasian countries and Russia. Since then, it has spread alarmingly and reached the European Union. ASFV strains are highly virulent and lead to almost 100% mortality under experimental conditions. However, the possibility of dose-dependent disease courses has been discussed. For this reason, a study was undertaken to assess the risk of chronic disease and the establishment of carriers upon low-dose oronasal infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar. It was demonstrated that very low doses of ASFV are sufficient to infect especially weak or runted animals by the oronasal route. Some of these animals did not show clinical signs indicative of ASF, and they developed almost no fever. However, no changes were observed in individual animal regarding the onset, course and outcome of infection as assessed by diagnostic tests. After amplification of ASFV by these animals, pen- and stablemates became infected and developed acute lethal disease with similar characteristics in all animals. Thus, we found no indication of prolonged or chronic individual courses upon low-dose infection in either species. The scattered onset of clinical signs and pathogen detection within and among groups confirms moderate contagiosity that is strongly linked with blood contact. In conclusion, the prolonged course at the "herd level" together with the exceptionally low dose that proved to be sufficient to infect a runted wild boar could be important for disease dynamics in wild-boar populations and in backyard settings.

  19. Prevalence of extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections and assessment of sanitary conditions of pig slaughter slabs in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mkupasi, Ernatus M; Ngowi, Helena A; Nonga, Hezron Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    A study was carried out to establish the prevalence of extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections and to assess the pig slaughter slab sanitary conditions in Dar es Salaam city, Tanzania. A total of 24 privately owned pig slaughter slabs were assessed. All slaughter slabs were sub-standard; wrongly located, poorly designed and constructed and lacked most basic requirements for a slaughter house. Because of inadequate slaughtering, disposal and cleaning facilities, the slaughter slabs were under unhygienic condition with questionable safety, soundness and wholesomeness of the pork produced. Routine meat inspection procedures were used to detect extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections. Of the 731 examined pigs; 8.1%, 5.9% and 0.4% were infected with ascariosis, porcine cysticercosis and hydatidosis, respectively. It was noted that almost all slaughter pigs in Dar es Salaam originated from different regions. Based on the region of origin, the status of porcine cysticercosis was 8.2% for Dodoma (n = 98), 8.2% for Manyara (n = 260) and 6.9% for Mbeya (n = 116). This study disclosed the unhygienic sanitary condition prevailing in Dar es Salaam pig slaughter slabs and recommends that strategies should be devised to improve the situation. Porcine ascariosis and cysticercosis were widely prevalent and caused economic losses due to condemnations. Because of their zoonotic nature, the observed extra-intestinal porcine helminth infections in pig pose a public health risk among consumers. Thus, there is a need to introduce appropriate control measures of parasitic infections in pigs.

  20. Descriptive analysis of the prevalence and the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium complex-infected pigs that were slaughtered on the main island of Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Hibiya, K; Kazumi, Y; Nishiuchi, Y; Sugawara, I; Miyagi, K; Oda, Y; Oda, E; Fujita, J

    2010-09-01

    Recent genetic studies have revealed that several epidemiological factors affect Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in pig populations. However, mechanisms underlying the spread of MAC infection among hog farms have not been clarified. In consideration of this situation, we cross-sectionally investigated the mechanisms underlying the spread of MAC on the island of Okinawa. Pigs slaughtered (n=706,763) and 331 hog farms on Okinawa were surveyed during the years 2002-2004. Two outbreaks of MAC infection were occurred in several farms during survey period. Bacteria were isolated from randomly selected pigs and genotype of isolates was determined by using genetic finger printing methods with the insertion sequence (IS) 1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Most isolates had large numbers of IS1245 copies, while strains with low copy numbers of IS1245 and isolates without IS1245 were seen in few farms. MACs strains were repeatedly isolated from pigs of the affected farms during the survey period. Those farms with an identical pig rearing systems showed synchronic changes in the prevalence of MAC infection. An industrial farm without an outbreak had an independent pig flow, but maintained distinct MAC strains. Multivariate analysis did not reveal independent factors for the prevalence of the MAC infection. These findings suggest that there were three clusters distinguished genetically in the main island of Okinawa, which were potentially spread by common pig flow. However, the outbreaks occurred because of unspecified conditions on each farm environment.

  1. New insights into the molecular epidemiology of Trichinella infection in domestic pigs, wild boars, and bears in Romania.

    PubMed

    Nicorescu, Isabela Madalina Dragoi; Ionita, Mariana; Ciupescu, Laurentiu; Buzatu, Cristian Vasile; Tanasuica, Rodica; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu

    2015-09-15

    Trichinellosis is a food-borne zoonosis caused by the parasitic nematode Trichinella, characterized by an extremely wide host range and geographical distribution. In Romania, it is recognized as one of the most serious zoonotic diseases. A cross-sectional study, covering all regions of Romania, was conducted in 2014 to investigate and update the prevalence of Trichinella infection among domestic pigs, wild boars, and bears. Additional, molecular identification of Trichinella species circulating among these animals was performed in order to establish the biogeography of Trichinella species within the seven geographical regions of Romania. For this, a total of 113,383 pigs raised in non-controlled housing conditions (backyards), 5596 hunted wild boars and 147 hunted bears were subjected to Trichinella analysis. The highest prevalence of Trichinella infections was found in bears (12.93%), followed by wild boars (1.66%) and domestic pigs (0.20%). Of 294 Trichinella isolates that tested positive by multiplex PCR, 219 (74.49%) were identified as Trichinella spiralis, 66 (22.45%) as Trichinella britovi, and 9 isolates (3.06%) as mixed infections of T. spiralis and T. britovi. T. spiralis was more prevalent in domestic pigs (165/228; 72.37%) than in game (63/228; 27.63%), while T. britovi showed a higher prevalence in game (50/75; 66.66%) than in domestic pigs (25/75; 33.33%). Moreover, the present study revealed a significant host- and area- related distribution of Trichinella species within the seven regions of Romania. Therefore, these findings are of epidemiological relevance, updating data on the prevalence and distribution of Trichinella species circulating among domestic and wild animals in South-Eastern Europe.

  2. Protein and antigen diversity in the vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci dissected from naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Larralde, Carlos; Morales, Julio; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium is a health threat for humans and pigs living in developing countries, for which there is neither a flawless immunodiagnostic test nor a totally effective vaccine. Suspecting of individual diversity of hosts and parasites as possible sources of the variations of the parasite loads among cysticercotic animals and of the limited success of such immunological applications as well as, we explored and measured both in nine cases of naturally acquired porcine cysticercosis. For this purpose, 2-Dimensional IgG immunoblots were performed by reacting the sera of each cysticercotic pig with the antigens contained in the vesicular fluid (VF) of their own cysticerci. We found an unexpectedly large diversity among the proteins and antigens contained in each of the nine VFs. Also diverse were the serum IgG antibody responses of the nine pigs, as none of their 2D- immunoblot images exhibited the same number of spots and resembled each other in only 6.3% to 65.3% of their features. So large an individual immunological diversity of the cysticercal antigens and of the infected pigs´ IgG antibody response should be taken into account in the design of immunological tools for diagnosis and prevention of cysticercosis and should also be considered as a possibly significant source of diversity in Taenia solium´s infectiveness and pathogenicity.

  3. Abattoir-based study investigating the association between gross pathological lesions and serological tests for Salmonella infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, R P; Sanchez-Vazquez, M J; Cook, A J C; Edwards, S A

    2011-03-05

    Abattoir data collected from three British pig health monitoring schemes were combined to investigate the associations between Salmonella infection and the presence of gross lesions detected in slaughtered pigs. Each set of results was linked back to the farm from which the pigs were submitted, and the Salmonella results and lesions reports were connected at farm level. Salmonella infection was determined through meat juice ELISA (MJE), and the health conditions were assessed by postmortem inspection. The final dataset contained 873 slapmarks, with an average of 215 samples tested by MJE, and 355 pigs that were assessed for health conditions, per slapmark. Each of the health assessment conditions was individually analysed by regression models to investigate associations with the MJE results, accounting for clustering at the slapmark level and also for seasonality. A multivariable model was also used to estimate the strength of association with MJE results when all the health conditions were entered into the model. The results showed positive associations between Salmonella and enzootic pneumonia-like lesions, milk spots, peritonitis and pericarditis.

  4. Bacteriocinogeny in experimental pigs treated with indomethacin and Escherichia coli Nissle

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Smajs, David; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Förstl, Miroslav; Smarda, Jan; Kohoutova, Darina; Kunes, Martin; Cyrany, Jiri; Tacheci, Ilja; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Lesna, Jirina; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate bacteriocinogeny in short-term high-dose indomethacin administration with or without probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) in experimental pigs. METHODS: Twenty-four pigs entered the study: Group A (controls), Group B (probiotics alone), Group C (indomethacin alone) and Group D (probiotics and indomethacin). EcN (3.5 × 1010 bacteria/d for 14 d) and/or indomethacin (15 mg/kg per day for 10 d) were administrated orally. Anal smears before and smears from the small and large intestine were taken from all animals. Bacteriocin production was determined with 6 different indicator strains; all strains were polymerase chain reaction tested for the presence of 29 individual bacteriocin-encoding determinants. RESULTS: The general microbiota profile was rather uniform in all animals but there was a broad diversity in coliform bacteria (parallel genotypes A, B1, B2 and D found). In total, 637 bacterial strains were tested, mostly Escherichia coli (E. coli). There was a higher incidence of non-E. coli strains among samples taken from the jejunum and ileum compared to that of the colon and rectum indicating predominance of E. coli strains in the large intestine. Bacteriocinogeny was found in 24/77 (31%) before and in 155/560 (28%) isolated bacteria at the end of the study. Altogether, 13 individual bacteriocin types (out of 29 tested) were identified among investigated strains. Incidence of four E. coli genotypes was equally distributed in all groups of E. coli strains, with majority of genotype A (ranging from 81% to 88%). The following types of bacteriocins were most commonly revealed: colicins Ia/Ib (44%), microcin V (18%), colicin E1 (16%) and microcin H47 (6%). There was a difference in bacteriocinogeny between control group A (52/149, 35%) and groups with treatment at the end of the study: B: 31/122 (25%, P = 0.120); C: 43/155 (28%, P = 0.222); D: 29/134 (22%, P = 0.020). There was a significantly lower prevalence of colicin Ib, microcins H47 and V

  5. Evaluation of the infectivity and the persistence of Trichinella patagoniensis in muscle tissue of decomposing guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Fariña, F; Pasqualetti, M; Ilgová, J; Cardillo, N; Ercole, M; Aronowicz, T; Krivokapich, S; Kašný, M; Ribicich, M

    2017-01-01

    Trichinella patagoniensis, a new species of Trichinella, is widespread in Argentina. The success of parasite transmission depends, among other factors, on the resistance of L1 larvae present in the muscle tissue (ML) of dead hosts undergoing the decomposition process in different environmental conditions. The aim of the present work was to study the infectivity of T. patagoniensis muscle larvae in Cavia porcellus and the capability of the parasite to survive in decomposed muscle tissue of guinea pigs subjected to different environmental conditions. Thirty-two female Ssi:AL guinea pigs were orally inoculated with 2000 ML of T. patagoniensis (ISS2311). All the animals were sacrificed 42 days post-infection. Twenty-six animals were eviscerated, and carcasses were placed on the surface of soil inside plastic boxes that were exposed to environmental conditions in the summer 2014-2015 and autumn of 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Carcasses from six animals were placed into a plastic box inside the refrigerator at a temperature of 4 °C. The muscle tissue samples from the carcasses were examined weekly for the presence of larvae, and the infectivity of recovered ML was tested in BALB/c mice. Our results showed for the first time the ability of T. patagoniensis to complete its life cycle in guinea pigs, thus serving as a potential natural host. Also, larvae of T. patagoniensis remained infective in muscle tissue for several weeks while undergoing decomposition under different environmental conditions.

  6. Repair of a Mutation Disrupting the Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus Pentameric Complex Acquired during Fibroblast Passage Restores Pathogenesis in Immune-Suppressed Guinea Pigs and in the Context of Congenital Infection

    PubMed Central

    McVoy, Michael A.; Wang, Jian Ben; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Swanson, Elizabeth C.; Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Zabeli, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) provides a valuable model for congenital cytomegalovirus transmission. Salivary gland (SG)-passaged stocks of GPCMV are pathogenic, while tissue culture (TC) passage in fibroblasts results in attenuation. Nonpathogenic TC-derived virus N13R10 (cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome [BAC]) has a 4-bp deletion that disrupts GP129, which encodes a subunit of the GPCMV pentameric complex (PC) believed to govern viral entry into select cell types, and GP130, an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of unknown function. To determine if this deletion contributes to attenuation of N13R10, markerless gene transfer in Escherichia coli was used to construct virus r129, a variant of N13R10 in which the 4-bp deletion is repaired. Virions from r129 were found to contain GP129 as well as two other PC subunit proteins, GP131 and GP133, whereas these three PC subunits were absent from N13R10 virions. Replication of r129 in fibroblasts appeared unaltered compared to that of N13R10. However, following experimental challenge of immunocompromised guinea pigs, r129 induced significant weight loss, longer duration of viremia, and dramatically higher (up to 1.5 × 106-fold) viral loads in blood and end organs compared to N13R10. In pregnant guinea pigs, challenge with doses of r129 virus of ≥5 × 106 PFU resulted in levels of maternal viremia, congenital transmission, pup viral loads, intrauterine growth restriction, and pup mortality comparable to that induced by pathogenic SG virus, although higher doses of r129 were required. These results suggest that the GP129-GP130 mutation is a significant contributor to attenuation of N13R10, likely by abrogating expression of a functional PC. IMPORTANCE Tissue culture adaptation of cytomegaloviruses rapidly selects for mutations, deletions, and rearrangements in the genome, particularly for viruses passaged in fibroblast cells. Some of these mutations are focused in the region of the genome

  7. Pig immune response to general stimulus and to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection: a meta-analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The availability of gene expression data that corresponds to pig immune response challenges provides compelling material for the understanding of the host immune system. Meta-analysis offers the opportunity to confirm and expand our knowledge by combining and studying at one time a vast set of independent studies creating large datasets with increased statistical power. In this study, we performed two meta-analyses of porcine transcriptomic data: i) scrutinized the global immune response to different challenges, and ii) determined the specific response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection. To gain an in-depth knowledge of the pig response to PRRSV infection, we used an original approach comparing and eliminating the common genes from both meta-analyses in order to identify genes and pathways specifically involved in the PRRSV immune response. The software Pointillist was used to cope with the highly disparate data, circumventing the biases generated by the specific responses linked to single studies. Next, we used the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software to survey the canonical pathways, biological functions and transcription factors found to be significantly involved in the pig immune response. We used 779 chips corresponding to 29 datasets for the pig global immune response and 279 chips obtained from 6 datasets for the pig response to PRRSV infection, respectively. Results The pig global immune response analysis showed interconnected canonical pathways involved in the regulation of translation and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Biological functions revealed in this meta-analysis were centred around translation regulation, which included protein synthesis, RNA-post transcriptional gene expression and cellular growth and proliferation. Furthermore, the oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondria dysfunctions, associated with stress signalling, were highly regulated. Transcription factors such as MYCN, MYC and

  8. Hydrofluoric acid dermal burns. An assessment of treatment efficacy using an experimental pig model.

    PubMed

    Dunn, B J; MacKinnon, M A; Knowlden, N F; Billmaier, D J; Derelanko, M J; Rusch, G M; Naas, D J; Dahlgren, R R

    1992-09-01

    There currently exist various opinions concerning the best therapy for managing hydrogen fluoride (HF) dermal burns. Previously reported animal studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of certain therapies are not completely convincing. Studies initially were conducted to develop a reliable animal model for assessing efficacy of treatment. Evaluation of several animal species, dosing regimens (HF concentrations, exposure periods), and application techniques showed that the most consistent and reproducible dermal lesions were produced with 38% HF applied to the skin of anesthetized pigs for exposures of 9, 12, or 15 minutes using Hill Top Chamber patches. Using this model, the efficacy of six clinically applicable treatments was assessed by subjectively scoring and statistically analyzing photographic and histopathological data obtained from treated and untreated control lesions. Photographic data analysis ranked treatments with respect to effectiveness as follows: iced Zephiran and 10% calcium acetate soaks--highly effective; 2.5% calcium gluconate gel, 5.0% calcium gluconate injection and iced Hyamine soaks--effective; 10% calcium gluconate injection--ineffective. Histopathological data analysis showed the topical treatments (2.5% calcium gluconate gel, iced Hyamine, or iced Zephiran soaks) to be most effective in reducing superficial epidermal damage, and the 5% calcium gluconate injection or 10% calcium acetate soaks to be beneficial to deeper tissues of the dermis and subdermis. Injection of 10% calcium gluconate was ineffective. This study suggests that the anesthetized pig model has good applicability for assessing efficacy of HF dermal burn therapies. In addition, it indicates that further experimentation with 10% calcium acetate soaks is warranted.

  9. Fetal infections and antibody profiles in pigs naturally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Priscilla F.; Garrocho, Flávia M.; Lana, Ângela M.Q.; Lobato, Zélia I.P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe early infections with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in naturally infected piglets and the piglets’ serologic profiles. A total of 20 sows (15 PCV2-vaccinated and 5 unvaccinated) and 100 newborn piglets were studied. Colostrum and serum of the sows and serum of the presuckling piglets were obtained on the day of parturition. Milk samples were collected on day 20 postpartum. Blood samples were taken and the piglets weighed on days 1, 20, 42, 63, and 84 postpartum. Colostrum and milk were evaluated for infectious PCV2 and for PCV2 total antibody (TA), neutralizing antibody (NA), and IgA. Serum samples were evaluated for PCV2 TA, NA, IgA, IgM, and DNA. The sows had high levels of TA and NA in serum and colostrum; however, 11 and 5, respectively, of the 20 colostrum and milk samples contained infectious PCV2. In the serum, PCV2 DNA and IgM were detected in 17 and 5, respectively, of the 20 sows. Nine piglets were born with PCV2 antibodies, which indicates in utero transmission of PCV2 after the period of immunocompetence (> 70 d of gestation). On day 1 postpartum, PCV2 DNA was detected in 29 of the 100 serum samples from the piglets. There was no difference between the weights of viremic and nonviremic piglets throughout the study. In conclusion, even on farms with sows that have high PCV2 antibody titers, vertical transmission of PCV2 may occur, resulting in piglet infection. PMID:22754093

  10. Experimental Infection of Amblyomma aureolatum Ticks with Rickettsia rickettsii

    PubMed Central

    Ogrzewalska, Maria; Soares, João F.; Martins, Thiago F.; Soares, Herbert S.; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda A.; Almeida, Aliny P.; Pinter, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally infected Amblyomma aureolatum ticks with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). These ticks are a vector for RMSF in Brazil. R. rickettsii was efficiently conserved by both transstadial maintenance and vertical (transovarial) transmission to 100% of the ticks through 4 laboratory generations. However, lower reproductive performance and survival of infected females was attributed to R. rickettsii infection. Therefore, because of the high susceptibility of A. aureolatum ticks to R. rickettsii infection, the deleterious effect that the bacterium causes in these ticks may contribute to the low infection rates (<1%) usually reported among field populations of A. aureolatum ticks in RMSF-endemic areas of Brazil. Because the number of infected ticks would gradually decrease after each generation, it seems unlikely that A. aureolatum ticks could sustain R. rickettsii infection over multiple successive generations solely by vertical transmission. PMID:21529391

  11. Experimental infection of Amblyomma aureolatum ticks with Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Ogrzewalska, Maria; Soares, João F; Martins, Thiago F; Soares, Herbert S; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda A; Almeida, Aliny P; Pinter, Adriano

    2011-05-01

    We experimentally infected Amblyomma aureolatum ticks with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). These ticks are a vector for RMSF in Brazil. R. rickettsii was efficiently conserved by both transstadial maintenance and vertical (transovarial) transmission to 100% of the ticks through 4 laboratory generations. However, lower reproductive performance and survival of infected females was attributed to R. rickettsii infection. Therefore, because of the high susceptibility of A. aureolatum ticks to R. rickettsii infection, the deleterious effect that the bacterium causes in these ticks may contribute to the low infection rates (<1%) usually reported among field populations of A. aureolatum ticks in RMSF-endemic areas of Brazil. Because the number of infected ticks would gradually decrease after each generation, it seems unlikely that A. aureolatum ticks could sustain R. rickettsii infection over multiple successive generations solely by vertical transmission.

