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Sample records for pigs orally inoculated

  1. Comparison of sesion severity, distribution, and colonic mucin expression in pigs with acute swine dysentery following oral inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" or Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Wilberts, B L; Arruda, P H; Kinyon, J M; Madson, D M; Frana, T S; Burrough, E R

    2014-11-01

    Swine dysentery is classically associated with infection by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the only current officially recognized Brachyspira sp. that consistently imparts strong beta-hemolysis on blood agar. Recently, several strongly beta-hemolytic Brachyspira have been isolated from swine with clinical dysentery that are not identified as B. hyodysenteriae by PCR including the recently proposed species "Brachyspira hampsonii." In this study, 6-week-old pigs were inoculated with either a clinical isolate of "B. hampsonii" (EB107; n = 10) clade II or a classic strain of B. hyodysenteriae (B204; n = 10) to compare gross and microscopic lesions and alterations in colonic mucin expression in pigs with clinical disease versus controls (n = 6). Gross lesions were similar between infected groups. No histologic difference was observed between infected groups with regard to neutrophilic inflammation, colonic crypt depth, mucosal ulceration, or hemorrhage. Histochemical and immunohistochemical evaluation of the apex of the spiral colon revealed decreased expression of sulphated mucins, decreased expression of MUC4, and increased expression of MUC5AC in diseased pigs compared to controls. No difference was observed between diseased pigs in inoculated groups. This study reveals significant alterations in colonic mucin expression in pigs with acute swine dysentery and further reveals that these and other microscopic changes are similar following infection with "B. hampsonii" clade II or B. hyodysenteriae.

  2. Postmortem Photonic Imaging of Lux-Modified Salmonella Typhimuium Within the Gastrointestinal Tract of Swine Following Oral Inoculation In Vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract after oral inoculation. Pigs (~80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1 x 1010 cfu of Salmonella Typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lux for a 6-h (n = 6) or 12-h...

  3. Postmortem photonic imaging of lux-modified Salmonella typhimurium within the gastrointestinal tract of swine following oral inoculation in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract following oral inoculation. Pigs (~ 80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1×10*10 colony forming units (cfu) of Salmonella typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lu...

  4. Dynamics of African swine fever virus shedding and excretion in domestic pigs infected by intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Reis, Ana Luisa; Netherton, Christopher L; Goatley, Lynnette; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2014-09-26

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly virulent swine pathogen that has spread across Eastern Europe since 2007 and for which there is no effective vaccine or treatment available. The dynamics of shedding and excretion is not well known for this currently circulating ASFV strain. Therefore, susceptible pigs were exposed to pigs intramuscularly infected with the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain to measure those dynamics through within- and between-pen transmission scenarios. Blood, oral, nasal and rectal fluid samples were tested for the presence of ASFV by virus titration (VT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum was tested for the presence of ASFV-specific antibodies. Both intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission resulted in development of acute disease in all pigs although the experiments indicated that the pathogenesis of the disease might be different, depending on the route of infection. Infectious ASFV was first isolated in blood among the inoculated pigs by day 3, and then chronologically among the direct and indirect contact pigs, by day 10 and 13, respectively. Close to the onset of clinical signs, higher ASFV titres were found in blood compared with nasal and rectal fluid samples among all pigs. No infectious ASFV was isolated in oral fluid samples although ASFV genome copies were detected. Only one animal developed antibodies starting after 12 days post-inoculation. The results provide quantitative data on shedding and excretion of the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain among domestic pigs and suggest a limited potential of this isolate to cause persistent infection.

  5. Tissue localization, shedding, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs.

    PubMed

    Niederwerder, Megan C; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Bai, Jianfa; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Breazeale, Barbara; Anderson, Joe; Kerrigan, Maureen A; An, Baoyan; Oberst, Richard D; Crawford, Kimberly; Lager, Kelly M; Madson, Darin M; Rowland, Raymond R R; Anderson, Gary A; Hesse, Richard A

    2016-11-01

    We determined tissue localization, shedding patterns, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs. Thirty-three pigs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups for the 42-day study: inoculated (group A; n = 23), contact transmission (group B; n = 5), and aerosol transmission (group C; n = 5). Contact transmission occurred rapidly to group B pigs whereas productive aerosol transmission failed to occur to group C pigs. Emesis was the first clinical sign noted at 3 days postinoculation (dpi) followed by mild to moderate diarrhea lasting 5 more days. Real-time PCR detected PEDV in fecal and nasal swabs, oral fluids, serum, and gastrointestinal and lymphoid tissues. Shedding occurred primarily during the first 2 weeks postinoculation, peaking at 5-6 dpi; however, some pigs had PEDV nucleic acid detected in swabs collected at 21 and 28 dpi. Antibody titers were measurable between 14 and 42 dpi. Although feces and intestines collected at 42 dpi were PEDV negative by PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, small intestines from 70% of group A pigs were PCR positive. Although disease was relatively mild and transient in this age group, the results demonstrate that 4-week-old pigs are productively infected and can sustain virus replication for several weeks. Long-term shedding of PEDV in subclinically affected pigs should be considered an important source for PEDV transmission.

  6. Anthelmintic effects of phytogenic feed additives in Ascaris suum inoculated pigs.

    PubMed

    van Krimpen, M M; Binnendijk, G P; Borgsteede, F H M; Gaasenbeek, C P H

    2010-03-25

    Two experiments were performed to determine the anthelmintic effect of some phytogenic feed additives on a mild infection of Ascaris suum in growing and finishing pigs. Usually, an infection of A. suum is controlled by using conventional synthetic drugs. Organic farmers, however, prefer a non-pharmaceutical approach to worm control. Therefore, phytotherapy could be an appropriate alternative. In the first experiment, a commercial available organic starter diet was supplemented with 3% of a herb mixture, adding 1% Thymus vulgaris, 1% Melissa officinalis and 1% Echinacea purpurea to the diet, or with 4% of a herb mixture, thereby adding the mentioned herbs plus 1% Camellia sinensis (black tea). A negative control group (no treatment) and a positive control group (treatment with conventional synthetic drug flubendazole) were included. In the second experiment, the anthelmintic properties against A. suum of three individual herbs, Carica papaya, Peumus boldus and Artemisia vulgaris, each in a dose of 1%, were tested. Pigs were infected with 1000 infective worm eggs each. Each experiment was performed with 32 individually housed growing pigs (8 replicates/treatment), which were monitored for 67 days. It was hypothesized that the herbs would block the cycles of the larvae, thereby preventing the development of adult worms. Therefore, phytogenic feed additives were not supplied during the whole experimental period, but only from the start until D39. Pigs were inoculated with infective worm eggs during five consecutive days (D17-D21). At D67 all pigs were dissected, whereafter livers were checked for the presence of white spots. Also numbers of worms in the small intestine were counted. In experiment 1, the numbers of worm-infected pigs were similar for both the herb supplemented (groups 3 and 4) and the unsupplemented (group 1) treatments (5-6 pigs of 8), while the treatment with flubendazole (group 2) resulted in 0 infected pigs. In experiment 2, herb addition (groups 2

  7. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  12. Pathogenesis of highly virulent African swine fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Howey, Erin B; O'Donnell, Vivian; de Carvalho Ferreira, Helena C; Borca, Manuel V; Arzt, Jonathan

    2013-12-26

    To investigate the pathogenesis of African swine fever virus (ASFV), domestic pigs (n=18) were challenged with a range (10(2)-10(6) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50)) of the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain by inoculation via the intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), or intramuscular (IM) routes. A subsequent contact challenge experiment was performed in which six IOP-inoculated donor pigs were allowed to have direct contact (DC) with six naïve pigs for exposure times that varied from 24 to 72 h. All challenge routes resulted in clinical progression and postmortem lesions similar to those previously described in experimental and natural infection. The onset of clinical signs occurred between 1 and 7 days post inoculation (dpi) and included pyrexia with variable progression to obtundation, hematochezia, melena, moribundity and death with a duration of 4-11 days. Viremia was first detected between 4 and 5 dpi in all inoculation groups whereas ASFV shedding from the nasal cavity and tonsil was first detected at 3-9 dpi. IM and DC were the most consistent modes of infection, with 12/12 (100%) of pigs challenged by these routes becoming infected. Several clinical and virological parameters were significantly different between IM and DC groups indicating dissimilarity between these modes of infection. Amongst the simulated natural routes, INP inoculation resulted in the most consistent progression of disease across the widest range of doses whilst preserving simulation of natural exposure and therefore may provide a superior system for pathogenesis and vaccine efficacy investigation.

  13. Simultaneous porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae co-inoculation does not potentiate disease in conventional pigs.

    PubMed

    Sibila, M; Fort, M; Nofrarías, M; Pérez de Rozas, A; Galindo-Cardiel, I; Mateu, E; Segalés, J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of simultaneous experimental inoculation of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2; intranasal delivery) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhyo; transtracheal delivery) into conventional, seropositive 6-week-old piglets. Thirty-six male piglets were assigned randomly to four groups: control (n=6), PCV2 (n=6), Mhyo (n=12) and PCV2+Mhyo (n=12). Blood samples and faecal and nasal swabs were collected at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days post inoculation (dpi). No significant clinical signs attributable to PCV2 infection were observed during the experiment. Coughing was recorded in three pigs from the Mhyo group and six from the PCV2+Mhyo group. No significant differences in mean body weight and rectal temperature were observed between the groups. Mild microscopical lesions similar to those reported for post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome were observed in two PCV2 pigs and in one PCV2+Mhyo animal. Mhyo-compatible lung lesions were observed in 21/24 pigs inoculated with Mhyo (10 from the Mhyo group and 11 from the PCV2+Mhyo group). PCV2 was detected by in-situ hybridization in 3/12 PCV2 and in 4/12 PCV2+Mhyo animals. No significant differences in PCV2 load (serum and nasal and faecal swabs), duration of viraemia or antibody titre were detected between PCV2-inoculated groups. No significant differences in Mhyo load in nasal swabs, percentage of Mhyo-seropositive pigs and mean lung score was detected between Mhyo-inoculated groups. Under the conditions of the present study, concurrent inoculation of PCV2 and Mhyo did not result in potentiation of clinical signs and lesions attributed to either infection.

  14. Evolution of infection in mice inoculated by the oral route with different developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi I and II.

    PubMed

    Dias, Greicy Brisa Malaquias; Gruendling, Ana Paula; Araújo, Silvana Marques; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2013-11-01

    Oral infection has become the most important transmission mechanism of Chagas disease in Brazil. For this study, the development of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice, induced by the oral and intraperitoneal (IP) routes, was compared. Four groups of Swiss mice were used to evaluate the influence of parasite genetics, number of parasites, inoculation volume and developmental stages on the development of the orally induced infection: 1 - blood trypomastigotes (BT) via oral; 2 - BT via IP; 3 - culture metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT) via oral; and 4 - culture MT via IP. Animals inoculated orally showed levels of parasitemia, as well as infectivity and mortality rates, lower than animals inoculated via IP, regardless of DTU (discrete typing unit) and inoculum. Animals infected with TcII showed higher levels of these parameters than did animals infected with TcI. The larger volume of inoculum showed a greater capacity to cause an infection when administered via the oral route. BT infection was more virulent than culture MT infection for both routes (oral and IP). However, mice inoculated orally with BT showed lower levels than via IP, while mice inoculated orally with culture MT showed similar levels of infection to those inoculated via IP. Mice inoculated with culture MT showed more histopathological changes than those inoculated with BT, regardless of the inoculation route. These results indicate that this alternative experimental model is useful for evaluating infection by T. cruzi isolates with subpatent parasitemia and low virulence, such as those belonging to the TcI and TcIV DTUs, which are prevalent in outbreaks of orally transmitted Chagas disease.

  15. Pathogenesis of infection with 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in isogenic guinea pigs after intranasal or intratracheal inoculation.

    PubMed

    Wiersma, Lidewij C M; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; van Amerongen, Geert; van Run, Peter; Nieuwkoop, Nella J; Ladwig, Mechtild; Banneke, Stefanie; Schaefer, Hubert; Kuiken, Thijs; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-03-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis and transmission of influenza virus, the ferret model is typically used. To investigate protective immune responses, the use of inbred mouse strains has proven invaluable. Here, we describe a study with isogenic guinea pigs, which would uniquely combine the advantages of the mouse and ferret models for influenza virus infection. Strain 2 isogenic guinea pigs were inoculated with H1N1pdm09 influenza virus A/Netherlands/602/09 by the intranasal or intratracheal route. Viral replication kinetics were assessed by determining virus titers in nasal swabs and respiratory tissues, which were also used to assess histopathologic changes and the number of infected cells. In all guinea pigs, virus titers peaked in nasal secretions at day 2 after inoculation. Intranasal inoculation resulted in higher virus excretion via the nose and higher virus titers in the nasal turbinates than intratracheal inoculation. After intranasal inoculation, infectious virus was recovered only from nasal epithelium; after intratracheal inoculation, it was recovered also from trachea, lung, and cerebrum. Histopathologic changes corresponded with virus antigen distribution, being largely limited to nasal epithelium for intranasally infected guinea pigs and more widespread in the respiratory tract for intratracheally infected guinea pigs. In summary, isogenic guinea pigs show promise as a model to investigate the role of humoral and cell-mediated immunities to influenza and their effect on virus transmission.

  16. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  17. Efficacy of oral vaccination against swine erysipelas in growing-finishing pigs in a clinically infected Slovakian pig herd.

    PubMed

    Friendship, C R; Bilkei, G

    2007-01-01

    In a large Slovakian growing-finishing pig production unit, the effects of oral vaccination against swine erysipelas (SE) were investigated in three groups of pigs of 10 weeks of age. In group 1, the pigs were vaccinated intramuscularly at 1 and 3 weeks after arrival in the growing-finishing barn using an Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacterin. Group 2 pigs were vaccinated at the same time as group 1 using an oral avirulent live SE vaccine administered through drinking water; the pigs in the third group were placebo treated. Clinical signs of acute SE, arthritic changes, average daily weight gain (ADG), feed conversion ratio, and mortality were evaluated. None of the pigs in groups 1 and 2 but 31.7% of the control animals (group 3) showed typical clinical signs of acute SE. More (P<0.01) non-vaccinated pigs had chronic arthritic changes compared with groups 1 and 2. No significant differences in mortality were recorded between the groups. Groups 1 and 2 had higher (P<0.05) ADG and lower feed conversion ratios compared with group 3 pigs. The results demonstrated that the oral avirulent live culture was efficacious in significantly reducing the clinical symptoms caused by E. rhusiopathiae infection, so enhancing the pigs' performance.

  18. Studies on the pathogenesis of pseudorabies in domestic cats following oral inoculation.

    PubMed Central

    Hagemoser, W A; Kluge, J P; Hill, H T

    1980-01-01

    Domestic cats were inoculated orally with an Iowa isolate of pseudorabies virus. Several cats were killed at intervals of one day and tissues were examined virologically and histologically to determine the initial sites of virus penetration and replication and to evaluate the pathways traveled by the virus from the mouth to the central nervous system. Lesions were consistent in the tonsils, along the pathways of the sensory branches of the ninth and tenth cranial nerves, the tractus and nucleus solitarius and the area postrema in the medulla. Less consistent lesions in the ganglia and nuclei of the fifth cranial nerve indicated a lesser role for the passage of virus via this nerve. Nervous lesions consisted of multifocal to diffuse microgliosis, mononuclear perivascular cuffing and a mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration with a variable number of neutrophils occasionally forming microabscesses. Virus isolations correlated well with microscopic lesions. Ultrastructurally, virions were observed within the nucleus of the neurons in the medulla. Clinical signs were similar to those previously reported. Pruritus was consistently absent. Virus was isolated consistently for the first two or three days postinoculation from oral and nasal secretions but not from secretions after three days. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6250684

  19. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gastrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP) on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed i...

  20. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gasrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP), on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed ...

  1. Chlamydial salpingitis in female guinea pigs receiving oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Barron, A L; Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; White, H J; Mrak, R E

    1988-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were given daily doses of a combination of oral contraceptive (OC) agents, consisting of mestranol and norethynodrel suspended in sesame oil or distilled H2O, and were infected in the genital tract with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Counts of chlamydial inclusions in cells of vaginal smears collected during infection, showed prolongation and enhancement of infection in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. Appearance of IgG and IgA antibodies to GPIC in genital secretions, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was also delayed in OC-treated animals as compared with controls. OC-treated infected animals were killed on days 15 and 43, and gross pathological evidence for ascending infection culminating in salpingitis was found in all of five and four of five animals, respectively. On the other hand, among untreated infected controls on each sacrifice day, only one of five animals had any evidence for ascending infection. Chlamydiae were detected by light and electron microscopy in fallopian tube tissue collected on day 15 following OC-treatment but not in tissue from control animals.

  2. The effect of feeding fermented liquid whey plus dextrose inoculated with specific lactic acid bacteria of pig origin to weanling pigs challenged with Escherichia coli O149:K91:F4.

    PubMed

    Amezcua, M D R; Friendship, R; Dewey, C; Weese, S; de Lange, C F M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of using fermented liquid whey inoculated with specific lactic acid bacteria of pig origin to reduce the severity and progression of postweaning enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea in weanling pigs challenged with E. coli O149:K91:F4. Based on two trials, it was determined that feeding inoculated fermented whey in a liquid diet did not affect growth performance or the severity or duration of postweaning diarrhea compared with a conventional dry feed containing an antibiotic. Because this study is one of very few examining the use of liquid feed and co-products inoculated with probiotics to control postweaning E. coli diarrhea, more studies are needed to confirm these results.

  3. Oral Salmonella challenge alters feed preference in newly weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common industry practice is to segregate sick pigs; however, the same diet is provided. Due to the higher nutrient demand of the activated immune system, we hypothesized pigs would choose diets differing in nutrient content during an immune challenge when given choices. This study examined pig feed ...

  4. An oral Aujeszky's disease vaccine (YS-400) induces neutralizing antibody in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Aujeszky's disease (AD) is an economically important disease affecting both wild and domestic pigs of the species Sus scrofa. A previous study yielded serological evidence of AD in Korean wild boars, which could spread AD to other animals. A new Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) bait vaccine is required to prevent AD outbreaks in swine. In the present study, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a gE-deleted marker vaccine, strain YS-400, in young domestic pigs. Materials and Methods The YS-400 strain was propagated in Vero cells, and the trial ADV bait vaccine (a vaccine blister in a matrix including an attractant) was prepared. Pigs were orally immunized with the vaccine (2 mL, 107.5 TCID50/mL) delivered using a syringe or in the bait vaccine. The animals were observed for 9 weeks after vaccination, and immunogenicity was assessed using a virus neutralization (VN) test and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results The YS-400 strain was non-pathogenic to pigs when given orally and induced high VN titers (1:32-1:128) 6 weeks post-administration. Of the pigs given the ADV bait vaccine twice or three times, 40% were seropositive by 2 weeks, and 100% were seropositive by 7 weeks after the first dose. Pigs that consumed the AD bait vaccine three times developed VN titers that were slightly higher than those of pigs given the vaccine twice. Conclusion Domestic pigs given the trial ADV bait vaccine exhibited no adverse effects and developed high VN titers against ADV, indicating that the YS-400 strain is safe and can prevent ADV infection in domestic pigs. PMID:27489803

  5. Relationship between Salmonella translocation patterns and immune responses in orally inoculated pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a pathogen of interest with broad implications ranging from animal health to food safety. Translocation patterns of Salmonella from the gastrointestinal tract to peripheral tissues have not been fully elucidated. Also, the mechanisms by which immunological responses influence transloca...

  6. A probiotic is ineffective in reducing Salmonela shedding in orally-inoculated weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella shedding proximal to harvest is a significant issue for the swine and meat industries. Probiotic supplementation prior to transport, lairage, and harvest has been suggested as a possible intervention to reduce Salmonella carcass contamination. In this study, a bolus dose of probiotic pr...

  7. Hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and infectious virus in gut-associated lymphoid tissue of mice after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Moser, C A; Dolfi, D V; Di Vietro, M L; Heaton, P A; Offit, P A; Clark, H F

    2001-04-01

    Oral inoculation of infants with a vaccine that contains simian-human reassortant rotaviruses has been found to be a rare cause of intussusception. Because intussusception can be associated with enlargement of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, we studied the capacity of simian-human and bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses to cause lymphoid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Peyer's patches (PP) of adult BALB/c mice. Neither hypertrophy nor hyperplasia was detected in PP after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses. However, infectious virus was detected in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes after oral inoculation with simian, but not bovine, reassortant rotaviruses. Implications of these findings on the pathogenesis of intussusception are discussed.

  8. Dose-response investigation of oral ketoprofen in pigs challenged with Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, K; Banting, A; Raekallio, M; Heinonen, M; Peltoniemi, O A T; Vainio, O

    2012-07-21

    In order to determine the effective dose, the effects of orally administered ketoprofen were evaluated in pigs following intravenous challenge with Escherichia coli endotoxin. One hour after the challenge, five groups of pigs were treated with either tap water or ketoprofen (0.5 mg/kg, 1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg or 4 mg/kg). The body temperature was measured and a total clinical score was calculated after assessing the general behaviour, respiratory rate and locomotion of the pigs. Thromboxane B(2) and ketoprofen concentrations were analysed from blood samples. Ketoprofen treatment significantly reduced the rectal temperature and total clinical scores, and lowered blood thromboxane B(2) concentrations when compared with the control group. Ketoprofen plasma concentrations were lower than previously reported in healthy pigs after similar doses. The appropriate dose of orally administered ketoprofen in pigs in this model is 2 mg/kg, as the higher dose of 4 mg/kg failed to provide an additional benefit.

  9. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-02

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms.

  10. Experimental infection of calves, sheep, goats and pigs with HoBi-like viruses by direct inoculation or exposure to persistently infected calves.

    PubMed

    Bauermann, F V; Falkenberg, S M; Decaro, N; Flores, E F; Ridpath, J F

    2015-12-31

    HoBi-like viruses are an emerging species of pestiviruses associated with respiratory and reproductive disease in cattle and in water buffaloes. Although cattle appear to be the main natural hosts, little is know about the potential for HoBi-like viruses to be transmitted to other livestock. In this study, seronegative calves, goats and pigs, and sheep harboring pestivirus antibodies (probably due to previous exposure to BVDV) were exposed to HoBi-like viruses either by direct inoculation (GIn) or by contact with calves persistently infected with HoBi-like viruses (GEx). Both GIn and GEx groups were monitored for clinical signs, lymphocyte count, virus in buffy coats and nasal swabs up to day 18 post-inoculation (pi). Evidence of transmission of HoBi-like virus by PI calves was observed in all studied species. No difference in clinical presentation was observed between animals in the GIn or GEx groups. Evidence of infection, depending on the species included lymphocyte depletion, fever, viral RNA detection, and/or seroconversion. Depletion of lymphocytes was observed in calves and goats (35% and 50%, respectively) but not in pigs. Seroconversion was observed in at least one animal of each group and for all exposed species. The rate of seroconversion was higher in animals in the GIn experimental groups. In sheep, pre-existing moderate to high neutralizing titers against BVDV did not prevent viral replication and shed. The study demonstrated that naive cattle, goats and pigs, in addition to antibody positive sheep, can be infected by HoBi-like virus via persistently infected calf and potentially transmit the virus.

  11. Influence of Mycotoxin Binders on the Oral Bioavailability of Doxycycline in Pigs.

    PubMed

    De Mil, Thomas; Devreese, Mathias; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2016-03-16

    Mycotoxin binders are feed additives that aim to adsorb mycotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, making them unavailable for systemic absorption. The antimicrobial drug doxycycline (DOX) is often used in pigs and is administered through feed or drinking water; hence, DOX can come in contact with mycotoxin binders in the gastrointestinal tract. This paper describes the effect of four mycotoxin binders on the absorption of orally administered DOX in pigs. Two experiments were conducted: The first used a setup with bolus administration to fasted pigs at two different dosages of mycotoxin binder. In the second experiment, DOX and the binders were mixed in the feed at dosages recommended by the manufacturers (= field conditions). Interactions are possible between some of the mycotoxin binders dosed at 10 g/kg feed but not at 2 g/kg feed. When applying field conditions, no influences were seen on the plasma concentrations of DOX.

  12. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia in guinea pigs following inoculation with H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses have caused widespread disease of poultry in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and sporadic human infections. The guinea pig model has been used to study human H3N2 and H1N1 influenza viruses, but knowledge is lacking on H5N1 HPAI virus inf...

  13. The pathogenesis of highly virulent African Swine Fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to optimize novel systems for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) vaccine development, domestic pigs were challenged with the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain via intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), intramuscular (IM), and direct contact (DC) routes. Direct challenge doses ...

  14. Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin in pigs and broilers following intravenous, intramuscular, and oral single-dose applications.

    PubMed

    Ding, H Z; Yang, G X; Huang, X H; Chen, Z L; Zeng, Z L

    2008-06-01

    Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was determined in pigs and broilers after intravenous (i.v.), intramuscular (i.m.), or oral (p.o.) administration at a single dose of five (pigs) or 10 mg/kg (broilers). Plasma concentration profiles were analyzed by a compartmental pharmacokinetic method. Following i.v., i.m. and p.o. doses, the elimination half-lives (t(1/2beta)) were 17.14 +/- 4.14, 25.79 +/- 8.10, 16.67 +/- 4.04 (pigs) and 6.11 +/- 1.50, 5.64 +/- 0.74, 8.20 +/- 3.12 h (broilers), respectively. After single i.m. and p.o. administration, difloxacin was rapidly absorbed, with peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of 1.77 +/- 0.66, 2.29 +/- 0.85 (pigs) and 2.51 +/- 0.36, 1.00 +/- 0.21 microg/mL (broilers) attained at t(max) of 1.29 +/- 0.26, 1.41 +/- 0.88 (pigs) and 0.86 +/- 0.4, 4.34 +/- 2.40 h (broilers), respectively. Bioavailabilities (F) were (95.3 +/- 28.9)% and (105.7 +/- 37.1)% (pigs) and (77.0 +/- 11.8)% and (54.2 +/- 12.6)% (broilers) after i.m. and p.o. doses, respectively. Apparent distribution volumes(V(d(area))) of 4.91 +/- 1.88 and 3.10 +/- 0.67 L/kg and total body clearances(Cl(B)) of 0.20 +/- 0.06 and 0.37 +/- 0.10 L/kg/h were determined in pigs and broilers, respectively. Areas under the curve (AUC), the half-lives of both absorption and distribution(t(1/2ka), t(1/2alpha)) were also determined. Based on the single-dose pharmacokinetic parameters determined, multiple dosage regimens were recommended as: a dosage of 5 mg/kg given intramuscularly every 24 h in pigs, or administered orally every 24 h at the dosage of 10 mg/kg in broilers, can maintain effective plasma concentrations with bacteria infections, in which MIC(90) are <0.25 microg/mL and <0.1 microg/mL respectively.

  15. Susceptibility of Pigs to Zoonotic Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 Isolated from a Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Thiry, D; Rose, N; Mauroy, A; Paboeuf, F; Dams, L; Roels, S; Pavio, N; Thiry, E

    2016-07-31

    In Europe, zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 strains mainly circulate in humans, swine and wild boar. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential transmission of a wild boar originating HEV strain (WbHEV) to swine by intravenous or oral inoculation and to study the consequences of infection of a WbHEV strain, a WbHEV strain previously passaged in a pig and a swine HEV strain after oral inoculation. Firstly, an intravenous infection was performed for which five piglets were divided into two groups with three pigs inoculated with a WbHEV field strain and two pigs inoculated with a HEV-negative swine liver homogenate. All pigs were necropsied 8, 9 and 10 days post-inoculation. Secondly, an oral infection of 56 days was performed on 12 piglets divided into four groups inoculated with a WbHEV strain, a WbHEV strain previously passaged in swine, a swine HEV strain or a HEV-negative swine liver homogenate. After intravenous inoculation, HEV RNA was detected in serum, bile, liver, spleen, duodenum, jejunum, colon, lung, gastro-hepatic lymph nodes and faeces in all infected piglets. After oral inoculation, HEV RNA was detected in serum, bile, liver, gastro-hepatic lymph nodes and faeces. Most of HEV-inoculated pigs became seropositive at day 15. This study provides experimental evidence of early viral spread throughout the organism after intravenous infection with a WbHEV strain and supports the notion that such a zoonotic strain could be transmitted via the natural faecal-oral route of infection between wild boar and pigs but also between pigs.

  16. Evaluation of Oral Bait Vaccine Efficacy Against Classical Swine Fever in Village Backyard Pig Farms in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Monger, V R; Stegeman, J A; Dukpa, K; Gurung, R B; Loeffen, W L A

    2016-12-01

    Control and eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in countries with a high proportion of backyard holdings is a challenge. Conventional attenuated Chinese C-strain vaccines, though safe and effective, are difficult to use in backyard farms due to various practical reasons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the CSF oral bait vaccine in village backyard pig farms and to assess the farmers' knowledge on CSF and motivation on using oral vaccines. The pigs were fed the bait by the farmers themselves; one bait was given on day 0, followed by second bait on the next day. Seventy-three per cent (140 of 193 pigs) of vaccinated pigs had either a slight (2-fold-3-fold; 60 pigs) or significant (at least 4-fold; 80 pigs) increase of the antibody titre against CSFV. A significant increase of the antibody titres was mainly observed in pigs with no pre-vaccination titre (OR = 12, 95% CI = 4-40). The number of pigs with protective antibody titres (≥40) rose from 47 (24%) to 115 (60%) following vaccination. Only 30% of the farmers claimed to be familiar with CSF, although clinical signs they mentioned were rather unspecific and could relate to many other pig diseases. Most of the farmers claimed to be motivated to use oral vaccines if made available. The oral vaccine could be a substitute for the conventional attenuated CSF vaccines in areas where it is logistically difficult for veterinarians to visit. It may therefore be a useful tool to combat endemic CSF disease in regions where the disease continues to have a serious impact on the backyard farmers who depend on pig farming for their sustenance and livelihoods.

