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Sample records for pigs orally inoculated

  1. Comparison of sesion severity, distribution, and colonic mucin expression in pigs with acute swine dysentery following oral inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" or Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Wilberts, B L; Arruda, P H; Kinyon, J M; Madson, D M; Frana, T S; Burrough, E R

    2014-11-01

    Swine dysentery is classically associated with infection by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the only current officially recognized Brachyspira sp. that consistently imparts strong beta-hemolysis on blood agar. Recently, several strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira have been isolated from swine with clinical dysentery that are not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by PCR including the recently proposed species "Brachyspira hampsonii." In this study, 6-week-old pigs were inoculated with either a clinical isolate of "B. hampsonii" (EB107; n = 10) clade II or a classic strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204; n = 10) to compare gross and microscopic lesions and alterations in colonic mucin expression in pigs with clinical disease versus controls (n = 6). Gross lesions were similar between infected groups. No histologic difference was observed between infected groups with regard to neutrophilic inflammation, colonic crypt depth, mucosal ulceration, or hemorrhage. Histochemical and immunohistochemical evaluation of the apex of the spiral colon revealed decreased expression of sulphated mucins, decreased expression of MUC4, and increased expression of MUC5AC in diseased pigs compared to controls. No difference was observed between diseased pigs in inoculated groups. This study reveals significant alterations in colonic mucin expression in pigs with acute swine dysentery and further reveals that these and other microscopic changes are similar following infection with "B. hampsonii" clade II or B. hyodysenteriae.

  2. Postmortem photonic imaging of lux-modified Salmonella typhimurium within the gastrointestinal tract of swine following oral inoculation in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract following oral inoculation. Pigs (~ 80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1×10*10 colony forming units (cfu) of Salmonella typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lu...

  3. Postmortem Photonic Imaging of Lux-Modified Salmonella Typhimuium Within the Gastrointestinal Tract of Swine Following Oral Inoculation In Vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract after oral inoculation. Pigs (~80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1 x 1010 cfu of Salmonella Typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lux for a 6-h (n = 6) or 12-h...

  4. Thymic necrosis following oral inoculation of mouse thymic virus.

    PubMed

    Morse, S S

    1989-11-01

    Mouse thymic virus (MTLV;ICTV designation murid herpesvirus 3) infects developing T lymphocytes of neonatal mice, causing thymic necrosis and acute immunosuppression. Infected animals shed virus indefinitely. However, although transmission in nature is presumably by contact and is likely to involve the oral-nasal route, virtually all experimental studies with MTLV have used systemic (intraperitoneal) inoculation. In order to determine whether systemic inoculation causes artifacts in pathogenesis of the infection, effects of intraperitoneal and oral-nasal inoculation were compared in newborn mice. Thymic necrosis occurred with either route of inoculation, although rate of infection was lower with oral inoculation, varying from about 20% to 67%. There were no gross differences in pathogenesis. Orally infected animals seroconverted and shed virus. These data indicate that the apparent lymphotropism of thymic virus, and induction of thymic necrosis, are not dependent on route of inoculation.

  5. Antibody-secreting cell responses to rotavirus proteins in gnotobiotic pigs inoculated with attenuated or virulent human rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Chang, K O; Vandal, O H; Yuan, L; Hodgins, D C; Saif, L J

    2001-08-01

    Because of their similarities to infants in mucosal immune responses and their susceptibility to human rotavirus (HRV) diarrhea, gnotobiotic pigs provide a useful model for rotaviral disease. In this study, we performed quantitative enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays to measure local and systemic isotype-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC) responses to individual structural (VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP3 and NSP4) proteins of Wa HRV. The Spodoptera frugiperda cells expressing each recombinant baculovirus HRV protein were formalin fixed and used as antigen for ELISPOT assays. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs were orally inoculated once with virulent Wa (WaV) or three times with attenuated Wa (WaA) HRV or mock inoculated (Mock) and then were challenged with virulent Wa (WaV/PC) 28 days after the first inoculation. The ASCs from intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of pigs from each group were quantitated by ELISPOT assay at the day of challenge, at postinoculation day 28 (WaV, WaA, and Mock) or at postchallenge day (PCD) 7 (WaV+WaV/PC, WaA+WaV/PC, and Mock+WaV/PC). In all virus-inoculated pigs, regardless of the inoculum, lymphoid tissue, or isotype, VP6 induced the highest numbers of ASCs, followed by VP4; ASCs specific for VP7, NSP3, and NSP4 were less numerous. At challenge, total HRV- and HRV protein-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG ASCs in intestinal lymphoid tissues were significantly greater in WaV- than in WaA-inoculated pigs, and WaV pigs were fully protected against diarrhea postchallenge, whereas the WaA pigs were partially protected. At PCD 7, there were no significant differences in ASC numbers for any HRV proteins between the WaV+WaV/PC and WaA+WaV/PC groups.

  6. Dynamics of African swine fever virus shedding and excretion in domestic pigs infected by intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Reis, Ana Luisa; Netherton, Christopher L; Goatley, Lynnette; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2014-09-26

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly virulent swine pathogen that has spread across Eastern Europe since 2007 and for which there is no effective vaccine or treatment available. The dynamics of shedding and excretion is not well known for this currently circulating ASFV strain. Therefore, susceptible pigs were exposed to pigs intramuscularly infected with the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain to measure those dynamics through within- and between-pen transmission scenarios. Blood, oral, nasal and rectal fluid samples were tested for the presence of ASFV by virus titration (VT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum was tested for the presence of ASFV-specific antibodies. Both intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission resulted in development of acute disease in all pigs although the experiments indicated that the pathogenesis of the disease might be different, depending on the route of infection. Infectious ASFV was first isolated in blood among the inoculated pigs by day 3, and then chronologically among the direct and indirect contact pigs, by day 10 and 13, respectively. Close to the onset of clinical signs, higher ASFV titres were found in blood compared with nasal and rectal fluid samples among all pigs. No infectious ASFV was isolated in oral fluid samples although ASFV genome copies were detected. Only one animal developed antibodies starting after 12 days post-inoculation. The results provide quantitative data on shedding and excretion of the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain among domestic pigs and suggest a limited potential of this isolate to cause persistent infection.

  7. Induction of mycoplasmal pneumonia in experimentally infected pigs by means of different inoculation routes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, Beatriz; Segalés, Joaquim; López-Soria, Sergio; de Rozas, Ana Pérez; Maiti, Henrike; Coll, Teresa; Sibila, Marina

    2016-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of three different inoculation routes into mycoplasmal pneumonia (MP) in pigs challenged with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae). Thirty six-week-old M. hyopneumoniae seronegative piglets were randomly assigned to four groups: three challenged groups with experimentally inoculated pigs by either the endotracheal (ET; n = 8), intranasal (IN; n = 8) or aerosol (AE; n = 8) routes and one uninfected group (Control; n = 6). Blood samples were collected 1 day before challenge and at necropsy, 28 days post-inoculation (dpi), to assess seroconversion. Laryngeal swabs were collected at -1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 dpi in order to evaluate colonization. At necropsy, lung lesions were scored and lung tissue was collected for histopathological studies and M. hyopneumoniae DNA detection. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also obtained to detect M. hyopneumoniae DNA, specific IgA antibodies and cytokines. MP was observed in all inoculated groups, but the ET group displayed a significantly higher number of animals affected by MP as well as a higher mean lung lesion score. These results were paralleled with an earlier seroconversion and upper respiratory tract colonization of M. hyopneumoniae. Additionally, in the ET group, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and specific IgA antibodies in BALF were found. Under the conditions of the present study, MP was reproduced by the three evaluated inoculation routes. Obtained results suggest that the ET route is the most effective in order to induce MP in pigs experimentally challenged with M. hyopneumoniae.

  8. Anthelmintic effects of phytogenic feed additives in Ascaris suum inoculated pigs.

    PubMed

    van Krimpen, M M; Binnendijk, G P; Borgsteede, F H M; Gaasenbeek, C P H

    2010-03-25

    Two experiments were performed to determine the anthelmintic effect of some phytogenic feed additives on a mild infection of Ascaris suum in growing and finishing pigs. Usually, an infection of A. suum is controlled by using conventional synthetic drugs. Organic farmers, however, prefer a non-pharmaceutical approach to worm control. Therefore, phytotherapy could be an appropriate alternative. In the first experiment, a commercial available organic starter diet was supplemented with 3% of a herb mixture, adding 1% Thymus vulgaris, 1% Melissa officinalis and 1% Echinacea purpurea to the diet, or with 4% of a herb mixture, thereby adding the mentioned herbs plus 1% Camellia sinensis (black tea). A negative control group (no treatment) and a positive control group (treatment with conventional synthetic drug flubendazole) were included. In the second experiment, the anthelmintic properties against A. suum of three individual herbs, Carica papaya, Peumus boldus and Artemisia vulgaris, each in a dose of 1%, were tested. Pigs were infected with 1000 infective worm eggs each. Each experiment was performed with 32 individually housed growing pigs (8 replicates/treatment), which were monitored for 67 days. It was hypothesized that the herbs would block the cycles of the larvae, thereby preventing the development of adult worms. Therefore, phytogenic feed additives were not supplied during the whole experimental period, but only from the start until D39. Pigs were inoculated with infective worm eggs during five consecutive days (D17-D21). At D67 all pigs were dissected, whereafter livers were checked for the presence of white spots. Also numbers of worms in the small intestine were counted. In experiment 1, the numbers of worm-infected pigs were similar for both the herb supplemented (groups 3 and 4) and the unsupplemented (group 1) treatments (5-6 pigs of 8), while the treatment with flubendazole (group 2) resulted in 0 infected pigs. In experiment 2, herb addition (groups 2

  9. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  14. Pathogenesis of highly virulent African swine fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Howey, Erin B; O'Donnell, Vivian; de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Borca, Manuel V; Arzt, Jonathan

    2013-12-26

    To investigate the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV), domestic pigs (n=18) were challenged with a range (10(2)-10(6) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50)) of the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain by inoculation via the intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), or intramuscular (IM) routes. A subsequent contact challenge experiment was performed in which six IOP-inoculated donor pigs were allowed to have direct contact (DC) with six naïve pigs for exposure times that varied from 24 to 72 h. All challenge routes resulted in clinical progression and postmortem lesions similar to those previously described in experimental and natural infection. The onset of clinical signs occurred between 1 and 7 days post inoculation (dpi) and included pyrexia with variable progression to obtundation, hematochezia, melena, moribundity and death with a duration of 4-11 days. Viremia was first detected between 4 and 5 dpi in all inoculation groups whereas ASFV shedding from the nasal cavity and tonsil was first detected at 3-9 dpi. IM and DC were the most consistent modes of infection, with 12/12 (100%) of pigs challenged by these routes becoming infected. Several clinical and virological parameters were significantly different between IM and DC groups indicating dissimilarity between these modes of infection. Amongst the simulated natural routes, INP inoculation resulted in the most consistent progression of disease across the widest range of doses whilst preserving simulation of natural exposure and therefore may provide a superior system for pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy investigation.

  15. Infection dynamics of foot-and-mouth disease virus in pigs using two novel simulated natural inoculation methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to characterize foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) dynamics in pigs, two simulated-natural inoculation systems were developed and evaluated using two different strains of FMDV (O1-Manisa and A24-Cruzeiro) at varying doses. Direct intra-oropharyngeal (IOP) and intra-nasopharyngeal (INP) in...

  16. Inoculation with nitrogen turnover bacterial agent appropriately increasing nitrogen and promoting maturity in pig manure composting.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jishao; Liu, Xueling; Huang, Yimei; Huang, Hua

    2015-05-01

    The nitrogen turnover bacterial (NTB) agent, which is closely related to nitrogen turnover, was comprised of a bacterial consortium of ammonifiers, nitrobacteria and Azotobacter in this study. The three constituents of the bacterial consortium were added to pig manure and wheat straw mixtures in different doses and at different times, and subsequently composted to investigate their effects on nitrogen transformation and maturity. Throughout the period, the total N loss was 35-56%, 10.7-22.7% of which consisted of NH3, and 18-35% of the initial organic carbon was degraded. Adding the NTB agent prolonged the thermophilic stage by one to six days compared to the control. The lowest N loss (35%), the highest degradation rate of organic carbon (35%) and the greatest increase in total nitrogen content (36.1%) occurred in the inoculation with 1% NTB agent at the beginning of composting. However, adding 1% NTB agent after the thermophilic stage and 3% NTB agent at the beginning of composting had no positive effect with respect to retaining nitrogen or accelerating the maturation process. Therefore, the inoculation with 1% NTB agent at the beginning of composting was effective for reducing N loss and promoting maturity.

  17. Inoculation of barrier-born pigs with Helicobacter pylori: a useful animal model for gastritis type B.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, L; Gustavsson, S; Jörgensen, A; Schwan, A; Scheynius, A

    1990-06-01

    At the age of 8 weeks, 15 barrier-born pigs, specific pathogen free, were inoculated intragastrically with suspensions of 10(7) to 10(10) CFU of Helicobacter pylori after pretreatment with omeprazole. The pigs were observed for up to 12 weeks, endoscopic biopsy specimens were taken, and serum samples were drawn. H. pylori was identified by routine culturing and by staining with an H. pylori-specific monoclonal antibody on cryostat sections of gastric biopsy specimens. In 11 of 15 inoculated pigs, H. pylori was detected throughout the observation period. In these infected pigs, there was an antibody response to H. pylori, as determined in serum by an enzyme immunoassay. Furthermore, the development of superficial, focal gastritis with infiltrates of mononuclear class II antigen-expressing lymphocytes was observed immunohistologically. H. pylori was never detected and an antibody response to H. pylori was not observed in two control pigs. The development of gastritis and the systemic antibody response to H. pylori support the usefulness of this animal model for studies of H. pylori-related human diseases.

  18. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y K; Lipatov, A S; Swayne, D E

    2009-01-01

    The H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus infections. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally or intragastrically with A/Vietnam/1203/04 (VN/04) or A/Muscovy duck/Vietnam/209/05 (MDk/VN/05) viruses. Mild listlessness was seen at 2 and 3 days postinoculation (DPI) in guinea pigs inoculated intranasally with VN/04 virus. At 5 DPI, the guinea pigs had bronchointerstitial pneumonia and virus was identified in bronchiolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages. Virus was isolated from the lungs but was lacking from other organs. Minimal lung lesions were seen in intranasal MDk/VN/06 group and virus was not detected, but serologic evidence of infection was observed. Intragastric exposure failed to produce infection or lesions with either virus. The localized respiratory disease in guinea pigs with H5N1 viruses was very similar to that of H3N2 and H1N1 influenza in humans and was less severe than reported for H5N1 human cases.

  19. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Loic

    2016-09-01

    Acquired dental disease represents the most common oral disorder of guinea pigs. Most patients are presented with nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms, such as weight loss, reduced food intake, difficulty chewing and/or swallowing. The physical examination must be followed by standard radiography and/or computed tomography, and thorough inspection under general anesthesia. Several complications may follow, including periodontal disease, subluxation of the temporomandibular joint, periapical infection, and abscessation. The dental treatment is aimed to restore the proper length and shape of both the incisor and cheek teeth, associated with medical and supportive treatment. Abscesses should be surgically addressed by complete excision. PMID:27497208

  20. Experimental inoculation of foals and pigs with an enterotoxigenic E. coli isolated from a foal.

    PubMed

    Holland, R E; Grimes, S D; Walker, R D; Wilson, R A

    1996-10-01

    Hemolytic E. coli strain 807-13, O149:NM:K88(STb+, LT+), was isolated from the feces of a neonatal diarrheic foal. E. coli 807-13 was examined for adhesion to brush border membranes (BBM) from foals, adult horses and pigs, and its pathogenicity was assessed in neonatal foals and pigs. E. coli 807-13 did not adhere to equine BBM but adhered to pig BBM. It did not cause diarrhea nor did it colonize the intestinal epithelium of 3 colostrum-deprived and 3 suckled foals challenged at 24 h of age. Acute ulcerative gastritis and acute suppurative gastritis were observed in 2 colostrum-deprived challenged foals, and acute neutrophilic enteritis was observed in 1 colostrum-deprived and in 1 suckled challenged foal. No similar histopathologic lesions were detected in the control foals. Both gnotobiotic and suckled pigs developed diarrhea after challenge exposure to E. coli 807-13 and the intestinal epithelium of the pigs was colonized. Histopathologic evidence of gastritis and enteritis among the foals indicated some complicity of E. coli 807-13 in foal enteric disease.

  1. Chlamydial salpingitis in female guinea pigs receiving oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Barron, A L; Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; White, H J; Mrak, R E

    1988-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were given daily doses of a combination of oral contraceptive (OC) agents, consisting of mestranol and norethynodrel suspended in sesame oil or distilled H2O, and were infected in the genital tract with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Counts of chlamydial inclusions in cells of vaginal smears collected during infection, showed prolongation and enhancement of infection in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. Appearance of IgG and IgA antibodies to GPIC in genital secretions, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was also delayed in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. OC-treated infected animals were killed on days 15 and 43, and gross pathological evidence for ascending infection culminating in salpingitis was found in all of five and four of five animals, respectively. On the other hand, among untreated infected controls on each sacrifice day, only one of five animals had any evidence for ascending infection. Chlamydiae were detected by light and electron microscopy in fallopian tube tissue collected on day 15 following OC-treatment but not in tissue from control animals.

  2. Survival patterns in white-tailed and mule deer after oral inoculation with a standardized, conspecific prion dose.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael W; Wolfe, Lisa L; Sirochman, Tracey M; Sirochman, Michael A; Jewell, Jean E; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2012-04-01

    We orally inoculated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) with a standardized, conspecific prion dose and collected biologic samples throughout the disease course. Mule deer (PRNP genotype 225SS) and PRNP genotype 96GG white-tailed deer succumbed along similar trajectories, but 96GS- and 96SS-genotype individuals tended to survive longer.

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of oral lactobacillus preparation for antibiotic-associated enteritis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wasson, K; Criley, J M; Clabaugh, M B; Koch, M A; Peper, R L

    2000-01-01

    Enteritis is a potential complication of antimicrobial agent use, particularly in certain species of rodents. The organism most frequently implicated in this disease is Clostridium difficile. Anecdotal information suggests that administration of yogurt or other Lactobacillus-containing products in conjunction with antimicrobial agents will prevent or minimize the effects of antibiotic-associated enteritis. We wanted to determine whether a single subcutaneous injection of clindamycin phosphate could induce enteritis in guinea pigs and whether a commercial Lactobacillus preparation would ameliorate the clinical effects of antibiotic administration in these animals. Juvenile male guinea pigs were divided into three treatment groups. Group 1 guinea pigs (n=8) received a single saline injection followed by an oral Lactobacillus preparation twice daily; group 2 (n=8) received a single antibiotic injection followed by an oral Lactobacillus preparation twice daily; group 3 (n=8) received a single antibiotic injection. Attitude, body temperature, body weight, and feed and water consumption were recorded for each guinea pig 7 days prior to and after treatment. Fecal samples were collected and necropsies performed on each guinea pig at the time of euthanasia. C. difficile and other enteric pathogens were not isolated from any group before or after treatment, although some guinea pigs receiving the antibiotic developed enteritis. There were no significant clinical differences between guinea pigs receiving antibiotics with the oral Lactobacillus preparation, and those receiving antibiotics alone. The results of this study suggest that a single injection of clindamycin phosphate can induce enteritis in guinea pigs and that oral administration of a Lactobacillus-containing product is ineffective in preventing clinical disease in guinea pigs administered clindamycin phosphate.

  4. An oral Aujeszky's disease vaccine (YS-400) induces neutralizing antibody in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aujeszky's disease (AD) is an economically important disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs of the species Sus scrofa. A previous study yielded serological evidence of AD in Korean wild boars, which could spread AD to other animals. A new Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) bait vaccine is required to prevent AD outbreaks in swine. In the present study, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a gE-deleted marker vaccine, strain YS-400, in young domestic pigs. Materials and Methods The YS-400 strain was propagated in Vero cells, and the trial ADV bait vaccine (a vaccine blister in a matrix including an attractant) was prepared. Pigs were orally immunized with the vaccine (2 mL, 107.5 TCID50/mL) delivered using a syringe or in the bait vaccine. The animals were observed for 9 weeks after vaccination, and immunogenicity was assessed using a virus neutralization (VN) test and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results The YS-400 strain was non-pathogenic to pigs when given orally and induced high VN titers (1:32-1:128) 6 weeks post-administration. Of the pigs given the ADV bait vaccine twice or three times, 40% were seropositive by 2 weeks, and 100% were seropositive by 7 weeks after the first dose. Pigs that consumed the AD bait vaccine three times developed VN titers that were slightly higher than those of pigs given the vaccine twice. Conclusion Domestic pigs given the trial ADV bait vaccine exhibited no adverse effects and developed high VN titers against ADV, indicating that the YS-400 strain is safe and can prevent ADV infection in domestic pigs. PMID:27489803

  5. Utility of Oral Swab Sampling for Ebola Virus Detection in Guinea Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Bird, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of oral swabs for diagnosing infection with Ebola virus, we used a guinea pig model and obtained daily antemortem and postmortem swab samples. According to quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis, the diagnostic value was poor for antemortem swab samples but excellent for postmortem samples.

  6. Utility of Oral Swab Sampling for Ebola Virus Detection in Guinea Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Jessica R; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D; Martin, Brock E; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Bird, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of oral swabs for diagnosing infection with Ebola virus, we used a guinea pig model and obtained daily antemortem and postmortem swab samples. According to quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis, the diagnostic value was poor for antemortem swab samples but excellent for postmortem samples. PMID:26401603

  7. An appropriate ingestion volume of oral sulfa drug suspension in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kokue, E; Shimoda, M; Suzuki, R

    1989-06-01

    The influence of ingested volume of a sulfa drug suspension, sodium sulfamonomethoxine (SMMNa), on the oral pharmacokinetics was studied in pigs, with regard to bioavailability and gastric emptying. Eighteen pigs, weighing 30-70 kg, were used. Phenol red solution was used for the evaluation of gastric emptying study. SMMNa suspension was used for pharmacokinetic study. Both of these fluids were administered by natural swallowing. Three experimental groups were constructed: G-I; 5 ml/kg of the test fluids to starved animals, G-II; 5 ml/kg of the test fluids to fed animals and G-III; 20 ml/kg of the fluids to fed animals. The glucose glycine electrolyte solution (GGES) was used as the vehicle for both the compounds. Six pigs, having duodenal cannula, were used for the study of gastric emptying. The gastric emptying rate was rapid in G-I, relatively rapid in G-III, and slow and variable in G-II. In agreement with the result of gastric emptying study, the values of Cmax and tmax were high and rapid in G-I, relatively high and rapid in G-III, and low and slow in G-II. Accordingly, the voluminous ingestion of drug suspension can facilitate the gastric emptying, in turn may make the oral absorption of the drug rapid-and-uniform. The 20 ml/kg volume of sulfa drug suspension may practically be recommended for the oral administration in pigs.

  8. Oral and aerosol immunization with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bacteria: antibody response to capsular polysaccharides in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and sera of pigs.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Pabst, R; Bunka, S; Petzoldt, K

    1994-04-01

    To investigate the antibody response after local application of lung-pathogenic bacteria, pigs were immunized with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by the oral and aerogenous route. After 3 weeks class-specific immunoglobulins against purified A. pleuropneumoniae capsular polysaccharides (CP) were determined in serum and BALF by ELISA. A significant increase of IgA antibodies was found in BALF but not in sera of all immunized pigs. Oral immunization with viable A. pleuropneumoniae and aerosol immunization with either viable or inactivated bacteria resulted in a significant increase of IgG antibodies to the CP antigen in BALF, whereas only aerosol exposure to viable bacteria resulted in a significant increase in IgG antibodies in serum. A significant increase in anti-CP IgM in BALF was observed after aerosol exposure but not after oral immunization. IgM antibodies towards CP increased significantly by both routes of immunization with viable bacteria. The anti-CP activity of all three isotypes in sera and BALF was low in all groups compared with the positive controls, although inoculation of viable A. pleuropneumoniae led to higher levels of antibody concentration than inactivated bacteria. Our results indicate a traffic of primed lymphocytes from the gut into the bronchoalveolar airways and further support the hypothesis that polysaccharide-specific B cells may functionally mature at the mucosal surfaces.

  9. Experimental infection of calves, sheep, goats and pigs with HoBi-like viruses by direct inoculation or exposure to persistently infected calves.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, F V; Falkenberg, S M; Decaro, N; Flores, E F; Ridpath, J F

    2015-12-31

    HoBi-like viruses are an emerging species of pestiviruses associated with respiratory and reproductive disease in cattle and in water buffaloes. Although cattle appear to be the main natural hosts, little is know about the potential for HoBi-like viruses to be transmitted to other livestock. In this study, seronegative calves, goats and pigs, and sheep harboring pestivirus antibodies (probably due to previous exposure to BVDV) were exposed to HoBi-like viruses either by direct inoculation (GIn) or by contact with calves persistently infected with HoBi-like viruses (GEx). Both GIn and GEx groups were monitored for clinical signs, lymphocyte count, virus in buffy coats and nasal swabs up to day 18 post-inoculation (pi). Evidence of transmission of HoBi-like virus by PI calves was observed in all studied species. No difference in clinical presentation was observed between animals in the GIn or GEx groups. Evidence of infection, depending on the species included lymphocyte depletion, fever, viral RNA detection, and/or seroconversion. Depletion of lymphocytes was observed in calves and goats (35% and 50%, respectively) but not in pigs. Seroconversion was observed in at least one animal of each group and for all exposed species. The rate of seroconversion was higher in animals in the GIn experimental groups. In sheep, pre-existing moderate to high neutralizing titers against BVDV did not prevent viral replication and shed. The study demonstrated that naive cattle, goats and pigs, in addition to antibody positive sheep, can be infected by HoBi-like virus via persistently infected calf and potentially transmit the virus. PMID:26525738

  10. Experimental infection of calves, sheep, goats and pigs with HoBi-like viruses by direct inoculation or exposure to persistently infected calves.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, F V; Falkenberg, S M; Decaro, N; Flores, E F; Ridpath, J F

    2015-12-31

    HoBi-like viruses are an emerging species of pestiviruses associated with respiratory and reproductive disease in cattle and in water buffaloes. Although cattle appear to be the main natural hosts, little is know about the potential for HoBi-like viruses to be transmitted to other livestock. In this study, seronegative calves, goats and pigs, and sheep harboring pestivirus antibodies (probably due to previous exposure to BVDV) were exposed to HoBi-like viruses either by direct inoculation (GIn) or by contact with calves persistently infected with HoBi-like viruses (GEx). Both GIn and GEx groups were monitored for clinical signs, lymphocyte count, virus in buffy coats and nasal swabs up to day 18 post-inoculation (pi). Evidence of transmission of HoBi-like virus by PI calves was observed in all studied species. No difference in clinical presentation was observed between animals in the GIn or GEx groups. Evidence of infection, depending on the species included lymphocyte depletion, fever, viral RNA detection, and/or seroconversion. Depletion of lymphocytes was observed in calves and goats (35% and 50%, respectively) but not in pigs. Seroconversion was observed in at least one animal of each group and for all exposed species. The rate of seroconversion was higher in animals in the GIn experimental groups. In sheep, pre-existing moderate to high neutralizing titers against BVDV did not prevent viral replication and shed. The study demonstrated that naive cattle, goats and pigs, in addition to antibody positive sheep, can be infected by HoBi-like virus via persistently infected calf and potentially transmit the virus.

  11. Experimental infection of conventional pigs with a 'Brachyspira hampsonii' isolate recovered from a migrating waterfowl in Spain.

    PubMed

    Aller-Morán, Luis Miguel; Martínez-Lobo, Francisco Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Carvajal, Ana

    2016-08-01

    'Brachyspira hampsonii' is a recently proposed new species within the Brachyspira genus, which produces a dysentery-like disease in pigs. This study aims at investigating whether a 'B. hampsonii' isolate recovered from a migrating waterfowl was capable of colonizing pig intestines, inducing clinical signs of dysentery and being transmitted among pigs. Eleven 7-week-old pigs were randomly assigned into two separate groups which were orally administered an avian isolate of 'B. hampsonii' (inoculated group, n = 5) or BHI broth (control group, n = 6). After inoculation, three pigs from the control group were placed in the inoculated pen and served as sentinel pigs. Our results show the capacity of this avian 'B. hampsonii' isolate to colonize the large intestine of pigs and to be transmitted among pigs. According to this, migrating birds could play a role in the epidemiology of 'B. hampsonii' as a possible source of infection in swine populations. PMID:27387719

  12. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  13. Oral inoculation of young dairy calves with Mycoplasma bovis results in colonization of tonsils, development of otitis media and local immunity.

    PubMed

    Maunsell, Fiona; Brown, Mary B; Powe, Joshua; Ivey, James; Woolard, Matthew; Love, Wees; Simecka, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear.

  14. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping; Birck, Malene M; Pan, Xiaoyu; Kamal, Shamrulazhar B S; Pors, Susanne E; Gammelgaard, Pernille L; Nielsen, Dennis S; Thymann, Thomas; Levy, Ofer; Frøkiær, Hanne; Sangild, Per T

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm neutrophil and monocyte TLR2 expression and TLR2-mediated blood cytokine responses were low relative to adults. ORA pigs showed enhanced blood neutrophil maturation with reduced cell size and CD172a expression. Only ORA pigs, but not SYS pigs, were protected from a high density of gut Gram-positive bacteria, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.

  15. Oral Fluids as a Live-Animal Sample Source for Evaluating Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protection following Intranasal Influenza A Virus Vaccination in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Holly R; Vincent, Amy L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Gauger, Phillip C; Pena, Lindomar; Santos, Jefferson; Braucher, Douglas R; Perez, Daniel R; Loving, Crystal L

    2015-10-01

    In North American swine, there are numerous antigenically distinct H1 influenza A virus (IAV) variants currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Experimentally, live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines demonstrate increased cross-protection compared to inactivated vaccines. However, there is no standardized assay to predict cross-protection following LAIV vaccination. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody in serum is the gold standard correlate of protection following IAV vaccination. LAIV vaccination does not induce a robust serum HI antibody titer; however, a local mucosal antibody response is elicited. Thus, a live-animal sample source that could be used to evaluate LAIV immunogenicity and cross-protection is needed. Here, we evaluated the use of oral fluids (OF) and nasal wash (NW) collected after IAV inoculation as a live-animal sample source in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to predict cross-protection in comparison to traditional serology. Both live-virus exposure and LAIV vaccination provided heterologous protection, though protection was greatest against more closely phylogenetically related viruses. IAV-specific IgA was detected in NW and OF samples and was cross-reactive to representative IAV from each H1 cluster. Endpoint titers of cross-reactive IgA in OF from pigs exposed to live virus was associated with heterologous protection. While LAIV vaccination provided significant protection, LAIV immunogenicity was reduced compared to live-virus exposure. These data suggest that OF from pigs inoculated with wild-type IAV, with surface genes that match the LAIV seed strain, could be used in an ELISA to assess cross-protection and the antigenic relatedness of circulating and emerging IAV in swine.

  16. Oral inoculation of probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM suppresses tumour growth both in segmental orthotopic colon cancer and extra-intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Kong, Man-Shan; Shi, Hai Ning; Walker, W Allan; Lin, Chun-Yen; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lin, Yung-Chang; Jung, Shih-Ming; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2012-06-01

    Modulation of the cellular response by the administration of probiotic bacteria may be an effective strategy for preventing or inhibiting tumour growth. We orally pre-inoculated mice with probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (La) for 14 d. Subcutaneous dorsal-flank tumours and segmental orthotopic colon cancers were implanted into mice using CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinoma cells. On day 28 after tumour initiation, the lamina propria of the colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were harvested and purified for flow cytometry and mRNA analyses. We demonstrated that La pre-inoculation reduced tumour volume growth by 50·3 %, compared with untreated mice at 28 d after tumour implants (2465·5 (SEM 1290·4) v. 4950·9 (SEM 1689·3) mm³, P<0·001). Inoculation with La reduced the severity of colonic carcinogenesis caused by CT-26 cells, such as level of colonic involvement and structural abnormality of epithelial/crypt damage. Moreover, La enhanced apoptosis of CT-26 cells both in dorsal-flank tumour and segmental orthotopic colon cancer, and the mean counts of apoptotic body were higher in mice pre-inoculated with La (P<0·05) compared with untreated mice. La pre-inoculation down-regulated the CXCR4 mRNA expressions in the colon, MLN and extra-intestinal tissue, compared with untreated mice (P<0·05). In addition, La pre-inoculation reduced the mean fluorescence index of MHC class I (H-2Dd, -Kd and -Ld) in flow cytometry analysis. Taken together, these findings suggest that probiotics La may play a role in attenuating tumour growth during CT-26 cell carcinogenesis. The down-regulated expression of CXCR4 mRNA and MHC class I, as well as increasing apoptosis in tumour tissue, indicated that La may be associated with modulating the cellular response triggered by colon carcinogenesis. PMID:21992995

  17. Microbiological and sensory effects of the combined application of hot-cold organic acid sprays and steam condensation at subatmospheric pressure for decontamination of inoculated pig tissue surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Frans J M; Wellm, Gabriele; Hiesberger, Johann; Rohrbacher, Irene; Bauer, Alexandra; Paulsen, Peter

    2011-08-01

    We studied microbiological and sensory effects of treating pig tissue for 15 s with 55 and 10°C sprays of acetic acid (AA; 0.15 to 0.3 M) and lactic acid (LA; 0.1 to 0.2 M) solutions prior to the tissue being subjected to steam condensation (18 s at 65°C or 10 s at 75°C). LA or AA spraying and then steam treatment resulted in 3- to 4-log average reductions of Pseudomonas fragi and Yersinia enterocolitica inocula (6 to 7 log CFU/cm(2)), regardless of acid temperature or concentration. Buffered LA or 1:1 mixtures of AA:LA and then steam treatment yielded similar reductions. Most of the acid-steam-treated samples had microbial counts below the limit of detection (2 log CFU/cm(2)); thus, the results likely underestimate the potential of this procedure. When the period between inoculation and acid-steam treatment was extended from 0.5 to 24 h, up to a 1-log-higher microbial reduction was observed, due to a 1- to 2-log-greater initial contamination. Increasing the LA contact time to 6 min increased the microbial reduction by 0.8 log. Acid-steam treatment effected lower L* values (darker color) on pigskin, but higher L* values on muscle and fat tissue (paler color). Many muscle samples exhibited lower a* values and off-color brown hues. Off-odors were observed immediately after treatment, but with the exception of fat tissue and AA-treated samples, they largely disappeared during further storage. Off-flavors were only detected in AA-treated muscle samples.

  18. Residual veterinary antibiotics in pig excreta after oral administration of sulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinrong; Zhao, Tao; Liu, Qingyun; He, Jinhua; He, Dechun; Wu, Genyi; Li, Yongtao; Jiang, Chengai; Xu, Zhencheng

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamides (SAs) are applied widely as feed additives in the farming of livestock and poultry. It can lead to the excretion of large amounts of SAs in manure and result in persistent environmental pollution. We evaluated the fate of four SAs, sulfamerazine (SM1), sulfachloropyridazine (SCP), sulfadimoxine (SDM') and sulfaquinoxaline (SQ), from oral administration to excretion in urine and feces in pigs. The four SAs were added to homemade feed to make them reach the required concentration gradient, which were 0, 50 and 100 mg/kg (low, normal and high concentrations, respectively). In different treatments, excretions of the four SAs were 35.68-86.88 %. With regard to total excretion, the order was SQ > SCP > SM1 > SDM' for all treatments. The concentration of SAs in the feed had significant effects on the amount of the four SAs excreted every day. The concentration of SAs in feces and in the urine for different treatments was 15.03-26.55 and 14.54-69.22 %, respectively. In each treatment, excretions of SCP, SDM' and SQ in feces were lower than that in urine. The four SAs remained longer in urine than in feces. Excretions in urine and feces were lower if SAs were administered orally rather than by injection. PMID:26164467

  19. Poliomyelitis in transgenic mice expressing CD155 under the control of the Tage4 promoter after oral and parenteral poliovirus inoculation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaukat; Toyoda, Hidemi; Linehan, Melissa; Iwasaki, Akiko; Nomoto, Akio; Bernhardt, Günter; Cello, Jeronimo; Wimmer, Eckard

    2014-08-01

    An important step in poliovirus (PV) infection by the oral route in humans is replication of the virus in lymphatic tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, thought to be mainly in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. No immunocompetent transgenic (tg) mice that express human PV receptor (CD155) under the control of different promoters can be infected orally. The mouse orthologue of human CD155 is Tage4, a protein expressed at the surface of enterocytes and in the Peyer's patches. We describe here the generation of a tg mouse model in which the Tage4 promoter was used to drive expression of the human PV receptor-coding region (Tage4-CD155tg mice). In this model, CD155 expression was observed by immunostaining in different regions in the Peyer's patches but not in their germinal centres. Although a similar pattern of staining was observed between 3- and 6-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice, poliomyelitis was only seen in the younger mice after PV infection by the oral route. When compared with TgPVR21 mice that expressed CD155 driven by its human promoter, 3-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice were more susceptible to gut infection and paralysis following feeding with PV. Also, Tage4-CD155tg mice exhibited higher susceptibility to poliomyelitis after parenteral inoculation of PV. Remarkably, the LD50 after intracerebral inoculation of PV was similar in both CD155 tg mouse strains. The CD155 tg mouse model reported here, although moderately susceptible to oral infection, may be suitable to study mechanisms of PV replication in the gastrointestinal tract and to dissect important aspects of PV neuroinvasiveness.

  20. Effects of a Preconditioning Oral Nutritional Supplement on Pig Livers after Warm Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nickkholgh, Arash; Li, Zhanqing; Yi, Xue; Mohr, Elvira; Liang, Rui; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Gross, Marie-Luise; Zorn, Markus; Benzing, Steffen; Schneider, Heinz; Büchler, Markus W.; Schemmer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Several approaches have been proposed to pharmacologically ameliorate hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a preconditioning oral nutritional supplement (pONS) containing glutamine, antioxidants, and green tea extract on hepatic warm IRI in pigs. Methods. pONS (70 g per serving, Fresenius Kabi, Germany) was dissolved in 250 mL tap water and given to pigs 24, 12, and 2 hrs before warm ischemia of the liver. A fourth dose was given 3 hrs after reperfusion. Controls were given the same amount of cellulose with the same volume of water. Two hours after the third dose of pONS, both the portal vein and the hepatic artery were clamped for 40 min. 0.5, 3, 6, and 8 hrs after reperfusion, heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central venous pressure (CVP), portal venous flow (PVF), hepatic arterial flow (HAF), bile flow, and transaminases were measured. Liver tissue was taken 8 hrs after reperfusion for histology and immunohistochemistry. Results. HR, MAP, CVP, HAF, and PVF were comparable between the two groups. pONS significantly increased bile flow 8 hrs after reperfusion. ALT and AST were significantly lower after pONS. Histology showed significantly more severe necrosis and neutrophil infiltration in controls. pONS significantly decreased the index of immunohistochemical expression for TNF-α, MPO, and cleaved caspase-3 (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Administration of pONS before and after tissue damage protects the liver from warm IRI via mechanisms including decreasing oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis, and necrosis. PMID:22791934

  1. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; Oliveira, Fábio Conceição de; Melo, João Cardoso de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz de; Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues de; Souza, Wanderley de; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis.

  2. Tonsils of the Soft Palate Do Not Mediate the Response of Pigs to Oral Vaccination with Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Romero, Beatriz; Boadella, Mariana; Casal, Carmen; Bezos, Javier; Mazariegos, María; Martín, MariPaz; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Villar, Margarita; Garrido, Joseba M.; Sevilla, Iker A.; Asensio, Fernando; Sicilia, Javier; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón A.; de la Fuente, José

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis causes animal tuberculosis (TB) in cattle, humans, and other mammalian species, including pigs. The goal of this study was to experimentally assess the responses of pigs with and without a history of tonsillectomy to oral vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis and challenge with a virulent M. bovis field strain, to compare pig and wild boar responses using the same vaccination model as previously used in the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), to evaluate the use of several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and lateral flow tests for in vivo TB diagnosis in pigs, and to verify if these tests are influenced by oral vaccination with inactivated M. bovis. At necropsy, the lesion and culture scores were 20% to 43% higher in the controls than those in the vaccinated pigs. Massive M. bovis growth from thoracic tissue samples was observed in 4 out of 9 controls but in none of the 10 vaccinated pigs. No effect of the presence or absence of tonsils was observed on these scores, suggesting that tonsils are not involved in the protective response to this vaccine in pigs. The serum antibody levels increased significantly only after challenge. At necropsy, the estimated sensitivities of the ELISAs and dual path platform (DPP) assays ranged from 89% to 94%. In the oral mucosa, no differences in gene expression were observed in the control group between the pigs with and without tonsils. In the vaccinated group, the mRNA levels for chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), interferon beta (IFN-β), and methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase (MUT) were higher in pigs with tonsils. Complement component 3 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increased with vaccination and decreased after M. bovis challenge. This information is relevant for pig production in regions that are endemic for M. bovis and for TB vaccine research. PMID:24920604

  3. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  4. Establishment and development of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes in the common vole (Microtus arvalis) after oral inoculation with parasite eggs.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, Ian David; Jensen, Per Moestrup; Deplazes, Peter; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen

    2015-12-01

    Transmission of the zoonotic tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis mainly occurs between the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and various species of vole. Microtus arvalis is considered one of the key intermediate hosts in Europe. We infected 21 M. arvalis aged 35 days (n=2), 56 days (n=6), 84 days (n=4) and 263 days (n=9) with 100 E. multilocularis eggs. Four voles aged 263 days were euthanized at 6 weeks post inoculation (wpi) with the remainder euthanized 10 wpi for analysis of metacestode growth and protoscolex development. Eight C57BL/6j mice (age 35-231 days) were included as controls for egg viability (they have been shown to exhibit visible infection after 4 wpi) and dissected at 6 (n=2) and 10 (n=6) wpi. M. arvalis had significantly higher metacestode establishment (p=0.008) 6 wpi with 27.5±6.63S.D. compared to C57BL/6j with 15.5±0.71S.D. Multivesiculation precluded enumeration at 10 wpi in M. arvalis. No protoscolices were found in metacestodes in M. arvalis 6 wpi or C57BL/6j at any time point but were found in all infected voles 10 wpi (48,056±52,574 S.D.). It has been reported that glucocorticoid (GC) profile can affect E. multilocularis establishment. This was assessed by measuring corticosterone in rodent hair to determine if parasite establishment or fertility was related to this stress hormone. No significant differences were found. Data presented here provides, for the first time, a protoscolex development window in this species that has the potential to shed light on the epizootiology of this parasite. PMID:26279253

  5. Effect of in-water iodine supplementation on weight gain, diarrhea and oral and dental health of nursery pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Anita L.; Farzan, Abdolvahab; Cassar, Glen; Friendship, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    A farm trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of in-water iodine on piglet growth, the incidence of diarrhea, and the development of deleterious oral and dental conditions. A total of 208 weaned piglets were included in the study. Piglets were weighed 3 times: within 24 h of weaning, and 3 wk and 6 wk after weaning. A concentration of 1 ppm iodine was provided in their drinking water. Swabs were taken from all water nipples and water lines and pooled fecal samples were collected from all pen floors. Fecal samples were also collected from sows at weaning. The swabs and fecal samples were tested for the presence of Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Within 24 h of each weighing, a complete oral examination was performed on each piglet. No significant difference in growth (P > 0.05) or dental conditions (P > 0.05) was found among treatment groups during the period that iodine was added to the drinking water. After weaning, all deleterious oral conditions increased (oral lesions from weaning to 6 wk, staining and caries from weaning to 3 wk, gingivitis from 3 wk to 6 wk; P < 0.05). Only gingivitis was found to be negatively associated with piglet weight (P < 0.05). Salmonella was cultured only twice from fecal samples and never from water nipples. Only 1 sow tested positive for Salmonella and E. coli O139: K82 and O157:K”V17 were cultured only rarely from the water nipples. No signs of diarrhea were noted throughout the study. Adding an aqueous iodine supplement to nursery pigs, therefore, did not provide an advantage for either growth or oral condition. Deleterious oral conditions do increase after weaning, with gingivitis being associated with lower piglet weight. PMID:22468027

  6. Oral immunization of pigs with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces pulmonary and systemic antibodies and protects against homologous aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Petzoldt, K; Lubitz, W

    1995-08-01

    A dose-defined aerosol infection of pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of oral immunization with dead or live Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 reference strain CVI 13261 against an aerogenic challenge. Pigs were vaccinated with a single dose of 10(11) CFU of viable (n = 8) or inactivated (n = 8) A. pleuropneumoniae given orally in a gelatin capsule. After 3 weeks, vaccinated pigs and nonvaccinated controls were challenged aerogenically with a dose of 10(8) CFU of A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261. The protective efficacy of oral immunization was evaluated by clinical and postmortem examinations. Bronchoalveolar lavage in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in sera and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on whole-cell antigen. Oral immunization did not induce clinical side effects. After aerosol challenge, two animals of both vaccinated groups (25% in each case) showed a moderate fever for 2 days, whereas all four pigs (100%) of the nonvaccinated control group developed severe fever. In contrast to the controls, which developed severe pleuropneumonia, the vaccinated pigs had only mild pulmonary lesions. Three weeks after challenge, 13 of 16 vaccinated pigs (81%) were found to be free of pathomorphological changes of the lungs. From two of these pigs immunized with live bacteria we were able to reisolate A. pleuropneumoniae. A significant systemic and pulmonary increase in the concentrations of immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae was detectable after aerosol challenge in both vaccinated groups. Immunization with viable bacteria was found to induce significantly higher concentrations of each Ig isotype in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and sera than immunization with inactivated A. pleuropneumoniae. These serological findings were

  7. Oral therapy using nanoparticle-encapsulated antituberculosis drugs in guinea pigs infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christine M; Pandey, Rajesh; Sharma, Sadhna; Khuller, G K; Basaraba, Randall J; Orme, Ian M; Lenaerts, Anne J

    2005-10-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of nanoparticle-encapsulated antituberculosis drugs administered every 10 days versus that of daily nonencapsulated drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol infection in guinea pigs. Both treatments significantly reduced the bacterial count and lung histopathology, suggesting that the nanoparticle drug delivery system has potential in intermitted treatment of tuberculosis.

  8. Collection of Oral Fluids Using Cotton Ropes as a Sampling Method to Detect Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, W; Morris, J; Davis, A; Giles, M; Wang, J; Nguyen, H T T; Kim, P V; Quach, N V; Le, P T T; Nguyen, P H N; Dang, H; Tran, H X; Vu, P P; Hung, V V; Le, Q T; Tran, T M; Mai, T M T; Le, Q T V; Singanallur, N B

    2015-10-01

    In high-density farming practices, it is important to constantly monitor for infectious diseases, especially diseases that have the potential to spread rapidly between holdings. Pigs are known to amplify foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by excreting large amounts of virus, and it is therefore important to detect the virus quickly and accurately to minimize the spread of disease. Ropes were used to collect oral fluid samples from pigs, and each sample was compared to saliva samples collected from individual animals by detecting FMD virus RNA using real-time PCR. Two different experiments are described where groups of pigs were infected with different serotypes of FMD virus, either with or without vaccination, and unvaccinated pigs were kept in aerosol contact. The sensitivity of the rope sampling varied between 0.67 and 0.92, and the statistical agreement between this method and individual sampling ranged from substantial to moderate for the two different serotypes. The ease of collecting oral fluids using ropes together with the high sensitivity of subsequent FMD detection through PCR indicates that this could be a useful method to monitor pig populations for FMD virus infection. With further validation of the sensitivity of detection of FMD virus RNA, this can be a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool.

  9. Tissue deposition and residue depletion of melamine in fattening pigs following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Hong; Yu, Bing; Mao, Xiangbing; Chen, Daiwen

    2014-01-01

    The adulteration of animal feed as well as milk products with melamine has led to concerns about the ability to establish appropriate withdrawal intervals to ensure food safety. Two experiments were conducted in this study. The first was to investigate the deposition and depletion of melamine in blood and tissues of pigs exposed to adulterated feed with high doses of melamine. A total of 500 or 1000 mg kg(-1) melamine was added to the diet for fattening pigs (initial BW = ±60.24 kg). Melamine residues were detected in tissues (brain, duodenum, liver, heart, muscle and kidney) by LC-MS/MS. Dose-dependent effects were found between melamine residual concentration and its dose in feed. Five days after the withdrawal of melamine from the diets, the residue concentration in tissues fell below 2.5 mg kg(-1). In the second experiment, blood samples were taken at different time points from fattening pigs (BW = 100 kg) fed with adulterated feed with 1000 mg kg(-1) of melamine for 42 days. Results from the pharmacokinetics analysis showed that it would take 83 h for the melamine level in plasma depleting to the safe level of 50 ng ml(-1) after an expose of 1000 mg kg(-1) melamine contaminated feed for 42 days.

  10. Detection and Isolation of Swine Influenza A Virus in Spiked Oral Fluid and Samples from Individually Housed, Experimentally Infected Pigs: Potential Role of Porcine Oral Fluid in Active Influenza A Virus Surveillance in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Decorte, Inge; Steensels, Mieke; Lambrecht, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Background The lack of seasonality of swine influenza A virus (swIAV) in combination with the capacity of swine to harbor a large number of co-circulating IAV lineages, resulting in the risk for the emergence of influenza viruses with pandemic potential, stress the importance of swIAV surveillance. To date, active surveillance of swIAV worldwide is barely done because of the short detection period in nasal swab samples. Therefore, more sensitive diagnostic methods to monitor circulating virus strains are requisite. Methods qRT-PCR and virus isolations were performed on oral fluid and nasal swabs collected from individually housed pigs that were infected sequentially with H1N1 and H3N2 swIAV strains. The same methods were also applied to oral fluid samples spiked with H1N1 to study the influence of conservation time and temperature on swIAV infectivity and detectability in porcine oral fluid. Results All swIAV infected animals were found qRT-PCR positive in both nasal swabs and oral fluid. However, swIAV could be detected for a longer period in oral fluid than in nasal swabs. Despite the high detectability of swIAV in oral fluid, virus isolation from oral fluid collected from infected pigs was rare. These results are supported by laboratory studies showing that the PCR detectability of swIAV remains unaltered during a 24 h incubation period in oral fluid, while swIAV infectivity drops dramatically immediately upon contact with oral fluid (3 log titer reduction) and gets lost after 24 h conservation in oral fluid at ambient temperature. Conclusions Our data indicate that porcine oral fluid has the potential to replace nasal swabs for molecular diagnostic purposes. The difficulty to isolate swIAV from oral fluid could pose a drawback for its use in active surveillance programs. PMID:26431039

  11. Virus quantification and identification of cellular targets in the lungs and lymphoid tissues of pigs at different time intervals after inoculation with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV).

    PubMed

    Duan, X; Nauwynck, H J; Pensaert, M B

    1997-05-01

    Sixteen 6 week old conventional pigs were inoculated by aerosol with a European strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Virus replication was followed by virus titration and immunofluorescence in the lungs and in associated and distant lymphoid tissues at 3, 14, 21, 35, 42 and 82 days post-inoculation (DPI). PRRSV replication was detected in alveolar macrophages, lungs, tonsils, spleen, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, bronchial lymph nodes and thoracic aortic lymph nodes at 3 DPI. The same tissues, except retropharyngeal and thoracic aortic lymph nodes, were PRRSV positive at 14 DPI. Lungs and alveolar macrophages were PRRSV positive until 35 DPI. PRRSV was not detected in heart, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and bone marrow cells. Viremia was detected from 3 to 28 DPI. Not more than 2% of alveolar macrophages were PRRSV positive even during the acute stage of infection. 80 to 94% of the PRRSV infected cells in the lungs and in lung lavaged cells were identified as macrophages using a porcine macrophage specific monoclonal antibodies. In the lymph nodes and spleen, 100% of the infected cells were macrophages. Anti-PRRSV antibodies were detected by a blocking ELISA as early as 7 DPI. the antibody titre gradually increased to reach a geometric mean titre (GMT) of 160 at 35 DPI. It remained at that level until the end of the study. These findings clearly demonstrate that PRRSV has a tropism for macrophages. PRRSV mainly replicates in macrophages of the lymphoid tissues and lungs in the acute phase of infection and persists in the lung macrophages.

  12. The Effects of Fat-soluble Vitamin Administration on Plasma Vitamin Status of Nursing Pigs Differ When Provided by Oral Administration or Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Y. D.; Lindemann, M. D.; Monegue, H. J.; Stuart, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration to sows or newborn pigs on plasma vitamin status. In Exp. 1 and 2, a total of 24 and 43 newborn pigs were allotted to control and vitamin treatments (vitamin D3 with variable addition of vitamins A and E) orally or by i.m. injection. In Exp. 3, pigs from Exp. 2 were allotted to 2 treatments (±vitamins D3 and E in drinking water) for 14 d postweaning. In Exp. 4, twenty-four gestating sows were used for 2 treatments (±injection of a vitamin D3/A/E product 2 wk prepartum). In Exp. 1 and 2, when vitamin D3 was administrated orally or by i.m. injection on d 1 of age, pigs had increased plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OH D3) concentration 10 d after administration compared with control pigs (p<0.05). The injectable administration with vitamin D3 and E was able to achieve higher plasma 25-OH D3 (p<0.05) and α-tocopherol (p<0.05) concentrations than oral administration. At weaning, the pigs in the injection group had higher plasma 25-OH D3 concentration than those in the other groups in both studies (p<0.05). In Exp. 3, water supplementation of vitamin D3 and E postweaning increased plasma 25-OH D3 and α-tocopherol concentrations at d 14 postweaning (p<0.01). In Exp. 4, when sows were injected with the vitamin D3 product prepartum, serum 25-OH D3 concentrations of sows at farrowing (p<0.01), and in their progeny at birth (p<0.01) and weaning (p<0.05) were increased. These results demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamin administration to newborn pigs increased plasma 25-OH D3 concentration regardless of administration routes and α-tocopherol concentration by the injectable route, and that water supplementation of vitamin D3 and E to nursery pigs increased plasma 25-OH D3 and α-tocopherol concentrations. Additionally, injecting sows with vitamin D3 prepartum increased 25-OH D3 in sows and their offspring. If continued research demonstrates that the serum levels of 25-OH D

  13. Oral squamous cell carcinoma in a Vietnamese pot-bellied pig (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Swenson, Julie; Carpenter, James W; Ragsdale, John; Kuroki, Kei; Ketz-Riley, Cornelia; Brinkman, Erin; Cole, Gretchen

    2009-11-01

    An 18-year-old, neutered, male Vietnamese pot-bellied pig (Sus scrofa) was treated for chronic, intermittent nasal discharge and sneezing. The animal was diagnosed with severe periodontal disease (grade IV), an oronasal fistula, and multiple tooth root abscesses via dental examination and computed tomography of the skull. Dentistry was performed, including multiple tooth extractions, and antibiotic therapy was initiated. Eighteen months later, the animal was evaluated for lethargy, anorexia, and a firm, 12 cm x 12 cm mass between the 2 rami of the mandible. Laboratory testing revealed moderate anemia, severe leukocytosis, and hyperglobulinemia. Skull radiographs indicated osteomyelitis of the mandible and soft-tissue swelling. A fine-needle aspirate and biopsy were taken, and results were consistent with squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment with piroxicam and antibiotics was initiated as needed to control signs of pain and secondary infection, respectively. Three months after diagnosis, the pig was euthanized due to cachexia and severe depression secondary to squamous cell carcinoma. On postmortem examination, the right mandibular area contained multiple, coalescing, irregular masses extending from the ramus rostrally to the mandibular canine teeth and ventrally within the intermandibular space, completely obliterating the normal anatomy. An open midshaft fracture was present on the right mandible. On histopathology, the masses were confirmed as locally invasive and destructive squamous cell carcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noted in regional lymph nodes or in any of the distant sites evaluated.