  12. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.

  13. Oxygen exchange in the isolated, arrested guinea pig heart: theoretical and experimental observations.

    PubMed Central

    Mawson, D A; Hunter, P J; Kenwright, D N; Loiselle, D S

    1994-01-01

    A model of oxygen transport in perfused myocardial tissue is presented. Steady-state conditions are assumed in order to mimic the metabolic rate of the arrested heart. The model incorporates Michaelis-Menten dependence of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, oxymyoglobin saturation and oxyhemoglobin saturation on oxygen partial pressure (PO2). The transport equations model both the advective supply of oxygen via the coronary circulation and the diffusive exchange of oxygen between tissues and environment across the epicardial and endocardial surfaces. The left ventricle is approximated by an axisymmetric prolate spheroid and the transport equations solved numerically using finite element techniques. Solution yields the PO2 profile across the heart wall. Integration of this profile yields the simulated rate of metabolic oxygen uptake determined according to the Fick principle. Correction for the diffusive flux of oxygen across the surfaces yields the simulated true metabolic rate of oxygen consumption. Simulated values of oxygen uptake are compared with those measured experimentally according to the Fick principle, using saline-perfused, Langendorff-circulated, K(+)-arrested, guinea pig hearts. Four perfusion variables were manipulated: arterial PO2, environmental PO2, coronary flow and perfusion pressure. In each case agreement between simulated and experimentally determined rates of oxygen consumption gives confidence that the model adequately describes the advective and diffusive transport of oxygen in the isolated, arrested, saline-perfused heart. Images FIGURE A1 PMID:8011911

  14. The pig as an experimental model for mid-dermal burns research.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Wen-Ling; Fu, Yuan-Tsung; Lin, Sheng-Chuan; Lei, Yi-Chih; Liao, Jeng-Hao; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2014-12-01

    This was a novel, prospective and interventional animal study designed to develop and evaluate a new infliction device for the experimental burn model. Four paired sets of contact burns measuring 36mm diameter were inflicted on the dorsum of an anesthetized pig using a stainless steel round bar heated up to 80-110°C. The bar was applied using a push-pull force gauge designed to control 1kgf mechanical force applied to the skin for a period of 20s. The left dorsum was used for macroscopic observation and the right dorsum was used for histopathological evaluation. A total of eight burns were covered with moist saline dressings and given daily treatments of xylocaine (lidocaine HCl) gel. This procedure was followed for a period of 24 days. Full-thickness biopsies were obtained for histologic analysis to determine the extent of injury. Statistical analysis showed a high correlation between the exposure temperature and histopathological assessment. The results found the depth of injury to the collagen (Seg1) correlated with the temperature (Ti) at which the burns was inflicted, Seg1=0.038Ti-2.57 (r=0.973, P<0.05). Also, the histological studies show a high correlation between the depth of collagen denaturation in wounds and the exposure temperature, Seg1=0.0268Ti-0.165 (r=0.991, P<0.05). This model is useful to assess more closely the therapeutic agents used for wound healing in experimental burn wounds.

  15. Risk factors for farm-level African swine fever infection in major pig-producing areas in Nigeria, 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Fasina, F O; Agbaje, M; Ajani, F L; Talabi, O A; Lazarus, D D; Gallardo, C; Thompson, P N; Bastos, A D S

    2012-11-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an economically devastating disease for the pig industry, especially in Africa. Identifying what supports infection on pig farms in this region remains the key component in developing a risk-based approach to understanding the epidemiology of ASF and controlling the disease. Nigeria was used for this matched case-control study, because there is perpetual infection in some areas, while contiguous areas are intermittently infected. Risk factors and biosecurity practices in pig farms were evaluated in association with ASF infection. Subsets of farms located in high-density pig population areas and high-risk areas for ASF infection were randomly selected for analysis. Most plausible risk factor variables from the univariable analysis included in the multivariable analysis include: owner of farm had regular contact with infected farms and other farmers, untested pigs were routinely purchased into the farm in the course of outbreaks, there was an infected neighbourhood, other livestock were kept alongside pigs, there was a presence of an abattoir/slaughter slab in pig communities, wild birds had free access to pig pens, tools and implements were routinely shared by pig farmers, there was free access to feed stores by rats, and feed was purchased from a commercial source. Only the presence of an abattoir in a pig farming community (OR=8.20; CI(95%)=2.73, 24.63; P<0.001) and the presence of an infected pig farm in the neighbourhood (OR=3.26; CI(95%)=1.20, 8.83; P=0.02) were significant. There was a marginally significant negative association (protective) between risk of ASF infection and sharing farm tools and equipment (OR=0.35; CI(95%)=0.12, 1.01; P=0.05). Of the 28 biosecurity measures evaluated, food and water control (OR=0.14; CI(95%)=0.04, 0.46; P<0.001), separation/isolation of sick pigs (OR=0.14; CI(95%)=0.04, 0.53; P=0.004) and washing and disinfection of farm equipment and tools (OR=0.27; CI(95%)=0.10, 0.78; P=0.02) were negatively

  16. Recovery of an unusual Flavobacterium group IIb-like isolate from a hand infection following pig bite.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Merkin, T E; Pickett, M J

    1990-01-01

    An unusual gram-negative rod (RMA 1571) was isolated from a hand infection following a pig bite. This unclassified isolate was characterized by growth requirements, microscopic examination, biochemical characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and cellular fatty acid analysis. It was indole positive and produced yellow-pigmented growth, which placed it in the genus Flavobacterium, but its other features, including cellular fatty acid analysis, did not appear to be those of a named species. PMID:2351726

  17. Experimental infection of Rio Mamore hantavirus in Sigmodontinae rodents

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, William Marciel; Machado, Alex Martins; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    This study shows an experimental spillover infection ofSigmodontinae rodents with Rio Mamore hantavirus (RIOMV).Necromys lasiurus and Akodon sp were infected with 103 RNA copies of RIOMV by intraperitoneal administration. The viral genome was detected in heart, lung, and kidney tissues 18 days after infection (ai), and viral excretion in urine and faeces began at four and six ai, respectively. These results reveal that urine and faeces of infected rodents contain the virus for at least 18 days. It is possible that inhaled aerosols of these excreta could transmit hantavirus to humans and other animals. PMID:27223653

  18. Influence of Age and Dose of African Swine Fever Virus Infections on Clinical Outcome and Blood Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Post, Jacob; Weesendorp, Eefke; Montoya, Maria; Loeffen, Willie L

    African swine fever (ASF) is a fatal disease for domestic pigs, leading to serious economic losses in countries where ASF is endemic. Despite extensive research, efficient vaccines against ASF are lacking. Since peripheral blood cells are important mediators for vaccines, we study the impact of ASF on blood parameters in pigs with different ages and infected with different doses of ASF virus. Four different groups were studied: (1) 12 weeks of age/low virus dose; (2) 12 weeks of age/high virus dose; (3) 18 weeks of age/low virus dose; and (4) 18 weeks of age/high virus dose. By varying in age and/or ASFV inoculation dose, we monitor blood parameters during different degrees of disease. Thirty percent of the pigs survived the infection with a moderately virulent strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). Animals that did survive infection were generally older, independent from the inoculation dose used. A firm reduction in many different cell types at 3-5 days postinfection (DPI) was accompanied by an increase in body temperature, followed by clinical signs and mortality from day 6 PI. While blood parameters generally normalized in survivors, γδ T cells and IL-10 levels could be related to mortality. These conclusions should be considered in new approaches for protection against ASF.

  19. The Pig: A Relevant Model for Evaluating the Neutrophil Serine Protease Activities during Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bréa, Déborah; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Barc, Céline; Pezant, Jérémy; Melo, Sandrine; Olivier, Michel; Delaunay, Rémy; Boulesteix, Olivier; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Becq, Frédéric; Gauthier, Francis; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Caballero-Posadas, Ignacio; Attucci, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The main features of lung infection and inflammation are a massive recruitment of neutrophils and the subsequent release of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs). Anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory treatments must be tested on a suitable animal model. Mice models do not replicate several aspects of human lung disease. This is particularly true for cystic fibrosis (CF), which has led the scientific community to a search for new animal models. We have shown that mice are not appropriate for characterizing drugs targeting neutrophil-dependent inflammation and that pig neutrophils and their NSPs are similar to their human homologues. We induced acute neutrophilic inflammatory responses in pig lungs using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen. Blood samples, nasal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h post-insfection (p.i.) and biochemical parameters, serum and BAL cytokines, bacterial cultures and neutrophil activity were evaluated. The release of proinflammatory mediators, biochemical and hematological blood parameters, cell recruitment and bronchial reactivity, peaked at 6h p.i.. We also used synthetic substrates specific for human neutrophil proteases to show that the activity of pig NSPs in BALFs increased. These proteases were also detected at the surface of lung neutrophils using anti-human NSP antibodies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung infection in pigs results in a neutrophilic response similar to that described for cystic fibrosis and ventilator-associated pneumonia in humans. Altogether, this indicates that the pig is an appropriate model for testing anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to combat adverse proteolytic effects of neutrophil in human lung diseases. PMID:27992534

  20. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection of the Mouse Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, John R.; Magliocco, Michael V.

    1971-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of human cornea is rare but serious. The work of previous investigators using experimental infection primarily of rabbit cornea resulted in successful therapy for 10 to 50% of clinical cases. The advantage of using the mouse is demonstrated. The methods we adapted for characterizing the untreated experimental infection included: incising the cornea to enable establishing the infection; corneal examination with a steroscopic microscope; grading corneal pathology; qualitative and quantitative monitoring of the infecting bacteria by culturing and staining sectioned and dissected tissues. The characteristics of the tissue pathology, host response, and infection were similar to those reported for other animals and man. Corneal pathology was frequently nearly maximal 1 day after infection; host response involved a progression of events of long duration; pathology persisted well beyond the period of bacterial infection. The infection was essentially noncommunicable, and invasiveness was limited to the tissues of the incised eye. The results show the possibility of tests for invasiveness of clinical isolates and for screening for therapeutic and prophylactic measures. PMID:16557955

  1. Advances in the diagnosis of Ascaris suum infections in pigs and their possible applications in humans.

    PubMed

    Vlaminck, Johnny; Levecke, Bruno; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Ascariasis is one of the most common parasitic diseases in both humans and pigs. It has been shown to cause growth deficits in both species and to impair cognitive development in children. Notwithstanding its substantial impact on pig economy and public health, diagnosis of ascariasis has mostly relied on the detection of eggs in stool and further development of novel, more sensitive methods has been limited or non-existent. Here, we discuss the currently available techniques for the diagnosis of ascariasis in pigs, their caveats, and the implications of a new serological detection technique for the evaluation of both pig and human ascariasis.

  2. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Kureljušić, Branislav; Nedorost, Nora; Matula, Bettina; Schießl, Wolfgang; Stixenberger, Daniela; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2)) and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b.), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h.), and Pasteurella multocida (P. m.)) co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases. PMID:27428002

  3. Neisseria lactamica protects against experimental meningococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kerry J; Reddin, Karen M; Bracegirdle, Philippa; Hudson, Michael J; Borrow, Ray; Feavers, Ian M; Robinson, Andrew; Cartwright, Keith; Gorringe, Andrew R

    2002-07-01

    Immunological and epidemiological evidence suggests that the development of natural immunity to meningococcal disease results from colonization of the nasopharynx by commensal Neisseria spp., particularly with N. lactamica. We report here that immunization with N. lactamica killed whole cells, outer membrane vesicles, or outer membrane protein (OMP) pools and protected mice against lethal challenge by a number of diverse serogroup B and C meningococcal isolates in a model of bacteremic infection. Sera raised to N. lactamica killed whole cells, OMPs, or protein pools were found to cross-react with meningococcal isolates of a diverse range of genotypes and phenotypes. The results confirm the potential of N. lactamica to form the basis of a vaccine against meningococcal disease.

  4. Evaluation of an Erns-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to distinguish Classical swine fever virus-infected pigs from pigs vaccinated with CP7_E2alf.

    PubMed

    Pannhorst, Katrin; Fröhlich, Andreas; Staubach, Christoph; Meyer, Denise; Blome, Sandra; Becher, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Infections with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are a major economic threat to pig production. To combat CSF outbreaks and to maintain trade, new marker vaccines were developed that allow differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA principle). The chimeric pestivirus CP7_E2alf was shown to be safe and efficacious. Its DIVA strategy is based on the detection of CSFV E(rns)-specific antibodies that are only developed on infection. However, for the new marker vaccine to be considered a valuable control tool, a validated discriminatory assay is needed. One promising candidate is the already commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, PrioCHECK CSFV E(rns) ELISA (Prionics BV, Lelystad, The Netherlands). Four laboratories of different European Union member states tested 530 serum samples and country-specific field sera from domestic pigs and wild boar. The ELISA displayed a good robustness. However, based on its reproducibility and repeatability, ranges rather than single values for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were defined. The ELISA displayed a sensitivity of 90-98% with sera from CSFV-infected domestic pigs. A specificity of 89-96% was calculated with sera from domestic pigs vaccinated once with CP7_E2alf. The ELISA detected CSFV infections in vaccinated domestic pigs with a sensitivity of 82-94%. The sensitivity was lower with sera taken ≤21 days post-challenge indicating that the stage of CSFV infection had a considerable influence on testing. Taken together, the PrioCHECK CSFV E(rns) ELISA can be used for detection of CSFV infections in CP7_E2alf-vaccinated and nonvaccinated domestic pig populations, but should only be applied on a herd basis by testing a defined number of animals.

  5. Bayesian estimation of diagnostic accuracy of a new bead-based antibody detection test to reveal Toxoplasma gondii infections in pig populations.

    PubMed

    Bokken, Gertie C A M; Portengen, Lützen; Cornelissen, Jan B W J; Bergwerff, Aldert A; van Knapen, Frans

    2015-01-15

    The success of a Toxoplasma gondii surveillance program in European pig production systems depends partly on the quality of the test to detect infection in the population. The test accuracy of a recently developed serological bead-based assay (BBA) was investigated earlier using sera from experimentally infected animals. In this study, the accuracy of the BBA was determined by the use of sera from animals from two field subpopulations. As no T. gondii infection information of these animals was available, test accuracy was determined through a Bayesian approach allowing for conditional dependency between BBA and an ELISA test. The priors for prevalence were based on available information from literature, whereas for specificity vague non-informative priors were used. Priors for sensitivity were based either on available information or specified as non-informative. Posterior estimates for BBA sensitivity and specificity were (mode) 0.855 (Bayesian 95% credibility interval (bCI) 0.702-0.960) and 0.913 (bCI 0.893-0.931), respectively. Comparing the results of BBA and ELISA, sensitivity was higher for the BBA while specificity was higher for ELISA. Alternative priors for the sensitivity affected posterior estimates for sensitivity of both BBA and ELISA, but not for specificity. Because the difference in prevalence between the two subpopulations is small, and the number of infected animals is small as well, the precision of the posterior estimates for sensitivity may be less accurate in comparison to the estimates for specificity. The estimated value for specificity of BBA is at least optimally defined for testing pigs from conventional and organic Dutch farms.

  6. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Danish organic pig farms: Seasonal and age-related variation in prevalence, infection intensity and species/genotypes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Jianmin, Wang; Katakam, Kiran K; Mejer, Helena; Thamsborg, Stig M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Olsen, Annette; Enemark, Heidi L

    2015-11-30

    Although pigs are commonly infected with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis, including potentially zoonotic species or genotypes, little is known about age-related infection levels, seasonal differences and genetic variation in naturally infected pigs raised in organic management systems. Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess seasonal and age-related variations in prevalence and infection intensity of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, evaluate zoonotic potential and uncover correlations between species/genotypes, infection intensity and faecal consistency. Shedding of oocysts and cysts ((oo-)cysts) was monitored at quarterly intervals (September 2011-June 2012) in piglets (n = 152), starter pigs (n = 234), fatteners (n = 230) and sows (n = 240) from three organic farms in Denmark. (oo-)Cysts were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy; and 56/75 subsamples from Cryptosporidium infected pigs were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and partial sequencing of the small subunit (SSU) 18S rRNA and hsp70genes, while 13/67 Giardia subsamples were successfully analysed by amplification and partial sequencing of the 18S rRNA and the gdh genes. Altogether, Cryptosporidium or Giardia infections were observed in 40.9% (350/856) and 14.0% (120/856) of the pigs, respectively, including 8.2% (70/856) infected with both parasites. Prevalence, intensity of infections and presence of Cryptosporidium species varied significantly between age-groups; 53.3% piglets, 72.2% starter pigs, 40.4% fatteners and 2.9% sows were infected with Cryptosporidium, whereas 2.0% piglets, 27.4% starter pigs, 17.8% fatteners and 5.0% sows were infected with Giardia. The overall prevalence was stable throughout the year, except for dual-infections that were more prevalent in September and December (p < 0.05). The infection intensity was age-related for both parasites, and dual-infected pigs tended to excrete lower levels of oocysts compared to pigs harbouring only

  7. Echocardiographic quantification of Dirofilaria immitis in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Arther, R G; Ciszewski, D K; Davis, W L; Ensley, S M; Guity, P S; Chopade, H; Hoss, H; Settje, T L

    2008-12-10

    The safety of heartworm preventives in heartworm-positive cats has traditionally been evaluated using adult Dirofilaria immitis removed from infected dogs and surgically implanted into the cats. An alternate study model uses infective larvae to establish adult infections in cats. Unfortunately, the number of adult worms resulting from the latter method varies widely from none to more than 30, both unacceptable for studies of natural heartworm infection and for studies evaluating product safety in heartworm-infected cats. We sought to determine infection severity in experimental infections via echocardiography to reduce the chances of enrolling uninfected and heavily infected cats into a study. Eighty adult cats were each inoculated with 60 infective D. immitis larvae and maintained for 8 months to allow for the development of adult worms. Antigen and antibody testing, as well as echocardiographic imaging, were performed to confirm and estimate adult worm burdens. Approximately 8 and 12 months post-infection, echocardiographic examination was performed to confirm and enumerate adult D. immitis populations in the cardiovascular system. Worm burdens were stratified as 0, 1-3, 4-11, and > 11 adults, with 0 being considered uninfected and more than 11 considered too heavily infected to be relevant for anthelmintic studies. Cats with clinically relevant infections (1-10 adults) subsequently received multiple treatments with the investigational drug, and worm burdens were confirmed by necropsy 30 days following the final treatment. Worm burden estimated with echocardiography correlated well, but not precisely, with post-mortem counts (p < 0.001, r2 = 0.67). Echocardiography under-, over-, and exactly estimated heartworm burden 53%, 27%, and 22% of the time, respectively. Although the correct category (0-4) was determined by echocardiography in only 54% of cats, positive cats were distinguished from negative cats 88% of the time and the heaviest infections (> 11) were