  17. Oral inoculation of young dairy calves with Mycoplasma bovis results in colonization of tonsils, development of otitis media and local immunity.

    PubMed

    Maunsell, Fiona; Brown, Mary B; Powe, Joshua; Ivey, James; Woolard, Matthew; Love, Wees; Simecka, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    Because M. bovis otitis media is an economically important problem, there is a need to understand the pathogenesis of disease, not only to improve our understanding of the factors contributing to the development of this disease but also to inform the development of improved diagnostic tests and therapy. Oral ingestion of M. bovis-contaminated milk is linked, but not definitively proven, to development of otitis media. In the current study, we demonstrate that oral ingestion of M. bovis infected colostrum can result in an ascending infection and development of otitis media. Importantly, M. bovis was found to have a previously unrecognized tendency for colonization of the tonsils of calves, which most likely contributed to the subsequent development of otitis media. In contrast, transtracheal inoculation failed to produce clinically significant upper respiratory tract disease, although did induce lower respiratory tract disease. The upper respiratory tract was the major site of M. bovis-specific B cell and mucosal IgA responses in calves inoculated by the oral route. The oral inoculation route of infection presented here is particularly suited to the study of host-pathogen interactions during initial colonization of the tonsils, expansion of infection and dissemination to the lower respiratory tract and middle ear. In addition, it could be used to investigate potential new preventative or control strategies, especially those aimed at limiting colonization of the tonsils and/or spread to the middle ear.

  18. Oral inoculation of live or dead third-stage larvae of Anisakis simplex in rats suggests that only live larvae induce production of antibody specific to A. simplex.

    PubMed

    Abe, Niichiro; Teramoto, Isao

    2014-03-01

    Live Anisakis simplex third-stage larvae (L3) penetrate gastrointestinal mucosa after they are ingested in raw or undercooked seafood, thereafter causing gastrointestinal manifestations and allergic manifestations such as urticaria and anaphylaxis. These allergic reactions are mediated by specific IgE to L3 allergens, especially excretory-secretory (ES) allergens. Recent evidences suggest that only live larvae can cause allergic reactions, although cases attributable to ingestion of cooked, frozen seafood have been reported. Therefore the risk of Anisakis-associated hypersensitivity by ingestion of properly cooked and frozen fish remains controversial. No prior report describes the kinetics of antibody production in experimental animals after oral inoculation with dead L3. This study used ELISA to assess antibody production in rats inoculated orally with dead L3. Positive absorbance value in IgG, IgM, and IgE specific to ES antigen from L3 were found in rats inoculated with live L3 but not with dead L3 (frozen, heated, cut, or homogenized). At one week post re-inoculation with live or frozen L3 to the initially sensitized rats, the absorbance value of the specific IgM and IgE to ES antigen elevated quickly and highly in rats that had been re-inoculated with live L3, but they decreased slightly or did not change in rats inoculated with frozen L3. These results suggest that only ingestion of live L3 can produce the specific antibody and induce initial and secondary sensitizations to L3.

  19. Enantiospecific ketoprofen concentrations in plasma after oral and intramuscular administration in growing pigs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ketoprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which has been widely used for domestic animals. Orally administered racemic ketoprofen has been reported to be absorbed well in pigs, and bioavailability was almost complete. The objectives of this study were to analyze R- and S-ketoprofen concentrations in plasma after oral (PO) and intra muscular (IM) routes of administration, and to assess the relative bioavailability of racemic ketoprofen for both enantiomers between those routes of administration in growing pigs. Methods Eleven pigs received racemic ketoprofen at dose rates of 4 mg/kg PO and 3 mg/kg IM in a randomized, crossover design with a 6-day washout period. Enantiomers were separated on a chiral column and their concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and relative bioavailability (Frel) was determined for S and R –ketoprofen. Results S-ketoprofen was the predominant enantiomer in pig plasma after administration of the racemic mixture via both routes. The mean (± SD) maximum S-ketoprofen concentration in plasma (7.42 mg/L ± 2.35 in PO and 7.32 mg/L ± 0.75 in IM) was more than twice as high as that of R-ketoprofen (2.55 mg/L ± 0.99 in PO and 3.23 mg/L ± 0.70 in IM), and the terminal half-life was three times longer for S-ketoprofen (3.40 h ± 0.91 in PO and 2.89 h ± 0.85 in IM) than R-ketoprofen (1.1 h ± 0.90 in PO and 0.75 h ± 0.48 in IM). The mean (± SD) relative bioavailability (PO compared to IM) was 83 ± 20% and 63 ± 23% for S-ketoprofen and R-ketoprofen, respectively. Conclusions Although some minor differences were detected in the ketoprofen enantiomer concentrations in plasma after PO and IM administration, they are probably not relevant in clinical use. Thus, the pharmacological effects of racemic ketoprofen should be comparable after intramuscular and oral routes of administration in growing pigs

  20. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping; Birck, Malene M; Pan, Xiaoyu; Kamal, Shamrulazhar B S; Pors, Susanne E; Gammelgaard, Pernille L; Nielsen, Dennis S; Thymann, Thomas; Levy, Ofer; Frøkiær, Hanne; Sangild, Per T

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm neutrophil and monocyte TLR2 expression and TLR2-mediated blood cytokine responses were low relative to adults. ORA pigs showed enhanced blood neutrophil maturation with reduced cell size and CD172a expression. Only ORA pigs, but not SYS pigs, were protected from a high density of gut Gram-positive bacteria, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.

  1. Oral Fluids as a Live-Animal Sample Source for Evaluating Cross-Reactivity and Cross-Protection following Intranasal Influenza A Virus Vaccination in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Holly R; Vincent, Amy L; Brockmeier, Susan L; Gauger, Phillip C; Pena, Lindomar; Santos, Jefferson; Braucher, Douglas R; Perez, Daniel R; Loving, Crystal L

    2015-10-01

    In North American swine, there are numerous antigenically distinct H1 influenza A virus (IAV) variants currently circulating, making vaccine development difficult due to the inability to formulate a vaccine that provides broad cross-protection. Experimentally, live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines demonstrate increased cross-protection compared to inactivated vaccines. However, there is no standardized assay to predict cross-protection following LAIV vaccination. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody in serum is the gold standard correlate of protection following IAV vaccination. LAIV vaccination does not induce a robust serum HI antibody titer; however, a local mucosal antibody response is elicited. Thus, a live-animal sample source that could be used to evaluate LAIV immunogenicity and cross-protection is needed. Here, we evaluated the use of oral fluids (OF) and nasal wash (NW) collected after IAV inoculation as a live-animal sample source in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to predict cross-protection in comparison to traditional serology. Both live-virus exposure and LAIV vaccination provided heterologous protection, though protection was greatest against more closely phylogenetically related viruses. IAV-specific IgA was detected in NW and OF samples and was cross-reactive to representative IAV from each H1 cluster. Endpoint titers of cross-reactive IgA in OF from pigs exposed to live virus was associated with heterologous protection. While LAIV vaccination provided significant protection, LAIV immunogenicity was reduced compared to live-virus exposure. These data suggest that OF from pigs inoculated with wild-type IAV, with surface genes that match the LAIV seed strain, could be used in an ELISA to assess cross-protection and the antigenic relatedness of circulating and emerging IAV in swine.

  2. Influence of Mycotoxins and a Mycotoxin Adsorbing Agent on the Oral Bioavailability of Commonly Used Antibiotics in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health. PMID:22606377

  3. Influence of mycotoxins and a mycotoxin adsorbing agent on the oral bioavailability of commonly used antibiotics in pigs.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-04-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health.

  4. Oral sodium chlorate, topical disinfection, and younger weaning age reduce Salmonella enterica shedding in pigs.

    PubMed

    Patchanee, Prapas; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Bahnson, Peter B

    2007-08-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica can cause swine illness or human foodborne disease. Although nontoxic to mammalian cells, chlorate can be converted to cytotoxic chlorite by salmonellae. To test whether chlorate is effective at reducing Salmonella shedding in weaned pigs exposed to shedding dams, a chlorate-nitrate-lactate (chlorate) oral dose was administered daily for 5 days following weaning, and this treatment was evaluated in combination with two weaning ages and a topical disinfectant. A total of 80 pigs were weaned at 10 or 21 days of age. Half within each age group were topically disinfected at weaning. Piglets were selected from dams for which Salmonella was detected in feces shortly after giving birth. Chlorate treatment reduced Salmonella prevalence and estimated Salmonella concentration in feces, cecal contents, and ileocolic lymph nodes. Younger weaning age (10 days of age) was associated with reduced shedding (lower concentration and prevalence) in samples collected at 10 days postweaning (DPW) and later. Chlorate treatment reduced the concentration of Salmonella in fecal samples at 5 DPW and in cecal samples at 14 DPW. The protective effects persisted through the end of the study at 14 DPW, 9 days after the final administration of chlorate. Disinfectant treatment reduced shedding in fecal samples at 14 DPW. Interactions were detected between the effects of chlorate and disinfection and between chlorate and weaning age. Chlorate treatment, topical disinfection, and younger weaning age may be useful tools for reducing Salmonella shedding on farms that practice segregated weaning and where sow-to-piglet transfer of Salmonella is an important source of infection in nursery pigs.

  5. Dose-response of Listeria monocytogenes after oral exposure in pregnant guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Denita; Irvin, Elizabeth A; Chmielewski, Revis A; Frank, Joseph F; Smith, Mary A

    2007-05-01

    Listeriosis, a severe disease that results from exposure to the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, is responsible for approximately 2500 illnesses and 500 deaths in the United States each year. Pregnant women are 20 times more likely to develop listeriosis than the general population, with adverse pregnancy outcomes that include spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, and neonatal meningitis. The objective of this study was to determine an infective dose that resulted in stillbirths and infectivity of selected tissues in pregnant guinea pigs. Pregnant guinea pigs were exposed orally on gestation day 35 to 10(4) to 10(8) L. monocytogenes CFU in sterile whipping cream. L. monocytogenes was recovered at 64, 73, 90, and 100% from the livers of animals infected with 10(5), 10(6), 10(7), and 10(8) CFU, respectively. In dams exposed to > or =10(6) CFU, L. monocytogenes was cultured from 50% of the spleen samples and 33% of the gallbladder samples. Eleven of 34 dams infected with > or =10(6) CFU delivered stillborn pups. L. monocytogenes was cultured from the placenta, liver, and brain tissue of all stillbirths. Dams that delivered nonviable fetuses after treatment with > or =10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU had fecal samples positive for L. monocytogenes at every collection posttreatment. On the basis of a log-logistic model, the dose that adversely affected 50% of the pregnancies was approximately 10(7) L. monocytogenes CFU compared with that estimated from a human outbreak of 106 CFU. Listeriosis in pregnant guinea pigs can result in stillbirths, and the overall disease is similar to that described in nonhuman primates and in humans.

  6. Poliomyelitis in transgenic mice expressing CD155 under the control of the Tage4 promoter after oral and parenteral poliovirus inoculation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaukat; Toyoda, Hidemi; Linehan, Melissa; Iwasaki, Akiko; Nomoto, Akio; Bernhardt, Günter; Cello, Jeronimo; Wimmer, Eckard

    2014-08-01

    An important step in poliovirus (PV) infection by the oral route in humans is replication of the virus in lymphatic tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, thought to be mainly in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. No immunocompetent transgenic (tg) mice that express human PV receptor (CD155) under the control of different promoters can be infected orally. The mouse orthologue of human CD155 is Tage4, a protein expressed at the surface of enterocytes and in the Peyer's patches. We describe here the generation of a tg mouse model in which the Tage4 promoter was used to drive expression of the human PV receptor-coding region (Tage4-CD155tg mice). In this model, CD155 expression was observed by immunostaining in different regions in the Peyer's patches but not in their germinal centres. Although a similar pattern of staining was observed between 3- and 6-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice, poliomyelitis was only seen in the younger mice after PV infection by the oral route. When compared with TgPVR21 mice that expressed CD155 driven by its human promoter, 3-week-old Tage4-CD155tg mice were more susceptible to gut infection and paralysis following feeding with PV. Also, Tage4-CD155tg mice exhibited higher susceptibility to poliomyelitis after parenteral inoculation of PV. Remarkably, the LD50 after intracerebral inoculation of PV was similar in both CD155 tg mouse strains. The CD155 tg mouse model reported here, although moderately susceptible to oral infection, may be suitable to study mechanisms of PV replication in the gastrointestinal tract and to dissect important aspects of PV neuroinvasiveness.

  7. Toxicokinetics of cyanide in rats, pigs and goats after oral dosing with potassium cyanide.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Altamir B; Manzano, Helena; Soto-Blanco, Benito; Górniak, Silvana L

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the species on the toxicokinetics of cyanide and its main metabolite, thiocyanate. Forty-two rats, six pigs and six goats were dosed orally with 3.0 mg KCN/kg body weight, and cyanide and thiocyanate concentrations in blood were measured within 24 h. After the single oral dose, KCN was rapidly absorbed by rats and goats, with a time of peak concentration ( T(max)) of 15 min. The maximum plasma concentration ( C(max)) of cyanide was observed in goats (93.5 micro mol/l), whereas the C(max) of thiocyanate was higher in rats (58.1 micro mol/l). The elimination half-life ( t(1/2)) and volume of distribution ( Vd(area)) of both cyanide and thiocyanate were higher in goats (1.28 and 13.9 h, and 0.41 and 1.76 l/kg, respectively). Whereas the area under the curve (AUC) of cyanide was significantly higher in goats (234.6 micro mol.l/h), the AUC of thiocyanate was higher in rats (846.5 micro mol.l/h). In conclusion, the results of the present study support the hypothesis that the metabolism of cyanide and its main metabolite, thiocyanate, is species-linked, with the goat being more sensitive to the toxic effects of cyanide/thiocyanate.

  8. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; de Souza, Diogo Benchimol; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; de Oliveira, Fábio Conceição; de Melo, João Cardoso; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; de Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz; de Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues; de Souza, Wanderley; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis. PMID:25742268

  9. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; Oliveira, Fábio Conceição de; Melo, João Cardoso de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz de; Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues de; Souza, Wanderley de; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis.

  10. Experimental infection with the Toxoplasma gondii ME-49 strain in the Brazilian BR-1 mini pig is a suitable animal model for human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Farlen José Bebber; Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Frazão-Teixeira, Edwards; Oliveira, Fábio Conceição de; Melo, João Cardoso de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Albernaz, Antonio Peixoto; Carvalho, Eulógio Carlos Queiróz de; Oliveira, Francisco Carlos Rodrigues de; Souza, Wanderley de; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-02-03

    Toxoplasma gondii causes toxoplasmosis, a worldwide disease. Experimentation with pigs is necessary for the development of new therapeutic approaches to human diseases. BR-1 mini pigs were intramuscularly infected with T. gondii with tachyzoites (RH strain) or orally infected with cysts (ME-49 strain). Haematology and serum biochemistry were analysed and buffy coat cells were inoculated in mice to determine tachyzoite circulation. No alterations were observed in erythrocyte and platelet values; however, band neutrophils increased seven days after infection with ME-49. Serology of the mice inoculated with pig blood leucocytes revealed circulating ME-49 or RH strain tachyzoites in the pigs' peripheral blood at two and seven or nine days post-infection. The tachyzoites were also directly observed in blood smears from the infected pigs outside and inside leucocytes for longer periods. Alanine-aminotransferase was high at days 21 and 32 in the RH infected pigs. After 90 days, the pigs were euthanised and their tissue samples were processed and inoculated into mice. The mice serology revealed the presence of parasites in the hearts, ileums and mesenteric lymph nodes of the pigs. Additionally, cysts in the mice were only observed after pig heart tissue inoculation. The infected pigs presented similar human outcomes with relatively low pathogenicity and the BR-1 mini pig model infected with ME-49 is suitable to monitor experimental toxoplasmosis.

  11. Effects of oral administration of sodium citrate or acetate to pigs on blood parameters, postmortem glycolysis, muscle pH decline, and quality attributes of pork.

    PubMed

    Stephens, J W; Dikeman, M E; Unruh, J A; Haub, M D; Tokach, M D; Dritz, S S

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of oral administration of sodium citrate (CIT) or acetate (ACE) to pigs on blood parameters, postmortem glycolysis, pH decline, and quality attributes of pork. Previous studies have shown that CIT has the potential to inhibit phosphofructokinase (PFK), a key enzyme in postmortem muscle glycolysis. In Exp. 1, CIT, ACE, or water was orally administered (0.75 g/kg of BW) to 24 pigs. After a 30-min rest, pigs were exercised, and blood samples were taken at 45 and 75 min after oral treatment. Citrate and ACE tended (P = 0.08) to increase blood pH and increased (P = 0.02) bicarbonate levels immediately after exercise. After a 30-min rest, blood pH of pigs administered ACE tended (P = 0.09) to remain higher, whereas blood pH of CIT-treated pigs was similar to that of control pigs. Bicarbonate levels in ACE- and CIT-treated pigs were still greater (P < 0.05) than those of control pigs at 75 min after oral treatment. In Exp. 2, 30 pigs were administered CIT, ACE, or water 45 min before stunning (electric plus captive bolt). Antemortem treatments had no effect (P > 0.10) on muscle pH or postmortem concentrations of the glycolytic metabolites of glucose-6 phosphate, fructose-6 phosphate, fructose-1,6 bisphosphate, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, or lactate. Minor, but inconsistent, differences in quality attributes were found in LM chops, and no differences in quality attributes were found between control and CIT- or ACE-treated pigs for inside and outside semimembranosus muscles (P > 0.10). There was no significant inhibition of the PFK enzyme by orally administered CIT or ACE; however, the PFK glycolytic metabolite data analysis indicated that PFK was a main regulatory enzyme in postmortem muscle.

  12. Transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary iron minerals during pig manure bioleaching by the co-inoculation acidophilic thiobacillus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zhou, Lixiang; Liu, Fenwu; Zheng, Chaocheng; Deng, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Bioleaching of heavy metals from pig manure using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in an air-lift reactor was conducted. The transformation of heavy metals and the formation of secondary Fe minerals during bioleaching were also investigated in the present study. The removal efficiencies of Zn, Cu, and Mn from pig manure were 95.1%, 80.9%, and 87.5%, respectively. Zn mainly existed in the form of Fe-Mn oxides in fresh pig manure; most of the pig manure-borne Cu was in organic matter form; Mn existed mainly in Fe-Mn oxides, carbonates, and residual forms. The pig manure can be applied to land more safely after bioleaching because the heavy metals mainly existed in stable forms. The removal efficiencies Zn, Cu, and Mn had good relationships with pH and oxidation reduction potential during bioleaching. A mixture ofjarosite and schwertmannite was found in the bioleached pig manure, which might have an adverse effect on the solubilization efficiency of toxic metals from pig manure. The bioleaching process using a mixture of harmless iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was shown to be a very feasible technology for the removal of heavy metals from pig manure.

  13. Oral rice-based vaccine induces passive and active immunity against enterotoxigenic E. coli-mediated diarrhea in pigs.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Oroku, Kazuki; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Kodama, Toshiaki; Nagai, Shinya; Ueda, Susumu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-09-22

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes severe diarrhea in both neonatal and weaned pigs. Because the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has a high level of amino acid identity to the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) B-subunit (LTB), we selected MucoRice-CTB as a vaccine candidate against ETEC-induced pig diarrhea. When pregnant sows were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, increased amounts of antigen-specific IgG and IgA were produced in their sera. CTB-specific IgG was secreted in the colostrum and transferred passively to the sera of suckling piglets. IgA antibodies in the colostrum and milk remained high with a booster dose after farrowing. Additionally, when weaned minipigs were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, production of CTB-specific intestinal SIgA, as well as systemic IgG and IgA, was induced. To evaluate the cross-protective effect of MucoRice-CTB against ETEC diarrhea, intestinal loop assay with ETEC was conducted. The fluid volume accumulated in the loops of minipigs immunized with MucoRice-CTB was significantly lower than that in control minipigs, indicating that MucoRice-CTB-induced cross-reactive immunity could protect weaned pigs from diarrhea caused by ETEC. MucoRice-CTB could be a candidate oral vaccine for inducing both passive and active immunity to protect both suckling and weaned piglets from ETEC diarrhea.

  14. Oral Bioavailability, Hydrolysis, and Comparative Toxicokinetics of 3-Acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol in Broiler Chickens and Pigs.

    PubMed

    Broekaert, Nathan; Devreese, Mathias; De Mil, Thomas; Fraeyman, Sophie; Antonissen, Gunther; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Vermeulen, An; Croubels, Siska

    2015-10-07

    The goal of this study was to determine the absolute oral bioavailability, (presystemic) hydrolysis and toxicokinetic characteristics of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol in broiler chickens and pigs. Crossover animal trials were performed with intravenous and oral administration of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol to broilers and pigs. Plasma concentrations were analyzed by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and data were processed via a tailor-made compartmental toxicokinetic analysis. The results in broiler chickens showed that the absorbed fraction after oral deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol administration was 10.6, 18.2, and 42.2%, respectively. This fraction was completely hydrolyzed presystemically for 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol to deoxynivalenol and to a lesser extent (75.4%) for 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol. In pigs, the absorbed fractions were 100% for deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and both 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol were completely hydrolyzed presystemically. The disposition properties of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol demonstrate their toxicological relevance and consequently the possible need to establish a tolerable daily intake.

  15. Influence of a pig respiratory disease on the pharmacokinetic behaviour of amoxicillin after oral ad libitum administration in medicated feed.

    PubMed

    Godoy, C; Castells, G; Martí, G; Capece, B P S; Pérez, F; Colom, H; Cristòfol, C

    2011-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of amoxicillin in healthy and respiratory-diseased pigs were studied, after ad libitum administration of medicated feed. In addition, amoxicillin dose linearity and drug penetration into respiratory tract tissues were evaluated in diseased animals. The respiratory disease involves porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and bacterial agents such as Pasteurella multocida, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Streptococcus suis. Typical clinical signs and gross lesions of respiratory disease were observed. The plasma pharmacokinetic analysis was performed by means of a noncompartmental approach. After single intravenous bolus administration of amoxicillin to healthy pigs, the steady-state volume of distribution was 0.61 L/kg, the total plasma clearance was 0.83 L/h/kg and the mean residence time was 0.81 h. After oral bolus administration, the mean absorption time was 1.6 h and the peak plasma concentration (3.09 μg/mL) reached at 1.1 h postadministration. The oral bioavailability was 34%. For oral ad libitum administration, plasma concentration-time profiles were related to the feeding behaviour. Plasma concentrations at steady-state were established between 12 and 120 h. The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated (C(maxss) , C(minss) , C(avss) and AUC(24ss) ) showed significantly lower values in healthy pigs compared to diseased animals. This was in accordance with the significantly higher amoxicillin bioavailability (44.7% vs. 14.1%) and longer absorption period observed in diseased pigs. Amoxicillin dose linearity in diseased animals was established in a dose range of 4-18 mg/kg. On the other hand, tissue distribution ratio in diseased animals was 0.65 for bronchial mucosa, 0.48 for lung tissue and 0.38 for lymph nodes. Our results suggest that the pharmacokinetic properties and disposition of amoxicillin can be influenced by the disease state or by related factors such as changes in the gastrointestinal transit.

  16. Factors affecting the infectivity of tissues from pigs with classical swine fever: thermal inactivation rates and oral infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Lucie; Haines, Felicity J; Everett, Helen E; Crudgington, Bentley; Johns, Helen L; Clifford, Derek; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2015-03-23

    Outbreaks of classical swine fever are often associated with ingestion of pig meat or products derived from infected pigs. Assessment of the disease risks associated with material of porcine origin requires knowledge on the likely amount of virus in the original material, how long the virus may remain viable within the resulting product and how much of that product would need to be ingested to result in infection. Using material from pigs infected with CSFV, we determined the viable virus concentrations in tissues that comprise the majority of pork products. Decimal reduction values (D values), the time required to reduce the viable virus load by 90% (or 1 log10), were determined at temperatures of relevance for chilling, cooking, composting and ambient storage. The rate of CSFV inactivation varied in different tissues. At lower temperatures, virus remained viable for substantially longer in muscle and serum compared to lymphoid and fat tissues. To enable estimation of the temperature dependence of inactivation, the temperature change required to change the D values by 90% (Z values) were determined as 13 °C, 14 °C, 12 °C and 10 °C for lymph node, fat, muscle and serum, respectively. The amount of virus required to infect 50% of pigs by ingestion was determined by feeding groups of animals with moderately and highly virulent CSFV. Interestingly, the virulent virus did not initiate infection at a lower dose than the moderately virulent strain. Although higher than for intranasal inoculation, the amount of virus required for infection via ingestion is present in only a few grams of tissue from infected animals.

  17. Tonsils of the Soft Palate Do Not Mediate the Response of Pigs to Oral Vaccination with Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Romero, Beatriz; Boadella, Mariana; Casal, Carmen; Bezos, Javier; Mazariegos, María; Martín, MariPaz; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Villar, Margarita; Garrido, Joseba M.; Sevilla, Iker A.; Asensio, Fernando; Sicilia, Javier; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón A.; de la Fuente, José

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis causes animal tuberculosis (TB) in cattle, humans, and other mammalian species, including pigs. The goal of this study was to experimentally assess the responses of pigs with and without a history of tonsillectomy to oral vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis and challenge with a virulent M. bovis field strain, to compare pig and wild boar responses using the same vaccination model as previously used in the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), to evaluate the use of several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and lateral flow tests for in vivo TB diagnosis in pigs, and to verify if these tests are influenced by oral vaccination with inactivated M. bovis. At necropsy, the lesion and culture scores were 20% to 43% higher in the controls than those in the vaccinated pigs. Massive M. bovis growth from thoracic tissue samples was observed in 4 out of 9 controls but in none of the 10 vaccinated pigs. No effect of the presence or absence of tonsils was observed on these scores, suggesting that tonsils are not involved in the protective response to this vaccine in pigs. The serum antibody levels increased significantly only after challenge. At necropsy, the estimated sensitivities of the ELISAs and dual path platform (DPP) assays ranged from 89% to 94%. In the oral mucosa, no differences in gene expression were observed in the control group between the pigs with and without tonsils. In the vaccinated group, the mRNA levels for chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7), interferon beta (IFN-β), and methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase (MUT) were higher in pigs with tonsils. Complement component 3 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increased with vaccination and decreased after M. bovis challenge. This information is relevant for pig production in regions that are endemic for M. bovis and for TB vaccine research. PMID:24920604

  18. The influence of diet on Lawsonia intracellularis colonization in pigs upon experimental challenge.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Henriette T; Jensen, Tim K; Schmidt, Anja S; Jensen, Bent B; Jensen, Søren M; Møller, Kristian

    2004-10-05

    The objective of this investigation was to study if different feeding strategies influence experimental infections of pigs with Lawsonia intracellularis, the causative agent of proliferative enteropathy. In three sequential trials, a total of 144 weaned pigs were fed five different diets all made from a standard diet based on wheat and barley as carbohydrate source and soybean as protein source. The five diets were: a standard diet (fine ground and pelleted), the standard diet fed as fermented liquid feed, the standard diet added 1.8% formic acid, the standard diet added 2.4% lactic acid and a diet similar to the standard diet (made from the same ingredients), but fed coarse ground. Twenty-four pigs on each diet were orally inoculated with L. intracellularis and growth performance and faecal excretion of bacteria were monitored. Twenty-four pigs fed the standard diet were included as not experimentally infected controls. Pigs in the first two trials were sacrificed 4 weeks post-inoculation, whereas animals in the third trial were sacrificed after 5 weeks. Pigs in all experimentally infected groups excreted L. intracellularis. The fermented liquid diet delayed the excretion of L. intracellularis and furthermore, pigs fed the standard diet supplemented with lactic acid had limited pathological lesions when the intestines were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The growth performance was reduced in pigs experimentally challenged with L. intracellularis, however the prevalence and severity of diarrhea was limited.

  19. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrP(Sc) accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Hamir, Amir N

    2016-04-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. This study reports the failure to detect PrP(Sc) in nervous or lymphoid tissues of Suffolk sheep of the PRNP ARQ/ARR genotype after oral inoculation with a U.S. scrapie isolate. Lambs were inoculated within the first 24 h of birth with 1 ml of a 10% (wt./vol.) brain homogenate derived from a clinically affected ARQ/ARQ sheep. The inoculated sheep were observed daily throughout the experiment for clinical signs suggestive of scrapie until they were necropsied at 86 months post inoculation. Tissues were collected for examination by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay, but all failed to demonstrate evidence of scrapie infection. Neonatal sheep of the ARQ/ARQ genotype receiving the same inoculum developed scrapie within 24 months. Lambs of the ARQ/ARR genotype that received the same inoculum by intracranial inoculation develop scrapie with a prolonged incubation period and with abnormal prion present within the central nervous system, but not peripheral lymphoid tissues. Results of this study suggest that ARQ/ARR sheep are resistant to oral infection with the scrapie isolate used even during the neonatal period.

  20. Induction of mucosal immune response after intranasal or oral inoculation of mice with Lactococcus lactis producing bovine beta-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chatel, J M; Langella, P; Adel-Patient, K; Commissaire, J; Wal, J M; Corthier, G

    2001-05-01

    The bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major cow's milk allergen. Here, we evaluated the immune response against BLG induced in mice, using the organism Lactococcus lactis, which has GRAS ("generally regarded as safe") status, as a delivery vehicle. The cDNA of the blg gene, encoding BLG, was expressed and engineered for either intra- or extracellular expression in L. lactis. Using a constitutive promoter, the yield of intracellular recombinant BLG (rBLG) was about 20 ng per ml of culture. To increase the quantity of rBLG, the nisin-inducible expression system was used to produce rBLG in the cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. Although the majority of rBLG remained in the cytoplasm, the highest yield (2 microg per ml of culture) was obtained with a secreting strain that encodes a fusion between a lactococcal signal peptide and rBLG. Whatever the expression system, the rBLG is produced mostly in a soluble, intracellular, and denatured form. The BLG-producing strains were then administered either orally or intranasally to mice, and the immune response to BLG was examined. Specific anti-BLG immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were detected 3 weeks after the immunization protocol in the feces of mice immunized with the secreting lactococcal strain. Specific anti-BLG IgA detected in mice immunized with lactococci was higher than that obtained in mice immunized with the same quantity of pure BLG. No specific anti-BLG IgE, IgA, IgG1, or IgG2a was detected in sera of mice. These recombinant lactococcal strains constitute good vehicles to induce a mucosal immune response to a model allergen and to better understand the mechanism of allergy induced by BLG.