  14. Evaluation of the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in virus-inoculated feed.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Loni L; Woodworth, Jason C; Jones, Cassandra K; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C; Stark, Charles R; Main, Rodger G; Hesse, Richard A; Tokach, Mike D; Dritz, Steve S

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in virus-inoculated feed. ANIMALS 30 crossbred 10-day-old pigs. PROCEDURES Tissue culture PEDV was diluted to form 8 serial 10-fold dilutions. An aliquot of stock virus (5.6 × 10(5) TCID50/mL) and each serial PEDV dilution were mixed into 4.5-kg batches of feed to create 9 PEDV-inoculated feed doses; 1 virus-negative dose of culture medium in feed was also created. Pigs were challenge exposed via oral administration of PEDV-inoculated feed, and fecal swab specimens were collected. All pigs were euthanized 7 days after challenge exposure; fresh tissues were collected and used for PCR assay, histologic examination, and immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS The PCR cycle threshold (Ct) decreased by approximately 10 when PEDV was added to feed, compared with results for equivalent PEDV diluted in tissue culture medium. Pigs became infected with PEDV when challenge exposed with the 4 highest concentrations (lowest concentration to cause infection, 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g; Ct = 27 in tissue culture medium and 37 in feed). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, PEDV in feed with detectable Ct values of 27 to 37 was infective. The Ct was 37 for the lowest infective PEDV dose in feed, which may be above the limit of detection established for PEDV PCR assays used by some diagnostic laboratories. Overall, results indicated 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g was the minimum PEDV dose in feed that can lead to infection in 10-day-old pigs under the conditions of this study. PMID:27668582

  15. Oral immunization of a live attenuated Escherichia coli strain expressing a holotoxin-structured adhesin-toxoid fusion (1FaeG-FedF-LTA₂:5LTB) protected young pigs against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) infection.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-03-01

    ETEC strains expressing K88 (F4) or F18 fimbriae and enterotoxins are the predominant cause of porcine post-weaning diarrhea (PWD). PWD continues causing significant economic losses to swine producers worldwide. Vaccines effectively protecting against PWD are needed. Our recent study revealed that a tripartite adhesin-toxin monomer (FaeG-FedF-LT(A2-B)) elicited protective antibodies. In this study, we constructed a new adhesin-toxoid fusion, expressed it as a 1A:5B holotoxin-structured antigen (1FaeG-FedF-LT(192A2):5LT(B)) in an avirulent Escherichia coli strain, and evaluated its vaccine potential in pig challenge studies. Piglets orally inoculated with this live strain showed no adverse effects but developed systemic and mucosal antibodies that neutralized cholera toxin and inhibited adherence of K88 and F18 fimbriae in vitro. Moreover, the immunized piglets, when were challenged with ETEC strain 3030-2 (K88ac/LT/STb), had significant fewer bacteria colonized at small intestines and did not develop diarrhea; whereas the control piglets developed severe diarrhea and died. These results indicated the 1FaeG-FedF-LT(192A2):5LT(B) fusion antigen induced protective antiadhesin and antitoxin immunity in pigs, and suggested a live attenuated vaccine can be potentially developed against porcine ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, presenting antigens in a holotoxin structure to target host local mucosal immunity can be used in vaccine development against other enteric diseases. PMID:23375979

  16. Protective immunity by oral immunization with heat-killed Shigella strains in a guinea pig colitis model.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Koley, Hemanta; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chakrabarti, Manoj Kumar; Shinoda, Sumio; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2013-11-01

    The protective efficacy of and immune response to heat-killed cells of monovalent and hexavalent mixtures of six serogroups/serotypes of Shigella strains (Shigella dysenteriae 1, Shigella flexneri 2a, S. flexneri 3a, S. flexneri 6, Shigella boydii 4, and Shigella sonnei) were examined in a guinea pig colitis model. A monovalent or hexavalent mixture containing 1 × 10(7) of each serogroup/serotype of heat-killed Shigella cells was administered orally on Days 0, 7, 14 and 21. On Day 28, the immunized animals were challenged rectally with 1 × 10(9) live virulent cells of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes. In all immunized groups, significant levels of protection were observed after these challenges. The serum titers of IgG and IgA against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes increased exponential during the course of immunization. High IgA titers against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes were also observed in intestinal lavage fluid from all immunized animals. These data indicate that a hexavalent mixture of heat-killed cells of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes studied would be a possible broad-spectrum candidate vaccine against shigellosis.

  17. Induction of immune responses in mice and pigs by oral administration of classical swine fever virus E2 protein expressed in rice calli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Yun Ji; Kim, Ju; Cha, Seung-Bin; Lee, Won-Jung; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Seung Won; Yang, Moon-Sik; Jang, Yong-Suk; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by the CSF virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease in pigs. In Korea, vaccination using a live-attenuated strain (LOM strain) has been used to control the disease. However, parenteral vaccination using a live-attenuated strain still faces a number of problems related to storage, cost, injection stress, and differentiation of CSFV infected and vaccinated pigs. Therefore, two kinds of new candidates for oral vaccination have been developed based on the translation of the E2 gene of the SW03 strain, which was isolated from an outbreak of CSF in 2002 in Korea, in transgenic rice calli (TRCs) from Oriza sativa L. cv. Dongjin to express a recombinant E2 protein (rE2-TRCs). The expression of the recombinant E2 protein (rE2) in rE2-TRCs was confirmed using Northern blot, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis. Immune responses to the rE2-TRC in mice and pigs were investigated after oral administration. The administration of rE2-TRCs increased E2-specific antibodies titers and antibody-secreting cells when compared to animals receiving the vector alone (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). In addition, mice receiving rE2-TRCs had a higher level of CD8+ lymphocytes and Th1 cytokine immune responses to purified rE2 (prE2) in vitro than the controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). Pigs receiving rE2-TRCs also showed an increase in IL-8, CCL2, and the CD8+ subpopulation in response to stimulation with prE2. These results suggest that oral administration of rE2-TRCs can induce E2-specific immune responses.

  18. Oral IGF-I alters the posttranslational processing but not the activity of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in formula-fed neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Burrin, D G; Stoll, B; Fan, M Z; Dudley, M A; Donovan, S M; Reeds, P J

    2001-09-01

    To determine the cellular mechanism whereby oral insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) increases intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) activity, we studied 2-d-old pigs fed cow's milk formula (control, n = 5), formula + low IGF-I (0.5 mg/L; n = 6) or formula + high IGF-I (12.0 mg/L, n = 6) for 15 d. On d 15, intestinal protein synthesis and lactase processing were measured in vivo in fed pigs using a 6-h intravenous, overlapping infusion of multiple stable isotopes (2H(3)-Leu, 13C(1)-Leu, 13C(1)-Phe, 2H(5)-Phe, 13C(6)-Phe and 13C(9)-Phe). Morphometry and cell proliferation also were measured in the jejunum and ileum. Neither dose of IGF-I affected the masses of wet tissue, protein or DNA, or the villus height, cell proliferation or LPH-specific activity. Oral IGF-I decreased the synthesis and abundance of prolactase-phlorizin hydrolase (pro-LPH), but increased brush-border (BB)-LPH synthesis in the ileum. The BB-LPH processing efficiency was twofold to threefold greater in IGF-fed than in control pigs. In all pigs, villus height and the total mucosal and specific activity of LPH activity were greater in the ileum than in the jejunum, yet the synthesis of BB-LPH were significantly lower in the ileum than in the jejunum. We conclude that oral IGF-I increases the processing efficiency of pro-LPH to BB-LPH but does not affect LPH activity. Moreover, the posttranslational processing of BB-LPH is markedly lower in the ileum than in the jejunum.

  19. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 299v modulates gene expression in the ileum of pigs: prediction of crosstalk between intestinal immune cells and sub-mucosal adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hulst, Marcel; Gross, Gabriele; Liu, Yaping; Hoekman, Arjan; Niewold, Theo; van der Meulen, Jan; Smits, Mari

    2015-05-01

    To study host-probiotic interactions in parts of the intestine only accessible in humans by surgery (jejunum, ileum and colon), pigs were used as model for humans. Groups of eight 6-week-old pigs were repeatedly orally administered with 5 × 10(12) CFU Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (L. plantarum 299v) or PBS, starting with a single dose followed by three consecutive daily dosings 10 days later. Gene expression was assessed with pooled RNA samples isolated from jejunum, ileum and colon scrapings of the eight pigs per group using Affymetrix porcine microarrays. Comparison of gene expression profiles recorded from L. plantarum 299v-treated pigs with PBS-treated pigs indicated that L. plantarum 299v affected metabolic and immunological processes, particularly in the ileum. A higher expression level of several B cell-specific transcription factors/regulators was observed, suggesting that an influx of B cells from the periphery to the ileum and/or the proliferation of progenitor B cells to IgA-committed plasma cells in the Peyer's patches of the ileum was stimulated. Genes coding for enzymes that metabolize leukotriene B4, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and steroids were regulated in the ileum. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that these metabolites may play a role in the crosstalk between intestinal immune cells and sub-mucosal adipocytes. Together with regulation of genes that repress NFKB- and PPARG-mediated transcription, this crosstalk may contribute to tempering of inflammatory reactions. Furthermore, the enzyme adenosine deaminase, responsible for the breakdown of the anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine, was strongly down-regulated in response to L. plantarum 299v. This suggested that L. plantarum 299v-regulated production of adenosine by immune cells like regulatory T cells may also be a mechanism that tempers inflammation in the ileum, and perhaps also in other parts of the pig's body. PMID:25861755

  20. Subchronic oral toxicity in guinea pigs of soot from a polychlorinated biphenyl-containing transformer fire

    SciTech Connect

    DeCaprio, A.P.; McMartin, D.N.; Silkworth, J.B.; Rej, R.; Pause, R.; Kaminsky, L.S.

    1983-04-01

    The soot was determined to contain polychlorinated biphenyls, biphenylenes, dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans. The present study evaluates soot toxicity in guinea pigs receiving 0, 0.2, 1.9, 9.3, or 46.3 ppm soot in the feed for 90 days or 231.5 ppm for 32 days. At 231.5 ppm, body weight loss, thymic atrophy, bone marrow depletion, skeletal muscle and gastrointestinal tract epithelial degeneration, and fatty infiltration of hepatocytes were observed. Mortality had reached 35% by Day 32 (when survivors were killed), with total soot consumption of approximately 400 mg/kg. At 46.3 or 9.3 ppm soot, a reduced rate of body weight gain was observed, and at 46.3 ppm, the mortality by Day 90 was 30%. Relative (to body) thymus weights were decreased in both groups, while relative spleen weights were increased at 46.3 ppm soot only. Salivary gland interlobular duct squamous metaplasia and focal lacrimal gland adenitis were detected histopathologically, while bone marrow depletion was noted only in females at the higher dose. Diminished serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in both sexes and decreased serum sodium levels in male and potassium levels in female animals were detected at both dose levels. No effectse were noted in animals receiving 0.2 ppm soot for 90 days. Salivary gland duct metaplasia has not been previously reported. Toxic effects of this subchronic exposure were observed at lower total doses than with acute exposure, although variations in absorption due to the effects of different vehicles (aqueous in the acute study versus the feed in this study) could account for some or all of this difference.

  1. Oral, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: the replacement for warfarin, leeches, and pig intestines?

    PubMed

    Straub, Alexander; Roehrig, Susanne; Hillisch, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    To prevent thromboses after surgery, patients have until now had to inject themselves daily with heparin. For stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation, patients take vitamin K antagonists of the coumarin type, which have a narrow therapeutic window and whose dosage must be regularly monitored. In order to improve the standard of therapy in thromboembolic diseases such as deep-vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and stroke in atrial fibrillation, intensive research has been carried out over the last decade in the search for new, orally active thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors. A number of these compounds are already on the market or are in advanced clinical development; they could revolutionize the anticoagulant market.

  2. Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Guinea Pigs via Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing VP1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Pan, Li; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is an effective strategy for generating antigen-specific immune responses against mucosal infections of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum strains NC8 and WCFS1 were used as oral delivery vehicles containing a pSIP411-VP1 recombinant plasmid to initiate mucosal and systemic immune responses in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were orally vaccinated (three doses) with NC8-pSIP411, NC8-pSIP411-VP1, WCFS1-pSIP411, WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 or milk. Animals immunized with NC8-pSIP411-VP1 and WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 developed high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG, IgA, IgM, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) and neutralizing antibodies, and revealed stronger cell-mediated immune responses and enhanced protection against FMDV challenge compared with control groups. The recombinant pSIP411-VP1 effectively improved immunoprotection against FMDV in guinea pigs. PMID:26629822

  3. Induction of protective immunity by aerosol or oral application of candidate vaccines in a dose-controlled pig aerosol infection model.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; van Leengoed, L A; Szostak, M; Windt, H; Weissenböck, H; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Katinger, A; Stadler, M; Ganter, M; Bunka, S; Pabst, R; Lubitz, W

    1996-01-26

    In order to outline basic concepts for the design of a bacterial aerosol infection model, the development of a pig model with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is described. First, reproducibility of aerosol parameters should be maintained by optimizing generating and sampling conditions. Survival rates of the chosen strain must be predictable. Secondly, inhalation conditions for the recipients have to be standardized to enable the determination of deposition sites and the dose administered. Subsequently, dose-response relationship should be evaluated to find a suitable challenge dose. Furthermore, it seems necessary to establish methods to obtain local specimens for determination of the local immune responses. The present study demonstrates that after aerosol challenge pigs were completely protected after inhalation and partially protected after oral application of A. pleuropneumoniae vaccines and describes techniques to administer bacteria in a dose-dependent, viable way. Using the infection model several stages of the disease from acute pleuropneumonia to chronic infection can be induced for research purposes.

  4. CpG DNA facilitate the inactivated transmissible gastroenteritis virus in enhancing the local and systemic immune response of pigs via oral administration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Tu, Chongzhi; Mou, Chunxiao; Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) replicates in the small intestine and induces enteritis and watery diarrhea. Establishment of local immunity in the intestine would thus prevent TGEV transmission. CpG DNA has been reported as a promising mucosal adjuvant in some animals. The effects of oral immunization of CpG DNA together with inactivated TGEV (ITGEV) were investigated in this study. Pigs (6 weeks old) were orally immunized with ITGEV plus CpG DNA. The TGEV-specific IgA level in the intestinal tract and the TGEV-specific IgG level in serum significantly increased following immunization with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Moreover, populations of IgA-secreting cells, CD3+ T lymphocytes and intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), in the intestine increased significantly after immunization with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of IL-6, IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in ligated intestine segments increased significantly after injection with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that oral immunization of ITGEV plus CpG DNA elicits a local immune response. Further studies are required to determine whether this immunity provides protection against TGEV in pigs. PMID:27032496

  5. An experimental Helicobacter suis infection causes gastritis and reduced daily weight gain in pigs.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Flahou, Bram; Chiers, Koen; Meyns, Tom; Kumar, Smitha; Vermoote, Miet; Pasmans, Frank; Millet, Sam; Dewulf, Jeroen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter suis is a zoonotically important bacterium, that has been associated with gastritis and ulcerative lesions of the pars oesophagea of the stomach in pigs. Its exact role in these pathologies, however, still remains controversial. Therefore, a total of 29 medicated early weaned piglets were inoculated intragastrically or orally, with a total of 2 × 10(9) viable H. suis bacteria and the effect on gastric pathology and weight gain was determined. Twenty-three medicated early weaned piglets were inoculated with a sterile culture medium and used as sham-inoculated controls. The animals were euthanized between 28 and 42 days after inoculation. Infected animals showed a more severe gastritis compared to the control group. There was also a significant reduction of approximately 60 g per day (10%) in weight gain in H. suis inoculated animals compared to the sham-inoculated control animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that a pure in vitro culture of H. suis not only causes gastritis but also a marked decrease of the daily weight gain in experimentally infected pigs.

  6. Oral vaccination of guinea pigs with a Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine in a lipid matrix protects against aerosol infection with virulent M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Nadian, Allan; Vipond, Julia; Court, Pinar; Williams, Ann; Hewinson, R Glyn; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-08-01

    Increased incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in the United Kingdom caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is a cause of considerable economic loss to farmers and the government. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) represents a wildlife source of recurrent M. bovis infections of cattle in the United Kingdom, and its vaccination against TB with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attractive disease control option. Delivery of BCG in oral bait holds the best prospect for vaccinating badgers over a wide geographical area. Using a guinea pig pulmonary challenge model, we evaluated the protective efficacy of candidate badger oral vaccines, based on broth-grown or ball-milled BCG, delivered either as aqueous suspensions or formulated in two lipids with differing fatty acid profiles (one being animal derived and the other being vegetable derived). Protection was determined in terms of increasing body weight after aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis, reduced dissemination of M. bovis to the spleen, and, in the case of one oral formulation, restricted growth of M. bovis in the lungs. Only oral BCG formulated in lipid gave significant protection. These data point to the potential of the BCG-lipid formulation for further development as a tool for controlling tuberculosis in badgers.

  7. Clinical signs, pathology and dose-dependent survival of adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, inoculated orally with frog virus 3 Ranavirus sp., Iridoviridae.

    PubMed

    Forzn, Mara J; Jones, Kathleen M; Vanderstichel, Raphal V; Wood, John; Kibenge, Frederick S B; Kuiken, Thijs; Wirth, Wytamma; Ariel, Ellen; Daoust, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    Amphibian populations suffer massive mortalities from infection with frog virus 3 FV3, genus Ranavirus, family Iridoviridae, a pathogen also involved in mortalities of fish and reptiles. Experimental oral infection with FV3 in captive-raised adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica Lithobates sylvaticus, was performed as the first step in establishing a native North American animal model of ranaviral disease to study pathogenesis and host response. Oral dosing was successful LD50 was 10(2.93 2.423.44) p.f.u. for frogs averaging 35mm in length. Onset of clinical signs occurred 614days post-infection p.i. median 11 days p.i. and time to death was 1014 days p.i. median 12 days p.i.. Each tenfold increase in virus dose increased the odds of dying by 23-fold and accelerated onset of clinical signs and death by approximately 15. Ranavirus DNA was demonstrated in skin and liver of all frogs that died or were euthanized because of severe clinical signs. Shedding of virus occurred in faeces 710 days p.i. 34.5days before death and skin sheds 10 days p.i. 01.5days before death of some frogs dead from infection. Most common lesions were dermal erosion and haemorrhages haematopoietic necrosis in bone marrow, kidney, spleen and liver and necrosis in renal glomeruli, tongue, gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder mucosa. Presence of ranavirus in lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies probably viral were present in the bone marrow and the epithelia of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, renal tubules and urinary bladder. Our work describes a ranaviruswood frog model and provides estimates that can be incorporated into ranavirus disease ecology models.

  8. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection. PMID:27610023

  9. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection.

  10. Fate of Transgenic DNA from Orally Administered Bt MON810 Maize and Effects on Immune Response and Growth in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Maria C.; Buzoianu, Stefan G.; Gardiner, Gillian E.; Rea, Mary C.; Gelencsér, Eva; Jánosi, Anna; Epstein, Michelle M.; Ross, R. Paul; Lawlor, Peadar G.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of short-term feeding of genetically modified (GM: Bt MON810) maize on immune responses and growth in weanling pigs and determined the fate of the transgenic DNA and protein in-vivo. Pigs were fed a diet containing 38.9% GM or non-GM isogenic parent line maize for 31 days. We observed that IL-12 and IFNγ production from mitogenic stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased (P<0.10) following 31 days of GM maize exposure. While Cry1Ab-specific IgG and IgA were not detected in the plasma of GM maize-fed pigs, the detection of the cry1Ab gene and protein was limited to the gastrointestinal digesta and was not found in the kidneys, liver, spleen, muscle, heart or blood. Feeding GM maize to weanling pigs had no effect on growth performance or body weight. IL-6 and IL-4 production from isolated splenocytes were increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize while the proportion of CD4+ T cells in the spleen decreased. In the ileum, the proportion of B cells and macrophages decreased while the proportion of CD4+ T cells increased in GM maize-fed pigs. IL-8 and IL-4 production from isolated intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes were also increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize. In conclusion, there was no evidence of cry1Ab gene or protein translocation to the organs and blood of weaning pigs. The growth of pigs was not affected by feeding GM maize. Alterations in immune responses were detected; however, their biologic relevance is questionable. PMID:22132091

  11. Comparison of experimental models for Streptococcus suis infection of conventional pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, Francisco J.; Halbur, Patrick G.; Schmitt, Cameron S.; Roth, James A.; Opriessnig, Tanja; Thomas, Peter J.; Kinyon, Joann M.; Murphy, Dee; Frank, Dagmar E.; Hoffman, Lorraine J.

    2003-01-01

    Four different experimental models for Streptococcus suis-induced disease were compared to find a model that closely mimics naturally occurring disease in conventional pigs. Fourteen, 2-week old pigs free of S. suis type 2 were used in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, 3 pigs were inoculated intravenously (IV) and 3 pigs intranasally (IN) with S. suis. Two out of 3 of the IV-inoculated pigs exhibited signs of severe central nervous system disease (CNS) and were euthanized. Streptococcus suis type 2 was isolated from whole blood, joints, and serosal surfaces of both pigs. No clinical signs and no growth of S. suis were detected in the IN-inoculated pigs. In experiment 2, 4 pigs were inoculated IV and another 4 were inoculated IN with the same isolate as in experiment 1. One hour before inoculation the IN-inoculated pigs were given 5 mL of 1% acetic acid intranasally (IN-AA). All the IV-inoculated pigs showed CNS disease and lameness, and 2 of the pigs became severely affected and were euthanized. All the IN-AA inoculated pigs exhibited roughened hair coats and 2 pigs developed severe CNS disease and were euthanized. Streptococcus suis was isolated from the joints and blood of 3 pigs in the IV-inoculated group. Streptococcus suis was isolated from blood of 2 pigs, meninges of 3 pigs, and joints of 1 pig in the IN-AA inoculated group. Natural exposure to S. suis most likely occurs by the intranasal route. The IN-AA model should serve as a good model for S. suis-induced disease, because the natural route of exposure is intranasal and the IN-AA model was effective in inducing disease that mimics what is observed in the field. PMID:12889730

  12. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies.

  13. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. PMID:25278142

  14. Effect of high oral doses of nitrate on salivary recirculation of nitrates and nitrites and on bacterial diversity in the saliva of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Casini, L; Nisi, I; Messori, S; Bosi, P

    2011-04-01

    Ingested nitrate is absorbed in the small intestine, recirculated into the saliva and reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. In pigs receiving a moderate dietary addition of nitrate, the recirculation into the saliva is modest, so we aimed to assess the effect of higher nitrate doses to find out how the animal reacts to this new situation and to evaluate if a higher nitrate level could enhance the nitrate reduction process, improving the nitrite production Trial 1. Six piglets received 100 g of a commercial diet with 2.45% KNO(3) . In relation to baseline values, nitrate in blood serum and saliva increased 15 times, and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Salivary nitrite increased seven times after the addition and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Trial 2. Six piglets were fed a diet with or without 1.22% KNO(3) for 2 weeks. Salivary nitrate and nitrite increased with the addition of KNO3: nitrate increased from d0 to the end of the trial, nitrite increased 15 times after 1 week, but decreased after 2 weeks to 4.5-fold the control. After 2 weeks, nitrate reduced Shan diversity index of salivary microbiota. The present results indicate that the long exposure to high quantities of nitrates impairs the oral reduction of nitrate to nitrite and engenders a reduction of the mouth's microbiota diversity.

  15. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  16. Gastric stability and oral bioavailability of colistin sulfate in pigs challenged or not with Escherichia coli O149: F4 (K88).

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Thériault, William; Bergeron, Nadia; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Fairbrother, John Morris; Letellier, Ann

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro gastric stability of colistin sulfate (CS) and its antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and to study the impact of ETEC O149: F4 (K88) infection in pigs on CS intestinal absorption. The stability profile of CS was evaluated in a simulated gastric fluid (SGF). Antimicrobial activity of CS and its degradation products were examined in a 96-well polystyrene microplate model. The effect of experimental infection with ETEC O149: F4 on CS intestinal absorption was determined by quantification of CS systemic concentration using a validated LC-MS/MS method. A rapid degradation of CS accompanied by an increase in CS antimicrobial activity by comparison with non-degraded CS (P<0.0001) was observed in SGF. Additionally, CS levels were not quantifiable in systemic circulation using a highly sensitive method and concurrent oral challenge did not affect CS absorption in an induction model of subclinical post-weaning diarrhea (PWD).

  17. Differentiation of F4 receptor profiles in pigs based on their mucin 4 polymorphism, responsiveness to oral F4 immunization and in vitro binding of F4 to villi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V U; Goetstouwers, T; Coddens, A; Van Poucke, M; Peelman, L; Deforce, D; Melkebeek, V; Cox, E

    2013-03-15

    F4(+) enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4(+) ETEC) are an important cause of diarrhoea and mortality in piglets. F4(+) ETEC use their F4 fimbriae to adhere to specific receptors (F4Rs) on small intestinal brush borders, resulting in colonization of the small intestine. To prevent pigs from post-weaning diarrhoea, pigs should be vaccinated during the suckling period. Previously, we demonstrated that F4acR(+), but not F4acR(-) piglets could be orally immunized with purified F4 fimbriae resulting in a protective immunity against F4(+) ETEC infections, indicating that this immune response was F4R dependent. Recently, aminopeptidase N has been identified as a glycoprotein receptor important for this oral immune response. However, in some oral immunization experiments, a few F4acR(+) piglets did not show an antibody response upon oral immunization, suggesting additional receptors. Therefore, the binding profile of F4 to brush border membrane (glyco)proteins was determined for pigs differing in F4-specific antibody response upon oral immunization, in in vitro adhesion of F4(+)E. coli to small intestinal villi, and in Muc4 genotype. Six groups of pigs could be identified. Only two groups positive in all three assays showed two high molecular weight (MW) glycoprotein bands (>250kDa) suggesting that these high MW bands are linked to the MUC4 susceptible genotype. The fact that these bands were absent in the MUC4 resistant group which showed a positive immune response against F4 and was positive in the adhesion test confirm that at least one or perhaps more other F4Rs exist. Interestingly, two pigs that were positive in the villous adhesion assay did not show an immune response against F4 fimbriae. This suggests that a third receptor category might exist which allows the bacteria to adhere but does not allow effective immunization with soluble F4 fimbriae. Future research will be necessary to confirm or reveal the identity of these receptors. PMID:23084626

  18. Oral Infection with Signature-Tagged Listeria monocytogenes Reveals Organ-Specific Growth and Dissemination Routes in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Melton-Witt, Jody A.; Rafelski, Susanne M.; Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes a serious food-borne disease due to its ability to spread from the intestine to other organs, a process that is poorly understood. In this study we used 20 signature-tagged wild-type clones of L. monocytogenes in guinea pigs in combination with extensive quantitative data analysis to gain insight into extraintestinal dissemination. We show that L. monocytogenes colonized the liver in all asymptomatic animals. Spread to the liver occurred as early as 4 h after ingestion via a direct pathway from the intestine to the liver. This direct pathway contributed significantly to the bacterial load in the liver and was followed by a second wave of dissemination via the mesenteric lymph nodes (indirect pathway). Furthermore, bacteria were eliminated in the liver, whereas small intestinal villi provided a niche for bacterial replication, indicating organ-specific differences in net bacterial growth. Bacteria were shed back from intestinal villi into the small intestinal lumen and reinfected the Peyer's patches. Together, these results support a novel dissemination model where L. monocytogenes replicates in intestinal villi, is shed into the lumen, and reinfects intestinal immune cells that traffic to liver and mesenteric lymph nodes, a process that occurs even during asymptomatic colonization. PMID:22083714

  19. Cloning. Pigs is pigs.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S

    2000-09-15

    Since the first report of a cloned animal (Dolly the sheep) 3 years ago, cloning mammals has become something of a cottage industry. As Prather discusses in his Perspective, pigs can now be added to the august list of cloned animals, which includes cows, goats, and mice. This is a particularly spectacular achievement because pig cloning has turned out to be notoriously difficult. The pig is also a valuable domestic animal to have cloned because, being physiologically close to humans, its organs can be used in xenotransplantation.

  20. Cloning. Pigs is pigs.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S

    2000-09-15

    Since the first report of a cloned animal (Dolly the sheep) 3 years ago, cloning mammals has become something of a cottage industry. As Prather discusses in his Perspective, pigs can now be added to the august list of cloned animals, which includes cows, goats, and mice. This is a particularly spectacular achievement because pig cloning has turned out to be notoriously difficult. The pig is also a valuable domestic animal to have cloned because, being physiologically close to humans, its organs can be used in xenotransplantation. PMID:11012362

  1. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide in rats dosed intravenously, orally, and topically and in guinea pigs dosed topically

    SciTech Connect

    el Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.; Barnett, J.W. Jr. )

    1989-01-01

    To determine the metabolic disposition of (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) and (14C)-2-mercaptobenzothiazole disulfide (MBTS), male and female rats were dosed topically. Topical doses were 36.1 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBT and 33.6 micrograms/animal for (14C)MBTS. Although more MBT passed through the skin than MBTS and although, relative to rats, guinea pigs absorbed a greater percentage of the dose (33.4% compared to 16.1-17.5% of the MBT and 12.2% compared to 5.94-7.87% for MBTS), the disposition of radioactivity derived from the two compounds was similar. Washing of the skin removed more of the radioactivity from guinea pigs than from rats. For both sexes of rats dosed intravenously with (14C)MBT or (14C)MBTS, disposition of the compounds was similar. In 72 h, 90.9-101% of the dose appeared in the urine and 3.79-15.1% in the feces. At this time, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes. Oral dosing of rats for 14 d with unlabeled MBT prior to a single dose of (14C)MBT or with unlabeled MBTS prior to a single dose of (14C)MBTS (0.730 mg/kg). For both sexes, disposition of the compounds was similar. At 96 h after dosing, a small portion of the administered radioactivity remained associated with erythrocytes, most of which was bound to the membranes. For both compounds and sexes, 60.8-101% of the radioactivity administered appeared in the urine and 3.46-9.99% in the feces in 96 h. At the time, only trace amounts of radioactivity remained in tissues other than blood. Of these tissues, thyroid contained the highest concentration. In the urine, there was a detectable MBT or MBTS, but there were two metabolites, one of which was identified as a thioglucuronide derivative of MBT. The other was possibly a sulfonic acid derivative of MBT.

  2. Natural and experimental hepatitis E virus genotype 3-infection in European wild boar is transmissible to domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Josephine; Eiden, Martin; Vina-Rodriguez, Ariel; Fast, Christine; Dremsek, Paul; Lange, Elke; Ulrich, Rainer G; Groschup, Martin H

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of acute hepatitis E in humans in developing countries, but sporadic and autochthonous cases do also occur in industrialised countries. In Europe, food-borne zoonotic transmission of genotype 3 (gt3) has been associated with domestic pig and wild boar. However, little is known about the course of HEV infection in European wild boar and their role in HEV transmission to domestic pigs. To investigate the transmissibility and pathogenesis of wild boar-derived HEVgt3, we inoculated four wild boar and four miniature pigs intravenously. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR viral RNA was detected in serum, faeces and in liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The antibody response evolved after fourteen days post inoculation. Histopathological findings included mild to moderate lymphoplasmacytic hepatitis which was more prominent in wild boar than in miniature pigs. By immunohistochemical methods, viral antigens were detected mainly in Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, partially associated with hepatic lesions, but also in spleen and lymph nodes. While clinical symptoms were subtle and gross pathology was inconspicuous, increased liver enzyme levels in serum indicated hepatocellular injury. As the faecal-oral route is supposed to be the most likely transmission route, we included four contact animals to prove horizontal transmission. Interestingly, HEVgt3-infection was also detected in wild boar and miniature pigs kept in contact to intravenously inoculated wild boar. Given the high virus loads and long duration of viral shedding, wild boar has to be considered as an important HEV reservoir and transmission host in Europe. PMID:25421429

  3. Experimental inoculation of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K R; Fitzgerald, S D; Hattey, J A; Bolin, C A; Berry, D E; Church, S V; Reed, W M

    2006-03-01

    Although avian species are known to be susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium spp. organisms, much remains unknown about the susceptibility of birds to infection with M. bovis. The objective of this current study was to determine if wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) can be infected with M. bovis when inoculated by the oral or intratracheal route. Six turkeys were orally inoculated and another six were inoculated via the trachea with a high dose of M. bovis, 1 x 10(5) CFU/ml. Six turkeys were sham-inoculated controls. Two turkeys from each treatment group were sacrificed on days 30, 60, and 90 postinoculation. There were no gross or microscopic lesions consistent with mycobacteriosis in the 23 inoculated turkeys over the 90-day duration of this study. Fecal cultures were also consistently negative for M. bovis when sampled before inoculation and on days 1, 30, and 60 postinoculation. Two intratracheally inoculated turkeys were positive for M. bovis in visceral tissues at 30 days postinoculation. However, this finding was only indicative of passive persistence of mycobacteria in the tissues and not of infection, as there were no attendant lesions or clinical compromise to support infection. Thus, it can be concluded that young wild turkeys are resistant to infection with M. bovis and, therefore, pose minimal threat as reservoir or spillover hosts for this organism.

  4. Fecal-oral transmission of the cyst form of Blastocystis hominis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hisao; Yoshida, Kumi; Nakajima, Ayumi; Yamanari, Kimie; Iwatani, Satoru; Kimata, Isao

    2004-12-01

    The infectivity of two Blastocystis hominis strains, RN94-9 and NIH:1295:1, was examined in 3-week-old SPF Wistar rats. The NIH:1295:1 strain, originally isolated from a guinea pig, was only able to infect rats via intracecal inoculation of the cultured organisms, while the RN94-9 strain, originally isolated from a laboratory rat, was able to infect rats by oral inoculation of the cultures due to the presence of a cystic form in the in vitro culture. Since many cysts were discharged in the feces of the infected rats, the infectivity of the concentrated cysts was compared between the two strains. Successful oral infection was observed in rats inoculated with 1 x 10(2)-1 x 10(6) cysts of the RN94-9 and NIH:1295:1 strains. The infectivity of the ten cysts varied in the three experiments of ten rats, being 20-100% and 30-100% in the RN94-9 and NIH:1295:1 strains, respectively. When an uninfected normal rat was housed with five experimentally inoculated rats, the normal rat became infected, demonstrating the fecal-oral transmission of the cyst form of this parasite. These results show that the Wistar rat is an ideal host for the propagation of strains RN94-9 and NIH:1295:1 of B. hominis, and demonstrate that the cyst form is the only transmissible form of this parasite. PMID:15480786

  5. Foot and mouth disease virus transmission among vaccinated pigs after exposure to virus shedding pigs.

    PubMed

    Orsel, K; de Jong, M C M; Bouma, A; Stegeman, J A; Dekker, A

    2007-08-21

    The aim of this study was to design a transmission experiment that enabled quantification of the effectiveness of vaccination against foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus in groups of pigs. Previous experiments showed that intradermal injection of pigs with FMD virus 14 days after vaccination was not suitable to start an infection chain, as inoculated vaccinated pigs resisted challenge. Therefore, we carried out two experiments in which we used direct contact to a non-vaccinated pig as route of infection. In the first experiment only the vaccine effect on susceptibility was quantified by exposing pigs, either vaccinated 14 days before or not vaccinated, each to a non-vaccinated seeder pig inoculated with FMD virus O/NET/2001. Since no significant differences were observed between contact infections in vaccinated or non-vaccinated pigs, we performed a second experiment in which both susceptibility and infectivity were subject to vaccination. We quantified virus transmission in homogenous groups of vaccinated or non-vaccinated pigs in which the infection chain was started by exposure to a third group of non-vaccinated infected pigs. Transmission occurred to all contact-exposed pigs in the non-vaccinated groups and to 9 out of 10 contact-exposed pigs in the vaccinated groups. The rate of transmission (beta) was significantly reduced in the vaccine group. Yet, the estimated reproduction ratio in both groups was still above 1. In conclusion, by adjusting our transmission study design and challenge method, we were able to quantify transmission of FMDV among vaccinated pigs. According to this study a single vaccination was not sufficient to stop pig to pig virus transmission. With these results major outbreaks may still be expected, even in groups of vaccinated pigs. PMID:17658199

  6. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  7. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M; Werling, Dirk

    2015-11-17

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a "proof of concept" vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage. PMID:26476879

  8. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M; Werling, Dirk

    2015-11-17

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a "proof of concept" vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage.

  9. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M.; Werling, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a “proof of concept” vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage. PMID:26476879

  10. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D L Hank; Rowland, Raymond R R; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence. PMID:27611939

  11. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D. L. Hank; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence. PMID:27611939

  12. Comparison of three patterns of feed supplementation with live Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast on postweaning diarrhea, health status, and blood metabolic profile of susceptible weaning pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli F4ac.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Colombo, M; Priori, D; Fontanesi, L; Galimberti, G; Calò, G; Motta, V; Latorre, R; Fanelli, F; Mezzullo, M; Pagotto, U; Gherpelli, Y; D'Inca, R; Bosi, P

    2015-05-01

    The development of effective feeding strategies to reduce the detrimental effect of enterotoxigenic F4ac (ETEC) plays a crucial role in reducing the occurrence of therapeutic intervention with antibiotics in livestock. The ability of CNCM I-4407 (SCC), supplied in different patterns to counteract ETEC infection in weaned pigs, was evaluated. Fifty pigs weaned at 24 d were then divided into 5 groups: control (CO), CO + colistin (AB), CO + 5 × 10(10) cfu of SCC/ kg feed, from d 0 to 21 (PR), CO + 5 × 10(10) cfu of SCC/ kg feed from d 7 to 11 (CM), and CO + 1 shot of 2 × 10(11) cfu of SCC when the first diarrhea appeared (CU). On d 7 postweaning, all the pigs were orally challenged with 10(8) cfu of ETEC. Blood samples were taken from the pigs (d 7, 8, 12, and 21) while the fecal excretion of ETEC was assessed on d 7 and 10. Fecal consistency was scored from 12 h before infection to 144 h postinfection (p.i.). On d 21, the pigs were sacrificed. The in vitro adhesion test on the intestinal villi confirmed individual susceptibility to ETEC, excluding the presence of resistant pigs. Growth performance did not differ between the treatments. Mortality was reduced in the AB group (P< 0.01) and, marginally, in the PR group (P = 0.089) when compared to the CO group. The CO group had a higher fecal score than AB in the period of observation (from P = 0.01 to P< 0.001). Yeast administration reduced the fecal score when compared to the CO group 12 and 48 h p.i. (P = 0.04). Total IgA never differed among the treatments, but the ETEC-specific IgA concentration was lower in the AB group than in CO (P = 0.04) at d 12. Four days p.i., the pigs fed live yeast had reduced ETEC excretion compared with the CO pigs (P = 0.05). Blood concentrations of dodecenoyl-L-carnitine (P < 0.01), glutaryl-L-carnitine/hydroxyhex¬anoyl-L-carnitine, phosphatidylcholine diacyl and phosphatidylcholine diacyl (P = 0.01 and P< 0.01, respectively), and α-amino adipic acid (P < 0.01) were reduced in the

  13. Effect of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Infectious Doses on Infection Outcomes in Naïve Conventional Neonatal and Weaned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joseph T.; Chen, Qi; Gauger, Phillip C.; Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Sinha, Avanti; Harmon, Karen M.; Madson, Darin M.; Burrough, Eric R.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Salzbrenner, Holly M.; Welch, Michael W.; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was identified in the United States (U.S.) swine population for the first time in April 2013 and rapidly spread nationwide. However, no information has been published regarding the minimum infectious dose (MID) of PEDV in different pig models. The main objective of this study was to determine the oral minimum infectious dose of PEDV in naïve conventional neonatal piglets and weaned pigs. A U.S. virulent PEDV prototype isolate (USA/IN19338/2013) with known infectious titer was serially ten-fold diluted in virus-negative cell culture medium. Dilutions with theoretical infectious titers from 560 to 0.0056 TCID50/ml together with a medium control were orogastrically inoculated (10ml/pig) into 7 groups of 5-day-old neonatal pigs (n = 4 per group) and 7 groups of 21-day-old weaned pigs (n = 6 per group). In 5-day-old pigs, 10ml of inoculum having titers 560–0.056 TCID50/ml, corresponding to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cycle threshold (Ct) values 24.2–37.6, resulted in 100% infection in each group; 10ml of inoculum with titer 0.0056 TCID50/ml (Ct>45) caused infection in 25% of the inoculated pigs. In 21-day-old pigs, 10ml of inoculum with titers 560–5.6 TCID50/ml (Ct 24.2–31.4) resulted in 100% infection in each group while 10ml of inoculum with titers 0.56–0.0056 TCID50/ml (Ct values 35.3 –>45) did not establish infection in any pigs under study conditions as determined by clinical signs, PCR, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and antibody response. These data reveal that PEDV infectious dose is age-dependent with a significantly lower MID for neonatal pigs compared to weaned pigs. This information should be taken into consideration when interpreting clinical relevance of PEDV PCR results and when designing a PEDV bioassay model. The observation of such a low MID in neonates also emphasizes the importance of strict biosecurity and thorough cleaning/disinfection on sow farms. PMID:26441071

  14. Experimental aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jobert, J L; Savoye, C; Cariolet, R; Kobisch, M; Madec, F

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the possible role of aerosol in the transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an experiment including 18 specific pathogen-free (SPF), 10-week-old piglets, randomly distributed into 2 adjacent units, was carried out. In these facilities, air was forced through absolute filters to prevent any contact with infectious agents. During the first 6 d post inoculation, the 2 units were connected by a rectangular opening and the air circulation was forced by the ventilation system from unit A (inoculated pigs) to unit B (non-inoculated pigs). The A. pleuropneumoniae strain (biovar 1 serovar 9) was isolated in France from an outbreak of porcine pleuropneumonia. Two different infecting doses, 10(7) cfu/animal and 10(8) cfu/animal, were inoculated by intranasal route in 6 pigs of unit A. The infection spread quickly from the inoculated pigs to the non-inoculated pigs. Clinical signs were acute during the 4 d post inoculation: hyperthermia, respiratory distress and, sometimes, death (6 pigs of the unit A and 2 pigs of the unit B). All pigs seroconverted against A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 9 within 2 weeks. Lung lesions were severe: fibrinous pleurisy and lung hemorrhages in the acute stage, pleural adherences and focal pulmonary necrosis in the chronic stage. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was isolated from the tonsils and/or lungs in 16 animals. It could be also isolated from the air of the experimental unit. This study showed that A. pleuropneumoniae was readily transmitted through aerosol over a distance of at least 2.5 m. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10680652

  15. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  16. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  17. Impact of Ceftiofur Injection on Gut Microbiota and Escherichia coli Resistance in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, M. A.; Mourand, G.; Jouy, E.; Touzain, F.; Le Devendec, L.; de Boisseson, C.; Eono, F.; Cariolet, R.; Guérin, A.; Le Goff, O.; Blanquet-Diot, S.; Alric, M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) is an important health concern. Here, we studied the impact of the administration of a long-acting form of ceftiofur on the pig gut microbiota and ESC resistance in Escherichia coli. Pigs were orally inoculated with an ESC-resistant E. coli M63 strain harboring a conjugative plasmid carrying a gene conferring resistance, blaCTX-M-1. On the same day, they were given or not a unique injection of ceftiofur. Fecal microbiota were studied using quantitative PCR analysis of the main bacterial groups and quantification of short-chain fatty acids. E. coli and ESC-resistant E. coli were determined by culture methods, and the ESC-resistant E. coli isolates were characterized. The copies of the blaCTX-M-1 gene were quantified. After ceftiofur injection, the main change in gut microbiota was the significant but transitory decrease in the E. coli population. Acetate and butyrate levels were significantly lower in the treated group. In all inoculated groups, E. coli M63 persisted in most pigs, and the blaCTX-M-1 gene was transferred to other E. coli. Culture and PCR results showed that the ceftiofur-treated group shed significantly more resistant strains 1 and 3 days after ESC injection. Thereafter, on most dates, there were no differences between the groups, but notably, one pig in the nontreated group regularly excreted very high numbers of ESC-resistant E. coli, probably leading to a higher contamination level in its pen. In conclusion, the use of ESCs, and also the presence of high-shedding animals, are important features in the spread of ESC resistance. PMID:26077254

  18. Impact of ceftiofur injection on gut microbiota and Escherichia coli resistance in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fleury, M A; Mourand, G; Jouy, E; Touzain, F; Le Devendec, L; de Boisseson, C; Eono, F; Cariolet, R; Guérin, A; Le Goff, O; Blanquet-Diot, S; Alric, M; Kempf, I

    2015-09-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) is an important health concern. Here, we studied the impact of the administration of a long-acting form of ceftiofur on the pig gut microbiota and ESC resistance in Escherichia coli. Pigs were orally inoculated with an ESC-resistant E. coli M63 strain harboring a conjugative plasmid carrying a gene conferring resistance, bla CTX-M-1. On the same day, they were given or not a unique injection of ceftiofur. Fecal microbiota were studied using quantitative PCR analysis of the main bacterial groups and quantification of short-chain fatty acids. E. coli and ESC-resistant E. coli were determined by culture methods, and the ESC-resistant E. coli isolates were characterized. The copies of the bla CTX-M-1 gene were quantified. After ceftiofur injection, the main change in gut microbiota was the significant but transitory decrease in the E. coli population. Acetate and butyrate levels were significantly lower in the treated group. In all inoculated groups, E. coli M63 persisted in most pigs, and the bla CTX-M-1 gene was transferred to other E. coli. Culture and PCR results showed that the ceftiofur-treated group shed significantly more resistant strains 1 and 3 days after ESC injection. Thereafter, on most dates, there were no differences between the groups, but notably, one pig in the nontreated group regularly excreted very high numbers of ESC-resistant E. coli, probably leading to a higher contamination level in its pen. In conclusion, the use of ESCs, and also the presence of high-shedding animals, are important features in the spread of ESC resistance.

  19. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs.

  20. Bioavailability of PCDDs and PCDFs of fly ash after semi-chronic oral ingestion by guinea pig and Syrian golden hamster

    SciTech Connect

    van den Bery, M.; de Vroom, E.; Olie, K.; Hutzinger, O.

    1986-01-01

    Groups of guinea pigs and syrian golden hamster were fed 2.5% HCl pre-treated fly ash from the electrostatic precipitator of a municipal incinerator during one, two, and three months, respectively, in the diet. The livers were analyzed for tetra-, penta-, and hexa-chlorinated dibenzo(p)dioxines (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). In the livers of the hamsters 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs were the major isomers retained. In the livers of the guinea pigs 2,3,7,8 substituted PCDDs and PCDF congeners were retained, but also a number of otherwise substituted PCDFs. The PCDF congener which had the highest retention in the livers of guinea pigs was 1,2,3,7,8-PnCDF, 11.3% after 95 days. In the livers of the hamsters highest retention was found for 2,3,4,7,8-PnCDF, 8.4% after 95 days. For most 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs the retention in the livers of the guinea pigs and hamsters was not significantly different during the whole period, which could indicate a bioconcentration approaching a linear relationship to the administered dose. Constant relative concentrations in the livers were found for the 2,3,7,8-substituted penta- and hexa-chlorinated PCDDs and PCDF in both species during the three time periods.

  1. Evaluation of a Novel, Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Compound, Acyclovir Elaidate (P-4010), in the Female Guinea Pig Model of Genital Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R.; Smith, T. L.; Myhren, F.; Phillips, J.; Sandvold, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    The antiviral effect of acyclovir elaidate in the female guinea pig model of genital herpes was investigated in a series of experiments. The antiherpesvirus effects of this novel compound, 9-(2′-[trans-9"-octadecenoyloxyl]ethoxymethyl)guanine (code no. P-4010), were studied in both primary and recurrent genital herpes in the female guinea pig, following oral gavage or intraperitoneal injection, with different formulations of the compound, and in comparison with acyclovir (ACV) or penciclovir (PCV). The results indicate that compound P-4010 has a greater capability than either ACV or PCV in reducing the clinical symptoms of primary genital herpes induced following the inoculation of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) intravaginally into guinea pigs. In addition, the administration of P-4010 twice daily over a 10-day period by the intraperitoneal route (15 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day) or by oral gavage (50 to 200 mg/kg/day), commencing 4 h subsequent to intravaginal HSV-2 infection, resulted in a degree of reduction in the incidence and severity of spontaneous, recurrent genital herpes in these animals. The findings are discussed in the light of the value and relevance of the female guinea pig model of genital herpes for the assessment of anti-herpes simplex virus compounds. PMID:9869565

  2. Oxfendazole flukicidal activity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Pedro; Terrones, Susana; Cabrera, María; Hoban, Cristian; Ceballos, Laura; Moreno, Laura; Canton, Candela; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2014-08-01

    Although oxfendazole (OFZ) is a well know broad-spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic, the assessment of its potential trematodicidal activity remains unexplored. OFZ administration at single high doses has been recommended to control Taenia solium cysticercus in pigs. The current study investigated the flukicidal activity obtained after a single high (30mg/kg) oral dose of OFZ in pigs harbouring a natural Fasciola hepatica infection. Sixteen (16) local ecotype pigs were randomly allocated into two (2) experimental groups of 8 animals each named as follow: Untreated control and OFZ treated, in which animals received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30mg/kg. At seven (7) days post-treatment, all the animals were sacrificed and direct adult liver fluke counts were performed following the WAAVP guidelines. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse event during the study. OFZ treatment as a single 30mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against F. hepatica. In conclusion, the trial described here demonstrated an excellent OFZ activity against F. hepatica in naturally infected pigs, after its administration at a single oral dose of 30mg/kg.

  3. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  4. [Experimental study of the inoculative transmission of Rickettsia typhi by gamasid mites (Gamasidae) Ornithonyssus bacoti].

    PubMed

    Grabarev, P A; Suroviatkin, A V; Tikhonova, Iu Iu; Mishchenko, O A; Potapenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    The authors' studies have established that the concentration of Rickettsia typhi may increase about 100-fold in the infected Ornithonyssus bacoti mites. At the time, when on feeding 20 to 200 adult mites on guinea-pigs and albino rats 4 to 36 days after inoculation, they did not transmit Rickettsia typhi on blood sucking. PMID:19566066

  5. Experimental Helicobacter pylori gastric infection in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Koga, T; Shimada, Y; Sato, K; Takahashi, K; Kikuchi; Miura, T; Takenouchi, T; Narita, T; Iwata, M

    2002-03-01

    An experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in miniature pigs was developed and investigated. Eighteen miniature pigs were inoculated with an H. pylori strain that has high virulence in mice at c. 5 x 10(10) cfu. H. pylori infection in miniature pigs was achieved by the administration of agar 1% in brucella broth with fetal bovine serum 10% just before inoculation. The bacterial colonisation and distribution were analysed by mapping of viable cell counts in the stomach in pigs of three different ages. The mapping assay was achieved on post-infection day 3 for the 5-day-old and 2-week-old pigs, and between days 41 and 43 for 3-month-old pigs. The highest cell counts were observed in 5-day-old pigs, which averaged 4.9 x 10(6) cfu/g of mucosa (n = 4). The bacteria were colonised mainly in the cardiac and fundus gland region in the 5-day-old and 2-week-old pigs, whereas the colonisation sites did not depend on the region in the 3-month-old pigs. Biopsy assay of the antral mucosa of a 3-month-old pig after H. pylori infection showed that this infection persisted for >22 months. Serum antibody against H. pylori was detected in the infected pigs but not in the uninfected animal. Immunostaining demonstrated the presence of bacteria on the epithelial surface of the infected pigs. A microscopic finding common to all the infected pigs, focal gastritis with infiltration of lymphocytes detected on the lesser curvature of the stomach, resembled the microscopic appearance in H. pylori-infected human patients. These results suggest that miniature pigs might be a suitable model for studying H. pylori infection.

  6. Do immune genes influence which pigs will have persistent Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) infections?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study, a part of the "Big Pig" project, was aimed at highlighting differences in immune responses between control pigs and pigs with PRRSV infections, from early times post inoculation (pi), 14 dpi, to long term persistent infections (as evidenced by viral RNA in tissues). Our goal is to identi...

  7. Expression of human CD46 has no effect on porcine circovirus type 2 infection and shedding in the experimental pig model.

    PubMed

    Hemann, Michelle; Shen, Hui-Gang; Beach, Nathan M; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2012-09-01

    Xenotransplantation of tissues from transgenic pigs with desired genetic modifications such as CD46 expression help minimize xenograft rejections. However, CD46 is a known receptor for some viruses. In this study, pigs transgenic for human CD46 (CD46-TG) and appropriate non-transgenic (non-TG) control pigs were utilized to determine possible differences in the level of replication and shedding of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2). Non-TG and CD46-TG were blocked by transgenic status and randomly divided into three groups: Non-TG negative controls (n = 3), non-TG-PCV2 (n = 10; PCV2a = 5, PCV2b = 5), and CD46-TG-PCV2 (n = 6; PCV2a = 3, PCV2b = 3). Blood, oral, nasal and fecal swabs were collected at regular intervals from the day of arrival until 70 days post inoculation (DPI). All samples were tested by quantitative real-time PCR for the presence of PCV2 DNA and serum was tested for presence of PCV2 antibodies by ELISA. Overall, the main effects "transgenic status" and "PCV2 subtype" had no influence on degree of PCV2 viremia and shedding or the anti-PCV2 humoral immune response in CD46-TG-PCV2 pigs compared to non-TG-PCV2 pigs. Differences in PCV2 concentrations between non-TG-PCV2 and CD46-TG-PCV2 pigs were minimal and limited to DPI 35 in sera, DPI 7 in fecal swabs and DPI 5 in nasal swabs when CD46-TG-PCV2 pigs had significantly higher concentrations of PCV2 DNA. At DPI 1, CD46-TG-PCV2 pigs had significantly lower concentrations of PCV2 DNA in oral swabs. Under the study conditions, the presence of human CD46 in transgenic pigs had no effect on PCV2 infection in otherwise healthy pigs capable of a normal immune response. PMID:22388862

  8. Pruritus and behavior of pigs infested by itch mites, Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari: Sarcoptidae).

    PubMed

    Davis, D P; Moon, R D

    1990-08-01

    Effects of infestation by Sarcoptes scabiei (De Geer) on pruritus and other behaviors of pigs for 9-13 wks after weaning were evaluated. Regardless of the dose of mites inoculated, pigs fed ad lib. spent approximately 60% of their time at rest. Within their average day, pigs spent more time eating in morning and evening, were more active and pruritic at midday, and rested more and spent the least time drinking water at night. Mite infestations increased total activity and time spent scratching and rubbing. Infested pigs sprayed with water rubbed and scratched 4-10 times more frequently than those left undisturbed or disturbed by other means. Pigs receiving inoculating doses of 1,000 mites became more pruritic than pigs receiving 100 mites, and both groups developed more pruritus than non-infested control pigs.

  9. Local and systemic immune response in pigs during subclinical and clinical swine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, M; Kwit, K; Markowska-Daniel, I; Kowalski, C; Pejsak, Z

    2014-10-01

    Local and systemic immune responses in pigs intranasally (IN) and intratracheally (IT) inoculated with swine influenza virus (SIV) were studied. No clinical signs were observed in IN-inoculated pigs, while IT-inoculated pigs developed typical signs of influenza. Significantly higher titres of specific antibodies and changes of haematological parameters were found only in IT-inoculated pigs. Because positive correlations between viral titre, local cytokine concentration, and lung pathology have been observed, we hypothesise that both viral load and the local secretion of cytokines play a role in the induction of lung lesions. It could be that a higher replication of SIV stimulates immune cells to secrete higher amounts of cytokines. The results of the present study indicate that pathogenesis of SIV is dependent on both, the damage caused to the lung parenchyma directly by virus, and the effects on the cells of the host's immune system.

  10. Experimental infection of pigs with 'Candidatus Helicobacter suis'.

    PubMed

    Hellemans, A; Chiers, K; Decostere, A; De Bock, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R

    2007-05-01

    'Candidatus Helicobacter suis' is a spiral-shaped bacterium that colonizes the stomach of more than 60% of slaughter pigs. The role of 'Candidatus Helicobacter suis' in gastric disease of pigs is still unclear. Experimental studies in pigs are lacking because this bacterium is unculturable until now. An inoculation protocol using 'Candidatus Helicobacter suis' infected mouse stomach homogenate was used to reproduce the infection in pigs. Control animals were inoculated using negative mouse stomach homogenate. Pigs were inoculated three times with one-week intervals and euthanized 6 weeks post inoculation. Tissue samples were taken from different mucosal stomach regions to detect 'Candidatus Helicobacter suis' by PCR and urease test. Mucosal inflammation was evaluated on formalin-fixed tissue samples. Lesions in the pars oesophagea were scored macroscopically. Infection was successful in all challenged animals, with the antrum and the fundus being predominantly positive. Infection was associated with infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells in the antral mucosa, evolving to follicular gastritis. No apparent inflammation of the fundic stomach region was detected in the infected animals. A clear link between 'Candidatus Helicobacter suis' and pars oesophageal lesions could not be found.

  11. Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwonil; Scheuer, Kelly A.; Lu, Zhongyan; Zhang, Yan; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the progression of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection, we inoculated gnotobiotic pigs with a newly emerged US strain, PC21A, of the virus. At 24–48 hours postinoculation, the pigs exhibited severe diarrhea and vomiting, fecal shedding, viremia, and severe atrophic enteritis. These findings confirm that strain PC21A is highly enteropathogenic. PMID:24795932

  12. Tissue distribution of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyl isomers in guinea pigs after oral ingestion

    SciTech Connect

    Jan, J.; Logar, B.; Jan, J.

    1996-03-01

    Food ingestion is the most important route for the uptake of lipophilic organochlorine contaminants. Uptake and transfer of the contaminants from the digestive tract to target organs can be used for risk evaluation. The bioconcentration and migration of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) is highly structure - dependent. Bioconcentration is correlated with lipophilicity on the basis of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient in its logarithmic form - logKow. However, some factors e.g. diffusion through cell membranes, accumulation in specific organs and tissues, uptake and deputation kinetics and metabolism can also influence the bioconcentration. Individual PCB compounds of commercial PCB preparation are taken up by organisms to markedly different extents. Until now little is known about the distribution of non-planar and co-planar PCBs in different tissues. Co-planar PCBs have dioxin - like toxicity. This study examines differences in the bioconcentration of two pairs of tetra and hexa chlorobiphenyls from the digestive tract and their distribution in different tissues of guinea pigs.