  8. Vaccination with viral protein-mimicking peptides postpones mortality in domestic pigs infected by African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Efremov, Evgeniy E; Novikov, Boris V; Balyshev, Vladimir M; Tsibanov, Sodnom Zh; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Kolbasov, Denis V; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection around the world threaten local populations of domestic pigs with lethal disease and provide grounds for pandemic spread. Effective vaccination may bring this threat under control. We investigated the effectiveness of select peptides mimicking viral proteins in establishing a protective immune response. Forty-six synthetic peptides based on the analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence of ASFV were tested for immunogenicity in mice. The 17 best immune response-inducing peptide candidates were selected for further investigation. Twenty-four domestic pigs, 3-4 months old and weighing 20-25 kg, were divided into six groups (n = 4) and immunized by subcutaneous injection using a standard three-round injection protocol with one of four peptide combinations prepared from the 17 peptides (Groups 1-4) or with carrier only (Group 5). Group 6, the control, was not vaccinated. Animal body temperature and behavior were monitored during and post immunization for health assessment. Two weeks after the last round of immunizations, the pigs were infected with live ASFV (Espania 70) at 6.0 Ig GAE50/cm3, and the survival rate was monitored. Blood samples were collected for analysis the day before infection and on days 3, 7 and 10 post-infection, or from deceased animals. The serum titers of specific immunoglobulins against synthetic peptides and whole inactivated ASFV were determined by enzyme immunoassay before and after infection. The presence of viral DNA in blood serum samples was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Viral infection activity in blood sera was determined by heme absorption in cultured porcine bone marrow and porcine leukocyte cells. Repeating the injection of synthetic peptides in both the mice and pigs produced an immune response specific to individual peptides, which differed widely in the intensity scale. Specific anti-whole virus immunoglobulin binding activity in the swine serum samples

  9. Evaluation of vaccines in the EU TB Vaccine Cluster using a guinea pig aerosol infection model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann; Hatch, Graham J; Clark, Simon O; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Kim A; Hall, Graham A; Huygen, Kris; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Franken, Kees L M C; Andersen, Peter; Doherty, T Mark; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Grode, Leander; Seiler, Peter; Martin, Carlos; Gicquel, Brigitte; Cole, Stewart T; Brodin, Priscille; Pym, Alexander S; Dalemans, Wilfried; Cohen, Joe; Lobet, Yves; Goonetilleke, Nilu; McShane, Helen; Hill, Adrian; Parish, Tanya; Smith, Debbie; Stoker, Neil G; Lowrie, Douglas B; Källenius, Gunilla; Svenson, Stefan; Pawlowski, Andrzej; Blake, Karen; Marsh, Philip D

    2005-01-01

    The TB Vaccine Cluster project funded by the EU Fifth Framework programme aims to provide novel vaccines against tuberculosis that are suitable for evaluation in humans. This paper describes the studies of the protective efficacy of vaccines in a guinea pig aerosol-infection model of primary tuberculosis. The objective was to conduct comparative evaluations of vaccines that had previously demonstrated efficacy in other animal models. Groups of 6 guinea pigs were immunized with vaccines provided by the relevant EU Vaccine Cluster partners. Survival over 17 or 26 weeks was used as the principal measure of vaccine efficacy following aerosol challenge with H37Rv. Counts of mycobacteria in lungs and spleens, and histopathological changes in the lungs, were also used to provide evidence of protection. A total of 24 vaccines were evaluated in 4 experiments each of a different design. A heterologous prime-boost strategy of DNA and MVA, each expressing Ag85A and a fusion protein of ESAT-6 and Ag85B in adjuvant, protected the guinea pigs to the same extent as BCG. Genetically modified BCG vaccines and boosted BCG strategies also protected guinea pigs to the same extent as BCG but not statistically significantly better. A relatively high aerosol-challenge dose and evaluation over a protracted time post-challenge allowed superior protection over BCG to be demonstrated by BCG boosted with MVA and fowl pox vectors expressing Ag85A.

  10. Experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD: implications for antiviral therapies.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Natasha; Finney, Lydia; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem and will be one of the leading global causes of mortality over the coming decades. Much of the morbidity, mortality and health care costs of COPD are attributable to acute exacerbations, the commonest causes of which are respiratory infections. Respiratory viruses are frequently detected in COPD exacerbations but direct proof of a causative relationship has been lacking. We have developed a model of COPD exacerbation using experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD patients and this has established a causative relationship between virus infection and exacerbations. In addition it has determined some of the molecular mechanisms linking virus infections to COPD exacerbations and identified potential new therapeutic targets. This new data should stimulate research into the role of antiviral agents as potential treatments for COPD exacerbations. Testing of antiviral agents has been hampered by the lack of a small animal model for rhinovirus infection and experimental rhinovirus infection in healthy volunteers has been used to test treatments for the common cold. Experimental rhinovirus infection in COPD subjects offers the prospect of a model that can be used to evaluate the effects of new treatments for virus-induced COPD exacerbations, and provide essential data that can be used in making decisions regarding large scale clinical trials.

  11. Experimental St. Louis encephalitis virus infection of sloths and cormorants.

    PubMed

    Seymour, C; Kramer, L D; Peralta, P H

    1983-07-01

    Experimental infection of 11 Bradypus variegatus and Choloepus hoffmanni sloths with St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus produced detectable viremias of seven to 27 (median 13) days duration and maximum titers of 2.7 to 6.5 (median 5.1) log10 median suckling mouse intracranial lethal doses (SMicLD50) per ml. Experimental SLE viremia onset was delayed and maximum titer depressed in two sloths concurrently infected with naturally acquired viruses. SLE viremias in four experimentally inoculated cormorants Phalacrocorax olivaceus were shorter, and of equal or lower titer, than in sloths. Colonized Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were infected by feeding on sloths circulating at least 4.8 log10 SMicLD50 of SLE virus per ml, and subsequently transmitted the infection to mice and chicks. An uninoculated baby Bradypus became infected by contact transmission from its mother. The antibody response of sloths to SLE virus was slow, being undetectable until several weeks post-inoculation. However, both sloth species developed high and long-lasting neutralizing and hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers. The complement-fixation antibody response in Bradypus was lower and slower to develop than in Choloepus. Sloths with naturally acquired SLE virus antibody did not become detectably viremic after experimental inoculation. Neither sloths nor cormorants become overly ill from SLE virus infection.

  12. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  13. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103(+) and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  14. A new pattern of spinal-cord demyelination in guinea pigs with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mimicking multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Colover, J.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is described for producing large demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord in the guinea pig. Guinea pigs were pretreated by immunization with ovalbumin and water-soluble adjuvant (N-acetyl-muramyl L-alanyl D-isoglutamine, MDP) in water-in-oil emulsion (Freund's incomplete adjuvant). They were given a large dose (10 mg) of ovalbumin i.p. one month later. After a few weeks the animals were sensitized with guinea-pig basic protein in Freund's complete adjuvant. Five out of 11 animals developed large, distinctive, sharply demarcated, symmetrical demyelinating lesions within 30 days. These lesions occurred in the dorsal and anterior columns, root entry zones and subpial region of the spinal cord. Histology showed a considerable amount of free lipids. There were also infiltrative lesions of classical experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) of normal severity in the same animals. The demyelinating lesions resembled those seen in multiple sclerosis in their location and extent in the spinal cord and in the presence of free lipids. Control experiments indicated that pretreatment with ovalbumin/MDP and the second injection of ovalbumin was necessary for all the demyelination; moreover guinea pigs immunized with basic protein in Freund's complete adjuvant or Freund's incomplete adjuvant plus MDP without pretreatment only developed classical EAE with minimal or no demyelination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7426390

  15. Vif Substitution Enables Persistent Infection of Pig-Tailed Macaques by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Thippeshappa, Rajesh; Polacino, Patricia; Yu Kimata, Monica T.; Siwak, Edward B.; Anderson, David; Wang, Weiming; Sherwood, Laura; Arora, Reetakshi; Wen, Michael; Zhou, Paul; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kimata, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Among Old World monkeys, pig-tailed macaques (Pt) are uniquely susceptible to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), although the infection does not persist. We demonstrate that the susceptibility of Pt T cells to HIV-1 infection is due to the absence of postentry inhibition by a TRIM5 isoform. Notably, substitution of the viral infectivity factor protein, Vif, with that from pathogenic SIVmne enabled replication of HIV-1 in Pt T cells in vitro. When inoculated into juvenile pig-tailed macaques, the Pt-tropic HIV-1 persistently replicated for more than 1.5 to 2 years, producing low but measurable plasma viral loads and persistent proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It also elicited strong antibody responses. However, there was no decline in CD4+ T cells or evidence of disease. Surprisingly, the Pt-tropic HIV-1 was rapidly controlled when inoculated into newborn Pt macaques, although it transiently rebounded after 6 months. We identified two notable differences between the Pt-tropic HIV-1 and SIVmne. First, SIV Vif does not associate with Pt-tropic HIV-1 viral particles. Second, while Pt-tropic HIV-1 degrades both Pt APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F, it prevents their inclusion in virions to a lesser extent than pathogenic SIVmne. Thus, while SIV Vif is necessary for persistent infection by Pt-tropic HIV-1, improved expression and inhibition of APOBEC3 proteins may be required for robust viral replication in vivo. Additional adaptation of the virus may also be necessary to enhance viral replication. Nevertheless, our data suggest the potential for the pig-tailed macaque to be developed as an animal model of HIV-1 infection and disease. PMID:21289128

  16. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection interference with Mycobacterium bovis diagnostics: natural infection cases and a pilot experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum and at least 1 unidentified species of soil mycobacteria were isolated from lymph nodes from 4 of 5 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that had been culled because of positive test results using the Bovigam assay. The buffalo were part of a group of 16 free-ranging buffalo captured in the far north of the Kruger National Park (South Africa) assumed to be free of bovine tuberculosis. No Mycobacterium bovis was isolated. To investigate the possible cause of the apparent false-positive diagnosis, the Mycobacterium isolates were inoculated into 4 experimental cattle and their immune responses monitored over a 13-week period, using the gamma interferon assay. The immune reactivity was predominantly directed toward avian tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and lasted for approximately 8 weeks. During that period 3 of 4 cattle yielded positive test results on 1 or 2 occasions. The immune responsiveness was boosted when the inoculations were repeated after 15 weeks, which led to 2 subsequent positive reactions in the experimental animal that did not react previously. Including an additional stimulatory antigen, sensitin prepared from M. fortuitum in the gamma interferon assay, showed that it was able to elicit a detectable gamma interferon response in all 4 experimentally inoculated cattle when applied in parallel with bovine and avian tuberculin PPD for the stimulation of blood samples. The implications of occasional cross-reactive responses in natural cases of infection with environmental mycobacteria in the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo and cattle in South Africa are discussed.

  17. Experimental Infections of Wild Birds with West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Ramírez, Elisa; Llorente, Francisco; Jiménez-Clavero, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Avian models of West Nile virus (WNV) disease have become pivotal in the study of infection pathogenesis and transmission, despite the intrinsic constraints that represents this type of experimental research that needs to be conducted in biosecurity level 3 (BSL3) facilities. This review summarizes the main achievements of WNV experimental research carried out in wild birds, highlighting advantages and limitations of this model. Viral and host factors that determine the infection outcome are analyzed in detail, as well as recent discoveries about avian immunity, viral transmission, and persistence achieved through experimental research. Studies of laboratory infections in the natural host will help to understand variations in susceptibility and reservoir competence among bird species, as well as in the epidemiological patterns found in different affected areas. PMID:24531334

  18. Comparison of commercial ELISA tests for the detection of Toxoplasma antibodies in the meat juice of naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Felin, Elina; Näreaho, Anu; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria

    2017-03-12

    Toxoplasmosis is a globally distributed protozoal zoonosis. Pigs are considered an important reservoir of Toxoplasma gondii and pork a major infection source of human toxoplasmosis. ELISA methods are commonly used diagnostic tools for detecting Toxoplasma infections. They are also used for slaughterhouse-based serological monitoring of toxoplasmosis in pigs to identify positive farms. The methods used are non-standardised with varying sensitivity and specificity. In our study, four commercial ELISA tests for the detection of Toxoplasma antibodies in the meat juice of slaughter pigs were compared with a modified agglutination test (MAT) as a reference. The cut-off values of the ELISA tests provided by the manufacturer varied between 0.20 and 0.50, and clearly influenced prevalence. The sensitivity of tests I, II and III varied between 96.4 and 78.6. Sensitivity was unacceptably low (3.6) for test IV (cut-off=0.30). Tests I, II and III had the highest accuracy and the best agreement with the reference test when a cut-off of 0.30 was used. Test II and III showed very good agreement (K=0.92 and 0.84, respectively) with the MAT. A very strong correlation (Pearson correlation >0.89) was observed between the S/P values of tests I, II and III. Our results demonstrate that the test and cut-off value used influence the results of the apparent seroprevalence studies.

  19. The Haemophilus ducreyi trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA protects against an experimental infection in the swine model of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fusco, William G; Choudhary, Neelima R; Routh, Patty A; Ventevogel, Melissa S; Smith, Valerie A; Koch, Gary G; Almond, Glen W; Orndorff, Paul E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Leduc, Isabelle

    2014-06-24

    Adherence of pathogens to cellular targets is required to initiate most infections. Defining strategies that interfere with adhesion is therefore important for the development of preventative measures against infectious diseases. As an adhesin to host extracellular matrix proteins and human keratinocytes, the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA, a proven virulence factor of the Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi, is a potential target for vaccine development. A recombinant form of the N-terminal passenger domain of DsrA from H. ducreyi class I strain 35000HP, termed rNT-DsrAI, was tested as a vaccine immunogen in the experimental swine model of H. ducreyi infection. Viable homologous H. ducreyi was not recovered from any animal receiving four doses of rNT-DsrAI administered with Freund's adjuvant at two-week intervals. Control pigs receiving adjuvant only were all infected. All animals receiving the rNT-DsrAI vaccine developed antibody endpoint titers between 3.5 and 5 logs. All rNT-DsrAI antisera bound the surface of the two H. ducreyi strains used to challenge immunized pigs. Purified anti-rNT-DsrAI IgG partially blocked binding of fibrinogen at the surface of viable H. ducreyi. Overall, immunization with the passenger domain of the trimeric autotransporter adhesin DsrA accelerated clearance of H. ducreyi in experimental lesions, possibly by interfering with fibrinogen binding.

  20. Intravenous Angiocardiography Using Digital Image Processing: Experience With Axial Projections In Normal Pigs And In Pigs With Experimentally Generated Left-To-Right Shunts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, Hugo G.; Bursch, Joachim H.; Brennecke, Rudiger; Heintzen, Paul H.

    1981-11-01

    Computerized digitization and processing of roentgen video images recorded at a rate of 50 per second was tested in intravenous angiocardiography in normal pigs weighing 15 to 20 kg. Roentgen video images were recorded in the 4-chamber view obtained by 30-35 degrees caudocranial angulation of the x-ray tube and 50-60 degrees LAO obliquity in the pig. Significant contrast enhancement was obtained through ECG-gated background subtraction and rescaling after integration of multiple background as well as contrast images. Occasionally, histogram equalization was used to further enhance contrast. To study temporal changes in cardiac motion, time parameter extraction or functional imaging was applied as well. The left and right heart were well visualized after intravenous injection of 1/3-1 cc. 76% Urografin per kg. bodyweight. Special purpose processing like subtraction of the end systolic phase from the end diastolic in the left and right ventricles as well as subtraction of the right ventricular phase from the left ventricular phase was also performed. If the left ventricular end systolic phase was subtracted from the end diastolic, most of the left atrium was also subtracted whereby the left ventricle was seen without continuity or superimposition of the left atrium. Experimentally generated ventricular and atrial septal defects as well as patent ductus arteriosus could be detected using the described technique. The results of the animal experiments became the basis for subsequent applications in children with congenital heart disease.

  1. Experimental infections of waterfowl with Sphaeridiotrema globulus (Digenea).

    PubMed

    Huffman, J E; Roscoe, D E

    1989-01-01

    Sphaeridiotrema globulus in experimentally infected mute swans (Cygnus olor), mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and Canada geese (Branta canadensis) induced ulcerative hemorrhagic enteritis. Sites of infection include the jejunum and ileum. The digeneans ulcerated the intestine. The inflammatory response was primarily lymphocytic with some eosinophils. Severe hemorrhage from damaged submucosal capillaries provided a blood meal for the parasite and caused anemia in the host. Extra-medullary hematopoiesis occurred in the liver, and an erythroid hyperplasia occurred in the bone marrow of infected birds. Infected birds exhibited muscular weakness and died from shock associated with severe blood loss. Mallards and Canada geese were less susceptible to fatal infection than the mute swan as evidenced by survivors in the higher dose groups.

  2. Pathogenesis of infection with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in isogenic guinea pigs after intranasal or intratracheal inoculation.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Lidewij C M; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; van Amerongen, Geert; van Run, Peter; Nieuwkoop, Nella J; Ladwig, Mechtild; Banneke, Stefanie; Schaefer, Hubert; Kuiken, Thijs; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis and transmission of influenza virus, the ferret model is typically used. To investigate protective immune responses, the use of inbred mouse strains has proven invaluable. Here, we describe a study with isogenic guinea pigs, which would uniquely combine the advantages of the mouse and ferret models for influenza virus infection. Strain 2 isogenic guinea pigs were inoculated with H1N1pdm09 influenza virus A/Netherlands/602/09 by the intranasal or intratracheal route. Viral replication kinetics were assessed by determining virus titers in nasal swabs and respiratory tissues, which were also used to assess histopathologic changes and the number of infected cells. In all guinea pigs, virus titers peaked in nasal secretions at day 2 after inoculation. Intranasal inoculation resulted in higher virus excretion via the nose and higher virus titers in the nasal turbinates than intratracheal inoculation. After intranasal inoculation, infectious virus was recovered only from nasal epithelium; after intratracheal inoculation, it was recovered also from trachea, lung, and cerebrum. Histopathologic changes corresponded with virus antigen distribution, being largely limited to nasal epithelium for intranasally infected guinea pigs and more widespread in the respiratory tract for intratracheally infected guinea pigs. In summary, isogenic guinea pigs show promise as a model to investigate the role of humoral and cell-mediated immunities to influenza and their effect on virus transmission.

  3. Erdosteine in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury: an experimental study in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Park, Chang-Sik; Kim, Myung-Cheol

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of erdosteine on renal reperfusion injury. Twelve male Landrace and Yorkshire mixed pigs were randomly divided into two groups: untreated control group (I/R), erdosteine treated group (I/R + erdosteine). Each group is composed of six pigs, and the pigs were unilaterally nephrectomized and their contralateral kidneys were subjected to 30 min of renal pedicle occlusion. The elevations of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels were lower in the treated group compared with the control group. The catalase activity and the glutathione peroxidase activity were higher in the erdosteine group. As a result, this study suggests that the erdosteine treatment has a role of attenuation of renal I/R injury recovery of renal function in pig.

  4. Influence of antibiotic-supplemented feed on occurrence and persistence of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected swine.

    PubMed

    Gutzmann, F; Layton, H; Simkins, K; Jarolmen, H

    1976-06-01

    The effect of chlortetracycline given at a concentration of 220.5 g/metric ton of feed and of a combination product which supplies chlortetracycline (110.2 g/metric ton), sulfamethazine (110.2 g/metric ton), and penicilin G (55.1 g/metric ton) on the occurrence and persistence of Salmonella typhimurium in experimentally infected swine was studied. Weanling pigs (av weight, 8.2 kg) were inoculated via the feed with 10(11) colony-forming units of S typhimurium 298-1NA. An equal number of nonexposed swine given identical treatment were used as controls. Infected pigs had increased temperatures (maximal av, 41 C) for the first 4 days after infection and severe diarrhea during the first 21 days. The use of chlortetracycline and a combination product at subtherapeutic concentrations in feed did not increase the Salmonella pool or prolong the carrier state in swine. A decrease in number of Salmonella shed from swine given chlortetracycline at the concentration of 220.5 g/metric ton was observed. Significant differences did not occur in Salmonella-related deaths or in emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant Salmonella by antibiotic selection or R factor transfer. Zoonotic transmission of the infecting Salmonella to animal caretakers was not detected.