  1. Induction of Mucosal Immune Response after Intranasal or Oral Inoculation of Mice with Lactococcus lactis Producing Bovine Beta-Lactoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe; Adel-Patient, Karine; Commissaire, Jacqueline; Wal, Jean-Michel; Corthier, Gérard

    2001-01-01

    The bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is a major cow's milk allergen. Here, we evaluated the immune response against BLG induced in mice, using the organism Lactococcus lactis, which has GRAS (“generally regarded as safe”) status, as a delivery vehicle. The cDNA of the blg gene, encoding BLG, was expressed and engineered for either intra- or extracellular expression in L. lactis. Using a constitutive promoter, the yield of intracellular recombinant BLG (rBLG) was about 20 ng per ml of culture. To increase the quantity of rBLG, the nisin-inducible expression system was used to produce rBLG in the cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. Although the majority of rBLG remained in the cytoplasm, the highest yield (2 μg per ml of culture) was obtained with a secreting strain that encodes a fusion between a lactococcal signal peptide and rBLG. Whatever the expression system, the rBLG is produced mostly in a soluble, intracellular, and denatured form. The BLG-producing strains were then administered either orally or intranasally to mice, and the immune response to BLG was examined. Specific anti-BLG immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were detected 3 weeks after the immunization protocol in the feces of mice immunized with the secreting lactococcal strain. Specific anti-BLG IgA detected in mice immunized with lactococci was higher than that obtained in mice immunized with the same quantity of pure BLG. No specific anti-BLG IgE, IgA, IgG1, or IgG2a was detected in sera of mice. These recombinant lactococcal strains constitute good vehicles to induce a mucosal immune response to a model allergen and to better understand the mechanism of allergy induced by BLG. PMID:11329455

  2. Evaluation of two different methods for per-oral gastrostomy tube placement in patients with motor neuron disease (MND): PIG versus PEG procedures.

    PubMed

    Chavada, Govindsinh; El-Nayal, Ayman; Lee, Fred; Webber, Stephen J; McAlindon, Mark; Walsh, Theresa; Hollinger, Hannah; McDermott, Christopher J; Shaw, Pamela J

    2010-12-01

    Placement of a gastrostomy tube remains the gold standard procedure to maintain nutrition in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) and bulbar muscle weakness. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the most commonly used procedure in this context. Per-oral image guided gastrostomy (PIG) is a new hybrid technique used successfully in non-MND patients. We have modified the PIG technique to improve patient tolerability and have undertaken a pilot evaluation of PIG compared to PEG in MND patients. Nineteen PIG and 16 PEG procedures performed over a period of four years were evaluated. Pre-procedural forced vital capacity (FVC), procedural oxygen saturation, post-procedural complications and survival duration were recorded. Results showed that a gastrostomy tube was successfully placed in 95% of the PIG group and 80% of the PEG group. Rates of minor complications were comparable in both groups (21% in PIG, 23% in PEG). No life-threatening complications occurred in either group. Procedural mean oxygen saturations were higher in the PIG group compared to the PEG group (p < 0.001). No significant survival differences were observed. This study provides evidence for the use of the PIG procedure as a safe and well tolerated alternative to PEG in MND patients.

  3. Effect of handling and storage conditions and stabilizing agent on the recovery of viral RNA from oral fluid of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Muehlhauser, V

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in using oral fluid to determine herd health and documenting the circulation of viruses in commercial swine populations but little is known about the stability of viruses in oral fluid. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic virus which is widespread in swine herds. Information on optimal handling methods such as heat treatments, freezing and RNA stabilization agents is needed to prevent or minimize degradation of viral RNA by degradative enzymes. The objectives of the study were to determine optimum handling conditions of the oral fluid before RNA extraction and to compare the performance of the RNeasy Protect Saliva Mini kit, which contains a stabilizing agent, with that of the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit, which does not contain a stabilizing agent. Preliminary studies with oral fluid inoculated with HEV indicated that a heat treatment of 60°C for 15min was detrimental to HEV RNA. HEV was recovered from 25/25 and 24/25 samples of oral fluid when samples were incubated for ≤24h at 4°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, without a stabilizing agent and extracted with the QiaAMP kit. In contrast, HEV RNA was detected in 16/25 and 11/25 samples when samples were incubated with a stabilizing agent for 24h at 37°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, and extracted with the RNeasy Protect Saliva kit. Moreover, the mean number of genome copies/ml of HEV recovered from oral fluid stored at -20°C without the stabilizing agent was 2.9 log units higher than oral fluid stored at -20°C in the presence of the stabilizing agent. The recovery of RNA from HEV, F-RNA coliphage MS2 and murine norovirus (MNV), which are surrogates for norovirus, was significantly greater when oral fluid was incubated for 24h at 4°C than when oral fluid was stabilized with RNAprotect Saliva Reagent for 24h at 37°C, where the relative differences between the two processes were 1.4, 1.8, and 2.7 log genome copies/ml for MS2, MNV, and HEV, respectively. The findings

  4. Extensive intestinal glucuronidation of raloxifene in vivo in pigs and impact for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Thörn, Helena Anna; Yasin, Mohammed; Dickinson, Paul Alfred; Lennernäs, Hans

    2012-09-01

    In this study an advanced multisampling site pig model, with simultaneous venous blood sampling pre- and post liver, was applied to quantify the role of the intestine in relation to the liver in first-pass glucuronidation of raloxifene in vivo. The pharmacokinetic of raloxifene (a BCS/BDDCS class II compound) in humans is characterized by extensive metabolism (>90%) and the major metabolite is the 4'-β-glucuronide (R-4-G). Following intra-jejunal (i.j.) single dose administration in pigs raloxifene was metabolized in the gut (E(G)) during first-pass to more than 70% and a high concentration (AUC(0-6 h) ratio R-4-G/raloxifene >100) of R-4-G was reached in the portal vein. The hepatic extraction (E(H)) of raloxifene was ~50% and as in humans the bioavailability become low (~7%) in pigs. Interestingly the E(H) of raloxifene and R-4-G was time-dependent after i.j. administration. It is clear that the gut was the dominating organ in first-pass extraction of raloxifene in vivo in pigs. The quantification in this study support earlier human data and emphasize that intestinal glucuronidation should be considered early in the pharmaceutical development.

  5. Papa Pig Just Left for Pigtown: Children's Oral and Written Picture Descriptions under Varying Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Temple, Jeanne M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the extent of variation in children's language performance in a picture description task arising from mode (oral or written) versus degree of demand for decontextualization. Finds that children manipulated the wide range of the oral form of the contextualized/decontextualized continuum more skillfully than the written form. Finds no…

  6. Evaluation of vaccine candidate potential of deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhoj Raj; Chandra, Mudit; Hansda, Dhananjoy; Alam, Javed; Babu, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Mehtab Z; Agrawal, Ravi K; Sharma, Gautam

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Abortusequi (S. Abortusequi), a host adapted Salmonella causes abortions, still births and foal mortality in equids. Though known since more than 100 years, it is still a problem in many of the developing countries including India. There is dearth of really good vaccine affording immunity lasting at least for one full gestation. In search of a potential vaccine candidate, three defined deletion mutants (deltaaroA, deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA) of S. Abortusequi were tested in guinea pig model for attenuation, safety, immunogenicity, humoral immune response, protective efficacy and persistence in host. The deltahtrA and deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutants were found to be safe on oral inoculation in doses as high as 4.2 x 10(9) cfu/animal. Also through subcutaneous inoculation deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant did not induce any abortion in pregnant guinea pigs. All the three mutants did not induce any illness or death in 1-2 week-old baby guinea pigs except deltahtrA mutant which caused mortality on intraperitoneal inoculation. Inoculation with mutants protected against challenge and increased breeding efficiency of guinea pigs. After >4.5 months of mutant inoculation, guinea pigs were protected against abortifacient dose of wild type S. Abortusequi and mother guinea pigs also conferred resistance to their babies to the similar challenge. Early humoral immune response of S. Abortusequi mutants was characteristic. Faecal excretion of deltaaroA and htrA mutants was detected up to 45 days of inoculation in guinea pigs while deltaaroAdeltahtrA mutant could not be detected after 21 days of inoculation. The results indicated that the double deletion mutant (deltaaroAdeltahtrA) was the most effective and safe candidate for vaccination against S. Abortusequi through mucosal route of inoculation.

  7. Collection of Oral Fluids Using Cotton Ropes as a Sampling Method to Detect Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vosloo, W; Morris, J; Davis, A; Giles, M; Wang, J; Nguyen, H T T; Kim, P V; Quach, N V; Le, P T T; Nguyen, P H N; Dang, H; Tran, H X; Vu, P P; Hung, V V; Le, Q T; Tran, T M; Mai, T M T; Le, Q T V; Singanallur, N B

    2015-10-01

    In high-density farming practices, it is important to constantly monitor for infectious diseases, especially diseases that have the potential to spread rapidly between holdings. Pigs are known to amplify foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) by excreting large amounts of virus, and it is therefore important to detect the virus quickly and accurately to minimize the spread of disease. Ropes were used to collect oral fluid samples from pigs, and each sample was compared to saliva samples collected from individual animals by detecting FMD virus RNA using real-time PCR. Two different experiments are described where groups of pigs were infected with different serotypes of FMD virus, either with or without vaccination, and unvaccinated pigs were kept in aerosol contact. The sensitivity of the rope sampling varied between 0.67 and 0.92, and the statistical agreement between this method and individual sampling ranged from substantial to moderate for the two different serotypes. The ease of collecting oral fluids using ropes together with the high sensitivity of subsequent FMD detection through PCR indicates that this could be a useful method to monitor pig populations for FMD virus infection. With further validation of the sensitivity of detection of FMD virus RNA, this can be a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool.

  8. The Effects of Fat-soluble Vitamin Administration on Plasma Vitamin Status of Nursing Pigs Differ When Provided by Oral Administration or Injection

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Y. D.; Lindemann, M. D.; Monegue, H. J.; Stuart, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration to sows or newborn pigs on plasma vitamin status. In Exp. 1 and 2, a total of 24 and 43 newborn pigs were allotted to control and vitamin treatments (vitamin D3 with variable addition of vitamins A and E) orally or by i.m. injection. In Exp. 3, pigs from Exp. 2 were allotted to 2 treatments (±vitamins D3 and E in drinking water) for 14 d postweaning. In Exp. 4, twenty-four gestating sows were used for 2 treatments (±injection of a vitamin D3/A/E product 2 wk prepartum). In Exp. 1 and 2, when vitamin D3 was administrated orally or by i.m. injection on d 1 of age, pigs had increased plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OH D3) concentration 10 d after administration compared with control pigs (p<0.05). The injectable administration with vitamin D3 and E was able to achieve higher plasma 25-OH D3 (p<0.05) and α-tocopherol (p<0.05) concentrations than oral administration. At weaning, the pigs in the injection group had higher plasma 25-OH D3 concentration than those in the other groups in both studies (p<0.05). In Exp. 3, water supplementation of vitamin D3 and E postweaning increased plasma 25-OH D3 and α-tocopherol concentrations at d 14 postweaning (p<0.01). In Exp. 4, when sows were injected with the vitamin D3 product prepartum, serum 25-OH D3 concentrations of sows at farrowing (p<0.01), and in their progeny at birth (p<0.01) and weaning (p<0.05) were increased. These results demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamin administration to newborn pigs increased plasma 25-OH D3 concentration regardless of administration routes and α-tocopherol concentration by the injectable route, and that water supplementation of vitamin D3 and E to nursery pigs increased plasma 25-OH D3 and α-tocopherol concentrations. Additionally, injecting sows with vitamin D3 prepartum increased 25-OH D3 in sows and their offspring. If continued research demonstrates that the serum levels of 25-OH D

  9. Induction of seroconversion and persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs are strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Alexander; Boyen, Filip; Leyman, Bregje; Verbrugghe, Elin; Maes, Dominiek; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Salmonella Typhimurium pathogenesis is host species specific. In addition, differences in in vitro behaviour of Salmonella Typhimurium strains have also been described, which may be reflected by a different course of infection within a host species. We compared the course of a Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs, using two Salmonella Typhimurium strains that were able to interfere with MHC II expression on porcine macrophages to a different extent in vitro. After experimental inoculation, blood and faecal samples from all pigs were collected at regular time points. At 40 days post inoculation (pi), animals were euthanized and tissue samples were bacteriologically analysed. The proportion of serologically positive piglets at 33 days pi was significantly higher in pigs that were inoculated with the strain that did not downregulate MHC II expression in vitro. Furthermore, this strain was less frequently shed and isolated in lower numbers from tonsils and ileocaecal lymph nodes than the strain that was able to markedly downregulate MHC II expression in vitro. We thus found that the delayed onset of seroconversion after oral inoculation of piglets with a particular Salmonella Typhimurium strain coincided with higher faecal shedding and increased persistence. Strain specific differences in Salmonella pathogenesis might thus have repercussions on the serological detection of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs.

  10. Evaluation of the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in virus-inoculated feed.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Loni L; Woodworth, Jason C; Jones, Cassandra K; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Gauger, Phillip C; Stark, Charles R; Main, Rodger G; Hesse, Richard A; Tokach, Mike D; Dritz, Steve S

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum infectious dose of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in virus-inoculated feed. ANIMALS 30 crossbred 10-day-old pigs. PROCEDURES Tissue culture PEDV was diluted to form 8 serial 10-fold dilutions. An aliquot of stock virus (5.6 × 10(5) TCID50/mL) and each serial PEDV dilution were mixed into 4.5-kg batches of feed to create 9 PEDV-inoculated feed doses; 1 virus-negative dose of culture medium in feed was also created. Pigs were challenge exposed via oral administration of PEDV-inoculated feed, and fecal swab specimens were collected. All pigs were euthanized 7 days after challenge exposure; fresh tissues were collected and used for PCR assay, histologic examination, and immunohistochemical analysis. RESULTS The PCR cycle threshold (Ct) decreased by approximately 10 when PEDV was added to feed, compared with results for equivalent PEDV diluted in tissue culture medium. Pigs became infected with PEDV when challenge exposed with the 4 highest concentrations (lowest concentration to cause infection, 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g; Ct = 27 in tissue culture medium and 37 in feed). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, PEDV in feed with detectable Ct values of 27 to 37 was infective. The Ct was 37 for the lowest infective PEDV dose in feed, which may be above the limit of detection established for PEDV PCR assays used by some diagnostic laboratories. Overall, results indicated 5.6 × 10(1) TCID50/g was the minimum PEDV dose in feed that can lead to infection in 10-day-old pigs under the conditions of this study.

  11. Systematic and intestinal antibody-secreting cell responses and correlates of protective immunity to human rotavirus in a gnotobiotic pig model of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Rosen, B I; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1996-01-01

    Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs orally inoculated with virulent (intestinal-suspension) Wa strain human rotavirus (which mimics human natural infection) developed diarrhea, and most pigs which recovered (87% protection rate) were immune to disease upon homologous virulent virus challenge at postinoculation day (PID) 21. Pigs inoculated with cell culture-attenuated Wa rotavirus (which mimics live oral vaccines) developed subclinical infections and seroconverted but were only partially protected against challenge (33% protection rate). Isotype-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC were enumerated at selected PID in intestinal (duodenal and ileal lamina propria and mesenteric lymph node [MLN]) and systemic (spleen and blood) lymphoid tissues by using enzyme-linked immunospot assays. At challenge (PID 21), the numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) ASC, but not IgG ASC, in intestines and blood were significantly greater in virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs than in attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs and were correlated (correlation coefficients: for duodenum and ileum, 0.9; for MLN, 0.8; for blood, 0.6) with the degree of protection induced. After challenge, the numbers of IgA and IgG virus-specific ASC and serum-neutralizing antibodies increased significantly in the attenuated-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs but not in the virulent-Wa rotavirus-inoculated pigs (except in the spleen and except for IgA ASC in the duodenum). The transient appearance of IgA ASC in the blood mirrored the IgA ASC responses in the gut, albeit at a lower level, suggesting that IgA ASC in the blood of humans could serve as an indicator for IgA ASC responses in the intestine after rotavirus infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report to study and identify intestinal IgA ASC as a correlate of protective active immunity in an animal model of human-rotavirus-induced disease. PMID:8627786

  12. Comparison of PRRSV Nucleic Acid and Antibody Detection in Pen-Based Oral Fluid and Individual Serum Samples in Three Different Age Categories of Post-Weaning Pigs from Endemically Infected Farms

    PubMed Central

    De Regge, Nick; Cay, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of an economically important disease in swine. Since it has been shown that PRRSV and PRRSV specific antibodies can be detected in oral fluid, many different aspects have been studied to show that oral fluid could be a worthy alternative diagnostic sample to serum for monitoring and surveillance of this disease. Thorough field evaluations are however missing to convincingly show its usefulness under representative field conditions. Methodology Pen-based oral fluid samples and serum samples from all individual pigs in the corresponding pens were collected from post-weaning pigs of three different age categories in eight endemically PRRSV infected farms and one PRRSV free farm in Belgium. All samples were tested by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA to detect PRRSV RNA and PRRSV specific antibodies, respectively. Results While the relative specificity of PRRSV detection by qRT-PCR in pen-based oral fluid compared to serum collected from individual pigs was high in all age categories (>90%), the relative sensitivity decreased with the age of the pigs (89, 93 and 10% in 8-12w, 16-20w and 24-28w old pigs, respectively). The latter correlated with a lower percentage of PRRSV positive pigs in serum/pen in the different age categories (55, 29 and 6%, respectively). Irrespective of the age category, pen-based oral fluid samples were always found PCR positive when at least 30% of the individual pigs were positive in serum. PRRSV specific antibody detection in oral fluid by ELISA showed a 100% relative sensitivity to detection in serum since oral fluid samples were always positive as soon as one pig in the pen was positive in serum. On the other hand, two false positive oral fluid samples in 11 pens without serum positive pigs were found, resulting in a relative specificity of 82%. Indications are however present that the oral fluid

  13. Protective immunity by oral immunization with heat-killed Shigella strains in a guinea pig colitis model.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Koley, Hemanta; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chakrabarti, Manoj Kumar; Shinoda, Sumio; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2013-11-01

    The protective efficacy of and immune response to heat-killed cells of monovalent and hexavalent mixtures of six serogroups/serotypes of Shigella strains (Shigella dysenteriae 1, Shigella flexneri 2a, S. flexneri 3a, S. flexneri 6, Shigella boydii 4, and Shigella sonnei) were examined in a guinea pig colitis model. A monovalent or hexavalent mixture containing 1 × 10(7) of each serogroup/serotype of heat-killed Shigella cells was administered orally on Days 0, 7, 14 and 21. On Day 28, the immunized animals were challenged rectally with 1 × 10(9) live virulent cells of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes. In all immunized groups, significant levels of protection were observed after these challenges. The serum titers of IgG and IgA against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes increased exponential during the course of immunization. High IgA titers against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes were also observed in intestinal lavage fluid from all immunized animals. These data indicate that a hexavalent mixture of heat-killed cells of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes studied would be a possible broad-spectrum candidate vaccine against shigellosis.

  14. Does the method of resection affect the margins of tumours in the oral cavity? Prospective controlled study in pigs.

    PubMed

    George, Katherine S; Hyde, Nicholas C; Wilson, Philip; Smith, Graham I

    2013-10-01

    It is important to obtain tumour-free resection margins in patients with oral cancer. Pathological processing is known to cause tissue to shrink, which affects the reported margins, and it is postulated that the method of resection also has an effect. We marked standardised simulated lesions on the tongues of 15 live anaesthetised pigs and divided each lesion into four equal sections. They were resected each with a margin of 10mm using cutting diathermy, coagulative diathermy, Harmonic scalpel, and a conventional scalpel. After processing, the excision margins were measured. With cutting diathermy and coagulative diathermy, shrinkage of the soft tissues was minimal relative to the margin of the simulated lesion compared with the Harmonic scalpel (p=0.001) and conventional scalpel (p=0.001). Cutting diathermy and coagulative diathermy caused significant thermal damage (p=0.001). The method of resection affects the surgical margin. Diathermy resulted in thermal injury and denaturing of the underlying muscle, but there was less tissue contraction than when the Harmonic scalpel and conventional scalpel were used. The ethics committee approved the study, which was undertaken in a registered European Scientific Institute in Hamburg.

  15. Use of Oral Fluids for Detection of Virus and Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Swine Vesicular Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, C; Bittner, H; Ambagala, A; Lung, O; Babiuk, S; Yang, M; Zimmerman, J; Giménez-Lirola, L G; Nfon, C

    2016-09-15

    The use of swine oral fluid (OF) for the detection of nucleic acids and antibodies is gaining significant popularity. Assays have been developed for this purpose for endemic and foreign animal diseases of swine. Here, we report the use of OF for the detection of virus and antibodies in pigs experimentally infected with swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), a virus that causes a disease clinically indistinguishable from the economically devastating foot-and-mouth disease. Viral genome was detected in OF by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (DPI) to 21 DPI. Virus isolation from OF was also successful at 1-5 DPI. An adapted competitive ELISA based on the monoclonal antibodies 5B7 detected antibodies to SVDV in OF starting at DPI 6. Additionally, using isotype-specific indirect ELISAs, SVDV-specific IgM and IgA were evaluated in OF. IgM response started at DPI 6, peaking at DPI 7 or 14 and declining sharply at DPI 21, while IgA response started at DPI 7, peaked at DPI 14 and remained high until the end of the experiment. These results confirm the potential use of OF for SVD surveillance using both established and partially validated assays in this study.

  16. In vivo contribution of deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside to deoxynivalenol exposure in broiler chickens and pigs: oral bioavailability, hydrolysis and toxicokinetics.

    PubMed

    Broekaert, Nathan; Devreese, Mathias; van Bergen, Thomas; Schauvliege, Stijn; De Boevre, Marthe; De Saeger, Sarah; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Berthiller, Franz; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachová, Alexandra; Adam, Gerhard; Vermeulen, An; Croubels, Siska

    2017-02-01

    Crossover animal trials were performed with intravenous and oral administration of deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside (DON3G) and deoxynivalenol (DON) to broiler chickens and pigs. Systemic plasma concentrations of DON, DON3G and de-epoxy-DON were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to unravel phase II metabolism of DON. Additionally for pigs, portal plasma was analysed to study presystemic hydrolysis and metabolism. Data were processed via tailor-made compartmental toxicokinetic models. The results in broiler chickens indicate that DON3G is not hydrolysed to DON in vivo. Furthermore, the absolute oral bioavailability of DON3G in broiler chickens was low (3.79 ± 2.68 %) and comparable to that of DON (5.56 ± 2.05 %). After PO DON3G administration to pigs, only DON was detected in plasma, indicating a complete presystemic hydrolysis of the absorbed fraction of DON3G. However, the absorbed fraction of DON3G, recovered as DON, was approximately 5 times lower than after PO DON administration, 16.1 ± 5.4 compared with 81.3 ± 17.4 %. Analysis of phase II metabolites revealed that biotransformation of DON and DON3G in pigs mainly consists of glucuronidation, whereas in chickens predominantly conjugation with sulphate occurred. The extent of phase II metabolism is notably higher for chickens than for pigs, which might explain the differences in sensitivity of these species to DON. Although in vitro studies demonstrate a decreased toxicity of DON3G compared with DON, the species-dependent toxicokinetic data and in vivo hydrolysis to DON illustrate the toxicological relevance and consequently the need for further research to establish a tolerable daily intake.

  17. Genome-wide relatedness of Treponema pedis, from gingiva and necrotic skin lesions of pigs, with the human oral pathogen Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Svartström, Olov; Mushtaq, Memoona; Pringle, Märit; Segerman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pedis and T. denticola are two genetically related species with different origins of isolation. Treponema denticola is part of the human oral microbiota and is associated with periodontitis while T. pedis has been isolated from skin lesions in animals, e.g., digital dermatitis in cattle and necrotic ulcers in pigs. Although multiple Treponema phylotypes may exist in ulcerative lesions in pigs, T. pedis appears to be a predominant spirochete in these lesions. Treponema pedis can also be present in pig gingiva. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of T. pedis strain T A4, isolated from a porcine necrotic ear lesion, and compared its genome with that of T. denticola. Most genes in T. pedis were homologous to those in T. denticola and the two species were similar in general genomic features such as size, G+C content, and number of genes. In addition, many homologues of specific virulence-related genes in T. denticola were found in T. pedis. Comparing a selected pair of strains will usually not give a complete picture of the relatedness between two species. We therefore complemented the analysis with draft genomes from six T. pedis isolates, originating from gingiva and necrotic ulcers in pigs, and from twelve T. denticola strains. Each strain carried a considerable amount of accessory genetic material, of which a large part was strain specific. There was also extensive sequence variability in putative virulence-related genes between strains belonging to the same species. Signs of lateral gene-transfer events from bacteria known to colonize oral environments were found. This suggests that the oral cavity is an important habitat for T. pedis. In summary, we found extensive genomic similarities between T. pedis and T. denticola but also large variability within each species.

  18. Induction of immune responses in mice and pigs by oral administration of classical swine fever virus E2 protein expressed in rice calli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Yun Ji; Kim, Ju; Cha, Seung-Bin; Lee, Won-Jung; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Seung Won; Yang, Moon-Sik; Jang, Yong-Suk; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by the CSF virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease in pigs. In Korea, vaccination using a live-attenuated strain (LOM strain) has been used to control the disease. However, parenteral vaccination using a live-attenuated strain still faces a number of problems related to storage, cost, injection stress, and differentiation of CSFV infected and vaccinated pigs. Therefore, two kinds of new candidates for oral vaccination have been developed based on the translation of the E2 gene of the SW03 strain, which was isolated from an outbreak of CSF in 2002 in Korea, in transgenic rice calli (TRCs) from Oriza sativa L. cv. Dongjin to express a recombinant E2 protein (rE2-TRCs). The expression of the recombinant E2 protein (rE2) in rE2-TRCs was confirmed using Northern blot, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis. Immune responses to the rE2-TRC in mice and pigs were investigated after oral administration. The administration of rE2-TRCs increased E2-specific antibodies titers and antibody-secreting cells when compared to animals receiving the vector alone (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). In addition, mice receiving rE2-TRCs had a higher level of CD8+ lymphocytes and Th1 cytokine immune responses to purified rE2 (prE2) in vitro than the controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01). Pigs receiving rE2-TRCs also showed an increase in IL-8, CCL2, and the CD8+ subpopulation in response to stimulation with prE2. These results suggest that oral administration of rE2-TRCs can induce E2-specific immune responses.

  19. Subchronic oral toxicity in guinea pigs of soot from a polychlorinated biphenyl-containing transformer fire

    SciTech Connect

    DeCaprio, A.P.; McMartin, D.N.; Silkworth, J.B.; Rej, R.; Pause, R.; Kaminsky, L.S.

    1983-04-01

    The soot was determined to contain polychlorinated biphenyls, biphenylenes, dibenzodioxins, and dibenzofurans. The present study evaluates soot toxicity in guinea pigs receiving 0, 0.2, 1.9, 9.3, or 46.3 ppm soot in the feed for 90 days or 231.5 ppm for 32 days. At 231.5 ppm, body weight loss, thymic atrophy, bone marrow depletion, skeletal muscle and gastrointestinal tract epithelial degeneration, and fatty infiltration of hepatocytes were observed. Mortality had reached 35% by Day 32 (when survivors were killed), with total soot consumption of approximately 400 mg/kg. At 46.3 or 9.3 ppm soot, a reduced rate of body weight gain was observed, and at 46.3 ppm, the mortality by Day 90 was 30%. Relative (to body) thymus weights were decreased in both groups, while relative spleen weights were increased at 46.3 ppm soot only. Salivary gland interlobular duct squamous metaplasia and focal lacrimal gland adenitis were detected histopathologically, while bone marrow depletion was noted only in females at the higher dose. Diminished serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity in both sexes and decreased serum sodium levels in male and potassium levels in female animals were detected at both dose levels. No effectse were noted in animals receiving 0.2 ppm soot for 90 days. Salivary gland duct metaplasia has not been previously reported. Toxic effects of this subchronic exposure were observed at lower total doses than with acute exposure, although variations in absorption due to the effects of different vehicles (aqueous in the acute study versus the feed in this study) could account for some or all of this difference.

  20. Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Guinea Pigs via Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing VP1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Pan, Li; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is an effective strategy for generating antigen-specific immune responses against mucosal infections of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum strains NC8 and WCFS1 were used as oral delivery vehicles containing a pSIP411-VP1 recombinant plasmid to initiate mucosal and systemic immune responses in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were orally vaccinated (three doses) with NC8-pSIP411, NC8-pSIP411-VP1, WCFS1-pSIP411, WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 or milk. Animals immunized with NC8-pSIP411-VP1 and WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 developed high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG, IgA, IgM, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) and neutralizing antibodies, and revealed stronger cell-mediated immune responses and enhanced protection against FMDV challenge compared with control groups. The recombinant pSIP411-VP1 effectively improved immunoprotection against FMDV in guinea pigs. PMID:26629822

  1. Protection against Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Guinea Pigs via Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing VP1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Pan, Li; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhongwang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination is an effective strategy for generating antigen-specific immune responses against mucosal infections of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). In this study, Lactobacillus plantarum strains NC8 and WCFS1 were used as oral delivery vehicles containing a pSIP411-VP1 recombinant plasmid to initiate mucosal and systemic immune responses in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were orally vaccinated (three doses) with NC8-pSIP411, NC8-pSIP411-VP1, WCFS1-pSIP411, WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 or milk. Animals immunized with NC8-pSIP411-VP1 and WCFS1-pSIP411-VP1 developed high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG, IgA, IgM, mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA) and neutralizing antibodies, and revealed stronger cell-mediated immune responses and enhanced protection against FMDV challenge compared with control groups. The recombinant pSIP411-VP1 effectively improved immunoprotection against FMDV in guinea pigs.