  13. Course and transmission characteristics of oral low-dose infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar with a Caucasian African swine fever virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Jana; Guinat, Claire; Beer, Martin; Pronin, Valery; Tauscher, Kerstin; Petrov, Anja; Keil, Günther; Blome, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    In 2007, African swine fever virus (ASFV) was introduced into the Transcaucasian countries and Russia. Since then, it has spread alarmingly and reached the European Union. ASFV strains are highly virulent and lead to almost 100% mortality under experimental conditions. However, the possibility of dose-dependent disease courses has been discussed. For this reason, a study was undertaken to assess the risk of chronic disease and the establishment of carriers upon low-dose oronasal infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar. It was demonstrated that very low doses of ASFV are sufficient to infect especially weak or runted animals by the oronasal route. Some of these animals did not show clinical signs indicative of ASF, and they developed almost no fever. However, no changes were observed in individual animal regarding the onset, course and outcome of infection as assessed by diagnostic tests. After amplification of ASFV by these animals, pen- and stablemates became infected and developed acute lethal disease with similar characteristics in all animals. Thus, we found no indication of prolonged or chronic individual courses upon low-dose infection in either species. The scattered onset of clinical signs and pathogen detection within and among groups confirms moderate contagiosity that is strongly linked with blood contact. In conclusion, the prolonged course at the "herd level" together with the exceptionally low dose that proved to be sufficient to infect a runted wild boar could be important for disease dynamics in wild-boar populations and in backyard settings.

  14. Distribution of vitamin C is tissue specific with early saturation of the brain and adrenal glands following differential oral dose regimens in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hasselholt, Stine; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2015-05-28

    Vitamin C (VitC) deficiency is surprisingly common in humans even in developed parts of the world. The micronutrient has several established functions in the brain; however, the consequences of its deficiency are not well characterised. To elucidate the effects of VitC deficiency on the brain, increased knowledge about the distribution of VitC to the brain and within different brain regions after varying dietary concentrations is needed. In the present study, guinea pigs (like humans lacking the ability to synthesise VitC) were randomly divided into six groups (n 10) that received different concentrations of VitC ranging from 100 to 1500 mg/kg feed for 8 weeks, after which VitC concentrations in biological fluids and tissues were measured using HPLC. The distribution of VitC was found to be dynamic and dependent on dietary availability. Brain saturation was region specific, occurred at low dietary doses, and the dose-concentration relationship could be approximated with a three-parameter Hill equation. The correlation between plasma and brain concentrations of VitC was moderate compared with other organs, and during non-scorbutic VitC deficiency, the brain was able to maintain concentrations from about one-quarter to half of sufficient levels depending on the region, whereas concentrations in other tissues decreased to one-sixth or less. The adrenal glands have similar characteristics to the brain. The observed distribution kinetics with a low dietary dose needed for saturation and exceptional retention ability suggest that the brain and adrenal glands are high priority tissues with regard to the distribution of VitC.

  15. Malignant transformation of guinea pig cells after exposure to ultraviolet-irradiated guinea pig cytomegalovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Isom, H.C.; Mummaw, J.; Kreider, J.W.

    1983-04-30

    Guinea pig cells were malignantly transformed in vitro by ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV). When guinea pig hepatocyte monolayers were infected with uv-irradiated GPCMV, three continuous epithelioid cell lines which grew in soft agarose were established. Two independently derived GPCMV-transformed liver cells and a cell line derived from a soft agarose clone of one of these lines induced invasive tumors when inoculated subcutaneously or intraperitoneally into nude mice. The tumors were sarcomas possibly derived from hepatic stroma or sinusoid. Transformed cell lines were also established after infection of guinea pig hepatocyte monolayers with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) or simian virus 40 (SV40). These cell lines also formed colonies in soft agarose and induced sarcomas in nude mice. It is concluded that (i) GPCMV can malignantly transform guinea pig cells; (ii) cloning of GPCMV-transformed cells in soft agarose produced cells that induced tumors with a shorter latency period but with no alteration in growth rate or final tumor size; and (iii) the tumors produced by GPCMV-and HCMV-transformed guinea pig cells were more similar to each other in growth rate than to those induced by SV40-transformed guinea pig cells.

  16. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  17. Potential use of oral fluid samples for serological diagnosis of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Mur, Lina; Gallardo, Carmina; Soler, Alejandro; Zimmermman, Jeffrey; Pelayo, Virginia; Nieto, Raquel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Arias, Marisa

    2013-07-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a complex, highly lethal, notifiable disease of swine. ASF is wide-spread in sub-Saharan Africa and East European countries and there is presently a great risk of spread to neighboring countries. Since there is no vaccine for ASF virus (ASFV), control is based on rapid and early detection of the disease via surveillance. This approach requires collecting blood samples from large number of animals. Laborious and expensive of itself, this process also presents an additional risk because ASFV is present at high concentrations in the blood. The objective of this study was to initiate studies into the potential use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum for ASF diagnosis, for latter studying its possible use in surveillance and control programs. To this end, oral fluid samples collected at different times post infection from eight pigs experimentally inoculated with an attenuated ASFV were assayed using modified protocols of the two validated serological techniques, the enzyme-immune-liked assay (ELISA) and immunoperoxidase technique (IPT). Antibodies against ASFV were detected in oral fluid samples of all animals from early post infection through the end of the experiment by ELISA and IPT. These results confirmed the presence of ASFV antibodies in swine oral fluids samples, the possibility of an oral fluid-based approach in ASF diagnosis and, potentially in ASF surveillance.

  18. Abortion and death in goats inoculated with Sarcocystis sporocysts from coyote feces.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    1981-04-01

    Ten 75- to 105-day-pregnant does each were inoculated orally within 1 million (2 does), 10,000 (4 does), or 1,000 (4 does) sporocysts of Sarcocystis from coyote feces. Two does not inoculated with sporocysts served as controls. The 2 does inoculated with 1 million sporocysts died from acute sarcocystosis 21 and 22 days after inoculation (DAI), and each had 2 dead fetuses. The 4 does inoculated with 10,000 sporocysts were ill 19 to 33 DAI but survived; 1 aborted at 33 DAI, 1 had a live kid that died within 2 hours of birth 31 DAI, 1 aborted 2 dead fetuses 23 DAI, and 1 had a normal kid 56 DAI. The 4 does inoculated with 1,000 sporocysts and the 2 control does remained clinically normal and had normal kids. Does and their offspring were killed within 24 hours of parturition, and their tissues were examined histologically and microbiologically. Meronts of Sarcocystis were found in the maternal placenta of does inoculated with 1 million sporocysts. Sarcocystis was not found in the placenta, fetuses, or tissues of kids from does inoculated with 10,000 or 1,000 sporocysts, or from control does. Other abortifacient agents were not found in the placenta, fetuses, or kids from any does.

  19. Effects of atmospheric ammonia on young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Meyer, R.C.; Simon, J.; Norton, H.W.

    1981-06-01

    Effects of atmospheric ammonia on performance and respiratory tract health of young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica were studied. Treatments were: (1) control, (2) Bordetella inoculation (approx 10(9) bacteria/naris) alone, (3) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 34.7 mg/m3 (50 ppm), and (4) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 69.4 mg/m3 (100 ppm). Pigs weighted 8.01 kg (av) at start of treatment. Body weight and feed disappearance were measured weekly. After 4 weeks, all pigs were killed and examined grossly, and appropriate specimens were obtained for histopathologic examination. Regression models were fitted to growth, feed disappearance, and gain-to-feed data. The growth model indicated that Bordetella-inoculated pigs gained 26% less body weight than did controls, regardless of atmospheric ammonia concentration. Bordetella inoculation, regardless of ammonia exposure, reduced feed disappearance 12% below the control rate. Treatment difference was not noted in gain/feed data. Shrunken turbinates were observed in Bordetella-inoculated pigs. Shrinkage also appeared to be related directly to ammonia concentration. Rhinitis was confirmed histopathologically, and its severity was related with atmospheric ammonia concentration, but no difference was seen in the osseous core of the turbinates.

  20. Dose Determination for Acute Salmonella Infection in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Loynachan, A. T.; Harris, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Pigs were exposed to various levels of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium by either intranasal inoculation or by subjecting them to a contaminated environment. More than 103 salmonellae were required to induce acute Salmonella infection. These results indicate that intervention against acute Salmonella infection in lairage may be more readily achieved than previously thought. PMID:15870368

  1. Inoculating against reactance to persuasive health messages.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam S; Banas, John A

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examined the possibility of decreasing psychological reactance to health campaigns through the use of inoculation messages. It was hypothesized that an inoculation message, which forewarned of the potential of subsequent reactance, would decrease participants' likelihood of reacting negatively to a freedom-threatening message aimed to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Participants (N = 275) who were inoculated against potential reactance felt less threatened and experienced less reactance compared to those who did not read an inoculation message. Structural equation modeling showed that inoculation indirectly predicted lower intention to drink alcohol via the theorized mediated reactance process. This research suggests that it is possible to inoculate against self-generated cognitions that might otherwise lead toward negative health behaviors.

  2. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi. PMID:27578872

  3. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition following feeding of silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants yield an increase in milk production without increasing fiber digestibility, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. We hypothesized that silage treated with a commercial inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum, LP) would improve milk production and would alter rumen bacter...

  4. Seeding Stress Resilience through Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ashokan, Archana; Sivasubramanian, Meenalochani; Mitra, Rupshi

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a generalized set of physiological and psychological responses observed when an organism is placed under challenging circumstances. The stress response allows organisms to reattain the equilibrium in face of perturbations. Unfortunately, chronic and/or traumatic exposure to stress frequently overwhelms coping ability of an individual. This is manifested as symptoms affecting emotions and cognition in stress-related mental disorders. Thus environmental interventions that promote resilience in face of stress have much clinical relevance. Focus of the bulk of relevant neurobiological research at present remains on negative aspects of health and psychological outcomes of stress exposure. Yet exposure to the stress itself can promote resilience to subsequent stressful episodes later in the life. This is especially true if the prior stress occurs early in life, is mild in its magnitude, and is controllable by the individual. This articulation has been referred to as “stress inoculation,” reminiscent of resilience to the pathology generated through vaccination by attenuated pathogen itself. Using experimental evidence from animal models, this review explores relationship between nature of the “inoculum” stress and subsequent psychological resilience. PMID:26881112

  5. Transmission of sheep-bovine spongiform encephalopathy to pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Cobrière, Fabien; Filali, Hicham; Vazquez, Francisco; Pitarch, José Luis; Vargas, Antonia; Acín, Cristina; Moreno, Bernardino; Pumarola, Martí; Andreoletti, Olivier; Badiola, Juan José

    2016-01-07

    Experimental transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent has been successfully reported in pigs inoculated via three simultaneous distinct routes (intracerebral, intraperitoneal and intravenous). Sheep derived BSE (Sh-BSE) is transmitted more efficiently than the original cattle-BSE isolate in a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine prion protein. However, the neuropathology and distribution of Sh-BSE in pigs as natural hosts, and susceptibility to this agent, is unknown. In the present study, seven pigs were intracerebrally inoculated with Sh-BSE prions. One pig was euthanized for analysis in the preclinical disease stage. The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. Intracellular and neuropil-associated pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition was consistently observed in different brain sections and corroborated by Western blot. PrP(Sc) was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay in the following tissues in at least one animal: lymphoid tissues, peripheral nerves, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland and pancreas. PrP(Sc) deposition was revealed by immunohistochemistry alone in the retina, optic nerve and kidney. These results demonstrate the efficient transmission of Sh-BSE in pigs and show for the first time that in this species propagation of bovine PrP(Sc) in a wide range of peripheral tissues is possible. These results provide important insight into the distribution and detection of prions in non-ruminant animals.

  6. Transmission of sheep-bovine spongiform encephalopathy to pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Cobrière, Fabien; Filali, Hicham; Vazquez, Francisco; Pitarch, José Luis; Vargas, Antonia; Acín, Cristina; Moreno, Bernardino; Pumarola, Martí; Andreoletti, Olivier; Badiola, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    Experimental transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent has been successfully reported in pigs inoculated via three simultaneous distinct routes (intracerebral, intraperitoneal and intravenous). Sheep derived BSE (Sh-BSE) is transmitted more efficiently than the original cattle-BSE isolate in a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine prion protein. However, the neuropathology and distribution of Sh-BSE in pigs as natural hosts, and susceptibility to this agent, is unknown. In the present study, seven pigs were intracerebrally inoculated with Sh-BSE prions. One pig was euthanized for analysis in the preclinical disease stage. The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. Intracellular and neuropil-associated pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition was consistently observed in different brain sections and corroborated by Western blot. PrP(Sc) was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay in the following tissues in at least one animal: lymphoid tissues, peripheral nerves, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland and pancreas. PrP(Sc) deposition was revealed by immunohistochemistry alone in the retina, optic nerve and kidney. These results demonstrate the efficient transmission of Sh-BSE in pigs and show for the first time that in this species propagation of bovine PrP(Sc) in a wide range of peripheral tissues is possible. These results provide important insight into the distribution and detection of prions in non-ruminant animals. PMID:26742788

  7. Role in virulence and protective efficacy in pigs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium secreted components identified by signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnell, Sonya C; Bowen, Alison; Morgan, Eirwen; Maskell, Duncan J; Wallis, Timothy S; Stevens, Mark P

    2007-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a zoonotic enteric pathogen of worldwide importance and pigs are a significant reservoir of human infection. Signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify genes required by S. Typhimurium to colonize porcine intestines. A library of 1045 signature-tagged mutants of S. Typhimurium ST4/74 Nal(R) was screened following oral inoculation of pigs in duplicate. A total of 119 attenuating mutations were identified in 95 different genes, many of which encode known or putative secreted or surface-anchored molecules. A large number of attenuating mutations were located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 and -2, confirming important roles for type III secretion systems (T3SS)-1 and -2 in intestinal colonization of pigs. Roles for genes encoded in other pathogenicity islands and islets, including the SPI-6-encoded Saf atypical fimbriae, were also identified. Given the role of secreted factors and the protection conferred against other pathogens by vaccination with extracellular and type III secreted proteins, the efficacy of a secreted protein vaccine from wild-type S. Typhimurium following intramuscular vaccination of pigs was evaluated. Serum IgG responses against type III secreted proteins were induced following vaccination and a significant reduction in faecal excretion of S. Typhimurium was observed in the acute phase of infection compared to mock-vaccinated animals. Vaccination with secreted proteins from an isogenic S. Typhimurium prgH mutant produced comparable levels of protection to vaccination with the preparation from the parent strain, indicating that protection was not reliant on T3SS-1 secreted proteins. The data provide valuable information for the control of Salmonella in pigs.

  8. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation.

  9. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation. PMID:26828597

  10. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation. PMID:26828597

  11. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. PMID:26432777

  12. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread.

  13. Isolation, characterization, and application of bacteriophages for Salmonella spp. biocontrol in pigs.

    PubMed

    Albino, Luiz A A; Rostagno, Marcos H; Húngaro, Humberto M; Mendonça, Regina C S

    2014-08-01

    Foodborne illness due to Salmonella-contaminated pork products is an important public health problem, causing significant economic losses worldwide. The use of bacteriophages is a potential intervention tool that has attracted interest for the control of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of Salmonella in commercial pig farms and to isolate specific autochthonous bacteriophages against Salmonella Typhimurium, to characterize them and to evaluate their lytic capacity against Salmonella Typhimurium in vivo and in vitro. Salmonella was isolated on 50% (4/8) of the farms, with serotype Typhimurium being the most prevalent, detected in 48.2% of samples (13/27). The isolated Salmonella Typhimurium bacteriophages belong to the Podoviridae family, were active against serotypes Abony, Enteritidis, Typhi, and Typhimurium, but not against serotypes Arizonae, Cholerasuis, Gallinarum, and Pullorum. In in vitro tests, bacteriophage at 10(7) PFU/mL and 10(9) PFU/mL significantly reduced (p<0.05) Salmonella Typhimurium counts in 1.6 and 2.5 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, respectively, after 24 h. Before the in vivo treatment with bacteriophages, Salmonella was identified in 93.3% (28/30) of the fecal samples from the pigs inoculated with 10(6) CFU/mL, and only in 56.6% (17/30) after the treatment consisting of oral administration of the pool of the bacteriophages after the fasting period, simulating a common preslaughter practice. These results indicate that the pool of bacteriophages administered was capable of reducing the colonization of Salmonella in pigs.

  14. Efficacy of the investigational echinocandin ASP9726 in a guinea pig model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P; Najvar, Laura K; Matsumoto, Satoru; Bocanegra, Rosie A; Herrera, Monica L; Wickes, Brian L; Kirkpatrick, William R; Patterson, Thomas F

    2015-05-01

    ASP9726 is an investigational echinocandin with in vitro activity against Aspergillus species. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of this agent in an established guinea pig model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. ASP9726 plasma concentrations were measured in guinea pigs administered either a single dose or multiple doses of this agent at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg of body weight/day by subcutaneous injection. Immunosuppressed guinea pigs were inoculated with A. fumigatus AF293, and ASP9726 (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day), voriconazole (10 mg/kg by oral gavage twice daily), or caspofungin (3 mg/kg/day by intraperitoneal injection) was administered for 8 days. Changes in fungal burden were measured by enumerating CFU and by quantitative PCR of specimens from within the lungs, as well as by analysis of serum (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan and galactomannan. Lung histopathology was also evaluated. ASP9726 plasma concentrations increased in a dose-proportional manner, and the drug was well tolerated at each dose. Each dose of ASP9726, voriconazole, and caspofungin significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden as measured by quantitative PCR and by determining (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan and galactomannan levels, but only voriconazole significantly reduced numbers of CFU. ASP9726 at 5 mg/kg also significantly improved survival. Histopathology demonstrated morphological changes in hyphae in animals exposed to ASP9726 and caspofungin, consistent with the activities of the echinocandins. These results suggest that ASP9726 may be efficacious for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:25753643

  15. Dynamics and persistence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Fano, Eduardo; Pijoan, Carlos; Dee, Scott

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the dynamics (shedding and transmission) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection within a population of swine and to determine the duration of the infection (persistence) through the identification of the agent in bronchial samples. Sixty-three 2-month-old pigs were used in this study. The pigs (n = 28) were experimentally infected by the intratracheal route with M. hyopneumoniae and considered as seeder pigs. The remaining pigs (n = 32) were not inoculated and randomly allocated to 2 different groups: direct contact exposure pigs (n = 12) and indirect contact exposure pigs (n = 20). Blood samples and nasal swabs were collected throughout the study on days 0, 28, 35, 42, 49, 63, 91, and 119 postinfection. To assess the duration of M. hyopneumoniae infection, 9 seeder and 6 contact exposure pigs were slaughtered at days 155 (group 1), 170 (group 2), and 185 (group 3) postinfection. Direct contact pigs showed evidence of infection on day 28 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and on day 35 by serology. The indirect contact exposure pigs presented a very delayed and slow seroconversion pattern; they did not present evidence of transmission until 42 d after the infection of seeder pigs. Identification of M. hyopneumoniae in bronchial swabs was confirmed by nested-PCR from days 155 to 185 postinfection. At the last slaughter date, 77.7% and 100% of the seeders and contact exposure pigs, respectively, tested positive. The results of this study reconfirmed direct infection of M. hyopneumoniae and suggest that indirect transmission can occur in a population. Finally, duration of the infection in this study was longer than previously described. PMID:16187553

  16. Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W.-L.; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Mineral soil-based inoculants of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium phaseoli survived better at 4°C than at higher temperatures, but ca. 15% of the cells were viable at 37°C after 27 days. Soil-based inoculants of R. meliloti, R. phaseoli, Rhizobium japonicum, and a cowpea Rhizobium sp. applied to seeds of their host legumes also survived better at low temperatures, but the percent survival of such inoculants was higher than peat-based inoculants at 35°C. Survival of R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and cowpea rhizobia was not markedly improved when the cells were suspended in sugar solutions before drying them in soil. Nodulation was abundant on Phaseolus vulgaris derived from seeds that had been coated with a soil-based inoculant and stored for 165 days at 25°C. The increase in yield and nitrogen content of Phaseolus angularis grown in the greenhouse was the same with soil-and peat-based inoculants. We suggest that certain mineral soils can be useful and readily available carriers for legume inoculants containing desiccation-resistant Rhizobium strains. PMID:16346460

  17. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  18. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Fruit Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Paweska, Janusz T; Storm, Nadia; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Markotter, Wanda; Kemp, Alan; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus

    2016-01-22

    Colonized Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), originating in South Africa, were inoculated subcutaneously with Ebola virus (EBOV). No overt signs of morbidity, mortality, or gross lesions were noted. Bats seroconverted by Day 10-16 post inoculation (p.i.), with the highest mean anti-EBOV IgG level on Day 28 p.i. EBOV RNA was detected in blood from one bat. In 16 other tissues tested, viral RNA distribution was limited and at very low levels. No seroconversion could be demonstrated in any of the control bats up to 28 days after in-contact exposure to subcutaneously-inoculated bats. The control bats were subsequently inoculated intraperitoneally, and intramuscularly with the same dose of EBOV. No mortality, morbidity or gross pathology was observed in these bats. Kinetics of immune response was similar to that in subcutaneously-inoculated bats. Viral RNA was more widely disseminated to multiple tissues and detectable in a higher proportion of individuals, but consistently at very low levels. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, no virus was isolated from tissues which tested positive for EBOV RNA. Viral RNA was not detected in oral, nasal, ocular, vaginal, penile and rectal swabs from any of the experimental groups.

  19. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Fruit Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Paweska, Janusz T.; Storm, Nadia; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Markotter, Wanda; Kemp, Alan; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus

    2016-01-01

    Colonized Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), originating in South Africa, were inoculated subcutaneously with Ebola virus (EBOV). No overt signs of morbidity, mortality, or gross lesions were noted. Bats seroconverted by Day 10–16 post inoculation (p.i.), with the highest mean anti-EBOV IgG level on Day 28 p.i. EBOV RNA was detected in blood from one bat. In 16 other tissues tested, viral RNA distribution was limited and at very low levels. No seroconversion could be demonstrated in any of the control bats up to 28 days after in-contact exposure to subcutaneously-inoculated bats. The control bats were subsequently inoculated intraperitoneally, and intramuscularly with the same dose of EBOV. No mortality, morbidity or gross pathology was observed in these bats. Kinetics of immune response was similar to that in subcutaneously-inoculated bats. Viral RNA was more widely disseminated to multiple tissues and detectable in a higher proportion of individuals, but consistently at very low levels. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, no virus was isolated from tissues which tested positive for EBOV RNA. Viral RNA was not detected in oral, nasal, ocular, vaginal, penile and rectal swabs from any of the experimental groups. PMID:26805873

  20. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Fruit Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Paweska, Janusz T; Storm, Nadia; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Markotter, Wanda; Kemp, Alan; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus

    2016-02-01

    Colonized Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), originating in South Africa, were inoculated subcutaneously with Ebola virus (EBOV). No overt signs of morbidity, mortality, or gross lesions were noted. Bats seroconverted by Day 10-16 post inoculation (p.i.), with the highest mean anti-EBOV IgG level on Day 28 p.i. EBOV RNA was detected in blood from one bat. In 16 other tissues tested, viral RNA distribution was limited and at very low levels. No seroconversion could be demonstrated in any of the control bats up to 28 days after in-contact exposure to subcutaneously-inoculated bats. The control bats were subsequently inoculated intraperitoneally, and intramuscularly with the same dose of EBOV. No mortality, morbidity or gross pathology was observed in these bats. Kinetics of immune response was similar to that in subcutaneously-inoculated bats. Viral RNA was more widely disseminated to multiple tissues and detectable in a higher proportion of individuals, but consistently at very low levels. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, no virus was isolated from tissues which tested positive for EBOV RNA. Viral RNA was not detected in oral, nasal, ocular, vaginal, penile and rectal swabs from any of the experimental groups. PMID:26805873

  1. Co-infection of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; De la Luz-Armendáriz, Jazmín; Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Jasso-Escutia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Ivan; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-02-29

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) and swine influenza virus infection causes respiratory disease in pigs. PorPV persistent infection could facilitate the establishment of secondary infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the pathogenicity of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus (swH1N1) in growing pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus. Conventional six-week-old pigs were intranasally inoculated with PorPV, swH1N1, or PorPV/swH1N1. A mock-infected group was included. The co-infection with swH1N1 was at 44 days post-infection (DPI), right after clinical signs of PorPV infection had stopped. The pigs of the co-infection group presented an increase of clinical signs compared to the simple infection groups. In all infected groups, the most recurrent lung lesion was hyperplasia of the bronchiolar-associated lymphoid tissue and interstitial pneumonia. By means of immunohistochemical evaluation it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the two viral agents infecting simultaneously the bronchiolar epithelium. Viral excretion of PorPV in nasal and oral fluid was recorded at 28 and 52 DPI, respectively. PorPV persisted in several samples from respiratory tissues (RT), secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). For swH1N1, the viral excretion in nasal fluids was significantly higher in single-infected swH1N1 pigs than in the co-infected group. However, the co-infection group exhibited an increase in the presence of swH1N1 in RT, SLO, and BALF at two days after co-infection. In conclusion, the results obtained confirm an increase in the clinical signs of infection, and PorPV was observed to impact the spread of swH1N1 in analysed tissues in the early stage of co-infection, although viral shedding was not enhanced. In the present study, the interaction of swH1N1 infection is demonstrated in pigs persistently infected with PorPV.

  2. Experimental infection of mice with tightly coiled spiral bacteria ("Candidatus Helicobacter suis") originating from the pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, J-H; Hong, J J; Park, J H

    2003-01-01

    Mice (n=34) were inoculated orally with a gastric homogenate from a pig infected with tightly coiled spiral bacteria (TCSB). In mice killed in pairs at 16 intervals up to 108 weeks post-inoculation (pi), TCSB were invariably found, mainly in the mucosal surface, gastric pits, intercellular spaces, cytoplasm of surface epithelial cells, and lumina of gastric glands. Histopathologically, infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells was seen from 8 weeks pi onwards, gradually increasing as infection progressed. From 64 weeks pi onwards, the formation of large follicles was observed in the lamina propria and submucosa, together with severe necrosis of surface epithelial cells. Glandular epithelial cells in the fundic mucosa were markedly dysplastic and intruded through the basement membrane into the submucosal layer. Common antigenicity between TCSB and Helicobacter pylori was demonstrated by Western blotting, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry. The sequence of the 16S rDNA fragment of 374 bp showed 100% homology with the 16S rRNA gene of "Candidatus Helicobacter suis". Experimental infection of the gastric mucosa of mice with TCSB was closely associated with chronic gastritis and dysplastic lesions.

  3. Chlamydial pneumonitis induced in newborn guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Jacobs, R F; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    One- to three-day-old guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis. Physical signs of infection included a marked increase in respiration rate on days 5 to 10 of infection and radiographic evidence of pneumonia on day 6. When animals were killed at various times after infection and lung tissue was examined by histopathology, evidence of pneumonia was found beginning on day 4 and lasting as long as day 12, with maximal pathological changes on days 6 to 8. The pneumonia was generally unilateral and consisted of an acute inflammatory component in the bronchioles with granulocytes in both the lumen and the wall of the bronchioles and an interstitial and intra-alveolar mononuclear infiltrate in the parenchyma of the lung. Chlamydial antigen was detected in the bronchial epithelial cells by immunoperoxidase staining, and the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis organism was isolated from lung tissue on days 6 to 9. No other significant bacteria were isolated from lung tissue or seen on gram stains of lung sections. Both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G serum antibodies to the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent were detected as early as day 8 and reached peak levels on day 12. The infection was apparently self-limiting. This model presents the opportunity to investigate pathophysiological and immunological aspects of chlamydial respiratory infections in a neonatal animal. Images PMID:3980080

  4. Experimental Transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) Low Virulent Isolate NH/P68 by Surviving Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Sánchez, M A; Martins, C; Pelayo, V; Carrascosa, A; Revilla, Y; Simón, A; Briones, V; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Arias, M

    2015-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has persisted in Eastern Europe since 2007, and two endemic zones have been identified in the central and southern parts of the Russian Federation. Moderate- to low-virulent ASF virus isolates are known to circulate in endemic ASF-affected regions. To improve our knowledge of virus transmission in animals recovered from ASF virus infection, an experimental in vivo study was carried out. Four domestic pigs were inoculated with the NH/P68 ASF virus, previously characterized to develop a chronic form of ASF. Two additional in-contact pigs were introduced at 72 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the same box for virus exposure. The inoculated pigs developed a mild form of the disease, and the virus was isolated from tissues in the inoculated pigs up to 99 dpi (pigs were euthanized at 36, 65, 99 and 134 dpi). In-contact pigs showed mild or no clinical signs, but did become seropositive, and a transient viraemia was detected at 28 days post-exposure (dpe), thereby confirming late virus transmission from the inoculated pigs. Virus transmission to in-contact pigs occurred at four weeks post-exposure, over three months after the primary infection. These results highlight the potential role of survivor pigs in disease maintenance and dissemination in areas where moderate- to low-virulent viruses may be circulating undetected. This study will help design better and more effective control programmes to fight against this disease.

  5. Prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use in Belgian fattening pig herds.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte; Persoons, Davy; Maes, Dominiek; Laanen, Maria; Postma, Merel; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of antimicrobial use is an essential step to control the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Between January and October 2010 data on prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use were collected retrospectively on 50 closed or semi-closed pig herds. Ninety-three percent of the group treatments were prophylactic whereas only 7% were methaphylactic. The most frequently used antimicrobials orally applied at group level were colistin (30.7%), amoxicillin (30.0%), trimethoprim-sulfonamides (13.1%), doxycycline (9.9%) and tylosin (8.1%). The most frequently applied injectable antimicrobials were tulathromycin (45.0%), long acting ceftiofur (40.1%) and long acting amoxicillin (8.4%). The treatment incidences (TI) based on the used daily dose pig (UDD(pig) or the actually administered dose per day per kg pig of a drug) for all oral and injectable antimicrobial drugs was on average 200.7 per 1000 pigs at risk per day (min=0, max=699.0), while the TI based on the animal daily dose pig (ADD(pig) or the national defined average maintenance dose per day per kg pig of a drug used for its main indication) was slightly higher (average=235.8, min=0, max=1322.1). This indicates that in reality fewer pigs were treated with the same amount of antimicrobials than theoretically possible. Injectable products were generally overdosed (79.5%), whereas oral treatments were often underdosed (47.3%). In conclusion, this study shows that prophylactic group treatment was applied in 98% of the visited herds and often includes the use of critically important and broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In Belgium, the guidelines for prudent use of antimicrobials are not yet implemented. PMID:22494905

  6. Transgenesis for pig models

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Soo-Young; Yoon, Ki-Young; Lee, Choong-Il; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Animal models, particularly pigs, have come to play an important role in translational biomedical research. There have been many pig models with genetically modifications via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, because most transgenic pigs have been produced by random integration to date, the necessity for more exact gene-mutated models using recombinase based conditional gene expression like mice has been raised. Currently, advanced genome-editing technologies enable us to generate specific gene-deleted and -inserted pig models. In the future, the development of pig models with gene editing technologies could be a valuable resource for biomedical research. PMID:27030199

  7. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglotic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi) charact...

  8. Vaccination of pigs to control human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Armando E; Gauci, Charles G; Barber, Dylan; Gilman, Robert H; Tsang, Victor C W; Garcia, Hector H; Verastegui, Manuela; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2005-06-01

    Taenia solium taeniasis/cysticercosis is a zoonotic disease complex in which the pig is an obligate intermediate host. The infection is widespread, particularly in the developing world, and neurocysticercosis is a major cause of human neurologic disease where the parasite is endemic. Despite easy availability, effective anti-parasitic drugs have not been deployed effectively to control disease transmission. We have investigated a vaccine strategy to prevent parasite infection of the pig intermediate host. Such a strategy would interrupt the parasite's life cycle and eliminate the source of infection for humans. Two recombinant antigens selected from the parasite oncosphere life cycle stage were tested in vaccination trials in pigs that were challenged orally with Taenia solium eggs. Both antigens were highly effective in protecting the pigs against infection with the parasite (98.6% and 99.9% protection, respectively). No viable cysts were found in eight pigs vaccinated with one of the antigens. A recombinant subunit vaccine based on oncosphere antigens has the potential to improve the available control measures for T. solium and thereby reduce or eliminate neurocysticercosis.

  9. Disease characteristics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy following inoculation into mice via three different routes.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Christopher M; Beck, Katy E; Simmons, Marion M; Hawkins, Stephen A C; Spiropoulos, John

    2013-10-01

    Mouse-adapted transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains are routinely distinguished based on reproducible disease characteristics in a given mouse line following inoculation via a consistent route. We investigated whether different administration routes (oral, intragastric (i.g.) and intracerebral (i.c.)) can alter the disease characteristics in IM mice after serial dilution of a stabilized mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) strain (301V). In addition, the infectivity of distal ileum and mesenteric lymph nodes (ln) sampled at three time points (35 days postinoculation (dpi), 70 dpi and terminal disease) after i.g. inoculation of 301V strain was assessed in mice by i.c. challenge. Strain characteristics were assessed according to standard methodology and PrP(Sc) immunohistochemistry deposition patterns. Mean incubation periods were prolonged following oral or i.g. inoculations compared to the i.c. route. Lesion profiles following i.c. challenges were elevated compared to i.g. and oral routes although vacuolation in the dorsal medulla was consistently high irrespective of the route of administration. Nevertheless, the same PrP(Sc) deposition pattern was associated with each route of administration. Distal and mesenteric ln infectivity was detected as early as 35 dpi and displayed consistent lesion profiles and PrP(Sc) deposition patterns. Our data suggest that although 301V retained its properties, some phenotypic parameters were affected by the route of inoculation. We conclude that bioassay data should be interpreted carefully and should be standardized for route of inoculation.

  10. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Related tolerances. See § 556.510 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Swine—(1) Amount. 40 milligrams orally, twice a day using a dosing pump. (2) Indications for use. Treatment of baby pigs under 10...

  11. Comparison of Inoculation with the InoqulA and WASP Automated Systems with Manual Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Croxatto, Antony; Dijkstra, Klaas; Prod'hom, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The quality of sample inoculation is critical for achieving an optimal yield of discrete colonies in both monomicrobial and polymicrobial samples to perform identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Consequently, we compared the performance between the InoqulA (BD Kiestra), the WASP (Copan), and manual inoculation methods. Defined mono- and polymicrobial samples of 4 bacterial species and cloudy urine specimens were inoculated on chromogenic agar by the InoqulA, the WASP, and manual methods. Images taken with ImagA (BD Kiestra) were analyzed with the VisionLab version 3.43 image analysis software to assess the quality of growth and to prevent subjective interpretation of the data. A 3- to 10-fold higher yield of discrete colonies was observed following automated inoculation with both the InoqulA and WASP systems than that with manual inoculation. The difference in performance between automated and manual inoculation was mainly observed at concentrations of >106 bacteria/ml. Inoculation with the InoqulA system allowed us to obtain significantly more discrete colonies than the WASP system at concentrations of >107 bacteria/ml. However, the level of difference observed was bacterial species dependent. Discrete colonies of bacteria present in 100- to 1,000-fold lower concentrations than the most concentrated populations in defined polymicrobial samples were not reproducibly recovered, even with the automated systems. The analysis of cloudy urine specimens showed that InoqulA inoculation provided a statistically significantly higher number of discrete colonies than that with WASP and manual inoculation. Consequently, the automated InoqulA inoculation greatly decreased the requirement for bacterial subculture and thus resulted in a significant reduction in the time to results, laboratory workload, and laboratory costs. PMID:25972424

  12. Immunological and clinical response of coyotes (Canis latrans) to experimental inoculation with Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Baeten, Laurie A; Pappert, Ryan; Young, John; Schriefer, Martin E; Gidlewski, Thomas; Kohler, Dennis; Bowen, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Multiple publications have reported the use of coyotes (Canis latrans) in animal-based surveillance efforts for the detection of Yersinia pestis. Coyotes are likely exposed via flea bite or oral routes and are presumed to be resistant to the development of clinical disease. These historic data have only been useful for the evaluation of the geographic distribution of Y. pestis in the landscape. Because the canid immunologic response to Y. pestis has not been thoroughly characterized, we conducted experimental inoculation of captive-reared, juvenile coyotes (n = 8) with Y. pestis CO92 via oral or intradermal routes. We measured the humoral response to Y. pestis fraction 1 capsular protein (anti-F1) and found a significant difference between inoculation groups in magnitude and duration of antibody production. The anti-F1 titers in animals exposed intradermally peaked at day 10 postinoculation (PI; range = 1∶32 to 1∶128) with titers remaining stable at 1∶32 through week 12. In contrast, orally inoculated animals developed higher titers (range = 1∶256 to 1∶1,024) that remained stable at 1∶256 to 1∶512 through week 6. No clinical signs of disease were observed, and minimal changes were noted in body temperature, white blood cell counts, and acute phase proteins during the 7 days PI. Gross pathology was unremarkable, and minimal changes were noted in histopathology at days 3 and 7 PI. Rechallenge at 14 wk PI via similar dosage and routes resulted in marked differences in antibody response between groups. Animals in the orally inoculated group produced a striking increase in anti-F1 titers (up to 1∶4,096) within 3 days, whereas there was minimal to no increase in antibody response in the intradermal group. Information gathered from this experimental trial may provide additional insight into the spatial and temporal evaluation of coyote plague serology.

  13. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  14. Immunization against chlamydial genital infection in guinea pigs with UV-inactivated and viable chlamydiae administered by different routes

    SciTech Connect

    Rank, R.G.; Batteiger, B.E.; Soderberg, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Female guinea pigs were immunized with viable or UV light-inactivated chlamydiae, belonging to the species Chlamydia psittaci, by intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, or ocular routes. All animals were then inoculated vaginally with viable chlamydiae to determine the extent of protection against challenge infection induced by the various regimens. The course of genital infection was significantly reduced in intensity in all groups of animals except the unimmunized controls and those animals immunized orally with inactivated antigen. Guinea pigs immunized with viable antigen were more likely to develop resistance to challenge infection and, in general, had a significantly greater degree of protection than animals immunized with inactivated antigen. No one route seemed superior in producing a protective response. Animals in all groups demonstrating protection developed serum and secretion immunoglobulin G antibody responses to chlamydiae. Lymphocyte proliferative reactions to chlamydial antigen were variable among groups. Immunoblot analysis of serum and secretions indicated a wide range of antibody specificities, but most protected animals produced antibodies to the major outer membrane protein, lipopolysaccharide, and the 61-kilodalton protein. No definitive associations could be made between the increased ability of immunization with viable organisms to produce resistance to challenge infection and a particular immune parameter. These data indicate that viable chlamydiae given by various routes are able to induce a strong immune response which can provide resistance against reinfection in some cases or at least reduce the degree of infection to a greater degree than inactivated antigen. However, complete resistance to genital tract infection may be difficult to obtain and alternate immunizations strategies may have to be developed.

  15. Cleaning pipelines: a pigging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Kipin, P.

    1985-02-04

    The ''pig'', a cleaning device currently used to clear out pipes, is discussed here. Types of pigs are described and include styrofoam, rubber, and soft foam. The limitations to the use of pigs are discussed. Unless all valves are fully open, a pig can get stuck. Ball-type tees may cause a short pig to drop and bypass. Generally, no pig is able to traverse a one-cut miter.

  16. Naegleria: another pathogenic ameba studies in germfree guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, B P

    1974-09-01

    Free-living amebas of the genus Naegleria, of world-wide distribution and long considered harmless, have been linked etiologically with 57 fatal cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis during the last decade. Naegleria from cultures derived from one of these fatal cases in Richmond, Virginia, have been inoculated intranasally, intraorally, into the conjunctival sac near the inner canthus of the eyes, and into induced skin lesions in adult germfree guinea pigs. Of 33 animals inoculated intranasally with 18 to 31 amebas, 31 developed a fatal encephalitis. There was considerable destruction of tissues of the cerebellum and the cerebrum and including the olfactory lobes. The meninges were involved to varying degrees in most of the animals. None of the animals inoculated by the three other routes developed either symptoms or lesions. PMID:4451226

  17. Oral Supplementation with a Special Additive of Retinyl Palmitate and Alpha Tocopherol Reduces Growth Retardation in Young Pancreatic Duct Ligated Pigs Used as a Model for Children Suffering from Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mößeler, Anne; Schmicke, Marion; Höltershinken, Martin; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is a disease of diverse aetiology—e.g., majority of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) show PEI congenitally. Malnutrition and malabsorption of nutrients impair growth and nutritional status. As reduced fat digestion leads to a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins the supplementation is standard, but absorption is a critical point in PEI-patients. The pancreatic duct ligated (PL) pig is an established model for PEI in humans and has been proven to be a suitable model to compare different vitamin additives for supplementation. In a former study, PEI caused distinct growth retardation in young piglets, but did not affect growth in older ones. Our study hypothesised that this age-dependent effect is caused by exhausted body reserves of fat-soluble vitamins and, therefore, extra supply reduces growth retardation. PEI was induced by PL at the age of seven (PL-7) or 16 weeks (PL-16). Controls (C) underwent a sham surgery. Some PL-7 pigs (PL-7 + Vit) were fed a special vitamin additive. PEI reduced the mean final body weight (kg) at 26 weeks of age significantly with lower effect in PL-16-pigs (C:117; PL-7:49.5; PL-7 + Vit:77.1; PL-16:96.4). Extra vitamin supply resulted in an increased growth and normalised serum concentration of alpha-tocopherol, underlining the importance of special supplementation in PEI-patients. PMID:27690005

  18. Metabolism and excretion kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled difloxacin in pigs after oral administration, and antimicrobial activity of manure containing difloxacin and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshoeft, Marc; Kusari, Souvik; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2009-04-15

    Fluoroquinolones are amongst the most important antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. On this account the behavior of difloxacin (DIF) and its metabolites was investigated by administering the {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled veterinary drug to fattening pigs. The excretion kinetics were determined after daily collection of manure. Sarafloxacin (SAR) was found to be the major metabolite, three further trace metabolites were also recovered, applying high-resolution (HR) mass spectrometric technique. The identification of DIF and SAR was confirmed by comparison with the spectroscopic and chromatographic data of the authentic references. The identification of the three trace metabolites was performed by HR-MS/MS. Only 8.1% of the administered radioactivity remained in the pig after 10 days and DIF accounted for 95.9% of the radioactivity excreted. More than 99% of the labeled compounds were detected and identified in the manure. The mean recoveries for all single electrolytes were {>=}94%. Linearity was established over concentration range 10-10,000 {mu}g/kg manure with a correlation coefficient {>=}0.99. By using in vitro antimicrobial activity tests against a group of standard pathogenic control strains, the results showed that the residual antibiotic concentrations in the manure of pigs are high enough to exhibit antibacterial activity.

  19. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  20. Serological and Molecular Investigation of Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Pigs Raised in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Nicola; Sarno, Eleonora; Peretti, Vincenzo; Ciambrone, Lucia; Casalinuovo, Francesco; Santoro, Adriano

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common acute hepatitis transmitted by the fecal-oral route. In developed countries, the virus has a zoonotic potential, and domestic pigs and wild boars are considered main reservoirs. To assess the prevalence of HEV-positive animals in the Calabria region (southern Italy) on a serological and molecular level, a total of 216 autochthonous healthy pigs (Apulo-Calabrese breed) were sampled. Both sera and feces were collected. Pigs were grouped based on age: 117 pigs <6 months and 99 pigs >6 months. By using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system, a total of 173 (80%) of the 216 pigs tested seropositive. In all sampled farms (n = 8), pigs with antibodies (immunoglobulin G) against HEV were detected at a level higher than 60%, with a significant difference among age groups (P < 0.0001). Moreover, 16 fattening pigs were found to be nested reverse transcription PCR positive and thus to shed viral genomes in their feces. These positive findings resulted in a prevalence of 48.4% on the farm level (16 of 35 pigs) and an overall prevalence of 7.4% at the animal level (16 of 216 pigs). Based on the present study, HEV seems to circulate among the autochthonous domestic pig population of southern Italy with a low sharing rate. Further studies exploring the origin of infection are needed to minimize the risk of human exposure and to reduce consequences for public health.

  1. Aerosol Inoculator for Exposure of Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gerone, Peter J.; Couch, Robert B.; Knight, Vernon

    1971-01-01

    The performance of an aerosol inoculator for human volunteers is described in tests that used the PR8 strain of type A influenza virus and sodium fluorescein as a physical tracer. Virus recovery from the aerosols was approximately 1% and was unaffected by such variables as prolonged aerosolization, total airflow, relative humidity, or method of sampling. The recovery of sodium fluorescein from the aerosol was approximately 12% and was influenced by total airflow rates and relative humidity. With this apparatus, it should be possible to deliver reasonably predictable and measurable doses of respiratory viruses to human subjects. The design makes it possible to dismantle the inoculator into its component parts to facilitate portability. Images PMID:5132095

  2. Grade 1 Students Meet David Wiesner's "Three Pigs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Describes the oral, written, and visual arts responses of a group of Grade 1 children. Discusses first grade children's understandings of and responses to several Radical Change characteristics and metafictive techniques found in David Wiesner's "The Three Pigs" (2001), the 2002 Randolph Caldecott Medal winner. Explores the nature of the literary…

  3. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all make. (NH)

  4. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  5. Inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Elizabeth J; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A

    2015-02-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions.

  6. Tail biting in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  7. Influence of inoculation route on the course of infection of Trichomonas gallinae in nonimmune pigeons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1971-01-01

    The Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae was given to nonimmune pigeons by five different routes: (I) oral; (2) pulmonary; (3) intravenous; (4) intramuscular; (5) subcutaneous. The birds infected by the oral and pulmonarv routes succumbed to typical trichomoniasis involving the liver and lungs respectively. The pulmonary route also produced air sac lesions resulting from trichomonads passing through the lungs via the mesobronchi. Intramuscular and subcutaneous introduction of the parasite resulted in transient infections involving small lesions which were resorbed in I to 2 weeks. The intravenous introductions resulted only in large lesions at the site of inoculation, presumably from perivascular leakage at the time of parasite entry. No other internal lesions were found and cultures made from liver and lung tissue were negative for T. gallinae. The results of infection by the oral and pulmonary routes were not surprising, since these are essentially normal routes of infection. The inhibition of parasite development at the intramuscular and subcutaneous sites of parasite introduction may have resulted from inhibition of the mobility of the parasite by connective tissue or these substrates may have been unsuitable for parasite development. The results of intravenous inoculation are surprising, since it has been stated that T. gallinae reaches the viscera via the circulation. If this were true, lesions should have occurred at least in the lungs where the parasites would have lodged following introduction into a vein. Recovery from infection at any site is apparently sufficient to produce an immunity to the parasite when subsequently introduced via the oral route.

  8. Effect of Low Dose of Fumonisins on Pig Health: Immune Status, Intestinal Microbiota and Sensitivity to Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Christine; Tanguy, Mael; Guerre, Philippe; Boilletot, Eric; Cariolet, Roland; Queguiner, Marilyne; Postollec, Gilbert; Pinton, Philippe; Salvat, Gilles; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Fravalo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the effects of chronic exposure to fumonisins via the ingestion of feed containing naturally contaminated corn in growing pigs infected or not with Salmonella spp. This exposure to a moderate dietary concentration of fumonisins (11.8 ppm) was sufficient to induce a biological effect in pigs (Sa/So ratio), but no mortality or pathology was observed over 63 days of exposure. No mortality or related clinical signs, even in cases of inoculation with Salmonella (5 × 104 CFU), were observed either. Fumonisins, at these concentrations, did not affect the ability of lymphocytes to proliferate in the presence of mitogens, but after seven days post-inoculation they led to inhibition of the ability of specific Salmonella lymphocytes to proliferate following exposure to a specific Salmonella antigen. However, the ingestion of fumonisins had no impact on Salmonella translocation or seroconversion in inoculated pigs. The inoculation of Salmonella did not affect faecal microbiota profiles, but exposure to moderate concentrations of fumonisins transiently affected the digestive microbiota balance. In cases of co-infection with fumonisins and Salmonella, the microbiota profiles were rapidly and clearly modified as early as 48 h post-Salmonella inoculation. Therefore under these experimental conditions, exposure to an average concentration of fumonisins in naturally contaminated feed had no effect on pig health but did affect the digestive microbiota balance, with Salmonella exposure amplifying this phenomenon. PMID:23612754

  9. Effect of low dose of fumonisins on pig health: immune status, intestinal microbiota and sensitivity to Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Burel, Christine; Tanguy, Mael; Guerre, Philippe; Boilletot, Eric; Cariolet, Roland; Queguiner, Marilyne; Postollec, Gilbert; Pinton, Philippe; Salvat, Gilles; Oswald, Isabelle P; Fravalo, Philippe

    2013-04-23

    The objective of this study was to measure the effects of chronic exposure to fumonisins via the ingestion of feed containing naturally contaminated corn in growing pigs infected or not with Salmonella spp. This exposure to a moderate dietary concentration of fumonisins (11.8 ppm) was sufficient to induce a biological effect in pigs (Sa/So ratio), but no mortality or pathology was observed over 63 days of exposure. No mortality or related clinical signs, even in cases of inoculation with Salmonella (5 × 10⁴ CFU), were observed either. Fumonisins, at these concentrations, did not affect the ability of lymphocytes to proliferate in the presence of mitogens, but after seven days post-inoculation they led to inhibition of the ability of specific Salmonella lymphocytes to proliferate following exposure to a specific Salmonella antigen. However, the ingestion of fumonisins had no impact on Salmonella translocation or seroconversion in inoculated pigs. The inoculation of Salmonella did not affect faecal microbiota profiles, but exposure to moderate concentrations of fumonisins transiently affected the digestive microbiota balance. In cases of co-infection with fumonisins and Salmonella, the microbiota profiles were rapidly and clearly modified as early as 48 h post-Salmonella inoculation. Therefore under these experimental conditions, exposure to an average concentration of fumonisins in naturally contaminated feed had no effect on pig health but did affect the digestive microbiota balance, with Salmonella exposure amplifying this phenomenon.

  10. Improved facility and sensitivity in the use of guinea pigs for the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Leinbach, E.D.; Winkler, H.H.; Wood, D.O.; Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    The established criteria for the determination of the optimum time for the sacrifice of guinea pigs inoculated with samples of cooling tower water were found to be inadequate for the detection of low levels of Legionella pneumophila. By ignoring the requirement for fever and by sequentially sacrificing the infected guinea pigs on days 3 through 5 postinoculation, we simplified the procedure, and the sensitivity of detection was improved a great deal.

  11. Comparative study of Helicobacter pylori infection in guinea pigs and mice - elevation of acute-phase protein C3 in infected guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sjunnesson, H; Sturegård, E; Grubb, A; Willén, R; Wadström, T

    2001-03-01

    Eighteen Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs and 50 NMRI mice were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori and the infection followed by culture, histopathology, antibody response, and plasma levels of the acute-phase proteins albumin, C3, and transferrin for up to 7 weeks. The immune response to H. pylori surface proteins was studied by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western immunoblot and the plasma levels of albumin, C3, and transferrin were analyzed by single radial immunodiffusion. Guinea pigs had a more severe gastritis and a higher EIA immune response than NMRI mice. Serum C3 levels were elevated in infected guinea pigs after 3 and 7 weeks indicating a systemic inflammatory response and a possible link between H. pylori infection and extragastric manifestations such as vasculitis associated with atherosclerosis. Serum cholesterol levels were analyzed in guinea pigs at 7 weeks and indicated a higher level in H. pylori-infected than in control animals, but this difference was not statistically significant.

  12. Cytomegalovirus excretion in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, N.; Watt, R. G.; Plowright, W.

    1976-01-01

    Germ-free piglets were infected intranasally with porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) at 1 day (group A) or 3 weeks of age (group B). Viraemia and virus excretion by the nasal, pharyngeal and conjunctival routes was studied up to the time of death or to 12 weeks. Virus was also sought in tissues at death or at slaughter, as well as in a few urine samples. Viraemia was detected in group A between days 5 and 19 after infection and in group B between days 14 and 16 inclusive. The chief route of virus excretion was the nasal mucosa, followed by the pharynx and conjunctiva; the maximal duration of excretion by these routes was 32, 25 and 14 days for pigs of group A and 9, 7 and 4 days for group B. The quantity of virus was also greater in the former group, of which died of generalized PCMV infection. A viruria was demonstrated in 2 animals. Antibody detectable in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) tests appeared towards the end of the third week, reaching maximal titres at 5 to 7 weeks after infection. The mean peak titre of antibody in group B was lower than in group A. Corticosteroid treatment at days 56--62 after infection resulted in some recrudescence of virus excretion, accompanied in group B by about a twofold increase in IIF antibody. PCMV was isolated in cultures of lung macrophages from 4 of 7 animals killed at about 12 weeks after inoculation. PMID:185292

  13. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment. PMID:26759120

  14. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment.

  15. Severe gastritis in guinea-pigs infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Sturegård, E; Sjunnesson, H; Ho, B; Willén, R; Aleljung, P; Ng, H C; Wadström, T

    1998-12-01

    An appropriate animal model is essential to study Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this study was to investigate if H. pylori can colonise the guinea-pig stomach and whether the infection causes gastritis and a serological response similar to that observed in man. Guinea-pigs were infected either with fresh H. pylori isolates from human gastric biopsies or with a guinea-pig passaged strain. When the animals were killed, 3 and 7 weeks after inoculation, samples were taken for culture, histopathology and serology. H. pylori was cultured from 22 of 29 challenged animals. All culture-positive animals exhibited a specific immune response against H. pylori antigens in Western blotting and gastritis in histopathological examination. Antibody titres in enzyme immunoassay were elevated among animals challenged with H. pylori. The inflammatory response was graded as severe in most animals and consisted of both polymorphonuclear leucocytes and lymphocytes. Erosion of the gastric epithelium was found in infected animals. These results suggest that the guinea-pig is suitable for studying H. pylori-associated diseases. Moreover, guinea-pigs are probably more similar to man than any other small laboratory animal as regards gastric anatomy and physiology.

  16. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  17. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  18. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  19. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  20. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  1. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  2. Serum and tear antibodies to Chlamydia after reinfection with guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent.

    PubMed

    Malaty, R; Dawson, C R; Wong, I; Lyon, C; Schachter, J

    1981-12-01

    Repeated inoculation of th eyes of guinea pigs with the naturally occurring Chlamydia psittaci agent, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC), showed that animals gradually become susceptible to reinfection with the passage of time after primary infection. Higher levels of serum IgG antibody had a significant association with resistance to challenge inoculation only with a high dose (250 ELD50) but not with a low dose (25 ELD50) inoculum. With each inoculum, however, some animals with high serum antibody were susceptible. the presence of antibodies in tears did not correlate with resistance to the first low-dose challenge inoculation, but both tear IgG and secretory antibody did have a significant association with resistance on the second rechallenge with a high-dose inoculum. Topical treatment of the eye with immune serum or tears during primary infection reduced the amount of agent in the conjunctiva only during the period of application. Local treatment of the eye with heat-killed vaccine prior to primary infection did not produce detectable antibody or protect animals against challenge inoculation; this local immunization did "prime" the animals, however, so that they had an accelerated antibody response after infection. Although there is abundant evidence that local immunity has an important role in resistance to challenge inoculation with GPIC, serum and tear antibody levels correlate equally well with resistance to repeated ocular challenge inoculation. Effective immunization procedures for this chlamydial infection then would involve stimulation of both local and systemic immune responses.

  3. Study on the infectivity of equine herpesvirus 9 (EHV-9) by different routes of inoculation in hamsters.

    PubMed

    El-Habashi, N; Murakami, M; El-Nahass, E; Hibi, D; Sakai, H; Fukushi, H; Sasseville, V; Yanai, T

    2011-05-01

    The infectivity and pathology of equine herpesvirus 9 (EHV-9), a new neurotropic equine herpesvirus isolated from gazelles, was studied in hamsters experimentally infected via nasal, ocular, oral, intravenous (IV), or peritoneal routes. Clinically, all animals inoculated by the nasal route and ~25% inoculated by the oral and peritoneal routes showed neurological signs on days 3, 6, and 9 postinoculation (PI), respectively. Neurological signs were not observed in animals administered EHV-9 by the IV and ocular routes. With the exception of animals administered EHV-9 by the IV route, all infected animals had lymphocytic meningoencephalitis. Although there were a number of differences in the severity and distribution of the lesions depending on the route of inoculation, the basic features of lymphocytic meningoencephalitis caused by EHV-9 were common. Lesions consisted of neuronal necrosis, perivascular aggregates of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and neutrophils, gliosis, intranuclear inclusion bodies, and diffuse lymphocytic infiltrates in the meninges. Viral antigen was detected in degenerated neurons in infected animals inoculated by the nasal, ocular, oral, and peritoneal routes. The distribution of EHV-9 antigen was somewhat dependent on inoculation route. There were no microscopic abnormalities or viral antigen in animals treated by the IV route. This study provides new data about experimental EHV-9 infection in hamsters through routes other than the IV route. These results suggest that in the animals infected by the oral, ocular, and peritoneal routes, EHV-9 might travel to the brain through nerves, other than by the olfactory route, after initial propagation at the site of viral entry. PMID:20574073

  4. Prior infection of pigs with swine influenza viruses is a barrier to infection with avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2010-12-15

    Although pigs are susceptible to avian influenza viruses (AIV) of different subtypes, the incidence of AIV infections in the field appears to be low. Swine H1N1, H3N2 and H1N2 influenza viruses (SIV) are enzootic worldwide and most pigs have antibodies to 1 or more SIV subtypes. This study aimed to examine whether infection-immunity to H1N1 or H3N2 SIV may (1) protect pigs against subsequent infections with AIV of various haemagglutinin and/or neuraminidase subtypes and/or (2) interfere with the serological diagnosis of AIV infection by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) or virus neutralization (VN) tests. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with an H1N1 or H3N2 SIV or left uninoculated. Four or 6 weeks later all pigs were challenged intranasally with 1 of 3 AIV subtypes (H4N6, H5N2 or H7N1). Fifteen out of 17 challenge control pigs shed the respective AIV for 4-6 days post-inoculation and 16 developed HI and VN antibodies. In contrast, 28 of the 29 SIV-immune pigs did not have detectable AIV shedding. Only 12 SIV-immune pigs developed HI antibodies to the AIV used for challenge and 14 had VN antibodies. Antibody titres to the AIV were low in both control and SIV-immune pigs. Our data show that prior infection of pigs with SIV is a barrier to infection with AIV of unrelated subtypes. Serological screening in regions where SIV is enzootic is only useful when the AIV strain for which the pigs need to be tested is known.