  5. Macrophage-activating T-cell factor(s) produced in an early phase of Legionella pneumophila infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Y; Yoshida, S; Goto, Y; Mizuguchi, Y; Kuroiwa, A

    1989-01-01

    Protective immunity of guinea pigs against Legionella pneumophila was studied by infecting the animals with a sublethal dose (about 2 x 10(4) CFU) of the organism. The bacteria multiplied in the liver, spleen, and lungs up to day 4 after the intraperitoneal infection. The live bacteria in these organs decreased quickly thereafter and were eliminated by day 7. A delayed-type skin reaction and lymphoproliferation of spleen cells to Formalin-killed L. pneumophila were detected from days 5 and 6, respectively, after infection. Peritoneal macrophages obtained from guinea pigs infected 6 days previously inhibited the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from infected guinea pigs inhibited the intracellular growth of the organism in macrophages obtained from uninfected animals. Antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor prepared from spleen cells treated with anti-guinea pig T-cell monoclonal antibody did not inhibit growth. The activity of antigen-stimulated spleen cell factor was labile to pH 2 treatment, and the factor could not be absorbed by L. pneumophila antigen, suggesting that it contains gamma interferon. Our data show that T-cell-mediated immunity begins to work from an early period of infection with L. pneumophila in guinea pigs. PMID:2807531

  6. Temporal and spatial association of Streptococcus suis infection in humans and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome outbreaks in pigs in northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huong, V T L; Thanh, L V; Phu, V D; Trinh, D T; Inui, K; Tung, N; Oanh, N T K; Trung, N V; Hoa, N T; Bryant, J E; Horby, P W; Kinh, N V; Wertheim, H F L

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) outbreaks in pigs are associated with increased susceptibility of pigs to secondary bacterial infections, including Streptococcus suis - an important zoonotic pathogen causing bacterial meningitis in humans. This case-control study examined the association between human S. suis infection and PRRS outbreaks in pigs in northern Vietnam. We included 90 S. suis case-patients and 183 non-S. suis sepsis controls from a referral hospital in Hanoi in 2010, a period of major PRRS epizootics in Vietnam. PRRS exposure was determined using data from the National Centre of Veterinary Diagnosis. By univariate analysis, significantly more S. suis patients were reported residing in or adjacent to a PRRS district compared to controls [odds ratio (OR) 2·82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·35-5·89 and OR 3·15, 95% CI 1·62-6·15, respectively]. Only residency in adjacent districts remained significantly associated with risk of S. suis infection after adjusting for sex, occupation, and eating practices. SaTScan analysis showed a possible cluster of S. suis infection in humans around PRRS confirmed locations during the March-August period. The findings indicate an epidemiological association between PRRS in pigs and S. suis infections in humans. Effective strategies to strengthen control of PRRS in pigs may help reduce transmission of S. suis infection to humans.

  7. The challenge of using experimental infectivity data in risk assessment for Ebola virus: why ecology may be important.

    PubMed

    Gale, P; Simons, R R L; Horigan, V; Snary, E L; Fooks, A R; Drew, T W

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of published data shows that experimental passaging of Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) in guinea pigs changes the risk of infection per plaque-forming unit (PFU), increasing infectivity to some species while decreasing infectivity to others. Thus, a PFU of monkey-adapted EBOV is 10(7) -fold more lethal to mice than a PFU adapted to guinea pigs. The first conclusion is that the infectivity of EBOV to humans may depend on the identity of the donor species itself and, on the basis of limited epidemiological data, the question is raised as to whether bat-adapted EBOV is less infectious to humans than nonhuman primate (NHP)-adapted EBOV. Wildlife species such as bats, duikers and NHPs are naturally infected by EBOV through different species giving rise to EBOV with different wildlife species-passage histories (heritages). Based on the ecology of these wildlife species, three broad 'types' of EBOV-infected bushmeat are postulated reflecting differences in the number of passages within a given species, and hence the degree of adaptation of the EBOV present. The second conclusion is that the prior species-transmission chain may affect the infectivity to humans per PFU for EBOV from individuals of the same species. This is supported by the finding that the related Marburg marburgvirus requires ten passages in mice to fully adapt. It is even possible that the evolutionary trajectory of EBOV could vary in individuals of the same species giving rise to variants which are more or less virulent to humans and that the probability of a given trajectory is related to the heritage. Overall the ecology of the donor species (e.g. dog or bushmeat species) at the level of the individual animal itself may determine the risk of infection per PFU to humans reflecting the heritage of the virus and may contribute to the sporadic nature of EBOV outbreaks.

  8. Clearance of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Onunkwo, Charles C; Hahn, Beth L; Sohnle, Peter G

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcal skin infections are quite common in human patients. These infections often clear spontaneously, but may also progress locally and/or disseminate to cause serious and sometimes fatal deep infections. The present studies were undertaken to examine the clearance phase of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in a mouse model system. Previous work in this system has shown that staphylococci applied to the skin rapidly disseminate to the spleen and kidney. In the present experiments the bacteria were found to persist at the skin infection site at a time (8 days after inoculation) when they had disappeared from the spleen and kidney. Examination of the infected skin at earlier times revealed rapid (within 6 h) invasion into the stratum corneum, stratum Malpighii, and dermis, but subsequent redistribution of bacteria (at 1-2 days) to more superficial sites, particularly crusts located just above the skin surface. The crusts seen in these infections were of two distinct types, which were termed type 1 and type 2. Type 1 crusts appeared first, consisted of bacteria, inflammatory cells, and debris, and developed over an intact epidermis. Type 2 crusts arose from the process of dermal necrosis previously reported to take place at 2 days in this model system. In the latter situation the bacteria were not really cleared from the epidermis and dermis; rather those layers were transformed into a superficial crust that contained the bacteria. Deep hair follicle infections in the dermis were found in these infections, but they did not persist and did not seem to be a reservoir for organisms in the dermis. Resolution of these experimental infections appeared to involve redistribution of invading bacteria to more superficial locations in crusts above the skin surface, marked proliferation of the epidermis, loss of the bacteria-laden crusts from the skin, and eventual healing of the cutaneous damage.

  9. Recent developments in experimental animal models of Henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rockx, Barry

    2014-07-01

    Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses (genus Henipavirus (HNV; family Paramyxoviridae) are emerging zoonotic agents that can cause severe respiratory distress and acute encephalitis in humans. Given the lack of effective therapeutics and vaccines for human use, these viruses are considered as public health concerns. Several experimental animal models of HNV infection have been developed in recent years. Here, we review the current status of four of the most promising experimental animal models (mice, hamsters, ferrets, and African green monkeys) and their suitability for modeling the clinical disease, transmission, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment for HNV infection in humans.

  10. Kunjin virus replicon-based vaccines expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein GP protect the guinea pig against lethal Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Reynard, O; Mokhonov, V; Mokhonova, E; Leung, J; Page, A; Mateo, M; Pyankova, O; Georges-Courbot, M C; Raoul, H; Khromykh, A A; Volchkov, V E

    2011-11-01

    Pre- or postexposure treatments against the filoviral hemorrhagic fevers are currently not available for human use. We evaluated, in a guinea pig model, the immunogenic potential of Kunjin virus (KUN)-derived replicons as a vaccine candidate against Ebola virus (EBOV). Virus like particles (VLPs) containing KUN replicons expressing EBOV wild-type glycoprotein GP, membrane anchor-truncated GP (GP/Ctr), and mutated GP (D637L) with enhanced shedding capacity were generated and assayed for their protective efficacy. Immunization with KUN VLPs expressing full-length wild-type and D637L-mutated GPs but not membrane anchor-truncated GP induced dose-dependent protection against a challenge of a lethal dose of recombinant guinea pig-adapted EBOV. The surviving animals showed complete clearance of the virus. Our results demonstrate the potential for KUN replicon vectors as vaccine candidates against EBOV infection.

  11. Socio-economic, industrial and cultural parameters of pig-borne infections.

    PubMed

    Pappas, G

    2013-07-01

    The pork-processing industry has been possibly the fastest growing sector of the food industry in recent years. Specialization, genetic homogenization of the pig population, high density of the breeding population, reduced human-animal interactions, slaughter at a lower age and increased international trade of live animals and pork are parameters that affect, positively or negatively, the emergence of novel pig-borne pathogens, many of which are pig-specific, and many of which have significant zoonotic potential, as observed in recent outbreaks of Nipah virus and Streptococcus suis in Southeast Asia and China, respectively. Numerous other pathogens are transmitted to humans through direct contact with or consumption of pig products, and globalization trends in trade and human population movements have resulted in outbreaks of pig-borne diseases even in Muslim countries and in Israel, where pork consumption is religiously prohibited. The role of pigs as potential reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant pathogens or genes encoding resistance, and the role of feral pigs as a reservoir of zoonotic disease, are scientific fields in direct need of further research.

  12. Vaccination of dams increases antibody titer and improves growth parameters in finisher pigs subclinically infected with porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Kurmann, J; Sydler, T; Brugnera, E; Buergi, E; Haessig, M; Suter, M; Sidler, X

    2011-10-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the obligate infectious agent in postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) of pigs. To control PMWS, we vaccinated dams at 4 and 2 weeks before pregnancy and again in the 12th week of gestation with an inactivated PCV2 vaccine (Circovac). Two producer farms run under the control of Swiss Swine Health Organization were selected for the experiment. Previously, in one farm PMWS was diagnosed on pigs after weaning, whereas in the other farm, pigs wasted during the fattening period. For the experiments 113 dams were randomly vaccinated, and 111 dams were sham injected. Vaccination increased serum antibodies in dams 3- to 9-fold, accompanied by serum antibody titer increases in their offspring. In the sixth week of life, progeny from vaccinated dams had about the same IgG antibody titers as progeny of unvaccinated dams at the third day of life. In sera of vaccinated dams only low concentrations of PCV2 DNA were detected, and no progeny developed PMWS. Interestingly, at day 56 four progeny of unvaccinated dams tested positive for anti-PCV2 IgM antibodies, indicating a primary infection with PCV2. Of economic importance is the observation that progeny of vaccinated dams had a significantly higher daily weight gain in the fattening period (farm X, +51 g/day; farm Y, +30 g/day) and thus a shortened fattening period of about 6 days compared to progeny of controls. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of subclinical circovirus infection and its effects on growth performance of fattening pigs by vaccination of dams.

  13. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system. Images Figure 1. PMID:11041500

  14. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-10-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system.

  15. Histopathological features in the small intestine of pigs infected with F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic or enterotoxigenic strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vijtiuk, N; Curić, S; Lacković, G; Udovicić, I; Vrbanac, I; Valpotić, I

    1995-01-01

    Four porcine strains of Escherichia coli were examined for their effects on the small intestine of 4-week-old weaned pigs infected orogastrically. The strains used experimentally were: strain 1467 (adhesin negative, non-toxigenic); strains 2407 and 1466 (adhesin positive, non-toxigenic), derived by genetical engineering from strain 1467 and containing a wild type plasmid and a recombinant plasmid, respectively, encoding the F4 antigen (adhesin); and strain M1823 (adhesin positive, toxigenic). In addition, 2-week-old pigs that died from natural colibacillosis associated with two strains ("Ihan 1 and 2"; adhesin positive, toxigenic) were examined. Strain M1823 and the Ihan strains produced moderate and marked lesions, respectively. Strain 1467 did not cause mucosal damage or an inflammatory response. Strains 1466 and 2407 caused a mild to moderate leucocyte (mononuclear and polymorphonuclear) infiltration in the jejunal (but not ileal) lamina propria. However, unlike strain 1466, strain 2407 did not cause damage to the small intestinal mucosa and should be further studied as a potential oral vaccine strain for post-weaning E. coli diarrhoea.

  16. Experimental infection of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) with SAT-1 and SAT-2 foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, W; Swanepoel, S P; Bauman, M; Botha, B; Esterhuysen, J J; Boshoff, C I; Keet, D F; Dekker, A

    2011-04-01

    The potential role of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in the epidemiology and spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) SAT types was investigated by experimental infection and detection of virus in excretions using virus isolation on primary pig kidney cell cultures. In two experiments separated by a period of 24 months, groups of four animals were needle infected with a SAT-1 or SAT-2 virus, respectively and two in-contact controls were kept with each group. Viraemia was detected 3-9 days post-infection and virus isolated from mouth washes and faeces only occasionally up to day 13. The SAT-1 virus was transmitted to only one in-contact control animal, probably via saliva that contained virus from vesicles in the mouth of a needle-infected animal. None of the animals infected with the SAT-2 virus had any vesicles in the mouth, and there was no evidence of transmission to the in-contact controls. No virus was detected in probang samples for the duration of the experiments (60 days post-infection), indicating that persistent infection probably did not establish with either of these isolates. Giraffe most likely do not play an important role in FMD dissemination. Transmission of infection would possibly occur only during close contact with other animals when mouth vesicles are evident.

  17. Diets containing inulin but not lupins help to prevent swine dysentery in experimentally challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C F; Phillips, N D; La, T; Hernandez, A; Mansfield, J; Kim, J C; Mullan, B P; Hampson, D J; Pluske, J R

    2010-10-01

    Swine dysentery is a contagious mucohemorrhagic diarrheal disease caused by the intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae that colonizes and induces inflammation of the cecum and colon. It has been reported that a diet containing chicory root and sweet lupin can prevent swine dysentery. This experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inulin in the chicory root rather than galactans in lupins was responsible for protective effects. An experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was undertaken using pigs fed barley- and triticale-based diets, with the main effects being protein source [185 g/kg of canola meal (decreased galactans) or 220 g/kg of lupins (greater galactans)] and inulin supplementation (0 or 80 g/kg). Forty Large White × Landrace pigs weighing 21 ± 3 kg, with 10 pigs per diet, were allowed to adapt to the diets for 2 wk, and then each pig was challenged orally 4 times with a broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae on consecutive days. Pigs were killed when they showed clinical signs of dysentery or 6 wk postchallenge. Pigs fed diets without inulin had 8.3 times greater risk (P = 0.017) of developing swine dysentery and were 16 times more likely (P = 0.004) to have colon contents that were culture-positive for B. hyodysenteriae, compared with the pigs fed a diet with 80 g/kg of inulin. Diets containing lupins did not prevent pigs from developing clinical swine dysentery; however, inclusion of lupins or inulin or both in the diets delayed the onset of disease compared with the diet based mainly on canola meal (P < 0.05). Diet did not influence the total concentration of organic acids in the ileum, cecum, or upper and lower colon; however, the molar proportions of the organic acids were influenced (P < 0.05). Consequently the pH values in the cecum, and upper and lower colon were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. However the pH values of the ileal digesta were decreased in pigs fed the diet with both lupins and

  18. Action of Amiodarone Over the Extension and Reversibility of Experimental Myocardial Infarction in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Carlos B.; Castelli, Alfredo; Grassi, Ernesto; Celener, David; Rapapport, Mauricio; Martín, José

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to evaluate the action of a benzofuran derivative, Amiodarone, on an experimental acute infarction model. Six pigs were intravenously administered 1 mg/kg Amiodarone (A) 20 minutes before inducing ischemia (I) by occlusion of the anterior descending coronary artery, which was maintained for 90 minutes. A similar dose level was repeated 20 minutes before ligation release (R). Similarly, another six animals received a placebo and formed the Control Group (C). The extent of myocardial injury was assessed by summations of ST segments (Σ ST) and R (Σ R) and Q (Σ Q) waves of electrocardiographic epicardial mappings, as well as by serum levels for SGOT and LDH. Systemic blood pressure, pulmonary pressure, right atrial pressure, systemic resistance and cardiac output were also controlled. Two hundred and ten minutes after R, the animal was sacrificed for the purpose of carrying out morphological and histochemical studies. No significant differences were observed in the blood pressure of either group. During I, systemic resistance values suffered a drop in the Amiodarone Group A, whereas they increased in both groups after reperfusion. Pulmonary pressure was higher in Group A. Cardiac output showed a similar behavior in both groups up to R, when it significantly decreased in animals receiving Amiodarone. The Σ ST and the Σ Q were higher in the Control Group C, whereas the Σ R was higher in Group A. The SGOT and LDH levels were higher during R in Group C. Histochemistry showed a higher activity for SDH and LDH in treated animals. Due to its action on afterload, its contractility and its direct myocardial action, Amiodarone limited the extent of necrosis and increased the recoverable amount of myocardium. Images PMID:15226875

  19. Transmission of experimental rhinovirus infection by contaminated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gwaltney, J M; Hendley, J O

    1982-11-01

    Transfer of experimental rhinovirus infection by an intermediary environmental surface was examined in healthy young adults, in four studies done in 1980--1981, by having recipients handle surfaces previously contaminated by infected donors. Recipients touched their nasal and conjunctival mucosa after touching the surfaces. Five (50%) of 10 recipients developed infection after exposure to virus-contaminated coffee cup handles and nine (56%) of 16 became infected after exposure to contaminated plastic tiles. Spraying of contaminated tiles with a commercially available phenol/alcohol disinfectant reduced (p = 0.003) the rate of recovery of virus from the tiles from 42% (20/47) to 8% (2/26). Similarly, the rate of detection of virus on fingers touching the tiles was reduced (p = 0.001) from 61% (28/46) with unsprayed tiles to 21% (11/53) with sprayed tiles. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the recipients exposed on three consecutive days to untreated tiles became infected while 35% (7/20) touching only sprayed tiles became infected with rhinovirus (p = 0.3). These studies indicate that experimental rhinovirus colds can be spread by way of contaminated environmental surfaces and suggest that disinfectant treatment of such surfaces may reduce risk of viral transmission by this route.

  20. Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man*

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher, M. C.; De Guerrero, L. B.; Boxaca, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    A fatal disease resembling Argentine haemorrhagic fever of man has been produced in guinea-pigs and mice by inoculation with Junin virus. Infected guinea-pigs show macroscopic and microscopic haemorrhagic lesions, marked bone marrow changes, decreased leukocytes and platelets in the peripheral blood, and impairment of immunological response. This response permits differentiation between pathogenic (XJ) and attenuated (XJ Cl3) strains. Guinea-pigs inoculated with the XJ Cl3 strain develop an inapparent infection accompanied by slight haematological changes, the appearance of antibody, and protection against challenge with the pathogenic strain. The attenuated strain has been used successfully as an immunizing antigen in 636 human volunteers. Guinea-pigs infected with Tacaribe virus show cross-protection against Junin virus, with the presence of heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Suckling mice infected with Junin virus develop a typical viral encephalitis; the pathogenicity of the virus decreases with increasing age of the mice. Experiments with thymectomized mice and with mice treated with antithymocyte serum suggest that the pathogenicity of Junin virus in this host is related to the integrity of the thymus-dependent immune system. There is evidence that humoral antibodies do not play any role in the development of the encephalitic lesions but rather protect mice against Junin virus infection. A recent serological survey among laboratory workers and inhabitants of the endemic area has demonstrated the presence of inapparent infection with Junin virus. PMID:182401

  1. Nocardia brasiliensis: from microbe to human and experimental infections.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Carmona, M C

    2000-09-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that lives as a saprophyte in soil. In this article the physical properties, chemical composition and taxonomic position of this species is reviewed. Human infections and an experimental model of actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice as well as the host-immune response is described.