  2. Oral vaccination against mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine using a live Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae vaccine strain as a vector.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yohsuke; Oishi, Eiji; Muneta, Yoshihiro; Sano, Akiyuki; Hikono, Hirokazu; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Yagi, Yukio; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2009-07-16

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Koganei 65-0.15 strain, the live swine erysipelas vaccine for subcutaneous injection, has been shown to colonize the tonsils of pigs after oral inoculation. We thus evaluated the possible use of the strain as a vector for oral vaccination against mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine. Recombinant E. rhusiopathiae strains expressing the C-terminal domain of the P97 adhesin of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were constructed and examined for vaccine efficacy in mice and pigs. Mice subcutaneously inoculated with the recombinant strains were protected from challenge exposure to a virulent E. rhusiopathiae. Administration of milk replacer containing recombinant E. rhusiopathiae expressing the M. hyopneumoniae protein protected pigs from death after exposure to E. rhusiopathiae and significantly reduced the severity of pneumonic lung lesions caused by infection with M. hyopneumoniae.

  3. Escherichia coli Probiotic Strain ED1a in Pigs Has a Limited Impact on the Gut Carriage of Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing E. coli.

    PubMed

    Mourand, G; Paboeuf, F; Fleury, M A; Jouy, E; Bougeard, S; Denamur, E; Kempf, I

    2017-01-01

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate the impact of Escherichia coli probiotic strain ED1a administration to pigs on the gut carriage or survival in manure of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing E. coli Groups of pigs were orally inoculated with strain E. coli M63 carrying the blaCTX-M-1 gene (n = 84) or used as a control (n = 26). In the first two trials, 24 of 40 E. coli M63-inoculated pigs were given E. coli ED1a orally for 6 days starting 8 days after oral inoculation. In the third trial, 10 E. coli M63-inoculated pigs were given either E. coli ED1a or probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 for 5 days. In the fourth trial, E. coli ED1a was given to a sow and its 12 piglets, and these 12 piglets plus 12 piglets that had not received E. coli ED1a were then inoculated with E. coli M63. Fecal shedding of cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CTX-RE) was studied by culture, and blaCTX-M-1 genes were quantified by PCR. The persistence of CTX-RE in manure samples from inoculated pigs or manure samples inoculated in vitro with E. coli M63 with or without probiotics was studied. The results showed that E. coli M63 and ED1a were good gut colonizers. The reduction in the level of fecal excretion of CTX-RE in E. coli ED1a-treated pigs compared to that in nontreated pigs was usually less than 1 log10 CFU and was mainly observed during the probiotic administration period. The results obtained with E. coli Nissle 1917 did not differ significantly from those obtained with E. coli ED1a. CTX-RE survival did not differ significantly in manure samples with or without probiotic treatment. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, E. coli ED1a and E. coli Nissle 1917 could not durably prevent CTX-RE colonization of the pig gut.

  4. Sexually dimorphic innate immune responses but not tissue Salmonella translocation patterns in pigs exposed to an oral Salmonella challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexually dimorphic innate immune responses have been observed in several species, but have not been studied in response to a live pathogen challenge in pigs. This study aimed to elucidate sexually dimorphic innate immune responses along with Salmonella translocation patterns in newly weaned pigs ora...

  5. CpG DNA facilitate the inactivated transmissible gastroenteritis virus in enhancing the local and systemic immune response of pigs via oral administration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Tu, Chongzhi; Mou, Chunxiao; Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) replicates in the small intestine and induces enteritis and watery diarrhea. Establishment of local immunity in the intestine would thus prevent TGEV transmission. CpG DNA has been reported as a promising mucosal adjuvant in some animals. The effects of oral immunization of CpG DNA together with inactivated TGEV (ITGEV) were investigated in this study. Pigs (6 weeks old) were orally immunized with ITGEV plus CpG DNA. The TGEV-specific IgA level in the intestinal tract and the TGEV-specific IgG level in serum significantly increased following immunization with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Moreover, populations of IgA-secreting cells, CD3+ T lymphocytes and intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), in the intestine increased significantly after immunization with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of IL-6, IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in ligated intestine segments increased significantly after injection with ITGEV plus CpG DNA (P ≤ 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that oral immunization of ITGEV plus CpG DNA elicits a local immune response. Further studies are required to determine whether this immunity provides protection against TGEV in pigs.

  6. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection. PMID:27610023

  7. Clinical signs, pathology and dose-dependent survival of adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, inoculated orally with frog virus 3 Ranavirus sp., Iridoviridae.

    PubMed

    Forzn, Mara J; Jones, Kathleen M; Vanderstichel, Raphal V; Wood, John; Kibenge, Frederick S B; Kuiken, Thijs; Wirth, Wytamma; Ariel, Ellen; Daoust, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    Amphibian populations suffer massive mortalities from infection with frog virus 3 FV3, genus Ranavirus, family Iridoviridae, a pathogen also involved in mortalities of fish and reptiles. Experimental oral infection with FV3 in captive-raised adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica Lithobates sylvaticus, was performed as the first step in establishing a native North American animal model of ranaviral disease to study pathogenesis and host response. Oral dosing was successful LD50 was 10(2.93 2.423.44) p.f.u. for frogs averaging 35mm in length. Onset of clinical signs occurred 614days post-infection p.i. median 11 days p.i. and time to death was 1014 days p.i. median 12 days p.i.. Each tenfold increase in virus dose increased the odds of dying by 23-fold and accelerated onset of clinical signs and death by approximately 15. Ranavirus DNA was demonstrated in skin and liver of all frogs that died or were euthanized because of severe clinical signs. Shedding of virus occurred in faeces 710 days p.i. 34.5days before death and skin sheds 10 days p.i. 01.5days before death of some frogs dead from infection. Most common lesions were dermal erosion and haemorrhages haematopoietic necrosis in bone marrow, kidney, spleen and liver and necrosis in renal glomeruli, tongue, gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder mucosa. Presence of ranavirus in lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies probably viral were present in the bone marrow and the epithelia of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, renal tubules and urinary bladder. Our work describes a ranaviruswood frog model and provides estimates that can be incorporated into ranavirus disease ecology models.

  8. Fate of Transgenic DNA from Orally Administered Bt MON810 Maize and Effects on Immune Response and Growth in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Maria C.; Buzoianu, Stefan G.; Gardiner, Gillian E.; Rea, Mary C.; Gelencsér, Eva; Jánosi, Anna; Epstein, Michelle M.; Ross, R. Paul; Lawlor, Peadar G.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of short-term feeding of genetically modified (GM: Bt MON810) maize on immune responses and growth in weanling pigs and determined the fate of the transgenic DNA and protein in-vivo. Pigs were fed a diet containing 38.9% GM or non-GM isogenic parent line maize for 31 days. We observed that IL-12 and IFNγ production from mitogenic stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased (P<0.10) following 31 days of GM maize exposure. While Cry1Ab-specific IgG and IgA were not detected in the plasma of GM maize-fed pigs, the detection of the cry1Ab gene and protein was limited to the gastrointestinal digesta and was not found in the kidneys, liver, spleen, muscle, heart or blood. Feeding GM maize to weanling pigs had no effect on growth performance or body weight. IL-6 and IL-4 production from isolated splenocytes were increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize while the proportion of CD4+ T cells in the spleen decreased. In the ileum, the proportion of B cells and macrophages decreased while the proportion of CD4+ T cells increased in GM maize-fed pigs. IL-8 and IL-4 production from isolated intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes were also increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize. In conclusion, there was no evidence of cry1Ab gene or protein translocation to the organs and blood of weaning pigs. The growth of pigs was not affected by feeding GM maize. Alterations in immune responses were detected; however, their biologic relevance is questionable. PMID:22132091

  9. Fate of transgenic DNA from orally administered Bt MON810 maize and effects on immune response and growth in pigs.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Maria C; Buzoianu, Stefan G; Gardiner, Gillian E; Rea, Mary C; Gelencsér, Eva; Jánosi, Anna; Epstein, Michelle M; Ross, R Paul; Lawlor, Peadar G

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of short-term feeding of genetically modified (GM: Bt MON810) maize on immune responses and growth in weanling pigs and determined the fate of the transgenic DNA and protein in-vivo. Pigs were fed a diet containing 38.9% GM or non-GM isogenic parent line maize for 31 days. We observed that IL-12 and IFNγ production from mitogenic stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased (P<0.10) following 31 days of GM maize exposure. While Cry1Ab-specific IgG and IgA were not detected in the plasma of GM maize-fed pigs, the detection of the cry1Ab gene and protein was limited to the gastrointestinal digesta and was not found in the kidneys, liver, spleen, muscle, heart or blood. Feeding GM maize to weanling pigs had no effect on growth performance or body weight. IL-6 and IL-4 production from isolated splenocytes were increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize while the proportion of CD4(+) T cells in the spleen decreased. In the ileum, the proportion of B cells and macrophages decreased while the proportion of CD4(+) T cells increased in GM maize-fed pigs. IL-8 and IL-4 production from isolated intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes were also increased (P<0.05) in response to feeding GM maize. In conclusion, there was no evidence of cry1Ab gene or protein translocation to the organs and blood of weaning pigs. The growth of pigs was not affected by feeding GM maize. Alterations in immune responses were detected; however, their biologic relevance is questionable.

  10. Use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on growth performance and microbiota of weaned pigs during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Price, K L; Totty, H R; Lee, H B; Utt, M D; Fitzner, G E; Yoon, I; Ponder, M A; Escobar, J

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobically fermented yeast products are a rich source of nutritional metabolites, mannanoligosaccharides, and β-glucans that may optimize gut health and immunity, which can translate into better growth performance and a reduced risk of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (Diamond V Original XPC) inclusion in nursery diets on pig performance and gastrointestinal microbial ecology before, during, and after an oral challenge with Salmonella. Pigs (n = 40) were weaned at 21 d of age, blocked by BW, and assigned in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement consisting of diet (control or 0.2% XPC) and inoculation (sterile broth or Salmonella). Pigs were fed a 3-phase nursery diet (0 to 7 d, 7 to 21 d, and 21 to 35 d) with ad libitum access to water and feed. On d 14, pigs were orally inoculated with 10(9) cfu of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 or sterile broth. During d 17 to 20, all pigs were treated with a 5 mg/kg of BW intramuscular injection of ceftiofur-HCl. Growth performance and alterations in the gastrointestinal microbial ecology were measured during preinoculation (PRE; 0 to 14 d), sick (SCK; 14 to 21 d), and postinoculation (POST; 21 to 35 d). Body weight and ADG were measured weekly. Rectal temperature (RT) was measured weekly during PRE and POST, and every 12 h during SCK. Diet had no effect on BW, ADG, or RT during any period (P = 0.12 to 0.95). Inclusion of XPC tended (P < 0.10) to increase Salmonella shedding in feces during SCK. Consumption of XPC altered the composition of the gastrointestinal microbial community, resulting in increased (P < 0.05) populations of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus after Salmonella infection. Pigs inoculated with Salmonella had decreased ADG and BW, and increased RT during SCK (P < 0.001). Furthermore, fecal Salmonella cfu (log(10)) was modestly correlated (P = 0.002) with BW (r = -0.22), ADFI (r = -0.27), ADG (r = -0.36), G:F (r

  11. Effect of modified-live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) vaccine on the shedding of wild-type virus from an infected population of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniel C L; Cano, Jean Paul; Wetzell, Thomas; Nerem, Joel; Torremorell, Montserrat; Dee, Scott A

    2012-01-05

    There are ongoing efforts to eliminate porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) from regions in the United States swine industry. However, an important challenge for the accomplishment of those efforts is the re-infection of pig units due to the area spread of PRRSv. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of PRRS modified-live virus vaccine (MLV) on viral shedding and on dynamics of PRRSv infection in pig populations raised under commercial conditions. The study composed of two rooms of 1000 pigs each. Ten percent of pigs of each room were inoculated with a field isolate of PRRSv. Rooms had separate air spaces and strict scientifically validated biosecurity protocols were adopted to avoid movement of pathogens between rooms. At 8 and 36 dpi (days post inoculation), all pigs of the challenge-vaccine group were inoculated with a MLV vaccine. Pigs of the challenge-control group were placebo-inoculated. Blood and oral fluid samples were collected from each room at 0, 8, 36, 70, 96 and 118 dpi for PRRSv RNA detection using PCR. PRRSv-antibodies were also screened from blood serum samples with a commercially available ELISA test. Additionally, tonsil scraping samples were collected from both groups at 70, 96 and 118 dpi. Moreover, air samples were collected 6 times per week from 0 to 118 dpi and were tested for PRRSv RNA using qPCR assay. There was no difference in the PRRSv infection dynamics measured as duration and magnitude of viremia and seroconversion. Also, there was no difference in the frequency of tonsil scraping samples PRRSv-positive by PCR. However, the challenge-vaccine group had significantly less PRRSv shed compared to the challenge-control group. The challenge-vaccine group had significant less PRRSv-positive oral fluids at 36 dpi. Moreover, the challenge-vaccine group had significant reduction in the cumulative PRRSv shed in the air.

  12. Inoculating for smallpox.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jan

    2003-04-01

    In California, one hospital decided the time was right to inoculate staff volunteers with the smallpox vaccine. Weighing the same pros and cons--civic responsibility, health risk, cost and reluctance of staff--other hospitals opted out of inoculations, at least for now. What led these organizations to such divergent decisions?

  13. Effect of irradiation on the viability of Toxoplasma gondii cysts in tissues of mice and pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, J.P.; Brake, R.J.; Murrell, K.D.; Fayer, R.

    1986-03-01

    Muscles from tongue, heart, and limbs of 14 pigs inoculated orally with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts were irradiated with 10, 20, 25, and 30 krad of gamma (cesium-137 and cobalt-60) irradiation. Viability of T gondii cysts was assayed by feeding porcine muscles to T gondii-free cats and/or by inoculation of sediment from acid-pepsin digested porcine muscle into mice. Cats fed 500-g samples of muscles irradiated with up to 20 krad shed T gondii oocysts. Cats fed muscles irradiated with 25 or 30 krad did not shed oocysts. Mice were inoculated with 8 isolates of T gondii, and tissue cysts in their brains irradiated with up to 40 krad were infective to mice; however, there was a 10,000-fold reduction in the viability of organisms in tissue cysts irradiated with 40 krad, compared with that in nonirradiated cysts. At 50 krad of gamma irradiation, there were no detectable infective organisms in infected mouse brains.

  14. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies.

  15. Effect of feed supplementation with live yeast on the intestinal transcriptome profile of weaning pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli F4.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Latorre, R; Priori, D; Luise, D; Archetti, I; Mazzoni, M; D'Inca, R; Bosi, P

    2017-01-01

    The ability of live yeasts to modulate pig intestinal cell signals in response to infection with Escherichia coli F4ac (ETEC) has not been studied in-depth. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-4407 (Sc), supplied at different times, on the transcriptome profile of the jejunal mucosa of pigs 24 h after infection with ETEC. In total, 20 piglets selected to be ETEC-susceptible were weaned at 24 days of age (day 0) and allotted by litter to one of following groups: control (CO), CO+colistin (AB), CO+5×1010 colony-forming unit (CFU) Sc/kg feed, from day 0 (PR) and CO+5×1010 CFU Sc/kg feed from day 7 (CM). On day 7, the pigs were orally challenged with ETEC and were slaughtered 24 h later after blood sampling for haptoglobin (Hp) and C-reactive protein (CRP) determination. The jejunal mucosa was sampled (1) for morphometry; (2) for quantification of proliferation, apoptosis and zonula occludens (ZO-1); (3) to carry out the microarray analysis. A functional analysis was carried out using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The normalized enrichment score (NES) was calculated for each gene set, and statistical significance was defined when the False Discovery Rate % was <25 and P-values of NES were <0.05. The blood concentration of CRP and Hp, and the score for ZO-1 integrity on the jejunal villi did not differ between groups. The intestinal crypts were deeper in the AB (P=0.05) and the yeast groups (P<0.05) than in the CO group. Antibiotic treatment increased the number of mitotic cells in intestinal villi as compared with the control group (P<0.05). The PR group tended to increase the mitotic cells in villi and crypts and tended to reduce the cells in apoptosis as compared with the CM group. The transcriptome profiles of the AB and PR groups were similar. In both groups, the gene sets involved in mitosis and in mitochondria development ranked the highest, whereas in the CO group, the gene sets related to cell junction and anion

  16. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  17. Direct contact and environmental contaminations are responsible for HEV transmission in pigs.

    PubMed

    Andraud, Mathieu; Dumarest, Marine; Cariolet, Roland; Aylaj, Bouchra; Barnaud, Elodie; Eono, Florent; Pavio, Nicole; Rose, Nicolas

    2013-10-28

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) can cause enterically-transmitted hepatitis in humans. The zoonotic nature of Hepatitis E infections has been established in industrialized areas and domestic pigs are considered as the main reservoir. The dynamics of transmission in pig herds therefore needs to be understood to reduce the prevalence of viremic pigs at slaughter and prevent contaminated pig products from entering the food chain. An experimental trial was carried out to study the main characteristics of HEV transmission between orally inoculated pigs and naïve animals. A mathematical model was used to investigate three transmission routes, namely direct contact between pigs and two environmental components to represent within-and between-group oro-fecal transmission. A large inter-individual variability was observed in response to infection with an average latent period lasting 6.9 days (5.8; 7.9) in inoculated animals and an average infectious period of 9.7 days (8.2; 11.2). Our results show that direct transmission alone, with a partial reproduction number of 1.41 (0.21; 3.02), can be considered as a factor of persistence of infection within a population. However, the quantity of virus present in the environment was found to play an essential role in the transmission process strongly influencing the probability of infection with a within pen transmission rate estimated to 2 · 10(-6)g ge(-1)d(-1)(1 · 10(-7); 7 · 10(-6)). Between-pen environmental transmission occurred to a lesser extent (transmission rate: 7 · 10(-8)g ge(-1) d(-1)(5 · 10(-9); 3 · 10(-7)) but could further generate a within-group process. The combination of these transmission routes could explain the persistence and high prevalence of HEV in pig populations.

  18. Effect of high oral doses of nitrate on salivary recirculation of nitrates and nitrites and on bacterial diversity in the saliva of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Casini, L; Nisi, I; Messori, S; Bosi, P

    2011-04-01

    Ingested nitrate is absorbed in the small intestine, recirculated into the saliva and reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. In pigs receiving a moderate dietary addition of nitrate, the recirculation into the saliva is modest, so we aimed to assess the effect of higher nitrate doses to find out how the animal reacts to this new situation and to evaluate if a higher nitrate level could enhance the nitrate reduction process, improving the nitrite production Trial 1. Six piglets received 100 g of a commercial diet with 2.45% KNO(3) . In relation to baseline values, nitrate in blood serum and saliva increased 15 times, and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Salivary nitrite increased seven times after the addition and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Trial 2. Six piglets were fed a diet with or without 1.22% KNO(3) for 2 weeks. Salivary nitrate and nitrite increased with the addition of KNO3: nitrate increased from d0 to the end of the trial, nitrite increased 15 times after 1 week, but decreased after 2 weeks to 4.5-fold the control. After 2 weeks, nitrate reduced Shan diversity index of salivary microbiota. The present results indicate that the long exposure to high quantities of nitrates impairs the oral reduction of nitrate to nitrite and engenders a reduction of the mouth's microbiota diversity.

  19. Experimental Salmonella Enterica Infection in Market-weight Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Market pigs infected with Salmonella pose a significant food safety risk by carrying the pathogen into abattoirs. A study was conducted to determine the dynamic of Salmonella infection in market-weight pigs (220-240 lbs.). Pigs (n=24) were individually inoculated (intranasally; 108 cfu/mL) with Salm...

  20. High dose and low dose Lactobacilli acidophilus exerted differential immune modulating effects on T cell immune responses induced by an oral human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Li, Yanru; Kocher, Jacob; Lin, Lin; Yang, Xingdong; Yuan, Lijuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Strain-specific effects of probiotics in pro- or anti-inflammatory immune responses have been well recognized. Several proinflammatory Lactobacillus strains have been shown to act as adjuvants to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines. However, dose effects of probiotics in modulating immune responses are not clearly understood. This study examined the dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) NCFM strain on T cell immune responses to rotavirus vaccination in a gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model. Methods Frequencies of IFN-γ producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and IL-10 and TGF-β producing CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- regulatory T (Treg) cell responses were determined in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues of Gn pigs vaccinated with an oral human rotavirus vaccine in conjunction with low dose (5 feedings; up to 106 colony forming units [CFU]/dose) or high dose (14 feedings; up to 109 CFU/dose) or without LA feeding. Results Low dose LA significantly promoted IFN-γ producing T cell responses and down-regulated Treg cell responses and their TGF-β and IL-10 productions in all the tissues compared to the high dose LA and control groups. To the contrary, high dose LA increased the frequencies of Treg cells in most of the tissues compared to the control groups. The dose effects of LA on IFN-γ producing T cell and CD4+CD25- Treg cell immune responses were similar in the intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues and were independent from the vaccination. Conclusion Thus the same probiotic strain in different doses can either promote or suppress IFN-γ producing T cell or Treg cell immune responses. These findings have significant implications in the use of probiotic lactobacilli as immunostimulatory versus immunoregulatory agents. Probiotics can be ineffective or even detrimental if not used at the optimal dosage for the appropriate purposes. PMID:22178726

  1. Inoculation lupus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, V N; Jain, S; Gupta, R

    1992-01-01

    An 11-years-old girl with lupus vulgaris on the right buttock following inoculation is described. The diagnosis was formed by the history, morphological characteristics, Mantoux test, histopathology, and was supported by an affirmative response to short course intensive chemotherapy (6 months). This route of infection acquires special significance with the worldwide-spread of HIV infection.

  2. Penetration of oxytetracycline into the nasal secretions and relationship between nasal secretions and plasma oxytetracycline concentrations after oral and intramuscular administration in healthy pigs.

    PubMed

    Bimazubute, M; Cambier, C; Baert, K; Vanbelle, S; Chiap, P; Gustin, P

    2011-04-01

    The penetration of oxytetracycline (OTC) in plasma and nasal secretions of healthy pigs was evaluated during the first study, in response to oral dose of 20 mg of OTC per kg of body weight (bwt) per day as a 400 mg/kg feed medication (n = 5) and to intramuscular (i.m.)-administered formulations at 10 mg/kg bwt (n = 5), 20 mg/kg bwt (n = 5), 40 mg/kg bwt (n = 5). Concentrations of OTC in plasma and nasal secretions were determined by a validated ultra-high performance liquid chromatography associated to tandem mass spectrometry method (UPLC/MS/MS). The objectives were to select the efficacy treatment and to evaluate the possibility to predict nasal secretions concentrations from those determined in plasma. The animals were housed together in each experiment. In each group, the treatment was administered once daily during 6 consecutive days, and nasal secretions and plasma were collected after 4 and 24 h at day 2 and day 6. For oral administration, only one medicated feed was prepared and distributed to all the animals together and was consumed in approximately 1 h. To meet recommendations of efficacy for OTC in nasal secretions, only the i.m. of 40 mg/kg bwt associated to an inter-dosing interval of 24 h provides and maintains concentrations in nasal secretions ≥1 μg/mL, appropriate to the MIC 50 and 90 of Pasteurella multocida and Bordetella bronchiseptica, respectively, the main pathological strains in nasal secretions. It has been demonstrated that, using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), OTC in the nasal secretions (μg/mL) can be predicted taking into account the OTC concentrations in plasma (μg/mL), according to the following equation: OTC(nasal secretions)  = 0.28 OTC(plasma) -1.49. In a second study, the pharmacokinetic behaviour of OTC in plasma and nasal secretions of healthy pigs was investigated, after single-dose i.m. of 40 mg/kg bwt of the drug. Blood samples and nasal secretions were collected at

  3. Gastric stability and oral bioavailability of colistin sulfate in pigs challenged or not with Escherichia coli O149: F4 (K88).

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Thériault, William; Bergeron, Nadia; Laurent-Lewandowski, Sylvette; Fairbrother, John Morris; Letellier, Ann

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro gastric stability of colistin sulfate (CS) and its antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and to study the impact of ETEC O149: F4 (K88) infection in pigs on CS intestinal absorption. The stability profile of CS was evaluated in a simulated gastric fluid (SGF). Antimicrobial activity of CS and its degradation products were examined in a 96-well polystyrene microplate model. The effect of experimental infection with ETEC O149: F4 on CS intestinal absorption was determined by quantification of CS systemic concentration using a validated LC-MS/MS method. A rapid degradation of CS accompanied by an increase in CS antimicrobial activity by comparison with non-degraded CS (P<0.0001) was observed in SGF. Additionally, CS levels were not quantifiable in systemic circulation using a highly sensitive method and concurrent oral challenge did not affect CS absorption in an induction model of subclinical post-weaning diarrhea (PWD).

  4. Risk Factors for Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli in Pigs Receiving Oral Antimicrobial Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Burow, Elke; Käsbohrer, Annemarie

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this literature review was to identify risk factors in addition to antimicrobial treatment for antimicrobial resistance (AMR) occurrence in commensal Escherichia coli in pigs. A variety of studies were searched in 2014 and 2015. Studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed against eligibility criteria such as observation or experiment (no review), presentation of risk factors in addition to (single dosage) antimicrobial use, risk factors for but not resulting from AMR, and the same antimicrobial used and tested. Thirteen articles (nine on observational, four on experimental studies) were finally selected as relevant. It was reported that space allowance, production size/stage, cleanliness, entry of animals and humans into herds, dosage/frequency/route of administration, time span between treatment and sampling date, herd size, distance to another farm, coldness, and season had an impact on AMR occurrence. Associations were shown by one to four studies per factor and differed in magnitude, direction, and level of significance. The risk of bias was unclear in nearly half of the information of observational studies and in most of the information from experimental studies. Further research on the effects of specific management practices is needed to develop well-founded management advice.

  5. Long-term oral administration of glucosamine or chondroitin sulfate reduces destruction of cartilage and up-regulation of MMP-3 mRNA in a model of spontaneous osteoarthritis in Hartley guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shin; Ryu, Junnosuke; Seki, Masayuki; Sumino, Takanobu; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Esumi, Mariko

    2012-05-01

    Histological and molecular changes were examined to investigate the effects of long-term administration of glucosamine (GlcN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) in a model of spontaneous osteoarthritis (OA) in Hartley guinea pigs. Three groups of female 3-week-old Hartley guinea pigs received GlcN, CS, and neither agent, respectively. Five animals in each group were sacrificed at 8, 12, and 18 months of age. At 8 months of age, Hartley guinea pigs had severe degeneration of knee joint cartilage, chondrocyte apoptosis, marked reduction of tissue total RNA, decreases of aggrecan and collagen type 2 mRNAs, and increases in MMP-3 and MMP-8 mRNAs. Long-term administration of GlcN and CS reduced cartilage degeneration at 8 months of age. The marked loss of total RNA and the increase in MMP-3 mRNA were also inhibited by GlcN and CS. Thus, long-term oral administration of GlcN or CS inhibits OA progression, maintains total RNA and down-regulates MMP-3 mRNA in a spontaneous OA model in Hartley guinea pigs.

  6. [Design of SCM inoculation device].

    PubMed

    Qian, Mingli; Xie, Haiyuan

    2014-01-01

    The first step of bacilli culture is inoculation bacteria on culture medium. Designing a device to increase efficiency of inoculation is significative. The new device is controlled by SCM. The stepper motor can drive the culture medium rotating, accelerating, decelerating, overturn and suspending. The device is high practicability and efficient, let inoculation easy for operator.