  5. Dual functions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ at the intermediate dose in protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with a human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangning; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Jones, Dorothy; Pelzer, Kevin; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (LA) ™ strain on rotavirus-specific antibody and B cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with an oral attenuated human rotavirus (AttHRV). Methods Pigs were inoculated with AttHRV vaccine in conjunction with high dose LA (14 doses, total 2.2×109 colony forming units [CFU]), intermediate dose LA (9 doses, total 3.2×106 CFU), low dose LA (5 doses, total 2.1×106 CFU) or without LA feeding. Protection against rotavirus shedding and diarrhea was assessed upon challenge with a virulent HRV. Rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells in ileum, spleen and blood of the pigs were measured and compared among treatment groups. Results The intermediate dose LA (MidLA), but not high or low dose LA, significantly reduced rotavirus diarrhea (MidLA only group) and significantly improved the protection conferred by AttHRV vaccine (MidLA+AttHRV group). Associated with the increased protection, MidLA significantly enhanced rotavirus-specific antibody, ASC and memory B cell responses to AttHRV vaccine. High or low dose LA did not enhance virus-specific antibody and ASC responses, hence did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of dose selection and indicate that certain specific lactobacilli strains at the appropriate dose have the dual function of reducing rotavirus diarrhea and enhancing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24126832

  6. Selection and application of Streptococcus bovis as a silage inoculant.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B A; Muck, R E; Ricke, S C

    1991-01-01

    Three strains of Streptococcus bovis, a homolactic bacterium capable of utilizing starch, were evaluated for growth kinetics and ability to decrease the pH of alfalfa silage. A selected strain was evaluated for its competitiveness as an inoculant with Enterococcus faecium, an organism used in inoculants, and for its ability to enhance the effect of a commercial inoculant. Testing was completed over three studies using wilted alfalfa (28 to 34% dry matter) ensiled into laboratory silos. Treatments were control, E. faecium, E. faecium and commercial inoculant, S. bovis, and S. bovis and commercial inoculant. Replicate silos were emptied and analyzed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 40 days for pH, fermentation products, and nitrogen fractions. S. bovis alone lowered the pH quicker and improved silage parameters early in the fermentation compared with E. faecium, the commercial inoculant, and control treatments. When combined with a commercial inoculant, S. bovis lowered pH more quickly than the commercial inoculant alone and E. faecium plus commercial inoculant. At 40 days, S. bovis combination had lower pH and ammonia nitrogen and acetate contents than the E. faecium combination. Starch in the silage was not utilized by S. bovis as had been anticipated. Results indicate that S. bovis was more effective than E. faecium as a silage inoculant and could enhance a commercial inoculant on low-dry-matter alfalfa. PMID:1746960

  7. Soil inoculation steers restoration of terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wubs, E R Jasper; van der Putten, Wim H; Bosch, Machiel; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Many natural ecosystems have been degraded because of human activities(1,2) and need to be restored so that biodiversity is protected. However, restoration can take decades and restoration activities are often unsuccessful(3) because of abiotic constraints (for example, eutrophication, acidification) and unfavourable biotic conditions (for example, competition or adverse soil community composition). A key question is what manageable factors prevent transition from degraded to restored ecosystems and what interventions are required for successful restoration(2,4). Experiments have shown that the soil community is an important driver of plant community development(5-8), suggesting that manipulation of the soil community is key to successful restoration of terrestrial ecosystems(3,9). Here we examine a large-scale, six-year-old field experiment on ex-arable land and show that application of soil inocula not only promotes ecosystem restoration, but that different origins of soil inocula can steer the plant community development towards different target communities, varying from grassland to heathland vegetation. The impact of soil inoculation on plant and soil community composition was most pronounced when the topsoil layer was removed, whereas effects were less strong, but still significant, when the soil inocula were introduced into intact topsoil. Therefore, soil inoculation is a powerful tool to both restore disturbed terrestrial ecosystems and steer plant community development. PMID:27398907

  8. Soil inoculation steers restoration of terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wubs, E R Jasper; van der Putten, Wim H; Bosch, Machiel; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2016-07-11

    Many natural ecosystems have been degraded because of human activities(1,2) and need to be restored so that biodiversity is protected. However, restoration can take decades and restoration activities are often unsuccessful(3) because of abiotic constraints (for example, eutrophication, acidification) and unfavourable biotic conditions (for example, competition or adverse soil community composition). A key question is what manageable factors prevent transition from degraded to restored ecosystems and what interventions are required for successful restoration(2,4). Experiments have shown that the soil community is an important driver of plant community development(5-8), suggesting that manipulation of the soil community is key to successful restoration of terrestrial ecosystems(3,9). Here we examine a large-scale, six-year-old field experiment on ex-arable land and show that application of soil inocula not only promotes ecosystem restoration, but that different origins of soil inocula can steer the plant community development towards different target communities, varying from grassland to heathland vegetation. The impact of soil inoculation on plant and soil community composition was most pronounced when the topsoil layer was removed, whereas effects were less strong, but still significant, when the soil inocula were introduced into intact topsoil. Therefore, soil inoculation is a powerful tool to both restore disturbed terrestrial ecosystems and steer plant community development.

  9. Vector-free transmission and persistence of Japanese encephalitis virus in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Nougairede, Antoine; Charrel, Remi N.; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a main cause of severe viral encephalitis in humans, has a complex ecology, composed of a cycle involving primarily waterbirds and mosquitoes, as well as a cycle involving pigs as amplifying hosts. To date, JEV transmission has been exclusively described as being mosquito-mediated. Here we demonstrate that JEV can be transmitted between pigs in the absence of arthropod vectors. Pigs shed virus in oronasal secretions and are highly susceptible to oronasal infection. Clinical symptoms, virus tropism and central nervous system histological lesions are similar in pigs infected through needle, contact or oronasal inoculation. In all cases, a particularly important site of replication are the tonsils, in which JEV is found to persist for at least 25 days despite the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Our findings could have a major impact on the ecology of JEV in temperate regions with short mosquito seasons. PMID:26902924

  10. Immunity to vaginal reinfection in female guinea pigs infected sexually with Chlamydia of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Lamont, H C; Semine, D Z; Leveille, C; Nichols, R L

    1978-03-01

    Guinea pig boars were inoculated intraurethrally with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). At the heights of their urethral infections, they were caged with sows in estrus. Whereas some of the sows had not been previously exposed to GPIC agent, others had received an intravaginal inoculation 5 to 8 weeks earlier. Those sows for which infected boars provided the first exposure were challenged by intravaginal inoculation 5 to 8 weeks later. Vaginal and conjunctival scrapings were taken regularly and stained for chlamydial inclusions. Titers of serum anti-GPIC antibodies and of vaginal secretory IgA anti-GPIC antibodies were determined by immunofluorescence. Our results show for the first time that a sexually acquired vaginal GPIC infection induces immunity to manual reinfection of the vagina. Because of the high incidence of secondary conjunctival infections among the vaginally infected sows, we could not provide a sound statistical basis for our tentative conclusion that manual infection of the vagina induces immunity to sexual reinfection. The results of our antibody titrations confirm previous work showing that vaginal GPIC infection induces formation of both serum antibody and vaginal secretory immunoglobulin A antibody.

  11. Development of in-situ hybridization for the detection of Mycoplasma haemosuis (Eperythrozoon suis) in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues from experimentally infected splenectomized pigs.

    PubMed

    Ha, S-K; Jung, K; Choi, C; Ha, Y; Song, H-C; Lim, J-H; Kim, S-H; Chae, C

    2005-11-01

    Mycoplasma haemosuis DNA was detected in experimentally infected splenectomized pigs by in-situ hybridization (ISH) with a nonradioactive digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe. An 839 base pair DNA probe targeting a 16S rRNA gene was generated by the polymerase chain reaction. Eight 6-week-old pigs were inoculated intraperitoneally with 6 ml of M. haemosuis-infected pig blood and eight negative control pigs were inoculated intraperitoneally with 6 ml of M. haemosuis-free blood. Two pigs from each group were killed for examination at 3, 7, 15 and 30 days post-inoculation (dpi). Red blood cells infected with M. haemosuis were first detected by light microscopy at 3 to 7 dpi. No M. haemosuis was observed in negative control pigs. Hybridization signals were evident in blood from the infected pigs at 3 dpi. The ISH method developed in this study was useful for the detection of M. haemosuis DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues and may be valuable for studying the pathogenesis of M. haemosuis infection.

  12. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  13. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology. PMID:16277953

  14. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  15. Pathogenesis of a genotype C strain of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Cai, Hong; Ma, Lei; Wang, Shu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-08-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory tract agents of both young and adult cattle and widespread among cattle around the world. Up to present, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis and only limited studies on the pathogenesis of the genotype A of BPIV3 infection in calves and laboratory animals have been performed. The report about experimental infections of the genotypes B and C of BPIV3 in laboratory animals and calves was scant. Therefore, an experimental infection of guinea pigs with the Chinese BPIV3 strain SD0835 of the genotype C was performed. Sixteen guinea pigs were intranasally inoculated with the suspension of SD0835, while eight control guinea pigs were also intranasally inoculated with the same volume of supernatant from uninfected MDBK cells. The virus-inoculated guinea pigs displayed a few observable clinical signs that were related to the respiratory tract disease and two of the sixteen experimentally infected guinea pigs died at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (PI), respectively, and apparent gross pneumonic lesions were observed at necropsy. The gross pneumonic lesions in guinea pigs inoculated with SD0835 consisted of dark red, slightly depressed, irregular areas of consolidation in the lung lobes from the second to 9th day of infection at necropsy, and almost complete consolidation and atelectasis of the lung lobes were seen at 7 days PI. Histopathological changes including alveoli septa thickening and focal cellulose pneumonia were also observed in the lungs of guinea pigs experimentally infected with SD0835. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in the respiratory tissues of guinea pigs as early as 24h after intranasal inoculation with SD0835. The results of virus isolation and titration showed that guinea pigs were permissive for

  16. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  17. Malaria entomological inoculation rates in western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Palis, Y; Wirtz, R A; Curtis, C F

    1992-12-01

    Over 61,000 anophelines collected between January 1988 and October 1989 in three villages in western Venezuela were assayed by ELISA for Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein. The six specimens confirmed positive belonged to three species: Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) nuneztovari Gabaldón, 1940, A. albitarsis Arribalzaga, 1878 sensu lato and A. oswaldoi (Peryassu, 1922). The estimated CS protein rate for all species combined was 0.01% (95% confidence limits 0.004-0.02%). This CS protein rate and the mean number of bites received by the collectors indicated a sporozoite inoculation rate of about 10.5 infective bites per person per year. From this value and the number of human malaria cases reported it was estimated that only 0.32% of bites by CS-positive mosquitoes led to a malaria infection. The CS protein rate is so low that this parameter would not be a practical indicator of the efficacy of control campaigns in this area.

  18. Morcellation complications: From direct trauma to inoculation.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nyia L; Isaacson, Keith B

    2016-08-01

    Morcellation is the fragmentation of tissue to facilitate removal of the specimen through small incision in minimally invasive surgery. This technique is not unique to gynecology and is used in general surgery with the goal of improved surgical outcomes including decreased pain, cost, hospital length of stay, and rapid return to normal activities and work. Gynecologic laparoscopic power morcellation (LPM) has come under increased scrutiny over the last 2 years due to widespread attention to a known but rare complication, an unanticipated dissemination of malignancy, namely occult uterine leiomyosarcoma. This chapter focuses on complications associated with gynecologic tissue morcellation from inoculation of benign or malignant tissue fragments within the peritoneal cavity and direct trauma from morcellation techniques. We also include a review of the various morcellation techniques from knife to electrical and the use of intraperitoneal specimen containment systems. PMID:26879674

  19. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  20. Biological responses to porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus in pigs of two genetic populations.

    PubMed

    Petry, D B; Holl, J W; Weber, J S; Doster, A R; Osorio, F A; Johnson, R K

    2005-07-01

    One hundred pigs from the NE Index Line (NEI) and 100 Hampshire-Duroc cross pigs (HD) were inoculated intranasally with porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV 97-7895 strain) at 26 d of age to determine whether genetic variation in response to PRRSV exists. An uninfected littermate to each infected pig served as a control. Pigs were from 163 dams and 83 sires. Body weight and rectal temperature were recorded, and blood samples were drawn from each pig on d 0 before inoculation and on d 4, 7, and 14 after inoculation. Pigs were sacrificed on d 14. Lung and bronchial lymph nodes were collected, placed in optimal cutting temperature compound, and frozen at -80 degrees C. The presence of PRRSV in serum and in lung tissue and bronchial lymph nodes was determined by isolation in cell culture. The presence of antibodies in serum collected on d 14 was determined by a commercial ELISA test. Lung tissue was examined microscopically and scored for incidence and severity of lesions (score of 1 to 3; 1 = no or few lesions, and 3 = severe interstitial pneumonia). Data were analyzed with a mixed model that included random sire and dam effects. The interaction of line x treatment was significant (P < 0.001) for weight change and rectal temperature. Un-infected HD pigs gained 0.67 kg more from d 0 to 14 and averaged 0.32 degrees C higher rectal temperature than uninfected NEI pigs (P < 0.001), whereas infected NEI pigs gained 0.34 kg more and had -0.54 degrees C lower temperature than infected HD pigs (P < 0.001). Viremic titer (cell culture infectious dose 50%/mL) was greater (P < 0.05) in HD than NEI at d 4 (10(4.52) vs. 10(4.22)), 7 (10(4.47) vs. 10(3.99)), and 14 (10(3.49) vs. 10(3.23)). Viral titer loads in lung (P = 0.11) and bronchial lymph nodes tended (P = 0.07) to be greater in HD than NEI pigs. Antibody signal-to-positive (S/P) ELISA ratios in infected pigs ranged from 0.18 to 3.38, and 88% had levels > or = 0.40, which is the positive threshold for

  1. Intracloacal inoculation, an effective screening method for determining the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates against Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Arsi, K; Donoghue, A M; Woo-Ming, A; Blore, P J; Donoghue, D J

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. It is common in poultry, and human infections are often associated with consumption of contaminated poultry products. One strategy to reduce Campylobacter colonization in poultry is the use of oral probiotics, but this produces variable results, possibly because the probiotics are destroyed in the stomach's acidic environment. Protection (e.g., encapsulation) of isolates may overcome this problem, but there is no assurance that these isolates will have efficacy in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, screening candidate isolates by directly placing them in the lower intestinal tract via cloacal inoculation may eliminate the time and expense of encapsulating ineffective isolates. Thus, the purpose of this study was to collect bacterial isolates with anti-Campylobacter activity in vitro and evaluate their efficacy in vivo upon either oral or intracloacal administration. Bacterial isolates were collected from healthy birds and were evaluated for efficacy against C. jejuni in vitro. Isolates having generally regarded as safe status and demonstrating in vitro anti-Campylobacter properties were evaluated after oral or intracloacal inoculation into chicks on day 1 (n = 10 birds per isolate per route of administration). On day 7, birds were dosed by oral gavage with a four-strain mixture of wild-type Campylobacter containing at least 1 × 10(7) CFU/ml organisms. On day 14, birds were euthanized and the ceca were collected aseptically for Campylobacter enumeration. When dosed orally, only one isolate had a 1-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts, whereas when administered intracloacally, six of these isolates produced a 1- to 3-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts in 14-day-old chickens. These results support the strategy of evaluating the efficacy of potential probiotic isolates via cloacal inoculation prior to undergoing the effort of encapsulating isolates for oral administration.

  2. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Eric J; Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ "cough receptors" such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli. PMID:27213574

  3. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E.; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ “cough receptors” such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli. PMID:27213574

  4. Parainfluenza 3-Induced Cough Hypersensitivity in the Guinea Pig Airways.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Eric J; Lieu, TinaMarie; Muroi, Yukiko; Potenzieri, Carl; Undem, Blair E; Gao, Peisong; Han, Liang; Canning, Brendan J; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of respiratory tract viral infection on evoked cough in guinea pigs was evaluated. Guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with either parainfluenza type 3 (PIV3) and cough was quantified in conscious animals. The guinea pigs infected with PIV3 (day 4) coughed nearly three times more than those treated with the viral growth medium in response to capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin. Since capsaicin, citric acid, and bradykinin evoked coughing in guinea pigs can be inhibited by drugs that antagonize the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), it was reasoned that the virally-induced hypertussive state may involve alterations in TPRV1 activity. PIV3 infection caused a phenotypic switch in tracheal nodose Aδ "cough receptors" such that nearly 50% of neurons began to express, de novo, TRPV1 mRNA. There was also an increase TRPV1 expression in jugular C-fiber neurons as determined by qPCR. It has previously been reported that tracheal-specific nodose neurons express the BDNF receptor TrkB and jugular neurons express the NGF receptor TrkA. Jugular neurons also express the artemin receptor GFRα3. All these neurotrophic factors have been associated with increases in TRPV1 expression. In an ex vivo perfused guinea pig tracheal preparation, we demonstrated that within 8 h of PIV3 infusion there was no change in NGF mRNA expression, but there was nearly a 10-fold increase in BDNF mRNA in the tissue, and a small but significant elevation in the expression of artemin mRNA. In summary, PIV3 infection leads to elevations in TRPV1 expression in the two key cough evoking nerve subtypes in the guinea pig trachea, and this is associated with a hypertussive state with respect to various TRPV1 activating stimuli.

  5. Pathogenicity of a currently circulating Chinese variant pseudorabies virus in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Zhe; Tan, Fei-Fei; Guo, Ling-Hua; Wang, Yu-Zhou; Wang, Juan; Wang, Zhi-Yan; Wang, Li-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong; Xiao, Yan; Tian, Ke-Gong

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the pathogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant HN1201 and compare its pathogenicity with a classical PRV Fa strain. METHODS: The pathogenicity of the newly-emerging PRV variant HN1201 was evaluated by different inoculating routes, virus loads, and ages of pigs. The classical PRV Fa strain was then used to compare with HN1201 to determine pathogenicity. Clinical symptoms after virus infection were recorded daily and average daily body weight was used to measure the growth performance of pigs. At necropsy, gross pathology and histopathology were used to evaluate the severity of tissue damage caused by virus infection. RESULTS: The results showed that the efficient infection method of RPV HN1201 was via intranasal inoculation at 107 TCID50, and that the virus has high pathogenicity to 35- to 127-d old pigs. Compared with Fa strain, pigs infected with HN1201 showed more severe clinical symptoms and pathological lesions. Immunochemistry results revealed HN1201 had more abundant antigen distribution in extensive organs. CONCLUSION: All of the above results suggest that PRV variant HN1201 was more pathogenic to pigs than the classical Fa strain. PMID:26870671

  6. Characterisation of acid-base abnormalities in pigs experimentally infected with Chlamydia suis.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Petra; Hartmann, Helmut; Constable, Peter D

    2010-05-01

    This study characterises the acid-base abnormalities in pigs experimentally infected with Chlamydia suis (Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and Constable's simplified strong ion equation). Eight pigs were challenged with the respiratory pathogen C. suis and four pigs served as non-infected controls. Pigs were monitored from 7 days before challenge to 8 days post-inoculation. Clinical examination was performed twice daily and venous blood samples were collected every two days. Blood-gas analysis, haemoxymetry, serum biochemical analysis and electrophoresis were performed in order to characterise the acid-base derangement. Aerosol challenge with C. suis resulted in severe acid-base disturbance characterised by acute respiratory acidosis and strong ion (metabolic) acidosis secondary to anaerobic metabolism and hyper L-lactataemia. Maximal changes were seen at day 3 post-inoculation when severe clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction were evident. The results of the study provide new information regarding the pathophysiology of respiratory infection caused by C. suis and the applicability and diagnostic utility of different approaches for assessing acid-base status in pigs.

  7. A rare case of primary inoculation tuberculosis seen after varicella.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan; Öğüt, Betül; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis (TB) is a rare form of cutaneous TB resulting from direct introduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the skin or mucosa of a previously uninfected, nonimmune person. We herein report the first case, to our knowledge, of primary inoculation TB to be seen after varicella; this case explains the possible mechanism of varicella-zoster virus-mediated transient cellular immune suppression that predisposed the patient to cutaneous TB. In this case, we believe that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection predisposed the patient to primary inoculation TB by leading to direct inoculation of tuberculosis bacilli through vesicles or by suppressing cellular immunity. PMID:26690605

  8. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad; Nielsen, Alexander; Hendriksen, Rene S; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-01-07

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/gentamicin, sulphonamide, tetracycline, hygromycin B, β-lactams and streptomycin [aac(3)-IV, sul2, tet(X), aph(4), bla TEM-1 and strA/B], with all but tet(X) located on the same conjugative plasmid. Nineteen pigs were randomly allocated into two inoculation groups, one treated with apramycin (pen 2) and one non-treated (pen 3), along with a non-inoculated control group (pen 1). Two pigs of pen 2 and 3 were inoculated intragastrically with a rifampicin resistant variant of the strain. Apramycin treatment in pen 2 was initiated immediately after inoculation. Strain colonization was assessed in the feces from all pigs. E. coli 912 was shown to spread to non-inoculated pigs in both groups. The selective effect did not persist beyond 3 days post-treatment, and the strain was not detected from this time point in pen 2. We demonstrated that E. coli 912 was able to spread between pigs in the same pen irrespective of treatment, and apramycin treatment resulted in significantly higher counts compared to the non-treated group. This represents the first demonstration of how antimicrobial treatment affects spread of resistant bacteria in pig production. The use of apramycin may lead to enhanced spread of gentamicin-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern.

  9. Skatole metabolism in the pigs with reduced testicular oestrogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zamaratskaia, G; Berger, T

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the involvement of oestrogens in the regulation of skatole levels in pigs. In total, 44 intact male pigs, siblings from 10 litters, were included in the study. Pigs were orally treated weekly with either 0.1 mg letrozole/kg body weight to reduce endogenous oestrogens or the canola oil vehicle. Fat and liver samples were collected at slaughter at 16, 20 and 40 weeks of age. Skatole and androstenone levels in fat and activities of hepatic cytochrome P4501A1, CYP1A2, CYP2A19 and CYP2E1 were analysed. Letrozole treatment did not significantly change either the levels of skatole or activities of skatole-metabolising enzymes, suggesting that oestrogens are not responsible for gender-related differences in skatole concentrations in porcine tissues. PMID:24460981

  10. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  11. Urolithiasis in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D G D; Vrielinck, J; Millet, S; Janssens, G P J; Deprez, P

    2004-11-01

    Urolithiasis in sows and neonatal pigs is well-known, but information on its occurrence and impact in finishing pigs is sparse. This study reports three outbreaks of urolithiasis in finishing pigs. In one herd, no symptoms were observed, whereas in the other herds the presence of calculi caused obstruction of the urinary tract resulting in death. Using infra-red spectroscopy, the predominant mineral-type found in the uroliths was calcium carbonate (calcite). Only small amounts of calcium oxalate (< 1%) could be detected. A high urinary pH, small abnormalities in the mineral composition of the feed and insufficient drinking water were the most important risk factors identified. To prevent urolithiasis, it is important to ensure adequate water intake, to provide a balanced mineral diet, and to avoid urinary tract infections.

  12. Pathogenicity of border disease virus FNK2012-1 strain isolated from a pig in the natural host, sheep.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Mine, Junki; Torii, Shiho; Fujimoto, Yuri; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A first isolation of border disease virus (BDV) in Japan was from a pig on a farm without keeping any ruminants. Our previous study showed that this BDV, termed the FNK2012-1 strain, replicated inefficiently in swine-derived cells compared with those of ruminant origin. Pigs inoculated with this virus showed neither clinical symptoms nor viremia. In this study, we evaluated the pathogenicity of the FNK2012-1 strain in sheep, its natural host. The inoculated sheep showed clinical symptoms and transient viremia. Seroconversion was observed in the inoculated sheep. These results suggest that the FNK2012-1 strain was introduced from sheep and has not yet adapted to swine. Therefore, surveillance of border disease in Japan is necessary among both the swine and ruminant populations.

  13. Intranasal Inoculation of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Lyophilized Chronic Wasting Disease Prion Particulate Complexed to Montmorillonite Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Tracy A.; Spraker, Terry R.; Rigg, Tara D.; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Hoover, Clare; Michel, Brady; Bian, Jifeng; Hoover, Edward; Gidlewski, Thomas; Balachandran, Aru; O'Rourke, Katherine; Telling, Glenn C.; Bowen, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known prion disease endemic in wildlife, is a persistent problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations. This disease continues to spread and cases are found in new areas each year. Indirect transmission can occur via the environment and is thought to occur by the oral and/or intranasal route. Oral transmission has been experimentally demonstrated and although intranasal transmission has been postulated, it has not been tested in a natural host until recently. Prions have been shown to adsorb strongly to clay particles and upon oral inoculation the prion/clay combination exhibits increased infectivity in rodent models. Deer and elk undoubtedly and chronically inhale dust particles routinely while living in the landscape while foraging and rutting. We therefore hypothesized that dust represents a viable vehicle for intranasal CWD prion exposure. To test this hypothesis, CWD-positive brain homogenate was mixed with montmorillonite clay (Mte), lyophilized, pulverized and inoculated intranasally into white-tailed deer once a week for 6 weeks. Deer were euthanized at 95, 105, 120 and 175 days post final inoculation and tissues examined for CWD-associated prion proteins by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that CWD can be efficiently transmitted utilizing Mte particles as a prion carrier and intranasal exposure. PMID:23671598

  14. Experimental inoculation of Neospora caninum in pregnant water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Konrad, J L; Moore, D P; Crudeli, G; Caspe, S G; Cano, D B; Leunda, M R; Lischinsky, L; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Odeón, A C; Ortega-Mora, L M; Echaide, I; Campero, C M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogenesis of Neospora caninum in experimentally inoculated pregnant water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Twelve Mediterranean female water buffaloes ranging in age from 4 to 14 years old and seronegative to N. caninum by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) were involved. Ten females were intravenously inoculated with 10(8) tachyzoites of NC-1 strain at 70 (n=3) or 90 (n=7) days of pregnancy (dp). Two control animals were inoculated with placebo at 70 and 90 dp, respectively. Serum samples were obtained weekly following inoculation to the end of the experiment. Three animals inoculated at 70 dp were slaughtered at 28 days post inoculation (dpi), three animals inoculated at 90 dp were slaughtered at 28 dpi and the remaining four animals inoculated at 90 dp were slaughtered at 42 dpi. Fetal fluids from cavities and tissue samples were recovered for IFAT and histopathology, immunohistochemistry and PCR, respectively. Genomic DNA from fetal tissues was used for parasite DNA detection and microsatellite genotyping in order to confirm the NC-1 specific-infection. Dams developed specific antibodies one week after the inoculation and serological titers did not decrease significantly to the end of the experiment. No abortions were recorded during the experimental time; however, one fetus from a dam inoculated at 70 dp was not viable at necropsy. Specific antibodies were detected in only two fetuses from dams inoculated at 90 dp that were slaughtered at 42 dpi. No macroscopic changes in the placentas and organs of viable fetuses were observed. Nonsuppurative placentitis was a common microscopic observation in Neospora-inoculated specimens. Microscopic fetal lesions included nonsuppurative peribronchiolar interstitial pneumonia, epicarditis and myocarditis, interstitial nephritis, myositis and periportal hepatitis. Positive IHC results were obtained in two fetuses from dams inoculated at 70 dp and slaughtered at 28 dpi. N

  15. Experimental inoculation of Neospora caninum in pregnant water buffalo.

    PubMed

    Konrad, J L; Moore, D P; Crudeli, G; Caspe, S G; Cano, D B; Leunda, M R; Lischinsky, L; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Odeón, A C; Ortega-Mora, L M; Echaide, I; Campero, C M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pathogenesis of Neospora caninum in experimentally inoculated pregnant water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Twelve Mediterranean female water buffaloes ranging in age from 4 to 14 years old and seronegative to N. caninum by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) were involved. Ten females were intravenously inoculated with 10(8) tachyzoites of NC-1 strain at 70 (n=3) or 90 (n=7) days of pregnancy (dp). Two control animals were inoculated with placebo at 70 and 90 dp, respectively. Serum samples were obtained weekly following inoculation to the end of the experiment. Three animals inoculated at 70 dp were slaughtered at 28 days post inoculation (dpi), three animals inoculated at 90 dp were slaughtered at 28 dpi and the remaining four animals inoculated at 90 dp were slaughtered at 42 dpi. Fetal fluids from cavities and tissue samples were recovered for IFAT and histopathology, immunohistochemistry and PCR, respectively. Genomic DNA from fetal tissues was used for parasite DNA detection and microsatellite genotyping in order to confirm the NC-1 specific-infection. Dams developed specific antibodies one week after the inoculation and serological titers did not decrease significantly to the end of the experiment. No abortions were recorded during the experimental time; however, one fetus from a dam inoculated at 70 dp was not viable at necropsy. Specific antibodies were detected in only two fetuses from dams inoculated at 90 dp that were slaughtered at 42 dpi. No macroscopic changes in the placentas and organs of viable fetuses were observed. Nonsuppurative placentitis was a common microscopic observation in Neospora-inoculated specimens. Microscopic fetal lesions included nonsuppurative peribronchiolar interstitial pneumonia, epicarditis and myocarditis, interstitial nephritis, myositis and periportal hepatitis. Positive IHC results were obtained in two fetuses from dams inoculated at 70 dp and slaughtered at 28 dpi. N

  16. Prior infection of pigs with a genotype 3 swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) protects against subsequent challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 human HEV.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Brenton J; Dryman, Barbara A; Huang, Yao-Wei; Feagins, Alicia R; Leroith, Tanya; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. At least four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV have been reported: genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans whereas genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The current experimental vaccines are all based on a single strain of HEV, even though multiple genotypes of HEV are co-circulating in some countries and thus an individual may be exposed to more than one genotype. Genotypes 3 and 4 swine HEV is widespread in pigs and known to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to know if prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV will confer protective immunity against subsequent exposure to genotypes 3 and 4 human and swine HEV. In this study, specific-pathogen-free pigs were divided into 4 groups of 6 each. Pigs in the three treatment groups were each inoculated with a genotype 3 swine HEV, and 12 weeks later, challenged with the same genotype 3 swine HEV, a genotype 3 human HEV, and a genotype 4 human HEV, respectively. The control group was inoculated and challenged with PBS buffer. Weekly sera from all pigs were tested for HEV RNA and IgG anti-HEV, and weekly fecal samples were also tested for HEV RNA. The pigs inoculated with swine HEV became infected as evidenced by fecal virus shedding and viremia, and the majority of pigs also developed IgG anti-HEV prior to challenge at 12 weeks post-inoculation. After challenge, viremia was not detected and only two pigs challenged with swine HEV had 1-week fecal virus shedding, suggesting that prior infection with a genotype 3 swine HEV prevented pigs from developing viremia and fecal virus shedding after challenges with homologous and heterologous genotypes 3 and 4 HEV. The results from this study have important implications for future development of an effective HEV vaccine.

  17. Malaria entomological inoculation rates in western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Palis, Y; Wirtz, R A; Curtis, C F

    1992-12-01

    Over 61,000 anophelines collected between January 1988 and October 1989 in three villages in western Venezuela were assayed by ELISA for Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein. The six specimens confirmed positive belonged to three species: Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) nuneztovari Gabaldón, 1940, A. albitarsis Arribalzaga, 1878 sensu lato and A. oswaldoi (Peryassu, 1922). The estimated CS protein rate for all species combined was 0.01% (95% confidence limits 0.004-0.02%). This CS protein rate and the mean number of bites received by the collectors indicated a sporozoite inoculation rate of about 10.5 infective bites per person per year. From this value and the number of human malaria cases reported it was estimated that only 0.32% of bites by CS-positive mosquitoes led to a malaria infection. The CS protein rate is so low that this parameter would not be a practical indicator of the efficacy of control campaigns in this area. PMID:1363181

  18. Colonization and Persistence of Labeled and “Foreign” Strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inoculated into the Mouths of Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Daniel H.; Karched, Maribasappa; Furgang, David; Sampathkumar, Vandana; Velusamy, Senthil; Godboley, Dipti

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) is a pathobiont and part of a consortium of bacteria that can lead to periodontitis in humans. Our aim was to develop a model for oral inoculation of labeled Aa into a suitable host in order to study Aa traits and ecological factors that either enhance or repress its persistence. Primate species were screened for Aa to select a host for colonization studies. Macaca mulatta (Rhesus/Rh) was selected. Rh Aa strains were isolated, subjected to sequencing and functional analysis for comparison to human strains. “Best” methods for microbial decontamination prior to inoculation were assessed. Three groups were studied; Group 1 (N=5) was inoculated with Aa Spectinomycin resistant (SpecR) Rh strain 4.35, Group 2 (N=5) inoculated with Aa SpecR human strain IDH 781, and Group 3 (N=5) the un-inoculated control. Repeated feeding with pancakes spiked with SpecRAa followed high dose oral inoculation. Cheek, tongue, and plaque samples collected at baseline 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after inoculation were plated on agar; 1) selective for Aa, 2) enriched for total counts, and 3) containing 50 µg/ml of Spec. Aa was identified by colonial morphology and DNA analysis. Rh and human Aa had > 93–98 % genome identity. Rh Aa attached to tissues better than IDH 781 in vitro (p < 0.05). SpecR IDH 781 was not recovered from any tissue at any time; whereas, RhSpecR 4.35 was detected in plaque, but never tongue or cheek, in all monkeys at all times (> 1 × 105 colonies/ml; p < 0.001). In conclusion, the primate model provides a useful platform for studying integration of Aa strains into a reduced but established oral habitat. Primate derived SpecRAa was consistently detected in plaque at all collection periods; however, human derived Aa was never detected. The model demonstrated both microbial as well as tissue specificity. PMID:26213715

  19. Silage Inoculant Effects on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four inoculants, B (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium), C (Lactobacillus plantarum), D (Lactobacillus pentosus), E (Lactococcus lactis), were compared with an uninoculated treatment (A) on alfalfa (38% DM, AS), corn (36% DM, CS), and brown midrib corn (33% DM, BMR) silages. All inocul...

  20. Lactating cow response to lucerne silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear why bacterial silage inoculants improve milk production in lactating dairy cattle. However, recent in vitro results suggest that inoculated silage effects on milk production may be tied to greater production of rumen microorganisms. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage trea...

  1. A Three Phase Stress Inoculation Program for Adolescent Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Andy; Haslam, Ian R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a three-phase stress inoculation program for health educators teaching adolescents. The program focuses on students actively interpreting and reshaping their perceptions of stress and students' ability to cope with and confront peer pressure situations. The article presents considerations for using stress inoculation in grades 7-12…

  2. A Simple "Pig" Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in…

  3. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  4. "Rickettsia amblyommii" induces cross protection against lethal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Mendell, Nicole L; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2014-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a severe illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii for which there is no available vaccine. We hypothesize that exposure to the highly prevalent, relatively nonpathogenic "Rickettsia amblyommii" protects against R. rickettsii challenge. To test this hypothesis, guinea pigs were inoculated with "R. amblyommii." After inoculation, the animals showed no signs of illness. When later challenged with lethal doses of R. rickettsii, those previously exposed to "R. amblyommii" remained well, whereas unimmunized controls developed severe illness and died. We conclude that "R. amblyommii" induces an immune response that protects from illness and death in the guinea pig model of RMSF. These results provide a basis for exploring the use of low-virulence rickettsiae as a platform to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to prevent severe rickettsioses.

  5. Dynamics of virus excretion via different routes in pigs experimentally infected with classical swine fever virus strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie

    2009-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is transmitted via secretions and excretions of infected pigs. The efficiency and speed of the transmission depends on a multitude of parameters, like quantities of virus excreted by infected pigs. This study provides quantitative data on excretion of CSFV over time from pigs infected with a highly, moderately or low virulent strain. For each strain, five individually housed pigs were infected. Virus excretion was quantified in oropharyngeal fluid, saliva, nasal fluid, lacrimal fluid, faeces, urine and skin scraping by virus titration and quantitative Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRRT-PCR). Infectious virus was excreted in all secretions and excretions of pigs infected with the highly and moderately virulent strain, while excretion from pigs infected with the low virulent strain was mostly restricted to the oronasal route. Pigs infected with the highly virulent strain excreted significantly more virus in all their secretions and excretions over the entire infectious period than pigs infected with the moderately or low virulent strains. An exception were the pigs that developed the chronic form of infection after inoculation with the moderately virulent strain. During the entire infectious period, they excreted the largest amounts of virus via most secretions and excretions, as they excreted virus continuously and for a long duration. This study highlights the crucial role chronically infected pigs may play in the transmission of CSFV. Furthermore, it demonstrates the importance of discriminating between strains and the clinical appearance of infection when using excretion data for modelling.

  6. [Rabies Tissue Culture Infection Test as an Alternative for the Mouse Inoculation Test

    PubMed

    Zanoni, R.; Hörnlimann, B.; Wandeler, A. I.; Kappeler, A.; Kipfer, R.; Peterhans, E.

    1990-01-01

    Rabies has disappeared from large parts of Switzerland. Due to systematic oral fox-vaccination campaings that started in 1987, cases of rabies in wild and domestic animals have been confined to the western frontier with France in the last three years. Nevertheless, some cases of severe exposition of man by rabid or rabies-suspect animals still occur. Rabies can be diagnosed in brain smears of infected animals with high specificity and sensitivity by a direct immunofluorescence method. According to WHO recommendations, negative results are to be confirmed in cases of a human exposition by intracerebral inoculation of brain suspensions in three-weeks-old mice. This method has an excellent sensitivity and is able to detect false-negative results in immunofluorescence, which occur in a very small percentage (0.043%). The disadvantage of this confirmatory assay is the sacrification of relatively high numbers of mice (in the Swiss rabies center about 1,300 animals each year), and the long time required for a final diagnosis: 7-20 days in positive, 21 days in negative cases. The cultivation of virus from brain suspensions on a mouse neuroblastoma cell line is a tempting alternative to the mouse inoculation test. This method usually provides a conclusive diagnosis within a few days. However, in our hands it showed in preliminary experiments an unsatisfactory sensitivity (80.7%). The necessity to carry out strict reproducibility controls in this assay has to be emphasized. Further work must be invested in the improvement of the rabies tissue culture infection test and a careful long-term comparison with the mouse inoculation test will be necessary before the mouse inoculation test can be replaced.

  7. Experimental exposure of young pigs using a pathogenic strain of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 and evaluation of this method for disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Torremorell, M; Pijoan, C; Dee, S

    1999-01-01

    Control of Streptococcus suis infections and associated disease have proven to be a difficult challenge under most farm conditions. The objective of this study was to experimentally expose young pigs with a pathogenic strain of S. suis serotype 2 as a means of controlling the disease in a commercial swine farm. Prior to the start of the study, the pathogenic S. suis strain responsible for mortality in the farm was identified and used to experimentally inoculate baby piglets. Over a 3-week period, groups of pigs were selected (100 pigs/wk) and divided into 2 groups: control (50 pigs/week) and experimentally exposed (50 pigs/week). Pigs in the experimentally exposed group were inoculated at 5 d old by tonsillar swabbing with the pathogenic S. suis farm isolate. The effect of exposure with this pathogenic strain was evaluated during the nursery and finishing stages and was based on: morbidity (pigs with central nervous signs (CNS) and/or lameness), mortality and number of treatments required by pigs that had either CNS or lameness. The relative risk (RR) of acquiring disease due to S. suis infection was also calculated. Results showed that morbidity in the experimentally exposed groups was lower than in the control group and these results were statistically different (P = 0.006). Experimentally exposed pigs also showed a statistically significant reduction in lameness problems (P = 0.012), but not in CNS (P = 0.20) or mortality (P = 0.59). Pigs in the control group had an increased RR of 4.76, 8.77 and 2.7 for morbidity, to have lameness or to have CNS signs, respectively. In conclusion, experimental exposure of young pigs with the farm's pathogenic S. suis strain at a young age, had a positive effect in reducing clinical signs characteristics of S. suis infection. This method constitutes a novel approach to the control of S. suis infections in swine farms. Images Figure 1. PMID:10534006

  8. Changes in ruminal bacterial community composition following feeding of alfalfa silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants promote an increase in milk production, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. In this study, dairy cows fed alfalfa silage treated with the inoculant, Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 (LPS), were compared to cows fed untreated silage (Ctrl) with the objectives: 1) to de...

  9. Growth performance and intestinal microbial populations of growing pigs fed diets containing sucrose thermal oligosaccharide caramel.

    PubMed

    Orban, J I; Patterson, J A; Adeola, O; Sutton, A L; Richards, G N

    1997-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to determine growth performance and changes in intestinal microbial populations of growing pigs fed diets containing sucrose thermal oligosaccharide caramel (STOC). Ninety-six barrows and 96 gilts were group-fed experimental nursery diets for 32 d after weaning in both Exp. 1 and 2. For each experiment, pigs were divided into four groups of 48 pigs and were fed either control, antibiotic (Apramycin sulfate, 34 mg/kg), 1% STOC, or 2% STOC diets for 32 d after weaning. Each diet was replicated six times with eight pigs per replication. Pigs were either orally gavaged (Exp 1) with water of STOC (2 g per pig) or pigs were creep-fed (Exp 2) either a control diet or a 2% STOC diet for 5 d before weaning (33 d). At the end of Exp 1 and 2, cecal material was collected for enumeration of total aerobes, total anaerobes, coliforms, lactobacilli, and bifidobacteria. Gilts (96 per experiment) used in Exp. 3 and 4 were weaned at 26 d and fed experimental nursery diets for 32 d. They were fed either a control or 1% STOC diet and were otherwise treated as previously described. There were no significant effects of STOC or antibiotic on ADG, ADFI, feed efficiency, or cecal microbial populations in pigs in this study. Feeding diets containing either antibiotic of STOC did not improve animal performance or change intestinal bacterial populations in the present study. PMID:9027562

  10. Probiotics and virulent human rotavirus modulate the transplanted human gut microbiota in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Husen; Wang, Haifeng; Shepherd, Megan; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Dickerman, Allan; Settlage, Robert; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We generated a neonatal pig model with human infant gut microbiota (HGM) to study the effect of a probiotic on the composition of the transplanted microbiota following rotavirus vaccination and challenge. All the HGM-transplanted pigs received two doses of an oral attenuated rotavirus vaccine. The gut microbiota of vaccinated pigs were investigated for effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplement and homotypic virulent human rotavirus (HRV) challenge. High-throughput sequencing of V4 region of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that HGM-transplanted pigs carried microbiota similar to that of the C-section delivered baby. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented over 98% of total bacteria in the human donor and the recipient pigs. HRV challenge caused a phylum-level shift from Firmicutes to Proteobacteria. LGG supplement prevented the changes in microbial communities caused by HRV challenge. In particular, members of Enterococcus in LGG-supplemented pigs were kept at the baseline level, while they were enriched in HRV challenged pigs. Taken together, our results suggested that HGM pigs are valuable for testing the microbiota's response to probiotic interventions for treating infantile HRV infection. PMID:25349634

  11. Probiotics and virulent human rotavirus modulate the transplanted human gut microbiota in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We generated a neonatal pig model with human infant gut microbiota (HGM) to study the effect of a probiotic on the composition of the transplanted microbiota following rotavirus vaccination and challenge. All the HGM-transplanted pigs received two doses of an oral attenuated rotavirus vaccine. The gut microbiota of vaccinated pigs were investigated for effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplement and homotypic virulent human rotavirus (HRV) challenge. High-throughput sequencing of V4 region of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that HGM-transplanted pigs carried microbiota similar to that of the C-section delivered baby. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented over 98% of total bacteria in the human donor and the recipient pigs. HRV challenge caused a phylum-level shift from Firmicutes to Proteobacteria. LGG supplement prevented the changes in microbial communities caused by HRV challenge. In particular, members of Enterococcus in LGG-supplemented pigs were kept at the baseline level, while they were enriched in HRV challenged pigs. Taken together, our results suggested that HGM pigs are valuable for testing the microbiota’s response to probiotic interventions for treating infantile HRV infection. PMID:25349634

  12. Quantitative Determination of Tenuazonic Acid in Pig and Broiler Chicken Plasma by LC-MS/MS and Its Comparative Toxicokinetics.

    PubMed

    Fraeyman, Sophie; Devreese, Mathias; Broekaert, Nathan; De Mil, Thomas; Antonissen, Gunther; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Rychlik, Michael; Croubels, Siska

    2015-09-30

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantitate tenuazonic acid (TeA) in pig and broiler chicken plasma was successfully developed and validated. Linear matrix-matched calibration curves ranged between 5 and 200 ng/mL. Correlation coefficients, goodness-of-fit coefficients, and within-day and between-day precision and accuracy fell well within the acceptance criteria. The limit of quantitation was 5.0 ng/mL in both pig and broiler chicken plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was applied in a comparative toxicokinetic study in both pigs and broiler chickens. TeA was completely bioavailable after oral administration in both animal species. However, absorption was deemed to be slower in broiler chickens (mean tmax 0.32 h in pigs vs 2.60 h in chickens). TeA was more slowly eliminated in broiler chickens (mean t1/2el 0.55 h in pigs vs 2.45 h in chickens after oral administration), mainly due to the significantly lower total body clearance (mean Cl 446.1 mL/h/kg in pigs vs 59.2 mL/h/kg in chickens after oral administration). Tissue residue studies and further research to elucidate the biotransformation and excretion processes of TeA in pigs, broiler chickens, and other animal species are imperative. PMID:26371380

  13. Quantitative Determination of Tenuazonic Acid in Pig and Broiler Chicken Plasma by LC-MS/MS and Its Comparative Toxicokinetics.

    PubMed

    Fraeyman, Sophie; Devreese, Mathias; Broekaert, Nathan; De Mil, Thomas; Antonissen, Gunther; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Rychlik, Michael; Croubels, Siska

    2015-09-30

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantitate tenuazonic acid (TeA) in pig and broiler chicken plasma was successfully developed and validated. Linear matrix-matched calibration curves ranged between 5 and 200 ng/mL. Correlation coefficients, goodness-of-fit coefficients, and within-day and between-day precision and accuracy fell well within the acceptance criteria. The limit of quantitation was 5.0 ng/mL in both pig and broiler chicken plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was applied in a comparative toxicokinetic study in both pigs and broiler chickens. TeA was completely bioavailable after oral administration in both animal species. However, absorption was deemed to be slower in broiler chickens (mean tmax 0.32 h in pigs vs 2.60 h in chickens). TeA was more slowly eliminated in broiler chickens (mean t1/2el 0.55 h in pigs vs 2.45 h in chickens after oral administration), mainly due to the significantly lower total body clearance (mean Cl 446.1 mL/h/kg in pigs vs 59.2 mL/h/kg in chickens after oral administration). Tissue residue studies and further research to elucidate the biotransformation and excretion processes of TeA in pigs, broiler chickens, and other animal species are imperative.

  14. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Schwartz, Kent J.; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Abby R.; Visek, Callie A.; Victoria, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  15. Experimental infection with Toxocara cati in pigs: migratory pattern and pathological response in early phase.

    PubMed

    Sommerfelt, Irma Estela; Duchene, Adriana; Daprato, Betina; Lopez, Clara María; Cardillo, Natalia; Franco, Aníbal Juan

    2014-01-01

    Experimental inoculations of approximately 100,000 infective Toxocara cati larval eggs were done in twelve pigs. The T. cati eggs used for inoculation were collected from cat's feces. Another group of three pigs served as an uninfected control. Groups of infected pigs were euthanized at seven, 14, 21, and 28 days post-inoculation (dpi). Tissue samples were taken for digestion and histopathology changes in early phase. The number of larvae recovered from the lungs peaked at seven and 14 dpi and were also present at 21, and 28 dpi. Larvae of T. cati were present in the lymph nodes of the small and large intestine at seven, 14, and 28 dpi and at seven, 14, 21, and 28 dpi respectively. In other studied tissues, no larvae or less than one larva per gram was detected. The pathological response observed in the liver and lungs at seven and 14 dpi, showed white spots on the liver surface and areas of consolidation were observed in the lungs. The lungs showed an inflammatory reaction with larvae in center at 28 dpi. In the liver we observed periportal and perilobular hepatitis. The lymph nodes of the intestines displayed eosinophil lymphadenitis with reactive centers containing parasitic forms in some of them. The granulomatous reaction was not observed in any tissues. The role of the other examined tissues had less significance. The relevance of this parasite as an etiological agent that leads to disease in paratenic hosts is evident.

  16. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele. PMID:23691623

  17. Animal model studies of genital chlamydial infections. Immunity to re-infection with guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent in the urethra and eye of male guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Howard, L V; O'Leary, M P; Nichols, R L

    1976-08-01

    A previous report demonstrated that male guinea-pigs could be infected in the urethra with guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) agent and that the infection was transmitted during mating from infected males to females. In the experiments reported here, inoculation of male guinea-pigs in the urethra with GPIC organisms resulted in infection which subsided spontaneously in about 2 weeks. Males were demonstrated to be completely resistant to urethral challenge with 10(3)ID50 when tested 6 weeks after urethral infection. These guinea-pigs, immune to re-infection of the urethra, remained susceptible to infection of the eye, but this ocular infection was shorter in duration than that in previously uninfected control animals. Infection in the eye resulted in immunity to both ocular and urethral infection when animals were challenged 6 weeks after the ocular infection.

  18. Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, R H; Green, D E; Maiztegui, J I; Peters, C J

    1988-01-01

    Guinea pigs infected with low-passage Junin virus of human origin showed viral strain dependent differences in mortality, LD50, time to death, and in viral spread and distribution. Different Junin strains appeared to cause at least two broad patterns of Argentine hemorrhagic fever in guinea pigs. A number of strains of Junin virus caused a viscerotropic type of illness in which virus replicated predominantly in lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow. With the most severe visceral forms of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, the guinea pigs became viremic, developed necrosis of spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow, showed gastric hemorrhages, and all animals died within 13-15 days. Other Junin strains induced a neurological type of illness with transient viral replication in and lymphocyte depletion of spleen and lymph nodes, with no detectable viremia or viral replication in bone marrow. Subsequently, virus was found in the brain with varying severities of polioencephalitis, and the guinea pigs frequently showed rear leg paralysis before death occurred 28-34 days after inoculation. Not all animals infected with a neurotropic strain developed all these signs. One viral strain induced some signs characteristic of both patterns of illness. Although the disease forms in the guinea pig model did not strictly correlate with those observed in the humans from which these strains were obtained, the different strains of Junin virus consistently caused very different patterns of illness in infected guinea pigs.

  19. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit anitsera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other cultured cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  20. Immunogenicity of guinea pig cells transformed in culture by chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Ohanian, S.H.; McCabe, R.P.; Evans, C.H.

    1981-12-01

    The immunogenicity of inbred strain 2/N guinea pig fibroblasts transformed to the malignant state in vitro by chemical carcinogens was evaluated with the use of a variety of in vivo and in vitro methods including delayed-type hypersensitivity skin and tumor transplantation tests and analysis of antibody production by immunofluorescence, complement fixation, and staphylococcal protein A binding tests. Neoplastic transformation was induced by direct treatment of cells in culture with benzo(a)pyrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or by the host-mediated method by which fetuses were exposed to diethylnitrosamine or MNNG in vivo prior to cell culture. Rabbits and syngeneic guinea pigs were inoculated with unirradiated and X-irradiated clonally derived cells. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to immunizing or other cells were equivalent in immunized or control guinea pigs, and no protection to tumor outgrowth from a challenge inoculum of immunizing cells was observed. Antibody activity induced in the sera of immunized guinea pigs was cross-reactive and removed by absorption with nontumorigenic cells. Rabbit antisera after absorption with fetal guinea pig cells were nonreactive with the specific immunizing or other culture cells. Chemical carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation of guinea pig cells can, therefore, occur without formation of detectable, individually distinct cell surface tumor-specific neoantigens.

  1. A Malaysia 97 monovalent foot-and-mouth disease vaccine (>6PD50/dose) protects pigs against challenge with a variant FMDV A SEA-97 lineage virus, 4 and 7 days post vaccination.

    PubMed

    Nagendrakumar, Singanallur Balasubramanian; Hong, Nguyen Thi Thu; Geoffrey, Fosgate T; Jacqueline, Morris Michelle; Andrew, Davis; Michelle, Giles; Van Phuc, Kim; Ngon, Quach Vo; Phuong, Le Thi Thu; Phuc, Nguyen Ngoc Hong; Hanh, Tran Xuan; Van Hung, Vo; Quynhanh, Le Thi; Tan, Tran Minh; Long, Ngo Thanh; Wilna, Vosloo

    2015-08-26

    Pigs play a significant role during outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) due to their ability to amplify the virus. It is therefore essential to determine what role vaccination could play to prevent clinical disease and lower virus excretion into the environment. In this study we investigated the efficacy of the double oil emulsion A Malaysia 97 vaccine (>6PD50/dose) against heterologous challenge with an isolate belonging to the A SEA-97 lineage at 4 and 7 days post vaccination (dpv). In addition, we determined whether physical separation of pigs in the same room could prevent virus transmission. Statistically there was no difference in the level of protection offered by 4 and 7 dpv. However, no clinical disease or viral RNA was detected in the blood of pigs challenged 4 dpv, although three of the pigs had antibodies to the non-structural proteins (NSPs), indicating viral replication. Viral RNA was also detected in nasal and saliva swabs, but on very few occasions. Two of the pigs vaccinated seven days prior to challenge had vesicles distal from the injection site, but on the inoculated foot, and two pigs had viral RNA detected in the blood. One pig sero-converted to the NSPs. In contrast, all unvaccinated and inoculated pigs had evidence of infection. No infection occurred in any of the susceptible pigs in the same room, but separated from the infected pigs, indicating that strict biosecurity measures were sufficient under these experimental conditions to prevent virus transmission. However, viral RNA was detected in the nasal swabs of one group of pigs, but apparently not at sufficient levels to cause clinical disease. Vaccination led to a significant decrease in viral RNA in vaccinated pigs compared to unvaccinated and infected pigs, even with this heterologous challenge, and could therefore be considered as a control option during outbreaks.