  2. Viral Metagenomic Analysis Displays the Co-Infection Situation in Healthy and PMWS Affected Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Caroline; Wallgren, Per; Berg, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput sequencing technologies have allowed the possibility to investigate and characterise the entire microbiome of individuals, providing better insight to the complex interaction between different microorganisms. This will help to understand how the microbiome influence the susceptibility of secondary agents and development of disease. We have applied viral metagenomics to investigate the virome of lymph nodes from Swedish pigs suffering from the multifactorial disease postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) as well as from healthy pigs. The aim is to increase knowledge of potential viruses, apart from porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), involved in PMWS development as well as to increase knowledge on the virome of healthy individuals. In healthy individuals, a diverse viral flora was seen with several different viruses present simultaneously. The majority of the identified viruses were small linear and circular DNA viruses, such as different circoviruses, anelloviruses and bocaviruses. In the pigs suffering from PMWS, PCV2 sequences were, as expected, detected to a high extent but other viruses were also identified in the background of PCV2. Apart from DNA viruses also RNA viruses were identified, among them were a porcine pestivirus showing high similarity to a recently (in 2015) discovered atypical porcine pestivirus in the US. Majority of the viruses identified in the background of PCV2 in PMWS pigs could also be identified in the healthy pigs. PCV2 sequences were also identified in the healthy pigs but to a much lower extent than in PMWS affected pigs. Although the method used here is not quantitative the very clear difference in amount of PCV2 sequences in PMWS affected pigs and healthy pigs most likely reflect the very strong replication of PCV2 known to be a hallmark of PMWS. Taken together, these findings illustrate that pigs appear to have a considerable viral flora consisting to a large extent of small single

  3. Endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids in experimental enterococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Papasian, Christopher J; Qureshi, Nilofer; Morrison, David C

    2006-03-01

    The potentially protective role of the host adrenal-glucocorticoid response to enterococcal infection was evaluated in an experimental model in which mice were infected intraperitoneally with two distinct Enterococcus faecalis strains (K9 and CP-1). We demonstrated that corticosterone levels in serum and peritoneal-lavage fluid were elevated within 1 hour of infection with either E. faecalis strain. We also demonstrated that adrenalectomized mice generated a more robust localized peritoneal tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) response to both E. faecalis strains than did sham-adrenalectomized mice but that neither E. faecalis strain induced a systemic TNF-alpha response. Further, peritoneal TNF-alpha production in adrenalectomized mice infected with either E. faecalis K9 or CP-1 was suppressed by prior treatment with an exogenous glucocorticoid (dexamethasone). The potential clinical significance of these results was suggested by our findings that adrenalectomy markedly increased susceptibility (a>100-fold decrease in the 50% lethal dose) to lethal infections with E. faecalis CP-1 and that prior dexamethasone treatment partially compensated for adrenalectomy. In marked contrast to these findings, however, adrenalectomy did not substantially increase susceptibility to lethal E. faecalis K9 infection. Further, preinfection with E. faecalis CP-1 1 hour before infection with E. faecalis K9 did not protect mice from lethal E. faecalis K9 infections. Collectively, these studies indicate that the host can generate a glucocorticoid response to E. faecalis infection that suppresses TNF-alpha production. Further, this glucocorticoid response can protect the host from potentially lethal E. faecalis infections, but different strains show heterogeneity with respect to the extent of protection afforded by the adrenal-glucocorticoid response.

  4. Immunization against chlamydial genital infection in guinea pigs with UV-inactivated and viable chlamydiae administered by different routes

    SciTech Connect

    Rank, R.G.; Batteiger, B.E.; Soderberg, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Female guinea pigs were immunized with viable or UV light-inactivated chlamydiae, belonging to the species Chlamydia psittaci, by intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, or ocular routes. All animals were then inoculated vaginally with viable chlamydiae to determine the extent of protection against challenge infection induced by the various regimens. The course of genital infection was significantly reduced in intensity in all groups of animals except the unimmunized controls and those animals immunized orally with inactivated antigen. Guinea pigs immunized with viable antigen were more likely to develop resistance to challenge infection and, in general, had a significantly greater degree of protection than animals immunized with inactivated antigen. No one route seemed superior in producing a protective response. Animals in all groups demonstrating protection developed serum and secretion immunoglobulin G antibody responses to chlamydiae. Lymphocyte proliferative reactions to chlamydial antigen were variable among groups. Immunoblot analysis of serum and secretions indicated a wide range of antibody specificities, but most protected animals produced antibodies to the major outer membrane protein, lipopolysaccharide, and the 61-kilodalton protein. No definitive associations could be made between the increased ability of immunization with viable organisms to produce resistance to challenge infection and a particular immune parameter. These data indicate that viable chlamydiae given by various routes are able to induce a strong immune response which can provide resistance against reinfection in some cases or at least reduce the degree of infection to a greater degree than inactivated antigen. However, complete resistance to genital tract infection may be difficult to obtain and alternate immunizations strategies may have to be developed.

  5. Ocular pathological changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Ismail, H I H; Ashour, D S; Abou Rayia, D M; Ali, A L

    2016-11-01

    Ocular lesions have been reported in patients with schistosomiasis; however, the problem with studying schistosomal infection of the human eye is that biopsies are almost impossible to take, and histopathological examination of suspicious lesions can only be undertaken post-mortem or after enucleation. This work aimed to study the possible effects and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis on the eye. This study involved 55 hamsters; five hamsters remained non-infected and the remaining 50 hamsters were infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Infected hamsters were sacrificed on weeks 8, 12, 16 and 20 post-infection (pi). Eye sections were prepared and stained for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Histopathological changes detected in hamsters infected after 16 and 20 weeks included looseness and oedema of the innermost retinal layers together with hyperplastic polypoid growth. Neither eggs nor granulomata were detected in eye sections throughout the experimental period. Deposition of S. mansoni antigen was revealed in 35% of infected hamsters. Later, on weeks 16 and 20 pi, moderate subepithelial conjuctival deposits and marked subchoroidal and scleral deposition were detected. In conclusion, the deposition of schistosomal antigen and immune complexes may play a pivotal role in the ocular changes that occur in schistosomiasis, even in the absence of detectable Schistosoma eggs. Schistosomiasis should be suspected in cases with unexplained ophthalmological findings, especially in endemic areas.

  6. Human migration and pig/pork import in the European Union: What are the implications for Taenia solium infections?

    PubMed

    Gabriël, S; Johansen, M V; Pozio, E; Smit, G S A; Devleesschauwer, B; Allepuz, A; Papadopoulos, E; van der Giessen, J; Dorny, P

    2015-09-30

    Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis is a neglected zoonotic disease complex occurring primarily in developing countries. Though claimed eradicated from the European Union (EU), an increasing number of human neurocysticercosis cases is being detected. Risk factors such as human migration and movement of pigs/pork, as well as the increasing trend in pig rearing with outside access are discussed in this review. The entry of a tapeworm carrier into the EU seems a lot more plausible than the import of infected pork. The establishment of local transmission in the EU is presently very unlikely. However, considering the potential changes in risk factors, such as the increasing trend in pig farming with outdoor access, the increasing human migration from endemic areas into the EU, this situation might change, warranting the establishment of an early warning system, which should include disease notification of taeniasis/cysticercosis both in human and animal hosts. As currently human-to-human transmission is the highest risk, prevention strategies should focus on the early detection and treatment of tapeworm carriers, and should be designed in a concerted way, across the EU and across the different sectors.

  7. Enriched Housing Reduces Disease Susceptibility to Co-Infection with Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Virus (PRRSV) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (A. pleuropneumoniae) in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    van Dixhoorn, Ingrid D. E.; Reimert, Inonge; Middelkoop, Jenny; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Wisselink, Henk J.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.; Kemp, Bas; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Until today, anti-microbial drugs have been the therapy of choice to combat bacterial diseases. Resistance against antibiotics is of growing concern in man and animals. Stress, caused by demanding environmental conditions, can reduce immune protection in the host, influencing the onset and outcome of infectious diseases. Therefore psychoneuro-immunological intervention may prove to be a successful approach to diminish the impact of diseases and antibiotics use. This study was designed to investigate the effect of social and environmental enrichment on the impact of disease, referred to as “disease susceptibility”, in pigs using a co-infection model of PRRSV and A. pleuropneumoniae. Twenty-eight pigs were raised in four pens under barren conditions and twenty-eight other pigs were raised in four pens under enriched conditions. In the enriched pens a combination of established social and environmental enrichment factors were introduced. Two pens of the barren (BH) and two pens of the enriched housed (EH) pigs were infected with PRRSV followed by A. pleuropneumoniae, the other two pens in each housing treatment served as control groups. We tested if differences in disease susceptibility in terms of pathological and clinical outcome were related to the different housing regimes and if this was reflected in differences in behavioural and immunological states of the animals. Enriched housed pigs showed a faster clearance of viral PRRSV RNA in blood serum (p = 0.014) and histologically 2.8 fold less interstitial pneumonia signs in the lungs (p = 0.014). More barren housed than enriched housed pigs developed lesions in the lungs (OR = 19.2, p = 0.048) and the lesions in the barren housed pigs showed a higher total pathologic tissue damage score (p<0.001) than those in enriched housed pigs. EH pigs showed less stress-related behaviour and differed immunologically and clinically from BH pigs. We conclude that enriched housing management reduces disease susceptibility to

  8. [The effect of local and systemic immunization of suckling pigs on bronchoalveolar clearance and on intrabronchial infections with Pasteurella multocida].

    PubMed

    Müller, G; Heilmann, P

    1990-01-01

    In vivo investigations of bactericidal bronchoalveolar clearance of weaning pigs locally or systemically immunized with Pasteurella antigens exhibited clearly distinctive results, as early as 3 days after the last immunization. They differed from controls by significant increase in the elimination of the homologous Pasteurella multocida A wild strain. That increase in the clearance remains for 21 days and is specific only to the immunized capsular type. There are no relations of this result to the cytological findings of the lavage fluids and to results of the intrabronchial challenge infection. Frequency and severity of pneumonias were reduced by as little as 3 aerogenic immunizations with Pasteurella mutants.

  9. The preventive effect of Bacillus subtilus strain DB9011 against experimental infection with enterotoxcemic Escherichia coli in weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Hikita, Chie; Mochizuki, Masami; Nakayama, Keizo

    2013-04-01

    Porcine edema disease (ED) is caused by Shiga toxin 2e-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Post-weaned piglets often suffer from ED as a result of intestinal infection with STEC, which causes impaired growth performance and high mortality. Antimicrobial therapy is a curative treatment for piglets infected with STEC, but the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant STEC has become a serious problem for Japanese pig farmers. Therefore, an alternative strategy other than antimicrobial therapy is needed for the prevention or treatment of ED. In this study, we evaluated the effect of oral administration of Bacillus subtilis DB9011 (DB9011) to prevent the experimental infection of STEC in weaning piglets. Eight 21-day-old piglets were divided into two groups: STEC challenge with the basal diet, and STEC challenge with DB9011 supplemented diet. The challenge was carried out when the animals were 25, 26 and 27 days old using STEC contained in capsules resistant against gastric digestion. All pigs were euthanized at 36 days of age. DB9011 improved the symptoms of ED and decreased the number of STEC in the ileal digesta and feces. Accordingly, oral administration of DB9011 in weaned piglets prevents ED through the suppression of the growth of STEC in the ileum.

  10. Pathogenicity of avian malaria in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Dusek, Robert J.; Woods, K.L.; Iko, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus) to the Hawaiian Islands (USA) is believed to have played a major role in the decline and extinction of native Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae). This introduced disease is thought to be one of the primary factors limiting recovery of honeycreepers at elevations below 1,200 m where native forest habitats are still relatively intact. One of the few remaining species of honeycreepers with a wide elevational distribution is the Hawaii Amakihi (Hernignathus virens). We measured morbidity and mortality in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi that were captured in a high elevation, xeric habitat that is above the current range of the mosquito vector. Mortality among amakihi exposed to a single infective mosquito bite was 65% (13/20). All infected birds had significant declines in food consumption and a corresponding loss in body weight over the 60 day course of the experiment. Gross and microscopic lesions in birds that succumbed to malaria included enlargement and discoloration of the spleen and liver and parasitemias as high as 50% of circulating erythrocytes. Mortality in experimentally-infected amakihi was similar to that observed in Apapane (Himnatione sanguinea) and lower than that observed in Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) infected under similar conditions with the same parasite isolate. We conclude that the current elevational and geographic distribution of Hawaiian honeycreepers is determined by relative susceptibility to avian malaria.

  11. Epidemiology of salmonella infections in pig units and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of the strains of Salmonella species isolated.

    PubMed

    Mejía, W; Casal, J; Zapata, D; Sánchez, G J; Martín, M; Mateu, E

    2006-08-26

    One hundred and thirteen finishing pig units and 74 sow units in Catalonia, Spain, were examined to determine the prevalence of salmonella infections and the factors that could be associated with them. Pooled faecal samples were taken from the finishing units, and samples of faeces were collected from individual sows. The Salmonella isolates were serotyped, phage typed and examined for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 18 common antimicrobial drugs. In addition, blood samples from pigs on 141 farms were analysed by ELISA. In both the bacteriological and serological surveys, a questionnaire with 84 questions was completed for each farm. Salmonella species were isolated from 20 per cent of the finishing units and 24 per cent of the sow units; 14 serotypes were detected in the finishing pigs and 11 in the sows. More than 30 per cent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline, sulphonamides, ampicillin or streptomycin, and 69 per cent of the strains were resistant to three or more agents up to 10 compounds. Seventy-seven per cent of the farms had at least one seropositive animal, and 26 per cent of these farms had an individual seroprevalence of 50 per cent or more. The factors associated (P<0.05) with the excretion of Salmonella species in the finishing units were the practice of raising livestock other than pigs (odds ratio [OR]=6.18), the herd size (OR=5.87), and a past history of clinical salmonellosis (OR=4.97). For the sows, the factors associated (P<0.05) with the excretion of Salmonella species were having open-flushed drainage of sewage (OR=34.48), a lack of rodent control measures (OR=0.05) and the number of sows in the unit (OR=9.26). Factors associated with seropositivity in the finishing units were a lack of bird-proof nets (OR=0.30) and the use of water from private wells (OR=3.64).

  12. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid and its effect on immune response in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Pinelli-Saavedra, A; Peralta-Quintana, J R; Sosa-Castañeda, J; Moya-Camarena, S Y; Burgara-Estrella, A; Hernández, J

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on immune response in pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A total of 18 pigs 4 weeks of age were allocated to 3 treatments, 6 per treatment: 0% CLA, 1% CLA, and 2% CLA. Serum IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α; lymphocyte proliferation; and IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-12 in PBMCs were evaluated. NF-κB, COX2, iNOS and PPAR-γ mRNA were also evaluated. No differences were observed among treatment groups in most of the in vivo cytokine profiles; only TNF-α production was increased in infected pigs in the CLA-supplemented groups. The cytokine profile in vitro was not affected by CLA supplementation. CLA decreased the proliferation of PBMCs stimulated with PRRSVs. Inflammation mediators and PPAR-γ were not affected by CLA in infected pigs. CLA did not improve the immune response of PRRSV infected pigs.

  13. Successful Antiparasitic Treatment for Cysticercosis Is Associated with a Fast and Marked Reduction of Circulating Antigen Levels in a Naturally Infected Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Armando E.; Bustos, Javier A.; Garcia, Hector H.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Zimic, Mirko; Castillo, Yesenia; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection of humans and pigs. We evaluated the posttreatment evolution of circulating parasite-specific antigen titers in 693 consecutive blood samples from 50 naturally infected cysticercotic pigs, which received different regimes of antiparasitic drugs (N = 39, 7 groups), prednisone (N = 5), or controls (N = 6). Samples were collected from baseline to week 10 after treatment, when pigs were euthanized and carefully dissected at necropsy. Antigen levels decreased proportionally to the efficacy of treatment and correlated with the remaining viable cysts at necropsy (Pearson's p = 0.67, P = 0.000). A decrease of 5 times in antigen levels (logarithmic scale) compared with baseline was found in 20/26 pigs free of cysts at necropsy, compared with 1/24 of those who had persisting viable cysts (odds ratio [OR] = 76.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1–3308.6, P < 0.001). Antigen monitoring reflects the course of infection in the pig. If a similar correlation exists in infected humans, this assay may provide a minimally invasive and easy monitoring assay to assess disease evolution and efficacy of antiparasitic treatment in human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26392159

  14. Successful Antiparasitic Treatment for Cysticercosis is Associated with a Fast and Marked Reduction of Circulating Antigen Levels in a Naturally Infected Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Armando E; Bustos, Javier A; Garcia, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Zimic, Mirko; Castillo, Yesenia; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection of humans and pigs. We evaluated the posttreatment evolution of circulating parasite-specific antigen titers in 693 consecutive blood samples from 50 naturally infected cysticercotic pigs, which received different regimes of antiparasitic drugs (N = 39, 7 groups), prednisone (N = 5), or controls (N = 6). Samples were collected from baseline to week 10 after treatment, when pigs were euthanized and carefully dissected at necropsy. Antigen levels decreased proportionally to the efficacy of treatment and correlated with the remaining viable cysts at necropsy (Pearson's p = 0.67, P = 0.000). A decrease of 5 times in antigen levels (logarithmic scale) compared with baseline was found in 20/26 pigs free of cysts at necropsy, compared with 1/24 of those who had persisting viable cysts (odds ratio [OR] = 76.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1-3308.6, P < 0.001). Antigen monitoring reflects the course of infection in the pig. If a similar correlation exists in infected humans, this assay may provide a minimally invasive and easy monitoring assay to assess disease evolution and efficacy of antiparasitic treatment in human neurocysticercosis.

  15. Virus-Specific Immune Memory at Peripheral Sites of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jingya; Veselenak, Ronald L.; Gorder, Summer R.; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in modulating HSV-2 pathogenesis, the nature of tissue-resident immune memory to HSV-2 is not completely understood. We used genital HSV-2 infection of guinea pigs to assess the type and location of HSV-specific memory cells at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells were readily detected in the spleen, bone marrow, vagina/cervix, lumbosacral sensory ganglia, and spinal cord of previously-infected animals. Memory B cells were detected primarily in the spleen and to a lesser extent in bone marrow but not in the genital tract or neural tissues suggesting that the HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells present at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection represented persisting populations of plasma cells. The antibody produced by these cells isolated from neural tissues of infected animals was functionally relevant and included antibodies specific for HSV-2 glycoproteins and HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies. A vigorous IFN-γ-secreting T cell response developed in the spleen as well as the sites of HSV-2 infection in the genital tract, lumbosacral ganglia and spinal cord following acute HSV-2 infection. Additionally, populations of HSV-specific tissue-resident memory T cells were maintained at these sites and were readily detected up to 150 days post HSV-2 infection. Unlike the persisting plasma cells, HSV-specific memory T cells were also detected in uterine tissue and cervicothoracic region of the spinal cord and at low levels in the cervicothoracic ganglia. Both HSV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ resident memory cell subsets were maintained long-term in the genital tract and sensory ganglia/spinal cord following HSV-2 infection. Together these data demonstrate the long-term maintenance of both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune response at the sites of HSV-2 latency and virus shedding and highlight the utility of the guinea pig infection model to investigate tissue-resident memory in the setting of HSV-2 latency

  16. Induction of a Specific Strong Polyantigenic Cellular Immune Response after Short-Term Chemotherapy Controls Bacillary Reactivation in Murine and Guinea Pig Experimental Models of Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Guirado, Evelyn; Gil, Olga; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Vilaplana, Cristina; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-01-01

    RUTI is a therapeutic vaccine that is generated from detoxified and liposomed Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell fragments that has demonstrated its efficacy in the control of bacillus reactivation after short-term chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to characterize the cellular immune response generated after the therapeutic administration of RUTI and to corroborate the lack of toxicity of the vaccine. Mouse and guinea pig experimental models were infected with a low-dose M. tuberculosis aerosol. RUTI-treated animals showed the lowest bacillary load in both experimental models. RUTI also decreased the percentage of pulmonary granulomatous infiltration in the mouse and guinea pig models. This was not the case after Mycobacterium bovis BCG treatment. Cellular immunity was studied through the characterization of the intracellular gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after the splenocytes' stimulation with M. tuberculosis-specific structural and growth-related antigens. Our data show that the difference between the therapeutic administration of BCG and RUTI resides mainly in the stronger activation of IFN-γ+ CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells against tuberculin purified protein derivative, ESAT-6, and Ag85B that RUTI generates. Both vaccines also triggered a specific immune response against the M. tuberculosis structural antigens Ag16kDa and Ag38kDa and a marked mRNA expression of IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-12, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and RANTES in the lung. The results show that RUTI's therapeutic effect is linked not only to the induction of a Th1 response but also to the stimulation of a quicker and stronger specific immunity against structural and growth-related antigens that reduces both the bacillary load and the pulmonary pathology. PMID:18524883

  17. Antibody response to Hepatozoon canis in experimentally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Baneth, G; Shkap, V; Samish, M; Pipano, E; Savitsky, I

    1998-01-31

    Canine hepatozoonosis is a disease caused by the tick-borne protozoan Hepatozoon canis. Five puppies were inoculated by ingestion of Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks experimentally infected with H. canis, and all became infected with H. canis: gametocytes were detected in blood smears from four dogs and schizonts were observed in the spleen and bone marrow of the fifth. Antibodies reactive with H. canis gametocytes were detected by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA), with IgM detected initially in all dogs 16 to 39 days post infection (PI) and IgG 22 to 43 days PI. The presence of gametocytes was first observed within peripheral blood neutrophils in Giemsa-stained blood smears between days 28 and 43 PI. Gametocyte-reactive antibodies were detected before the appearance of blood gametocytes in three of the four parasitemic dogs and also in a dog with no observed parasitemia. The detection of serum antibodies prior to the detection of blood gametocytes, or without apparent parasitemia, suggests that antibodies reactive with gametocytes may be formed against earlier forms of the parasite developing in the parenchymal tissues. Sera of dogs experimentally infected with Babesia canis, Babesia gibsoni and Ehrlichia canis exhibited no reactivity when tested with H. canis antigen. Additionally, sera positive for H. canis were not reactive with antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania donovani and E. canis. In conclusion, incoculation of dogs with ticks infected with H. canis results in production of antibodies reactive with peripheral blood gametocytes. Detection of IgG titres would be beneficial for the diagnosis of progressive infections with undetectable parasitemia, for seroprevalence studies, and as an adjunct to IgM titres in early infections.