  7. In Vitro Development and Characterization of a Tissue-Engineered Conduit Resembling Esophageal Wall Using Human and Pig Skeletal Myoblast, Oral Epithelial Cells, and Biologic Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Poghosyan, Tigran; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Vanneaux, Valerie; Bruneval, Patrick; Domet, Thomas; Lecourt, Severine; Jarraya, Mohamed; Sfeir, Rony; Larghero, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tissue engineering represents a promising approach for esophageal replacement, considering the complexity and drawbacks of conventional techniques. Aim To create the components necessary to reconstruct in vitro or in vivo an esophageal wall, we analyzed the feasibility and the optimal conditions of human and pig skeletal myoblast (HSM and PSM) and porcine oral epithelial cell (OEC) culture on biologic scaffolds. Materials and Methods PSM and HSM were isolated from striated muscle and porcine OECs were extracted from oral mucosa biopsies. Myoblasts were seeded on an acellular scaffold issue from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and OEC on decellularized human amniotic membrane (HAM). Seeding conditions (cell concentrations [0.5×106 versus 106 cells/cm2] and culture periods [7, 14 and 21 days]), were analyzed using the methyl thiazoltetrazolium assay, quantitative PCR, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. Results Phenotypic stability was observed after cellular expansion for PSM and HSM (85% and 97% CD56-positive cells, respectively), and OECs (90% AE1/AE3- positive cells). After PSM and HSM seeding, quantities of viable cells were similar whatever the initial cell concentration used and remained stable at all time points. During cell culture on SIS, a decrease of CD56-positive cells was observed (76% and 76% by D7, 56% and 70% by D14, 28% and 60% by D21, for PSM and HSM, respectively). Multilayered surface of α-actin smooth muscle and Desmine-positive cells organized in bundles was seen as soon as D7, with no evidence of cell within the SIS. Myoblasts fusion was observed at D21. Pax3 and Pax7 expression was downregulated and MyoD expression upregulated, at D14.OEC proliferation was observed on HAM with both cell concentrations from D7 to D21. The cell metabolism activity was more important on matrix seeded by 106 cells/cm2. With 0.5×106 OEC/cm2, a single layer of pancytokeratin-positive cells was seen at D7, which became pluristratified

  8. Stress inoculation modeled in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brockhurst, J; Cheleuitte-Nieves, C; Buckmaster, C L; Schatzberg, A F; Lyons, D M

    2015-01-01

    Stress inoculation entails intermittent exposure to mildly stressful situations that present opportunities to learn, practice and improve coping in the context of exposure psychotherapies and resiliency training. Here we investigate behavioral and hormonal aspects of stress inoculation modeled in mice. Mice randomized to stress inoculation or a control treatment condition were assessed for corticosterone stress hormone responses and behavior during open-field, object-exploration and tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation training sessions that acutely increased plasma levels of corticosterone diminished subsequent immobility as a measure of behavioral despair on tail-suspension tests. Stress inoculation also decreased subsequent freezing in the open field despite comparable levels of thigmotaxis in mice from both treatment conditions. Stress inoculation subsequently decreased novel-object exploration latencies and reduced corticosterone responses to repeated restraint. These results demonstrate that stress inoculation acutely stimulates glucocorticoid signaling and then enhances subsequent indications of active coping behavior in mice. Unlike mouse models that screen for the absence of vulnerability to stress or presence of traits that occur in resilient individuals, stress inoculation training reflects an experience-dependent learning-like process that resembles interventions designed to build resilience in humans. Mouse models of stress inoculation may provide novel insights for new preventive strategies or therapeutic treatments of human psychiatric disorders that are triggered and exacerbated by stressful life events. PMID:25826112

  9. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M.; Werling, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a “proof of concept” vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage. PMID:26476879

  10. Oral application of freeze-dried yeast particles expressing the PCV2b Cap protein on their surface induce protection to subsequent PCV2b challenge in vivo.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Robert; Eley, Thomas; Browne, Christopher; Martineau, Henny M; Werling, Dirk

    2015-11-17

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is now endemic in every major pig producing country, causing PCV-associated disease (PCVAD), linked with large scale economic losses. Current vaccination strategies are based on the capsid protein of the virus and are reasonably successful in preventing PCVAD but fail to induce sterile immunity. Additionally, vaccinating whole herds is expensive and time consuming. In the present study a "proof of concept" vaccine trial was employed to test the effectiveness of powdered freeze-dried recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast stably expressing the capsid protein of PCV2b on its surface as an orally applied vaccine. PCV2-free pigs were given 3 doses of vaccine or left un-vaccinated before challenge with a defined PCV2b strain. Rectal temperatures were measured and serum and faeces samples were collected weekly. At the end of the study, pigs were euthanized, tissue samples taken and tested for PCV2b load by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. The peak of viraemia in sera and faeces of unvaccinated pigs was higher than that of vaccinated pigs. Additionally more sIgA was found in faeces of vaccinated pigs than unvaccinated. Vaccination was associated with lower serum concentrations of TNFα and IL-1β but higher concentrations of IFNα and IFNγ in comparison to the unvaccinated animals. At the end of the trial, a higher viral load was found in several lymphatic tissues and the ileum of unvaccinated pigs in comparison to vaccinated pigs. The difference between groups was especially apparent in the ileum. The results presented here demonstrate a possible use for recombinant S. cerevisiae expressing viral proteins as an oral vaccine against PCV2. A powdered freeze-dried recombinant S. cerevisiae used as an oral vaccine could be mixed with feed and may offer a cheap and less labour intensive alternative to inoculation with the additional advantage that no cooling chain would be required for vaccine transport and storage.

  11. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D L Hank; Rowland, Raymond R R; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence.

  12. Detection of African Swine Fever Virus Antibodies in Serum and Oral Fluid Specimens Using a Recombinant Protein 30 (p30) Dual Matrix Indirect ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Mur, Lina; Rivera, Belen; Mogler, Mark; Sun, Yaxuan; Lizano, Sergio; Goodell, Christa; Harris, D. L. Hank; Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Gallardo, Carmina; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Zimmerman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of effective vaccine(s), control of African swine fever caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV) must be based on early, efficient, cost-effective detection and strict control and elimination strategies. For this purpose, we developed an indirect ELISA capable of detecting ASFV antibodies in either serum or oral fluid specimens. The recombinant protein used in the ELISA was selected by comparing the early serum antibody response of ASFV-infected pigs (NHV-p68 isolate) to three major recombinant polypeptides (p30, p54, p72) using a multiplex fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA). Non-hazardous (non-infectious) antibody-positive serum for use as plate positive controls and for the calculation of sample-to-positive (S:P) ratios was produced by inoculating pigs with a replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the ASFV p30 gene. The optimized ELISA detected anti-p30 antibodies in serum and/or oral fluid samples from pigs inoculated with ASFV under experimental conditions beginning 8 to 12 days post inoculation. Tests on serum (n = 200) and oral fluid (n = 200) field samples from an ASFV-free population demonstrated that the assay was highly diagnostically specific. The convenience and diagnostic utility of oral fluid sampling combined with the flexibility to test either serum or oral fluid on the same platform suggests that this assay will be highly useful under the conditions for which OIE recommends ASFV antibody surveillance, i.e., in ASFV-endemic areas and for the detection of infections with ASFV isolates of low virulence. PMID:27611939

  13. Experimental aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Jobert, J L; Savoye, C; Cariolet, R; Kobisch, M; Madec, F

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the possible role of aerosol in the transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an experiment including 18 specific pathogen-free (SPF), 10-week-old piglets, randomly distributed into 2 adjacent units, was carried out. In these facilities, air was forced through absolute filters to prevent any contact with infectious agents. During the first 6 d post inoculation, the 2 units were connected by a rectangular opening and the air circulation was forced by the ventilation system from unit A (inoculated pigs) to unit B (non-inoculated pigs). The A. pleuropneumoniae strain (biovar 1 serovar 9) was isolated in France from an outbreak of porcine pleuropneumonia. Two different infecting doses, 10(7) cfu/animal and 10(8) cfu/animal, were inoculated by intranasal route in 6 pigs of unit A. The infection spread quickly from the inoculated pigs to the non-inoculated pigs. Clinical signs were acute during the 4 d post inoculation: hyperthermia, respiratory distress and, sometimes, death (6 pigs of the unit A and 2 pigs of the unit B). All pigs seroconverted against A. pleuropneumoniae serovar 9 within 2 weeks. Lung lesions were severe: fibrinous pleurisy and lung hemorrhages in the acute stage, pleural adherences and focal pulmonary necrosis in the chronic stage. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was isolated from the tonsils and/or lungs in 16 animals. It could be also isolated from the air of the experimental unit. This study showed that A. pleuropneumoniae was readily transmitted through aerosol over a distance of at least 2.5 m. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10680652

  14. Comparison of three patterns of feed supplementation with live Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast on postweaning diarrhea, health status, and blood metabolic profile of susceptible weaning pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli F4ac.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Colombo, M; Priori, D; Fontanesi, L; Galimberti, G; Calò, G; Motta, V; Latorre, R; Fanelli, F; Mezzullo, M; Pagotto, U; Gherpelli, Y; D'Inca, R; Bosi, P

    2015-05-01

    The development of effective feeding strategies to reduce the detrimental effect of enterotoxigenic F4ac (ETEC) plays a crucial role in reducing the occurrence of therapeutic intervention with antibiotics in livestock. The ability of CNCM I-4407 (SCC), supplied in different patterns to counteract ETEC infection in weaned pigs, was evaluated. Fifty pigs weaned at 24 d were then divided into 5 groups: control (CO), CO + colistin (AB), CO + 5 × 10(10) cfu of SCC/ kg feed, from d 0 to 21 (PR), CO + 5 × 10(10) cfu of SCC/ kg feed from d 7 to 11 (CM), and CO + 1 shot of 2 × 10(11) cfu of SCC when the first diarrhea appeared (CU). On d 7 postweaning, all the pigs were orally challenged with 10(8) cfu of ETEC. Blood samples were taken from the pigs (d 7, 8, 12, and 21) while the fecal excretion of ETEC was assessed on d 7 and 10. Fecal consistency was scored from 12 h before infection to 144 h postinfection (p.i.). On d 21, the pigs were sacrificed. The in vitro adhesion test on the intestinal villi confirmed individual susceptibility to ETEC, excluding the presence of resistant pigs. Growth performance did not differ between the treatments. Mortality was reduced in the AB group (P< 0.01) and, marginally, in the PR group (P = 0.089) when compared to the CO group. The CO group had a higher fecal score than AB in the period of observation (from P = 0.01 to P< 0.001). Yeast administration reduced the fecal score when compared to the CO group 12 and 48 h p.i. (P = 0.04). Total IgA never differed among the treatments, but the ETEC-specific IgA concentration was lower in the AB group than in CO (P = 0.04) at d 12. Four days p.i., the pigs fed live yeast had reduced ETEC excretion compared with the CO pigs (P = 0.05). Blood concentrations of dodecenoyl-L-carnitine (P < 0.01), glutaryl-L-carnitine/hydroxyhex¬anoyl-L-carnitine, phosphatidylcholine diacyl and phosphatidylcholine diacyl (P = 0.01 and P< 0.01, respectively), and α-amino adipic acid (P < 0.01) were reduced in the

  15. Gastric hyperplasia and parietal cell loss in Taenia taeniaeformis inoculated immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, Jose Trinipil; Konno, Kenjiro; Oku, Yuzaburo; Nonaka, Nariaki; Ito, Mamoru; Kamiya, Masao

    2002-03-01

    Immunodeficient mice were studied to determine their suitability as models in investigating the role of Taenia taeniaeformis larval products in the development of gastric hyperplasia. Recombinant active gene 2 (RAG2)-deficient and severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice were studied as candidate animal models. RAG2-deficient mice inoculated orally with T. taeniaeformis eggs developed gastric hyperplasia with alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff-positive cell proliferation similar to those of rats. SCID mice inoculated with different doses and routes of T. taeniaeformis in vitro-hatched oncospheres and those orally inoculated with eggs resulted also in different degrees of gastric hyperplasia. Influence of inoculation forms of parasite, doses and routes of inoculation on initiation of hyperplastic gastropathy was suggested to be dependent on number and size of developed larvae. Both RAG2-deficient and SCID mice with hyperplastic mucosa were observed with significant loss of parietal cells. Apparent decrease in parietal cell number was observed in SCID mice at 2 weeks after intraperitoneal inoculation with oncospheres before hyperplastic lesions developed. Earliest occurrence of gastric hyperplasia in SCID mice was observed at 3 weeks after oral inoculation of in vitro-hatched oncospheres, sooner than orally inoculated rats. The results suggested that these immunodeficient mice could be used as animal models to study factors involved in T. taeniaeformis-induced gastric mucous cell hyperplasia.

  16. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine.

  17. Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria enhance mucosal B cell responses and differentially modulate systemic antibody responses to an oral human rotavirus vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig disease model

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a key role in generation of protective immunity against rotavirus infection, a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Current RV vaccines are less effective in developing countries compared to developed countries. Commensals/probiotics influence mucosal immunity, but the role of early gut colonizing bacteria in modulating intestinal B cell responses to RV vaccines is largely unknown. We co-colonized neonatal gnotobiotic pigs, the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea, with 2 dominant bacterial species present in the gut of breastfed infants, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and Bifidobacterium animalis lactis Bb12 to evaluate their impact on B cell responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine. Following HRV challenge, probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated piglets had significantly lower fecal scores and reduced HRV shedding titers compared to uncolonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs. The reduction in HRV diarrhea was significantly correlated with higher intestinal IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal HRV-specific IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs. The significantly higher small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses coincided with higher IL-6, IL-10 and APRIL responses of ileal mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics genomic DNA on TGF-β and IL-10 responses. However, serum RV IgG antibody titers and total IgG titers were significantly lower in probiotic-colonized, AttHRV vaccinated pigs compared to uncolonized, vaccinated pigs, both pre- and post-challenge. In summary, LGG and Bb12 beneficially modulated intestinal B cell responses to HRV vaccine. PMID:25483333

  18. Cranberry extract inhibits in vitro adhesion of F4 and F18(+)Escherichia coli to pig intestinal epithelium and reduces in vivo excretion of pigs orally challenged with F18(+) verotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coddens, Annelies; Loos, Michaela; Vanrompay, Daisy; Remon, Jean Paul; Cox, Eric

    2017-01-20

    F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections are an important threat for pig industry worldwide. Antibiotics are commonly used to treat infected piglets, but the emerging development of resistance against antibiotics raises major concerns. Hence, alternative therapies to prevent pigs from F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli infections need to be developed. Since cranberry previously showed anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic E. coli, we aimed to investigate whether cranberry extract could also inhibit binding of F4(+)E. coli and F18(+)E. coli to pig intestinal epithelium. Using the in vitro villus adhesion assay, we found that low concentrations of cranberry extract (20μg or 100μg/ml) have strong inhibitory activity on F4(+)E. coli (75.3%, S.D.=9.31 or 95.8%, S.D.=2.56, respectively) and F18(+)E. coli adherence (100% inhibition). This effect was not due to antimicrobial activity. Moreover, cranberry extract (10mg or 100mg) could also abolish in vivo binding of F4 and F18 fimbriae to the pig intestinal epithelium in ligated loop experiments. Finally, two challenge experiments with F18(+)E. coli were performed to address the efficacy of in-feed or water supplemented cranberry extract. No effect could be observed in piglets that received cranberry extract only in feed (1g/kg or 10g/kg). However, supplementation of feed (10g/kg) and drinking water (1g/L) significantly decreased excretion and diarrhea. The decreased infection resulted in a decreased serum antibody response indicating reduced exposure to F18(+)E. coli.

  19. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs.

  20. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis

    PubMed Central

    Kovšca Janjatović, A.; Lacković, G.; Božić, F.; Kezić, D.; Popović, M.; Valpotić, H.; Harapin, I.; Pavižić, Ž.; Njari, B.; Valpotić, I.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the most common type of porcine postweaning colibacillosis (PWC). Among fimbriae of porcine ETEC strains the best studied family of fimbriae are the members of F4 adhesins, existing in at least three variants: ab, ac, ad. Active immunization against porcine PWC is difficult due to: i) ETEC strains are only one of the essential predisposing factors, ii) the success of vaccinal antigen uptake depends on the presence of enterocyte receptors for F4 adhesins, iii) the intestinal immune system may react with tolerance or hypersensitivity to the same antigens depending on the dose and form of the vaccinal immunogen, and iv) kinetics of the specific immune responses may be different in the case of F4 (earlier) and the other ETEC adhesins, particularly F18 (later). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a live attenuated F4ac+ non-ETEC vaccine against porcine PWC by analyzing quantitative differences in the small intestinal lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets of immunized (with or without levamisole given as an adjuvant) vs control non-immunized pigs. Four week-old pigs were intragastrically immunized with a vaccine candidate F4ac + non-ETEC strain 2407 at day 0, challenged 7 days later with a virulent F4ac+ strain ETEC 11-800/1/94, euthanatized at day 13 and sampled for immunohistology. Non-immunized pigs received saline at day 0 and were processed as the principals. Immunophenotypes of lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets were demonstrated within jejunal and ileal mucosa by immunohistochemical avidinbiotin complex method and corresponding morphometric data were analyzed using software program Lucia G for digital image analyses. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with surface molecules on porcine immune cells such as CD3, CD45RA, CD45RC, CD21 and SWC3 enabled clear insight into distribution patterns and amount of these cells within the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) examined. The numbers of jejunal and

  1. [Experimental study of the inoculative transmission of Rickettsia typhi by gamasid mites (Gamasidae) Ornithonyssus bacoti].

    PubMed

    Grabarev, P A; Suroviatkin, A V; Tikhonova, Iu Iu; Mishchenko, O A; Potapenko, O V

    2009-01-01

    The authors' studies have established that the concentration of Rickettsia typhi may increase about 100-fold in the infected Ornithonyssus bacoti mites. At the time, when on feeding 20 to 200 adult mites on guinea-pigs and albino rats 4 to 36 days after inoculation, they did not transmit Rickettsia typhi on blood sucking.

  2. The use of tannins to control Salmonella typhimurium infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, A; Boyen, F; Dewulf, J; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a hydrolysable tannin extract of sweet chestnut wood (Globatan(®)) has an inhibitory effect on Salmonella Typhimurium survival both in vitro and in vivo in pigs. In a first experiment, the minimal inhibitory concentration of Globatan(®) on 57 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates was determined. For all isolates, an MIC of 160-320 μg/ml was found. The second in vitro study revealed that Salmonella growth was strongly reduced using Globatan(®) concentrations of 25-50 μg/ml and nearly completely inhibited at a concentration of 100 μg/ml Globatan(®). In an in vivo trial, two groups of six piglets, each group receiving feed with or without the addition of Globatan(®) (3 g/kg), were orally inoculated with 10(7) colony forming units of a Salmonella Typhimurium strain. Globatan(®) had no effect on faecal excretion of Salmonella, and no differences in colonization of the intestines and internal organs were demonstrated in pigs euthanized at 4 days post-inoculation. In conclusion, the hydrolysable tannin extract used in this study showed strong action against Salmonella Typhimurium in vitro but not in vivo.

  3. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  4. A chronic oral exposure of pigs with deoxynivalenol partially prevents the acute effects of lipopolysaccharides on hepatic histopathology and blood clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Cassandra; Reinhardt, Nicole; Diesing, Anne-Kathrin; Nossol, Constanze; Kahlert, Stefan; Panther, Patricia; Kluess, Jeannette; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Kuester, Doerthe; Brosig, Bianca; Kersten, Susanne; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-12-17

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a cell wall component of gram-negative bacteria, and deoxynivalenol (DON), a prevalent Fusarium-derived contaminant of cereal grains, are each reported to have detrimental effects on the liver. A potentiating toxic effect of the combined exposure was reported previously in a mouse model and hepatocytes in vitro, but not in swine as the most DON-susceptible species. Thus, pigs were fed either a control diet (CON) or a Fusarium contaminated diet (DON, 3.1mg DON/kg diet) for 37 days. At day 37 control pigs were infused for 1h either with physiological saline (CON_CON), 100μg/kg BW DON (CON_DON), 7.5μg/kg BW LPS (CON_LPS), or both toxins (CON_DON/LPS) and Fusarium-pigs with saline (DON_CON) or 7.5μg/kg BW LPS (DON_LPS). Blood samples were taken before and after infusion (-30, +30, +60, +120, and +180min) for clinical blood chemistry. Pigs were sacrificed at +195min and liver histopathology was performed. LPS resulted in higher relative liver weight (p<0.05), portal, periportal and acinar inflammation (p<0.05), haemorrhage (p<0.01) and pathological bilirubin levels (CON_CON 1.0μmol/L vs. CON_LPS 5.4μmol/L, CON_DON/LPS 8.3μmol/L; p<0.001). DON feeding alleviated effects of LPS infusion on histopathology and blood chemistry to control levels, whereas DON infusion alone had no impact.

  5. Mechanical inoculation of plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Hull, Roger

    2009-05-01

    This technique is for the mechanical inoculation of viruses to plants. It is used to diagnose a virus by its reactions in a variety of plant species, to test the infectivity of virus samples using local lesion hosts, and to propagate viruses. The virus preparation is rubbed onto the surface of the leaf in such a way as to break the surface cells without causing too much mechanical damage. The preparation of the virus sample, its application to the leaf, and the care of the plants before and after inoculation are described.

  6. Polyerositis and Arthritis Due to Escherichia coli in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waxler, G. L.; Britt, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Forty gnotobiotic pigs from six litters were exposed orally to Escherichia coli 083:K·:NM at 69 to 148 hours of age, while 17 pigs from the same litters served as unexposed controls. Clinical signs of infection included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, lameness, and reluctance to move. Eighty-four percent of the exposed pigs in four litters died, while only 13% in two litters died. Gross and microscopic lesions included serofibrinous to fibrinopurulent polyserositis in 96% of the exposed pigs in four litters and 33% of the exposed pigs in two litters. A few pigs had gross and/or microscopic lesions of arthritis. Escherichia coli was routinely isolated from the serous and synovial cavities of infected pigs. Anti-hog cholera serum administered orally as a colostrum substitute gave partial protection against E. coli infection. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4261837

  7. Mycotoxin Fumonisin B1 Increases Intestinal Colonization by Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Isabelle P.; Desautels, Clarisse; Laffitte, Joëlle; Fournout, Sylvie; Peres, Sylvie Y.; Odin, Marielle; Le Bars, Pierrette; Le Bars, Joseph; Fairbrother, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin that commonly occurs in maize. FB1 causes a variety of toxic effects in different animal species and has been implicated as a contributing factor of esophageal cancers in humans. In the present study, we examined the effect of dietary exposure to FB1 on intestinal colonization by pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with extraintestinal infection. Three-week-old weaned pigs were given FB1 by gavage as a crude extract or as a purified toxin at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg of body weight daily for 6 days. On the last day of the toxin treatment, the pigs were orally inoculated with an extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strain. All animals were euthanized 24 h later, necropsies were performed, and tissues were taken for bacterial counts and light microscopic examination. Ingestion of FB1 had only a minimal effect on animal weight gain, did not cause any macroscopic or microscopic lesions, and did not change the plasma biochemical profile. However, colonization of the small and large intestines by an extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strain was significantly increased. Our results show that FB1 is a predisposing factor to infectious disease and that the pig can be used as a model for the study of the consequences of ingesting mycotoxin-contaminated food. PMID:14532038

  8. Transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus 1 to and from vaccinated pigs in a one-to-one model.

    PubMed

    Pileri, E; Gibert, E; Martín-Valls, G E; Nofrarias, M; López-Soria, S; Martín, M; Díaz, I; Darwich, L; Mateu, E

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined transmission by contact of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) 1 in a one-to-one model to vaccinated and unvaccinated pigs and from vaccinated infected pigs to other vaccinated pigs. The experiment started by randomly assigning weaned pigs to groups V (n=24) and U (n=26). V pigs were vaccinated with a commercial live attenuated PRRSV vaccine and the U animals were kept as unvaccinated controls. Twenty-eight days later, 6U pigs were separated and allocated in individual boxes. The remaining 20U pigs were intranasally inoculated with PRRSV isolate 3267 (from now on designated as seeder (S) pigs) and 48h later were distributed in boxes where they were commingled with either V or U pigs in 1:1 groups (first contact phase), resulting in 6S:U and 14S:V pairs. As soon as a V pig was detected to be viremic because of contact with a S, the infected V (from now on designated as Vinf) was transferred (<24h after detection) to a new pen where it was comingled with a new V pig (designated as V2) in a second contact phase. For the first contact phase, pigs were maintained 21days at maximum and for the second contact phase the maximum exposure period was 14days. Two V pigs tested positive for the vaccine virus (>99.5% similarity) when they were relocated with the corresponding V2 pigs and they were removed; thus, only 12Vinf were finally considered. All V pigs (12/12) exposed to S animals became infected although the first detection of viremia occurred at 13.6±3.6days, one week later than in U (p<0.05). Also, duration of viremia was shorter for Vinf compared to U, (5.5±4.3days versus 12.5±2.7days). The Vinf group showed remarkable individual variability: eight animals had a viremic period of 5 or less days (3.0±1.4) while the remaining four had a longer viremic period of more than one week (10.8±2.9). This situation was not observed in U. In the second contact phase, transmission from Vinf to V2 pigs occurred in 7/8 cases

  9. Experimental dual infection of pigs with an H1N1 swine influenza virus (A/Sw/Hok/2/81) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Shigeto; Okada, Munenori; Ono, Masaaki; Fujii, Seiichi; Okuda, Yo; Shibata, Isao; Kida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-05

    Dual infection of pigs with swine influenza virus (SIV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was carried out to compare the clinical and pathological effects of dual infection in caesarian derived and colostrums deprived (CDCD) pigs, with that of a single infection with M. hyopneumoniae. In Experiment 1, 40-day-old CDCD pigs were inoculated only with SIV (A/Sw/Hok/2/81, H1N1). The virus was isolated from nasal swabs for 5-6 days. None of these pigs showed clinical signs of infection throughout the experimental period. These results suggested that this strain can infect pigs but is only slightly pathogenic when it is inoculated singly to a CDCD pig. In Experiment 2, 60-day-old CDCD pigs were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and then were inoculated with SIV (A/Sw/Hok/2/81) at 1 week (MHYO-7d-SIV-7d group) or 3 weeks (MHYO-21d-SIV-7d group) after M. hyopneumoniae inoculation. Macroscopically, dark red-to-purple lung lesions were observed in all of pigs at 14 or 28 days post-inoculation. Percentages of dark red-to-purple lung lesions in dual infection groups (MHYO-7d-SIV-7d group: 18.7 +/- 4.2%, MHYO-21d-SIV-7d group: 23.0 +/- 8.0%) were significantly (P < 0.05) increased compared to those of each control group in which pigs were inoculated only with M. hyopneumoniae (MHYO-14d group: 4.7 +/- 2.9%, MHYO-28 group: 3.3 +/- 2.4%). Microscopically, bronchial epithelial lesions (epithelial disruption, degeneration, hyperplasia and formation of microabscess) were frequently observed in dark red-to-purple lung lesions of only the dual infection groups. These results demonstrate that the lung lesion of pigs inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and SIV is more severe than that of pigs inoculated only with M. hyopneumoniae.

  10. Effects of syndyphalin-33 on immune function during a Salmonella challenge in recently weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this experiment was to characterize the effect of Syndyphalin-33 (SD-33) on immune cell populations with and without a concurrent inoculation with a common enteric pathogen, Salmonella enterica (SALM) in recently weaned pigs. On d 0, pigs (8 barrows and 6 gilts, 24 ± 1 d of age, 8.4...

  11. Dietary rice bran protects against rotavirus diarrhea and promotes Th1-type immune responses to human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Li, Guohua; Wang, Haifeng; Kocher, Jacob; Pelzer, Kevin; Ryan, Elizabeth; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran (RB) contains a distinct stoichiometry of phytochemicals that can promote gut mucosal immune responses against enteric pathogens. The effects of RB on rotavirus diarrhea and immunogenicity of an attenuated human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine were evaluated in gnotobiotic pigs. The four treatment groups studied were RB plus vaccine, vaccine only, RB only, and mock control. Pigs in the RB groups were fed the amount of RB that replaced 10% of the pigs' total daily calorie intake from milk starting from 5 days of age until they were euthanized. Pigs in the vaccine groups were orally inoculated with two doses of the attenuated HRV vaccine. A subset of pigs from each group was orally challenged with the homologous virulent HRV on postinoculation day 28. Diarrhea and virus shedding were monitored daily from postchallenge day 0 to day 7. RB feeding significantly protected against diarrhea upon virulent HRV challenge and enhanced the protective rate of the vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea. Consistent with protection, RB significantly increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, RB also increased the number of total IgM- and IgA-secreting cells, total serum IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, and HRV-specific IgA titers in intestinal contents. RB reduced the numbers of intestinal and systemic HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells and reduced serum HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers before the challenge. These results demonstrate clear beneficial effects of RB in protection against rotavirus diarrhea and stimulation of nonspecific and HRV-specific immune responses, as well as its biased Th1-type adjuvant effect for the vaccine.

  12. Evaluation of the infectivity and the persistence of Trichinella patagoniensis in muscle tissue of decomposing guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Fariña, F; Pasqualetti, M; Ilgová, J; Cardillo, N; Ercole, M; Aronowicz, T; Krivokapich, S; Kašný, M; Ribicich, M

    2017-01-01

    Trichinella patagoniensis, a new species of Trichinella, is widespread in Argentina. The success of parasite transmission depends, among other factors, on the resistance of L1 larvae present in the muscle tissue (ML) of dead hosts undergoing the decomposition process in different environmental conditions. The aim of the present work was to study the infectivity of T. patagoniensis muscle larvae in Cavia porcellus and the capability of the parasite to survive in decomposed muscle tissue of guinea pigs subjected to different environmental conditions. Thirty-two female Ssi:AL guinea pigs were orally inoculated with 2000 ML of T. patagoniensis (ISS2311). All the animals were sacrificed 42 days post-infection. Twenty-six animals were eviscerated, and carcasses were placed on the surface of soil inside plastic boxes that were exposed to environmental conditions in the summer 2014-2015 and autumn of 2015 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Carcasses from six animals were placed into a plastic box inside the refrigerator at a temperature of 4 °C. The muscle tissue samples from the carcasses were examined weekly for the presence of larvae, and the infectivity of recovered ML was tested in BALB/c mice. Our results showed for the first time the ability of T. patagoniensis to complete its life cycle in guinea pigs, thus serving as a potential natural host. Also, larvae of T. patagoniensis remained infective in muscle tissue for several weeks while undergoing decomposition under different environmental conditions.

  13. Tissue distribution of co-planar and non-planar tetra- and hexa-chlorobiphenyl isomers in guinea pigs after oral ingestion

    SciTech Connect

    Jan, J.; Logar, B.; Jan, J.

    1996-03-01

    Food ingestion is the most important route for the uptake of lipophilic organochlorine contaminants. Uptake and transfer of the contaminants from the digestive tract to target organs can be used for risk evaluation. The bioconcentration and migration of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) is highly structure - dependent. Bioconcentration is correlated with lipophilicity on the basis of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient in its logarithmic form - logKow. However, some factors e.g. diffusion through cell membranes, accumulation in specific organs and tissues, uptake and deputation kinetics and metabolism can also influence the bioconcentration. Individual PCB compounds of commercial PCB preparation are taken up by organisms to markedly different extents. Until now little is known about the distribution of non-planar and co-planar PCBs in different tissues. Co-planar PCBs have dioxin - like toxicity. This study examines differences in the bioconcentration of two pairs of tetra and hexa chlorobiphenyls from the digestive tract and their distribution in different tissues of guinea pigs.