  2. A Refined Guinea Pig Model of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection for Assessing the Efficacy of Antiviral Compounds.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, A R; Lefebvre, D J; Willems, T; Paul, G; Billiet, A; Murao, L E; Neyts, J; Goris, N; De Clercq, K

    2016-04-01

    An antiviral containment strategy for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks could support or replace current contingency plans in case of an outbreak in Europe and could spare many healthy animals from being pre-emptively culled. Recently, substantial progress has been made towards the development of small molecule drugs that inhibit FMD virus (FMDV) replication in vitro. For the initial in vivo evaluation of antiviral lead molecules, a refined FMDV-infection model in guinea pigs (GP) is herewith described. This GP model was validated by demonstrating the antiviral effect of T-1105 (an influenza virus inhibitor with reported activity against FMDV). Sixteen animals were orally administered with T-1105 twice daily (400 mg/kg/day) for five consecutive days and inoculated intraplantarly with 100 GPID50 of the GP-adapted FMDV strain O1 Manisa 1 h after the first administration. The efficacy of T-1105 was compared with that of prophylactic vaccination with a highly potent double-oil emulsion-inactivated O1 Manisa vaccine. Ten animals received a single, full (2 ml) cattle vaccine dose and were inoculated 3 weeks later. Fourteen T-1105-treated and all vaccinated GP were completely protected from generalization of vesicular lesions. At 2 dpi, viral RNA was detected in serum of 9/16 T-1105-treated and of 6/10 vaccinated animals. At 4 dpi, viral RNA was detected in serum, organs and oral swabs of half of the T-1105-treated animals and only in the serum of 1/10 of the vaccinated animals. Mean viral RNA levels in serum and organs of T-1105-treated and vaccinated animals were reduced compared to untreated controls (P < 0.01). T-1105 conferred a substantial clinical and virological protection against infection with O1 Manisa, similar to the protection afforded by vaccination. These results validate the suitability of the enhanced GP model for the purpose of initial evaluation of inhibitors of FMDV replication and illustrate the potential of selective inhibitors of viral

  3. A Refined Guinea Pig Model of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection for Assessing the Efficacy of Antiviral Compounds.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, A R; Lefebvre, D J; Willems, T; Paul, G; Billiet, A; Murao, L E; Neyts, J; Goris, N; De Clercq, K

    2016-04-01

    An antiviral containment strategy for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks could support or replace current contingency plans in case of an outbreak in Europe and could spare many healthy animals from being pre-emptively culled. Recently, substantial progress has been made towards the development of small molecule drugs that inhibit FMD virus (FMDV) replication in vitro. For the initial in vivo evaluation of antiviral lead molecules, a refined FMDV-infection model in guinea pigs (GP) is herewith described. This GP model was validated by demonstrating the antiviral effect of T-1105 (an influenza virus inhibitor with reported activity against FMDV). Sixteen animals were orally administered with T-1105 twice daily (400 mg/kg/day) for five consecutive days and inoculated intraplantarly with 100 GPID50 of the GP-adapted FMDV strain O1 Manisa 1 h after the first administration. The efficacy of T-1105 was compared with that of prophylactic vaccination with a highly potent double-oil emulsion-inactivated O1 Manisa vaccine. Ten animals received a single, full (2 ml) cattle vaccine dose and were inoculated 3 weeks later. Fourteen T-1105-treated and all vaccinated GP were completely protected from generalization of vesicular lesions. At 2 dpi, viral RNA was detected in serum of 9/16 T-1105-treated and of 6/10 vaccinated animals. At 4 dpi, viral RNA was detected in serum, organs and oral swabs of half of the T-1105-treated animals and only in the serum of 1/10 of the vaccinated animals. Mean viral RNA levels in serum and organs of T-1105-treated and vaccinated animals were reduced compared to untreated controls (P < 0.01). T-1105 conferred a substantial clinical and virological protection against infection with O1 Manisa, similar to the protection afforded by vaccination. These results validate the suitability of the enhanced GP model for the purpose of initial evaluation of inhibitors of FMDV replication and illustrate the potential of selective inhibitors of viral

  4. Oral cenesthopathy.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Miura, Anna; Watanabe, Motoko; Takenoshita, Miho; Uezato, Akihito; Toriihara, Akira; Nishikawa, Toru; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cenesthopathy is characterized by abnormal and strange bodily sensations and is classified as a 'delusional disorder, somatic type' or 'somatoform disorder' according to the DSM 5. The oral cavity is one of the frequent sites of cenesthopathy, thus the term 'oral cenesthopathy.' Patients with oral cenesthopathy complain of unusual sensations without corresponding abnormal findings in the oral area, such as excessive mucus secretion, a slimy sensation, or a feeling of coils or wires being present within the oral region. They usually visit multiple dentists rather than psychiatrists. Without a proper diagnosis, they repeatedly pursue unnecessary surgical procedures to remove their 'foreign body'. This sometimes creates a dilemma between the dentists and patients. The nosography of oral cenesthopathy has been discussed in some case reports and reviews but is overlooked in mainstream medicine. This review focuses on the various aspects of oral cenesthopathy. The estimated prevalence of cenesthopathy was 0.2 to 1.9 % in a study done at a Japanese university psychiatry clinic and 27 % in a study done at a Japanese psychosomatic dentistry clinic. Oral cenesthopathy do not have clear disposition, while some studies reported that elderly women were most commonly affected. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. However, recent studies have suggested a right > left asymmetrical pattern of the cerebral blood flow of patients with oral cenesthopathy. Antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychotherapy might be effective in some cases, though it is known to be intractable. To date, the epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, classification and treatment of oral cenesthopathy are unknown due to the few reports on the disorder, though there are a few case reports. To overcome this difficult medical condition, clinico-statistical and case-control studies done under rigorous criteria and with a large sample size are required. PMID

  5. Evaluation of a ceftiofur-washed whole cell Streptococcus suis bacterin in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The efficacy of currently available washed whole cell Streptococcus suis bacterins is generally poor. We developed and tested the efficacy of a novel ceftiofur-washed whole cell bacterin. Sixty-six, 2-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) pigs were randomly divided into 5 groups. Three groups were vaccinated 28 and 14 d prior to challenge. The 3 ceftiofur-washed whole cell bacterins each contained 1 of 3 different adjuvants (Montanide ISA 25, Montanide ISA 50, and Saponin). Pigs exhibiting severe central nervous system disease or severe joint swelling and lameness were euthanized immediately and necropsied. All remaining pigs were necropsied at 14 d post inoculation. The ceftiofur-washed whole cell S. suis bacterin with Montanide ISA 50 adjuvant significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bacteremia, meningitis, pneumonia, and mortality associated with S. suis challenge. Further work on this novel approach to bacterin production is warranted. PMID:15352553

  6. Pathogenesis of endometritis and salpingitis in a guinea pig model of chlamydial genital infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rank, R. G.; Sanders, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    The development of tubal obstruction and subsequent infertility is a major sequelum of upper genital tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis; however, little is known about the pathogenesis of the infection. In this investigation, the authors present a detailed study of the progression of ascending chlamydial infection in female guinea pigs resulting from intravaginal inoculation of the Chlamydia psittaci agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Isolation of chlamydiae from different tissues of the genital tract revealed definitive evidence for ascending infection that was not dose-related. By 7 days after infection, GPIC was isolated from the endometrium and oviducts of 78% of the animals. Pathologic changes analogous to those seen in human chlamydial disease, including polymorphonuclear, mononuclear, and plasma cell infiltration, were seen in the endometrium and oviducts, although not all isolation positive animals developed overt tubal disease. Long-term fibrosis, often in combination with hydrosalpinx, was noted in the mesosalpingeal tissue in 20% of the animals. Thus, the guinea pig:GPIC system represents a model for ascending chlamydial infection resulting from vaginal inoculation of normal guinea pigs that closely approximates the disease as seen in humans and can be used to study the pathogenesis of chlamydial genital infection. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1562052

  7. Experimental infection of pigs with Border disease virus isolated from Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica).

    PubMed

    Cabezón, Oscar; Rosell, Rosa; Sibila, Marina; Lavín, Santiago; Marco, Ignasi; Segalés, Joaquim

    2010-05-01

    Between 2001 and 2007, several outbreaks of disease associated with Border disease virus (BDV) infection were reported in the central Pyrenees (northeast Spain) and were associated with a major reduction in chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica) populations. At the same time, wild boars (Sus scrofa) from the same area were found to be seropositive to this pestivirus, without showing clinical signs. The present study examines the susceptibility of domestic swine and the course of the infection with a BDV strain isolated from naturally infected chamois. Twenty pigs were inoculated with 1 x 10(7) TCID(50) (50% tissue culture infective dose) by oronasal route, and 16 control pigs received Eagles sterile Minimal Essential Medium. Serologic (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization test) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays were performed on serum samples obtained at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 31 days postinoculation (dpi). All infected pigs were viremic from 3 to 14 dpi. After 14 dpi, all infected animals developed an antibody response against the homologous virus. Clinical signs or histologic lesions were not observed in inoculated pigs. The present work demonstrates the susceptibility of domestic swine to a BDV strain of chamois origin.

  8. Pathogenesis of endometritis and salpingitis in a guinea pig model of chlamydial genital infection.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; Sanders, M M

    1992-04-01

    The development of tubal obstruction and subsequent infertility is a major sequelum of upper genital tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis; however, little is known about the pathogenesis of the infection. In this investigation, the authors present a detailed study of the progression of ascending chlamydial infection in female guinea pigs resulting from intravaginal inoculation of the Chlamydia psittaci agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Isolation of chlamydiae from different tissues of the genital tract revealed definitive evidence for ascending infection that was not dose-related. By 7 days after infection, GPIC was isolated from the endometrium and oviducts of 78% of the animals. Pathologic changes analogous to those seen in human chlamydial disease, including polymorphonuclear, mononuclear, and plasma cell infiltration, were seen in the endometrium and oviducts, although not all isolation positive animals developed overt tubal disease. Long-term fibrosis, often in combination with hydrosalpinx, was noted in the mesosalpingeal tissue in 20% of the animals. Thus, the guinea pig:GPIC system represents a model for ascending chlamydial infection resulting from vaginal inoculation of normal guinea pigs that closely approximates the disease as seen in humans and can be used to study the pathogenesis of chlamydial genital infection.

  9. Intracerebroventricular porcine corticotropin-releasing hormone and cortisol effects on pig immune measures and behavior.

    PubMed

    Salak-Johnson, J L; McGlone, J J; Whisnant, C S; Norman, R L; Kraeling, R R

    1997-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of porcine corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and cortisol on the immune system and behavior were examined in domestic pigs. In Experiment 1, 50 micrograms of pCRH in 200 microliters of saline or 200 microliters of vehicle was administered i.c.v. at 0600 h. Blood samples were obtained at 0600 (prior to injection), 0700, and 0800 h. Plasma cortisol concentrations were higher at 1 and 2 h after pCRH than after saline. Generally, pCRH failed to effect NK cytotoxicity or lymphocyte proliferation in response to phytohemagluttin (PHA). However, 1 h postinjection, pigs administered pCRH i.c.v. had marginally lower NK activity than control pigs. Pigs injected with pCRH had substantially lower neutrophil chemotaxis (CHTX) than the control pigs at 1 and 2 h postinjection. As blood cortisol concentration increased, neutrophil CHTX decreased. Pigs injected i.c.v. with pCRH had higher neutrophil numbers and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios than control pigs. Percentage of lymphocytes was higher among control than treated pigs. Central pCRH increased overall activity, particularly walking, standing, licking, rooting, and increased activity-related sequences (e.g., sit, walk and stand, walk), but reduced complex oral/nasal sequences (e.g., root, lick). In Experiment 2, pigs were injected i.c.v. with 10 micrograms of cortisol in 200 microliters of saline or with vehicle at 0600 h. Administration of cortisol failed to effect NK cytotoxicity, lymphocyte proliferation, CHTX, or leukocyte distribution. Pigs given cortisol had no apparent change in behavior. These data indicate leukocyte distribution and specific neutrophil function in pigs were significantly modulated by stress-related hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and complexity of behavioral sequences (pigs repeating certain behavioral sequences) associated with increased activity was reduced. Oral/nasal stereotypies (as seen among confined sows) were

  10. Virus excretion and antibody dynamics in goats inoculated with a field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wu, X; Wang, Z; Bao, J; Li, L; Zhao, Y; Li, J

    2013-11-01

    A field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) from an outbreak in Tibet, China, was inoculated into goats to investigate the dynamics of virus excretion and antibody production. Further, animals received PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Ocular, nasal and oral samples were tested for the presence of virus antigen by one-step real-time qualitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); competitive ELISA (c-ELISA) was used for the measurement of specific antibodies against PPRV. Virus particles could be detected as early as day 3 post-inoculation (pi) and virus excretion lasted for up to day 26 pi. All four goats inoculated with the PPRV field isolate were seropositive as early as day 10 pi. In animals inoculated with the vaccine strain, antibody was detected at day 14 pi, and levels of neutralizing antibodies remained above the protection threshold level (1 : 8) for 8 months. Both virus particles and neutralizing antibodies were detected earlier in goats challenged with the field isolate than in those receiving the vaccine strain.

  11. Chlamydial infection of subcutaneous conjunctival transplants in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pham, R T; Sung, M; Dawson, C R; Schachter, J

    1990-07-01

    The development and testing of candidate vaccines for trachoma are constrained because only humans and nonhuman primates are susceptible to conjunctival infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. Guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC), an analogous disease of guinea pigs, provides a useful, less expensive model to study ocular chlamydial infections. GPIC is caused by a Chlamydia psittaci strain whose external constituents are very similar to those of C. trachomatis. To develop a better model for studying GPIC immunity, conjunctival pockets were established under the abdominal skin of guinea pigs by subcutaneous implantation. Up to six implants could be produced in each animal. The success rate of implantation was 79.0% (n = 148). These pockets were then infected with GPIC. The organism was recovered from the autografts indicating local replication, and tests for serum antibody by microimmunofluorescence showed production of GPIC-specific antibody of IgG and IgM classes after infection. There was minimal antibody response after moderate inoculating doses to the implants, and the titers increased more slowly than after eye infection with GPIC; with higher concentration of the inoculum, however, the antibody response increased to the same levels as with the ocular challenge but more slowly. Inoculation of pockets with GPIC also produced acute inflammatory changes in infected autografts (n = 101). Histologic examination of infected grafts showed chlamydial inclusions in epithelial cells and significant infiltration with lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Subcutaneous autografts may provide a useful model for chronologic studies of chlamydial infection. The delayed immunologic response, however, suggests that these pockets of implanted epithelium do not have full access to the immune system.

  12. Antifungal potential of Spilanthes calva after inoculation of Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Rai, M K; Varma, A; Pandey, A K

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the influence of Piriformospora indica on the antifungal principle of Spilanthes calva, a plant of high commercial value. An antifungal efficacy was shown by aqueous and petroleum ether extracts of S. calva against Fusarium oxysporum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The petroleum ether extract of S. calva was more effective than the aqueous extract in inoculated as well as uninoculated plants. The antifungal activity of the plant was enhanced due to the increase in spilanthol content after inoculation of P. indica. PMID:15601453

  13. Studies of guinea pig immunoglobulin isotype, idiotype and antiidiotype

    SciTech Connect

    Tirrell, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of Guinea pigs with diphtheria toxoid generated antibodies of the IgG class that were capable of neutralizing native toxin in vivo. Sera from these animals were used to affinity purify idiotypic antibodies (AB1). AB1 vaccines derived from the IgG1 class and from F(ab{prime}){sub 2} of IgG1 + IgG2 (IgG1/2) classes were effective in inducing a syngeneic anti-idiotype (AB2) response. Animals immunized with AB1 consisting of both IgG1/2 did not elicit a detectable AB2 response. Binding of homologous {sup 125}I-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} (AB1) to the antiidiotype was inhibited 90% in the presence of DT.F(ab{prime}){sub 2} derived from preimmune serum or had no inhibitory effects on the idiotype-antiidiotype interactions. Two groups of outbred guinea pigs were vaccinated with alum absorbed F(ab{prime}){sub 2} of anti-idiotype IgG1/2 (AB2). Of the ten animals inoculated with AB2, three tested positive by RIA against {sup 125}I-DT. Two of the RIA positive sera contained antibodies that neutralized diphtheria toxin in a rabbit intracutaneous assay. Purification of guinea pig IgG by protein A-Sepharose affinity chromatography resulted in the separation of three distinct IgG populations.

  14. Exploitation of genetically modified inoculants for industrial ecology applications.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, John P; Walsh, Ultan F; O'Donnell, Anne; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; O'Gara, Fergal

    2002-08-01

    The major growth seen in the biotechnology industry in recent decades has largely been driven by the exploitation of genetic engineering techniques. The initial benefits have been predominantly in the biomedical area, with products such as vaccines and hormones that have received broad public approval. In the environmental biotechnology and industrial ecology sectors, biotechnology has the potential to make significant advances through the use of genetically modified (GM) microbial inoculants that can reduce agri-chemical usage or remediate polluted environments. Although many GM inoculants have been developed and tested under laboratory conditions, commercial exploitation has lagged behind. Here, we review scientific and regulatory requirements that must be satisfied as part of that exploitation process. Particular attention is paid to new European Union (EU) regulations (Directives) that govern the testing and release of genetically modified organisms and microbial plant protection inoculants in the EU. With regard to the release of GM inoculants, the impact of the inoculant and the fate of modified genes are important concerns. Long term monitoring of release sites is necessary to address these issues. Data are reported from the monitoring of a site 6 years after release of GM Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It was found that despite the absence of a host plant, the GM strains persisted in the soil for at least 6 years. Horizontal transfer and microevolution of a GM plasmid between S. meliloti strains was also observed. These data illustrate the importance of assessing the long-term persistence of GM inoculants. PMID:12448755

  15. Characterisation of a novel pestivirus associated with an outbreak of stillbirths and pre-weaning deaths in pigs due to myocarditis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A syndrome of stillbirths and preweaning losses with myocarditis occurred on 2 Australian pig farms in 2003. While extensive investigations excluded a wide range of know agents, a foetal inoculation study confirmed an infectious agent was present and likely to be viral. This paper describes the iden...

  16. Characterization of an antibiotic resistant clostridium hathewayi strain from a continuous flow exclusion chemostat culture derived from the cecal contents of a feral pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemostat model has been an important tool in studying intestinal microflora. To date, several competitive exclusion products have been developed from such studies as prophylactic treatment against pathogenic bacteria. A continuous flow chemostat model of a feral pig was developed using inocul...

  17. Prevalence of Yersinia enterocolitica in Pigs Slaughtered in Chinese Abattoirs

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Junrong; Wang, Xin; Xiao, Yuchun; Cui, Zhigang; Xia, Shengli; Hao, Qiong; Yang, Jinchuan; Luo, Longze; Wang, Shukun; Li, Kewei; Yang, Haoshu; Gu, Wenpeng; Xu, Jianguo; Kan, Biao

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of Yersinia enterocolitica in slaughtered pigs in China was studied. A total of 8,773 samples were collected and examined from different pig abattoirs in 11 provinces from 2009 to 2011. Of these, 4,495 were oral-pharyngeal swab (tonsils) samples from pigs, 1,239 were from intestinal contents, and 3,039 were feces samples from abattoirs or local pigpens. The data showed that 1,132 strains were obtained, from which the isolation rate for Yersinia enterocolitica was 19.53% (878/4,495) from the tonsil samples, 7.51% (93/1,239) from intestinal contents, and 5.30% (161/3,039) from feces. Of the 850 pathogenic Yersinia strains, except for three of bioserotype 2/O:9 and three of bioserotype 4/O:3, most (844/850) were of bioserotype 3/O:3. Interestingly, pathogenic Y. enterocolitica accounted for the majority of the isolated strains from most provinces (85.17% to 100%), whereas from Heilongjiang, 96.52% (111/115) were classified as nonpathogenic biotype 1A with various serotypes, and only 3.48% of the strains (4/115) were pathogenic 3/O:3. All of the pathogenic strains were analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and 49 patterns were obtained for the O:3 pathogenic strains; most of them were K6GN11C30021 (53.13%: 450/847) and K6GN11C30012 (21.37%: 181/847). Several strains from diarrhea patient samples revealed PFGE patterns identical to that from samples of local pigs, suggesting a possible link between porcine isolates and human infection. The results above suggested that Yersinia enterocolitica in slaughtered pigs from Chinese abattoirs was characterized by region-specific PFGE patterns and confirmed that strains isolated from pigs are closely related to those from human infections. PMID:22327599

  18. Concurrent vaccination of pigs with type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protects against type 1 PRRSV but not against type 2 PRRSV on dually challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Jeong, Jiwoon; Kang, Ikjae-; Park, Su-Jin; Chae, Chanhee

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent vaccination of pigs with both type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine against heterologous dual challenge of both genotypes and compare with single vaccination of pigs against heterologous single challenge of both genotypes. Pigs were administered both type 1 and type 2 PRRSV vaccine concurrently into separate anatomical sites at 28 days of age and inoculated intranasally with both genotypes at 63 days of age. Neutralizing antibodies (NA) were not detected in any pigs in any group (NA titer <2 log2) throughout the experiment. In addition, concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes had significantly lower numbers of type 1 and type 2 PRRSV-specific interferon-γ secreting cells (IFN-γ-SC) compared to vaccination of pigs with type 1 or type 2 PRRSV only. Despite the decreased induction of type 1 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC, concurrent vaccination is still able to reduce type 1 PRRSV viremia whereas the decreased induction of type 2 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC by concurrent vaccination correlates with lack of reduction of type 2 PRRSV viremia after dual challenge. The results of this study demonstrated that concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes is able to reduce the levels of type 1 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions but not able to reduce the levels of type 2 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions.

  19. Survival rate of salmonella on cooked pig ear pet treats at refrigerated and ambient temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Pet treats, including pig ears, have been implicated as vehicles of human salmonellosis, and Salmonella has been isolated on commercially produced pig ears. Therefore, behavior of the pathogen on this very low water activity (aw) pet treat is of interest. The survival of Salmonella serotypes Newport and Typhimurium DT104 was measured on natural (aw 0.256) and smoked (aw 0.306) pig ear pet treat products inoculated at ca. 6.5 log CFU per sample and stored at 4.4 or 22°C for 365 days. Surviving populations of Salmonella were enumerated periodically, and a modified Weibull model was used to fit the inactivation curves for log populations. After 14 days, the decline of Salmonella was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at 22°C than at 4.4°C. By 365 days of storage at 4.4°C, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 declined by 2.19 log on smoked pig ears and 1.14 log on natural pig ears, while Salmonella Newport declined by 4.20 log on smoked pig ears and 2.08 log on natural pig ears. Populations of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on refrigerated natural pig ears rebounded between day 152 (3.21 log CFU per sample) and day 175 (4.79 log CFU per sample) and rose gradually for the duration of the study to 5.28 log CFU per sample. The model fits for survival rate of Salmonella on pig ears at 4.4°C show a rapid initial decline followed by a long tailing effect. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on natural pig ears at 4.4°C had the slowest rate of reduction. At 22°C Salmonella declined nonlinearly by >4.5 log for each combination of serotype and pig ear type at 22°C but remained detectable by enrichment. The model parameter for days to first decimal reduction of Salmonella on pig ears was two to three times higher at 4.4°C compared with 22°C, demonstrating that Salmonella slowly declines on very low aw refrigerated pet treats and more rapidly at room temperature. This information may be useful for pet treat safety assessments. PMID:24405998

  20. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  1. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  2. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  3. Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... its box has the American Dental Association's (ADA) seal of acceptance, it is good for your oral ... dispensed solutions have the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Other over-the-counter whitening products include whitening ...

  4. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  5. Energy Dense, Protein Restricted Diet Increases Adiposity and Perturbs Metabolism in Young, Genetically Lean Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kimberly D.; Scheffler, Tracy L.; Kasten, Steven C.; Reinholt, Brad M.; van Eyk, Gregory R.; Escobar, Jeffery; Scheffler, Jason M.; Gerrard, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood) are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12), containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1–12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11) with 12.2–19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001) energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); blood glucose increased (P<0.05) in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01), even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001). Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05) subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7) was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs. PMID:23991090

  6. Cell-free and cell-associated viremia in pigs after oronasal infection with Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Nawynck, H J; Pensaert, M B

    1995-03-01

    Nine pigs were examined for the presence of viremia during the first week after oronasal inoculation of 10(8.0) TCID50 Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV). Blood was taken at 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 days post inoculation (PI) and the presence of cell-free ADV in plasma and of ADV-infected mononuclear cells was examined by titration and by cocultivation with permissive cells, respectively. The mononuclear cells of 6 of the 9 pigs, collected at 3 and 5 days PI were further separated into subpopulations of enriched monocytes and enriched lymphocytes. Both subpopulations were cocultivated. Nasal secretions were collected from 4 of the 9 pigs for the determination of virus titers and interferon concentrations. Both infected mononuclear cells and cell-free ADV were demonstrated in 5 pigs, infected mononuclear cells only were found in 2 pigs, and neither cell-associated or cell-free ADV were detected in 2 pigs. Two of the 7 viremic animals were positive on one single day, 3 on 2 days, 1 on 3 days and 1 on 4 days. The number of infected cells was approximately 5 times higher in monocytes than in lymphocytes. The highest virus titers were present in those nasal fluids with the lowest alpha-interferon concentration. A correlation between the titer of locally produced ADV in the nose and the presence of a viremia was not found. In conclusion, we can state that a viremia regularly occurs under both cell-free and cell-associated form after an oronasal inoculation of ADV and that monocytes are the most susceptible mononuclear cells.

  7. Biodegradation of Pig Manure by the Housefly, Musca domestica: A Viable Ecological Strategy for Pig Manure Management

    PubMed Central

    Čičková, Helena; Pastor, Berta; Kozánek, Milan; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rojo, Santos; Takáč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology for biodegradation of pig manure by using houseflies in a pilot plant capable of processing 500–700 kg of pig manure per week is described. A single adult cage loaded with 25,000 pupae produced 177.7±32.0 ml of eggs in a 15-day egg-collection period. With an inoculation ratio of 0.4–1.0 ml eggs/kg of manure, the amount of eggs produced by a single cage can suffice for the biodegradation of 178–444 kg of manure. Larval development varied among four different types of pig manure (centrifuged slurry, fresh manure, manure with sawdust, manure without sawdust). Larval survival ranged from 46.9±2.1%, in manure without sawdust, to 76.8±11.9% in centrifuged slurry. Larval development took 6–11 days, depending on the manure type. Processing of 1 kg of wet manure produced 43.9–74.3 g of housefly pupae and the weight of the residue after biodegradation decreased to 0.18–0.65 kg, with marked differences among manure types. Recommendations for the operation of industrial-scale biodegradation facilities are presented and discussed. PMID:22431982

  8. Comparative pathogenicity of Escherichia coli O157 and intimin-negative non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E coli strains in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Dean-Nystrom, Evelyn A; Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Pohlenz, Joachim F L; Moon, Harley W; O'Brien, Alison D

    2003-11-01

    We compared the pathogenicity of intimin-negative non-O157:H7 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O91:H21 and O104:H21 strains with the pathogenicity of intimin-positive O157:H7 and O157:H(-) strains in neonatal pigs. We also examined the role of Stx2d-activatable genes and the large hemolysin-encoding plasmid of O91:H21 strain B2F1 in the pathogenesis of STEC disease in pigs. We found that all E. coli strains that made wild-type levels of Stx caused systemic illness and histological lesions in the brain and intestinal crypts, whereas none of the control Stx-negative E. coli strains evoked comparable central nervous system signs or intestinal lesions. By contrast, the absence of intimin, hemolysin, or motility had little impact on the overall pathogenesis of systemic disease during STEC infection. The most striking differences between pigs inoculated with non-O157 STEC strains and pigs inoculated with O157 STEC strains were the absence of attaching and effacing intestinal lesions in pigs inoculated with non-O157:H7 strains and the apparent association between the level of Stx2d-activatable toxin produced by an STEC strain and the severity of lesions. PMID:14573674

  9. Neural invasion of two virulent suid herpesvirus 1 strains in neonatal pigs with or without maternal immunity.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Pensaert, M B; Nauwynck, H J; Kyriakis, S C

    1999-09-15

    The neural invasion of two virulent Suid Herpesvirus 1 (SHV1) strains was examined in neonatal pigs with or without maternal immunity. One-week-old pigs with comparable levels of maternal immunity (SN-titer = 12-48) were intranasally inoculated with 10(7.0) TCID50 of either of the Ka or E21 strains. The invasion of the strains was examined in the nasal mucosa and in three neuronal levels of the trigeminal nervous pathway as well as in three levels of the olfactory nervous pathway by virus titration and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In control pigs without specific antibodies, both strains invaded up to the end level of each neural pathway. In pigs with maternal immunity, the Ka strain invaded only up to the 2nd level of each pathway with titers being significantly lower (p<0.05) than in the negative controls. However, the E21 strain invaded up to the end levels in both neural pathways of immune pigs with virus titers being similar to those observed in non-immune pigs (p>0.05). IHC revealed that maternal antibodies can protect against a fibroblast-mediated spread of the Ka strain in the lamina propria of the nasal mucosa, as well as against a local spread of the Ka and E21 strains from neurons to their satellite cells in the trigeminal ganglion. In conclusion, the nature of virus strain determines the invasion of SHV1 within the nervous system of maternally-immune neonatal pigs.

  10. Development of large intestinal attaching and effacing lesions in pigs in association with the feeding of a particular diet.

    PubMed Central

    Neef, N A; McOrist, S; Lysons, R J; Bland, A P; Miller, B G

    1994-01-01

    Hysterotomy-derived piglets were kept in gnotobiotic isolators and artificially colonized at 7 days of age with an adult bovine enteric microflora. At 3 weeks of age, the pigs were transferred to conventional experimental accommodation and weaned, either onto a solid diet that had been associated with field cases of typhlocolitis in pigs or onto a solid control diet. At necropsy at 5 weeks of age, groups of pigs fed the diet associated with field cases of typhlocolitis were found to have developed typhlocolitis. This was absent from the groups fed the control diet. The typhlocolitis was characterized by attaching and effacing lesions typical of those described following experimental inoculation of various species with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. A nonverocytotoxic, eae probe-positive E. coli serotype O116 was isolated from pigs on the colitis-associated diet but not from any of the pigs on the control diet. Coliform bacteria attached to the colonic lesions reacted with polyclonal antiserum to E. coli O116 in an immunoperoxidase assay of histological sections of affected tissue. No reaction with this antiserum was observed in corresponding tissue sections taken from pigs on the control diet. No colon lesions were observed in germfree pigs fed either of the diets. It is postulated that proliferation and possibly expression of pathogenicity of the attaching and effacing E. coli responsible for the lesions are strongly influenced by diet. Images PMID:7927691

  11. Chlorate Concentration in the Jejunum and Cecum in Growing Pigs when Supplemented in Drinking Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior research has demonstrated that oral administration of chlorate and nitrate results in reduced risk and / or concentration of Salmonella enterica fecal shedding of infected pigs, poultry and ruminants. The effect of chlorate is concentration dependent in vitro, but the concentrations of chlorat...

  12. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  13. Replication and Transmission of the Novel Bovine Influenza D Virus in a Guinea Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Chithra; Thomas, Milton; Sheng, Zizhang; Hause, Ben M.; Collin, Emily A.; Knudsen, David E. B.; Pillatzki, Angela; Nelson, Eric; Wang, Dan; Kaushik, Radhey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza D virus (FLUDV) is a novel influenza virus that infects cattle and swine. The goal of this study was to investigate the replication and transmission of bovine FLUDV in guinea pigs. Following direct intranasal inoculation of animals, the virus was detected in nasal washes of infected animals during the first 7 days postinfection. High viral titers were obtained from nasal turbinates and lung tissues of directly inoculated animals. Further, bovine FLUDV was able to transmit from the infected guinea pigs to sentinel animals by means of contact and not by aerosol dissemination under the experimental conditions tested in this study. Despite exhibiting no clinical signs, infected guinea pigs developed seroconversion and the viral antigen was detected in lungs of animals by immunohistochemistry. The observation that bovine FLUDV replicated in the respiratory tract of guinea pigs was similar to observations described previously in studies of gnotobiotic calves and pigs experimentally infected with bovine FLUDV but different from those described previously in experimental infections in ferrets and swine with a swine FLUDV, which supported virus replication only in the upper respiratory tract and not in the lower respiratory tract, including lung. Our study established that guinea pigs could be used as an animal model for studying this newly emerging influenza virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza D virus (FLUDV) is a novel emerging pathogen with bovine as its primary host. The epidemiology and pathogenicity of the virus are not yet known. FLUDV also spreads to swine, and the presence of FLUDV-specific antibodies in humans could indicate that there is a potential for zoonosis. Our results showed that bovine FLUDV replicated in the nasal turbinate and lungs of guinea pigs at high titers and was also able to transmit from an infected animal to sentinel animals by contact. The fact that bovine FLUDV replicated productively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts

  14. Radiologic observations of gastric and small intestinal motility in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Wood, A K

    1982-01-01

    The passage of a single oral dose of barium sulfate through the stomach and small intestine of 18 pigs (1 to 21 days of age) was studied. In a series of lateral radiographs, the stomach had a smooth oval appearance, filling the cranial third of the abdomen. Barium mixed rapidly with the milk clot in the stomach immediately after swallowing and became distributed throughout the stomach (except for the diverticulum, which contained gas). Barium passed into the duodenum by postdosing minute (PDM) 3 in 1 pig, and by PDM 10 in 11 pigs. In 32 experiments in 17 pigs, gastric emptying of barium was complete by PDM 100 in 91% of the experiments, whether or not the pigs had suckled the sow. Suckling also did not influence the time taken for barium to reach the large intestine (by PDM 360 in 12 pigs). When a hyperosmolar contrast medium (diatrizoate meglumine) was given instead of barium sulfate to 10 pigs, gastric emptying was delayed (it was not complete by up to PDM 218), but the small intestine filled rapidly (the contrast medium reached the cecum by PDM 218).

  15. Brewers dried yeast as a source of mannan oligosaccharides for weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    White, L A; Newman, M C; Cromwell, G L; Lindemann, M D

    2002-10-01

    Brewers dried yeast, a source of mannan oligosaccharides (MOS), was assessed as an alternative to an antimicrobial agent (carbadox) for young pigs in two experiments. The yeast contained 5.2% MOS. Agglutination tests confirmed adsorption of several serovars of E. coli and Salmonella spp. onto the yeast product. In Exp. 1, seven replicates (five pigs per pen) of 22-d-old pigs were fed a nonmedicated basal diet or the basal diet with carbadox (55 mg/kg), yeast (3%), or a combination of 3% yeast and 2% citric acid for 28 d. Carbadox did not improve growth performance. Growth rate and feed intake were depressed (P < 0.05) in pigs fed yeast alone or in combination with acid. Log counts of total coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium perfringens in feces were not affected by diet, but Bifidobacteria spp. counts were lower (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the yeast + acid diet and lactobacilli counts were higher (P < 0.05) in pigs fed yeast. Fecal pH and VFA concentrations and intestinal morphological traits were not consistently affected by diet. Serum IgG levels were elevated in the yeast + acid (P < 0.01) group. In Exp. 2, the effects of yeast and carbadox additions to the diet on enteric microbial populations in young pigs housed in isolation units were evaluated. Pigs (n = 24) were weaned at 11 d of age (4.1 kg BW) and placed in isolation chambers (two pigs per chamber) equipped with individual air filtering systems and excrement containers. Treatments were a nonmedicated basal diet and the basal diet with 55 mg/kg of carbadox or with 3% yeast. Diets were fed for 29 d, then each pig was orally dosed with approximately 9.5 x 10(8) CFU of E. coli K88. Daily fecal E. coli K88 counts were not different (P > 0.05) among treatments, but fecal shedding of carbadox-resistant coliforms was higher (P < 0.01) during the 9-d period in pigs fed carbadox. Total fecal coliforms were consistently lower throughout the postinoculation period in pigs fed yeast (P < 0.05). Yeast reduced

  16. Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  17. A neonatal gnotobiotic pig model of human enterovirus 71 infection and associated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Kocher, Jacob; Jortner, Bernard S; Vonck, Marlice; Pelzer, Kevin; Deng, Jie; Zhu, Runan; Li, Yuyun; Qian, Yuan; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine development and pathogenesis studies for human enterovirus 71 are limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report the development of a novel neonatal gnotobiotic pig model using the non-pig-adapted neurovirulent human enterovirus 71 strain BJ110, which has a C4 genotype. Porcine small intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural cells were infected in vitro. Oral and combined oral-nasal infection of 5-day-old neonatal gnotobiotic pigs with 5×10(8) fluorescence forming units (FFU) resulted in shedding up to 18 days post-infection, with viral titers in rectal swab samples peaking at 2.22×10(8) viral RNA copies/mL. Viral capsid proteins were detected in enterocytes within the small intestines on post-infection days (PIDs) 7 and 14. Additionally, viral RNA was detected in intestinal and extra-intestinal tissues, including the central nervous system, the lung and cardiac muscle. The infected neonatal gnotobiotic pigs developed fever, forelimb weakness, rapid breathing and some hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms. Flow cytometry analysis revealed increased frequencies of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ-producing T cells in the brain and the blood on PID 14, but reduced frequencies were observed in the lung. Furthermore, high titers of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies were generated in both orally and combined oral-nasally infected pigs on PIDs 7, 14, 21 and 28. Together, these results demonstrate that neonatal gnotobiotic pigs represent a novel animal model for evaluating vaccines for human enterovirus 71 and for understanding the pathogenesis of this virus and the associated immune responses. PMID:26038741

  18. Causes of reduced survival of neonatal pigs by medium-chain triglycerides: blood metabolite and behavioral activity approaches.

    PubMed

    Lin, C L; Chiang, S H; Lee, H F

    1995-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the causes of the failure of orally dosed medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in improving the survival of neonatal pigs. In Exp. 1, four litters consisting of 24 unsuckled neonatal pigs were either dosed with 6 mL/kg BW.75 of MCT or the dosing process was mimicked by inserting and withdrawing the feeding tube at 10 and 18 h after birth. Blood beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration was increased (P < .06) and the depletion of liver glycogen was reduced (P < .05) by MCT. Plasma octanoate (C8) concentration peaked at 1 h and was minimized at 4 to 8 h after each MCT dosage; decanoate (C10) concentration increased (P < .001) gradually after each dosage. Activity of pigs was decreased (P < .01) by MCT. In Exp. 2, 94 litters consisting of 887 neonatal pigs were dosed with either 6 mL/kg BW.75 of MCT, coconut oil (CO), or saline at 10 to 14 and 20 to 28 h after birth. Milk intake (P < .05) and weight gain were reduced (P < .01) in 1- to 2-d-old pigs dosed with MCT compared with intake and gain of pigs dosed with saline. Mortality of large pigs (> 1 kg) was increased (P < .05) but mortality of small pigs (< 1 kg) was not affected by MCT. Mortality of small pigs was reduced (P < .05) but mortality of large pigs (> 1 kg) was not affected by CO. Standing, walking, and suckling behaviors of pigs were not affected by MCT or CO. Coma was evident in 9.7% of pigs dosed with MCT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7592086

  19. Technology And Pregnant Pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    One of the interesting things about aerospace spinoff is the way it keeps cropping up in uncommon applications unimaginably remote from the original technology. For example, the pig pregnancy detector. The pig pregnancy detector? City folk may be surprised to learn that there is such a thing-and wonder why. The why is because it is a sow's job to produce piglets and farmers can't afford to keep those who don't; it costs about a half-dollar a day in feed, labor and facilities, and even in small herds that's intolerable. So the barren sow must go. Until recently, the best method of determining pig pregnancy was "eyeballing," daily visual examination over a period of time. The problem with eyeballing is that pregnancy is not evident until well advanced; when there is no pregnancy, the farmer learns too late that he has been feeding a sow that won't give him a litter. Advancing technology provided an answer: the quick, easy-to-use, accurate automatic detector for early evaluation of pregnancy status. Among the most popular of these devices are Scanopreg and Scanoprobe, to whose development NASA technology contributed. Scanopreg is an ultrasonic system which detects pregnancy about 30 days after breeding, long before eyeballing can provide an answer. The companion Scanoprobe is a dual-function unit which not only determines pregnancy but also gives farmers an analysis of a hog's meat-fat ratio, an important factor in breeding. Only a short time on the market, Scanopreg and Scanoprobe have already found wide acceptance among meat producers because they rapidly repay their cost.

  20. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n = 10), control vaccinated (CV, n = 20), and experimental — received doxycycline (DOXY, n = 20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day − 1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8 + cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications. - Highlights: • We examine the postvaccinal immune response in pigs treated with doxycycline. • Doxycycline negatively influenced the specific proliferation after recall stimulation. • Doxycycline negatively influenced secretion of IFN-γ after recall stimulation. • The lower number of

  1. Periapical inflammation after coronal microbial inoculation of dog roots filled with gutta-percha or resilon.

    PubMed

    Shipper, Guy; Teixeira, Fabricio B; Arnold, Roland R; Trope, Martin

    2005-02-01

    A dog model was used to assess and compare in vivo the efficacy of gutta-percha and AH26 sealer versus Resilon with Epiphany primer and sealer [Resilon "Monoblock" System (RMS)] filled roots in preventing apical periodontitis subsequent to coronal inoculation with oral microorganisms. There were 56 vital roots in the premolars of seven adult beagle dogs aseptically instrumented, filled, and temporized. The roots were randomly divided into four experimental groups (Coronal Leakage Model) and one negative control group and filled as follows: group 1-lateral condensation of gutta-percha and AH26 sealer (n=12); group 2-vertical condensation of gutta-percha and AH26 sealer (n=12); group 3-lateral condensation of RMS (n=12); group 4-vertical condensation of RMS (n=10); negative control (n=10)-gutta-percha and AH26 sealer or RMS root fillings using lateral or vertical condensation techniques as in groups 1 to 4. Positive control-57 additional premolar roots were instrumented, infected and not filled (beginning of the Entombment Model experiment). The premolars in groups 1 to 4 were accessed again, inoculated with dental plaque scaled from the dog's teeth, and temporized. This fresh innoculum of microorganisms was repeated on two more occasions at monthly intervals. The teeth in the negative control group were not accessed again and remained undisturbed. On the 14-wk postcoronal inoculation, dogs were euthanized, and jaw blocks prepared for histologic evaluation under a light microcope. Mild inflammation was observed in 82% (18 of 22) of roots filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer that was stastistically more than roots filled with RMS (19% or 4 of 21) and roots in the negative control (22% or 2 of 9) (McNemar paired analysis, p < 0.05). The Resilon "Monoblock" System was associated with less apical periodontitis, which may be because of its superior resistance to coronal microleakage. PMID:15671816

  2. The Pig--Pet, Pork or Sacrifice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Arthur

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the various roles of the pig in children's books, including E. B. White's CHARLOTTE'S WEB and Nina Bawden's PEPPERMINT PIG. Notes that, although pigs are often used as metaphors for greed, gluttony, and squalor, the portrayal of pigs in children's literature is typically positive. (MM)

  3. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  4. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rocheli; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  5. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  6. Comparative pathogenesis of an avian H5N2 and a swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschauwer, Annebel; Atanasova, Kalina; Van Borm, Steven; van den Berg, Thierry; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Ase; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2009-01-01

    Pigs are considered intermediate hosts for the transmission of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) to humans but the basic organ pathogenesis of AIVs in pigs has been barely studied. We have used 42 four-week-old influenza naive pigs and two different inoculation routes (intranasal and intratracheal) to compare the pathogenesis of a low pathogenic (LP) H5N2 AIV with that of an H1N1 swine influenza virus. The respiratory tract and selected extra-respiratory tissues were examined for virus replication by titration, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR throughout the course of infection. Both viruses caused a productive infection of the entire respiratory tract and epithelial cells in the lungs were the major target. Compared to the swine virus, the AIV produced lower virus titers and fewer antigen positive cells at all levels of the respiratory tract. The respiratory part of the nasal mucosa in particular showed only rare AIV positive cells and this was associated with reduced nasal shedding of the avian compared to the swine virus. The titers and distribution of the AIV varied extremely between individual pigs and were strongly affected by the route of inoculation. Gross lung lesions and clinical signs were milder with the avian than with the swine virus, corresponding with lower viral loads in the lungs. The brainstem was the single extra-respiratory tissue found positive for virus and viral RNA with both viruses. Our data do not reject the theory of the pig as an intermediate host for AIVs, but they suggest that AIVs need to undergo genetic changes to establish full replication potential in pigs. From a biomedical perspective, experimental LP H5 AIV infection of pigs may be useful to examine heterologous protection provided by H5 vaccines or other immunization strategies, as well as for further studies on the molecular pathogenesis and neurotropism of AIVs in mammals.

  7. Diarrhea-like condition and intestinal mucosal responses in susceptible homozygous and heterozygous F4R+ pigs challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugiharto, S; Hedemann, M S; Jensen, B B; Lauridsen, C

    2012-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) F4 is a major cause of diarrhea in both neonatal and young pigs. Indeed, only pigs having F4 receptors are susceptible. Among the susceptible pigs, it is yet unknown if spontaneous E. coli postweaning diarrhea (PWD) occurrence and intestinal mucosal responses to ETEC differ between genotypes. This study investigated a diarrhea-like condition and intestinal mucosal responses in F4 homo- and heterozygous susceptible weaner pigs. Sixteen weaned pigs (28 d of age) were used in a 2 × 2 factorial study with genotype (homo- or heterozygous F4R(+)) and inoculation with E. coli F4 or not as the 2 factors. Within genotype, 4 pigs were inoculated with E. coli F4 and the other 4 pigs received saline buffer on days 7 and 8 after weaning. Fecal score and DM and bacterial counts were conducted from days 7 to 12 after weaning. Blood was obtained on days 3 and 10 after weaning and at the time of killing. Four pigs were killed per day on days 14, 15, 16, and 17. Small intestine (SI) was divided into 3 parts of equal length for measurement of intestinal weight and the amount of mucosa. Lymphocyte subsets in jejunal Peyer's patches (jejPP) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Escherichia coli reduced (P = 0.05) total percentage of intestinal mucosa (on a dry basis) and had an impact on metabolomics profile of the plasma. No effect of genotype was seen on fecal score and DM, fecal shedding of hemolytic E. coli, mucosal responses, metabolomics profile, antibody responses, and lymphocyte subsets counts. This study suggests that both F4 homo- and heterozygous susceptible pigs have similar functional receptors for E. coli F4, which facilitate the adhesion of F4 to the intestinal tissue. PMID:23365356

  8. Oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  9. Earthworm Effects without Earthworms: Inoculation of Raw Organic Matter with Worm-Worked Substrates Alters Microbial Community Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Aira, Manuel; Domínguez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthworms are key organisms in organic matter decomposition because of the interactions they establish with soil microorganisms. They enhance decomposition rates through the joint action of direct effects (i.e. effects due to direct earthworm activity such as digestion, burrowing, etc) and indirect effects (i.e. effects derived from earthworm activities such as cast ageing). Here we test whether indirect earthworm effects affect microbial community functioning in the substrate, as when earthworms are present (i. e., direct effects). Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions we inoculated fresh organic matter (pig manure) with worm-worked substrates (vermicompost) produced by three different earthworm species. Two doses of each vermicompost were used (2.5 and 10%). We hypothesized that the presence of worm-worked material in the fresh organic matter will result in an inoculum of different microorganisms and nutrients. This inoculum should interact with microbial communities in fresh organic matter, thus promoting modifications similar to those found when earthworms are present. Inoculation of worm-worked substrates provoked significant increases in microbial biomass and enzyme activities (β-glucosidase, cellulase, phosphatase and protease). These indirect effects were similar to, although lower than, those obtained in pig manure with earthworms (direct and indirect earthworm effects). In general, the effects were not dose-dependent, suggesting the existence of a threshold at which they were triggered. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that the relationships between earthworms and microorganisms are far from being understood, and suggest the existence of several positive feedbacks during earthworm activity as a result of the interactions between direct and indirect effects, since their combination produces stronger modifications to microbial biomass and enzyme activity. PMID:21298016

  10. Assessment of Pediococcus acidilactici as a Potential Silage Inoculant

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, A.; Duffner, F.; Curtin, D.; Brophy, G.; O'Kiely, P.; O'Connell, M.

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen Pediococcus strains were screened for their potential as silage inoculants. Pediococcus acidilactici G24 was found to be the most suitable, exhibiting a short lag phase on both glucose and fructose, a rapid rate of acid production, a high sugar-to-lactate conversion efficiency, no detectable breakdown of proteins or lactic acid, and the ability to grow within a broad range of pH and temperature. When tested in laboratory silos using grass with a water-soluble carbohydrate content of 24 g/kg of aqueous extract, P. acidilactici G24 stimulated the natural Lactobacillus plantarum population and accelerated the rates of lactic acid production and pH decrease. After 6 days of fermentation, the inoculated silage exhibited a 12% decrease in ammonia nitrogen and an 11% increase in crude protein levels compared with uninoculated controls. The use of an L. plantarum inoculant at a rate of 104 bacteria per g of grass in conjunction with P. acidilactici G24 produced no additional beneficial effect. Inoculation of grass with a water-soluble carbohydrate level of 8 g/kg of aqueous extract with P. acidilactici G24 led to no acceleration in the rate of L. plantarum growth or pH decrease. However, after 7 days of fermentation the inoculated silage had a 14% lower ammonia nitrogen protein content than did uninoculated controls. The results suggest that P. acidilactici G24 may be useful as a silage inoculant for crops with a sufficiently high water-soluble carbohydrate level. PMID:16348773

  11. Preclinical electrogastrography in experimental pigs

    PubMed Central

    Květina, Jaroslav; Varayil, Jithinraj Edakkanambeth; Ali, Shahzad Marghoob; Kuneš, Martin; Bureš, Jan; Tachecí, Ilja; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kopáčová, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive means of recording gastric myoelectric activity or slow waves from cutaneous leads placed over the stomach. This paper provides a comprehensive review of preclinical EGG. Our group recently set up and worked out the methods for EGG in experimental pigs. We gained our initial experience in the use of EGG in assessment of porcine gastric myoelectric activity after volume challenge and after intragastric administration of itopride and erythromycin. The mean dominant frequency in pigs is comparable with that found in humans. EGG in experimental pigs is feasible. Experimental EGG is an important basis for further preclinical projects in pharmacology and toxicology. PMID:21217873

  12. Inducing Resistance to Conspiracy Theory Propaganda: Testing Inoculation and Metainoculation Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banas, John A.; Miller, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the boundaries of inoculation theory by examining how inoculation can be applied to conspiracy theory propaganda as well as inoculation itself (called metainoculation). A 3-phase experiment with 312 participants compared 3 main groups: no-treatment control, inoculation, and metainoculation. Research questions explored…

  13. Unloading the hired gun: Inoculation effects in expert witness testimony.

    PubMed

    Ziemke, Mitchell H; Brodsky, Stanley L

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the efficacy of inoculation as a trial strategy designed to counter mock jurors' perceptions that an expert is a hired gun in a criminal trial. The effect of narrative and fragmented expert responses to cross-examination questions was also examined. The significant results were that not using inoculation led to higher ratings of expert knowledge compared to other conditions. Response style did not make a difference in the criminal setting. Implications of these results regarding "hired gun" expert witnesses and courtroom persuasion are discussed. PMID:26299600

  14. Extraction of an incisor embedded within the nasal cavity in two guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ONO, Kaori; OMIYA, Tomoko; OGUCHI, Yukio; SETOGAWA, Moemi; MACHIDA, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Oral examination of two guinea pigs revealed that the unilateral incisor was absent. On radiographic examination, the incisor was identified within the nasal cavity in both patients. Under anesthesia in both patients, the skin was incised from the nostril to 1.5 cm proximal, and the premaxilla and part of the maxilla were exposed. The bone was removed using a surgical drill, and the incisor was exposed in the nasal cavity. The root was grasped with forceps and carefully extracted as it was degraded and very fragile. Diagnosis was easy using oral and radiographic examination. In guinea pig patients where an incisor is absent on oral examination, this condition should be considered. PMID:26118492

  15. Early pathogenesis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains in Danish pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Uttenthal, Ase

    2012-10-12

    Host-virus interactions play an important role for the clinical outcome of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infections in pigs. Strain virulence, host characteristics and environment are all factors that markedly influence disease severity. We tested CSFV strains of varying virulence in an experimental set-up, reducing the influence of host and environmental factors. Thus, weaner pigs were inoculated with one of 4 CSFV strains in order to compare the pathogenesis for a 3-week-period after infection. CSFV strains selected were 2 new and 2 previously characterized. None of these strains had been tested in Danish outbred pigs before. Clinical observations grouped the infected pigs into two different categories reflecting either non-specific, mainly gastro-intestinal, problems, or severe disease including high fever within the first week after inoculation. Gross-pathological findings varied between strains, however, lymphoid atrophy and growth retardation represented a consistent finding for all 4 strains. Virus distribution, viral load and in particular virus persistence differed, but supported present practice that recommends lymphoid tissue, most optimal tonsil and lymph nodes, as target material to be applied for early laboratory diagnosis. The present study demonstrated constraints associated with early detection of infections with CSFV strains of low virulence. Since neither clinical symptoms nor pathological lesions observed with these strains constituted characteristic signs of CSF, the risk of neglecting a CSF suspicion is immediate. Therefore, topical information on new outbreaks and continuous enhancement of an efficient surveillance system is of great importance to prevent further spread of CSF within the pig population.

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are the effects of oral cancer on speech and swallowing? The effects of cancer on speech and swallowing depend on the location and size ... movement. This could result in unclear production of speech sounds made with the lips such as /p/, / ...

  17. Oral Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on other parts of the mouth. Credit: NIDCR publication: Mouth Problems + HIV Download: Low-Resolution Image High- ...

  18. Effect of the concentration of maternal antibodies on the neural invasion of Aujeszky's disease virus in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Nauwynck, H J; Pensaert, M B; Kyriakis, S C

    1997-04-01

    The degree to which maternally derived antibodies may affect neural invasion of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) in neonatal pigs was examined. One-week-old pigs with different levels of maternal immunity were inoculated intranasally with 10(7.0) TCID50 of the Ka strain. The invasion of the virus was studied in both the trigeminal neural pathway (nasal mucosa, trigeminal ganglion = 1st level, pons/medulla = 2nd level and cerebellum/thalamus = 3rd level) and the olfactory neural pathway (olfactory mucosa = 1st level, olfactory bulb = 2nd level and lateral olfactory gyrus = 3rd level) by virus titration and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In control pigs without specific antibodies, virus invaded all neuronal levels in both neural pathways. In pigs with a low concentration of maternal antibodies (SN-titer = 2-3), virus infected all neuronal levels in both neural pathways but, compared to the controls, virus titers were significantly lower (approximately 2 log10) in the trigeminal pathway. In pigs with a high concentration of maternal antibodies (SN-titer = 272-384), virus reached the 2nd neuronal level of the olfactory pathway while no neural tissue had been infected in the trigeminal pathway. Virus titers in the affected neuronal levels of the latter pigs were significantly lower than in the controls. IHC revealed, in non-immune pigs, a fibroblast-mediated spread of the virus in the nasal lamina propria, and a local spread of the virus from neurons to their satellite cells in the trigeminal ganglion. Such a spread of the virus was rarely seen in the nasal mucosa and in the trigeminal ganglion of passively immune pigs. These findings suggest that, in the presence of maternal immunity, defence mechanisms operate at these sites. In conclusion, we can state that a correlation exists between the level of maternal immunity and the protection against invasion of ADV in the nervous system of neonatal pigs.

  19. Pathogenic and Genotypic Characterization of a Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolate Associated with Reproductive Failure in an Indian Pig Herd

    PubMed Central

    Desingu, P. A.; Ray, Pradeep K.; Patel, B. H. M.; Singh, R.; Singh, R. K.; Saikumar, G

    2016-01-01

    Background India is endemic to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and recurrent outbreaks occur mainly in rice growing areas. Pigs are considered to be the amplifying host for JEV and infection in gestating pigs results in reproductive failure. Most studies conducted on JEV infection in Indian pigs have been serological surveys and very little is known about JEV genotypes circulating in pigs. So the potential risk posed by pigs in JEV transmission and the genetic relationship between viruses circulating in pigs, mosquitoes and humans is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in pigs with a history of reproductive failure characterized by stillborn piglets with neuropathological lesions. Japanese encephalitis (JE) suspected brain specimens inoculated intracerebrally into mice and Vero cells resulted in successful isolation of JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014. Clinicopathological observations in infected mice, demonstration of JEV antigen in brain, and analysis of the envelope protein identified the swine isolate as being neurovirulent. Phylogenetic analysis based on prM and E gene sequences showed that it belonged to genotype III. This swine isolate was closely related to JEV associated with the 2005 outbreak in India and JaoArS982 from Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of JEV strains collected between 1956 and 2014 in India categorized the GIII viruses into different clades blurring their spatial distribution, which has been discernible in the previous century. Conclusions/Significance Isolation of JEV from stillborn piglets and its close genetic relationship with viruses detected at least three decades ago in humans and mosquitoes in Japan suggests that the virus may have been circulating among Indian pigs for several decades. The close similarity between the present swine isolate and those detected in humans affected in the 2005 outbreak in Uttar Pradesh, India, suggests the need for more intensive surveillance of pigs and implementation of

  20. Automatic inoculating apparatus. [includes movable carraige, drive motor, and swabbing motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic inoculating apparatus for agar trays is described and using a simple inoculating element, such as a cotton swab or inoculating loop. The apparatus includes a movable carriage for supporting the tray to be inoculated, a drive motor for moving the tray along a trackway, and a swabbing motor for automatically swabbing the tray during the movement. An actuator motor controls lowering of the inoculating element onto the tray and lifting of the inoculating element. An electrical control system, including limit microswitches, enables automatic control of the actuator motor and return of the carriage to the initial position after inoculating is completed.

  1. Experimental infection of weaned piglets with Campylobacter coli--excretion and translocation in a pig colonisation trial.

    PubMed

    Bratz, Katharina; Bücker, Roland; Gölz, Greta; Zakrzewski, Silke S; Janczyk, Pawel; Nöckler, Karsten; Alter, Thomas

    2013-02-22

    Campylobacter (C.) is one of the most common food-borne pathogen causing bacterial enteric infections in humans. Consumption of meat and meat products that have been contaminated with Campylobacter are the major source of infection. Pigs are a natural reservoir of Campylobacter spp. with C. coli as the dominant species. Even though some studies focussed on transmission of C. coli in pig herds and the excretion in faeces, little is known about the colonisation and excretion dynamics of C. coli in a complex gut microbiota present in weaned piglets and the translocation to different tissues. Therefore, an experimental trial was conducted to evaluate the colonisation and translocation ability of the porcine strain C. coli 5981 in weaned pigs. Thus, ten 35 days old piglets were intragastrically inoculated with strain C. coli 5981 (7 × 10(7)CFU/animal) encoding resistances against erythromycin and neomycin. Faecal samples were taken and C. coli levels were enumerated over 28 days. All piglets were naturally colonised with C. coli before experimental inoculation, and excretion levels ranged from 10(4) to 10(7)CFU/g faeces. However, no strain showed resistances against the additional antimicrobials used. Excretion of C. coli 5981 was seen for all piglets seven days after inoculation and highest counts were detectable ten days after inoculation with 10(6)CFU/g faeces. Post-mortem, translocation and subsequent invasion of luminal C. coli was observed for gut tissues of the small intestine and for the gut associated lymphatic tissues, such as jejunal mesenteric lymph nodes and tonsils as well as for spleen and gall bladder. In conclusion, this pig colonisation trial offers the opportunity to study C. coli colonisation in weaned piglets using the porcine strain C. coli 5981 without the need for gnotobiotic or specific pathogen-free animals.