  18. The origin of bacteria responsible for bioerosion to the internal bone microstructure: Results from experimentally-deposited pig carcasses.

    PubMed

    White, Lorraine; Booth, Thomas J

    2014-06-01

    It is unclear whether the principal forms of bioerosion that are often found within the internal microstructure of human bone are produced by intrinsic gut microbiota or exogenous bacteria from the soil. The aim of this study was to attempt to resolve this issue through the histological analysis of bone sampled from experimentally-deposited domestic pig (Sus scrofa) carcasses. Confirmation of either scenario will dictate how patterns of bone bioerosion can be used in reconstructions of taphonomic events. The results should also reveal the post mortem processes that promote the survival of bone biomolecules as well as the histomorphological structures that can be used in forensic identifications of human remains. Twelve pig carcasses were differentially buried and sub-aerially exposed for one year at Riseholme, Lincolnshire, U.K. Their femora were examined after one year using thin section light microscopy to investigate the patterns of microscopic bioerosion. The distribution and extent of degradation observed within the microstructures of the pig femora were consistent with bacterial bioerosion. The early occurrence of bioerosion within the Riseholme samples suggested that enteric putrefactive bacteria are primarily responsible for characteristic internal bone bioerosion. The distribution of bioerosion amongst the buried/unburied and stillborn/juvenile pig remains also supported an endogenous model. Bone from stillborn neonatal carcasses always demonstrated immaculate histological preservation due to the intrinsic sterility of newborn infant intestinal tracts. Bioerosion within the internal microstructure of mature bone will reflect the extent to which the skeletal element was exposed to putrefaction. Bone histology should be useful in reconstructing early taphonomic events. There is likely to be a relationship between post mortem processes that deny enteric gut bacteria access to internal bone microstructures and the survival of biomolecules.

  19. Larva migrans in squirrel monkeys experimentally infected with Baylisascaris potosis.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Tsugo, Kosuke; Nakamura, Shohei; Taira, Kensuke; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-01

    Roundworms of the genus Baylisascaris are natural parasites primarily of wild carnivores, and they can occasionally cause infection in humans and animals. Infection results in visceral larva migrans and/or neural larva migrans, which can be severe or fatal in some animals. Recently, Baylisascaris nematodes isolated from kinkajous (Potos flavus) and previously referred to as Baylisascaris procyonis were renamed as Baylisascaris potosis; however, data regarding the pathogenicity of B. potosis towards animals and humans are lacking. In the present study, we experimentally infected squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) with B. potosis to determine the suitability of the monkey as a primate model. We used embryonated eggs of B. potosis at two different doses (10,000 eggs and 100,000 eggs) and examined the animals at 30 days post-infection. Histopathological examination showed the presence of B. potosis larvae and infiltration of inflammatory cells around a central B. potosis larvae in the brain, intestines, and liver. Nevertheless, the monkeys showed no clinical signs associated with infection. Parasitological examination revealed the presence of B. potosis larvae in the intestines, liver, lung, muscles, brain, kidney, and diaphragm. Our findings extend the range of species that are susceptible to B. potosis and provide evidence for the zoonotic potential of larva migrans in high dose infections.

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone increases resistance to experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Domingues; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; Santello, Fabrícia Helena; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Brazão, Vânia; do Prado Júnior, José Clóvis

    2008-05-31

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) enhances immune responses against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. In a previous study, we reported that administration of DHEA significantly decreased the numbers of blood parasites in Trypanosoma cruzi experimental infection. The present study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of DHEA in reducing the severity of acute phase T. cruzi infection of male and female Wistar rats. Animals were treated subcutaneously with 40 mg/kg body weight/day of DHEA. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) was determined in spleen peritoneal cavity. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were determined in the sera of uninfected and infected animals. DHEA treatment augments NO production for both sexes after in vitro LPS treatment for uninfected animals. Infection triggered enhanced NO levels although not significant. IL-2 and IFN-gamma were detectable in higher concentrations in treated and infected rats of both genders when compared to untreated controls. These data suggest that DHEA may have a potent immunoregulatory function that can affect the course of T. cruzi infection.

  1. Effect of feed restriction on performance and postprandial nutrient metabolism in pigs co-infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and swine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Le Floc'h, Nathalie; Deblanc, Céline; Cariolet, Roland; Gautier-Bouchardon, Anne V; Merlot, Elodie; Simon, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    As nutritional status and inflammation are strongly connected, feeding and nutritional strategies could be effective to improve the ability of pigs to cope with disease. The aims of this study were to investigate the impact of a feed restriction on the ability of pigs to resist and be tolerant to a coinfection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and the European H1N1 swine influenza virus, and the consequences for nutrient metabolism, with a focus on amino acids. Two groups of specific pathogen-free pigs were inoculated with Mhp and H1N1 21 days apart. One group was fed ad libitum, the other group was subjected to a two-week 40% feed restriction starting one week before H1N1 infection. The two respective mock control groups were included. Three days post-H1N1 infection, 200 g of feed was given to pigs previously fasted overnight and serial blood samples were taken over 4 hours to measure plasma nutrient concentrations. Throughout the study, clinical signs were observed and pathogens were detected in nasal swabs and lung tissues. Feed-restricted pigs presented shorter hyperthermia and a positive mean weight gain over the 3 days post-H1N1 infection whereas animals fed ad libitum lost weight. Both infection and feed restriction reduced postprandial glucose concentrations, indicating changes in glucose metabolism. Post-prandial plasma concentrations of the essential amino acids histidine, arginine and threonine were lower in co-infected pigs suggesting a greater use of those amino acids for metabolic purposes associated with the immune response. Altogether, these results indicate that modifying feeding practices could help to prepare animals to overcome an influenza infection. Connections with metabolism changes are discussed.

  2. Effect of Feed Restriction on Performance and Postprandial Nutrient Metabolism in Pigs Co-Infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Swine Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Cariolet, Roland; Gautier-Bouchardon, Anne V.; Merlot, Elodie; Simon, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    As nutritional status and inflammation are strongly connected, feeding and nutritional strategies could be effective to improve the ability of pigs to cope with disease. The aims of this study were to investigate the impact of a feed restriction on the ability of pigs to resist and be tolerant to a coinfection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and the European H1N1 swine influenza virus, and the consequences for nutrient metabolism, with a focus on amino acids. Two groups of specific pathogen-free pigs were inoculated with Mhp and H1N1 21 days apart. One group was fed ad libitum, the other group was subjected to a two-week 40% feed restriction starting one week before H1N1 infection. The two respective mock control groups were included. Three days post-H1N1 infection, 200 g of feed was given to pigs previously fasted overnight and serial blood samples were taken over 4 hours to measure plasma nutrient concentrations. Throughout the study, clinical signs were observed and pathogens were detected in nasal swabs and lung tissues. Feed-restricted pigs presented shorter hyperthermia and a positive mean weight gain over the 3 days post-H1N1 infection whereas animals fed ad libitum lost weight. Both infection and feed restriction reduced postprandial glucose concentrations, indicating changes in glucose metabolism. Post-prandial plasma concentrations of the essential amino acids histidine, arginine and threonine were lower in co-infected pigs suggesting a greater use of those amino acids for metabolic purposes associated with the immune response. Altogether, these results indicate that modifying feeding practices could help to prepare animals to overcome an influenza infection. Connections with metabolism changes are discussed. PMID:25101681

  3. Forensic Geopedology and Micropedology: New Indications and Lookouts from Pigs Experimental Burials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Stephania Irmgard Elena; Trombino, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The role played by soil scientists in the modern forensic science is very real and important, above all in the crime scenes when buried remains, both strongly decomposed or skeletal, are found. Thanks to a PhD project on Forensic Geopedology, an interdisciplinary team of the Universities of Milano and Milano Bicocca, has been working for the last four years on several sets of experimental burials of pigs and piglets, in different soil types and for different times of burial, in order to get new evidences on environmental responses to the burial, including geopedological and micropedological aspects. The present work constitutes a conclusive synthesis of results emerged from comparative soil characterizations, listed as follow: - Grainsize analyses; - Determination of pH in H2O and KCl; - Total Nitrogen and Organic Carbon analyses: - Quantification of Available Phosphorous; - Determination of Cation Exchange Capacity and Base Saturation; - Analyses of Volatile Fatty Acids; - Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analyses; - Petrographic Optical Microscope analyses (including thin sections descriptions). It is proposed a diachronic picture of the project where it is possible to follow the variability of significance of the different kinds of analyses carried out. The achieved results, especially when cross-checked, are very stimulating as regards the setting of analytical protocols for: - The determination of time since burial (TSB); - The discrimination between primary and secondary burials; - The identification of corpses concealments. All the analyses and different approaches discussed and addressed in this work require extreme care when applied to real forensic scenarios; however, the protocols tested can be a piece of a large and articulated puzzle that depicts the major forensic case studies in which Geopedology can be of help in solving problems or in answering some peculiar questions. It is important to understand that a science so

  4. Infectivity to experimental rodents of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from Siberian chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) originated in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Fujino, T; Kajima, J; Tsuji, M

    2000-05-01

    We isolated Cryptosporidium parvum-type oocysts from naturally infected siberian chipmunks which originated in the People's Republic of China and examined the infectivity to rodents as experimental animals. The naturally infected chipmunks did not show any clinical symptoms. The oocysts were 4.8 x 4.2 microm on average in size. They were ovoid and morphologically similar to the C. parvum oocysts isolated from human and cattle. Experimental rodents were inoculated with 1.6 x 10(6) original oocysts each. SCID mice began to shed oocysts on day 7 and the OPG value was 10(5) from 50 days. The oocysts were found from ICR mice on days 13 and 16 by only sugar flotation method, however, any oocysts were not detected from the rats, guinea pigs and rabbits until 30 days. Two infected SCID mice were necropsied on days 100 and 102 and examined for coccidian organisms. Merozoites and oocysts were found in the low part of jejunum and ileum, however, no parasites were detected in the stomach. Consequently, it was considered that the present species was C. parvum and was probably genotype 2 from result of infectivity to rodents.

  5. High Prevalence of Co-Infection with Multiple Torque Teno Sus Virus Species in Italian Pig Herds

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Sylvain; Mallus, Francesca; Liciardi, Manuele; Pilo, Cristian; Camboni, Tania; Macera, Lisa; Maggi, Fabrizio; Manzin, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Torque teno viruses (TTVs) are a large group of vertebrate-infecting small viruses with circular single-stranded DNA, classified in the Anelloviridae family. In swine, two genetically distinct species, Torque teno sus virus 1a (TTSuV1a) and 1b (TTSuV1b) are currently grouped into the genus Iotatorquevirus. More recently, a novel Torque teno sus virus species, named Torque teno sus virus k2b (TTSuVk2b), has been included with Torque teno sus virus k2a (TTSuVk2a) into the genus Kappatorquevirus. In the present study, TTSuV1 (TTSuV1a and TTSuV1b), TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b prevalence was evaluated in 721 serum samples of healthy pigs from Sardinian farms, insular Italy. This is the largest study to date on the presence of TTSuV in healthy pigs in Italy. The global prevalence of infection was 83.2% (600/721), being 62.3% (449/721), 60.6% (437/721), and 11.5% (83/721) the prevalence of TTSuV1, TTSuVk2a and TTSuVk2b, respectively. The rate of co-infection with two and/or three species was also calculated, and data show that co-infections were significantly more frequent than infections with single species, and that TTSuV1+TTSuVk2a double infection was the prevalent combination (35.4%). Quantitative results obtained using species-specific real time-qPCR evidenced the highest mean levels of viremia in the TTSuV1 subgroup, and the lowest in the TTSuVk2b subgroup. Interestingly, multiple infections with distinct TTSuV species seemed to significantly affect the DNA load and specifically, data highlighted that double infection with TTSuVk2a increased the viral titers of TTSuV1, likewise the co-infection with TTSuVk2b increased the titers of TTSuVk2a. PMID:25411972

  6. Experimental parasite infection reveals costs and benefits of paternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Joshka; Lenz, Tobias L; Milinski, Manfred; Eizaguirre, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Forces shaping an individual's phenotype are complex and include transgenerational effects. Despite low investment into reproduction, a father's environment and phenotype can shape its offspring's phenotype. Whether and when such paternal effects are adaptive, however, remains elusive. Using three-spined sticklebacks in controlled infection experiments, we show that sperm deficiencies in exposed males compared to their unexposed brothers functionally translated into reduced reproductive success in sperm competition trials. In non-competitive fertilisations, offspring of exposed males suffered significant costs of reduced hatching success and survival but they reached a higher body condition than their counterparts from unexposed fathers after experimental infection. Interestingly, those benefits of paternal infection did not result from increased resistance but from increased tolerance to the parasite. Altogether, these results demonstrate that parasite resistance and tolerance are shaped by processes involving both genetic and non-genetic inheritance and suggest a context-dependent adaptive value of paternal effects. PMID:25168056

  7. Pneumonia in Saskatchewan Swine: Abattoir Incidence of Intrathoracic Lesions in Pigs from a Herd Infected with Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae and from Other Herds

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, J. R.; Osborne, A. D.; K-Sebunya, T.

    1981-01-01

    A 1978-79 survey of the incidence of thoracic cavity lesions at slaughter had shown that the overall incidence of pleurisy in Saskatchewan swine was low (2%). Therefore, in the summer of 1979 a comparison was made between the incidence of pleurisy in a herd of pigs chronically affected with Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae pneumonia and in animals from other herds slaughtered at the same time. The incidence of pleurisy in control pigs (3.6%) was slightly higher than in the large scale survey but in the pigs from the Haemophilus infected herd it was almost four times as great (13.3%). In the same herd the survivors of a batch of pigs which had been decimated by more severe disease showed an incidence of 32% pleurisy. The economic implications of these findings are detailed and discussed. PMID:7340926

  8. Genetic variability in swine leukocyte antigen class II and Toll-like receptors affects immune responses to vaccination for bacterial infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, H; Arakawa, A; Tanaka-Matsuda, M; Ide-Okumura, H; Terada, K; Chikyu, M; Kawarasaki, T; Ando, A; Uenishi, H

    2012-12-01

    The genes encoding swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) are highly polymorphic in pig populations, and likely have influences on infection and the effects of vaccination. We explored the associations of different genotypes of SLA class II and of the genes TLR1, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR6 with antibody responses after vaccination against Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) serotypes 1, 2, and 5 in 191 Duroc pigs maintained under specific pathogen-free conditions. We demonstrated close relationships between SLA class II and ER antibody response and between TLR genes other than TLR4 and APP antibody responses. Pigs with specific haplotypes in SLA class II or TLR5 showed decreased antibody response to ER vaccination or increased responses to APP2 and APP5 vaccination, respectively. It might be possible to breed for responsiveness to vaccination and to implement new vaccine development strategies unaffected by genetic backgrounds of pigs.

  9. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii

    PubMed Central

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26716018

  10. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii.

    PubMed

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis.

  11. Inhibition of Bacterial Growth and Intramniotic Infection in a Guinea Pig Model of Chorioamnionitis Using PAMAM Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Navath, Raghavendra S.; Menjoge, Anupa R.; Balakrishnan, Bindu; Bellair, Robert; Dai, Hui; Romero, Roberto; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2010-01-01

    Dendrimers have emerged as topical microbicides to treat vaginal infections. This study explores the in-vitro, in-vivo antimicrobial activity of PAMAM dendrimers, and the associated mechanism. Interestingly, topical cervical application of 500 µg of generation-4 neutral dendrimer (G4-PAMAM-OH) showed potential to treat the Escherichia coli induced ascending uterine infection in guinea pig model of chorioamnionitis. Amniotic fluid collected from different gestational sacs of infected guinea pigs post treatment showed absence of E. coli growth in the cultures plated with it. The cytokine level [tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and interleukin (IL-6 and IL-1β)] in placenta of the G4-PAMAM-OH treated animals were comparable to those in healthy animals while these were notably high in infected animals. Since, antibacterial activity of amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers is known, the activity of hydroxyl and carboxylic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimers was compared with it. Though the G4-PAMAM-NH2 shows superior antibacterial activity, it was found to be cytotoxic to human cervical epithelial cell line above 10µg / mL, while the G4-PAMAM-OH was non cytotoxic upto 1mg / mL concentration. Cell integrity, outer (OM) and inner (IM) membrane permeabilization assays showed that G4-PAMAM-OH dendrimer efficiently changed the OM permeability, while G4-PAMAM-NH2 and G3.5-PAMAM-COOH damaged both OM and IM causing the bacterial lysis. The possible antibacterial mechanism are; G4-PAMAM-NH2 acts as polycation binding to the polyanionic lipopolysaccharide in E. coli, the G4-PAMAM-OH forms hydrogen bonds with the hydrophilic O-antigens in E. coli membrane and the G3.5-PAMAM-COOH acts as a polyanion, chelating the divalent ions in outer cell membrane of E. coli. This is the first study which shows that G4-PAMAM-OH dendrimer acts as an antibacterial agent. PMID:20580797

  12. Blood viscosity changes in experimentally Trypanosoma cruzi-infected rats.

    PubMed

    Berra, H H; Piaggio, E; Revelli, S S; Luquita, A

    2005-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations would explain focal lesions found in Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection induces host blood properties modifications and defensive responses capable of producing blood hyperviscosity, an ischemic risk factor able to affect microvascular blood flow. We studied whole blood viscosity (eta(b)) and plasmatic and cellular factors influencing it in rats, 7 and 14 days after experimental infection with T. cruzi. Increased plasma viscosity (eta(p)) was found in infected versus control rats and it was correlated with high blood parasite levels at 7 days and enhanced gamma-globulin fraction concentration at 14 days. The hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and eta(b) were higher in 14 days infected rats vs. 7 days and control animals. Also, electron microscopy observation showed morphological changes in red blood cells (RBC) at 7 and 14 days post-infection, with increased proportion of echinocyte and stomatocyte shapes transformation. In our rat model of Chagas' disease, BPL, increased plasmatic protein concentration, enhanced MCV and RBC shapes transformation would determine blood hyperviscosity, cause of microvascular blood flow abnormalities.