  14. Course and transmission characteristics of oral low-dose infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar with a Caucasian African swine fever virus isolate.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Jana; Guinat, Claire; Beer, Martin; Pronin, Valery; Tauscher, Kerstin; Petrov, Anja; Keil, Günther; Blome, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    In 2007, African swine fever virus (ASFV) was introduced into the Transcaucasian countries and Russia. Since then, it has spread alarmingly and reached the European Union. ASFV strains are highly virulent and lead to almost 100% mortality under experimental conditions. However, the possibility of dose-dependent disease courses has been discussed. For this reason, a study was undertaken to assess the risk of chronic disease and the establishment of carriers upon low-dose oronasal infection of domestic pigs and European wild boar. It was demonstrated that very low doses of ASFV are sufficient to infect especially weak or runted animals by the oronasal route. Some of these animals did not show clinical signs indicative of ASF, and they developed almost no fever. However, no changes were observed in individual animal regarding the onset, course and outcome of infection as assessed by diagnostic tests. After amplification of ASFV by these animals, pen- and stablemates became infected and developed acute lethal disease with similar characteristics in all animals. Thus, we found no indication of prolonged or chronic individual courses upon low-dose infection in either species. The scattered onset of clinical signs and pathogen detection within and among groups confirms moderate contagiosity that is strongly linked with blood contact. In conclusion, the prolonged course at the "herd level" together with the exceptionally low dose that proved to be sufficient to infect a runted wild boar could be important for disease dynamics in wild-boar populations and in backyard settings.

  15. Hemorrhagic Fever Occurs After Intravenous, But Not After Intragastric, Inoculation of Rhesus Macaques With Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Rodas, Juan D.; Zapata, Juan C.; Usborne, Amy; Emerson, Carol; Mitchen, Jacque; Jahrling, Peter B.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2008-01-01

    Arenaviruses can cause hemorrhagic fever and death in primates and guinea pigs, but these viruses are not highly pathogenic for most rodent carriers. In the United States, arenaviruses precipitated outbreaks of hepatitis in captive monkeys, and they present an emerging health threat in the tropical areas of Africa and South America. We describe infection of rhesus macaques with the prototype arenavirus, lymphocytic choriome-ningitis virus (LCMV), using the WE strain that has been known to cause both encephalopathy and multifocal hemorrhage. Five macaques were inoculated: two by the intravenous (i.v.) and three by the intragastric (i.g.) route. Whereas the two i.v.-inoculated monkeys developed signs and lesions consistent with fatal hemorrhagic fever, the i.g.-inoculated monkeys had an attenuated infection with no disease. Pathological signs of the primate i.v. infection differ significantly from guinea pig arenavirus infections and make this a superior model for human viral hemorrhagic disease. PMID:11992578

  16. Distribution of vitamin C is tissue specific with early saturation of the brain and adrenal glands following differential oral dose regimens in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hasselholt, Stine; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2015-05-28

    Vitamin C (VitC) deficiency is surprisingly common in humans even in developed parts of the world. The micronutrient has several established functions in the brain; however, the consequences of its deficiency are not well characterised. To elucidate the effects of VitC deficiency on the brain, increased knowledge about the distribution of VitC to the brain and within different brain regions after varying dietary concentrations is needed. In the present study, guinea pigs (like humans lacking the ability to synthesise VitC) were randomly divided into six groups (n 10) that received different concentrations of VitC ranging from 100 to 1500 mg/kg feed for 8 weeks, after which VitC concentrations in biological fluids and tissues were measured using HPLC. The distribution of VitC was found to be dynamic and dependent on dietary availability. Brain saturation was region specific, occurred at low dietary doses, and the dose-concentration relationship could be approximated with a three-parameter Hill equation. The correlation between plasma and brain concentrations of VitC was moderate compared with other organs, and during non-scorbutic VitC deficiency, the brain was able to maintain concentrations from about one-quarter to half of sufficient levels depending on the region, whereas concentrations in other tissues decreased to one-sixth or less. The adrenal glands have similar characteristics to the brain. The observed distribution kinetics with a low dietary dose needed for saturation and exceptional retention ability suggest that the brain and adrenal glands are high priority tissues with regard to the distribution of VitC.

  17. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  18. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-04-26

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 10(4) genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization.

  19. Effects of atmospheric ammonia on young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Meyer, R.C.; Simon, J.; Norton, H.W.

    1981-06-01

    Effects of atmospheric ammonia on performance and respiratory tract health of young pigs experimentally infected with Bordetella bronchiseptica were studied. Treatments were: (1) control, (2) Bordetella inoculation (approx 10(9) bacteria/naris) alone, (3) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 34.7 mg/m3 (50 ppm), and (4) Bordetella inoculation plus exposure to atmospheric ammonia at 69.4 mg/m3 (100 ppm). Pigs weighted 8.01 kg (av) at start of treatment. Body weight and feed disappearance were measured weekly. After 4 weeks, all pigs were killed and examined grossly, and appropriate specimens were obtained for histopathologic examination. Regression models were fitted to growth, feed disappearance, and gain-to-feed data. The growth model indicated that Bordetella-inoculated pigs gained 26% less body weight than did controls, regardless of atmospheric ammonia concentration. Bordetella inoculation, regardless of ammonia exposure, reduced feed disappearance 12% below the control rate. Treatment difference was not noted in gain/feed data. Shrunken turbinates were observed in Bordetella-inoculated pigs. Shrinkage also appeared to be related directly to ammonia concentration. Rhinitis was confirmed histopathologically, and its severity was related with atmospheric ammonia concentration, but no difference was seen in the osseous core of the turbinates.

  20. Potential use of oral fluid samples for serological diagnosis of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Mur, Lina; Gallardo, Carmina; Soler, Alejandro; Zimmermman, Jeffrey; Pelayo, Virginia; Nieto, Raquel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Arias, Marisa

    2013-07-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a complex, highly lethal, notifiable disease of swine. ASF is wide-spread in sub-Saharan Africa and East European countries and there is presently a great risk of spread to neighboring countries. Since there is no vaccine for ASF virus (ASFV), control is based on rapid and early detection of the disease via surveillance. This approach requires collecting blood samples from large number of animals. Laborious and expensive of itself, this process also presents an additional risk because ASFV is present at high concentrations in the blood. The objective of this study was to initiate studies into the potential use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum for ASF diagnosis, for latter studying its possible use in surveillance and control programs. To this end, oral fluid samples collected at different times post infection from eight pigs experimentally inoculated with an attenuated ASFV were assayed using modified protocols of the two validated serological techniques, the enzyme-immune-liked assay (ELISA) and immunoperoxidase technique (IPT). Antibodies against ASFV were detected in oral fluid samples of all animals from early post infection through the end of the experiment by ELISA and IPT. These results confirmed the presence of ASFV antibodies in swine oral fluids samples, the possibility of an oral fluid-based approach in ASF diagnosis and, potentially in ASF surveillance.

  1. Age-dependent variation in innate immune responses to porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection in suckling versus weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Thavamathi; Saif, Linda J; Lu, Zhongyan; Jung, Kwonil

    2015-12-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is an enteric coronaviral infection that causes severe morbidity and mortality in suckling pigs, but less severe disease in older pigs. Consequently, it causes significant economic losses to the pork industry. There are limited studies on the innate immune responses to PED virus (PEDV) in pigs. The aims of our study were to investigate differences in innate immune responses to PEDV infection in suckling and weaned pigs and to examine if disease severity coincides with reduced innate immune responses. Weaned 26-day-old pigs (n=20) and 9-day-old nursing pigs (n=20) were assigned to PEDV inoculated or uninoculated control groups. The pigs were observed daily for clinical signs, virus shedding and were euthanized at post-inoculation days (PIDs) 1 and 5 to assay immune responses. Blood samples were collected at PIDs 1, 3 and 5. The natural killer (NK) cell frequencies, NK cell activities (lysis of target K562 tumor cells in vitro), CD3+CD4+ T cell and CD3+CD8+ T cell frequencies were measured in blood and ileum at PIDs 1 and 5. The PEDV infected suckling pigs showed severe diarrhea and vomiting at PID 1, whereas the PEDV infected weaned pigs showed milder clinical signs starting at PID 3. PEDV infected suckling pigs had significantly higher diarrhea scores, earlier fecal PEDV RNA shedding and significantly higher viremia (viral RNA in serum) compared to weaned pigs. There was no mortality in either infected suckling or infected weaned pigs. The control pigs not inoculated with PEDV did not show any clinical signs and no detectable fecal or serum PEDV RNA. Strikingly, PEDV infected suckling pigs had significantly lower NK cell frequencies, undetectable NK cell activity and lower IFNγ producing NK cells in blood and ileum compared to PEDV infected weaned pigs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine profiles of PEDV infected suckling pigs differed from those of PEDV infected weaned pigs and coincided with onset of fecal PEDV RNA shedding and serum PEDV

  2. Rare Spontaneous Loss of Multiresistance Gene Carrying IncI/ST12 Plasmid in Escherichia coli in Pig Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Mourand, Gwenaelle; Touzain, Fabrice; Jouy, Eric; Fleury, Mickael Alain; Denamur, Erick

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) is a matter of considerable concern for public health. Here, we studied the spontaneous loss of an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-encoding plasmid from a rifampin-resistant Escherichia coli isolate orally inoculated into pigs under controlled conditions. Fecal samples were collected and cultured on rifampin-supplemented medium, and the resistance of the E. coli isolates to ESCs was studied by phenotypic tests, PCR detection of plasmid genes, and complete sequencing. The results showed that only 3 out of 353 rifampin-resistant E. coli isolates were ESC susceptible, and PCR and bioinformatics analysis confirmed the loss of the plasmid. These in vivo experiments indicate that the loss of an ESBL-encoding plasmid seems a rare event in gut microbiota. PMID:27480865

  3. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonization of pigs sired by different boars.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Alvaro; Galina, Lucina; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-04-01

    Differences in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonization were evaluated in experimentally inoculated pigs sired by 3 different boars of the same genetic line. Forty-six pigs were used, including a treatment group and positive and negative control groups. The pigs were intratracheally inoculated with an M. hyopneumoniae suspension or with Friis media as a placebo. To evaluate differences in the magnitude of colonization during a 35-day period, nasal and tracheal swabs were collected weekly and tested by nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR). Temperature, weight and circulating antibodies were measured for 35 days. At 11 and 35 d postinoculation the pigs were necropsied and macroscopic and microscopic lesions were determined. A section of bronchus was tested by the indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N-PCR. The N-PCR results from the nasal and tracheal swabs showed that the pigs sired by one boar (B3) had a distinctive colonization pattern, different from that of the pigs from the other 2 boars and from the positive controls. SEM studies demonstrated that at 35 d postinoculation a higher proportion of B3 pigs had lower numbers of mycoplasmas attached to the cilia compared with B1 and B2 offspring. No significant differences were observed in temperature and weight gain among groups by ANOVA; however, with use of a 2 x 2 table, temperature differences were observed between pigs sired by boars B1 and B2 at 4 d postinoculation. No pigs seroconverted, showed gross or microscopic lesions, or had positive IFAT results. These results provide evidence of differences in patterns of colonization between pigs sired by different boars, suggesting a possible genetic effect.

  4. Pathogenicity of an Escherichia coli O115:K"V165" mutant negative for F165(1) fimbriae in septicemia of gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Ngeleka, M; Jacques, M; Martineau-Doizé, B; Daigle, F; Harel, J; Fairbrother, J M

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the F165(1) fimbrial system in the pathogenesis of septicemia, 2-day-old germfree pigs were inoculated intragastrically with Escherichia coli O115:K"V165":F165 wild-type strain 5131, its F165(1)-negative TnphoA mutant M48, or E. coli O115:K(-):F165(-) wild-type strain 862B. Pigs were sacrificed at different times (3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h) postinfection (p.i.). Pigs inoculated with strain 5131 developed clinical signs (anorexia, lameness, reluctance to move, or lack of motor coordination) and were moribund within 48 h p.i., and, at necropsy, infecting bacteria were isolated in various extraintestinal organs. Strain 5131 was isolated as early as 6 h p.i. from the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with mutant M48 developed only mild clinical signs at 96 h p.i. Mutant M48 colonized extraintestinal organs of pigs but to a lesser extent than the parent strain did. In contrast to the parent strain, this mutant was not isolated in the blood of inoculated pigs. Pigs inoculated with strain 862B remained normal during the experiment. All of the strains colonized the mucus layer of the intestine, but no histological changes of intestinal mucosa were observed by either light or electron microscopy. The parent strain, but not the mutant M48, expressed F165(1) in vivo. In a competitive study in which the parent strain and its afimbrial mutant were inoculated simultaneously, clinical signs of septicemia developed 24 h after inoculation, and only the parent strain 5131 was isolated from the blood of inoculated pigs. Our results suggest that the F165(1) fimbrial system of E. coli O115:K"V165" strains may play an important role in the ability of the bacteria to survive in the blood and spread systemically through the porcine host. Images PMID:8094383

  5. Inoculating against reactance to persuasive health messages.

    PubMed

    Richards, Adam S; Banas, John A

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examined the possibility of decreasing psychological reactance to health campaigns through the use of inoculation messages. It was hypothesized that an inoculation message, which forewarned of the potential of subsequent reactance, would decrease participants' likelihood of reacting negatively to a freedom-threatening message aimed to reduce excessive alcohol consumption. Participants (N = 275) who were inoculated against potential reactance felt less threatened and experienced less reactance compared to those who did not read an inoculation message. Structural equation modeling showed that inoculation indirectly predicted lower intention to drink alcohol via the theorized mediated reactance process. This research suggests that it is possible to inoculate against self-generated cognitions that might otherwise lead toward negative health behaviors.

  6. Experimental infection of conventional nursing pigs and their dams with Porcine deltacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Vitosh-Sillman, Sarah; Loy, John Dustin; Brodersen, Bruce; Kelling, Clayton; Doster, Alan; Topliff, Christina; Nelson, Eric; Bai, Jianfa; Schirtzinger, Erin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Meadors, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph; Hause, Benjamin; Anderson, Gary; Hesse, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a newly identified virus that has been detected in swine herds of North America associated with enteric disease. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the pathogenicity, course of infection, virus kinetics, and aerosol transmission of PDCoV using 87 conventional piglets and their 9 dams, including aerosol and contact controls to emulate field conditions. Piglets 2-4 days of age and their dams were administered an oronasal PDCoV inoculum with a quantitative real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR quantification cycle (Cq) value of 22 that was generated from a field sample having 100% nucleotide identity to USA/Illinois121/2014 determined by metagenomic sequencing and testing negative for other enteric disease agents using standard assays. Serial samples of blood, serum, oral fluids, nasal and fecal swabs, and tissues from sequential autopsy, conducted daily on days 1-8 and regular intervals thereafter, were collected throughout the 42-day study for qRT-PCR, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry. Diarrhea developed in all inoculated and contact control pigs, including dams, by 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) and in aerosol control pigs and dams by 3-4 dpi, with resolution occurring by 12 dpi. Mild to severe atrophic enteritis with PDCoV antigen staining was observed in the small intestine of affected piglets from 2 to 8 dpi. Mesenteric lymph node and small intestine were the primary sites of antigen detection by immunohistochemistry, and virus RNA was detected in these tissues to the end of the study. Virus RNA was detectable in piglet fecal swabs to 21 dpi, and dams to 14-35 dpi.

  7. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition following feeding of silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants yield an increase in milk production without increasing fiber digestibility, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. We hypothesized that silage treated with a commercial inoculant (Lactobacillus plantarum, LP) would improve milk production and would alter rumen bacter...

  8. Comparison of protection in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) inoculated with and fed Hagerman redmouth bacterins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, D.P.; Nelson, J.R.

    1974-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) fed 1.0 mg Hagerman redmouth bacterin per fish for 2 wk had no detectable specific, circulating, agglutinating antibody. In fish given a single subcutaneous inoculation of 1.0 mg of bacterin per fish, antibody was present from 3 wk later until 3 mo later, when the final sample was taken. Median lethal doses at various intervals after the bacterins were administered indicated that the inoculated fish could withstand a greater challenge by subcutaneous inoculation of the virulent bacteria than the orally immunized fish. The fish fed the vaccine lost their protection within 6 wk, whereas the inoculated fish had high levels of protection through 3 mo. The degree of protection was also confirmed by a "natural" exposure challenge.

  9. Transmission of sheep-bovine spongiform encephalopathy to pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Cobrière, Fabien; Filali, Hicham; Vazquez, Francisco; Pitarch, José Luis; Vargas, Antonia; Acín, Cristina; Moreno, Bernardino; Pumarola, Martí; Andreoletti, Olivier; Badiola, Juan José

    2016-01-07

    Experimental transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent has been successfully reported in pigs inoculated via three simultaneous distinct routes (intracerebral, intraperitoneal and intravenous). Sheep derived BSE (Sh-BSE) is transmitted more efficiently than the original cattle-BSE isolate in a transgenic mouse model expressing porcine prion protein. However, the neuropathology and distribution of Sh-BSE in pigs as natural hosts, and susceptibility to this agent, is unknown. In the present study, seven pigs were intracerebrally inoculated with Sh-BSE prions. One pig was euthanized for analysis in the preclinical disease stage. The remaining six pigs developed neurological signs and histopathology revealed severe spongiform changes accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis throughout the central nervous system. Intracellular and neuropil-associated pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition was consistently observed in different brain sections and corroborated by Western blot. PrP(Sc) was detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay in the following tissues in at least one animal: lymphoid tissues, peripheral nerves, gastrointestinal tract, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland and pancreas. PrP(Sc) deposition was revealed by immunohistochemistry alone in the retina, optic nerve and kidney. These results demonstrate the efficient transmission of Sh-BSE in pigs and show for the first time that in this species propagation of bovine PrP(Sc) in a wide range of peripheral tissues is possible. These results provide important insight into the distribution and detection of prions in non-ruminant animals.

  10. Effect of O. porcinus Tick Salivary Gland Extract on the African Swine Fever Virus Infection in Domestic Pig.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jennifer; Hutet, Evelyne; Paboeuf, Frédéric; Randriamparany, Tantely; Holzmuller, Philippe; Lancelot, Renaud; Rodrigues, Valérie; Vial, Laurence; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is a haemorrhagic disease in pig production that can have disastrous financial consequences for farming. No vaccines are currently available and animal slaughtering or area zoning to restrict risk-related movements are the only effective measures to prevent the spread of the disease. Ornithodoros soft ticks are known to transmit the African swine fever virus (ASFV) to pigs in farms, following the natural epidemiologic cycle of the virus. Tick saliva has been shown to modulate the host physiological and immunological responses during feeding on skin, thus affecting viral infection. To better understand the interaction between soft tick, ASFV and pig at the bite location and the possible influence of tick saliva on pig infection by ASFV, salivary gland extract (SGE) of Ornithodoros porcinus, co-inoculated or not with ASFV, was used for intradermal auricular inoculation. Our results showed that, after the virus triggered the disease, pigs inoculated with virus and SGE presented greater hyperthermia than pigs inoculated with virus alone. The density of Langerhans cells was modulated at the tick bite or inoculation site, either through recruitment by ASFV or inhibition by SGE. Additionally, SGE and virus induced macrophage recruitment each. This effect was enhanced when they were co-inoculated. Finally, the co-inoculation of SGE and virus delayed the early local spread of virus to the first lymph node on the inoculation side. This study has shown that the effect of SGE was powerful enough to be quantified in pig both on the systemic and local immune response. We believe this model should be developed with infected tick and could improve knowledge of both tick vector competence and tick saliva immunomodulation.

  11. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread.

  12. [Immunosuppression in dogs and pigs infected with canine distemper virus].

    PubMed

    Sereda, A D; Nogina, I V

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppression manifesting itself as leukopenia and a considerably lower lymphocyte proliferative response to T- and B-cell mitogens develops in pigs and dogs within 2-3 weeks after intramuscular or oral infection with canine distemper virus (CDV). CDV antigens are detectable in the oral secretions of the animals within 2-2.5 week after infection.

  13. Isolation, characterization, and application of bacteriophages for Salmonella spp. biocontrol in pigs.

    PubMed

    Albino, Luiz A A; Rostagno, Marcos H; Húngaro, Humberto M; Mendonça, Regina C S

    2014-08-01

    Foodborne illness due to Salmonella-contaminated pork products is an important public health problem, causing significant economic losses worldwide. The use of bacteriophages is a potential intervention tool that has attracted interest for the control of foodborne pathogens. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of Salmonella in commercial pig farms and to isolate specific autochthonous bacteriophages against Salmonella Typhimurium, to characterize them and to evaluate their lytic capacity against Salmonella Typhimurium in vivo and in vitro. Salmonella was isolated on 50% (4/8) of the farms, with serotype Typhimurium being the most prevalent, detected in 48.2% of samples (13/27). The isolated Salmonella Typhimurium bacteriophages belong to the Podoviridae family, were active against serotypes Abony, Enteritidis, Typhi, and Typhimurium, but not against serotypes Arizonae, Cholerasuis, Gallinarum, and Pullorum. In in vitro tests, bacteriophage at 10(7) PFU/mL and 10(9) PFU/mL significantly reduced (p<0.05) Salmonella Typhimurium counts in 1.6 and 2.5 log10 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL, respectively, after 24 h. Before the in vivo treatment with bacteriophages, Salmonella was identified in 93.3% (28/30) of the fecal samples from the pigs inoculated with 10(6) CFU/mL, and only in 56.6% (17/30) after the treatment consisting of oral administration of the pool of the bacteriophages after the fasting period, simulating a common preslaughter practice. These results indicate that the pool of bacteriophages administered was capable of reducing the colonization of Salmonella in pigs.

  14. Efficacy of the investigational echinocandin ASP9726 in a guinea pig model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P; Najvar, Laura K; Matsumoto, Satoru; Bocanegra, Rosie A; Herrera, Monica L; Wickes, Brian L; Kirkpatrick, William R; Patterson, Thomas F

    2015-05-01

    ASP9726 is an investigational echinocandin with in vitro activity against Aspergillus species. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of this agent in an established guinea pig model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. ASP9726 plasma concentrations were measured in guinea pigs administered either a single dose or multiple doses of this agent at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg of body weight/day by subcutaneous injection. Immunosuppressed guinea pigs were inoculated with A. fumigatus AF293, and ASP9726 (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day), voriconazole (10 mg/kg by oral gavage twice daily), or caspofungin (3 mg/kg/day by intraperitoneal injection) was administered for 8 days. Changes in fungal burden were measured by enumerating CFU and by quantitative PCR of specimens from within the lungs, as well as by analysis of serum (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan and galactomannan. Lung histopathology was also evaluated. ASP9726 plasma concentrations increased in a dose-proportional manner, and the drug was well tolerated at each dose. Each dose of ASP9726, voriconazole, and caspofungin significantly reduced pulmonary fungal burden as measured by quantitative PCR and by determining (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan and galactomannan levels, but only voriconazole significantly reduced numbers of CFU. ASP9726 at 5 mg/kg also significantly improved survival. Histopathology demonstrated morphological changes in hyphae in animals exposed to ASP9726 and caspofungin, consistent with the activities of the echinocandins. These results suggest that ASP9726 may be efficacious for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOEpatents

    Triplett, Eric W.; Kaeppler, Shawn M.; Chelius, Marisa K.

    2008-07-01

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  16. Desferoxamine and iron dextran in acute Salmonella cholerae-suis infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kramer, T T; Saucke, L; Griffith, R W; Kunesh, J P

    1986-07-01

    Serum iron (SI)-related and hematologic changes were evaluated in a herd of weaned pigs inoculated with a strain of Salmonella cholerae-suis, causing 83% mortality within 22 days after inoculation was done. Serum iron concentrations decreased to 35% of base-line values 2 days after inoculation was done, but recovered to near base line subsequently. Total SI-binding capacity (TIBC) decreased gradually for 14 days after inoculation was done. Transferrin (TF) concentrations decreased to near half the base line throughout the postinoculation observation period. The calculated SI saturation coefficient decreased to half the base line, but recovered to or above the base-line value subsequently. Combined observations of SI, TIBC, TF, and SI saturation coefficient concentrations indicated that there was higher saturation of host iron-binding proteins and recruitment of additional iron-binding systems subsequent to 2 days after inoculation was done. Day 2 after inoculation seemed to be a critical period for host iron metabolism. Injection of supplemental iron dextran simultaneously with Salmonella infection resulted in lower mortality of iron-injected pigs (P less than 0.005). A highly significant negative correlation was observed between SI concentration and rectal temperatures after pigs were inoculated with Salmonella (r = -0.54; P less than 0.0001). Hemoglobin concentrations, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin were not significantly affected by Salmonella infection or iron injection concurrent with Salmonella infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Fruit Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Ebola Virus.

    PubMed

    Paweska, Janusz T; Storm, Nadia; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Markotter, Wanda; Kemp, Alan; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus

    2016-01-22

    Colonized Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), originating in South Africa, were inoculated subcutaneously with Ebola virus (EBOV). No overt signs of morbidity, mortality, or gross lesions were noted. Bats seroconverted by Day 10-16 post inoculation (p.i.), with the highest mean anti-EBOV IgG level on Day 28 p.i. EBOV RNA was detected in blood from one bat. In 16 other tissues tested, viral RNA distribution was limited and at very low levels. No seroconversion could be demonstrated in any of the control bats up to 28 days after in-contact exposure to subcutaneously-inoculated bats. The control bats were subsequently inoculated intraperitoneally, and intramuscularly with the same dose of EBOV. No mortality, morbidity or gross pathology was observed in these bats. Kinetics of immune response was similar to that in subcutaneously-inoculated bats. Viral RNA was more widely disseminated to multiple tissues and detectable in a higher proportion of individuals, but consistently at very low levels. Irrespective of the route of inoculation, no virus was isolated from tissues which tested positive for EBOV RNA. Viral RNA was not detected in oral, nasal, ocular, vaginal, penile and rectal swabs from any of the experimental groups.

  18. Artificial inoculation-perspectives in tailings phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Petrisor, Ioana G; Dobrota, Smaranda; Komnitsas, Kostas; Lazar, Ioan; Kuperberg, J Michael; Serban, Mihai

    2004-01-01

    Intensive mining and processing activities worldwide resulted in the generation of huge amounts of waste (tailings), generally characterized as toxic, radioactive, and/or hazardous. The exposure potential and, hence, the risk posed by such wastes is enhanced by a general lack of vegetation. Phytostabilization has proven to be efficient in reducing this risk. However, establishing vegetation on tailing dumps may be expensive due to the intensive use of amendments and chemical fertilizers. In this article, investigations on artificial inoculation of mine tailings with bacterial strains as a means to improve the development of vegetative covers and reduce application cost by eliminating chemical fertilization are presented and discussed. The development of plants and microbial communities from tailings, as well as the impact of inoculation on metal uptake in plants, were studied. Experiments were carried out in greenhouse using two types of mine tailings (phosphogypsum and sulphidic tailings) from the Romanian Black Sea coast. Indigenous herbaceous plants were cultivated on tailings with the addition of chemical fertilizers versus bacterial inoculation. After a 6-month experimental period, excellent plant growth, which is associated with a rich microbial community, was observed in all inoculated treatments, in contrast with poor plant growth and microbiota from the chemical fertilization treatments alone. Additionally, artificial inoculation improved plant resistance to heavy metals by reducing the uptake of some toxic metals. Once a rich microbial community is established, inoculation may be discontinued. Based on these results, efficient and cost-effective phytostabilization schemes can be proposed.

  19. The effect of fermentable carbohydrates on experimental swine dysentery and whip worm infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lisbeth E; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Jensen, Tim K; Christensen, Anja S; Møller, Kristian; Roepstorff, Allan

    2007-01-31

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of diets with contrasting fermentability in the large intestine on experimental infections with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery, and the whip worm, Trichuris suis, in pigs. Two diets with organically grown ingredients were composed. Both diets were based on triticale and barley and supplemented with either rape seed cake (Diet 1) or dried chicory root and sweet lupins (Diet 2). The study had a three-factorial design, with eight groups of pigs receiving Diet 1 or Diet 2, +/-B. hyodysenteriae, and +/-T. suis. Pigs fed Diet 2 and challenged with B. hyodysenteriae did not develop swine dysentery and B. hyodysenteriae was not demonstrated in any of the pigs during the study. In contrast, 94% of the B. hyodysenteriae challenged pigs fed Diet 1 showed clinical symptoms of swine dysentery and all the pigs were shedding B. hyodysenteriae in faeces at some points in time during the experiment. The number of T. suis was lower in pigs fed Diet 2 compared to pigs fed Diet 1, but the differences were not significant. Pigs on Diet 1 and challenged with both pathogens showed clinical symptoms of SD for a longer period than pigs inoculated with B. hyodysenteriae only. The study showed that diets supplemented with highly fermentable carbohydrates from dried chicory roots and sweet lupins can protect pigs against developing swine dysentery, but do not have any significant influence on T. suis.

  20. Co-infection of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus in pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; De la Luz-Armendáriz, Jazmín; Saavedra-Montañez, Manuel; Jasso-Escutia, Miguel Ángel; Sánchez-Betancourt, Ivan; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2016-02-29

    Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) and swine influenza virus infection causes respiratory disease in pigs. PorPV persistent infection could facilitate the establishment of secondary infections. The aim of this study was to analyse the pathogenicity of classic swine H1N1 influenza virus (swH1N1) in growing pigs persistently infected with porcine rubulavirus. Conventional six-week-old pigs were intranasally inoculated with PorPV, swH1N1, or PorPV/swH1N1. A mock-infected group was included. The co-infection with swH1N1 was at 44 days post-infection (DPI), right after clinical signs of PorPV infection had stopped. The pigs of the co-infection group presented an increase of clinical signs compared to the simple infection groups. In all infected groups, the most recurrent lung lesion was hyperplasia of the bronchiolar-associated lymphoid tissue and interstitial pneumonia. By means of immunohistochemical evaluation it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the two viral agents infecting simultaneously the bronchiolar epithelium. Viral excretion of PorPV in nasal and oral fluid was recorded at 28 and 52 DPI, respectively. PorPV persisted in several samples from respiratory tissues (RT), secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). For swH1N1, the viral excretion in nasal fluids was significantly higher in single-infected swH1N1 pigs than in the co-infected group. However, the co-infection group exhibited an increase in the presence of swH1N1 in RT, SLO, and BALF at two days after co-infection. In conclusion, the results obtained confirm an increase in the clinical signs of infection, and PorPV was observed to impact the spread of swH1N1 in analysed tissues in the early stage of co-infection, although viral shedding was not enhanced. In the present study, the interaction of swH1N1 infection is demonstrated in pigs persistently infected with PorPV.