  2. Protection of pigs from swine dysentery by vaccination with recombinant BmpB, a 29.7 kDa outer-membrane lipoprotein of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    La, Tom; Phillips, Nyree D; Reichel, Michael P; Hampson, David J

    2004-08-19

    Swine dysentery (SD) is an important endemic infection in many piggeries, and control can be problematic. In this study the efficacy of BmpB, a 29.7 kDa outer-membrane lipoprotein of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, was evaluated as an SD vaccine. Non-lipidated BmpB was expressed in Escherichia coli as a histidine-tagged protein (His6-BmpB), or as an 8 kDa carboxy-terminal portion fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP-BmpB-F604). The purified proteins were emulsified with oil-based adjuvants for intramuscular (im) administrations. In experiment 1, 20 weaner pigs were vaccinated im with 1 mg of His6-BmpB. After 3 weeks, 10 received 1 mg of the protein orally (im/oral), and 10 received 1 mg im (im/im). Ten acted as unvaccinated controls. In experiment 2, 12 pigs were vaccinated im with 1 mg of His6-BmpB, and 12 with 1 mg of MBP-BmpB-F604. Three weeks later, each was given 1 mg of the same protein orally. Twelve pigs acted as unvaccinated controls. All pigs were challenged orally with B. hyodysenteriae 2 weeks after their second vaccination. In both experiments, all pigs vaccinated with His6-BmpB developed serum antibodies to BmpB, and oral administration provided boosting of im-induced serum antibody titres. In experiment 1, seven non-vaccinated control pigs developed dysentery and severe colitis. Three pigs vaccinated im/oral developed diarrhoea; two had severe colitis and one had mild lesions. Four pigs vaccinated im/im developed diarrhoea; one had severe colitis and the others had mild lesions. In experiment 2, six control pigs developed SD with severe colitis. Two His6-BmpB vaccinated pigs developed SD with mild colitis. Nine pigs vaccinated with MBP-BmpB-F604 developed SD and severe colitis. Overall, 50-70% of controls and 17-40% of His6-BmpB vaccinated pigs developed disease. Vaccination with MBP-BmpB-F604 did not induce serum titres against BmpB, nor confer protection. The incidence of disease for the three His6-BmpB vaccinated groups was significantly less (P = 0

  3. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable. PMID:21325845

  4. Oral care.

    PubMed

    Hitz Lindenmüller, Irène; Lambrecht, J Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Adequate dental and oral hygiene may become a challenge for all users and especially for elderly people and young children because of their limited motor skills. The same holds true for patients undergoing/recovering from chemo-/radiotherapy with accompanying sensitive mucosal conditions. Poor dental hygiene can result in tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, tooth loss, bad breath (halitosis), fungal infection and gum diseases. The use of a toothbrush is the most important measure for oral hygiene. Toothbrushes with soft bristles operated carefully by hand or via an electric device help to remove plaque and to avoid mucosal trauma. A handlebar with a grip cover can be helpful for manually disabled patients or for those with reduced motor skills. In case of oral hygiene at the bedside or of patients during/after chemo-/radiotherapy a gauze pad can be helpful for gently cleaning the teeth, gums and tongue. The use of fluoride toothpaste is imperative for the daily oral hygiene. Detergents such as sodium lauryl sulphate improve the cleaning action but may also dehydrate and irritate the mucous membrane. The use of products containing detergents and flavouring agents (peppermint, menthol, cinnamon) should therefore be avoided by bedridden patients or those with dry mouth and sensitive mucosa. Aids for suitable interdental cleaning, such as dental floss, interdental brushes or dental sticks, are often complicated to operate. Their correct use should be instructed by healthcare professionals. To support dental care, additional fluoridation with a fluoride gel or rinse can be useful. Products further containing antiseptics such as chlorhexidine or triclosan reduce the quantity of bacteria in the mouth. For patients undergoing or having undergone radio-/chemotherapy, a mouthwash that concomitantly moisturizes the oral mucosa is advisable.

  5. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D J; Ostler, H B; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1981-04-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infection even without the re-inoculation of the infectious agent. Extensive cross-reactions among the three chlamydial antigens during the cell-mediated immune response appeared to be due to shared species-specific and group-reactive antigens. Serum antibody response was pronounced and uniform to GPIC; it was less marked to 6BC and LB-1, with fewer cross-reactions than seen in tests for cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity and ...

  7. Guinea pig models of asthma.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Alice E; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    Described in this unit are methods for establishing guinea pig models of asthma. Sufficient detail is provided to enable investigators to study bronchoconstriction, cough, airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. PMID:25446291

  8. Characterization of the pseudorabies virus-specific immunoglobulin M response and evaluation of its diagnostic use in pigs with preexisting immunity to the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kimman, T G

    1993-01-01

    Despite preexisting immunity to pseudorabies virus (PRV), pigs may become infected and may or may not show clinical signs of disease. To investigate whether detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to PRV is suitable for diagnosis of recent infection in pigs with (or without) preexisting immunity, the IgM responses of pigs were examined after both experimental and natural infections. Upon inoculation of seronegative pigs with a low dose of a mildly virulent strain of PRV, IgM was first detectable at day 7 postinoculation (p.i.), reached a maximum at day 14 p.i., and became undetectable again at about days 32 to 36 p.i. In inoculated pigs with maternal antibodies against PRV, the IgM response began later and ended sooner, and peak titers were also lower. In immune pigs with maternally derived antibodies, there was apparently no correlation between the virulence of the inoculated strain and the IgM response. The suitability of the IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of recent infection in the field was compared with that of the virus neutralization (VN) assay and with an ELISA which specifically detects antibodies directed to glycoprotein I (gI) of PRV. Paired sera were obtained from pigs suspected of PRV infection in an area endemic for PRV infection in which vaccination against PRV is often applied. Practically all pigs had antibodies to PRV in the acute phase of the disease. Compared with the VN assay, the specificity of the IgM ELISA was high but its sensitivity was low. However, all three serotests apparently failed to detect some PRV infections. The IgM ELISA appeared to be especially useful as a diagnostic aid for detection of recent infections in pigs with high levels of neutralizing and gI antibodies, probably maternally derived, in the acute phase of the disease. Such pigs may fail to develop a significant rise in VN antibody titer. The IgM ELISA may be the only serotest for monitoring infections in such pigs. PMID:8408547

  9. Inoculating against Pro-Plagiarism Justifications: Rational and Affective Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Josh; Pfau, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism continues to threaten academic integrity. This investigation assessed whether an inoculation message strategy could combat university plagiarism by protecting student attitudes against pro-plagiarism justification arguments. Additionally, we sought theoretical confirmation of previous findings on involvement and accessibility in…

  10. Experimental inoculation of plants and animals with Ebola virus.

    PubMed Central

    Swanepoel, R.; Leman, P. A.; Burt, F. J.; Zachariades, N. A.; Braack, L. E.; Ksiazek, T. G.; Rollin, P. E.; Zaki, S. R.; Peters, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty-three varieties of 24 species of plants and 19 species of vertebrates and invertebrates were experimentally inoculated with Ebola Zaire virus. Fruit and insectivorous bats supported replication and circulation of high titers of virus without necessarily becoming ill; deaths occurred only among bats that had not adapted to the diet fed in the laboratory. PMID:8969248

  11. Three inoculation methods for evaluating Sclerotinia blight resistance in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-based assays for screening germplasm for resistance to Sclerotinia blight in peanuts can be conducted year-round, and thus may accelerate progress in breeding for resistant plants. Three previously proposed inoculation methods (using main stems of intact plants, detached main stems, or de...

  12. Induction of systemic IFITM3 expression does not effectively control foot-and-mouth disease viral infection in transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Zheng, Haixue; Qian, Ping; Xu, Jinfang; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, and can cause severe economic loss. Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins constitute a family of viral restriction factors that can inhibit the replication of several types of viruses. Our previous study showed that overexpression of swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) impeded replication of the FMD virus (FMDV) in BHK-21 cells and mice. In this study, sIFITM3-transgenic (TG) pigs were produced by handmade cloning. Results showed that sIFITM3 was highly overexpressed in many organs of sIFITM3-TG pigs compared to wild-type pigs. After a virulent FMDV strain (O/ES/2001) was intramuscularly inoculated, the sIFITM3-TG pigs showed slightly higher susceptibility to FMDV infection than wild-type pigs. Both groups displayed comparable degrees of clinical symptoms throughout the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the induction of systemic sIFITM3 expression does not protect pigs against FMDV infection. Based on these observations, we propose that a combination of interferons and vaccines be used to control FMDV infections and subsequent FMD outbreaks. PMID:27374903

  13. 13C-urea breath test for diagnosis of experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in barrier born pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rosberg, K; Gustavsson, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies with Helicobacter pylori infected barrier born pigs indicate that the infection has a patchy distribution, resulting in false negative culture results on endoscopic biopsy specimens. This study aimed to adapt the 13C-urea breath test as used in humans to diagnose H pylori infection in barrier born pigs. The breath test was also performed after bismuth as a single treatment and after triple therapy (bismuth, ampicillin, metronidazole). In control pigs the median excess of 13CO2 in expired air was 2.2 (range 0-12 n = 22) ppm. The infected pigs (n = 4) showed consistently high values (median 23 range 14-43) when examined on four occasions (n = 16) four to 10 weeks after inoculation. Biopsy specimens for culture had lower sensitivity than the breath test. No reduction in excess 13CO2 was seen after three days' single bismuth treatment, but after two weeks' triple therapy the breath test results had returned to normal. This suppression was temporary only, however, as the breath test was positive again four weeks after stopping treatment. In conclusion, the 13C-urea breath test is a simple and reliable test for determining H pylori infection and monitoring treatment effects in barrier born pigs. Because the test can be performed in awake pigs anaesthesia and gastroscopy are unnecessary. Images Figure 1 PMID:8504957

  14. Review: influenza virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Crisci, Elisa; Mussá, Tufária; Fraile, Lorenzo; Montoya, Maria

    2013-10-01

    Influenza virus disease still remains one of the major threats to human health, involving a wide range of animal species and pigs play an important role in influenza ecology. Pigs were labeled as "mixing vessels" since they are susceptible to infection with avian, human and swine influenza viruses and genetic reassortment between these viruses can occur. After the H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009 with a swine origin virus, the most recent research in "influenzology" is directed at improving knowledge of porcine influenza virus infection. This tendency is probably due to the fact that domestic pigs are closely related to humans and represent an excellent animal model to study various microbial infectious diseases. In spite of the role of the pig in influenza virus ecology, swine immune responses against influenza viruses are not fully understood. Considering these premises, the aim of this review is to focus on the in vitro studies performed with porcine cells and influenza virus and on the immune responses of pigs against human, avian and swine influenza viruses in vivo. The increased acceptance of pigs as suitable and valuable models in the scientific community may stimulate the development of new tools to assess porcine immune responses, paving the way for their consideration as the future "gold standard" large-animal model in immunology.

  15. Bradyrhizobium japonicum Survival in and Soybean Inoculation with Fluid Gels.

    PubMed

    Jawson, M D; Franzluebbers, A J; Berg, R K

    1989-03-01

    The utilization of gels, which are used for fluid drilling of seeds, as carriers of Bradyrhizobium japonicum for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) inoculation was studied. Gels of various chemical composition (magnesium silicate, potassium acrylate-acrylamide, grafted starch, and hydroxyethyl cellulose) were used, although the hydroxyethyl cellulose gels were more extensively investigated. Gel inocula were prepared by mixing gel powder with liquid cultures of B. japonicum (2% [wt/vol]). The population of B. japonicum USDA 110 did not change in each gel type during 8 days of incubation at 28 degrees C. These fluid gels were prepared with late-exponential-growth-phase cells that were washed and suspended in physiological saline. Mid-exponential-growth-phase B. japonicum USDA 110, 123, and 138 grew in cellulose gels prepared with yeast extract-mannitol broth as well as or better than in yeast extract-mannitol broth alone for the first 10 days at 28 degrees C. Populations in these cellulose gels after 35 days were as large as when the gels had originally been prepared, and survival occurred for at least 70 days. Soybeans grown in sand in the greenhouse had greater nodule numbers, nodule weights, and top weights with gel inoculants compared with a peat inoculant. In soil containing 10 indigenous B. japonicum per g of soil, inoculation resulted in increased soybean nodule numbers, nodule weights, and top weights, but only nodule numbers were greater with gel than with peat inoculation. The gel-treated seeds carried 10 to 10 more bacteria per seed (10 to 10) than did the peat-treated seeds. PMID:16347870

  16. Recombinant bacteriophage-based multiepitope vaccine against Taenia solium pig cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Díaz-Orea, Alicia; Gevorkian, Goar; Fragoso, Gladis; Acero, Gonzalo; González, Erik; De Aluja, Aline; Villalobos, Nelly; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Sciutto, Edda

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the capacity of recombinant phages to deliver antigens for vaccination against porcine cysticercosis. Thus, three peptides (KETc1, KETc12, GK1) and a recombinant antigen KETc7, previously proven to induce high levels of protection against pig cysticercosis, were expressed on the surface of the M13 bacteriophage at multiple copies. The pool of these four recombinant phages induced high levels of protection against an experimental murine cysticercosis. The immunogenicity of the phage vaccine preparation was therefore, tested in pigs, the natural host of Taenia solium. Subcutaneous or oral vaccination with these phages induced antigen-specific cellular immune responses in pigs. Preliminary data also points to the protective capacity of this recombinant phage vaccine against pig cysticercosis. The immunogenicity of these recombinant phages, together with the low cost of their production, make them a realistic candidate to be tested in pigs as an anti-cysticercus phage vaccine for field trials. This is the first report describing the application of a filamentous bacteriophage as a vaccine in large animals such as pigs, the only intermediate hosts of T. solium, a parasite of major medical importance in developing countries. The potential application of phages as a modern platform for vaccines for human and animal diseases is discussed.

  17. Swallowing kinematics and airway protection after palatal local anesthesia in infant pigs

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Shaina Devi; Campbell-Malone, Regina; Ding, Peng; Gierbolini-Norat, Estela M.; Lukasik, Stacey L.; Waranch, Danielle R.; German, Rebecca Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Abnormal kinematics during swallowing can result in aspiration which may become life threatening. We tested the role of palatal sensation in the motor control of pharyngeal swallow in infants. Study Design In eight infant pigs, we reduced palatal sensation using local anesthesia (PLA) and measured the impact on swallowing kinematics and airway protection. Methods The pigs drank milk containing barium while we simultaneously recorded videofluoroscopy and electromyography from fine wire bipolar electrodes in several hyolaryngeal muscles. We compared these results to control feedings and feedings following palatal saline injections (PSA). Results After PLA, four pigs had extreme jaw movements and abnormal tongue movement uncharacteristic of sucking. For this reason, we evaluated differences between these “Group B” pigs and the others that could suck normally after PLA, “Group A”. In the four Group A pigs, after PLA there was less hyoid elevation (p<0.001) but normal jaw and tongue movements. In Group B, in addition to greater jaw movement (p<0.001) there was more anterior and superior tongue movement (p<0.001) and a larger range of hyoid movement (p<0.001) Conclusion The airway was protected in all of the pigs, indicating that these changes allowed successful adaptation to the reduction in palatal sensation. However, the oral and pharyngeal phases of the swallow were functionally linked and trigeminal sensation influenced the motor control of the pharyngeal swallow. PMID:23686446

  18. Efficacy of active carbon towards the absorption of deoxynivalenol in pigs.

    PubMed

    Devreese, Mathias; Antonissen, Gunther; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2014-10-21

    In order to assess the in vivo efficacy of mycotoxin binders, specific toxicokinetic parameters should be measured according to European guidelines. For this purpose, an absorption model in pigs is described with emphasis on absorption kinetics. Pigs received a single oral bolus of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol alone or in combination with active carbon (applied as mycotoxin binder). After administration of deoxynivalenol alone, significant plasma amounts of deoxynivalenol were detected and kinetic parameters were calculated using a one compartmental model. Activated carbon completely prevented the absorption of deoxynivalenol as no plasma amounts could be detected.

  19. Effect of drinker type and sound stimuli on early-weaned pig performance and behavior.

    PubMed

    Torrey, S; Widowski, T M

    2004-07-01

    Early-weaned pigs appear to be highly motivated to engage in motor patterns associated with nursing, which is thought to lead to the development of abnormal ingestive behaviors. If performance of these behaviors is related to sucking motivation, then the normal stimuli associated with nursing should stimulate pigs to perform these abnormal behaviors, specifically belly nosing. The goal of this study was to determine whether belly nosing could be affected by sow nursing vocalizations and whether the style of the drinker device influenced early-weaned pig behavior. Over six trials, 352 Yorkshire pigs were weaned at 15 d and assigned to pens (n = 44) of eight pigs based on litter, weight, and sex. Four pens in each of two rooms were outfitted with either a water nipple drinker or a drinker bowl. Rooms either had recorded sow vocalizations broadcast at hourly intervals or no sound (control). Pig behaviors were videotaped in a sample of pens (n = 32) on d 0, 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 13, 16, and 18 after weaning. On d 0 to 2, pigs were observed continuously for feeding and drinking behaviors. On d 5 to 18, pigs were observed by scan sampling every 5 min for time budgets. Pigs with drinker bowls had higher apparent feed intakes during the first 2 d after weaning (P = 0.024), whereas they spent less time engaged in drinking behavior (P = 0.001). This coincided with an overall lower water use (P = 0.001) than that of pigs with nipple drinkers. Pigs with bowl drinkers also spent less time belly nosing than those with access to a nipple drinker (P = 0.012). Pigs in the sow vocalization treatment tended to have a higher ADG (P = 0.075), whereas they spent less time performing feeding behavior (P = 0.064). However, there was no effect of sow nursing grunts on belly nosing. These results suggest that there is a complex relationship between feeding, drinking and sucking, and belly nosing is not controlled by the same external stimuli as sucking. Because drinker type and the motor patterns

  20. Effect of inoculation process on lycopene production by Blakeslea trispora in a stirred-tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Feng, Ling-Ran; Luo, Wei; Li, Han-Guang; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Xiao-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene biosynthesis by Blakeslea trispora was greatly enhanced in a stirred-tank reactor when a nonsynchronous inoculation process, in which the (+) mating type was inoculated after the (-) mating type has been grown for a certain period of time, was applied. The lycopene concentration with nonsynchronous inoculation in a 24-h inoculation interval was 33 % higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The optimum inoculation ratio was 1:2 (+/-) at the 36 and 48 h inoculum age of mating types (+) and (-), respectively. Fermentation time for the individual strains and mated conditions showed that the (+) mating type grows faster than the (-) mating type. Morphological observation showed that the mycelium ratio of B. trispora (-) in mating culture with nonsynchronous inoculation was higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The results indicated that nonsynchronous inoculation process increased the dominance of B. trispora (-) in joint cultivation and hence stimulated lycopene biosynthesis.

  1. [Comparison of 2 inactivated vaccines against Aujeszky's disease in pigs].

    PubMed

    Smíd, B; Valícek, L; Rodák, L; Mensík, J

    1981-06-01

    Equal efficiency was proved by comparing two inactivated vaccines against Aujeszky's disease (AD) virus manufactured in Czechoslovakia. Fifteen porkers at the age of four weeks were included in the experiment, not possessing any specific antibodies to AD virus. Each vaccine was inoculated intramuscularly to five porkers (2 ml) in the interval of three weeks. The third group of five porkers was control. The samples of blood serum were subjected to the serum neutralizing test and radioimmunoassay (RIA) 21 and 35 days after vaccination. Three weeks after vaccination, antibody titers were demonstrated in nine from ten vaccinated porkers by RIA, in one pig by SNT. All 15 porkers were challenged with live virulent strain of the virus on the 35th day after the start of the experiment. The ten vaccinated porkers survived the infection after a short feverish disorder. Out of the five unvaccinated controls four pigs died; the patho-anatomic findings demonstrated necrotic tonsillitis and lobar bronchopneumonia. The finding in the fifth control porker was identical; the porker was killed 15 days after infection.

  2. ORAL PAPILLOMATOSIS OF RABBITS: A VIRUS DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Robert J.; Kidd, John G.

    1943-01-01

    Papillomas occur frequently on the oral mucosa of domestic rabbits procured in the metropolitan area of New York. They are small and benign, and are situated mostly on the under side of the tongue. A filtrable virus can be extracted from them with which growths can be reproduced in the oral mucosa of several species of rabbits and hares but which fails to cause lesions when inoculated into other rabbit tissues and into the oral mucosa of other species. The virus differs notably from the Shope virus, which causes cutaneous papillomas in rabbits but proves innocuous to oral mucosa: rabbits solidly immune to the oral papilloma virus are fully susceptible to the Shope virus and vice versa. The oral papillomas are not highly contagious, for susceptible animals kept in individual cages in the same rooms with others carrying the growths, fed the same kind of food, and cared for by the same attendants, do not "catch" them. They are found much more frequently in the offspring of dams that carry the growths than in those of mothers free from them, and the causative virus can be recovered from the mouth washings of rabbits having no growths. The observations indicate that the virus may be spread by transfer from the mother to the young during the period of suckling, and that it may lie latent in the mouth, doing no harm unless the mucous membrane is injured. The slight trauma occurring now and then when coarse foods are chewed may furnish the required tissue nidus under natural conditions, for papillomas occasionally appear after virus has been dropped into the mouths of uninoculated rabbits; but the more extensive injury and healing resulting from experimental tattoo inoculations proves regularly effective in this respect. Tar can also act as an efficient adjuvant to the virus, the incidence of "spontaneous" oral papillomas being much higher in domestic rabbits that had had the opportunity to lick tar from their ears and paws during long periods than in normal control

  3. Effects of dietary beef tallow and soy oil on glucose and cholesterol homeostasis in normal and diabetic pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Woollett, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Toe valuate whether dietary fats of different degrees of unsaturation alter glucose and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-CH) homeostasis, normal and alloxan-diabetic pigs were fed diets containing either beef tallow or soy oil as the primary source of fat for 6 weeks. After intra-arterial and oral doses of glucose, pigs fed soy oil had similar glucose and greater insulin concentrations in plasma when compared with pigs fed beef tallow. Beef tallow-fed pigs additionally were 40% more glucose effective than were soy oil-fed pigs. Disappearance of injected autologous /sup 14/C-VLDL-CH was analyzed in pigs using a two-pool model. Diabetes resulted in a twofold increase in half-lives and a 60-fold increase in pool sizes of the primary and secondary components of VLDL-CH disappearance when compared with those of normal pigs. In normal pigs, feeding beef tallow resulted in longer half-lives of both components of VLDL-CH disappearance and no effect in pool size of both components of VLDL-CH disappearance than did feeding soy oil. In comparison, diabetic pigs fed beef tallow had a similar half-life of the primary component, a twofold shorter half-life of the secondary component, and threefold larger pool size of the primary component, and a similar pool size of the secondary component of VLDL-CH disappearance than did diabetic pigs fed soy oil. Thus, dietary fat seems to play an important role in regulation of glucose and VLDL-CH homeostasis in normal and diabetic animals.

  4. Experimental aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Shamblin, J D; Wollen, S E; Pitt, L M; Sizemore, D R; Ogg, M M; Johnston, S C

    2015-01-01

    Eight guinea pigs were aerosolized with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) and developed lethal interstitial pneumonia that was distinct from lesions described in guinea pigs challenged subcutaneously, nonhuman primates challenged by the aerosol route, and natural infection in humans. Guinea pigs succumbed with significant pathologic changes primarily restricted to the lungs. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in many alveolar macrophages. Perivasculitis was noted within the lungs. These changes are unlike those of documented subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs and aerosolized filoviral infections in nonhuman primates and human cases. Similar to findings in subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs, there were only mild lesions in the liver and spleen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aerosol challenge of guinea pigs with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga). Before choosing this model for use in aerosolized ebolavirus studies, scientists and pathologists should be aware that aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

  5. Postnatal mandibular cheek tooth development in the miniature pig based on two-dimensional and three-dimensional X-ray analyses.

    PubMed

    Ide, Yoshiaki; Nakahara, Taka; Nasu, Masanori; Matsunaga, Satoru; Iwanaga, Takehiro; Tominaga, Noriko; Tamaki, Yuichi

    2013-08-01

    The miniature pig is a useful large laboratory animal model. Various tissues and organs of miniature pigs are similar to those of humans in terms of developmental, anatomical, immunological, and physiological characteristics. The oral and maxillofacial region of miniature pigs is often used in preclinical studies of regenerative dentistry. However, there is limited information on the dentition and tooth structure of miniature pigs. The purpose of this study was to examine the time-course changes of dentition and tooth structure (especially the root) of the miniature pig mandibular cheek teeth through X-ray analyses using soft X-ray for two-dimensional observations and micro-CT for three-dimensional observations. The mandibles of male Clawn strain miniature pigs (2 weeks and 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 17, and 29 months of age) were used. X-ray analysis of the dentition of miniature pig cheek teeth showed that the eruption pattern of the miniature pig is diphyodont and that the replacement pattern is vertical. Previous definitions of deciduous and permanent teeth often varied and there has been no consensus on the number of teeth (dentition); however, we found that three molars are present in the deciduous dentition and that four premolars and three molars are present in the permanent dentition. Furthermore, we confirmed the number of tooth roots and root canals. We believe that these findings will be highly useful in future studies using miniature pig teeth.

  6. Albendazole inhibits Pneumocystis carinii proliferation in inoculated immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Edlind, T D; Lee, C H; Dean, R; Queener, S F; Shaw, M M; Smith, J W

    1994-01-01

    Albendazole, a benzimidazole derivative widely used for treating helminth infections, was successfully used to treat and prevent development of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in transtracheally inoculated immunosuppressed mice. For treatment, 3 weeks postinoculation, albendazole at 300 and 600 mg/kg of body weight per day was administered in food for 3 weeks. For prophylaxis, albendazole was begun on the same day as inoculation at 300 mg/kg/day for 7 days, and then the dose was reduced to 150 mg/kg/day for 35 additional days. With these regimens, albendazole was effective both for treatment and prophylaxis. Both dexamethasone-immunosuppressed and L3T4+ monoclonal antibody-immunosuppressed mouse models were used, and albendazole inhibited P. carinii infection in both. PMID:7986016

  7. Advocating Inoculation in the Eighteenth Century: Exemplarity and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Argument Smallpox inoculation was introduced in Europe in the early eighteenth century and has been considered the first mass treatment of disease based on practical use of probability calculations and mathematical tools of computation. The article argues that these new approaches were deeply entangled with other rationalities, most emphatically that of exemplarity. Changes in inoculation methods around mid-century gradually changed the conceptualization of disease, seeing all cases as fundamentally equal, and thus making it more relevant to count them. Arithmetic changed the ways of thinking about smallpox epidemics, but new ways of conceptualizing disease were vital to making it a matter of arithmetic at all. The article investigates what happened when numbers and figures were introduced into medical matters: Who did the figures really concern, and what types of argument were they fitted into? How were numbers transformed into metaphors, and how did quantitative argument work together with arguments from exemplarity? PMID:27171893

  8. Noninvasive in vivo structural and vascular imaging of human oral tissues with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Bahar; Lindenmaier, Andras; Standish, Beau A.; Allo, Ghassan; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system and an oral imaging probe have been developed to visualize the microstructural morphology and microvasculature in the human oral cavity. Structural OCT images of ex vivo pig oral tissues with the histology of the same sites were acquired and compared for correlations. Structural in vivo OCT images of healthy human tissue as well as a pathologic site (ulcer) were obtained and analyzed based on the results of the ex vivo pig study, drawing on the similarity between human and swine oral tissues. In vivo Doppler and speckle variance OCT images of the oral cavity in human volunteers were also acquired, to demonstrate the feasibility of microvascular imaging of healthy and pathologic (scar) oral tissue. PMID:22567578

  9. Genital herpes in guinea pigs: pathogenesis of the primary infection and description of recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Stanberry, L R; Kern, E R; Richards, J T; Abbott, T M; Overall, J C

    1982-09-01

    Guinea pigs inoculated intravaginally with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) developed a self-limiting infection characterized by vesiculo-ulcerative lesions on the external genital skin, urinary retention, and hindlimb paralysis. Infection rarely resulted in death. Virologic, histologic, and immunoperoxidase data suggested the following scheme for viral pathogenesis: initial replication in the introitus, vagina, and bladder; spread via sensory nerves to the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord, and transmission via peripheral nerves to the external genital skin to produce the characteristic lesions. After recovery from primary infection, animals developed recurrent vesicular lesions, shed virus from genital sites in the absence of lesions, and harbored latent HSV-2 in dorsal root ganglia. Genital infection in the guinea pig shares many features with genital herpes in humans and provides a model to explore mechanisms of latency and reactivation and to evaluate several methods for control of recurrent disease.

  10. Experimental bovine genital ureaplasmosis. I. Granular vulvitis following vulvar inoculation.

    PubMed

    Doig, P A; Ruhnke, H L; Palmer, N C

    1980-07-01

    Granular vulvitis was reproduced in ten virgin heifers following vulvar inoculation with strains of ureaplasma previously isolated from natural cases. The disease appeared one to three days postinoculation and was characterized by vulvar swabs but not from the upper mucopurulent discharge. At necropsy 13 to 41 days later, ureaplasmas were recovered consistently from vulvar swabs but not from the upper reproductive tract. It was concluded that some strains of ureaplasma are pathogenic and should be viewed as a cause of bovine granular vulvitis.

  11. Detection of African swine fever virus DNA in blood samples stored on FTA cards from asymptomatic pigs in Mbeya region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Braae, U C; Johansen, M V; Ngowi, H A; Rasmussen, T B; Nielsen, J; Uttenthal, Å

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether blood samples collected onto FTA(®) cards could be used in combination with real-time PCR for the detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in samples from resource-poor settings under the assumption that asymptomatically (sub-clinically) infected pigs may be present. Blood samples were collected from clinically healthy pigs from Mbeya Region, Tanzania. The blood samples were stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed by real-time PCR assays in duplicate; three pigs had high levels of viral DNA (Ct values of 27-29), and three pigs had a low level of viral DNA (Ct 36-45). Four pigs were positive in one of the duplicate samples only, but clear products of the expected size were obtained when the reactions were analysed by gel electrophoresis. For comparison, blood samples from pigs experimentally infected with either a pathogenic (OURT T88/1) or a non-pathogenic (OURT T88/3) isolate of ASFV were collected, stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed in the same way. The blood from pigs infected with the OURT T88/1 isolate showed high levels of viral DNA (Ct 22-33), whereas infection with non-pathogenic OURT T88/3 isolate resulted in only low levels of viral DNA (Ct 39) in samples collected at 10-14 days after inoculation.

  12. Degradation of PAHs in soil by indigenous and inoculated bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aamand, J.; Bruntse, G.; Jepsen, M.; Joergensen, C.; Jensen, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    In soil heavily polluted by coal tar, the inherent mineralization of radio-labeled phenanthrene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was relatively slow, and a stimulation of degradation was observed by inoculation with a mixed population of PAH-degrading bacteria. A much faster inherent mineralization of phenanthrene was observed in soil slightly polluted by coal tar, and inoculation of this soil had no effect. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from different soils. Two strains were further characterized as an Arthrobacter sp. and a Pseudomonas sp. In an organic medium without phenanthrene, growth rates of 0.52 h{sup {minus}1} and 0.71 h{sup {minus}1} were measured for the Arthrobacter sp. and the Pseudomonas sp., respectively. Most isolates grown in the phenanthrene-free medium, including the Arthrobacter sp., rapidly adapted to phenanthrene degradation following transfer to a phenanthrene-containing medium. In contrast, the phenanthrene-degrading capability of other strains, including the Pseudomonas sp., was lost during growth in the phenanthrene-free medium. Growth in an organic medium without phenanthrene of strains that retain the ability to degrade phenanthrene could prove to be a useful technique for production of PAH-degrading bacteria on a larger scale for soil inoculation.

  13. Intraspleen DNA inoculation elicits protective cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Fragoso, G; Gevorkian, G; Terrazas, L I; Petrossian, P; Govezensky, T; Sciutto, E; Manoutcharian, K

    2001-04-01

    DNA immunization or inoculation is a recent vaccination method that induces both humoral and cellular immune responses in a range of hosts. Independent of the route or site of vaccination, the transfer of antigen-presenting cells (APC) or antigens into lymphoid organs is necessary. The aim of this investigation was to test whether intraspleen (i.s.) DNA inoculation is capable of inducing a protective immune response. We immunized mice by a single i.s. injection of a DNA construct expressing the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable domain (VH) in which the complementarity-determining regions (CDR) had been replaced by a Taenia crassiceps T-cell epitope. In these mice, immune responses and protective effects elicited by the vaccine were measured. We have shown here for the first time that i.s. DNA inoculation can induce protective cellular immune responses and activate CD8(+) T cells. Also, Ig V(H) appeared to be the minimal delivery unit of "antigenized" Ig capable of inducing T-cell activation in a lymphoid organ. The strategy of introducing T-cell epitopes into the molecular context of the V(H) domain in combination with i.s. DNA immunization could have important implications and applications for human immunotherapy.

  14. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  15. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure increases disinhibition and perseverative responding in the adult guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Mary C; Martin, Amanda; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2009-09-01

    Cognitive and behavioural deficits, including increased impulsivity and perseveration, are associated with chronic prenatal ethanol exposure (CPEE) in humans. We tested whether these same deficits occur in the guinea pig after CPEE treatment. Pregnant guinea pigs received oral administration of ethanol (4 g/kg maternal body weight/day), or isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding throughout gestation. Young adult offspring were trained in lever-pressing paradigms to work for a sucrose-pellet food reward. CPEE increased No-Go, but not Go, responses in the Go/No-Go paradigm, indicative of a disinhibition deficit in these animals. Perseverative responses in the Cued Alternation task were also increased in CPEE offspring. These data show that CPEE induces behavioural deficits in the guinea pig that are remarkably similar to the executive function deficits that follow prenatal ethanol exposure in humans.

  16. Omnivores Going Astray: A Review and New Synthesis of Abnormal Behavior in Pigs and Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Brunberg, Emma I.; Rodenburg, T. Bas; Rydhmer, Lotta; Kjaer, Joergen B.; Jensen, Per; Keeling, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs and poultry are by far the most omnivorous of the domesticated farm animals and it is in their nature to be highly explorative. In the barren production environments, this motivation to explore can be expressed as abnormal oral manipulation directed toward pen mates. Tail biting (TB) in pigs and feather pecking (FP) in laying hens are examples of unwanted behaviors that are detrimental to the welfare of the animals. The aim of this review is to draw these two seemingly similar abnormalities together in a common framework, in order to seek underlying mechanisms and principles. Both TB and FP are affected by the physical and social environment, but not all individuals in a group express these behaviors and individual genetic and neurobiological characteristics play an important role. By synthesizing what is known about environmental and individual influences, we suggest a novel possible mechanism, common for pigs and poultry, involving the brain–gut–microbiota axis. PMID:27500137

  17. Omnivores Going Astray: A Review and New Synthesis of Abnormal Behavior in Pigs and Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Brunberg, Emma I; Rodenburg, T Bas; Rydhmer, Lotta; Kjaer, Joergen B; Jensen, Per; Keeling, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Pigs and poultry are by far the most omnivorous of the domesticated farm animals and it is in their nature to be highly explorative. In the barren production environments, this motivation to explore can be expressed as abnormal oral manipulation directed toward pen mates. Tail biting (TB) in pigs and feather pecking (FP) in laying hens are examples of unwanted behaviors that are detrimental to the welfare of the animals. The aim of this review is to draw these two seemingly similar abnormalities together in a common framework, in order to seek underlying mechanisms and principles. Both TB and FP are affected by the physical and social environment, but not all individuals in a group express these behaviors and individual genetic and neurobiological characteristics play an important role. By synthesizing what is known about environmental and individual influences, we suggest a novel possible mechanism, common for pigs and poultry, involving the brain-gut-microbiota axis.

  18. Omnivores Going Astray: A Review and New Synthesis of Abnormal Behavior in Pigs and Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Brunberg, Emma I; Rodenburg, T Bas; Rydhmer, Lotta; Kjaer, Joergen B; Jensen, Per; Keeling, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Pigs and poultry are by far the most omnivorous of the domesticated farm animals and it is in their nature to be highly explorative. In the barren production environments, this motivation to explore can be expressed as abnormal oral manipulation directed toward pen mates. Tail biting (TB) in pigs and feather pecking (FP) in laying hens are examples of unwanted behaviors that are detrimental to the welfare of the animals. The aim of this review is to draw these two seemingly similar abnormalities together in a common framework, in order to seek underlying mechanisms and principles. Both TB and FP are affected by the physical and social environment, but not all individuals in a group express these behaviors and individual genetic and neurobiological characteristics play an important role. By synthesizing what is known about environmental and individual influences, we suggest a novel possible mechanism, common for pigs and poultry, involving the brain-gut-microbiota axis. PMID:27500137

  19. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The methods for isolation and purification of a guinea-pig serum protein with homocytotropic antibody activity and characteristics of IgE are described. By precipitation in the equivalence zone or immunoadsorption and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, we isolated an homocytotropic antibody, that was not able to give a precipitin line when it was reacted directly with the antigen. It was capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA after a latent period of 24–48 hours but not after 3 hours; it was sensitive to treatment with mercaptoethanol. It had antigenic determinants present in the other guinea-pig immunoglobulins and particular antigenic determinants. All these properties make us believe that this protein belongs to an immunoglobulin different from γ1 and similar to the reaginic antibody (IgE) described in other species. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4126261

  20. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura C; Jiang, Zhihua; Sang, Yongming; Harhay, Gregory P; Lager, Kelly M

    2014-06-15

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the current annotation of pig IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, IFITM5, IFITM1L1 and IFITM1L4, manually annotated IFITM1L2, IFITM1L3, IFITM5L, IFITM3L1 and IFITM3L2, and provide expressed sequence tag (EST) and/or mRNA evidence, not contained with the NCBI Reference Sequence database (RefSeq), for the existence of IFITM6, IFITM7 and a new IFITM1-like (IFITM1LN) gene in pigs. Phylogenic analyses showed seven porcine IFITM genes with highly conserved human/mouse orthologs known to have anti-viral activity. Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling (DGETP) of swine tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) of pigs infected with swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus or porcine circovirus type 2 over 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) showed that gene expression abundance differs dramatically among pig IFITM family members, ranging from 0 to over 3000 tags per million. In particular, SIV up-regulated IFITM1 by 5.9 fold at 3 dpi. Bayesian framework further identified pig IFITM1 and IFITM3 as differentially expressed genes in the overall transcriptome analysis. In addition to being a component of protein complexes involved in homotypic adhesion, the IFITM1 is also associated with pathways related to regulation of cell proliferation and IFITM3 is involved in immune responses.

  1. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  2. Coccidiosis in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Ellis, P A; Wright, A E

    1961-07-01

    The attention of laboratory workers is drawn to the possibility of coccidiosis as a cause of death in guinea-pigs. The purchase of a number of guinea-pigs infected with this protozoon was followed by 12 deaths when these animals were injected with material for diagnostic purposes. No deaths occurred in the laboratory stock herd, as these were kept separate from the newcomers and were not infected. The life history of the parasite is described, together with the post-mortem findings in our series of animals.

  3. Did Jews avoid using products made of pigs as medical materials? "And the swine ... it is unclean unto you" (Deut. 14 : 8).

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Abraham Ofir

    2014-01-01

    Medical and halakhic literature in medieval and modern times teach us that healing by porcine produce was used quite extensively. Medical materials made of pig were mentioned in Jewish manuscripts in Christian and Islamic territories. We assume that, in fact, they were in wider usage in Europe, where the pig was common. Much of the permitted uses seem to involve external application and there was little ingestion orally unless there were compelling reasons. The Jewish medical literature mentions many treatments using pig products, such as: the fat for skin diseases, diaphoresis; bile for gynecologic problems; dung to stop bleeding in circumcision and drinking urine for kidney stones. PMID:25739154

  4. Kinetics and pathogenicity of oral infection by equine herpesvirus-9 in mice and suckling hamsters.

    PubMed

    El-Nahass, E; El-Habashi, N; Abdelaziz, A A; Nayel, M; Kasem, S; Fukushi, H; Tuji, H; Hirata, A; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis and kinetics of oral infection by equine herpesvirus (EHV)-9 were studied in mice and hamsters. After oral inoculation of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus, 1-week-old suckling hamsters showed varying severity of neurological disease from 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) and all of these animals had died by 96 hpi. Four-week-old ICR mice inoculated orally with 4 × 10(4)PFU of virus showed no clinical signs, but they developed erosive and ulcerative gastritis from 36 hpi. Varying degrees of encephalitis were seen in infected mice and hamsters, and the hamsters also developed myelitis by 96 hpi. Immunohistochemistry performed on whole body sections of suckling hamsters revealed the kinetics of spread of the virus to the central nervous system. EHV-9 antigen was detected initially in macrophages of the oral and lingual submucosa. At 36 hpi virus antigen was detected in the nerve fibres and pseudounipolar neurons of the trigeminal ganglion and at 96 hpi antigen was present in the myenteric plexuses of the intestine. Virus antigen was also detected in the liver, lungs and heart of affected animals. EHV-9 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the brain, blood and spinal cord of suckling hamsters at 36, 48 and 96 hpi. These findings show that EHV-9 may spread via the trigeminal nerve when mice and hamsters are inoculated orally with virus.

  5. Vaccination trials against Taiwan Taenia eggs in pigs injected with frozen oncospheres of Taiwan Taenia, Korea Taenia, T. saginata or T. solium.

    PubMed

    Fan, P C; Chung, W C; Eom, K S; Ito, A

    1997-06-01

    When Small-Ear-Miniature pigs subcutaneously injected once with frozen oncospheres of Taiwan Taenia, Korea Taenia, T. saginata or T. solium emulsified with Freund's complete adjuvant (1.6 x 10(4)/0.4 ml) were challenged orally with 1.6 x 10(4) viable eggs of Taiwan Taenia 41 days later, they all showed strong resistance compared with pigs vaccinated with T. solium. Most pigs (5/8) of the former 3 groups harboured no cysticerci. The number of cysticerci was 5.5 +/- 9.1 (mean +/- S.D.), whereas pigs of the T. solium group and control group harboured 160 +/- 30.1 and 661 +/- 637.2 cysticerci, respectively. All cysticerci recovered from vaccinated pigs and most cysticerci in control pigs were degenerated or calcified at 36-55 days after oral egg challenge. These results strongly suggest that oncospheres of Taiwan Taenia and Korea Taenia are very similar to T. saginata in their immunogenicity in pigs.

  6. [Oral pain].

    PubMed

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  7. [Oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Guillat, J C

    1980-04-20

    OC (oral contraception) includes the combined and sequential methods, postcoital and progestin only contraception, mini pills, and macro pills. The mechanism of action of OC modifies the hypothalamo-hypophysary secretion, the uterine mucosa, and the cervical mucus. Effectiveness of OC is nearly 100%; prescription of OC requires a complete clinical and biological evaluation of the patient. Contraindications to OC are any form of cancer, hypertension, vascular or thrombotic antecedents, obesity, tabagism, diabetes. OC users must be checked at least every 6 months, and treatment can last, if there are no evident signs of side effects, until about age 40. The most commonly known side effects of OC are menstruation disorders, cardio- and cerebrovascular effects, hepatic and metabolic effects; there is no evidence that OC can cause carcinogenic effects, but it can increase teratogenic risk. The association of OC with such drugs as Rifampicine, anticonvulsants and/or tranquillizers, can nullify contraceptive effectiveness. PMID:6900393

  8. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  9. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  10. On-farm produced microbial soil inoculants effects on bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of microbial soil inoculants in agriculture is of increasing interest among growers and scientists. Research on the efficacy and application of soil inoculants, especially on-farm produced inoculants, is limited. This study aimed to determine the effects of a commercially available arbuscu...

  11. Pathogenesis in Eurasian tree sparrows inoculated with H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus and experimental virus transmission from tree sparrows to chickens.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yu; Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Yamada, Manabu; Mase, Masaji

    2013-06-01

    Small wild birds that routinely enter poultry farms may be possible vectors of Asian lineage H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In this study, we conducted experimental infections using wild-caught Eurasian tree sparrows (Passer montanus) to evaluate their possible epidemiological involvement in virus transmission. When tree sparrows were intranasally inoculated with the virus at a low or high dose, all sparrows excluding euthanatized birds died within 11 days after inoculation. Viruses were frequently isolated from the drinking water, oral swabs, and visceral organs of the sparrows. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the virus replicated strongly in the central nervous system, heart, and adrenal gland following primary infection in the upper respiratory tract and a probable subsequent viremic stage. In the contact infection study using virus-inoculated sparrows and untreated contact chickens, more than half of all chickens died from viral infection. In the virus transmission study in which chickens were given drinking water collected from virus-inoculated sparrows, mortality due to viral infection was observed in chickens. Our data suggest that Eurasian tree sparrows could be biological vectors of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In addition to frequent virus detection in the drinking water of sparrows, the results of the virus transmission study suggest that waterborne pathways could be important for viral transmission from tree sparrows to poultry.

  12. [Immune Protection against H9N2 Provided by H1N1 Pre-infection in Pigs].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Maocai; Hong, Wenshan; Zheng, Zuoyi; Chen, Rirong

    2015-07-01

    To explore the impact of the history of infection by the influenza A virus subtype H1N1 on secondary infection by the influenza A virus subtype H9N2, pigs non-infected and pre-infected with H1N1 were inoculated with H9N2 in parallel to compare nasal shedding and seroconversion patterns. Unlike pigs without a background of H1N1 infection, nasal shedding was not detected in pigs pre-infected with H1N1. Both groups generated antibodies against H9N2. However, levels of H1N1 antibodies in pigs pre-infected with H1N1 increased quickly and dramatically after challenge with H9N2. Cross-reaction was not observed between H1N1 antibodies and H9N2 viruses. These findings suggest that circulation of the H1N1 virus might be a barrier to the introduction and transmission of the avian H9N2 virus, thereby delaying its adaptation in pigs.

  13. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  14. Fermented liquid feed for pigs.

    PubMed

    Missotten, Joris A M; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël A

    2010-12-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviation of the transition from the sow milk to solid feed and may also reduce the time spent to find both sources of nutrients, and secondly, that offering FLF with a low pH may strengthen the potential of the stomach as a first line of defence against possible pathogenic infections. Because of these two advantages, FLF is often stated as an ideal feed for weaned piglets. The results obtained so far are rather variable, but in general they show a better body weight gain and worse feed/gain ratio for the piglets. However, for growing-finishing pigs on average a better feed/gain ratio is found compared to pigs fed dry feed. This better performance is mostly associated with less harmful microbiota and better gut morphology. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of FLF for pigs,dealing with the FLF itself as well as its effect on the gastrointestinal tract and animal performance. PMID:21214019

  15. Fermented liquid feed for pigs.

    PubMed

    Missotten, Joris A M; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël A

    2010-12-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviation of the transition from the sow milk to solid feed and may also reduce the time spent to find both sources of nutrients, and secondly, that offering FLF with a low pH may strengthen the potential of the stomach as a first line of defence against possible pathogenic infections. Because of these two advantages, FLF is often stated as an ideal feed for weaned piglets. The results obtained so far are rather variable, but in general they show a better body weight gain and worse feed/gain ratio for the piglets. However, for growing-finishing pigs on average a better feed/gain ratio is found compared to pigs fed dry feed. This better performance is mostly associated with less harmful microbiota and better gut morphology. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of FLF for pigs,dealing with the FLF itself as well as its effect on the gastrointestinal tract and animal performance.

  16. Resistance to colistin: what is the fate for this antibiotic in pig production?

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Colistin, a cationic polypeptide antibiotic, has reappeared in human medicine as a last-line treatment option for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). Colistin is widely used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. GNB resistant to colistin owing to chromosomal mutations have already been reported both in human and veterinary medicine, however several recent studies have just identified a plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene encoding for colistin resistance in Escherichia coli colistin resistance. The discovery of a non-chromosomal mechanism of colistin resistance in E. coli has led to strong reactions in the scientific community and to concern among physicians and veterinarians. Colistin use in food animals and particularly in pig production has been singled out as responsible for the emergence of colistin resistance. The present review will focus mainly on the possible link between colistin use in pigs and the spread of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. First we demonstrate a possible link between Enterobacteriaceae resistance emergence and oral colistin pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and its administration modalities in pigs. We then discuss the potential impact of colistin use in pigs on public health with respect to resistance. We believe that colistin use in pig production should be re-evaluated and its dosing and usage optimised. Moreover, the search for competitive alternatives to using colistin with swine is of paramount importance to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections in human medicine. PMID:27234675

  17. Effect of KOB03, a polyherbal medicine, on ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background KOB03 is a polyherbal medicine that originated from the oriental prescription for the treatment of chronic allergic diseases such as rhinitis and asthma. This study aims to evaluate the effect of KOB03 on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) in guinea pigs. Methods Hartley guinea pigs were sensitized to OVA by intraperitoneal injection on days 0, 7, and 14 and challenged with intranasal exposure to OVA three times for 7 days after the last sensitization. KOB03 at doses of 200 and 500 mg/kg were orally administrated to guinea pigs once daily during challenge. The serum levels of histamine, OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4 and IFN-γ) in OVA sensitization/challenge-induced AR guinea pigs were measured. We also observed histological changes in nasal tissues of AR guinea pigs by staining with H&E, Periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue. Results The administration of KOB03 at a dose of 500 mg/kg significantly decreased the serum levels of histamine (P = 0.001), OVA-specific IgE (P = 0.0017), ECP (P = 0.008), and TNF-α (P = 0.0003) in OVA-sensitized/challenged guinea pigs compared with controls. KOB03 significantly decreased the serum levels of a Th2 cytokine, IL-4 (P = 0.017), while significantly increasing the levels of a Th1 cytokine, IFN-γ (P = 0.0006) in OVA-sensitized/challenged guinea pigs compared with controls. In addition, KOB03 suppressed the epithelial destruction, goblet cell hyperplasia and eosinophilic infiltration into nasal mucosa associated with AR. Conclusion KOB03 may regulate allergic inflammation in AR by inhibiting nasal damage, the release of allergic mediators and modulating the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines. PMID:23253436

  18. Experimental bovine genital ureaplasmosis. I. Granular vulvitis following vulvar inoculation.

    PubMed Central

    Doig, P A; Ruhnke, H L; Palmer, N C

    1980-01-01

    Granular vulvitis was reproduced in ten virgin heifers following vulvar inoculation with strains of ureaplasma previously isolated from natural cases. The disease appeared one to three days postinoculation and was characterized by vulvar swabs but not from the upper mucopurulent discharge. At necropsy 13 to 41 days later, ureaplasmas were recovered consistently from vulvar swabs but not from the upper reproductive tract. It was concluded that some strains of ureaplasma are pathogenic and should be viewed as a cause of bovine granular vulvitis. PMID:7427772

  19. Itraconazole, a new triazole that is orally active in aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, J; Van Gerven, F; Van de Ven, M A; Borgers, M; Janssen, P A

    1984-01-01

    Itraconazole is a new orally active triazole derivative with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. This drug is effective in experimental aspergillosis and possesses in vitro activity against various species and strains of Aspergillus. Morphological destruction of inoculated hyphae and complete inhibition of hyphal outgrowth in culture is obtained from 0.07 micrograms ml-1 (10(-7)M) onward. These properties make itraconazole a likely candidate for clinical evaluation in disseminated aspergillosis. Images PMID:6097167

  20. Performance and physiology of pigs administered spray-dried plasma protein during the late suckling period and transported after weaning.

    PubMed

    Wittish, L M; McElroy, A P; Harper, A F; Estienne, M J

    2014-10-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of spray-dried plasma protein (SDPP), given as an oral gavage during the last 5 d of suckling, on weight gain and physiology in pigs after weaning and transportation for 5 h. Pigs were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: 1) SDPP (9.375 g) + transportation, 2) water + transportation, 3) SDPP + no transportation, and 4) water + no transportation (n = 10 barrows and 10 gilts per treatment). Pigs received 25 mL of the SDPP (0.375 g/mL) or water twice daily. There was no effect (P = 0.55) of gavage on weaning BW. On the day of weaning, BW decreased in all groups but the magnitude was greatest in SDPP pigs that were transported (gavage × transportation × time, P = 0.03). Rectal temperatures increased in all groups but were greater after transportation than after no transportation (gavage × transportation × time, P < 0.01). Effects of transportation × time existed for several blood chemistry measures. Urea and protein concentrations increased (P < 0.01) in transported pigs only. Creatinine, chloride, and albumin increased (P < 0.01) and CO2 decreased (P < 0.01) in both transported and nontransported pigs, but the magnitudes of change were greater after transportation. Concentrations of sodium increased (P < 0.01) only in transported pigs receiving water and not in the other groups (gavage × transportation × time, P < 0.01). Concentrations of phosphorous (P < 0.01) were affected by sex × gavage × transportation × time and increased (P < 0.01) in transported, water-treated gilts but not barrows. Overall changes in concentrations of urea, creatinine, chloride, CO2, protein, albumin, sodium, and phosphorous are consistent with dehydration in transported pigs in this study and in the case of sodium (both sexes) and phosphorous (gilts only), these minerals were maintained by prior gavage with SDPP. Transported pigs receiving SDPP tended (P = 0.1) to have greater concentrations of glucose than transported pigs receiving water and

  1. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-04-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways. PMID:23453730

  2. Efficacy of ivermectin and oxfendazole against Taenia solium cysticercosis and other parasitoses in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Leifsson, Pall S; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2013-10-01

    Smallholder semi-confined pig production is a fast growing practice in sub-Saharan Africa with an unfortunate outcome of high prevalence of Taenia solium cysticercosis and other parasitoses. The widely used anthelmintic for control of endo and ecto-parasites in pigs in the area is ivermectin at a recommended dose of 0.3mg/kg. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety in pigs after subcutaneous injection of ivermectin (IVM, 0.3mg/kg) and orally administration of oxfendazole (OFZ, 30mg/kg) in treatment of porcine cysticercosis and other parasitoses in naturally infected pigs. A total of 61 pigs with T. solium cysticercosis (38 males and 23 females) as identified by tongue palpation with age ranging from 3 to 24 months were recruited. The pigs were stratified based on sex, age and number of cysts on the tongue and randomly allocated to IVM, OFZ and control groups. Three days before treatment and two weeks after treatment faecal samples and skin scrapings were taken to establish the burden of endo- and ectoparasites, respectively and the effect of the treatment. No adverse effect was observed in any of the treatment groups throughout the study period. Half of the pigs from each group were slaughtered at week four and the remaining half at week twelve post treatment. The IVM treatment group had no significant effect (p=0.224) on T. solium cysts viability in comparison to the control group. Significant effect on cysts viability was observed in the OFZ treated group (p<0.001) compared to IVM and control groups in all muscle tissues. Regarding to brain cysts, neither of the drugs was efficacious. Ivermectin and OFZ treatments significantly reduced (p<0.001) the faecal egg count of Ascaris suum, strongyles and Trichuris suis two weeks after treatment. At slaughter, Oesophagostomum dentatum, Ascarops strongylina and Physocephalus sexalatus were recovered from pigs in the IVM treated and in the control groups. Ivermectin was 100% effective in control of

  3. Diets containing inulin but not lupins help to prevent swine dysentery in experimentally challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C F; Phillips, N D; La, T; Hernandez, A; Mansfield, J; Kim, J C; Mullan, B P; Hampson, D J; Pluske, J R

    2010-10-01

    Swine dysentery is a contagious mucohemorrhagic diarrheal disease caused by the intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae that colonizes and induces inflammation of the cecum and colon. It has been reported that a diet containing chicory root and sweet lupin can prevent swine dysentery. This experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inulin in the chicory root rather than galactans in lupins was responsible for protective effects. An experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was undertaken using pigs fed barley- and triticale-based diets, with the main effects being protein source [185 g/kg of canola meal (decreased galactans) or 220 g/kg of lupins (greater galactans)] and inulin supplementation (0 or 80 g/kg). Forty Large White × Landrace pigs weighing 21 ± 3 kg, with 10 pigs per diet, were allowed to adapt to the diets for 2 wk, and then each pig was challenged orally 4 times with a broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae on consecutive days. Pigs were killed when they showed clinical signs of dysentery or 6 wk postchallenge. Pigs fed diets without inulin had 8.3 times greater risk (P = 0.017) of developing swine dysentery and were 16 times more likely (P = 0.004) to have colon contents that were culture-positive for B. hyodysenteriae, compared with the pigs fed a diet with 80 g/kg of inulin. Diets containing lupins did not prevent pigs from developing clinical swine dysentery; however, inclusion of lupins or inulin or both in the diets delayed the onset of disease compared with the diet based mainly on canola meal (P < 0.05). Diet did not influence the total concentration of organic acids in the ileum, cecum, or upper and lower colon; however, the molar proportions of the organic acids were influenced (P < 0.05). Consequently the pH values in the cecum, and upper and lower colon were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. However the pH values of the ileal digesta were decreased in pigs fed the diet with both lupins and

  4. Alteration of the Microbiota and Virulence Gene Expression in E. coli O157:H7 in Pig Ligated Intestine with and without AE Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Feng, Yanni; Ying, Xin; Gong, Joshua; Gyles, Carlton L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously we found that E. coli O157:H7 inoculated into ligated pig intestine formed attaching and effacing (AE) lesions in some pigs but not in others. The present study evaluated changes in the microbial community and in virulence gene expression in E. coli O157:H7 in ligated pig intestine in which the bacteria formed AE lesions or failed to form AE lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The intestinal microbiota was assessed by RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The DGGE banding patterns showed distinct differences involving two bands which had increased intensity specifically in AE-negative pigs (AE- bands) and several bands which were more abundant in AE-positive pigs. Sequence analysis revealed that the two AE- bands belonged to Veillonella caviae, a species with probiotic properties, and Bacteroides sp. Concurrent with the differences in microbiota, gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR showed that, compared with AE negative pigs, E. coli O157:H7 in AE positive pigs had upregulated genes for putative adhesins, non-LEE encoded nleA and quorum sensing qseF, acid resistance gene ureD, and genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrated that AE-positive pigs had reduced activities or populations of Veillonella caviae and Bacterioides sp. compared with AE-negative pigs. Further studies are required to understand how the microbiota was changed and the role of these organisms in the control of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26090813

  5. Antiparasitic efficacy of a novel plant-based functional food using an Ascaris suum model in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R M; Storey, B E; Vidyashankar, A N; Bissinger, B W; Mitchell, S M; Howell, S B; Mason, M E; Lee, M D; Pedroso, A A; Akashe, A; Skrypec, D J

    2014-11-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the most prevalent soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection of human beings worldwide. Chemotherapy with synthetic anthelmintics such as albendazole, mebendazole, and pyrantel pamoate is the current method of treatment; however, the emergence of anthelmintic resistance could substantially decrease the efficacy of such treatments and the sustainability of STH control programs. Additionally, benzimidazoles are not recommended for pregnant women or children under age one. A blinded, controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of two microencapsulated, plant-based essential oil blends, TTN1013 (α-pinene, linalyl acetate, p-cymene, and thymol octanoate) and TTN1014 (α-pinene, linalyl acetate, p-cymene, and thymol acetate) as functional foods against Ascaris suum infection in pigs, an important pathogen that closely resembles human infections with A. lumbricoides. Four groups of 16 female, 21-24 day old, Yorkshire-cross pigs were treated daily with 0.5 or 1.0mg/kg TTN1013, 1.0mg/kg TTN1014, or 1.0mg/kg equivalent of empty capsules, delivered inside a cream-filled sandwich cookie for 14 weeks. Three days after the initiation of daily treatments, pigs were inoculated daily with A. suum eggs for four weeks. Pigs were weighed weekly and fecal egg counts (FEC) were conducted weekly starting five weeks after initial inoculation with A. suum eggs. Fourteen weeks after first infection with eggs, pigs were necropsied and worms were recovered, counted and separated according to sex. TTN1013 administered daily at a dose of 1.0mg/kg yielded a statistically significant reduction in total worm counts (76.8%), female worm counts (75.5%), FEC (68.6%), and worm volume (62.9%) when compared to control group. Reduction of total and female worm numbers and FEC were not significant for TTN1014 or at the 0.5mg/kg dose of TTN1013. All treatments were well-tolerated by all pigs and did not cause any adverse reactions. All pigs remained clinically normal

  6. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Rousette Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Viruses of the Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Genera.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan E B; Schuh, Amy J; Amman, Brian R; Sealy, Tara K; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-07-01

    The Egyptian rousette bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) is a natural reservoir for marburgviruses and a consistent source of virus spillover to humans. Cumulative evidence suggests various bat species may also transmit ebolaviruses. We investigated the susceptibility of Egyptian rousettes to each of the five known ebolaviruses (Sudan, Ebola, Bundibugyo, Taï Forest, and Reston), and compared findings with Marburg virus. In a pilot study, groups of four juvenile bats were inoculated with one of the ebolaviruses or Marburg virus. In ebolavirus groups, viral RNA tissue distribution was limited, and no bat became viremic. Sudan viral RNA was slightly more widespread, spurring a second, 15-day Sudan virus serial euthanasia study. Low levels of Sudan viral RNA disseminated to multiple tissues at early time points, but there was no viremia or shedding. In contrast, Marburg virus RNA was widely disseminated, with viremia, oral and rectal shedding, and antigen in spleen and liver. This is the first experimental infection study comparing tissue tropism, viral shedding, and clinical and pathologic effects of six different filoviruses in the Egyptian rousette, a known marburgvirus reservoir. Our results suggest Egyptian rousettes are unlikely sources for ebolaviruses in nature, and support a possible single filovirus-single reservoir host relationship. PMID:26120867

  7. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Rousette Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Viruses of the Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Genera.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan E B; Schuh, Amy J; Amman, Brian R; Sealy, Tara K; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-06-25

    The Egyptian rousette bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) is a natural reservoir for marburgviruses and a consistent source of virus spillover to humans. Cumulative evidence suggests various bat species may also transmit ebolaviruses. We investigated the susceptibility of Egyptian rousettes to each of the five known ebolaviruses (Sudan, Ebola, Bundibugyo, Taï Forest, and Reston), and compared findings with Marburg virus. In a pilot study, groups of four juvenile bats were inoculated with one of the ebolaviruses or Marburg virus. In ebolavirus groups, viral RNA tissue distribution was limited, and no bat became viremic. Sudan viral RNA was slightly more widespread, spurring a second, 15-day Sudan virus serial euthanasia study. Low levels of Sudan viral RNA disseminated to multiple tissues at early time points, but there was no viremia or shedding. In contrast, Marburg virus RNA was widely disseminated, with viremia, oral and rectal shedding, and antigen in spleen and liver. This is the first experimental infection study comparing tissue tropism, viral shedding, and clinical and pathologic effects of six different filoviruses in the Egyptian rousette, a known marburgvirus reservoir. Our results suggest Egyptian rousettes are unlikely sources for ebolaviruses in nature, and support a possible single filovirus-single reservoir host relationship.