  13. Controlling Salmonella infection in weanling pigs through water delivery of direct-fed microbials or organic acids: Part II. Effects on intestinal histology and active nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M C; Rostagno, M H; Gardiner, G E; Sutton, A L; Richert, B T; Radcliffe, J S

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-delivered, direct-fed microbials (DFM) or organic acids on intestinal morphology and active nutrient absorption in weanling pigs after deliberate Salmonella infection. Pigs (n = 88) were weaned at 19 ± 2 d of age and assigned to 1 of the following treatments, which were administered for 14 d: 1) control diet; 2) control diet + DFM (Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus licheniformis) in drinking water at 10(9) cfu/L for each strain of bacteria; 3) control diet + organic acid-based blend (predominantly propionic, acetic, and benzoic acids) in drinking water at 2.58 mL/L; and 4) control diet + 55 mg/kg carbadox. Pigs were challenged with 10(10) cfu Salmonella enterica var Typhimurium 6 d after commencement of treatments. Pigs (n = 22/d) were harvested before Salmonella challenge and on d 2, 4, and 8 after challenge. Duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosal tissues were sampled for measurement of villus height and crypt depth. Jejunal tissue was sampled for determination of active nutrient absorption in modified Ussing chambers. Duodenal villus height was greater in pigs fed in-feed antibiotic before infection (P < 0.05). Jejunal crypts were deeper in DFM- and acid-treated pigs on d 4 after infection compared with all other treatments (P < 0.05). Salmonella infection resulted in a linear decrease in phosphorus (P < 0.001) and glucose (P < 0.05) active transport, and an increase (P < 0.001) in glutamine uptake immediately after challenge. Salmonella infection reduced basal short-circuit current (I(sc)); however, water-delivered DFM or organic acid treatments caused greater basal I(sc) on d 2 after challenge than did carbadox. Carbachol-induced chloride ion secretion was greatest in negative control pigs before infection (P < 0.01) and DFM-treated pigs (P < 0.05) after infection. In conclusion, both the DFM and acidification treatments induced increases in basal active ion movement and jejunal

  14. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection

    PubMed Central

    Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes. PMID:28182785

  15. Virulence and immunogenicity of genetically defined human and porcine isolates of M. avium subsp. hominissuis in an experimental mouse infection.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Nicolas; Vluggen, Christelle; Roupie, Virginie; Duytschaever, Lucille; Van den Poel, Christophe; Denoël, Joseph; Wattiez, Ruddy; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Fretin, David; Rigouts, Leen; Chapeira, Ophélie; Mathys, Vanessa; Saegerman, Claude; Huygen, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (Mah) represents a health concern for humans and to a lesser extent for pigs, but its zoonotic potential remains elusive. Using multispacer sequence typing (MST) we previously identified 49 different genotypes of Mah among Belgian clinical and porcine isolates, with 5 MSTs shared by both hosts. Using experimental intranasal infection of BALB/c mice, we compared the virulence and immunogenicity of porcine and clinical human isolates with shared genotype or with a genotype only found in humans or pigs. Bacterial replication was monitored for 20 weeks in lungs, spleen and liver and mycobacteria specific spleen cell IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 production as well as serum antibody responses were analyzed. Isolates varied in virulence, with human and porcine isolates sharing MST22 genotype showing a thousand fold higher bacterial replication in lungs and more dissemination to spleen and liver than the human and porcine MST91 isolates. Virulent MST22 type was also associated with progressive suppression of IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, and increased IL-10 production. Whole genome sequencing of the two virulent isolates with MST22 genotype and two avirulent isolates of genotype MST91 and comparison with two well-studied M. avium subsp. hominissuis reference strains i.e. Mah 104 and Mah TH135, identified in the two MST22 isolates nine specific virulence factors of the mammalian cell entry family, that were identical with Mah 104 strain. Despite the obvious limitations of the mouse model, a striking link of virulence and identity at the genome level of porcine and human isolates with the same multisequence type, for which no correlation of place of residence (humans) or farm of origin (pigs) was observed, seems to point to the existence in the environment of certain genotypes of Mah which may be more infectious both for humans and pigs than other genotypes.

  16. A modified live PRRSV vaccine and the pathogenic parent strain induce regulatory T cells in pigs naturally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    LeRoith, T; Hammond, S; Todd, S M; Ni, Y; Cecere, T; Pelzer, K D

    2011-04-15

    The lack of heterologous protection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccines is currently a major problem in the field. Heterologous protection by PRRS vaccines depends on the ability of the vaccine to induce an interferon gamma (IFN-γ) response. One mechanism by which the virus evades the immune system is by activating regulatory T cells (T(regs)), resulting in induction of interleukin 10 rather than IFN-γ. Our hypothesis that current PRRS vaccines do not differ from pathogenic strains in the ability to induce T(regs) was tested by inoculating three groups of pigs with two pathogenic viruses and an attenuated vaccine strain and evaluating the number of T(regs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Before inoculation, the pigs, although vaccinated became infected naturally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae before shipment to our research facility. Our results show that the PRRSV vaccine strain and parent strain are equally able to induce T(regs) in pigs naturally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. Pigs in the vaccine and PRRSV groups had higher lung lesion scores than pigs in the control groups. The results suggest that the exacerbation M. hyopneumoniae respiratory disease may be due to the ability of PRRSV vaccination and viral infection to induce regulatory T cells.

  17. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    PubMed

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-10-12

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs.

  18. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B.; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs. PMID:26456301

  19. Vertical transmission of Trypanosoma evansi in experimentally infected rats.

    PubMed

    Campigotto, Gabriela; Volpato, Andréia; Galli, Gabriela M; Glombowsky, Patrícia; Baldissera, Matheus D; Miletti, Luiz Claudio; Jaguezeski, Antonise M; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2017-03-01

    Many reproductive problems has been described in male and female animals infected by Trypanosoma evansi. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of vertical (Experiment I) and venereal (Experiment II) transmission of T. evansi in rats experimentally infected. In the experiment I, eight female Wistar rats were used: three animals as negative controls, and five rats were infected by T. evansi on day ten of gestation. Out of these eight females, half puppies were used for molecular analysis (polymerase chain reaction - PCR) for T. evansi. Two infected females showed delivery problems, such as stillbirth, and fetal death that also led to female death. Three female rats infected had normal delivery of stunted offspring at term that died 2 days after birth. Rats from the control group had normal delivery of healthy offspring. T. evansi PCR was positive for 80% (12/15) of pups in the infected group. For the experiment II, five male rats were infected by T. evansi, and monitored by blood smears to check the parasitemia level. When the male rats showed parasitemia between 2 and 5 parasites per field, they were individually housed with one female adult rat. After approximately 21 days, the females delivered their offspring. Blood sample was collected from the females for blood smears and T. evansi PCR tests, which revealed negative results. Therefore, we were able to prove the occurrence of transplacental transmission of T. evansi and its negative effect on female rats and their offspring.

  20. Investigation of T-cell responses and viral mRNA persistence in lymph nodes of pigs infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, J Sandra; Rodríguez-Ropón, A; Kennedy, Seamus; Moreno-López, Jorge; Berg, Mikael; Hernández-Jáuregui, Pablo

    2009-01-15

    Selected lymphocyte subpopulations were studied and the distribution of viral mRNA were investigated during acute and persistent porcine rubulavirus (PoRV-LPMV) infection in Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs. Six pigs infected with PoRV-LPMV at 17 days of age exhibited clinical signs 7-10 days post-inoculation (pi). One infected piglet died 11 days pi while the other five recovered around day 13 pi and survived until euthanasia on day 277 pi. Increased numbers of CD8+, CD4+ and CD2+ T cells were detected during the acute phase of infection while CD8+ cells were elevated throughout the infection, including during the persistent stage. Specific antibodies against the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of PoRV-LPMV were detected during persistent infection. Although infectious virus could not be recovered from tissues from any of the infected pigs at necropsy 277 days pi, PoRV-LPMV mRNA was detected in lymph nodes, pancreas and central nervous system using a nested polymerase chain reaction technique. Continued lymphocyte interaction with viral RNA may be an important factor in promoting cellular and humoral responses during persistent PoRV-LPMV infection.

  1. Chlamydial Variants Differ in Ability To Ascend the Genital Tract in the Guinea Pig Model of Chlamydial Genital Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Bowlin, Anne K.; Spencer, Nicole; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    An important question in the study of chlamydial genital tract disease is why some women develop severe upper tract disease while others have mild or even “silent” infections with or without pathology. Animal studies suggest that the pathological outcome of an infection is dependent upon both the composition of the infecting chlamydial population and the genotype of the host, along with host physiological effects, such as the cyclical production of reproductive hormones and even the size of the infecting inoculum or the number of repeated infections. In this study, we compared two variants of Chlamydia caviae, contrasting in virulence, with respect to their abilities to ascend the guinea pig genital tract. We then determined the effect of combining the two variants on the course of infection and on the bacterial loads of the two variants in the genital tract. Although the variants individually had similar infection kinetics in the cervix, SP6, the virulent variant, could be isolated from the oviducts more often and in greater numbers than the attenuated variant, AZ2. SP6 also elicited higher levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) in the lower genital tract and increased leukocyte infiltration in the cervix and uterus compared to AZ2. When the two variants were combined in a mixed infection, SP6 outcompeted AZ2 in the lower genital tract; however, AZ2 was able to ascend the genital tract as readily as SP6. These data suggest that the ability of SP6 to elicit an inflammatory response in the lower genital tract facilitates the spread of both variants to the oviducts. PMID:26015484

  2. Development of antinuclear antibodies and a genetic linkage in pigs infected with porcine circovirus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives. Prominent nuclear immunohistochemical staining of a PCV-2 free porcine kidney cell line (PK-15) was detected with a rabbit polyclonal antibody produced against a conserved PCV2 Rep-protein peptide. This unexpected finding led us to retrospectively test sera from gnotobiotic pigs for the ...

  3. Discovery of Antinuclear Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Porcine Circovirus Type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes post-weaning-multisystemic-wasting-syndrome (PMWS), a swine disease first observed in Canada in 1991 (1). It is characterized by general wasting, respiratory disease, jaundice and pallor in young pigs resulting in production losses and variable...

  4. Natural Pig Plasma Immunoglobulins Have Anti-Bacterial Effects: Potential for Use as Feed Supplement for Treatment of Intestinal Infections in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, Chris J.; Strube, Mikael L.; Hansen, Marie B.; Lindved, Bodil K.; Lihme, Allan; Boye, Mette; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for non-antibiotics solutions to control infectious disease in intensive pig production. Here, one such alternative, namely pig antibodies purified from slaughterhouse blood was investigated in order to elucidate its potential usability to control post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD), which is one of the top indications for antibiotics usage in the pig production. A very cost-efficient and rapid one-step expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography procedure was used to purify pig immunoglobulin G from slaughterhouse pig plasma (more than 100 litres), resulting in >85% pure pig IgG (ppIgG). The ppIgG thus comprised natural pig immunoglobulins and was subsequently shown to contain activity towards four pig-relevant bacterial strains (three different types of Escherichia coli and one type of Salmonella enterica) but not towards a fish pathogen (Yersinia ruckeri), and was demonstrated to inhibit the binding of the four pig relevant bacteria to a pig intestinal cell line (IPEC-J2). Finally it was demonstrated in an in vivo weaning piglet model for intestinal colonization with an E. coli F4+ challenge strain that ppIgG given in the feed significantly reduced shedding of the challenge strain, reduced the proportion of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, increased the proportion of families Enterococcoceae and Streptococcaceae and generally increased ileal microbiota diversity. Conclusively, our data support the idea that natural IgG directly purified from pig plasma and given as a feed supplement can be used in modern swine production as an efficient and cost-effective means for reducing both occurrence of PWD and antibiotics usage and with a potential for the prevention and treatment of other intestinal infectious diseases even if the causative agent might not be known. PMID:26824607

  5. Natural Pig Plasma Immunoglobulins Have Anti-Bacterial Effects: Potential for Use as Feed Supplement for Treatment of Intestinal Infections in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Strube, Mikael L; Hansen, Marie B; Lindved, Bodil K; Lihme, Allan; Boye, Mette; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for non-antibiotics solutions to control infectious disease in intensive pig production. Here, one such alternative, namely pig antibodies purified from slaughterhouse blood was investigated in order to elucidate its potential usability to control post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD), which is one of the top indications for antibiotics usage in the pig production. A very cost-efficient and rapid one-step expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography procedure was used to purify pig immunoglobulin G from slaughterhouse pig plasma (more than 100 litres), resulting in >85% pure pig IgG (ppIgG). The ppIgG thus comprised natural pig immunoglobulins and was subsequently shown to contain activity towards four pig-relevant bacterial strains (three different types of Escherichia coli and one type of Salmonella enterica) but not towards a fish pathogen (Yersinia ruckeri), and was demonstrated to inhibit the binding of the four pig relevant bacteria to a pig intestinal cell line (IPEC-J2). Finally it was demonstrated in an in vivo weaning piglet model for intestinal colonization with an E. coli F4+ challenge strain that ppIgG given in the feed significantly reduced shedding of the challenge strain, reduced the proportion of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, increased the proportion of families Enterococcoceae and Streptococcaceae and generally increased ileal microbiota diversity. Conclusively, our data support the idea that natural IgG directly purified from pig plasma and given as a feed supplement can be used in modern swine production as an efficient and cost-effective means for reducing both occurrence of PWD and antibiotics usage and with a potential for the prevention and treatment of other intestinal infectious diseases even if the causative agent might not be known.

  6. Effect of experimental manipulation on survival and recruitment of feral pigs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, L.B.; Mitchell, M.S.; Grand, J.B.; Jolley, D.B.; Sparklin, B.D.; Ditchkoff, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Lethal removal is commonly used to reduce the density of invasive-species populations, presuming it reduces population growth rate; the actual effect of lethal removal on the vital rates contributing to population growth, however, is rarely tested. We implemented a manipulative experiment of feral pig (Sus scrofa) populations at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA, to assess the demographic effects of harvest intensity. Using markrecapture data, we estimated annual survival, recruitment, and population growth rates of populations in a moderately harvested area and a heavily harvested area for 200406. Population growth rates did not differ between the populations. The top-ranked model for survival included a harvest intensity effect; model-averaged survival was lower for the heavily harvested population than for the moderately harvested population. Increased immigration and reproduction likely compensated for the increased mortality in the heavily harvested population. We conclude that compensatory responses in feral pig recruitment can limit the success of lethal control efforts. ?? 2009 CSIRO.

  7. Comparison of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection in light and heavy pigs of market age on farms with routine PCV2 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Kwang-Soo; Joo, Han Soo; Davies, Peter R; Han, Jeong Hee

    2012-07-01

    Commercial vaccines against Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) are widely used on swine farms. Marked body weight variation at marketing age is a problem on conventional pig farms using all-in/all-out barn management. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PCV2 infection could be a factor influencing body weight variation. Seven conventional farms that routinely used PCV2 vaccination were selected, and 60 serum samples from light and heavy pigs at each site were tested for PCV2 antibody titers and viremia. At 3 farms the mean antibody titer, proportion of viremic pigs, and virus load differed significantly between the light and heavy groups. These preliminary results suggest that PCV2 infection may be a factor contributing to weight variation in vaccinated market-age hogs.

  8. Experimental infection of the rabbit tick, Haemaphysalis leporispalustris, with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, and comparative biology of infected and uninfected tick lineages.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luciana Helena T; Faccini, João Luiz H; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2009-04-01

    The present study consisted of two experiments that evaluated experimental infections of Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks by a Brazilian strain of Rickettsia rickettsii, and their effect on tick biology. In experiment I, ticks were exposed to R. rickettsii during the larval, nymphal or adult stages by feeding on rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) needle-inoculated with R. rickettsii, and thereafter reared on uninfected rabbits for the entire next tick generation. Regardless of the tick stage that acquired the infection, all subsequent tick stages were shown to be infected by PCR (infection rates varying from 1.3 to 41.7%), and were able to transmit R. rickettsii to uninfected rabbits, as demonstrated by rabbit seroconversion, guinea pig inoculation with rabbit blood, and PCR on rabbit blood. In Experiment II, ticks were exposed to R. rickettsii during the larval stage by feeding on rabbits co-infested with R. rickettsii-infected adult ticks, and thereafter reared on uninfected rabbits until the next generation of larvae. Again, all subsequent tick stages were shown to be infected by PCR (infection rates varying from 3.0 to 40.0%), and were able to transmit R. rickettsii to uninfected rabbits. Thus, it was demonstrated that larvae, nymphs, and adults of H. leporispalustris were able to acquire and maintain the R. rickettsii infection by transstadial and transovarial transmissions within the tick population, with active transmission of the bacterium to susceptible rabbits by all parasitic stages. Analyses of biological parameters of uninfected and R. rickettsii-infected tick lineages were performed in order to evaluate possible deleterious effects of R. rickettsii to the infected tick lineages. Surprisingly, all but one of the four R. rickettsii-experimental groups of the present study showed overall better biological performance than their sibling uninfected control ticks. Results of the present study showed that H. leporispalustris could support infection by a

  9. Two clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae showed differing pattern of lameness and pathogen detection in experimentally challenged pigs

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Matthew; Bower, Leslie; Ramirez, Alejandro; Madson, Darin M.; Strait, Erin L.; Rosey, Everett L.; Rapp-Gabrielson, Vicki J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyosynoviae is known to colonize and cause disease in growing-finishing pigs. In this study, two clinical isolates of M. hyosynoviae were compared by inoculating cesarean-derived colostrum-deprived and specific-pathogen-free growing pigs. After intranasal or intravenous inoculation, the proportion and distribution pattern of clinical cases was compared in addition to the severity of lameness. Tonsils were found to be the primary site of colonization, while bacteremia was rarely detected prior to the observation of clinical signs. Regardless of the clinical isolate, route of inoculation, or volume of inocula, histopathological alterations and tissue invasion were detected in multiple joints, indicating an apparent lack of specific joint tropism. Acute disease was primarily observed 7 to 10 days post-inoculation. The variability in the severity of synovial microscopic lesions and pathogen detection in joint cavities suggests that the duration of joint infection may influence the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, these findings demonstrate that diagnosis of M. hyosynoviae-associated arthritis can be influenced by the clinical isolate, and provides a study platform to investigate the colonization and virulence potential of field isolates. This approach can be particularly relevant to auxiliate in surveillance and testing of therapeutic and/or vaccine candidates. PMID:27297416

  10. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency.

  11. Feline immunodeficiency virus env gene evolution in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Kraase, Martin; Sloan, Richard; Klein, Dieter; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Linda; Biek, Roman; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), an immunosuppressive lentivirus found in cats worldwide, is studied to illuminate mechanisms of lentiviral pathogenesis and to identify key components of protective immunity. During replication, lentiviruses accumulate errors of nucleotide mis-incorporation due to the low-fidelity of reverse transcriptase and recombination between viral variants, resulting in the emergence of a complex viral "quasispecies". In patients infected with HIV-1, env sequences may vary by up to 10% and the detection of quasispecies with greater heterogeneity is associated with higher viral loads and reduced CD4+ T cell numbers [1], indicating that transmission of more complex quasispecies may lead to disease progression. However, little is known about how FIV evolves as disease progresses, or why some cats develop AIDS rapidly while disease progression is slow in others. The aim of this study was to determine whether disease progression may be governed by viral evolution and to examine the diversity of viral variants emerging following infection with an infectious molecular clone. The FIV env gene encoding the envelope glycoprotein (Env) was examined at early (12 weeks) and late (322 weeks) stages of FIV infection in two groups of cats infected experimentally with the FIV-GL8 molecular clone. Viral variants were detected within quasispecies in cats in the late stages of FIV infection that contained differing amino acid compositions in several variable loops of Env, some of which were identified as determinants of receptor usage and resistance to neutralization. Therefore these results indicate that the FIV env gene evolves during the course of infection, giving rise to variants that resist neutralization and likely lead to disease progression.