  1. Dietary plant extracts alleviate diarrhea and alter immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Almeida, J A S; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2013-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of 3 different plant extracts on diarrhea, immune response, intestinal morphology, and growth performance of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sixty-four weaned pigs (6.3±0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens in disease containment chambers for 15 d: 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2×4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge (toxins: heat-labile toxin, heat-stable toxin b, and Shiga-like toxin 2; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose; daily for 3 d from d 0) and 4 diets [a nursery basal diet (CON) or 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin]. The growth performance was measured on d 0 to 5, 5 to 11, and 0 to 11. Diarrhea score (1, normal, to 5, watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Frequency of diarrhea was the percentage of pig days with a diarrhea score of 3 or greater. Blood was collected on d 0, 5, and 11 to measure total and differential white blood cell counts and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin. On d 5 and 11, half of the pigs were euthanized to measure villi height and crypt depth of the small intestine and macrophage and neutrophil number in the ileum. The E. coli infection increased (P<0.05) diarrhea score, frequency of diarrhea, white blood cell counts, serum TNF-α and haptoglobin, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils but reduced (P<0.05) villi height and the ratio of villi height to crypt depth of the small intestine on d 5. In the challenged group, feeding plant extracts reduced (P<0.05) average diarrhea score from d 0 to 2 and d 6 to 11 and frequency of diarrhea and decreased (P<0.05) TNF-α and haptoglobin on d 5, white blood cell counts and neutrophils on d 11, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils on d 5. Feeding plant extracts increased (P<0

  2. Survival of several Rhizobium/Bradyrhizobium strains on different inoculant formulations and inoculated seeds.

    PubMed

    Temprano, F J; Albareda, M; Camacho, M; Daza, A; Santamaría, C; Rodríguez-Navarro, D Nombre

    2002-06-01

    The effect of a variety factors on the survival of several rhizobia strains on inoculants and inoculated seeds has been evaluated. Since the rhizobia strains showed different cell-density-evolution patterns on peat-based inoculants and on inoculated seeds, several inoculant formulations with highly effective Rhizobium/Bradyrhizobium strains (for Lupinus, Hedysarum, Phaseolus and Glycine max.) were monitored under the following storage conditions: (a) the inoculants were kept refrigerated (at 4 degrees C), or (b) at room temperature (25 degrees C). The effect of water content (30-50%, w/w) in the inoculants as well as that of several seed-coating adhesives were also investigated. Alternative carriers including perlite and vermiculite were tested. For all of the strains, survival on sterile peat-based inoculants was higher than on the corresponding unsterile peat formulation; for the latter, refrigerated storage conditions are recommended to ensure high bacterial densities. The water content of the inoculants had a differential effect on strain survival depending on the sterility of the peat, such that a high water content was more detrimental when unsterilized peat was employed. The best adherent for rhizobia survival was a gum arabic/water solution. Perlite was as effective as peat in maintaining a high population of rhizobia, at least for 6 months of storage.

  3. Cross-species infection of pigs with a novel rabbit, but not rat, strain of hepatitis E virus isolated in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cossaboom, Caitlin M; Córdoba, Laura; Sanford, Brenton J; Piñeyro, Pablo; Kenney, Scott P; Dryman, Barbara A; Wang, Youchun; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important human pathogen. In addition to humans, HEV has also been identified in pig, chicken, mongoose, deer, rat, rabbit and fish. There are four recognized and two putative genotypes of mammalian HEV. Genotypes 1 and 2 are restricted to humans, while genotypes 3 and 4 are zoonotic. The recently identified rabbit HEV is a distant member of genotype 3. Here, we first expressed and purified the recombinant capsid protein of rabbit HEV and showed that the capsid protein of rabbit HEV cross-reacted with antibodies raised against avian, rat, swine and human HEV. Conversely, we showed that antibodies against rabbit HEV cross-reacted with capsid proteins derived from chicken, rat, swine and human HEV. Since pigs are the natural host of genotype 3 HEV, we then determined if rabbit HEV infects pigs. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups of four each and intravenously inoculated with PBS, US rabbit HEV, Chinese rabbit HEV, US rat HEV and swine HEV, respectively. Results showed that only half of the pigs inoculated with rabbit HEV had low levels of viraemia and faecal virus shedding, indicative of active but not robust HEV infection. Infection of pigs by rabbit HEV was further verified by transmission of the virus recovered from pig faeces to naïve rabbits. Pigs inoculated with rat HEV showed no evidence of infection. Preliminary results suggest that rabbit HEV is antigenically related to other HEV strains and infects pigs and that rat HEV failed to infect pigs.

  4. Experimental Transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) Low Virulent Isolate NH/P68 by Surviving Pigs.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Sánchez, M A; Martins, C; Pelayo, V; Carrascosa, A; Revilla, Y; Simón, A; Briones, V; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Arias, M

    2015-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has persisted in Eastern Europe since 2007, and two endemic zones have been identified in the central and southern parts of the Russian Federation. Moderate- to low-virulent ASF virus isolates are known to circulate in endemic ASF-affected regions. To improve our knowledge of virus transmission in animals recovered from ASF virus infection, an experimental in vivo study was carried out. Four domestic pigs were inoculated with the NH/P68 ASF virus, previously characterized to develop a chronic form of ASF. Two additional in-contact pigs were introduced at 72 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the same box for virus exposure. The inoculated pigs developed a mild form of the disease, and the virus was isolated from tissues in the inoculated pigs up to 99 dpi (pigs were euthanized at 36, 65, 99 and 134 dpi). In-contact pigs showed mild or no clinical signs, but did become seropositive, and a transient viraemia was detected at 28 days post-exposure (dpe), thereby confirming late virus transmission from the inoculated pigs. Virus transmission to in-contact pigs occurred at four weeks post-exposure, over three months after the primary infection. These results highlight the potential role of survivor pigs in disease maintenance and dissemination in areas where moderate- to low-virulent viruses may be circulating undetected. This study will help design better and more effective control programmes to fight against this disease.

  5. Effects of atmospheric ammonia on young pigs experimentally infected with Ascaris suum

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.G.; Curtis, S.E.; Simon, J.; Norton, H.W.

    1981-06-01

    Effects of atmospheric ammonia at 69.4 mg/m3 (100 ppm) on productive performance and respiratory tract health of young pigs (starting body weight averaged 7.5 kg) experimentally infected with Ascaris suum (50,000 embryonated ova administered by gavage when pigs were 5 weeks of age) were studied in 5 trials of 4 weeks each (when pigs were 5 to 9 weeks of age). Effects of atmospheric-ammonia exposure and ascarid infection on growth were additive. Compared with controls, percentage reductions in average daily gain were 32%, 28%, and 61% for ammonia-exposed, ascarid-infected, and combined ammonia plus ascarid groups, respectively. Ammonia exposure or ascarid infection alone depressed feed disappearance by 18%. Effects of the 2 factors were additive, resulting in a 35% reduction in feed disappearance. Pigs exposed to the combined factors had an average gain/feed ratio of 0.518, which was less than that of control pigs (0.546), but was greater than that of pigs exposed to atmospheric ammonia (0.489) or pigs infected with ascarids (0.501) alone. Liver scarring, due to larval migration, was not affected by ammonia exposure. Larval migration through the respiratory tract was not confirmed histopathologically in pigs killed 4 weeks after inoculation. A supplementary experiment was conducted which demonstrated that residual evidence of previous pulmonary larval migration was present 2 weeks after inoculation.

  6. Prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use in Belgian fattening pig herds.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte; Persoons, Davy; Maes, Dominiek; Laanen, Maria; Postma, Merel; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of antimicrobial use is an essential step to control the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Between January and October 2010 data on prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use were collected retrospectively on 50 closed or semi-closed pig herds. Ninety-three percent of the group treatments were prophylactic whereas only 7% were methaphylactic. The most frequently used antimicrobials orally applied at group level were colistin (30.7%), amoxicillin (30.0%), trimethoprim-sulfonamides (13.1%), doxycycline (9.9%) and tylosin (8.1%). The most frequently applied injectable antimicrobials were tulathromycin (45.0%), long acting ceftiofur (40.1%) and long acting amoxicillin (8.4%). The treatment incidences (TI) based on the used daily dose pig (UDD(pig) or the actually administered dose per day per kg pig of a drug) for all oral and injectable antimicrobial drugs was on average 200.7 per 1000 pigs at risk per day (min=0, max=699.0), while the TI based on the animal daily dose pig (ADD(pig) or the national defined average maintenance dose per day per kg pig of a drug used for its main indication) was slightly higher (average=235.8, min=0, max=1322.1). This indicates that in reality fewer pigs were treated with the same amount of antimicrobials than theoretically possible. Injectable products were generally overdosed (79.5%), whereas oral treatments were often underdosed (47.3%). In conclusion, this study shows that prophylactic group treatment was applied in 98% of the visited herds and often includes the use of critically important and broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In Belgium, the guidelines for prudent use of antimicrobials are not yet implemented.

  7. Experimental reproduction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in pigs by dual infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Thacker, E L; Yu, S; Fenaux, M; Meng, X-J; Halbur, P G

    2004-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactions between Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and to establish a model for studying the pathogenesis of and testing intervention strategies for the control of PCV2-associated porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Sixty-seven pigs were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 (n=17) pigs served as controls, group 2 (n=17) pigs were inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae, group 3 (n=17) pigs were dual infected with M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2, and group 4 (n=16) pigs were inoculated with PCV2. Pigs were inoculated intratracheally with M. hyopneumoniae at 4 weeks of age followed by intranasal inoculation with PCV2 at 6 weeks of age. Dual-infected pigs had moderate dyspnea, lethargy, and reduced weight gain. The overall severity of macroscopic lung lesions, PCV2-associated microscopic lesions in lung and lymphoid tissues, and the amount of PCV2-antigen associated with these lesions were significantly (P <0.05) higher in dual-infected pigs compared with all other groups. Four of 17 (23.5%) dual-infected pigs had decreased growth rate and severe lymphoid depletion and granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with high amounts of PCV2-antigen consistent with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). PCV2-antigen in lung tissue was most often associated with M. hyopneumoniae-induced peribronchial lymphoid hyperplasia, suggesting that this is an important site for PCV2 replication in the lung. This study indicates that M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of PCV2-associated lung and lymphoid lesions, increases the amount and prolongs the presence of PCV2-antigen, and increases the incidence of PMWS in pigs.

  8. Transgenesis for pig models

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Soo-Young; Yoon, Ki-Young; Lee, Choong-Il; Lee, Byeong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Animal models, particularly pigs, have come to play an important role in translational biomedical research. There have been many pig models with genetically modifications via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, because most transgenic pigs have been produced by random integration to date, the necessity for more exact gene-mutated models using recombinase based conditional gene expression like mice has been raised. Currently, advanced genome-editing technologies enable us to generate specific gene-deleted and -inserted pig models. In the future, the development of pig models with gene editing technologies could be a valuable resource for biomedical research. PMID:27030199

  9. Automatic Surface Inoculation of Agar Trays1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Judd R.; Mills, Stacey M.; Boykin, Elizabeth H.

    1972-01-01

    A machine is described which automatically inoculates a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture by use of either a conventional inoculating loop or a cotton swab. Isolated colonies were obtained with an inoculating loop when a heavy inoculum (109 cells/ml) was used or with a cotton swab when a light inoculum (ca. 104 cells/ml) was used. Trays containing combinations of differential or selective media were used to (i) separate mixtures of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, (ii) facilitate isolation of organisms from clinical specimens, and (iii) compare colony growth characteristics of pure cultures. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. Images PMID:16349943

  10. Characterization of a novel parainfluenza virus, caviid parainfluenza virus 3, from laboratory guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Simmons, Joe H; Purdy, Gregory A; Franklin, Craig L; Trottier, Pierre; Churchill, Anthony E; Russell, Robert J; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L; Riley, Lela K

    2002-12-01

    A novel Respirovirus was isolated from nasopharyngeal swab specimens from clinically normal laboratory guinea pigs, and was characterized and named caviid parainfluenza virus 3 (CavPIV-3). The CavPIV-3 is enveloped, is 100 to 300 nm in diameter, and has a characteristic 15-nm-diameter chevron-shaped virus ribonucleocapsid protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion glycoprotein of CavPIV-3 revealed it to be 94% identical to human and guinea pig parainfluenza 3 (PIV-3) viruses and 80% identical to bovine PIV-3. To determine whether CavPIV-3 causes clinical disease in laboratory guinea pigs and to compare the serologic response of guinea pigs to CavPIV-3 and to other paramyxoviruses, an infection study was performed, in which groups of guinea pigs were inoculated with CavPIV-3, Sendai virus, simian virus 5 (SV-5), murine pneumonia virus (PVM), or bovine PIV-3 virus. During the course of the study, guinea pigs were maintained in an infectious disease suite, housed in Micro-Isolator cages, and were only manipulated under a laminar flow hood. Clinical signs of disease were not observed in any of the paramyxovirus-inoculated guinea pigs during the eight-week course of the study, and histologic signs of disease were not evident at necropsy eight weeks after inoculation. Guinea pigs inoculated with CavPIV-3, Sendai virus, PVM, and bovine PIV-3 developed robust homologous or heterologous serologic responses. In contrast, guinea pigs inoculated with SV-5 developed modest or equivocal serologic responses, as assessed by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Further, use of the SV-5 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay resulted in the highest degree of non-specific reactivity among all of the paramyxovirus assays. In summary, CavPIV-3 is a novel guinea pig Respirovirus that subclinically infects laboratory guinea pigs, resulting in a robust serologic response, but no observed clinical or histologic disease. The CavPIV-3 fusion glycoprotein gene sequence is available from Gen

  11. Disease characteristics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy following inoculation into mice via three different routes.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Christopher M; Beck, Katy E; Simmons, Marion M; Hawkins, Stephen A C; Spiropoulos, John

    2013-10-01

    Mouse-adapted transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains are routinely distinguished based on reproducible disease characteristics in a given mouse line following inoculation via a consistent route. We investigated whether different administration routes (oral, intragastric (i.g.) and intracerebral (i.c.)) can alter the disease characteristics in IM mice after serial dilution of a stabilized mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) strain (301V). In addition, the infectivity of distal ileum and mesenteric lymph nodes (ln) sampled at three time points (35 days postinoculation (dpi), 70 dpi and terminal disease) after i.g. inoculation of 301V strain was assessed in mice by i.c. challenge. Strain characteristics were assessed according to standard methodology and PrP(Sc) immunohistochemistry deposition patterns. Mean incubation periods were prolonged following oral or i.g. inoculations compared to the i.c. route. Lesion profiles following i.c. challenges were elevated compared to i.g. and oral routes although vacuolation in the dorsal medulla was consistently high irrespective of the route of administration. Nevertheless, the same PrP(Sc) deposition pattern was associated with each route of administration. Distal and mesenteric ln infectivity was detected as early as 35 dpi and displayed consistent lesion profiles and PrP(Sc) deposition patterns. Our data suggest that although 301V retained its properties, some phenotypic parameters were affected by the route of inoculation. We conclude that bioassay data should be interpreted carefully and should be standardized for route of inoculation.

  12. Comparison of Inoculation with the InoqulA and WASP Automated Systems with Manual Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Antony; Dijkstra, Klaas; Prod'hom, Guy; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-07-01

    The quality of sample inoculation is critical for achieving an optimal yield of discrete colonies in both monomicrobial and polymicrobial samples to perform identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Consequently, we compared the performance between the InoqulA (BD Kiestra), the WASP (Copan), and manual inoculation methods. Defined mono- and polymicrobial samples of 4 bacterial species and cloudy urine specimens were inoculated on chromogenic agar by the InoqulA, the WASP, and manual methods. Images taken with ImagA (BD Kiestra) were analyzed with the VisionLab version 3.43 image analysis software to assess the quality of growth and to prevent subjective interpretation of the data. A 3- to 10-fold higher yield of discrete colonies was observed following automated inoculation with both the InoqulA and WASP systems than that with manual inoculation. The difference in performance between automated and manual inoculation was mainly observed at concentrations of >10(6) bacteria/ml. Inoculation with the InoqulA system allowed us to obtain significantly more discrete colonies than the WASP system at concentrations of >10(7) bacteria/ml. However, the level of difference observed was bacterial species dependent. Discrete colonies of bacteria present in 100- to 1,000-fold lower concentrations than the most concentrated populations in defined polymicrobial samples were not reproducibly recovered, even with the automated systems. The analysis of cloudy urine specimens showed that InoqulA inoculation provided a statistically significantly higher number of discrete colonies than that with WASP and manual inoculation. Consequently, the automated InoqulA inoculation greatly decreased the requirement for bacterial subculture and thus resulted in a significant reduction in the time to results, laboratory workload, and laboratory costs.

  13. Colonization of the small intestine of weaned pigs by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that lack known colonization factors.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Arp, L H; Moon, H W; Casey, T A

    1992-05-01

    Intestinal colonization of 3-week-old weaned pigs by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that were originally isolated from weaned pigs with fatal diarrhea and that lacked K88, K99, F41, and 987P adhesins (4P- ETEC) was studied by histologic, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopic techniques. In the first experiment, 16 principal pigs were inoculated orogastrically with ETEC strain 2134 (serogroup O157: H19) or 2171 (serogroup 0141:H4), and eight control pigs were not inoculated. In the second experiment, 24 principals were inoculated with ETEC strain 2134, and 12 controls were inoculated with a nonenterotoxigenic strain of E. coli. Principal and control pigs were necropsied at intervals from 24 to 72 hours after inoculation of principals to provide the tissues used for this report. Results from the two experiments and with both ETEC strains were similar and therefore were combined. Adhesion by 4P- ETEC was demonstrated in ileum but not in cecum or colon in 22/40 principal pigs sampled at 24 to 72 hours after orogastric inoculation. Adherent bacteria were most apparent on the intestinal villi covering Peyer's patches. Only occasional adherent bacteria were detected in ileal sections from a few (4/20) of the control pigs. Adherence by 4P- ETEC was characterized by "patches" of bacteria closely associated with the lateral surfaces and less frequently with the tips and the bases of intact villi. In most cases, the adherent bacteria were separated from epithelial cell microvilli and other bacterial cells by a 50-400-nm space. Filamentous bacterial appendages bridged this space and formed a network among adjacent bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  15. Tarnish of dental alloys by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, T K; Vaidyanathan, J; Linke, H A; Schulman, A

    1991-11-01

    Five dental alloys, on exposure to blood and chocolate media with and without inoculated microorganisms, showed varying degrees of tarnish. The results indicated a composition-dependent tarnish behavior of alloys in microorganism-inoculated media, indicating a potential role for the oral microorganisms in inducing clinically observed tarnish of dental alloys. Actinomyces viscosus and periodontal pocket specimens show a similarity in their activity to induce tarnish in base metal-containing dental alloys.

  16. Growth performance and whole-body composition of pigs experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Escobar, J; Van Alstine, W G; Baker, D H; Johnson, R W

    2002-02-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) is the primary infectious pathogen responsible for enzootic pneumonia in pigs. Although Mh is thought to impair growth performance, whole-body composition, and fat and protein accretion in pigs with pneumonia have not been reported and the mechanism through which Mh reduces growth is unknown. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of Mh on growth performance, whole-body composition, and protein and fat accretion in nursery pigs and to determine whether Mh infection increases the expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Sixty-four 2-wk-old Mh-free pigs were used (two trials) in a randomized complete block design. In each trial, two pigs were housed in each of 16 disease-containment chambers. At 4 wk of age, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with 3 mL of Mh broth (P5722-3, 10(7) cfu/mL) or sterile Friis culture medium. Clinical signs of disease and feed intake were monitored daily and body weight was determined weekly for 4 wk. Whole-body composition was determined from pigs killed 0, 14, and 28 d after inoculation, and the comparative slaughter technique was used to estimate protein and fat accretion. At death, gross lung lesions were quantified, and lung tissue was collected to verify the presence or absence of Mh, and to determine cytokine mRNA levels. Control pigs displayed no overt signs of infection and were Mh-negative and free of pulmonary lesions. Pigs inoculated with Mh showed pneumonic coughing (P < 0.005), were Mh-positive, and had pulmonary lesions that affected 4.5% (P < 0.01) and 14.1% (P < 0.001) of total lung surface area at 14 and 28 d, respectively, after inoculation. Ribonuclease protection assays revealed increased IL-1beta (P < 0.04) and TNF-alpha (P < 0.06) mRNA in lung tissue collected from a lesion site compared with tissue collected 10 cm from a lesion site or from control pigs. Interestingly, Mh did not depress weight gain or feed efficiency

  17. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  18. Coping With Pain: Studies in Stress Inoculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horan, John J.; And Others

    The stress-inoculation paradigm for helping clients deal with pain consists of education about the psychological dimensions of pain, training in a number of coping skills relevant to each dimension, and practice in applying these skills to the noxious stimulus. Presented are two studies, the first of which represents a component analysis of stress…

  19. The role of heterotrophic microorganism Galactomyces sp. Z3 in improving pig slurry bioleaching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zheng, Guanyu; Zhou, Lixiang; Liu, Fenwu; Zheng, Chaocheng; Cui, Chunhong

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of removing heavy metals and eliminating pathogens from pig slurry through bioleaching involving the fungus Galactomyces sp. Z3 and two acidophilic thiobacillus (A. ferrooxidans LX5 and A. thiooxidans TS6) was investigated. It was found that the isolated pig slurry dissolved organic matter (DOM) degrader Z3 was identified as Galactomyces sp. Z3, which could grow well at pH 2.5-7 and degrade pig slurry DOM from 1973 to 942 mg/l within 48 h. During the successive multi-batch bioleaching systems, the co-inoculation of pig slurry degrader Galactomyces sp. Z3 and the two Acidithiobacillus species could improve pig slurry bioleaching efficiency compared to the single system without Galactomyces sp. Z3. The removal efficiency of Zn and Cu exceeded 94% and 85%, respectively. In addition, the elimination efficiencies of pathogens, including both total coliform and faecal coliform counts, exceeded 99% after bioleaching treatment. However, the counts of Galactomyces sp. Z3 decreased with the fall of pH and did not restore to the initial level during successive multi-batch bioleaching systems, and it is necessary to re-inoculate Galactomyces sp. Z3 cells into the bioleaching system to maintain its role in degrading pig slurry DOM. Therefore, a bioleaching technique involving both Galactomyces sp. Z3 and Acidithiobacillus species is an efficient method for removing heavy metals and eliminating pathogens from pig slurry.

  20. Immunization against chlamydial genital infection in guinea pigs with UV-inactivated and viable chlamydiae administered by different routes

    SciTech Connect

    Rank, R.G.; Batteiger, B.E.; Soderberg, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Female guinea pigs were immunized with viable or UV light-inactivated chlamydiae, belonging to the species Chlamydia psittaci, by intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, or ocular routes. All animals were then inoculated vaginally with viable chlamydiae to determine the extent of protection against challenge infection induced by the various regimens. The course of genital infection was significantly reduced in intensity in all groups of animals except the unimmunized controls and those animals immunized orally with inactivated antigen. Guinea pigs immunized with viable antigen were more likely to develop resistance to challenge infection and, in general, had a significantly greater degree of protection than animals immunized with inactivated antigen. No one route seemed superior in producing a protective response. Animals in all groups demonstrating protection developed serum and secretion immunoglobulin G antibody responses to chlamydiae. Lymphocyte proliferative reactions to chlamydial antigen were variable among groups. Immunoblot analysis of serum and secretions indicated a wide range of antibody specificities, but most protected animals produced antibodies to the major outer membrane protein, lipopolysaccharide, and the 61-kilodalton protein. No definitive associations could be made between the increased ability of immunization with viable organisms to produce resistance to challenge infection and a particular immune parameter. These data indicate that viable chlamydiae given by various routes are able to induce a strong immune response which can provide resistance against reinfection in some cases or at least reduce the degree of infection to a greater degree than inactivated antigen. However, complete resistance to genital tract infection may be difficult to obtain and alternate immunizations strategies may have to be developed.

  1. PSITTACOSIS : III. EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED INFECTIONS IN RABBITS AND GUINEA PIGS.

    PubMed

    Rivers, T M; Berry, G P

    1931-06-30

    1. Rabbits and guinea pigs are susceptible to psittacosis virus introduced intracerebrally. By means of brain to brain passages in these animals the active agent is capable of propagation indefinitely. 2. Serial passages of the virus through rabbits and guinea pigs do not cause the active agent to lose its pathogenicity for parrots and mice. 3. The chief clinical evidences of infection in rabbits and guinea pigs following intracranial inoculation of the virus are fever and loss of weight. The pathological changes are characterized by a mild meningo-encephalitis, and fatty degeneration, focal necrosis, and infarction of the liver. 4. Rabbits upon recovery from an attack of psittacosis are actively immune. 5. Two strains of virus, human and parrot, were found to be immunologically similar. 6. No evidence was obtained to show that human convalescent serum possesses an appreciable amount of neutralizing substances.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in pigs infected experimentally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Andrada, M; Quesada-Canales, O; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Paz-Sánchez, Y; Espinosa de Los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F

    2014-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia, primarily caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh), is a contagious disease characterized by catarrhal bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Previous studies have evaluated immunohistochemically the distribution of Mh, different cellular populations and cytokines during Mh-induced pneumonia. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is overexpressed during inflammatory responses by different cell types in the lung. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of COX-2 in the pathogenesis of porcine enzootic pneumonia. COX-2 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lung tissues from 10 pigs infected experimentally with Mh. Ten pigs were inoculated intranasally with Mh and killed in pairs weekly from 1 to 5 weeks post inoculation. Three Mh-free pigs were taken as controls. Bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells, bronchial submucosal glands and a small number of macrophages in the bronchoalveolar exudate expressed COX-2. COX-2 protein was always associated with areas of pneumonia and expression was minimal in lungs from control pigs. These results suggest that COX-2 plays a role in the pathogenesis of Mh-infection.

  3. Immunostimulatory effects of recombinant Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae expressing porcine interleukin-18 in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yohsuke; Minagawa, Yu; Shi, Fang; Eguchi, Masahiro; Muneta, Yoshihiro; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), which was originally called gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducing factor, has been shown to play an important role in innate and acquired immune responses. In this study, attenuated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains were engineered to produce porcine IL-18 (poIL-18) and evaluated for their potential immunostimulatory effect in animals. Recombinant poIL-18 was successfully expressed in the recombinant E. rhusiopathiae strains YS-1/IL-18 and KO/IL-18. The culture supernatant of YS-1/IL-18 was confirmed to induce IFN-γ production in murine splenocytes in vitro, and this production was inhibited by incubation with anti-poIL-18 monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, more IFN-γ production was induced upon stimulation of splenocytes with concanavalin A for splenocytes from mice that were intraperitoneally inoculated with YS-1/IL-18 than for splenocytes from control mice inoculated with the parent strain YS-1. Peritoneal macrophages from mice preinoculated with YS-1/IL-18 exhibited enhanced phagocytosis of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium compared with peritoneal macrophages from control mice preinoculated with YS-1. We also confirmed the immunostimulatory effect on humoral immune responses against antigens of E. rhusiopathiae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in gnotobiotic pigs that were orally preinoculated with KO/IL-18. Thus, these results provide evidence that E. rhusiopathiae is a promising vector for the expression of host cytokines and suggest the potential utility of E. rhusiopathiae vector-encoded cytokines in the activation of host innate and acquired immune responses.

  4. Immunostimulatory Effects of Recombinant Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Expressing Porcine Interleukin-18 in Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Yohsuke; Minagawa, Yu; Shi, Fang; Eguchi, Masahiro; Muneta, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), which was originally called gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducing factor, has been shown to play an important role in innate and acquired immune responses. In this study, attenuated Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains were engineered to produce porcine IL-18 (poIL-18) and evaluated for their potential immunostimulatory effect in animals. Recombinant poIL-18 was successfully expressed in the recombinant E. rhusiopathiae strains YS-1/IL-18 and KO/IL-18. The culture supernatant of YS-1/IL-18 was confirmed to induce IFN-γ production in murine splenocytes in vitro, and this production was inhibited by incubation with anti-poIL-18 monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, more IFN-γ production was induced upon stimulation of splenocytes with concanavalin A for splenocytes from mice that were intraperitoneally inoculated with YS-1/IL-18 than for splenocytes from control mice inoculated with the parent strain YS-1. Peritoneal macrophages from mice preinoculated with YS-1/IL-18 exhibited enhanced phagocytosis of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium compared with peritoneal macrophages from control mice preinoculated with YS-1. We also confirmed the immunostimulatory effect on humoral immune responses against antigens of E. rhusiopathiae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in gnotobiotic pigs that were orally preinoculated with KO/IL-18. Thus, these results provide evidence that E. rhusiopathiae is a promising vector for the expression of host cytokines and suggest the potential utility of E. rhusiopathiae vector-encoded cytokines in the activation of host innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:22761300

  5. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP.