  8. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig. Occasional Paper #23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Keston H.; Good, Megan R.; Coleman, Chris M.; Smith, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results…

  9. [Effects of multi-stage strengthening inoculation on bacterial community diversity during composting].

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Ming-Xiao; Xi, Bei-Dou; Wei, Zi-Min; Liu, Chi; Xia, Xun-Feng; Yang, Tian-Xue; Li, Ye

    2011-09-01

    Effects of multi-stage strengthening inoculation on bacterial community diversity were analyzed using PCR-DGGE method in municipal solid waste composting combined with Cluster analysis and changes of Shannon-Weaver index, and the changes of lignocellulose's degradation rate were also detected during the process. The results showed that Multi-stage inoculation of composting can improve the temperature of cooling and the secondary fermentation period. And the hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin degradation rate increased by 7.19%, 10.89% and 8.98% compared to general inoculation composting. The analysis of bacterial community diversity indicated that the diversity index of the two inoculation showed significant differences, the microbial inoculation could live well in the pile. It could avoid competition between different inoculated agents and competition between inoculated and indigenous microorganisms, and could improve bacterial community diversity during composting especially for maturity stage. It could speed up the composting process of stabilization.

  10. Pigs taking wing with transposons and recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J; Carlson, Daniel F; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Swine production has been an important part of our lives since the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic periods, and ranks number one in world meat production. Pig production also contributes to high-value-added medical markets in the form of pharmaceuticals, heart valves, and surgical materials. Genetic engineering, including the addition of exogenous genetic material or manipulation of the endogenous genome, holds great promise for changing pig phenotypes for agricultural and medical applications. Although the first transgenic pigs were described in 1985, poor survival of manipulated embryos; inefficiencies in the integration, transmission, and expression of transgenes; and expensive husbandry costs have impeded the widespread application of pig genetic engineering. Sequencing of the pig genome and advances in reproductive technologies have rejuvenated efforts to apply transgenesis to swine. Pigs provide a compelling new resource for the directed production of pharmaceutical proteins and the provision of cells, vascular grafts, and organs for xenotransplantation. Additionally, given remarkable similarities in the physiology and size of people and pigs, swine will increasingly provide large animal models of human disease where rodent models are insufficient. We review the challenges facing pig transgenesis and discuss the utility of transposases and recombinases for enhancing the success and sophistication of pig genetic engineering. 'The paradise of my fancy is one where pigs have wings.' (GK Chesterton). PMID:18047690

  11. Transcriptome analysis of wheat inoculated with Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Erayman, Mustafa; Turktas, Mine; Akdogan, Guray; Gurkok, Tugba; Inal, Behcet; Ishakoglu, Emre; Ilhan, Emre; Unver, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    Plants are frequently exposed to microorganisms like fungi, bacteria, and viruses that cause biotic stresses. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is an economically risky wheat disease, which occurs upon Fusarium graminearum (Fg) infection. Moderately susceptible (cv. "Mizrak 98") and susceptible (cv. "Gun 91") winter type bread wheat cultivars were subjected to transcriptional profiling after exposure to Fg infection. To examine the early response to the pathogen in wheat, we measured gene expression alterations in mock and pathogen inoculated root crown of moderately susceptible (MS) and susceptible cultivars at 12 hours after inoculation (hai) using 12X135K microarray chip. The transcriptome analyses revealed that out of 39,179 transcripts, 3668 genes in microarray were significantly regulated at least in one time comparison. The majority of differentially regulated transcripts were associated with disease response and the gene expression mechanism. When the cultivars were compared, a number of transcripts and expression alterations varied within the cultivars. Especially membrane related transcripts were detected as differentially expressed. Moreover, diverse transcription factors showed significant fold change values among the cultivars. This study presented new insights to understand the early response of selected cultivars to the Fg at 12 hai. Through the KEGG analysis, we observed that the most altered transcripts were associated with starch and sucrose metabolism and gluconeogenesis pathways. PMID:26539199

  12. Accumulation of Transcripts Abundance after Barley Inoculation with Cochliobolus sativus

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad Imad Eddin; AL-Daoude, Antonious; Shoaib, Amina; Jawhar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Spot blotch caused by the hemibiotrophic pathogen Cochliobolus sativus has been the major yield-reducing factor for barley production during the last decade. Monitoring transcriptional reorganization triggered in response to this fungus is an essential first step for the functional analysis of genes involved in the process. To characterize the defense responses initiated by barley resistant and susceptible cultivars, a survey of transcript abundance at early time points of C. sativus inoculation was conducted. A notable number of transcripts exhibiting significant differential accumulations in the resistant and susceptible cultivars were detected compared to the non-inoculated controls. At the p-value of 0.0001, transcripts were divided into three general categories; defense, regulatory and unknown function, and the resistant cultivar had the greatest number of common transcripts at different time points. Quantities of differentially accumulated gene transcripts in both cultivars were identified at 24 h post infection, the approximate time when the pathogen changes trophic lifestyles. The unique and common accumulated transcripts might be of considerable interest for enhancing effective resistance to C. sativus. PMID:25774113

  13. Transcriptome analysis of wheat inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Erayman, Mustafa; Turktas, Mine; Akdogan, Guray; Gurkok, Tugba; Inal, Behcet; Ishakoglu, Emre; Ilhan, Emre; Unver, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    Plants are frequently exposed to microorganisms like fungi, bacteria, and viruses that cause biotic stresses. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is an economically risky wheat disease, which occurs upon Fusarium graminearum (Fg) infection. Moderately susceptible (cv. “Mizrak 98”) and susceptible (cv. “Gun 91”) winter type bread wheat cultivars were subjected to transcriptional profiling after exposure to Fg infection. To examine the early response to the pathogen in wheat, we measured gene expression alterations in mock and pathogen inoculated root crown of moderately susceptible (MS) and susceptible cultivars at 12 hours after inoculation (hai) using 12X135K microarray chip. The transcriptome analyses revealed that out of 39,179 transcripts, 3668 genes in microarray were significantly regulated at least in one time comparison. The majority of differentially regulated transcripts were associated with disease response and the gene expression mechanism. When the cultivars were compared, a number of transcripts and expression alterations varied within the cultivars. Especially membrane related transcripts were detected as differentially expressed. Moreover, diverse transcription factors showed significant fold change values among the cultivars. This study presented new insights to understand the early response of selected cultivars to the Fg at 12 hai. Through the KEGG analysis, we observed that the most altered transcripts were associated with starch and sucrose metabolism and gluconeogenesis pathways. PMID:26539199

  14. Pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and protective immunity against Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Juan J; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Alvarado, Gilberth; Taylor, Lizeth; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Hun, Laya; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Morales, Juan Alberto; Troyo, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' is a spotted fever group rickettsia that is not considered pathogenic, although there is serologic evidence of possible infection in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' in guinea pigs and determine its capacity to generate protective immunity against a subsequent infection with a local strain of Rickettsia rickettsii isolated from a human case. Six guinea pigs were inoculated with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' strain 9-CC-3-1 and two controls with cell culture medium. Health status was evaluated, and necropsies were executed at days 2, 4, and 13. Blood and tissues were processed by PCR to detect the gltA gene, and end titers of anti-'Candidatus R. amblyommii' IgG were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. To evaluate protective immunity, another 5 guinea pigs were infected with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' (IGPs). After 4 weeks, these 5 IGPs and 3 controls (CGPs) were inoculated with pathogenic R. rickettsii. Clinical signs and titers of anti-Rickettsia IgG were determined. IgG titers reached 1:512 at day 13 post-infection with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii'. On day 2 after inoculation, two guinea pigs had enlarged testicles and 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' DNA was detected in testicles. Histopathology confirmed piogranulomatous orchitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate in the epididymis. In the protective immunity assay, anti-Rickettsia IgG end titers after R. rickettsii infection were lower in IGPs than in CGPs. IGPs exhibited only transient fever, while CGP showed signs of severe disease and mortality. R. rickettsii was detected in testicles and blood of CGPs. Results show that the strain 9-CC-3-1 of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' was able to generate pathology and an antibody response in guinea pigs. Moreover, its capacity to generate protective immunity against R. rickettsii may modulate the epidemiology and severity of Rocky

  15. Isolation and maintenance of Balantidium coli (Malmsteim, 1857) cultured from fecal samples of pigs and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alynne da Silva; Bastos, Otilio Machado Pereira; Uchôa, Claudia M Antunes; Pissinatti, Alcides; Ferreira Filho, Paulo Ricardo; Dib, Lais Verdan; Azevedo, Eduarda Peixoto; de Siqueira, Mayara Perlingeiro; Cardozo, Matheus Lessa; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2015-06-15

    Balantidium coli is a protozoa that can determine dysentery in humans, pigs and non-human primates having zoonotic potential. The lack of standardization in isolation and maintenance hinders the development of research on its biology and epidemiology. This study is aimed to standardize the isolation and maintenance of this parasite from animal feces, in culture medium, Pavlova modified. From 2012 to 2014, 1905 fecal samples were collected from captive animals of Rio de Janeiro. Were selected for isolation samples with a minimum of 10 trophozoites and/or 30 cysts of B. coli, totaling 88 pigs, 26 Cynomolgus and 90 rhesus macaques. In the presence of cysts, the sample was homogenized in saline solution, 500 μL was removed and inoculated into culture medium. The material that contained trophozoites the inoculum was made from 240 μL of fecal solution. All inoculate tubes with the subcultures were kept at 36°C, and sterile rice starch was always added to the medium. The parasites isolate from pigs, 34%, and from Cynomolgus 38.4% were maintained in vitro for a period of more than 24 months. These procedures proved to be adequate for isolation and maintenance of B. coli from different animals, they were found to be inexpensive and easy to perform. PMID:25920329

  16. Cessation of clinical disease and spirochete shedding after tiamulin treatment in pigs experimentally infected with "Brachyspira hampsonii".

    PubMed

    Wilberts, B L; Arruda, P H; Warneke, H L; Erlandson, K R; Hammer, J M; Burrough, E R

    2014-10-01

    With the emergence of "Brachyspira hampsonii" associated with swine dysentery in North America, identification of effective treatments and interventions is a pressing need. Denagard® (tiamulin hydrogen fumarate) Liquid Concentrate 12.5% is approved in the United States for treatment of dysentery caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae at 0.006% in the water. In this study, the effectiveness of tiamulin in resolving clinical disease, eliminating viable spirochete shedding, and reducing neutrophilic colitis following infection with either "B. hampsonii" or B. hyodysenteriae was evaluated. Seventy-eight 7-week-old crossbred pigs were divided into three groups [sham-inoculated (n = 18), "B. hampsonii"-inoculated (n = 30), and B. hyodysenteriae-inoculated (n = 30)]. Each inoculum group was divided into three subgroups which received either 0.006% tiamulin, 0.018% tiamulin, or no medication. Both levels of tiamulin resolved clinical disease within 24 h of treatment initiation, eliminated spirochete shedding within 72 h of treatment initiation, and resolved and/or prevented histologic lesions in pigs infected with either Brachyspira spp.

  17. Detecting mitochondrial signatures of selection in wild Tibetan pigs and domesticated pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Jin, Long; Ma, Jideng; Tian, Shilin; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Selection in genomic regions is prevalent in mammals; however, the effects of selection on the mitogenome are not clearly understood. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from six wild Tibetan pigs from the Tibetan plateau and four domestic pig breeds from the lowland of neighboring southwest China. Nucleotide diversity analysis using the sliding window method showed that the nucleotide diversity of wild Tibetan pigs in most regions of the mitogenome was higher than that of domestic pigs. The 12 s ribosomal RNA showed relatively lower nucleotide diversity in Tibetan pigs, suggesting purifying selection of these genes during high-altitude adaptation. More non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions in the ATP6 were found in wild Tibetan pigs, indicating adaptive selection in Tibetan pigs. The results suggested distinct impacts of natural selection and artificial selection upon the mitogenome, especially the mitochondrial signatures of adaptive evolution in wild Tibetan pigs under natural selection.

  18. Restricted Infectivity of a Human-Lineage H3N2 Influenza A Virus in Pigs Is Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Gene Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Landolt, Gabriele A.; Karasin, Alexander I.; Schutten, Melissa M.; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause pandemics at sporadic intervals. Pandemic viruses can potentially be introduced into the human population through in toto transfer of an avian influenza virus or through reassortment between avian and human strains. Pigs are believed to play a central role in the creation of pandemic viruses through reassortment because of their susceptibility to infection with both avian and human influenza viruses. However, we recently found that a human-lineage H3N2 influenza virus was highly restricted in its ability to infect pigs after intranasal inoculation. We hypothesized that this restricted infectivity phenotype was controlled by the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA). To test this, we infected pigs with reverse genetics-created HA plus NA reassortant viruses. Specifically, introduction of the HA and NA genes of a contemporary H3N2 swine virus into the genetic background of the wholly human virus resulted in a significant increase in virus shedding and pathogenicity. These data indicate that the HA/NA can play important roles in controlling human influenza virus infectivity in pigs. The results further support the premise that a barrier exists to human influenza virus infection in pigs, which may limit the role of pigs in pandemic virus creation through reassortment of human and avian influenza viruses. PMID:16455873

  19. Outbreak of swine influenza in Argentina reveals a non-contemporary human H3N2 virus highly transmissible among pigs.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Javier A; Pena, Lindomar; Dibárbora, Marina; Rimondi, Agustina; Piñeyro, Pablo; Insarralde, Lucas; Quiroga, María A; Machuca, Mariana; Craig, Maria I; Olivera, Valeria; Chockalingam, Ashok; Perfumo, Carlos J; Perez, Daniel R; Pereda, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Sporadic outbreaks of human H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infections in swine populations have been reported in Asia, Europe and North America since 1970. In South America, serological surveys in pigs indicate that IAVs of the H3 and H1 subtypes are currently in circulation; however, neither virus isolation nor characterization has been reported. In November 2008, an outbreak of respiratory disease in pigs consistent with swine influenza virus (SIV) infection was detected in Argentina. The current study describes the clinical epidemiology, pathology, and molecular and biological characteristics of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus isolate shared nucleotide identities of 96-98 % with H3N2 IAVs that circulated in humans from 2000 to 2003. Antigenically, sera from experimentally inoculated animals cross-reacted mainly with non-contemporary human-origin H3N2 influenza viruses. In an experimental infection in a commercial swine breed, the virus was of low virulence but was transmitted efficiently to contact pigs and caused severe disease when an infected animal acquired a secondary bacterial infection. This is the first report of a wholly human H3N2 IAV associated with clinical disease in pigs in South America. These studies highlight the importance of two-way transmission of IAVs and SIVs between pigs and humans, and call for enhanced influenza surveillance in the pig population worldwide.

  20. The efficacy of oxytetracycline treatment at batch, pen and individual level on Lawsonia intracellularis infection in nursery pigs in a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Inge; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Nielsen, Jens Peter

    2016-02-01

    Antimicrobial consumption in animal husbandry is of great scientific and political concern due to the risk of selection of resistant bacteria. Whilst a reduction in the use of antimicrobials is therefore preferable, the efficacy of treatment must be maintained in order to ensure animal welfare and profitability of pig production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three treatment strategies under field conditions against Lawsonia intracellularis (LI)-related diarrhoea. A randomised clinical trial was carried out in four Danish pig herds, including a total of 520 pigs from 36 nursery batches. A high prevalence of LI was demonstrated in all herds prior to the initiation of the study. Treatment efficacy was assessed by faecal shedding of LI, the occurrence of diarrhoea and average daily weight gain (ADG) after treatment. All strategies were implemented at batch level at presence of LI-related diarrhoea and included daily treatment with 10mg oxytetracycline (OTC) per kilogram of bodyweight for 5 days, though the OTC was administered differently: either by oral treatment of all pigs in a batch, by oral treatment of pigs in diarrhoeic pens only, or by intramuscular treatment of individual diarrhoeic pigs only. The treatment strategies were randomly allocated to batches and were initiated at the presence of diarrhoea. From the included batches, 100% of the trial pigs were medicated in the batch treatment strategy, 87% in the pen treatment strategy and 55% in the individual treatment strategy. All strategies reduced the occurrence of diarrhoea and faecal shedding of LI after treatment. However, batch treatment was found to be most efficient in reducing both high-level LI shedding and diarrhoea when compared to the treatment of diarrhoeic pens or individual diarrhoeic pigs. There was no significant difference identified in ADG between the treatment strategies. In conclusion, batch treatment of all pigs in a section resulted in the highest efficacy

  1. Decomposition Rate and Pattern in Hanging Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Aird, Jeanne; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the postmortem interval requires an understanding of the decomposition process and the factors acting upon it. A controlled experiment, over 60 days at an outdoor site in the northwest of England, used 20 freshly killed pigs (Sus scrofa) as human analogues to study decomposition rate and pattern. Ten pigs were hung off the ground and ten placed on the surface. Observed differences in the decomposition pattern required a new decomposition scoring scale to be produced for the hanging pigs to enable comparisons with the surface pigs. The difference in the rate of decomposition between hanging and surface pigs was statistically significant (p=0.001). Hanging pigs reached advanced decomposition stages sooner, but lagged behind during the early stages. This delay is believed to result from lower variety and quantity of insects, due to restricted beetle access to the aerial carcass, and/or writhing maggots falling from the carcass.

  2. Oral Health in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin; Haber, Judith; Krainovich-Miller, Barbara; Bella, Abigail; Vasilyeva, Anna; Lange Kessler, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Oral health is crucial to overall health. Because of normal physiologic changes, pregnancy is a time of particular vulnerability in terms of oral health. Pregnant women and their providers need more knowledge about the many changes that occur in the oral cavity during pregnancy. In this article we describe the importance of the recognition, prevention, and treatment of oral health problems in pregnant women. We offer educational strategies that integrate interprofessional oral health competencies. PMID:27281467

  3. Passive protection of suckling infant mice against F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains by intravenous inoculation of the dams with monoclonal antibodies against F41.

    PubMed Central

    Duchet-Suchaux, M; Menanteau, P; van Zijderveld, F G

    1992-01-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five different epitope clusters of adhesion factor F41 (two MAbs per cluster) were tested for protection of infant mice against an oral challenge with F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) B2C and B41M. Infant mice suckling dams intravenously inoculated with MAbs were orally challenged, and the survival rates were measured for 12 days after inoculation and challenge. Irrespective of their epitope specificity, all F41 MAbs given in a single dose of 4 mg per dam had a protective effect against both ETEC strains. In contrast, one K99 MAb of the same isotype and given in the same dose as the F41 MAbs did not protect infant mice at all. A reduction in the dose of F41 MAbs to 0.032 mg per dam resulted in a decrease in protection. Two different MAbs against the same epitope cluster were not necessarily equally protective. Combining MAbs two by two, whether the MAbs recognized the same epitope cluster or not, resulted in protective activity essentially similar to that obtained with each MAb separately, without any improvement. Therefore, one MAb against any epitope may be sufficient for protection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers of MAbs in the serum of dams were similar, irrespective of the epitope specificity of the MAbs, and gradually decreased from day 1 to day 12 after inoculation. We found a good correlation between colostrum and milk ELISA titers of MAbs and serum ELISA titers of MAbs. Colostrum and milk MAb titers were 10-fold lower than corresponding serum MAb titers and stayed high until day 5 after inoculation. The most protective MAb had the highest ELISA titers in colostrum and milk for the first 5 days after inoculation. ETEC strain B2C colonized the intestines of infant mice suckling MAb-inoculated mothers until day 12 after challenge. Intestinal levels of the challenge strain were high on day 2 but never reached the very high numbers (10(9) to 10(10)) described previously in a

  4. Passive protection of suckling infant mice against F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains by intravenous inoculation of the dams with monoclonal antibodies against F41.

    PubMed

    Duchet-Suchaux, M; Menanteau, P; van Zijderveld, F G

    1992-07-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five different epitope clusters of adhesion factor F41 (two MAbs per cluster) were tested for protection of infant mice against an oral challenge with F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) B2C and B41M. Infant mice suckling dams intravenously inoculated with MAbs were orally challenged, and the survival rates were measured for 12 days after inoculation and challenge. Irrespective of their epitope specificity, all F41 MAbs given in a single dose of 4 mg per dam had a protective effect against both ETEC strains. In contrast, one K99 MAb of the same isotype and given in the same dose as the F41 MAbs did not protect infant mice at all. A reduction in the dose of F41 MAbs to 0.032 mg per dam resulted in a decrease in protection. Two different MAbs against the same epitope cluster were not necessarily equally protective. Combining MAbs two by two, whether the MAbs recognized the same epitope cluster or not, resulted in protective activity essentially similar to that obtained with each MAb separately, without any improvement. Therefore, one MAb against any epitope may be sufficient for protection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers of MAbs in the serum of dams were similar, irrespective of the epitope specificity of the MAbs, and gradually decreased from day 1 to day 12 after inoculation. We found a good correlation between colostrum and milk ELISA titers of MAbs and serum ELISA titers of MAbs. Colostrum and milk MAb titers were 10-fold lower than corresponding serum MAb titers and stayed high until day 5 after inoculation. The most protective MAb had the highest ELISA titers in colostrum and milk for the first 5 days after inoculation. ETEC strain B2C colonized the intestines of infant mice suckling MAb-inoculated mothers until day 12 after challenge. Intestinal levels of the challenge strain were high on day 2 but never reached the very high numbers (10(9) to 10(10)) described previously in a

  5. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  6. Cloning pigs: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Polejaeva, I A

    2001-01-01

    Although mouse embryonic stem cells have been used widely for over a decade as an important tool for introducing precise genetic modification into the genome, demonstrating the great value of this technology in a range of biomedical applications, similar technology does not exist for domestic animals. However, the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer has bypassed the need for embryonic stem cells from livestock. The production of offspring from differentiated cell nuclei provides information and opportunities in a number of areas including cellular differentiation, early development and ageing. However, the primary significance of cloning is probably in the opportunities that this technology brings to genetic manipulation. Potential applications of gene targeting in livestock species are described with particular emphasis on the generation of pigs that can be used for xenotransplantation, and the production of improved models for human physiology and disease. The development of techniques for somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs and the challenges associated with this technology are also reviewed.

  7. Assessing learning and memory in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gieling, Elise Titia; Nordquist, Rebecca Elizabeth; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge of interest in (mini) pigs (Sus scrofa) as species for cognitive research. A major reason for this is their physiological and anatomical similarity with humans. For example, pigs possess a well-developed, large brain. Assessment of the learning and memory functions of pigs is not only relevant to human research but also to animal welfare, given the nature of current farming practices and the demands they make on animal health and behavior. In this article, we review studies of pig cognition, focusing on the underlying processes and mechanisms, with a view to identifying. Our goal is to aid the selection of appropriate cognitive tasks for research into pig cognition. To this end, we formulated several basic criteria for pig cognition tests and then applied these criteria and knowledge about pig-specific sensorimotor abilities and behavior to evaluate the merits, drawbacks, and limitations of the different types of tests used to date. While behavioral studies using (mini) pigs have shown that this species can perform learning and memory tasks, and much has been learned about pig cognition, results have not been replicated or proven replicable because of the lack of validated, translational behavioral paradigms that are specially suited to tap specific aspects of pig cognition. We identified several promising types of tasks for use in studies of pig cognition, such as versatile spatial free-choice type tasks that allow the simultaneous measurement of several behavioral domains. The use of appropriate tasks will facilitate the collection of reliable and valid data on pig cognition.

  8. Erysipelas in turkeys, sheep and pigs.

    PubMed

    2015-03-21

    Erysipelas diagnosed in turkeys, sheep and pigs. Parasitic gastroenteritis reported in cattle on several farms. Unusual presentation of Actinobacillus suis causing spinal abscesses in pigs on a breeder-finisher unit. First APHA diagnosis of oedema disease in pigs in East Anglia for many years. Infectious coryza confirmed in a hobby breeding flock. These are among matters discussed in the Animal and Plant Health Agency's (APHA's) disease surveillance report for November 2014.

  9. Persistent Gastric Colonization with Burkholderia pseudomallei and Dissemination from the Gastrointestinal Tract following Mucosal Inoculation of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Andrew; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Schweizer, Herbert; Dow, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Melioidosis is a disease of humans caused by opportunistic infection with the soil and water bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis can manifest as an acute, overwhelming infection or as a chronic, recurrent infection. At present, it is not clear where B. pseudomallei resides in the mammalian host during the chronic, recurrent phase of infection. To address this question, we developed a mouse low-dose mucosal challenge model of chronic B. pseudomallei infection and investigated sites of bacterial persistence over 60 days. Sensitive culture techniques and selective media were used to quantitate bacterial burden in major organs, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We found that the GI tract was the primary site of bacterial persistence during the chronic infection phase, and was the only site from which the organism could be consistently cultured during a 60-day infection period. The organism could be repeatedly recovered from all levels of the GI tract, and chronic infection was accompanied by sustained low-level fecal shedding. The stomach was identified as the primary site of GI colonization as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Organisms in the stomach were associated with the gastric mucosal surface, and the propensity to colonize the gastric mucosa was observed with 4 different B. pseudomallei isolates. In contrast, B. pseudomallei organisms were present at low numbers within luminal contents in the small and large intestine and cecum relative to the stomach. Notably, inflammatory lesions were not detected in any GI tissue examined in chronically-infected mice. Only low-dose oral or intranasal inoculation led to GI colonization and development of chronic infection of the spleen and liver. Thus, we concluded that in a mouse model of melioidosis B. pseudomallei preferentially colonizes the stomach following oral inoculation, and that the chronically colonized GI tract likely serves as a reservoir for dissemination of infection to

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum pig genotype II diagnosed in pigs from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pigs may represent a source of Cryptosporidium sp. infection to humans. The objective of this study was to identify the species present in pigs from the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and verify what risks pigs represent in transmission of human cryptosporidiosis, since there is no such informati...

  11. Association between microbiological and serological prevalence of human pathogenic Yersinia spp. in pigs and pig batches.

    PubMed

    Vanantwerpen, Gerty; Berkvens, Dirk; De Zutter, Lieven; Houf, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    Pigs are the main reservoir of human pathogenic Y. enterocolitica, and the microbiological and serological prevalence of this pathogen differs between pig farms. The infection status of pig batches at moment of slaughter is unknown while it is a possibility to classify batches. A relation between the presence of human pathogenic Yersinia spp. and the presence of antibodies could help to predict the infection of the pigs prior to slaughter. Pigs from 100 different batches were sampled. Tonsils and pieces of diaphragm were collected from 7047 pigs (on average 70 pigs per batch). The tonsils were analyzed using a direct plating method and the meat juice collected from the pieces of diaphragm was analyzed by Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. The microbiological and serological results were compared using a mixed-effects logistic regression at pig and batch level. Yersinia spp. were found in 2031 (28.8%) pigs, antibodies were present in 4692 (66.6%) pigs. According to the logistic regression, there was no relation at pig level between the presence of Yersinia spp. in tonsils and the presence of antibodies. Contrarily, at batch level, a mean activity value of 37 Optical Density (OD)% indicated a Yersinia spp. positive farm and the microbiological prevalence in pig batches could be estimated before shipment to the slaughterhouse. This offers the opportunity to classify batches based on their potential risk to contaminate carcasses with human pathogenic Yersinia spp.

  12. Response of Hard Red Winter Wheat to Soilborne wheat mosaic virus Using Novel Inoculation Methods.

    PubMed

    Driskel, Barbara A; Hunger, Robert M; Payton, Mark E; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2002-04-01

    ABSTRACT Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is an agronomically important pathogen of wheat that is transmitted by the soilborne plasmodiophorid vector Polymyxa graminis. In the laboratory, attempts to generate SBWMV-infected plants are often hampered by poor infectivity of the virus. To analyze the mechanism for virus resistance in wheat cultivars, we developed novel inoculation techniques. A new technique for foliar inoculation of SBWMV was developed that eliminated wound-induced necrosis normally associated with rub inoculating virus to wheat leaves. This new technique is important because we can now uniformly inoculate plants in the laboratory for studies of host resistance mechanisms in the inoculated leaf. Additionally, wheat plants were grown hydroponically in seed germination pouches and their roots were inoculated with SBWMV either by placing P. graminis-infested root material in the pouch or by mechanically inoculating the roots with purified virus. The susceptibility of one SBWMV susceptible and three field resistant wheat cultivars were analyzed following inoculation of plants using these novel inoculation techniques or the conventional inoculation technique of growing plants in P. graminis-infested soil. The results presented in this study suggest that virus resistance in wheat likely functions in the roots to block virus infection. PMID:18942947

  13. Analysis of the temperature sensitivity of Japanese rubella vaccine strain TO-336.vac and its effect on immunogenicity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kiyoko; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    The marker of Japanese domestic rubella vaccines is their lack of immunogenicity in guinea pigs. This has long been thought to be related to the temperature sensitivity of the viruses, but supporting evidence has not been described. In this study, we generated infectious clones of TO-336.vac, a Japanese domestic vaccine, TO-336.GMK5, the parental virus of TO-336.vac, and their mutants, and determined the molecular bases of their temperature sensitivity and immunogenicity in guinea pigs. The results revealed that Ser(1159) in the non-structural protein-coding region was responsible for the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac dominantly, while the structural protein-coding region affected the temperature sensitivity subordinately. The findings further suggested that the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac affected the antibody induction in guinea pigs after subcutaneous inoculation.

  14. Pathogenesis and transmission of the novel swine-origin influenza virus A/H1N1 after experimental infection of pigs.

    PubMed

    Lange, Elke; Kalthoff, Donata; Blohm, Ulrike; Teifke, Jens P; Breithaupt, Angele; Maresch, Christina; Starick, Elke; Fereidouni, Sasan; Hoffmann, Bernd; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Beer, Martin; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2009-09-01

    Influenza virus A/H1N1, which is currently causing a pandemic, contains gene segments with ancestors in the North American and Eurasian swine lineages. To get insights into virus replication dynamics, clinical symptoms and virus transmission in pigs, we infected animals intranasally with influenza virus A/Regensburg/D6/09/H1N1. Virus excretion in the inoculated pigs was detected in nasal swabs from 1 day post-infection (p.i.) onwards and the pigs developed generally mild symptoms, including fever, sneezing, nasal discharge and diarrhoea. Contact pigs became infected, shed virus and developed clinical symptoms similar to those in the inoculated animals. Plasma samples of all animals remained negative for virus RNA. Nucleoprotein- and haemagglutinin H1-specific antibodies could be detected by ELISA 7 days p.i. CD4(+) T cells became activated immediately after infection and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell populations expanded from 3 to 7 days p.i., coinciding with clinical signs. Contact chickens remained uninfected, as judged by the absence of virus excretion, clinical signs and seroconversion.

  15. Growth performance and gastrointestinal microbial ecology responses of piglets receiving Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products after an oral challenge with Escherichia coli (K88).

    PubMed

    Kiarie, E; Bhandari, S; Scott, M; Krause, D O; Nyachoti, C M

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products (YFP) on growth performance and gastrointestinal (GIT) microbial ecology in 90 weanling pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli K88(+) (ETEC) were investigated. The YFP were an original YFP product (XPC) and a water-suspendable yeast fermentation prototype (WSYFP) from a commercial company. Treatments consisted of a negative control (NC, no in-feed or in-water additive), carbadox (AB, 55 mg of carbadox/kg of feed), XPC (in feed, 0.2%), and WSYFP (in water, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/pig per day), and each was allotted to 5 pens (3 pigs/pen). The diets met the 1998 NRC specifications. Pigs were acclimated to treatments for a 7-d period before an ETEC challenge. On d 8, blood was collected from pigs to determine the baseline packed cell volume (PCV) measurement, and pigs were orally challenged with ETEC. At various time points postchallenge, blood samples were taken, performance measures and fecal consistency scores were recorded, and gut digesta and tissue samples were taken to evaluate GIT morphology, microbial ecology, and metabolites. Preplanned contrasts were used for comparison. Pigs receiving YFP had greater ADFI than NC pigs on d 3 (424 vs. 378 g/d; P = 0.01) and d 7 (506 vs. 458 g/d; P = 0.03) postchallenge. This effect of YFP on ADFI was similar to that of AB on d 3, but pigs receiving AB ate more (576 vs. 506 g/d; P = 0.03) at d 7 than pigs receiving YFP. Pigs exhibited reduced (P < 0.001) PCV upon ETEC challenge; however, pigs receiving additives sustained a greater (P < 0.05) PCV at 72 h compared with the NC group. Compared with the NC pigs, pigs receiving YFP showed a smaller (P < 0.05) number of ileal mucosa adherent ETEC and prevalence of the order Enterobacteriales in the ileal digesta, which corresponded to less (5.09 vs. 6.97 mg/dL; P = 0.03) colonic ammonia on d 7 postchallenge. Most of the indices for ileal digesta bacterial richness and diversity were greater (P < 0.01) for YFP pigs compared

  16. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  17. Current status of pig liver xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ekser, Burcin; Markmann, James F; Tector, A Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The shortage of organs from deceased human donors is a major problem limiting the number of organs transplanted each year and results in the death of thousands of patients on the waiting list. Pigs are currently the preferred species for clinical organ xenotransplantation. Progress in genetically-engineered (GE) pig liver xenotransplantation increased graft and recipient survival from hours with unmodified pig livers to up to 9 days with normal to near-normal liver function. Deletion of genes such as GGTA1 (Gal-knockout pigs) or adding genes such as human complement regulatory proteins (hCD55, hCD46 expressing pigs) enabled hyperacute rejection to be overcome. Although survival up to 9 days was recorded, extended pig graft survival was not achieved due to lethal thrombocytopenia. The current status of GE pig liver xenotransplantation with world experience, potential factors causing thrombocytopenia, new targets on pig endothelial cells, and novel GE pigs with more genes deletion to avoid remaining antibody response, such as beta1,4-N-acetyl galactosaminyl transferase 2 (β4GalNT2), are discussed.

  18. Gastric zygomycosis (mucormycosis) in 4 suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Sanford, S E

    1985-02-15

    Acute gastric zygomycosis (mucormycosis) was diagnosed in four 6- to 7-day-old pigs with large venous infarcts in the gastric fundus. Two pigs were from one farm where several dams had developed fever at parturition and most of their litters had died. The other 2 pigs, from separate farms, had diarrhea that was unresponsive to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Histologically there was severe hemorrhagic, ulcerative gastritis associated with numerous transmurally invading, mucoraceous fungi. The discussion includes speculation on the pathogenesis of this lesion in neonatal pigs.

  19. Stress inoculation training: a case study in gymnastics.

    PubMed Central

    Mace, R; Eastman, C; Carroll, D

    1986-01-01

    A young female gymnast of regional squad potential had ceased to make progress when she resumed training after a series of injuries and was given stress inoculation training to help her to regain her form. Preliminary interviews revealed that she had developed a number of negative self-statements and images which, it was hypothesised, may have been contributing towards her lack of progress. In order to replace these with positive self-statements and images a treatment programme of eight training sessions was implemented. Recorded interviews and subsequent comparison of comments made by the subject before and after the intervention programme, indicated that the training had been successful. This was endorsed by the coaches who reported an improved attitude to training and rapid progress in skill learning. PMID:3779344

  20. Inoculation and scoring methods for rice sheath blight disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Liu, Guangjie; Park, Dong-Soo; Yang, Yinong

    2013-01-01

    Sheath blight disease of rice caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani has been a major disease of rice with a serious threat to stable rice production worldwide. Although various cultural practices have been used to manage the disease, it is advantageous and important to screen rice germplasm and identify resistant rice cultivars for more effective disease control. Recent advances in methods for the fungal inoculation and disease evaluation have enabled a better measurement of host resistance by minimizing confounding factors from plant architectures and environmental conditions. This chapter introduces five such methods: (1) detached leaf method; (2) micro-chamber method; (3) mist-chamber method; (4) parafilm sachet method; and (5) aluminum foil method. These methods are useful for screening and evaluating disease reactions of rice germplasm and facilitating the genetic mapping of disease resistance genes.

  1. Structural elucidation of crystallization centers in aluminium inoculated with titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Banerji, A.; Reif, W. . Inst. fuer Metallforschung-Metallkunde); Feng, Q. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The heterogeneous nucleation process in commercially pure aluminium (99.7%) castings inoculated with hypoperitectic titanium additions (<0.15%) was investigated. Electron diffraction of the crystallization center particles, which formed in situ by reaction of added titanium with carbon impurity in the melt and subsequently nucleated [alpha]-aluminium, showed that they were essentially composed of Ti[sub 2]C, having orthorhombic lattice with a = 1.2 nm, b = 1.06 nm and c = 0.50 nm, and stoichiometric TiC, having cubic lattice with a = 0.4380 nm. Traces of Ti[sub 3]AlC and Al[sub 4]C[sub 3] were recorded only in rare cases.

  2. Mutant USA strain of porcine circovirus type 2 (mPCV2) exhibits similar virulence to the classical PCV2a and PCV2b strains in caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived pigs.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Gerber, Priscilla F; Halbur, Patrick G; Matzinger, Shannon R; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, a mutant porcine circovirus type 2 (mPCV2) strain was identified in cases of PCV-associated disease (PCVAD) in the USA. The mPCV2 had an additional amino acid, lysine (K), in the capsid at position 234. The objectives of this study were to compare the pathogenicity of mPCV2, PCV2a and PCV2b in pigs using biologically pure infectious virus stocks derived from respective infectious DNA clones, and to investigate the importance of genotype-specific ORF2 and the presence of lysine at position 234 of the capsid. A total of 47, 2-week-old, caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived (CDCD) pigs were assigned to one of seven groups. At 3 weeks of age, the pigs were experimentally inoculated with saline, PCV2a, PCV2b, mPCV2, PCV2b-234-K (lysine addition in ORF2), chimeric PCV2b-ORF1/mPCV2-ORF2 or reciprocal chimeric mPCV2-ORF1/PCV2b-ORF2. All pigs were necropsied 21 days post-infection (p.i.). Gross lesions were limited to visible icterus and loss of body condition in a portion of the mPCV2 pigs. The amount of PCV2 DNA was significantly higher in pigs inoculated with mPCV2 compared with PCV2b in sera at 7 days p.i. and faecal swabs at 14 days p.i. Based on lymphoid lesions, a higher prevalence of PCVAD was seen in pigs infected with PCV2s containing the additional 234-K (64.3 %) compared with those infected with a PCV2 with the regular 233 bp ORF2 (40 %). Results indicated that all PCV2 isolates were capable of inducing severe lesions and disease in the CDCD pig model, and there was no significant difference in virulence.

  3. Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; De Hert, Karl; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-01-01

    Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs. PMID:26404790

  4. Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; De Hert, Karl; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-09-24

    Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

  5. Infectivity of PRRS virus in pig manure at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniel C L; Torremorell, Montserrat; Joo, Han Soo; Morrison, Robert B

    2012-11-01

    PRRSv is an economically important swine pathogen which can be disseminated from infected pig herds via movement of contaminated manure. The process of manure handling and inadequate cleaning of transport vehicles are commonly implicated as sources of PRRSv transmission. Stability of PRRSv in pig manure at different temperatures is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine PRRSv-infectivity half-life in manure and in a cell culture medium at 4, 20, 60 and 80°C. To assure sample consistency across the study, all samples were prepared from common homogenized solutions (MEM and manure) and frozen at -20°C. Samples were thawed, transferred to a water bath set at a specific temperature, inoculated with 100 μl of PRRSv at designated time points and then tested for virus infectivity. Regression models were created to estimate PRRSv half-life based on incubation temperature. There was an exponential decrease in PRRSv infectivity with increasing temperature. At every temperature tested, PRRSv had shorter half-life when incubated in manure compared to MEM. PRRSv half-life in MEM and manure was estimated at 112.6 and 120.5 h at 4°C, 14.6 and 24.5 h at 20°C, 1.6 and 1.7 h at 40°C, 2.9 and 8.5 min at 60°C, and 0.36-0.59 min at 80°C, respectively. Results of this study can be used as basis for developing strategies to inactivate PRRSv present in manure-contaminated environments using heating treatments. For example, these data suggest that submitting transport trailers to temperature of 50°C for 8h would decrease PRRSv from 10(6) TCID(50)/ml to less than 10(1) TCID(50)/ml.

  6. Applications of pig zona pellucida immunocontraception to wildlife fertility control.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, J F; Turner, J W; Liu, I K; Fayrer-Hosken, R

    1996-01-01

    A unique application of pig zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception is the control of wildlife populations. A native PZP vaccine has been successfully applied to wild horse and donkey populations. A single annual booster inoculation was capable of maintaining contraception. Seven consecutive years of PZP treatment in wild mares resulted in no detectable debilitating side effects, and reversibility of contraception has been documented among mares treated for up to 4 consecutive years. Long-term treatment (5-7 years) is associated with some ovulation failure and depressed urinary oestrogen concentrations. Complex social behaviours in horses were unaffected by treatment. PZP immunocontraception has also been successfully applied to white-tailed deer, with no detectable changes in ovarian histology after 2 years of treatment. Seventy-four species of captive zoo animals have been treated with the PZP vaccine, with documented success in 27 species, including members of the orders Perissodactyla (Equidae), Artiodactyla (Cervidae, Capridae, Giraffidae, Bovidae), and Carnivora (Ursidae, Mustelidae, Felidae). Immunocytochemistry studies have demonstrated a high degree of crossreactivity between anti-PZP antibodies and African elephant zona pellucida. The need for a one-inoculation form of the vaccine has led to the incorporation of PZP into lactide-glycolide microspheres, which cause a delayed release of the PZP. PZP immunocontraception of wildlife has potential because of (1) > 90% effectiveness, (2) the ability for remote delivery, via darts, (3) reversibility after short-term use, (4) a wide breadth of effectiveness across many species, (5) a lack of debilitating side-effects even after long-term treatment, and (6) minimal effects upon social behaviours. PMID:8984182

  7. Impact of dietary betaine and conjugated linoleic acid on insulin sensitivity, protein and fat metabolism of obese pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fígares, I; Lachica, M; Martín, A; Nieto, R; González-Valero, L; Rodríguez-López, J M; Aguilera, J F

    2012-07-01

    To determine possible mechanisms of action that might explain the nutrient partitioning effect of betaine and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in Iberian pigs and to address potential adverse effects, twenty gilts were restrictively fed from 20 to 50 kg BW Control, 0.5% betaine, 1% CLA or 0.5% betaine + 1% CLA diets. Serum hormones and metabolites profile were determined at 30 kg BW and an oral glucose test was performed before slaughter. Pigs were slaughtered at 50 kg BW and livers were obtained for chemical and histological analysis. Decreased serum urea in pigs fed betaine and betaine + CLA diets (11%; P = 0.0001) indicated a more efficient N utilization. The increase in serum triacylglycerol (58% and 28%, respectively; P = 0.0098) indicated that CLA and betaine + CLA could have reduced adipose tissue triacylglycerol synthesis from preformed fatty acids. Serum glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids were unaffected. CLA and betaine + CLA altered serum lipids profile, although liver of pigs fed CLA diet presented no histopathological changes and triglyceride content was not different from Control pigs. Compared with controls, serum growth hormone decreased (20% to 23%; P = 0.0209) for all treatments. Although serum insulin increased in CLA, and especially in betaine + CLA pigs (28% and 83%; P = 0.0001), indices of insulin resistance were unaffected. In conclusion, CLA, and especially betaine + CLA, induced changes in biochemical parameters and hormones that may partially explain a nutrient partitioning effect in young pigs. Nevertheless, they exhibited weak, although detrimental, effects on blood lipids. Moreover, although livers were chemically and histologically normal, pigs fed CLA diet challenged with a glucose load had higher serum glucose than controls.

  8. The roles of inoculants' carbon source use in the biocontrol of potato scab disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xinbei; Shangguan, Nini; Chang, Dongwei; Ma, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Despite the application of multiple strains in the biocontrol of plant diseases, multistrain inoculation is still constrained by its inconsistency in the field. Nutrients, especially carbons, play an important role in the biocontrol processes. However, little work has been done on the systematic estimation of inoculants' carbon source use on biocontrol efficacies in vivo. In the present study, 7 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains alone and in different combinations were inoculated as biocontrol agents against the potato scab disease, under field conditions and greenhouse treatments. The influence of the inoculants' carbon source use properties on biocontrol efficacies was investigated. The results showed that increasing the number of inoculated strains did not necessarily result in greater biocontrol efficacy in vivo. However, single strains with higher growth rates or multiple strains with less carbon source competition had positive effects on the biocontrol efficacies. These findings may shed light on optimizing the consistent biocontrol of plant disease with the consideration of inoculants' carbon source use properties. PMID:25756527

  9. Comparison of traditional intranasal and aerosol inhalation inoculation of mice with influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Gustin, Kortney M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-07-01

    Intranasal instillation of virus in a liquid suspension (IN) is the most frequently employed method to inoculate small mammalian models with influenza virus, but does not reflect a natural route of exposure. In contrast, inoculation via aerosol inhalation (AR) more closely resembles human exposure to influenza virus. Studies in mice have yielded conflicting results regarding virulence induced by virus inoculated by these routes, and have not controlled for potential strain-specific differences, or examined contemporary influenza viruses and avian viruses with pandemic potential. We used a whole-body AR inoculation method to compare infectivity and disease progression of a highly pathogenic H5N1, a low pathogenic H7N9, and a 2009 H1N1 virus with traditional IN inoculation in the mouse model. Generally comparable levels of morbidity and mortality were observed with all viruses examined using either inoculation route, indicating that both IN and AR delivery are appropriate for murine studies investigating influenza virus pathogenicity.

  10. Metabolic disposition of acyclovir in the guinea pig, rabbit, and monkey.

    PubMed

    Good, S S; de Miranda, P

    1982-07-20

    Two guinea pigs and two rabbits were each inoculated subcutaneously with 14C-labeled acyclovir (25 mg/kg). Both species excreted the entire amount within 72 hours. The rabbits excreted all of the radioactivity in the urine while the guinea pigs excreted an average of 14.2 percent in the feces. The rabbits excreted an average of 71.0 percent of the dose as unchanged drug; 25.1 percent was excreted as 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine (CMMG) and 3.5 percent as 8-hydroxy-9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (8-hydroxyacyclovir). An average of 60.7 percent of the dose was recovered from the guinea pigs as acyclovir; 32.3 percent was excreted as CMMG and 3.1 percent as 8-hydroxyacyclovir. The two rabbits showed elimination-phase half-lives (t 1/2 beta) for plasma acyclovir of 0.8 and 2.2 hours. Mean t 1/2 beta for acyclovir in two rhesus, four patas, and four african green monkeys, each receiving acyclovir (10 mg/kg) as a bolus intravenous injection, were 1.2, 1.7, and 1.8 hours respectively. The average 48 hour urinary excretion of acyclovir, 8-hydroxyacyclovir, and CMMG in the rhesus monkey was estimated to be 21.3 percent, 15.3 percent, and 7.1 percent, respectively, of the total administered amount. The patas and african green species excreted the dose mostly as acyclovir and CMMG.

  11. Predominant involvement of the cerebellum in guinea pigs infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Horiuchi, M; Yamakawa, Y; Sata, T

    2011-05-01

    This study reports the experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to guinea pigs and describes the cerebellar lesions in these animals. Guinea pigs were inoculated intracerebrally with 10% brain homogenates from BSE-affected cattle. These animals were designated as the first passage. Second and third passages were subsequently performed. All guinea pigs developed infection at each passage. The mean incubation period of the first passage was 370 days post-infection (dpi) and this decreased to 307 dpi and 309 dpi for the second and third passages, respectively. Mild to severe spongiform degeneration and gliosis were observed in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem. In addition, the affected animals had marked pathological changes in the cerebellum characterized by severe cortical atrophy associated with Bergmann radial gliosis of the molecular layer and reduction in the width of the granular cell layer. Immunohistochemically, intense PrP(Sc) deposition and scattered plaque-like deposits were observed in the molecular and granular cell layers. Cerebellar lesions associated with severe atrophy of the cortex have not been reported in animal prion diseases, including in the experimental transmission of PrP(Sc) to small rodents. These lesions were similar to the lesions of human kuru or the VV2 variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although typical kuru plaques or florid plaques were not observed in the affected animals.

  12. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp. PMID:23357598

  13. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp.

  14. [Oral viral infections].

    PubMed

    Parent, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Exclude herpes infection in the presence of acute oral ulcers of unknown origin, particularly in patients in poor general condition. Remember that asymptomatic HSV-1 shedding in saliva may result in an oral-genital transmission. Perform an anogenital examination and a screening for other sexually transmitted diseases when oral warts are diagnosed. Search for immunosuppression and monitor the patient (screening for a potential associated carcinoma) when there is rapid growth of oral warts. Consider all the clinical signs (systemic, skin, other mucosa, immunity...) when a patient has an enanthem or oral ulcerations. Ask for a HIV test when an oral Kaposi's sarcoma, a hairy leukoplakia or major aphthae are diagnosed. PMID:26854091

  15. Invited Review: The preterm pig as a model in pediatric gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Sangild, P. T.; Thymann, T.; Schmidt, M.; Stoll, B.; Burrin, D. G.; Buddington, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    At birth, the newborn mammal undergoes a transition from a sterile uterine environment with a constant nutrient supply, to a microbe-rich environment with intermittent oral intake of complex milk nutrients via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These functional challenges partly explain the relatively high morbidity and mortality of neonates. Preterm birth interrupts prenatal organ maturation, including that of the GIT, and increases disease risk. Exemplary is necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is associated closely with GIT immaturity, enteral feeding, and bacterial colonization. Infants with NEC may require resection of the necrotic parts of the intestine, leading to short bowel syndrome (SBS), characterized by reduced digestive capacity, fluid loss, and dependency on parenteral nutrition. This review presents the preterm pig as a translational model in pediatric gastroenterology that has provided new insights into important pediatric diseases such as NEC and SBS. We describe protocols for delivery, care, and handling of preterm pigs, and show how the immature GIT responds to delivery method and different nutritional and therapeutic interventions. The preterm pig may also provide a sensitive model for postnatal adaptation of weak term piglets showing high mortality. Attributes of the preterm pig model include close similarities with preterm infants in body size, organ development, and many clinical features, thereby providing a translational advantage relative to rodent models of GIT immaturity. On the other hand, the need for a sow surgical facility, a piglet intensive care unit, and clinically trained personnel may limit widespread use of preterm pigs. Studies on organ adaptation in preterm pigs help to identify the physiological basis of neonatal survival for hypersensitive newborns and aid in defining the optimal diet and rearing conditions during the critical neonatal period. PMID:23942716

  16. Ultraviolet Light (UV) Inactivation of Porcine Parvovirus in Liquid Plasma and Effect of UV Irradiated Spray Dried Porcine Plasma on Performance of Weaned Pigs.

    PubMed

    Polo, Javier; Rodríguez, Carmen; Ródenas, Jesús; Russell, Louis E; Campbell, Joy M; Crenshaw, Joe D; Torrallardona, David; Pujols, Joan

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultraviolet light irradiation (UV-C, 254 nm) process was designed as an additional safety feature for manufacturing of spray dried porcine plasma (SDPP). In Exp. 1, three 10-L batches of bovine plasma were inoculated with 10(5.2 ± 0.12) tissue culture infectious dose 50 (TCID50) of porcine parvovirus (PPV) per mL of plasma and subjected to UV-C ranging from 0 to 9180 J/L. No viable PPV was detected in bovine plasma by micro-titer assay in SK6 cell culture after UV-C at 2295 J/L. In Exp. 2, porcine plasma was subjected to UV-C (3672 J/L), then spray dried and mixed in complete mash diets. Diets were a control without SDPP (Control), UV-C SDPP either at 3% (UVSDPP3) or 6% (UVSDPP6) and non-UV-C SDPP at 3% (SDPP3) or 6% (SDPP6). Diets were fed ad libitum to 320 weaned pigs (26 d of age; 16 pens/diet; 4 pigs/pen) for 14 d after weaning and a common diet was fed d 15 to 28. During d 0 to 14, pigs fed UVSDPP3, UVSDPP6, or SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control. During d 0 to 28, pigs fed UVSDPP3 and UVSDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control and SDPP3, and SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) feed intake than control. Also, pigs fed UVSDPP had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain than pigs fed SDPP. In conclusion, UV-C inactivated PPV in liquid plasma and UVSDPP used in pig feed had no detrimental effects on pig performance.