  12. Effect of swine hepatitis E virus on the livers of experimentally infected Mongolian gerbils by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Shi, Ruihan; She, Ruiping; Soomro, Majid Hussain; Mao, Jingjing; Du, Fang; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Can

    2015-10-02

    Previous studies have shown that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted between rats, pigs, cattle, rabbits, chicken, cats, and deer. Because wild and domestic rodents have anti-HEV antibodies, they are considered potential reservoirs of HEV. In the current study, Mongolian gerbils were experimentally infected with swine hepatitis E virus and the effects of this infection were investigated. After inoculation with HEV, the liver-to-body weight ratio increased at 7 dpi. Mongolian gerbils demonstrated significant increase (p<0.05) in Aspartate Transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) concentrations in the sera, and HEV IgG was detected at 21 days post-inoculation (dpi). Real-time PCR revealed that the copies of HEV RNA in the liver were detected at 7 dpi, and peaked at 28 dpi at a concentration of 7.73 logs g(-1). Using both light and electron microscopy, hepatic lesions were observed in the HEV inoculated animals. In the experimental group, characteristic viral hepatitis lesions were prominent in the liver. HEV antigen was detected in the liver by immunohistochemistry, and HEV ORF3 antigen was detectable in liver by Western blot. These results clearly demonstrate that viral load of HEV in livers was dynamic, and ultrastructural hepatic injury in HEV infected Mongolian gerbils and anti-HEV IgG positive seroconversion were observed during infection.

  13. Intraspinal nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and substance P in guinea-pigs with acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Vyas, D; Bieger, D; White, S R

    1988-07-01

    Spinal cord axons and terminals stained for tyrosine hydroxylase-, serotonin- and substance P-like immunoreactivity were examined in guinea-pigs in the paraplegic phase of acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal disease model for multiple sclerosis. Fibers positive for monoamine and substance P-like staining that terminated in the lumbar ventral horn appeared to be markedly damaged during the disease. However, no changes were detected in those substance P-containing fibers that terminated in the dorsal horn. It was concluded that small diameter, thinly myelinated or unmyelinated axons that course for long distances in the spinal cord, and, therefore, have a high probability for encountering inflammatory foci, are particularly vulnerable to damage during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Damage to these monoaminergic and peptidergic fibers may contribute to the neurological deficits that are associated with this autoimmune nervous system disease.

  14. Experimental infection of rainbow trout with Saprolegnia parasitica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, George E.; Stehly, Guy R.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed to experimentally induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The development of a reliable method to produce infected fish is essential to efforts to determine the efficacy of various antifungal treatments. Three methods for inducing saprolegniasis were evaluated in waters containing known concentrations of Saprolegnia parasitica zoospores. These methods included application of the following stressors to fish: (1) abrasion and dewatering, (2) water temperature increase, and (3) a combination of abrasion, dewatering, and temperature increase. Neither physical abrasion nor temperature increase stress alone was effective for inducing saprolegniasis. Only 25.9% of fish stressed by abrasion and dewatering alone became infected. Application of both abrasion and temperature stress, however, induced saprolegniasis in 77.8% of fish tested. Most of these fish became infected after 5 d of stress treatments. No fish became infected or died in the positive control group (not stressed but exposed to S. parasitica zoospores) or the negative control group (not stressed or challenged). This method should enable researchers to induce saprolegniasis in rainbow trout to study its pathogenesis or to test the efficacy of antifungal treatments. In conducting efficacy studies, it is important that therapeutic treatments begin promptly after the first signs of saprolegniasis are observed because the disease can progress very quickly and often results in mortality.

  15. Trypanosoma evansi: hematologic changes in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Costa, Márcio Machado; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Zanette, Régis Adriel; Faccio, Luciana; Gressler, Lucas Trevisan; Dorneles, Tagor Eduardo Andreolla; Santurio, Janio Morais; Lopes, Sonia Terezinha dos Anjos; Monteiro, Silvia Gonzalez

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed at evaluating hemogram and erythropoietic changes in cats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma evansi. Thirteen adult female non-breeding Felix catus were separated into two groups: seven animals were infected with 10(8) trypomastigotes each, and six animals were used as negative controls. Animals were kept in air-conditioned rooms and blood smears were performed daily for 49 days. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein at days 0, 7, 21, 35 and 49 and stored in blood-collecting tubes containing anticoagulant. Bone marrow was collected from the proximal epiphysis of the right femur at days 14 and 42 post-inoculation (PI). Total erythrocyte count, hematocrit and hemoglobin showed statistical differences among groups from the seventh day PI onwards (P<0.05). The mean corpuscular volume and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration remained normal, characterizing a normocytic-normochromic anemia. Reticulocyte count increased in the infected group from the 21st day onwards, but remained near normal values suggesting a mild regenerative anemia. Moreover, the myeloid:erythroid ratio significantly reduced at day 42 PI, evidencing a bone marrow hematopoietic response. Based on these results we conclude that cats infected with T. evansi have normocytic, normochromic, regenerative anemia.

  16. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ+ T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens. PMID:27853451

  17. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ(+) T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens.

  18. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or lim...

  19. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  20. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulou, G; Kritas, S; Christodoulopoulos, G; Burriel, A R

    2015-03-01

    and qualitative costs of man and animal Salmonella infections should be calculated in the light of free trade and open borders. Understandably, accurate calculation of the economic and political costs requires knowledge of the many factors influencing nationally the quality and safety of pork products and internationally free trade. Thus, how Salmonella pig infections affect commerce and public health across open borders depends on a state's ability to accurately calculate costs for the surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses in general, and pig infections as a particular example.

  1. The commercial impact of pig Salmonella spp. infections in border-free markets during an economic recession

    PubMed Central

    Evangelopoulou, G.; Kritas, S.; Christodoulopoulos, G.; Burriel, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    qualitative and qualitative costs of man and animal Salmonella infections should be calculated in the light of free trade and open borders. Understandably, accurate calculation of the economic and political costs requires knowledge of the many factors influencing nationally the quality and safety of pork products and internationally free trade. Thus, how Salmonella pig infections affect commerce and public health across open borders depends on a state’s ability to accurately calculate costs for the surveillance and control of animal salmonelloses in general, and pig infections as a particular example. PMID:27047083

  2. New Application of Actuator-Driven Pulsed Water Jet for Spinal Cord Dissection: An Experimental Study in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiki; Wenting, Jia; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Endo, Hidenori; Sagae, Yuto; Iwasaki, Masaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-03-01

    Background Surgery for intramedullary tumors is technically demanding because it requires surgical resection along with functional preservation of the spinal cord. The water jet dissector is an emerging tool in neurologic surgeries and a novel tool in spinal cord surgeries. This article evaluates the usefulness and safety of water jet dissection in an experimental study. Methods A pulsed water jet was applied to dissect the posterior median sulcus of the spinal cords of seven anesthetized pigs. In four pigs, the water jet was delivered on the dorsal spinal cord at different input voltages (5, 10, and 15 V) and for durations of either 15 or 30 seconds. The depth and dissected areas were measured histologically and compared. In three separate pigs, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were recorded before and after dissection (10 V for 30 seconds) to evaluate the function of the dorsal column sensory pathway. Results Increased pressure and duration of exposure to the pulsed water jet led to deeper and wider dissection of the dorsal spinal cord. Application of the water jet at 5 or 10 V allowed precise dissection along the dorsal columns along with the preservation of microvasculature. During SEP monitoring, responses were maintained after application of the water jet to the posterior column at 10 V for 30 seconds. Conclusions The pulsed water jet is a feasible option for spinal cord dissection. Characteristics of this water jet may help surgeons achieve complete resection of intramedullary tumors along with preserving satisfactory postoperative neurologic functions.

  3. Immunization of suckling pigs against enteric enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection by vaccinating dams with purified pili.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E; To, C C; Brinton, C C

    1978-07-01

    Pregnant swine (gilts) were vaccinated parenterally with a suspension of purified pili from the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain 987 (09:K103::NM). Gilts injected with placebo served as controls. Suckling pigs born to gilts in both groups were challenged intragastrically with virulent strain 987. The percentage of deaths, incidence and duration of diarrhea, numbers of E. coli in the ilea, and E. coli attachment to the villous epithelia were significantly less in suckling pigs of vaccinated gilts than in those of controls. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that pili of some enterotoxigenic E. coli facilitate adhesion to intestinal epithelia. Vaccination of dams with pili appears to be a means of immunizing against diarrheal disease caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli in suckling neonates. This work confirms the role of somatic pili as colonization and virulence factors and provides another example of safe and effective purified pilus vaccines.

  4. Expression of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in subplacental trophoblasts from guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) following infection with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; DiVerde, K D; Sahin, O; Plummer, P J; Zhang, Q; Yaeger, M J

    2011-03-01

    Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) are well-characterized cell surface receptors that recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and play an important role in pathogen recognition and activation of the innate immune system. Variable expression of TLR2 and TLR4 has been described in trophoblasts from normal and diseased placentas; yet, there are limited data regarding trophoblast TLR expression in response to specific placental pathogens, and TLR expression in the guinea pig placenta has not been described. The guinea pig is an effective model for Campylobacter-induced abortion of small ruminants, and the authors have shown by immunohistochemistry that C jejuni localizes within syncytiotrophoblasts of the guinea pig subplacenta. The present study was designed to determine if the expression of either TLR2 or TLR4 would be affected in subplacental trophoblasts following infection with C jejuni. Immunohistochemistry for TLR2 and TLR4 was performed on placenta from guinea pigs that aborted following inoculation with C jejuni and from sham-inoculated controls. Quantitative assessment of TLR expression was performed, and mean immunoreactivity for TLR2 was significantly higher in subplacental trophoblasts from animals that aborted compared with uninfected controls (P = .0283), whereas TLR4 expression was not statistically different (P = .5909). These results suggest that abortion in guinea pigs following infection with C jejuni is associated with increased TLR2 expression in subplacental trophoblasts and may reveal a possible role for TLR2 in the pathogenesis of Campylobacter-induced abortion.

  5. Collection of Oral Fluids Using Cotton Ropes as a Sampling Method to Detect Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, W; Morris, J; Davis, A; Giles, M; Wang, J; Nguyen, H T T; Kim, P V; Quach, N V; Le, P T T; Nguyen, P H N; Dang, H; Tran, H X; Vu, P P; Hung, V V; Le, Q T; Tran, T M; Mai, T M T; Le, Q T V; Singanallur, N B

    2015-10-01

    In high-density farming practices, it is important to constantly monitor for infectious diseases, especially diseases that have the potential to spread rapidly between holdings. Pigs are known to amplify foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by excreting large amounts of virus, and it is therefore important to detect the virus quickly and accurately to minimize the spread of disease. Ropes were used to collect oral fluid samples from pigs, and each sample was compared to saliva samples collected from individual animals by detecting FMD virus RNA using real-time PCR. Two different experiments are described where groups of pigs were infected with different serotypes of FMD virus, either with or without vaccination, and unvaccinated pigs were kept in aerosol contact. The sensitivity of the rope sampling varied between 0.67 and 0.92, and the statistical agreement between this method and individual sampling ranged from substantial to moderate for the two different serotypes. The ease of collecting oral fluids using ropes together with the high sensitivity of subsequent FMD detection through PCR indicates that this could be a useful method to monitor pig populations for FMD virus infection. With further validation of the sensitivity of detection of FMD virus RNA, this can be a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool.

  6. Kinetics of Bartonella birtlesii Infection in Experimentally Infected Mice and Pathogenic Effect on Reproductive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Henri J.; Barrat, Francine; Bermond, Delphine; Bernex, Florence; Thibault, Danièle; Heller, Rémy; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Piémont, Yves; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of infection and the pathogenic effects on the reproductive function of laboratory mice infected with Bartonella birtlesii recovered from an Apodemus species are described. B. birtlesii infection, as determined by bacteremia, occurred in BALB/c mice inoculated intravenously. Inoculation with a low-dose inoculum (1.5 × 103 CFU) induced bacteremia in only 75% of the mice compared to all of the mice inoculated with higher doses (≥1.5 × 104). Mice became bacteremic for at least 5 weeks (range, 5 to 8 weeks) with a peak ranging from 2 × 103 to 105 CFU/ml of blood. The bacteremia level was significantly higher in virgin females than in males but the duration of bacteremia was similar. In mice infected before pregnancy (n = 20), fetal loss was evaluated by enumerating resorption and fetal death on day 18 of gestation. The fetal death and resorption percentage of infected mice was 36.3% versus 14.5% for controls (P < 0.0001). Fetal suffering was evaluated by weighing viable fetuses. The weight of viable fetuses was significantly lower for infected mice than for uninfected mice (P < 0.0002). Transplacental transmission of Bartonella was demonstrated since 76% of the fetal resorptions tested was culture positive for B. birtlesii. The histopathological analysis of the placentas of infected mice showed vascular lesions in the maternal placenta, which could explain the reproductive disorders observed. BALB/c mice appeared to be a useful model for studying Bartonella infection. This study provides the first evidence of reproductive disorders in mice experimentally infected with a Bartonella strain originating from a wild rodent. PMID:11500400

  7. A polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine induces heterologous immunity and protects pigs against pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bragstad, Karoline; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Mette Sif; Nielsen, Jens; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2013-04-26

    The composition of current influenza protein vaccines has to be reconsidered every season to match the circulating influenza viruses, continuously changing antigenicity. Thus, influenza vaccines inducing a broad cross-reactive immune response would be a great advantage for protection against both seasonal and emerging influenza viruses. We have developed an alternative influenza vaccine based on DNA expressing selected influenza proteins of pandemic and seasonal origin. In the current study, we investigated the protection of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in pigs. We immunised pigs intradermally with a combination of influenza DNA vaccine components based on the pandemic 1918 H1N1 (M and NP genes), pandemic 2009 H1N1pdm09 (HA and NA genes) and seasonal 2005 H3N2 genes (HA and NA genes) and investigated the protection against infection with virus both homologous and heterologous to the DNA vaccine components. We found that pigs challenged with a virus homologous to the HA and NA DNA vaccine components were well protected from infection. In addition, heterologous challenge virus was cleared rapidly compared to the unvaccinated control pigs. Immunisation by electroporation induced HI antibodies >40 HAU/ml seven days after second vaccination. Heterologous virus challenge as long as ten weeks after last immunisation was able to trigger a vaccine antibody HI response 26 times higher than in the control pigs. The H3N2 DNA vaccine HA and NA genes also triggered an effective vaccine response with protective antibody titres towards heterologous H3N2 virus. The described influenza DNA vaccine is able to induce broadly protective immune responses even in a larger animal, like the pig, against both heterologous and homologous virus challenges despite relatively low HI titres after vaccination. The ability of this DNA vaccine to limit virus shedding may have an impact on virus spread among pigs which could possibly extend to humans as well, thereby diminishing the

  8. Callithrix penicillata: a feasible experimental model for dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Milene Silveira; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Silva, Gilmara Abreu; Casseb, Samir Mansur Moraes; Dias Júnior, Antônio Gregório; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiros; Azevedo, Raimunda do Socorro da Silva; Costa e Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2014-01-01

    Although the murine models have the feasibility to reproduce some signs of dengue Virus (DENV) infection, the use of isogenic hosts with polarized immune response patterns does not reproduce the particularities of human disease. Our goal was to investigate the kinetics of peripheral blood biomarkers in immunocompetent Callithrix penicillata non-human primates subcutaneously infected with DENV-3. The viral load of infected animals was determinated by quantitative real time PCR. Measurements of DENV-3/IgM were performed, and several parameters were assessed by hemogram: red blood cells count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cells count, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets count. The coagulogram was performed by prothrombin time (PT), and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assays. The renal function was monitored by urea and creatinine, and the liver function by the aspartate (AST), and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases. Also, the level of the cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-5 was quantified during the experimental study. Data analysis was performed considering relevant differences when baseline fold changes were found outside from 0.75 to 1.5 range. Our data demonstrated that infected animals presented relevant signs of dengue disease, including peaks of viremia at 5 days-post-infection (dpi), peaks of anti-DENV-3 IgM at 15 dpi and hemaglutination inhibition assay (HIA) from 15 to at 60 dpi. Despite early monocytosis, slight neutrophilia and lymphocytosis, animals developed persistent leucopenia starting at 4 dpi. Anemia episodes were steady at 3-4 dpi. Patent thrombocytopenia was observed from 1 to 15 dpi with sporadic decrease of APTT. A substantial increase of ALT and AST was observed with higher peak at 4 dpi. Moreover, early increases of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma besides late increase of IFN-gamma were observed. The analysis of biomarkers network pointed out two relevant strong axes during early stages of dengue fever

  9. Intracranial Pressure Response to Non-Penetrating Ballistic Impact: An Experimental Study Using a Pig Physical Head Model and Live Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai; Kang, Jianyi; Chen, Jing; Li, Guanhua; Li, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the intracranial pressure response to non-penetrating ballistic impact using a "scalp-skull-brain" pig physical head model and live pigs. Forty-eight ballistic tests targeting the physical head model and anesthetized pigs protected by aramid plates were conducted with standard 9 mm bullets at low (279-297 m/s), moderate (350-372 m/s), and high (409-436 m/s) velocities. Intracranial pressure responses were recorded with pressure sensors embedded in similar brain locations in the physical head model and the anesthetized pigs. Three parameters of intracranial pressure were determined from the measured data: intracranial maximum pressure (Pmax), intracranial maximum pressure impulse (PImax), and the duration of the first positive phase (PPD). The intracranial pressure waves exhibited blast-like characteristics for both the physical model and l live pigs. Of all three parameters, Pmax is most sensitive to impact velocity, with means of 126 kPa (219 kPa), 178 kPa (474 kPa), and 241 kPa (751 kPa) for the physical model (live pigs) for low, moderate, and high impact velocities, respectively. The mean PPD becomes increasingly short as the impact velocity increases, whereas PImax shows the opposite trend. Although the pressure parameters of the physical model were much lower than those of the live pigs, good correlations between the physical model and the live pigs for the three pressure parameters, especially Pmax, were found using linear regression. This investigation suggests that Pmax is a preferred parameter for predicting the severity of the brain injury resulting from behind armor blunt trauma (BABT). PMID:23055817

  10. Intracranial pressure response to non-penetrating ballistic impact: an experimental study using a pig physical head model and live pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Kang, Jianyi; Chen, Jing; Li, Guanhua; Li, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the intracranial pressure response to non-penetrating ballistic impact using a "scalp-skull-brain" pig physical head model and live pigs. Forty-eight ballistic tests targeting the physical head model and anesthetized pigs protected by aramid plates were conducted with standard 9 mm bullets at low (279-297 m/s), moderate (350-372 m/s), and high (409-436 m/s) velocities. Intracranial pressure responses were recorded with pressure sensors embedded in similar brain locations in the physical head model and the anesthetized pigs. Three parameters of intracranial pressure were determined from the measured data: intracranial maximum pressure (P(max)), intracranial maximum pressure impulse (PI(max)), and the duration of the first positive phase (PPD). The intracranial pressure waves exhibited blast-like characteristics for both the physical model and l live pigs. Of all three parameters, P(max) is most sensitive to impact velocity, with means of 126 kPa (219 kPa), 178 kPa (474 kPa), and 241 kPa (751 kPa) for the physical model (live pigs) for low, moderate, and high impact velocities, respectively. The mean PPD becomes increasingly short as the impact velocity increases, whereas PI(max) shows the opposite trend. Althoug