  17. Ultraviolet Light (UV) Inactivation of Porcine Parvovirus in Liquid Plasma and Effect of UV Irradiated Spray Dried Porcine Plasma on Performance of Weaned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Javier; Rodríguez, Carmen; Ródenas, Jesús; Russell, Louis E.; Campbell, Joy M.; Crenshaw, Joe D.; Torrallardona, David; Pujols, Joan

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultraviolet light irradiation (UV-C, 254 nm) process was designed as an additional safety feature for manufacturing of spray dried porcine plasma (SDPP). In Exp. 1, three 10-L batches of bovine plasma were inoculated with 105.2±0.12 tissue culture infectious dose 50 (TCID50) of porcine parvovirus (PPV) per mL of plasma and subjected to UV-C ranging from 0 to 9180 J/L. No viable PPV was detected in bovine plasma by micro-titer assay in SK6 cell culture after UV-C at 2295 J/L. In Exp. 2, porcine plasma was subjected to UV-C (3672 J/L), then spray dried and mixed in complete mash diets. Diets were a control without SDPP (Control), UV-C SDPP either at 3% (UVSDPP3) or 6% (UVSDPP6) and non-UV-C SDPP at 3% (SDPP3) or 6% (SDPP6). Diets were fed ad libitum to 320 weaned pigs (26 d of age; 16 pens/diet; 4 pigs/pen) for 14 d after weaning and a common diet was fed d 15 to 28. During d 0 to 14, pigs fed UVSDPP3, UVSDPP6, or SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control. During d 0 to 28, pigs fed UVSDPP3 and UVSDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control and SDPP3, and SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) feed intake than control. Also, pigs fed UVSDPP had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain than pigs fed SDPP. In conclusion, UV-C inactivated PPV in liquid plasma and UVSDPP used in pig feed had no detrimental effects on pig performance. PMID:26171968

  18. Method and a horizontal pipeline pig launching mechanism for sequentially launching pipeline pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.W.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for timed automatic sequential launching of serially oriented pipeline pigs from a pig launching system having a tubular pig storage and launching magazine into a gas transmission pipeline. It comprises providing a source of hydraulic fluid medium; locating a free piston within the tubular pig storage and launching magazine for motive contact with the last of the serially oriented pipeline pigs; employing gas pressure from the gas transmission pipeline for pressurizing the hydraulic fluid medium from the source; introducing the pressurized hydraulic fluid medium into the hydraulic chamber; controllably releasing the restraining of the first of the serially oriented pipeline pigs from the tubular pig storage and launching magazine.

  19. Carbon decomposition by inoculating Phanerochaete chrysosporium during drum composting of agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Ramu, Kamma; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation during drum composting of agricultural waste was performed at different composting stages. Three trials were carried out with (5:4:1) combination of vegetable waste, cattle manure, and sawdust along with 10 kg of dried leaves with a total mass of 100 kg in a 550 L rotary drum composter. Trial 1 was a control without inoculation of fungus, while trial 2 was inoculated during the initial day (0th day of composting), and trial 3 was inoculated after the thermophilic phase, i.e., on the 8th day of composting period. The inoculation of fungus increased the volatile solids reduction by 1.45-fold in trial 2 and 1.7-fold in trial 3 as compared to trial 1 without any fungal inoculation. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) was observed with 2.31, 2.62, and 2.59% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, at the end of 20 days of composting period. Hence, it can be concluded that inoculation of white-rot fungus increased the decomposition rate of agricultural waste within shorter time in drum composting. However, inoculation after the thermophilic phase was found more effective than inoculation during initial days of composting for producing more stabilized and nutrient-rich compost.

  20. Response of Sesbania grandiflora to Inoculation of Soil with Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi.

    PubMed

    Habte, M; Aziz, T

    1985-09-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the influence of two tropical isolates of Glomus fasciculatum and Glomus mosseae on the nutrient uptake and growth of Sesbania grandiflora. Inoculation of sterile soil with the fungi significantly improved growth and nutrient uptake by S. grandiflora, but the response of the legume was markedly better when the soil was inoculated with G. fasciculatum than when it was inoculated with G. mosseae. Nutrient uptake and growth of S. grandiflora in nonsterile soil was also significantly stimulated by inoculation, but the legume did not respond differently to the two endophytes under this condition. PMID:16346890

  1. Response of Sesbania grandiflora to Inoculation of Soil with Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi †

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Mitiku; Aziz, Taufiqul

    1985-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the influence of two tropical isolates of Glomus fasciculatum and Glomus mosseae on the nutrient uptake and growth of Sesbania grandiflora. Inoculation of sterile soil with the fungi significantly improved growth and nutrient uptake by S. grandiflora, but the response of the legume was markedly better when the soil was inoculated with G. fasciculatum than when it was inoculated with G. mosseae. Nutrient uptake and growth of S. grandiflora in nonsterile soil was also significantly stimulated by inoculation, but the legume did not respond differently to the two endophytes under this condition. PMID:16346890

  2. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Miscellaneous Exotic Companion Mammals.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Angela M; Miwa, Yasutsugu

    2016-09-01

    Unusual mammalian species such as the hedgehog, sugar glider, and miniature pig are encountered with increasing frequency in exotic companion medicine. Disease of the oral cavity can occur in any species; although occasionally encountered in exotic mammalian species, it is rarely described in the literature. Anatomy and dentition vary significantly; diagnosis and treatment are often extrapolated from that known in other species. The best-documented disease of the oral cavity in this group of species is oral neoplasia in the hedgehog. PMID:27497212

  3. Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus RNA and capsid protein in lymphoid tissues of convalescent pigs does not indicate existence of a carrier state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the potential of pigs to maintain persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) infection. Infectious virus could not be recovered from sera, oral, nasal- or oropharyngeal fluids obtained after resolution of clinical infection with FMDV serotypes A, O...

  4. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  5. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    In his interesting and informative book "Is That a Fact?," Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on…

  6. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  7. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  8. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  9. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Famous People Famous historical Arts & Entertainment Sports figures ... The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national public service, non-profit entity designed to reduce suffering ...

  10. Antagonism of peptidoleukotrienes and inhibition of systemic anaphylaxis by RG 12525 in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Inwegen, R.G.; Nuss, G.W.; Carnathan, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    RG 12525 was determined to be a specific, competitive and orally effective antagonist of the peptidoleukotrienes, LTC/sub 4/, LTD/sub 4/ and LTE/sub 4/, in several assays utilizing guinea pigs. In vitro, RG 12525 competitively inhibited /sup 3/H-LTD/sub 4/ binding to lung membranes and competitively antagonized the spasmogenic activity of LTC/sub 4/, LTD/sub 4/ and LTE/sub 4/ on lung strips with > 8000 fold selectivity. In vivo, RG 12525 orally inhibited LTD/sub 4/ induced wheal formation LTD/sub 4/ induced bronchoconstriction and anaphylactic death and antigen induced bronchoconstriction. RG 12525 represents a significant improvement in receptor affinity and oral efficacy and thus, is a valuable pharmacological tool to evaluate peptidoleukotrienes in allergic diseases.

  11. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin B; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2016-08-30

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2 of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously with the parental field strain and transmission to in-contact pigs occurred. Two sequence reversions, in the NS2 and NS5B coding regions, became dominant within the virus populations in these infected pigs. Rescued viruses, with mutant IRES elements, did not induce disease and only very limited circulation of viral RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals. PMID:27527774

  12. Isolation and characterization of Guinea pig properidin.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A; Austen, K F

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pig properdin was purified to homogeneity by employing as an assay during isolation its capacity to augment the hemolytic activity of a heterologous human C3b-dependent C3 convertase, C3B. The purified protein elicited a monospecific antibody response in a rabbit. The antiserum, by immunodiffusion, gave a reaction of identity between a protein in whole guinea pig serum and the immunogen. A solid phase immunoadsorbent prepared with the antiserum removed properdin function from the purified protein. The purified guinea pig protein exhibited the classical properdin function of reconstituting a human RP for zymosan-induced C3 inactivation. The guinea pig properdin also agglutinated red cell intermediates bearing either guinea pig or human C3b and retarded the decay of homologous C3 convertase, C3B. These activities are the same as those observed for purified human properdin and validate the amplification function of properdin on terminal component activation in a second species.

  13. Endocrine tumours in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Mayer, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Functional endocrine tumours have long been thought to be rare in guinea pigs, although conditions such as hyperthyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been documented with increasing frequency so the prevalence of hormonal disorders may have been underestimated. Both the clinical signs and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in guinea pigs appear to be very similar to those described in feline hyperthyroidism, and methimazole has been proven to be a practical therapy option. Hyperadrenocorticism has been confirmed in several guinea pigs with an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test using saliva as a non-invasive sample matrix; trilostane has been successfully used to treat a guinea pig with hyperadrenocorticism. Insulinomas have only rarely been documented in guinea pigs and one animal was effectively treated with diazoxide. PMID:26542368

  14. Endocrine tumours in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Mayer, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Functional endocrine tumours have long been thought to be rare in guinea pigs, although conditions such as hyperthyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been documented with increasing frequency so the prevalence of hormonal disorders may have been underestimated. Both the clinical signs and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in guinea pigs appear to be very similar to those described in feline hyperthyroidism, and methimazole has been proven to be a practical therapy option. Hyperadrenocorticism has been confirmed in several guinea pigs with an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test using saliva as a non-invasive sample matrix; trilostane has been successfully used to treat a guinea pig with hyperadrenocorticism. Insulinomas have only rarely been documented in guinea pigs and one animal was effectively treated with diazoxide.

  15. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  16. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  17. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment. PMID:26125159

  18. Toxicology of aflatoxin B1, warfarin, and cadmium in young pigs: performance and hematology.

    PubMed

    Osuna, O; Edds, G T

    1982-08-01

    Observations on the interactions of cadmium (Cd) x aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and Cd x warfarin included several variables of animal performance and hematology. Cadmium was fed daily for 40 days (groups IV, V, VI) and a Cd-free diet was fed to groups I, II, and III. Groups II and V were treated with AFB1, and groups III and VI were treated with warfarin--each for 5 days during the 5th week of the experiment and the effects were observed for 10 days. All pigs fed the diet with added Cd had developed severe anemia by the 4th week of the experiment. The incorporation of this toxic concentration of Cd (83 micrograms/g) in the diet seemed to have blocked the liver microsomal enzyme system (cytochrome P-450), diminishing the toxic effects of 5 daily oral doses (0.2 mg/kg of body wt) of AFB1 (group V pigs), but enhancing synergistically the toxic anticoagulant effects of the same doses of warfarin in young pigs (group VI). The data presented also indicated that the feeding of toxic concentrations of Cd stimulated increased glutathione peroxidase activity, which conjugated the AFB1 epoxides with their excretion as reduced glutathione but enhanced the toxic anticoagulant effects of warfarin in young pigs.

  19. Glucose tolerance normalization following transplantation of pig pancreatic primordia into non-immunosuppressed diabetic ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sharon A; Chen, Feng; Talcott, Mike; Liapis, Helen; Hammerman, Marc R

    2006-11-01

    Pancreas or pancreatic islet transplantation in humans is limited by organ availability, and success of the latter is negatively impacted upon by tissue loss post-transplantation and limited potential for expansion of beta cells. A way to overcome the supply and expansion problems is to xenotransplant embryonic tissue. Previously, we have shown that beta cells originating from embryonic day (E) 28 (E28) pig pancreatic primordia transplanted into the mesentery of streptozotocin-diabetic (type 1) Lewis rats engraft without the need for host immune-suppression and normalize glucose tolerance. Here we show long-term engraftment of pig beta cells within liver, pancreas and mesenteric lymph nodes post-transplantation of E28 pig pancreatic primordia into diabetic ZDF rats, a model for type 2 diabetes. Porcine insulin is present in circulation after an oral glucose load. Glucose tolerance is normalized in transplanted ZDF hosts and insulin sensitivity restored in formerly diabetic ZDF males. Release of porcine insulin in vitro from tissue originating in transplanted rats occurs within 1 min of glucose stimulation characteristic of first-phase secretion from beta cells. Of potential importance for application of this transplantation technology to treatment of type 2 diabetes in humans and confirmatory of our previous findings in Lewis rats, no host immunosuppression is required for engraftment of E28 pig pancreatic primordia. PMID:17138051

  20. Guinea Pig Ciliary Muscle Development

    PubMed Central

    Pucker, Andrew D.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; McHugh, Kirk M.; Mutti, Donald O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantifying guinea pig ciliary muscle volume (CMV) and to determine its relationship to age and ocular biometric measurements. Methods Six albino guinea pigs eyes were collected at each of five ages (n=30 eyes). Retinoscopy and photography were used to document refractive error, eye size, and eye shape. Serial sections through the excised eyes were made and then labeled with an α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The CM was then visualized with an Olympus BX51 microscope, reconstructed with Stereo Investigator (MBF Bioscience) and analyzed using Neurolucida Explorer (MBF Bioscience). Full (using all sections) and partial (using a subset of sections) reconstruction methods were used to determine CMV. Results There was no significant difference between the full and partial volume determination methods (P = 0.86). The mean CMV of the 1, 10, 20, 30, and 90-day old eyes was 0.40 ± 0.16 mm3, 0.48 ± 0.13 mm3, 0.67 ± 0.15 mm3, 0.86 ± 0.35 mm3, and 1.09 ± 0.63 mm3, respectively. CMV was significantly correlated with log age (P = 0.001), ocular length (P = 0.003), limbal circumference (P = 0.01), and equatorial diameter (P = 0.003). It was not correlated with refractive error (P = 0.73) or eye shape (P = 0.60). Multivariate regression determined that biometric variables were not significantly associated with CMV after adjustment for age. Conclusions Three-dimensional reconstruction was an effective means of determining CMV. These data provide evidence that CM growth occurs with age in tandem with eye size in normal albino guinea pigs. Additional work is needed to determine the relationship between CMV and abnormal ocular growth. PMID:24901488

  1. Stress susceptibility in pigs supplemented with ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Athayde, N B; Dalla Costa, O A; Roça, R O; Guidoni, A L; Ludtke, C B; Oba, E; Takahira, R K; Lima, G J M M

    2013-09-01

    Ractopamine is a β-adrenergic agonist used as an energy repartitioning agent in the diets of finishing pigs. Most ractopamine studies are limited to evaluations of growth performance and meat quality, and there is little information on the effects of this additive on the behavior and welfare of pigs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate various indicators of stress caused by feeding diets containing ractopamine. One hundred seventy barrows and 170 gilts weighing 107.3 kg were allocated to 30 pens with 10 to 12 barrows or gilts per pen. Pigs were offered 1 of the 3 dietary treatments (0, 5, or 10 mg ractopamine/kg) for 28 d with 5 barrow pens and 5 gilt pens per treatment. Pigs were evaluated for behavior 3 d per week 1 wk before the initiation of the experiment and throughout the experiment. Each pig was classified into 1 of the 13 activities (drinking water, lying alone, lying in clusters, standing, nosing pig, sitting, feeding, biting pig, walking, exploring, running away, playing, and mounting pen mates) and also grouped into 1 of the 3 categories (calm, moving, and feeding themselves) based on those activities. At the end of the experiment, 3 pigs from each pen were slaughtered, and blood samples were collected during exsanguination to determine physiological indicators of stress (cortisol, lactate, and creatine-kinase enzymes). The incidence of skin and carcass lesions was determined at shoulder, loin, and ham. Ractopamine had no effect (P > 0.05) on pig behavior, total number of skin and carcass lesions, or blood concentrations of cortisol or lactate. However, there was an increase (P < 0.05) of creatine kinase concentrations in pigs receiving ractopamine-supplemented feed. This finding is consistent with the concept that ractopamine may cause muscular disorders, and this warrants further investigation.

  2. Developing Oral Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Intended for use by both elementary and secondary school teachers, the two papers in this report stress the importance of developing students' oral and written communication skills. The first paper, "Relationship of Oral Communication to Reading," by Phil Backlund and John Johnson, argues that ability in oral communication is a prerequisite to the…

  3. Bibliography on Oral History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waserman, Manfred J., Comp.

    This annotated bibliography covers articles and books dealing with oral history published between 1950 and 1970. In addition to works treating oral history as a methodology for historical discovery, the guide includes a separate annotated list of twenty selected books that use oral history material in the development of their themes and…

  4. Soil inoculation with symbiotic microorganisms promotes plant growth and nutrient transporter genes expression in durum wheat.

    PubMed

    Saia, Sergio; Rappa, Vito; Ruisi, Paolo; Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Sunseri, Francesco; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso S; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    In a field experiment conducted in a Mediterranean area of inner Sicily, durum wheat was inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), or with both to evaluate their effects on nutrient uptake, plant growth, and the expression of key transporter genes involved in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake. These biotic associations were studied under either low N availability (unfertilized plots) and supplying the soil with an easily mineralizable organic fertilizer. Regardless of N fertilization, at the tillering stage, inoculation with AMF alone or in combination with PGPR increased the aboveground biomass yield compared to the uninoculated control. Inoculation with PGPR enhanced the aboveground biomass yield compared to the control, but only when N fertilizer was added. At the heading stage, inoculation with all microorganisms increased the aboveground biomass and N. Inoculation with PGPR and AMF+PGPR resulted in significantly higher aboveground P compared to the control and inoculation with AMF only when organic N was applied. The role of microbe inoculation in N uptake was elucidated by the expression of nitrate transporter genes. NRT1.1, NRT2, and NAR2.2 were significantly upregulated by inoculation with AMF and AMF+PGPR in the absence of organic N. A significant down-regulation of the same genes was observed when organic N was added. The ammonium (NH4 (+)) transporter genes AMT1.2 showed an expression pattern similar to that of the NO3 (-) transporters. Finally, in the absence of organic N, the transcript abundance of P transporters Pht1 and PT2-1 was increased by inoculation with AMF+PGPR, and inoculation with AMF upregulated Pht2 compared to the uninoculated control. These results indicate the soil inoculation with AMF and PGPR (alone or in combination) as a valuable option for farmers to improve yield, nutrient uptake, and the sustainability of the agro-ecosystem.

  5. Soil inoculation with symbiotic microorganisms promotes plant growth and nutrient transporter genes expression in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Rappa, Vito; Ruisi, Paolo; Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Sunseri, Francesco; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso S.; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    In a field experiment conducted in a Mediterranean area of inner Sicily, durum wheat was inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), or with both to evaluate their effects on nutrient uptake, plant growth, and the expression of key transporter genes involved in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake. These biotic associations were studied under either low N availability (unfertilized plots) and supplying the soil with an easily mineralizable organic fertilizer. Regardless of N fertilization, at the tillering stage, inoculation with AMF alone or in combination with PGPR increased the aboveground biomass yield compared to the uninoculated control. Inoculation with PGPR enhanced the aboveground biomass yield compared to the control, but only when N fertilizer was added. At the heading stage, inoculation with all microorganisms increased the aboveground biomass and N. Inoculation with PGPR and AMF+PGPR resulted in significantly higher aboveground P compared to the control and inoculation with AMF only when organic N was applied. The role of microbe inoculation in N uptake was elucidated by the expression of nitrate transporter genes. NRT1.1, NRT2, and NAR2.2 were significantly upregulated by inoculation with AMF and AMF+PGPR in the absence of organic N. A significant down-regulation of the same genes was observed when organic N was added. The ammonium (NH4+) transporter genes AMT1.2 showed an expression pattern similar to that of the NO3- transporters. Finally, in the absence of organic N, the transcript abundance of P transporters Pht1 and PT2-1 was increased by inoculation with AMF+PGPR, and inoculation with AMF upregulated Pht2 compared to the uninoculated control. These results indicate the soil inoculation with AMF and PGPR (alone or in combination) as a valuable option for farmers to improve yield, nutrient uptake, and the sustainability of the agro-ecosystem. PMID:26483827

  6. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? How could oral contraceptives influence cancer risk? How ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? Two types of oral contraceptives (birth control pills) ...

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  8. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity. PMID:27586612

  9. Pasteurization of salted whole egg inoculated with Arizona or Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ng, H; Garibaldi, J A; Ijichi, K; Mihara, K L

    1979-06-01

    Recently, Arizona bacteria, close relatives of Salmonella, were recovered from salted whole egg that had been pasteurized by the presently recommended process of 63.3 degrees C (146 degrees F) for 3.5 min. Because of this and the fact that the heat resistance of Arizona in salted whole egg had not been determined, the present study was undertaken. Arizona or Salmonella, grown in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 2% yeast extract in Fernbach flasks covered with aluminum foil over cotton and guaze at 35 degrees C with shaking at 176 rpm for about 96 h, were found to have the greatest degree of heat resistance. As expected, these cells, when inoculated into salted whole egg at 10(7) cells per ml, survived heating at 63.3 degrees C (146 degrees F) for 3.5 min in a two-phase slug flow heat exchanger. To consistently achieve a 7-log kill of typical Salmonella or Arizona, a treatment of 67 degrees C (152.6 degrees F) for 3.5 min was required. However, if a 7-log kill is mandatory, it remains to be determined whether this process affect the functional properties of this product.

  10. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity.

  11. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section... Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety test. The guinea pig safety test provided in this section... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the...

  12. Cultural and Economic Motivation of Pig Raising Practices in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Nazmun; Uddin, Main; Gurley, Emily S; Jahangir Hossain, M; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    The interactions that pig raisers in Bangladesh have with their pigs could increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. Since raising pigs is a cultural taboo to Muslims, we aimed at understanding the motivation for raising pigs and resulting practices that could pose the risk of transmitting disease from pigs to humans in Bangladesh, a predominantly Muslim country. These understandings could help identify acceptable strategies to reduce the risk of disease transmission from pigs to people. To achieve this objective, we conducted 34 in-depth interviews among pig herders and backyard pig raisers in eight districts of Bangladesh. Informants explained that pig raising is an old tradition, embedded in cultural and religious beliefs and practices, the primary livelihood of pig herders, and a supplemental income of backyard pig raisers. To secure additional income, pig raisers sell feces, liver, bile, and other pig parts often used as traditional medicine. Pig raisers have limited economic ability to change the current practices that may put them at risk of exposure to diseases from their pigs. An intervention that improves their financial situation and reduces the risk of zoonotic disease may be of interest to pig raisers.

  13. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section... Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety test. The guinea pig safety test provided in this section... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the...

  14. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section... Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety test. The guinea pig safety test provided in this section... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the...

  15. Early Systemic Microvascular Damage in Pigs with Atherogenic Diabetes Mellitus Coincides with Renal Angiopoietin Dysbalance

    PubMed Central

    Khairoun, Meriem; van den Heuvel, Mieke; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Sorop, Oana; de Boer, Rients; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.; Baelde, Hans J.; Zandbergen, Malu; Duncker, Dirk J.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Reinders, Marlies E. J.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a range of microvascular complications including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Microvascular abnormalities in the kidneys are common histopathologic findings in DN, which represent one manifestation of ongoing systemic microvascular damage. Recently, sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging has emerged as a noninvasive tool that enables one to visualize the microcirculation. In this study, we investigated whether changes in the systemic microvasculature induced by DM and an atherogenic diet correlated spatiotemporally with renal damage. Methods Atherosclerotic lesion development was triggered in streptozotocin-induced DM pigs (140 mg/kg body weight) by administering an atherogenic diet for approximately 11 months. Fifteen months following induction of DM, microvascular morphology was visualized in control pigs (n = 7), non-diabetic pigs fed an atherogenic diet (ATH, n = 5), and DM pigs fed an atherogenic diet (DM+ATH, n = 5) using SDF imaging of oral mucosal tissue. Subsequently, kidneys were harvested from anethesized pigs and the expression levels of well-established markers for microvascular integrity, such as Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) and Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) were determined immunohistochemically, while endothelial cell (EC) abundance was determined by immunostaining for von Willebrand factor (vWF). Results Our study revealed an increase in the capillary tortuosity index in DM+ATH pigs (2.31±0.17) as compared to the control groups (Controls 0.89±0.08 and ATH 1.55±0.11; p<0.05). Kidney biopsies showed marked glomerular lesions consisting of mesangial expansion and podocyte lesions. Furthermore, we observed a disturbed Angpt2/ Angpt1balance in the cortex of the kidney, as evidenced by increased expression of Angpt2 in DM+ATH pigs as compared to Control pigs (p<0.05). Conclusion In the setting of DM, atherogenesis leads to the augmentation of mucosal capillary tortuosity, indicative of systemic microvascular damage

  16. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  17. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  18. A Stress Inoculation Program for Parents Whose Children Are Undergoing Painful Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Susan M.; Elliott, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Compared program efficacy in helping parents cope with children's painful medical procedures. Parents (n=72) of pediatric leukemia patients participated in either stress inoculation program or observed child participating in cognitive behavior therapy. Found parents in stress inoculation program reported lower anxiety scores and higher positive…

  19. Inoculation of strawberries with AM fungi produced on-farm increased yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculation of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungi has the potential to increase or maintain yields and allow for reduced fertilizer and pesticide application, thereby enhancing agricultural sustainability. We inoculated strawberry plants (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cv Chandler) prior to o...

  20. Silage inoculant effects on milk production and why that may be important to you

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage inoculants are the most common additives used in making corn and hay crop silages. The main active ingredients in these products are lactic acid bacteria that help ensure the fermentation in the silo goes in a direction that helps preserve the crop. While inoculants have been available for ma...

  1. Salmonella persistance within the peripheral lymph nodes of cattle following experimental inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing a transdermal method of inoculation developed in our laboratory, the duration of infection of Salmonella in the peripheral lymph nodes of steers was examined. Thirty-six Holstein steers (mean body weight of 137 kg) were inoculated with Salmonella Montevideo (day 0) on each lower leg and b...

  2. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  3. Review of the Literature Regarding McGuire's Inoculation Theory: Early Formulations and Recent Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braley, Christopher

    As originally formulated by William J. McGuire, Inoculation Theory provided a means of immunizing cultural truisms against the effects of persuasive attacks. Subsequent studies have demonstrated its efficacy in conferring resistance to issues of considerable complexity and controversy. The efficacy of the Inoculation Theory process has been widely…

  4. Boosting the Potency of Resistance: Combining the Motivational Forces of Inoculation and Psychological Reactance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Claude H.; Ivanov, Bobi; Sims, Jeanetta; Compton, Josh; Harrison, Kylie J.; Parker, Kimberly A.; Parker, James L.; Averbeck, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of inoculation theory has been confirmed by decades of empirical research, yet optimizing its effectiveness remains a vibrant line of investigation. The present research turns to psychological reactance theory for a means of enhancing the core mechanisms of inoculation--threat and refutational preemption. Findings from a multisite…

  5. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  6. The Effect of LAB Silage Inoculants on the Rumen Environment--Current Research Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants containing mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common additives used in making silage. Their function is to promote intensive production of lactic acid and rapid decrease in pH and so minimize fermentation losses. Some LAB inoculants reduce aerobic spoilage. In addition, feedin...

  7. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage microbial inoculants can enhance animal performance, but the mechanisms involved in these effects are not clear. Our hypothesis was that an extractable factor from inoculated silage enhances rumen microbial activity. One alfalfa haylage (58% DM) and two corn silages (30% and 50% DM) were made...

  8. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa and two corn crops were ensiled with and without Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 silage inoculant and fermented for 4 or 60 d to assess the effect of the inoculant on in vitro rumen fermentation of the resulting silages. Water and 80% ethanol extracts of the silages with added glucose were als...

  9. Milk production response to feeding alfalfa silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mini-silo trials, silages treated with a Lactobacillus plantarum silage inoculant (Ecosyl, Yorkshire, UK) had increased in vitro rumen microbial biomass production compared to untreated. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage treated with this inoculant could produce a milk production r...

  10. Rice resistance to blast caused by leaf surface moistening prior to inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of water droplets placed onto rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves before inoculation with blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr on disease severity and superoxide radical generation by the leaves was investigated. The leaves were inoculated by placement of spore suspension droplets. One da...

  11. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  12. Risk Assessment of Deoxynivalenol by Revisiting Its Bioavailability in Pig and Rat Models to Establish Which Is More Suitable

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Cyr, Manuel Jimmy; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Manceau, Jacqueline; Houée, Paméla; Delmas, Jean-Michel; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Laurentie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Due to its toxic properties, high stability, and prevalence, the presence of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the food chain is a major threat to food safety and therefore a health risk for both humans and animals. In this study, experiments were carried out with sows and female rats to examine the kinetics of DON after intravenous and oral administration at 100 µg/kg of body weight. After intravenous administration of DON in pigs, a two-compartment model with rapid initial distribution (0.030 ± 0.019 h) followed by a slower terminal elimination phase (1.53 ± 0.54 h) was fitted to the concentration profile of DON in pig plasma. In rats, a short elimination half-life (0.46 h) and a clearance of 2.59 L/h/kg were estimated by sparse sampling non-compartmental analysis. Following oral exposure, DON was rapidly absorbed and reached maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) of 42.07 ± 8.48 and 10.44 ± 5.87 µg/L plasma after (tmax) 1.44 ± 0.52 and 0.17 h in pigs and rats, respectively. The mean bioavailability of DON was 70.5% ± 25.6% for pigs and 47.3% for rats. In the framework of DON risk assessment, these two animal models could be useful in an exposure scenario in two different ways because of their different bioavailability. PMID:26633505

  13. Abcb1 in Pigs: Molecular cloning, tissues distribution, functional analysis, and its effect on pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingting; Huang, Jinhu; Zhang, Hongyu; Dong, Lingling; Guo, Dawei; Guo, Li; He, Fang; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Wang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the best-known ATP-dependent efflux transporters, contributing to differences in pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions. Until now, studies on pig P-gp have been scarce. In our studies, the full-length porcine P-gp cDNA was cloned and expressed in a Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line. P-gp expression was then determined in tissues and its role in the pharmacokinetics of oral enrofloxacin in pigs was studied. The coding region of pig Abcb1 gene was 3,861 bp, encoding 1,286 amino acid residues (Mw = 141,966). Phylogenetic analysis indicated a close evolutionary relationship between porcine P-gp and those of cow and sheep. Pig P-gp was successfully stably overexpressed in MDCK cells and had efflux activity for rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-gp. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that P-gp was highly expressed in brain capillaries, small intestine, and liver. In MDCK-pAbcb1 cells, enrofloxacin was transported by P-gp with net efflux ratio of 2.48 and the efflux function was blocked by P-gp inhibitor verapamil. High expression of P-gp in the small intestine could modify the pharmacokinetics of orally administrated enrofloxacin by increasing the Cmax, AUC and Ka, which was demonstrated using verapamil, an inhibitor of P-gp. PMID:27572343

  14. Risk Assessment of Deoxynivalenol by Revisiting Its Bioavailability in Pig and Rat Models to Establish Which Is More Suitable.

    PubMed

    Saint-Cyr, Manuel Jimmy; Perrin-Guyomard, Agnès; Manceau, Jacqueline; Houée, Paméla; Delmas, Jean-Michel; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Laurentie, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic properties, high stability, and prevalence, the presence of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the food chain is a major threat to food safety and therefore a health risk for both humans and animals. In this study, experiments were carried out with sows and female rats to examine the kinetics of DON after intravenous and oral administration at 100 µg/kg of body weight. After intravenous administration of DON in pigs, a two-compartment model with rapid initial distribution (0.030 ± 0.019 h) followed by a slower terminal elimination phase (1.53 ± 0.54 h) was fitted to the concentration profile of DON in pig plasma. In rats, a short elimination half-life (0.46 h) and a clearance of 2.59 L/h/kg were estimated by sparse sampling non-compartmental analysis. Following oral exposure, DON was rapidly absorbed and reached maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax) of 42.07 ± 8.48 and 10.44 ± 5.87 µg/L plasma after (t(max)) 1.44 ± 0.52 and 0.17 h in pigs and rats, respectively. The mean bioavailability of DON was 70.5% ± 25.6% for pigs and 47.3% for rats. In the framework of DON risk assessment, these two animal models could be useful in an exposure scenario in two different ways because of their different bioavailability.

  15. Infant oral health and oral habits.

    PubMed

    Nowak, A J; Warren, J J

    2000-10-01

    Many oral diseases and conditions, including dental caries (cavities) and malocclusions, have their origins early in life. Prudent anticipatory guidance by the medical and dental professions can help prevent many of the more common oral health problems. This article provides information on the rationale for early dental examination and instructions for pediatric and family practitioners in scheduling and conducting an early oral intervention appointment. In addition, feeding practices, non-nutritive sucking, mouth breathing, and bruxing are discussed, including their effects on orofacial growth and development.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of orpanoxin administered orally and topically to rodents.

    PubMed

    Brooks, R R; Bonk, K R; Decker, G E; Miller, K E

    1985-07-01

    Orpanoxin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) lacking gastric ulcerogenic effects in the therapeutic dose range in rats, was compared with six reference NSAIDs for oral activity in the rat paw carrageenin-induced edema assay. Tested NSAIDs were ranked on the basis of oral mg/kg ED50 values: piroxicam, 0.55; orpanoxin, 35.6; diflunisal, 59.6; benoxaprofen, greater than 300; tolmetin sodium, greater than 300; and sulindac, greater than 300. Zomepirac sodium was inactive. Only the three most potent compounds produced greater than 60% inhibition of edema. Inhibition was generally greater at 4 h than at 6 h post carrageenin for all compounds. Oral activity of orpanoxin was also demonstrated in the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model (ED50 = 24.2 mg/kg p.o. when given 1 h before irradiation) and in the mouse ear croton oil induced edema test (ED50 value = 131 mg/kg p.o.). Topical activity of orpanoxin was assessed in both the guinea-pig and mouse models. In the guinea-pig u.v.-induced erythema model, application (1 h after u.v.) of 1, 5, and 10% (w/v) orpanoxin creams (containing 10% urea) significantly inhibited erythema at 2, 3, and 4 h post-irradiation. Orpanoxin, mefenamic acid, and indomethacin as 1% creams inhibited total erythema scores 70, 92 and 74%, respectively. Evidence for topical activity in the mouse ear assay was also obtained for orpanoxin in diethyl ether or 10% urea cream, but not in dimethylsulfoxide. It was concluded that orpanoxin has anti-inflammatory activity comparable to reference NSAIDs in the rat paw edema test, is active orally in rat, mouse, and guinea-pig models, and shows topical activity in the guinea-pig and the mouse.

  17. Persuading Others to Avoid Persuasion: Inoculation Theory and Resistant Health Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Compton, Josh; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A

    2016-01-01

    Inoculation theory, a theory of conferring resistance to persuasive influence, has established efficacy as a messaging strategy in the health domain. In fact, the earliest research on the theory in the 1960s involved health issues to build empirical support for tenets in the inoculation framework. Over the ensuing decades, scholars have further examined the effectiveness of inoculation-based messages at creating robust positive health attitudes. We overview these efforts, highlight the structure of typical inoculation-based health messages, and describe the similarities and differences between this method of counter-persuasion and other preparatory techniques commonly employed by health researchers and practitioners. Finally, we consider contexts in which inoculation-oriented health messages could be most useful, and describe how the health domain could offer a useful scaffold to study conceptual issues of the theory. PMID:26903925

  18. Changing the needle when inoculating blood cultures. A no-benefit and high-risk procedure.

    PubMed

    Leisure, M K; Moore, D M; Schwartzman, J D; Hayden, G F; Donowitz, L G

    Although the Centers for Disease Control recommends that needles should never be recapped, many phlebotomists routinely recap and change needles before blood culture inoculation. This study compared the extrinsic contamination rate in blood cultures when the needle was and was not changed. One hundred eight medical students obtained 182 blood specimens from each other by means of standard methods. Each specimen was inoculated into two culture bottles. The first bottle was inoculated with the needle used for phlebotomy, and the second was inoculated after needle change. Four (2.2%) of 182 bottles were contaminated when the needle was not changed, compared with one (0.6%) when the needle was changed. This small difference was not statistically significant, and the likelihood of having failed to detect a 5% difference in contamination rate was small. The risk of needle-stick injury incurred by changing the needle before inoculation of blood culture bottles seems to be unjustified. PMID:2170700

  19. Distribution of viral antigens and development of lesions in chicken embryos inoculated with nipah virus.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, N; Imada, T; Kashiwazaki, Y; Sharifah, S H

    2006-01-01

    An isolate of Nipah virus was injected into fertile eggs via the allantoic cavity or yolk sac. Allantoic inoculation resulted in considerable pathological variation and only partial mortality. Dead embryos showed severe necrosis in the brain and congestion in the kidney and the subcutis of limbs. In contrast, yolk sac inoculation led to uniform infection and mortality, the dead embryos exhibiting the same lesions as those described above but without the subcutaneous congestion. Histological lesions in dead embryos inoculated by either route were similar and particularly severe in the central nervous system. Viral antigens were detected mainly in the vasculature and neurons. The results indicated that Nipah virus is highly pathogenic to chicken embryos, and that the route of inoculation is an important determinant of the course of disease. The findings also suggested that yolk sac inoculation can be used for viral titration, and that the chicken embryo represents a useful model for studying the vascular and neuronal tropisms of Nipah virus.

  20. Persuading Others to Avoid Persuasion: Inoculation Theory and Resistant Health Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Josh; Jackson, Ben; Dimmock, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Inoculation theory, a theory of conferring resistance to persuasive influence, has established efficacy as a messaging strategy in the health domain. In fact, the earliest research on the theory in the 1960s involved health issues to build empirical support for tenets in the inoculation framework. Over the ensuing decades, scholars have further examined the effectiveness of inoculation-based messages at creating robust positive health attitudes. We overview these efforts, highlight the structure of typical inoculation-based health messages, and describe the similarities and differences between this method of counter-persuasion and other preparatory techniques commonly employed by health researchers and practitioners. Finally, we consider contexts in which inoculation-oriented health messages could be most useful, and describe how the health domain could offer a useful scaffold to study conceptual issues of the theory. PMID:26903925

  1. Differential expression of immune genes of adult honey bee (Apis mellifera) after inoculated by Nosema ceranae.

    PubMed

    Chaimanee, Veeranan; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Chen, Yanping; Evans, Jay D; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2012-08-01

    Nosema ceranae is a microsporidium parasite infecting adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) and is known to affects at both the individual and colony level. In this study, the expression levels were measured for four antimicrobial peptide encoding genes that are associated with bee humoral immunity (defensin, abaecin, apidaecin, and hymenoptaecin), eater gene which is a transmembrane protein involved cellular immunity and gene encoding female-specific protein (vitellogenin) in honey bees when inoculated by N. ceranae. The results showed that four of these genes, defensin, abaecin, apidaecin and hymenoptaecin were significantly down-regulated 3 and 6days after inoculations. Additionally, antimicrobial peptide expressions did not significantly differ between control and inoculated bees after 12days post inoculation. Moreover, our results revealed that the mRNA levels of eater and vitellogenin did not differ significantly following N. ceranae inoculation. Therefore, in this study we reaffirmed that N. ceranae infection induces host immunosuppression.

  2. Co-inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 improves nodulation in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Camacho, M; Santamaría, C; Temprano, F; Rodriguez-Navarro, D N; Daza, A

    2001-11-01

    The strain Bacillus sp. CECT 450 increased nodulation on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) when co-inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899. This positive effect occured under controlled conditions on perlite-vermiculite, sand, or in a mixture of soil and sand. This increase was also observed in a field assay. Nodulation kinetic studies suggested that the synergistic effect is pronounced during the latter stages of cultivation. In contrast, the same bacteria co-inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 reduced nodulation on soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Inoculation with Bacillus sp. CECT 450 alone had no effect on bean plants, but reduced root growth in soybean. The survival of Bacillus sp. CECT 450 on inoculated seeds was high, even when inoculated seeds were maintained for several months at room temperature. PMID:11766056

  3. Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs: an overview.

    PubMed

    Laha, R

    2015-12-01

    Sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs is caused by Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. It is the most common mange infestation of pigs. The parasite is distributed worldwide. Pig owners are generally concerned about the internal parasitic infections and ignored the external parasitic infestations. But the external parasitic infestation with S. scabiei var. suis has economic significance as it causes morbidity, mortality, decreased fertility and feed conversion ratio in pigs. Keeping in view of importance of S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, this communication discussed about the present and past research works done on S. scabies var. suis infestation in pigs, particularly its prevalence, life cycle, pathological lesions, clinical symptoms, haematobiochemical changes, diagnosis, treatment and control, to have an idea about this infestation at a glance. It has been concluded that the research work done on sarcoptic mange infestation in pigs in India is less in comparison to other countries. It may be due to its consideration as a neglected parasite or due to it's under report. Organization of awareness programs for the farmers by extension personalities or other authorities might be able to save the farmers from economic losses due to this infestation. PMID:26688620

  4. Continuous odour measurement from fattening pig units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, Anne-Claude; Nicolas, Jacques; Cobut, Pierre; Delva, Julien; Nicks, Baudouin; Philippe, François-Xavier

    2013-10-01

    A study in experimental slatted-system fattening pig units was conducted with the aim of estimating the odour emission factor (in ou s.pig-1), which can subsequently be used in dispersion models to assess the odour annoyance zone. Dynamic olfactometry measurements carried out at different development stages of pigs showed a logical trend of the mean assessed odour emission factor with the pig mass. However, the variation within the same mass class was much larger than variation between classes. Possible causes of such variation were identified as the evolution of ventilation rate during the day and the circadian rhythm of pig. To be able to monitor continuously the daily variation of the odour, an electronic nose was used with suitable regression model calibrated against olfactometric measurements. After appropriate validation check, the electronic nose proved to be convenient, as a complementary tool to dynamic olfactometry, to record the daily variation of the odour emission factor in the pig barn. It was demonstrated that, in the controlled conditions of the experimental pens, the daily variation of the odour emission rate could be mainly attributed to the sole influence of the circadian rhythm of pig. As a consequence, determining a representative odour emission factor in a real case cannot be based on a snapshot odour sampling.

  5. A new model of corneal transplantation in the miniature pig: efficacy of immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Tavandzi, Urania; Procházka, Radek; Usvald, Dusan; Hlucílová, Jana; Vitásková, Martina; Motlík, Jan; Vítová, Andrea; Filipec, Martin; Forrester, John V; Holán, Vladimír

    2007-05-27

    Corneal allograft rejection is frequently studied in small rodent or rabbit models. To study mechanisms of rejection in a model that more closely mimics transplantation in humans, we performed orthotopic corneal transplantation in the miniature pig using a 7-mm diameter donor graft. Four groups of recipients were studied: 1) untreated naive, 2) untreated vascularized (high risk), 3) high-risk grafts treated by topical application of prednisolone, or 4) high-risk grafts treated with a combined systemic immunosuppression regime of oral prednisone, cyclosporine A, and mycophenolate mofetil. Both the clinical features and histological assessment of corneal graft rejection showed close similarities to graft rejection in humans. Interestingly, preliminary results indicated that topical steroid treatment was superior to systemic immunosuppression in significantly promoting graft survival. Thus, corneal transplantation in the pig represents an animal model most closely resembling corneal grafting in humans, and offers possibilities for testing various clinically applicable immunosuppressive treatments.

  6. A comparative study of sheep and pigs given the tremorgenic mycotoxins verruculogen and penitrem A.

    PubMed

    Peterson, D W; Penny, R H; Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-09-01

    The moulds Penicillium simplicissimum and P crustosum and the tremorgenic mycotoxins, verruculogen and penitrem A, isolated from them, were given to sheep and pigs to compare their potencies. Pigs were generally less susceptible and in both species penitrem A was less potent than verruculogen. Five-month-old lambs seemed more susceptible to mycelium containing verruculogen than were 15-month-old sheep given a similar oral dose relative to bodyweight. Repeated daily dosing of lambs and sheep for five days with P simplicissimum failed to enhance the effect, indicating that verruculogen toxicity was not cumulative. Long and short acting barbiturate anaesthesia blocked the effects of lethal doses of tremorgens. Sedation with diazepam diminished, but did not block, mycotoxin-induced tremors suggesting that there was no specific action of this anticonvulsant sedative on tremorgens. PMID:7146626

  7. [Breeding and management of mycobacteria-free guinea pigs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kazda, J

    1976-08-01

    A number of mycobacterial species are detectable under conventional holding condition of guinea pigs. These mycobacteria originating in drinking water and litter caused cross reactions in the Jones-Mote hypersensitivity test. Using suitable precautions it was possible to breed and hold the animals mycobacteria-free. The precautions depend mainly in alteration of the wire mesh floor in cages to avoide the contact of the animals with the litter, in cleaning and desinfection of water bottles, in using of heated water and food and in the prevention of mycobacterial contamination from the staff. The control examination on mycobacteria without treating is given in details. Cases are refered in which a oral rece ption of mycobacteria can alter the immune response. The modification of guinea pigs management to the mycobacteria-free ones is possible in a short time and with minimal cost.

  8. Pigging ends freezeups in caustic piping system

    SciTech Connect

    Gros, R.; Gaines, A.

    1985-03-01

    Convent Chemical Corporation in Convent, LA produces and ships bulk quantities of chlorine and caustic soda (NaOH). The caustic soda is available in various grades, including a 50% aqueous solution that freezes at 56/sup 0/F. An extensive network of chemical-resistant polypropylene-lined steel pipe (without heat tracing) is used to transfer the caustic soda from the production area to storage tanks and to the loading facilities for tank trucks, rail tank cars and barges. A sudden drop in ambient temperature can cause freezeup of the caustic transfer pipes which may result in downtime of as much as a week. Convent plant engineers designed a pigging system for the outdoor caustic transfer lines in the tank farm and to the loading stations. The patented design pig, (internal pipeline cleaner) consists of a flexible, bullet-shaped cylinder of chemical-resistant polyurethane foam with strips of urethane rubber on the surface, or with a solid coating of the tough material. Fluid or gas pressure on the sealed concave base propels the flexible pig through the pipe, valves, elbows, and other fittings, and material ahead of the pig is discharged into an appropriate receiver. The pigging system has eliminated the caustic freezing and plugging problems since it was installed in the summer of 1981. The flexible pig, propelled by 80 psi air, is used to clear the pipelines whenever caustic is transferred during the winter months. The air-propelled pig is designed and sized to easily pass through restrictions in the piping system, such as reduced port plug valves, but was once stuck when it reached a section of pipe that had collapsed. A pig containing the Cobalt 60 nuclear element was inserted into the line to quickly locate the stuck pig with the Geiger counter. The faulty section of pipe was replaced with a new polypropylene lined spool piece.

  9. Pigs experimentally infected with Serpulina hyodysenteriae can be protected from developing swine dysentery by feeding them a highly digestible diet.

    PubMed Central

    Siba, P. M.; Pethick, D. W.; Hampson, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    Weaner pigs (n = 72) were fed 1 of 4 diets. These were based on either cooked rice and animal protein, cooked rice and lupin, wheat and lupin, or wheat and animal protein. Twenty-six of the pigs were slaughtered after 1 month. Those fed the highly digestible cooked rice and animal protein diet had drier colonic contents and faeces, lighter large intestines, and the contents of their large intestines had increased pH values and decreased total VFA concentrations. The other 46 were orally challenged with broth cultures of Serpulina hyodysenteriae, and were monitored for faecal excretion of the spirochaetes, and for the development of swine dysentery (SD). None of 18 pigs fed the cooked rice and animal protein diet developed colonic changes or disease, whereas most pigs on the other diets developed mucohaemorrhagic colitis and dysentery. The reduced fermentation that occurred in the large intestines of pigs fed cooked rice and animal protein was associated with a subsequent failure of colonization by S. hyodysenteriae, and resultant protection against SD. PMID:8620913

  10. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer.

  11. Nuclear transfer and transgenesis in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wuensch, Annegret; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Wolf, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using genetically modified donor cells facilitates the generation of tailored pig models for biomedical research and for xenotransplantation. Up to now, SCNT is the main way to generate gene-targeted pigs, since germ line-competent pluripotent stem cells are not available for this species. In this chapter, we introduce our routine workflow for the production of genetically engineered pigs, especially focused on the genetic modification of somatic donor cells, SCNT using in vitro matured oocytes, and laparoscopic embryo transfer. PMID:25287337

  12. Effect of terramycin in balantidiosis of pigs.

    PubMed

    Mwamba, T; Pandey, V S

    1977-01-01

    In an industrial pig farm in Lubumashi, Zaïre, Balantidium coli produced severe clinical and fatal disease. Terramycin at a dose rate of 15 mg/kg body weight administered twice daily with concentrates gave clinical recovery in all the pigs treated. The complete parasitological recovery was obtained in 14 out of 20 animals. In the remaining 6 there was significant reduction in the number of B. coli. Keeping in view the large spectrum of activity of terramycin in various infections as well as B. coli, terramycin can be useful in the treatment of balantidiosis of pigs. PMID:596795

  13. Immune responses of recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus and porcine interferon alpha in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Dai, Jianjun; Li, Yufeng; Li, Congzhi; Qi, Jing; Duan, Shuyi; Jiang, Ping

    2008-08-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. In this study, we constructed and characterized the immune responses and vaccine efficacy conferred by the recombinant adenovirus co-expressing VP1 of FMDV and porcine interferon alpha as fusion protein (rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1). Six groups of female BALB/c mice each with 18 were inoculated subcutaneously twice 2-week intervals with the recombinant adenoviruses. The results showed that the levels of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the group inoculated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 were significantly higher than those in the group inoculated with rAd-VP1+rAd-pIFNalpha (P<0.05). Then four groups of guinea pigs each with six were inoculated two times at 2-week intervals intramuscularly with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1, commercial inactivated FMD vaccine, wild-type adenovirus (wtAd) or PBS, and the protective efficacy of rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was determined. The results indicated that all the guinea pigs vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 as well as inactivated FMD vaccine were protected from FMDV challenge, even though the levels of neutralizing antibodies (1:32-1:40) of the animals vaccinated with rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 was lower than that in the group inoculated with inactivated FMD vaccine (1:64-1:128). It demonstrated that the newly recombinant adenovirus rAd-pIFNalpha-VP1 might further be an attractive candidate vaccine for preventing FMDV infection in swine. PMID:18511133

  14. Metabolism of the masked mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nagl, Veronika; Woechtl, Bettina; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi Elisabeth; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Moll, Wulf-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Berthiller, Franz

    2014-08-17

    Plants can metabolize the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) by forming the masked mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside (D3G). D3G might be cleaved during digestion, thus increasing the total DON burden of an individual. Due to a lack of in vivo data, D3G has not been included in the various regulatory limits established for DON so far. The aim of our study was to contribute to the risk assessment of D3G by determination of its metabolism in pigs. Four piglets received water, D3G (116 μg/kg b.w.) and the equimolar amount of DON (75 μg/kg b.w.) by gavage on day 1, 5 and 9 of the experiment, respectively. Additionally, 15.5 μg D3G/kg b.w. were administered intravenously on day 13. Urine and feces were collected for 24 h and analyzed for DON, D3G, deoxynivalenol-3-glucuronide (DON-3-GlcA), deoxynivalenol-15-GlcA (DON-15-GlcA) and deepoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) by UHPLC-MS/MS. After oral application of DON and D3G, in total 84.8±9.7% and 40.3±8.5% of the given dose were detected in urine, respectively. The majority of orally administered D3G was excreted in form of DON, DON-15-GlcA, DOM-1 and DON-3-GlcA, while urinary D3G accounted for only 2.6±1.4%. In feces, just trace amounts of metabolites were found. Intravenously administered D3G was almost exclusively excreted in unmetabolized form via urine. Data indicate that D3G is nearly completely hydrolyzed in the intestinal tract of pigs, while the toxin seems to be rather stable after systemic absorption. Compared to DON, the oral bioavailability of D3G and its metabolites seems to be reduced by a factor of up to 2, approximately.

  15. Comparison of market hog characteristics of pigs selected by feeder pig frame size or current USDA feeder pig grade standards.

    PubMed

    Siemens, A L; Lipsey, R J; Hedrick, H B; Williams, F L; Yokley, S W; Siemens, M G

    1990-08-01

    Two feeder pig grading systems were tested. Forty-five barrows were selected using current USDA Feeder Pig Grade Standards (U.S. No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3). Additionally, 45 barrows were selected using three frame sizes (large, medium and small). Pigs were slaughtered at 100, 113.5 of 127 kg live weight. Trimmed four lean cuts were separated into soft tissue, skin and bone. The skinless belly and soft tissue from the four lean cuts were ground separately and analyzed chemically. Data from each grading system were analyzed separately in a 3 X 3 factorial plan. Pigs selected using current USDA grade standards differed (P less than .05) for last rib backfat, 10th rib fat depth, longissimus muscle area, percentage of trimmed four lean cuts and USDA carcass grade. In the frame size system, pigs with large frame size had less last rib backfat, less 10th rib fat depth, longer carcasses, higher percentage of four lean cuts and superior USDA carcass grades than pigs with small frame size did (P less than .05). The Bradley and Schumann test of sensitivity showed that selection by frame size was more sensitive than current USDA grade standards for discriminating feeder pig foreleg length, body depth and ham width. In addition, selection by frame size was more sensitive than current USDA grade standards for discriminating carcass length and carcass radius length. No increase in sensitivity (P greater than .10) was noted for carcass composition or growth traits over the current USDA Feeder Pig Grade Standards.

  16. Safety of long-term dietary supplementation with L-arginine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengdi; Li, Xilong; Rezaei, Reza; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted with a swine model to determine the safety of long-term dietary supplementation with L-arginine-HCl or L-arginine free base. Beginning at 30 days of age, pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet (31.5 g/kg body weight/day) supplemented with 0, 1.21, 1.81 or 2.42 % L-arginine-HCl (Experiment 1) or with 0, 1, 1.5 or 2 % L-arginine (Experiment 2). The supplemental doses of 0, 1, 1.5, and 2 % L-arginine provided pigs with 0, 315, 473, and 630 mg L-arginine/kg body weight/day, respectively, which were equivalent to 0, 286, 430, and 573 mg L-arginine/kg body weight/day, respectively, in humans. At 121 days of age (91 days after initiation of supplementation), blood samples were obtained from the jugular vein of pigs at 1 and 4 h after feeding for hematological and clinical chemistry tests. Dietary supplementation with L-arginine increased plasma concentrations of arginine, ornithine, proline, albumin and reticulocytes, while reducing plasma concentrations of ammonia, free fatty acids, triglyceride, cholesterol, and neutrophils. L-Arginine supplementation enhanced protein gain and reduced white-fat deposition in the body. Other variables in standard hematology and clinical chemistry tests, serum concentrations of insulin, growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I did not differ among all the groups of pigs. These results indicate that dietary supplementation with L-arginine (up to 630 mg/kg body weight/day) is safe in pigs for at least 91 days. Our findings help guide clinical studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of L-arginine to humans.

  17. In vivo formation of nitrosocarbamates in the stomach of rats and guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Rickard, R.W.; Dorough, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    The N-nitrosocarbamates are potent mutagens and carcinogens and have been synthesized under acid conditions that prevail in the human stomach. However, it has never been documented that nitrosocarbamates are actually formed in vivo in the stomach of any mammalian species. Using /sup 14/C-labeled carbaryl and carbofuran, attempts were made to isolate the nitroso derivatives from the stomach contents of rats and guinea pigs treated orally with the carbamate and sodium nitrite. Only trace quantities of nitrocarbamate were recovered from the rat stomach, whereas 0.5 to 2.0% of the carbamate doses were isolated as the nitroso derivative from the contents of the guinea pig stomach. The rather low apparent yields resulted in part from the instability of the nitrosocarbamates and from absorption of the carbamate and/or nitrosocarbamate from the stomach. Higher rates of synthesis were indicated by incubating the carbamates with sodium nitrite in the presence of the stomach contents at 37/sup 0/C for 15 min. About 30% nitrosation occurred with the guinea pig and about 0.5% with the rat. The difference was attributed to the pH of the gastric contents. For the rat, the pH ranged from 3 to 5; gastric contents of the guinea pig had a pH between 1 and 2. Since the pH of the human stomach is also in the pH 1-2 range, it is likely that nitrosation of carbamates in humans would be very similar to that in the guinea pig. 21 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Experimental bovine genital ureaplasmosis. II. Granular vulvitis, endometritis and salpingitis following uterine inoculation.

    PubMed

    Doig, P A; Ruhnke, H L; Palmer, N C

    1980-07-01

    Twenty-three virgin Holstein heifers received uterine inoculations with ureaplasma and were necropsied one to thirteen days later. Three heifers inoculated intracervically were necropsied on days 3, 5 and 11.Granular vulvitis was produced on average by 3.6 days in fourteen of sixteen uterine inoculated heifers monitored for four or more days. Two cervically inoculated heifers monitored for over four days also developed granular vulvitis by the fourth day. At necropsy, ureaplasma was recovered from 94% of uterine horn cultures for the first four days postinoculation and 50% during days 5 to 7. Thereafter all uterine cultures were negative. The percentage of positive ureaplasma recoveries from uterine tube flushings was lower than for uterine horns but remained positive for a longer period. By day 7, three of four uterine tube flushings were still positive. No bacterial pathogens were isolated from the uterine horns or uterine tube flushings. On histopathology 50% of uterine inoculated heifers had endometritis up to six days postinoculation and a slightly higher percentage (58%) had salpingitis. Endometritis was not found in any heifers after day 6. Residual salpingitis was present in one heifer on day 7. Endometritis was present in cervically inoculated heifers necropsied on days 3 and 5 but not on day 11. Salpingitis was not found in any of the three cervically inoculated animals. The study concluded that some strains of ureaplasma are pathogenic for the upper reproductive tract of the cow and should be considered significant when isolated from cases of granular vulvitis, endometritis or salpingitis.

  19. [Queries related to the technology of soybean seed inoculation with Bradyrhizobium spp].

    PubMed

    Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of exploiting symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soybean crops are inoculated with selected strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens or Bradyrhizobium elkanii (collectively referred to as Bradyrhizobium spp.). The most common method of inoculation used is seed inoculation, whether performed immediately before sowing or using preinoculated seeds or pretreated seeds by the professional seed treatment. The methodology of inoculation should not only cover the seeds with living rhizobia, but must also optimize the chances of these rhizobia to infect the roots and nodulate. To this end, inoculated rhizobia must be in such an amount and condition that would allow them to overcome the competition exerted by the rhizobia of the allochthonous population of the soil, which are usually less effective for nitrogen fixation and thus dilute the effect of inoculation on yield. This optimization requires solving some queries related to the current knowledge of seed inoculation, which are addressed in this article. I conclude that the aspects that require further research are the adhesion and survival of rhizobia on seeds, the release of rhizobia once the seeds are deposited in the soil, and the movement of rhizobia from the vicinity of the seeds to the infection sites in the roots. PMID:26364183

  20. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231