  6. Capsid coding sequences of foot-and-mouth disease viruses are determinants of pathogenicity in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Jackson, Terry; Bøtner, Anette; Belsham, Graham J

    2012-05-24

    The surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) determine its antigenicity and the ability of the virus to interact with host-cell receptors. Hence, modification of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus.In the present study we compared the pathogenicity of different FMDVs in young pigs. In total 32 pigs, 7-weeks-old, were exposed to virus, either by direct inoculation or through contact with inoculated pigs, using cell culture adapted (O1K B64), chimeric (O1K/A-TUR and O1K/O-UKG) or field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) viruses. The O1K B64 virus and the two chimeric viruses are identical to each other except for the capsid coding region.Animals exposed to O1K B64 did not exhibit signs of disease, while pigs exposed to each of the other viruses showed typical clinical signs of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). All pigs infected with the O1K/O-UKG chimera or the field strain (O-UKG/34/2001) developed fulminant disease. Furthermore, 3 of 4 in-contact pigs exposed to the O1K/O-UKG virus died in the acute phase of infection, likely from myocardial infection. However, in the group exposed to the O1K/A-TUR chimeric virus, only 1 pig showed symptoms of disease within the time frame of the experiment (10 days). All pigs that developed clinical disease showed a high level of viral RNA in serum and infected pigs that survived the acute phase of infection developed a serotype specific antibody response. It is concluded that the capsid coding sequences are determinants of FMDV pathogenicity in pigs.

  7. Sequential inoculation versus co-inoculation in Cabernet Franc wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Pedro Miguel Izquierdo; Romero, Esteban García; Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Palop, María Llanos

    2015-04-01

    A study has been carried out in order to determine the effect of the lactic acid bacteria inoculation time on the kinetic of vinification and on chemical and sensory characteristics of Cabernet Franc wines. Traditional vinifications, with lactic acid bacteria inoculated after completion of alcoholic fermentation were compared with vinifications where yeast and bacteria were co-inoculated at the beginning of vinification. One commercial yeast strain and an autochthonous Oenococcus oeni strain (C22L9), previously identified and selected at our laboratory, were used. Monitoring of alcoholic and malolactic fermentations was carried out by yeast and lactic acid bacteria counts and by measuring l-malic acid concentration. Wines were chemically characterized and analysed for volatile compounds content. A sensory analysis, consisting of a descriptive and a triangular test, was also carried out. Results from this study showed that the concurrent yeast/bacteria inoculation of musts at the beginning of vinification produced a reduction in duration of the process without an excessive increase in volatile acidity. Differences in volatile compounds content and the corresponding impact on the sensorial profile of wines were also displayed. These results suggest that co-inoculation is a worthwhile alternative for winemaking of Cabernet Franc wines, if compared with traditional post-alcoholic fermentation lactic acid bacteria inoculation.

  8. Metabolism and excretion kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled difloxacin in pigs after oral administration, and antimicrobial activity of manure containing difloxacin and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sukul, Premasis; Lamshoeft, Marc; Kusari, Souvik; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael

    2009-04-15

    Fluoroquinolones are amongst the most important antibiotics used in veterinary medicine. On this account the behavior of difloxacin (DIF) and its metabolites was investigated by administering the {sup 14}C-labeled and non-labeled veterinary drug to fattening pigs. The excretion kinetics were determined after daily collection of manure. Sarafloxacin (SAR) was found to be the major metabolite, three further trace metabolites were also recovered, applying high-resolution (HR) mass spectrometric technique. The identification of DIF and SAR was confirmed by comparison with the spectroscopic and chromatographic data of the authentic references. The identification of the three trace metabolites was performed by HR-MS/MS. Only 8.1% of the administered radioactivity remained in the pig after 10 days and DIF accounted for 95.9% of the radioactivity excreted. More than 99% of the labeled compounds were detected and identified in the manure. The mean recoveries for all single electrolytes were {>=}94%. Linearity was established over concentration range 10-10,000 {mu}g/kg manure with a correlation coefficient {>=}0.99. By using in vitro antimicrobial activity tests against a group of standard pathogenic control strains, the results showed that the residual antibiotic concentrations in the manure of pigs are high enough to exhibit antibacterial activity.

  9. Inter-species transplantation of gut microbiota from human to pigs.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaoyan; Hua, Xiuguo; Yang, Qian; Ding, Dezhong; Che, Chuanyan; Cui, Li; Jia, Wei; Bucheli, Peter; Zhao, Liping

    2007-06-01

    Direct research on gut microbiota for understanding its role as 'an important organ' in human individuals is difficult owing to its vast diversity and host specificity as well as ethical concerns. Transplantation of human gut microbiota into surrogate hosts can significantly facilitate the research of human gut ecology, metabolism and immunity but rodents-based model provides results with low relevance to humans. A new human flora-associated (HFA) piglet model was hereby established taking advantage of the high similarity between pigs and humans with respect to the anatomy, physiology and metabolism of the digestive system. Piglets were delivered via cesarean section into a SPF-level barrier system and were inoculated orally with a whole fecal suspension from one healthy 10-year-old boy. The establishment and composition of the intestinal microbiota of the HFA piglets were analyzed and compared with that of the human donor using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-PCR fingerprinting-based community DNA hybridization, group-specific PCR-temperature gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR. Molecular profiling demonstrated that transplantation of gut microbiota from a human to germfree piglets produced a donor-like microbial community with minimal individual variation. And the microbial succession with aging of those ex-germfree piglets was also similar to that observed in humans. This HFA model provides a significantly improved system for research on gut ecology in human metabolism, nutrition and drug discovery.

  10. Stress Inoculation through Cognitive and Biofeedback Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE DEC 2010 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The2010 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation & Education Conference (I/ITSEC), 29 Nov ? 2 Dec, Orlando, FL 14. ABSTRACT...Page 2 of 11 Stress Inoculation through Cognitive and Biofeedback Training LCDR Joseph Cohn, PhD Gershon Weltman, PhD, Raj Ratwani, PhD Don

  11. Serological and Molecular Investigation of Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Pigs Raised in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Nicola; Sarno, Eleonora; Peretti, Vincenzo; Ciambrone, Lucia; Casalinuovo, Francesco; Santoro, Adriano

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a common acute hepatitis transmitted by the fecal-oral route. In developed countries, the virus has a zoonotic potential, and domestic pigs and wild boars are considered main reservoirs. To assess the prevalence of HEV-positive animals in the Calabria region (southern Italy) on a serological and molecular level, a total of 216 autochthonous healthy pigs (Apulo-Calabrese breed) were sampled. Both sera and feces were collected. Pigs were grouped based on age: 117 pigs <6 months and 99 pigs >6 months. By using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system, a total of 173 (80%) of the 216 pigs tested seropositive. In all sampled farms (n = 8), pigs with antibodies (immunoglobulin G) against HEV were detected at a level higher than 60%, with a significant difference among age groups (P < 0.0001). Moreover, 16 fattening pigs were found to be nested reverse transcription PCR positive and thus to shed viral genomes in their feces. These positive findings resulted in a prevalence of 48.4% on the farm level (16 of 35 pigs) and an overall prevalence of 7.4% at the animal level (16 of 216 pigs). Based on the present study, HEV seems to circulate among the autochthonous domestic pig population of southern Italy with a low sharing rate. Further studies exploring the origin of infection are needed to minimize the risk of human exposure and to reduce consequences for public health.

  12. Glasser's Disease of Swine Produced by the Intratracheal Inoculation of Haemophilus suis

    PubMed Central

    Neil, D. H.; McKay, K. A.; L'Ecuyer, C.; Corner, A. H.

    1969-01-01

    The intracheal inoculation of pigs with Haemophilus suis led to the production of Glasser's disease at every attempt without significant pulmonary involvement. Isolation of this organism from the experimental animals was possible only in the acute phase of the disease. The indirect fluorescent antibody technique when applied to frozen sections of tissues obtained from the experimentally infected pigs at autopsy, revealed a few rod forms but mostly “round bodies” of H. suis in animals from which the organism was isolated, and “round bodies” only in the pigs from which the organism was not isolated. Attention is drawn to the similarities between the lesions caused by H. suis and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, and to the confusion which may result therefrom. It is stressed that the laboratory diagnosis of these two diseases is complicated by the fact that both agents may not be isolated on the media commonly used in diagnostic laboratories. Both organisms necessitate the use of special media where the clinical and autopsy results indicate polyserositis and arthritis. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4242769

  13. Inoculation Stress Hypothesis of Environmental Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Crofton, Elizabeth J.; Zhang, Yafang; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    One hallmark of psychiatric conditions is the vast continuum of individual differences in susceptibility vs. resilience resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The environmental enrichment paradigm is an animal model that is useful for studying a range of psychiatric conditions, including protective phenotypes in addiction and depression models. The major question is how environmental enrichment, a non-drug and non-surgical manipulation, can produce such robust individual differences in such a wide range of behaviors. This paper draws from a variety of published sources to outline a coherent hypothesis of inoculation stress as a factor producing the protective enrichment phenotypes. The basic tenet suggests that chronic mild stress from living in a complex environment and interacting non-aggressively with conspecifics can inoculate enriched rats against subsequent stressors and/or drugs of abuse. This paper reviews the enrichment phenotypes, mulls the fundamental nature of environmental enrichment vs. isolation, discusses the most appropriate control for environmental enrichment, and challenges the idea that cortisol/corticosterone equals stress. The intent of the inoculation stress hypothesis of environmental enrichment is to provide a scaffold with which to build testable hypotheses for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying these protective phenotypes and thus provide new therapeutic targets to treat psychiatric/neurological conditions. PMID:25449533

  14. Experimental Colibacillosis in Gnotobiotic Baby Pigs I. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Christie, B. R.; Waxler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Sixty-two gnotobiotic pigs were used in three experiments to determine the means whereby two related strains of Escherichia coli colonized the intestinal tract. Pigs were exposed by a method simulating neonatal contamination of the umbilical stump. Bacteremia was produced within one and one half hours, and by 24 hours the infection was generally well established in the gastrointestinal tract. By 48 hours after exposure, the bacteremia had subsided so that only an occasional isolation from organs other than the gastrointestinal tract was made. Oral exposure of one litter of germfree pigs produced heavy colonization of the entire gastrointestinal tract within four hours. Evidence of intermittent bacteremia was present in pigs of this litter. Diarrhea appeared earlier when pigs were exposed orally than when they were exposed by way of the umbilical stump. PMID:4270433

  15. Influence of inoculation route on the course of infection of Trichomonas gallinae in nonimmune pigeons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1971-01-01

    The Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae was given to nonimmune pigeons by five different routes: (I) oral; (2) pulmonary; (3) intravenous; (4) intramuscular; (5) subcutaneous. The birds infected by the oral and pulmonarv routes succumbed to typical trichomoniasis involving the liver and lungs respectively. The pulmonary route also produced air sac lesions resulting from trichomonads passing through the lungs via the mesobronchi. Intramuscular and subcutaneous introduction of the parasite resulted in transient infections involving small lesions which were resorbed in I to 2 weeks. The intravenous introductions resulted only in large lesions at the site of inoculation, presumably from perivascular leakage at the time of parasite entry. No other internal lesions were found and cultures made from liver and lung tissue were negative for T. gallinae. The results of infection by the oral and pulmonary routes were not surprising, since these are essentially normal routes of infection. The inhibition of parasite development at the intramuscular and subcutaneous sites of parasite introduction may have resulted from inhibition of the mobility of the parasite by connective tissue or these substrates may have been unsuitable for parasite development. The results of intravenous inoculation are surprising, since it has been stated that T. gallinae reaches the viscera via the circulation. If this were true, lesions should have occurred at least in the lungs where the parasites would have lodged following introduction into a vein. Recovery from infection at any site is apparently sufficient to produce an immunity to the parasite when subsequently introduced via the oral route.

  16. Effect of Low Dose of Fumonisins on Pig Health: Immune Status, Intestinal Microbiota and Sensitivity to Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Burel, Christine; Tanguy, Mael; Guerre, Philippe; Boilletot, Eric; Cariolet, Roland; Queguiner, Marilyne; Postollec, Gilbert; Pinton, Philippe; Salvat, Gilles; Oswald, Isabelle P.; Fravalo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the effects of chronic exposure to fumonisins via the ingestion of feed containing naturally contaminated corn in growing pigs infected or not with Salmonella spp. This exposure to a moderate dietary concentration of fumonisins (11.8 ppm) was sufficient to induce a biological effect in pigs (Sa/So ratio), but no mortality or pathology was observed over 63 days of exposure. No mortality or related clinical signs, even in cases of inoculation with Salmonella (5 × 104 CFU), were observed either. Fumonisins, at these concentrations, did not affect the ability of lymphocytes to proliferate in the presence of mitogens, but after seven days post-inoculation they led to inhibition of the ability of specific Salmonella lymphocytes to proliferate following exposure to a specific Salmonella antigen. However, the ingestion of fumonisins had no impact on Salmonella translocation or seroconversion in inoculated pigs. The inoculation of Salmonella did not affect faecal microbiota profiles, but exposure to moderate concentrations of fumonisins transiently affected the digestive microbiota balance. In cases of co-infection with fumonisins and Salmonella, the microbiota profiles were rapidly and clearly modified as early as 48 h post-Salmonella inoculation. Therefore under these experimental conditions, exposure to an average concentration of fumonisins in naturally contaminated feed had no effect on pig health but did affect the digestive microbiota balance, with Salmonella exposure amplifying this phenomenon. PMID:23612754

  17. Pig in the Middle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Explores themes relating to human transition as they appear in "Charlotte's Web" and four other stories using pigs as a subject. Discusses the motifs common to all these texts that recur in the film "Babe." Considers how the cycle of life and death is ceaseless, and pigs symbolize the necessary transitions that people must all…

  18. Accessing inoculation methods of maize and wheat with Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Josiane; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of inoculants containing Azospirillum is becoming more popular due to increasing reports of expressive gains in grain yields. However, incompatibility with pesticides used in seed treatments represents a main limitation for a successful inoculation. Therefore, in this study we searched for alternatives methods for seed inoculation of maize and wheat, aiming to avoid the direct contact of bacteria with pesticides. Different doses of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense were employed to perform inoculation in-furrow, via soil spray at sowing and via leaf spray after seedlings had emerged, in comparison to seed inoculation. Experiments were conducted first under greenhouse controlled conditions and then confirmed in the field at different locations in Brazil. In the greenhouse, most parameters measured responded positively to the largest inoculant dose used in foliar sprays, but benefits could also be observed from both in-furrow and soil spray inoculation. However, our results present evidence that field inoculation with plant-growth promoting bacteria must consider inoculant doses, and point to the need of fine adjustments to avoid crossing the threshold of growth stimulation and inhibition. All inoculation techniques increased the abundance of diazotrophic bacteria in plant tissues, and foliar spray improved colonization of leaves, while soil inoculations favored root and rhizosphere colonization. In field experiments, inoculation with A. brasilense allowed for a 25 % reduction in the need for N fertilizers. Our results have identified alternative methods of inoculation that were as effective as the standard seed inoculation that may represent an important strategy to avoid the incompatibility between inoculant bacteria and pesticides employed for seed treatment.

  19. Cysticercosis in the pig.

    PubMed

    de Aluja, A S

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is still an important parasitosis in rural pigs in many developing countries, México among them. The main causes for the persistence of this condition are lack of hygiene in the rural communities, lack of education of the animal owners, lack of control in the trade of pigs and their meat and lack of conscientious meat inspection. The pig production systems in the marginated areas of Mexico are briefly mentioned and it is stressed that among the important reasons for the persistence of the reproductive cycle of Taenia solium is the fact that appropriate toilet facilities in village dwellings are not mandatory. The diagnostic methods of cysticercosis in the living pigs and in their meat are discussed and the degenerative stages of the larvae as well as methods to test their viability are explained. The treatment of infected pigs and their meat is discussed. Recommendations for control programmes are given.

  20. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Signs & Symptoms? Should You Have an Oral Cancer Exam? U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and ...

  2. Oral Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  3. 7 CFR 201.24a - Inoculated seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoculated seed. 201.24a Section 201.24a Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.24a Inoculated seed. Seed claimed to be inoculated shall...

  4. The effects of two synthetic glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists, Ro 43-8857 and L-700,462, on platelet aggregation and bleeding in guinea-pigs and dogs: evidence that Ro 43-8857 is orally active.

    PubMed

    Cook, N S; Bruttger, O; Pally, C; Hagenbach, A

    1993-11-15

    In vitro platelet aggregation studies in whole blood were used to define the species-specificity profile of two synthetic GP-IIb/IIIa antagonists, Ro 43-8857 and L-700,462. Aggregation of rhesus monkey platelets was inhibited with a similar potency to human platelets, whereas both compounds were poor antagonists in mini-pig, rabbit or hamster blood. Compared to human platelets, Ro 43-8857 was 2-3-fold less active as an inhibitor of dog and guinea-pig platelet aggregation, whereas L-700,462 was, respectively, 4- and 14-fold less active in these species. In vivo investigations with these two compounds were performed in anesthetized guinea-pigs and conscious dogs, with bleeding times measured on small mesenteric arteries or on the inner jowl respectively. Ex vivo ADP-induced whole blood platelet aggregation was completely inhibited in guinea-pigs by Ro 43-8857 following intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg and intraduodenal administration of 3 mg/kg, with a duration of action exceeding 5 hours. Mesenteric bleeding times were prolonged by Ro 43-8857 only at doses causing supra-maximal inhibition of aggregation, suggesting these two effects could be partially dissociated. L-700,462 (3 mg/kg i.v.) was shorter acting than Ro 43-8857 in guinea-pigs (duration approximately 1 hour) and the anti-aggregatory effect was accompanied by mesenteric bleeding time prolongations. In conscious dogs, ex vivo aggregation was inhibited to approximately 80% by Ro 43-8857 (0.3 mg/kg i.v. or 10 mg/kg p.o.) and L-700,462 (1 mg/kg i.v.). However, bleeding time prolongations accompanied these anti-aggregatory effects with both compounds. In conclusion, we have shown clear differences between two synthetic GP-IIb/IIIa antagonists, both in terms of their species-specificity in vitro and in terms of their in vivo profile, and in particular the propensity to promote bleeding from mesenteric arteries in guinea-pigs. However, the ability of Ro 43-8857 to discriminate between anti-aggregatory and

  5. Pathogenesis of a Chinese strain of bovine adenovirus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Yan, Hao; Ma, Lei; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3) is considered one of the most important respiratory tract agents of cattle and is widespread among cattle around the world. A BAV-3 strain was isolated from a bovine nasal swab for the first time in China in 2009 and named HLJ0955. Subsequently, BAV-3 has frequently been isolated from calves with respiratory diseases in China. To date, only limited study on the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in cotton rats has been conducted, and the pathogenesis of BAV-3 infection in guinea pigs has not been reported. Therefore, sixteen albino guinea pigs were inoculated intranasally with HLJ0955. All of the infected guinea pigs had apparently elevated rectal temperatures (39.2 °C-39.9 °C) at 2-7 days post-inoculation (PI). Consolidation and petechial hemorrhage were also observed in guinea pigs experimentally infected with HLJ0955. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration and by immunohistochemistry in the lungs of guinea pigs as early as 24 h PI. Viral DNA was detectable in the lungs of infected guinea pigs during 11 days of observation by real-time PCR. Virus-neutralizing antibodies against BAV-3 were detectable from 11 days PI and reached a peak titer at 15 days PI. Histopathological changes mainly occurred in the lungs of infected guinea pigs and were characterized by thickening of alveolar septa, mononuclear cell infiltration, hemorrhage and alveolar epithelial necrosis. These results indicate that HLJ0955 can replicate in the lungs of guinea pigs and cause fever and gross and histological lesions. The guinea pig infection model of BAV-3 would serve as a useful system for monitoring the infection process and pathogenesis of the Chinese BAV-3 strain HLJ0955, as well as immune responses to BAV-3 vaccines.

  6. Intermittent bolus feeding increases visceral tissue protein synthesis more than continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orogastric tube feeding, using either continuous or intermittent bolus delivery, is commonly used in infants unable to feed orally. To compare the impact of different feeding strategies on visceral tissue protein synthesis, neonatal pigs (5–7 day old) received a balanced formula orally either by int...

  7. Dual functions of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ at the intermediate dose in protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with a human rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangning; Wen, Ke; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Jones, Dorothy; Pelzer, Kevin; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine dose effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (LA) ™ strain on rotavirus-specific antibody and B cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs vaccinated with an oral attenuated human rotavirus (AttHRV). Methods Pigs were inoculated with AttHRV vaccine in conjunction with high dose LA (14 doses, total 2.2×109 colony forming units [CFU]), intermediate dose LA (9 doses, total 3.2×106 CFU), low dose LA (5 doses, total 2.1×106 CFU) or without LA feeding. Protection against rotavirus shedding and diarrhea was assessed upon challenge with a virulent HRV. Rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells in ileum, spleen and blood of the pigs were measured and compared among treatment groups. Results The intermediate dose LA (MidLA), but not high or low dose LA, significantly reduced rotavirus diarrhea (MidLA only group) and significantly improved the protection conferred by AttHRV vaccine (MidLA+AttHRV group). Associated with the increased protection, MidLA significantly enhanced rotavirus-specific antibody, ASC and memory B cell responses to AttHRV vaccine. High or low dose LA did not enhance virus-specific antibody and ASC responses, hence did not improve the vaccine efficacy. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of dose selection and indicate that certain specific lactobacilli strains at the appropriate dose have the dual function of reducing rotavirus diarrhea and enhancing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of rotavirus vaccines. PMID:24126832

  8. Oseltamivir inhibits influenza virus replication and transmission following ocular-only aerosol inoculation of ferrets.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Creager, Hannah M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2015-10-01

    Ocular exposure to influenza virus represents an alternate route of virus entry capable of establishing a respiratory infection in mammals, but the effectiveness of currently available antiviral treatments to limit virus replication within ocular tissue or inhibit virus spread from ocular sites to the respiratory tract is poorly understood. Using an inoculation method that delivers an aerosol inoculum exclusively to the ocular surface, we demonstrate that oral oseltamivir administration following ocular-only aerosol inoculation with multiple avian and human influenza viruses protected ferrets from a fatal and systemic infection, reduced clinical signs and symptoms of illness, and decreased virus transmissibility to susceptible contacts when a respiratory infection was initiated. The presence of oseltamivir further inhibited influenza virus replication in primary human corneal epithelial cells. These findings provide critical experimental evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors during outbreaks of influenza virus resulting in ocular disease or following ocular exposure.

  9. Influence of inoculation method, spot inoculation site, and inoculation size on the efficacy of acidic electrolyzed water against pathogens on lettuce.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shigenobu; Yoshida, Kyoichiro; Kamitani, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kazuhiko

    2003-11-01

    The influence of bacterial inoculation methods on the efficacy of sanitizers against pathogens was examined. Dip and spot inoculation methods were employed in this study to evaluate the effectiveness of acidic electrolyzed water (AcEW) and chlorinated water (200 ppm free available chlorine) against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. Ten pieces of lettuce leaf (5 by 5 cm) were inoculated by each method then immersed in 1.5 liters of AcEW, chlorinated water, or sterile distilled water for 1 min with agitation (150 rpm) at room temperature. The outer (abaxial) and inner (adaxial) surfaces of the lettuce leaf were distinguished in the spot inoculation. Initial inoculated pathogen population was in the range 7.3 to 7.8 log CFU/g. Treatment with AcEW and chlorinated water resulted in a 1 log CFU/g or less reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella populations inoculated with the dip method. Spot inoculation of the inner surface of the lettuce leaf with AcEW and chlorinated water reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella by approximately 2.7 and 2.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Spot inoculation of the outer surface of the lettuce leaf with both sanitizers resulted in approximately 4.6 and 4.4 log CFU/g reductions of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella, respectively. The influence of inoculation population size was also examined. Each sanitizer could not completely eliminate the pathogens when E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella cells inoculated on the lettuce were of low population size (10(3) to 10(4) CFU/g), regardless of the inoculation technique.

  10. The combination of PRRS virus and bacterial endotoxin as a model for multifactorial respiratory disease in pigs.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Steven; Labarque, Geoffrey; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2004-12-08

    This paper reviews in vivo studies on the interaction between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and LPS performed in the authors' laboratory. The main aim was to develop a reproducible model to study the pathogenesis of PRRSV-induced multifactorial respiratory disease. The central hypothesis was that respiratory disease results from an overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs. In a first series of studies, PRRSV was shown to be a poor inducer of TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha in the lungs, whereas IL-1 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were produced consistently during infection. We then set up a dual inoculation model in which pigs were inoculated intratracheally with PRRSV and 3-14 days later with LPS. PRRSV-infected pigs developed acute respiratory signs for 12-24h upon intratracheal LPS inoculation, in contrast to pigs inoculated with PRRSV or LPS only. Moreover, peak TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 titers were 10-100 times higher in PRRSV-LPS inoculated pigs than in the singly inoculated pigs and the cytokine overproduction was associated with disease. To further prove the role of proinflammatory cytokines, we studied the effect of pentoxifylline, a known inhibitor of TNF-alpha and IL-1, on PRRSV-LPS induced cytokine production and disease. The clinical effects of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), meloxicam and flunixin meglumine, were also examined. Pentoxifylline, but not the NSAIDs, significantly reduced fever and respiratory signs from 2 to 6h after LPS. The levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 in the lungs of pentoxifylline-treated pigs were moderately reduced, but were still 26 and 3.5-fold higher than in pigs inoculated with PRRSV or LPS only. This indicates that pathways other than inhibition of cytokine production contributed to the clinical improvement. Finally, we studied a mechanism by which PRRSV may sensitize the lungs for LPS. We hypothesized that PRRSV would increase the amount of LPS receptor

  11. A guinea pig model of bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Morck, D W; Costerton, J W; Bolingbroke, D O; Ceri, H; Boyd, N D; Olson, M E

    1990-01-01

    The induction of pneumonic pasteurellosis in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) was examined. Specific pathogen free male guinea pigs were anesthetized and a tracheostomy performed to introduce 10(5), 10(4) or 10(3) Pasteurella haemolytica-A1 into the left principal bronchus. The surgical site was closed with tissue adhesive and staples and the animals were monitored for signs of respiratory tract infection. Within 24 hours after inoculation they became depressed, anorectic, pyretic and dyspneic. Fibrinous pleuropneumonia with prominent areas of necrosis and hemorrhage was present. Pericardial effusion was a frequent finding. There was infiltration of the pleura and alveoli with degenerate heterophils and macrophages, a hyperplastic mesothelium and fibrin exudation on the pleura and within alveoli. Hemorrhage, congestion, consolidation, edema and fibrin exudation were prominent in the hilar region of the lungs. Bacterial colonies were evident in all airways. More bacteria were recovered from infected lungs than were inoculated (p less than 0.05) indicating P. haemolytica was actively multiplying in the lungs. Hematological and clinical chemistry data were consistent with fibrinous pneumonia, however, blood cultures were positive for P. haemolytica in 61% (11/18) of animals sampled. Examination of pneumonic pasteurellosis in guinea pigs may be useful in studying pathogenetic and pathological features applicable to bovine pneumonic pasteurellosis (shipping fever pneumonia). Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2306663

  12. Improving ante mortem diagnosis of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection by use of oral fluids for bacterial, nucleic acid, and antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Zavala, Marissa; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, T

    2013-02-15

    Swine erysipelas is an economically important disease caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Pen-based collection of oral fluids has recently been utilized for monitoring infection dynamics in swine operations. The diagnostic performance of bacterial isolation, real-time PCR, and antibody detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA) methods were evaluated on pen-based oral fluid samples from pigs experimentally infected with E. rhusiopathiae (n=112) and from negative controls (n=32). While real-time PCR was a sensitive method with an overall detection rate of 100% (7/7 pens) one day post inoculation (dpi), E. rhusiopathiae was successfully isolated in only 28.6% (2/7 pens). Anti-Erysipelothrix IgM and IgG antibodies in pen-based oral fluids were detected at 4 to 5 dpi by FMIA and at 5 and 8 dpi by ELISA. The number of infected animals per pen, and in particular the timing of antimicrobial treatment administration impacted bacterial isolation and ELISA results. In oral fluid field samples, E. rhusiopathiae DNA was found in 23.3% of the samples while anti-E. rhusiopathiae IgG and IgM antibodies were found in 59.6% and 5.5% of the samples, respectively. The results suggest that an algorithm integrating oral fluids as specimen and real-time PCR and FMIA as detection methods is effective for earlier detection of an erysipelas outbreak thereby allowing for a more effective treatment outcome.

  13. Pig production in the Solomon Islands. I. Village pig production.

    PubMed

    de Fredrick, D F

    1977-05-01

    In 181 villages in the Solomon Islands the pig: human ratio was 1:5-8 and the annual per capita pork consumption was 4-2 kg. Some communities did not keep pigs or eat pig meat. Sows weaned an average of 5-5 piglets per year and mean liveweight at 12 months of age was 28-4 kg. Most pigs were kept on the ground but some were housed in pens over the sea and very few lived in their owner's houses. Pigs were important in the social life of the people but proportionally fewer pigs were raised than in neighbouring Pacific countries.

  14. Vector-free transmission and persistence of Japanese encephalitis virus in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Nougairede, Antoine; Charrel, Remi N.; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a main cause of severe viral encephalitis in humans, has a complex ecology, composed of a cycle involving primarily waterbirds and mosquitoes, as well as a cycle involving pigs as amplifying hosts. To date, JEV transmission has been exclusively described as being mosquito-mediated. Here we demonstrate that JEV can be transmitted between pigs in the absence of arthropod vectors. Pigs shed virus in oronasal secretions and are highly susceptible to oronasal infection. Clinical symptoms, virus tropism and central nervous system histological lesions are similar in pigs infected through needle, contact or oronasal inoculation. In all cases, a particularly important site of replication are the tonsils, in which JEV is found to persist for at least 25 days despite the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Our findings could have a major impact on the ecology of JEV in temperate regions with short mosquito seasons. PMID:26902924

  15. Oral Transmission of L-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent among Cattle.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    To determine oral transmissibility of the L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion, we orally inoculated 16 calves with brain homogenates of the agent. Only 1 animal, given a high dose, showed signs and died at 88 months. These results suggest low risk for oral transmission of the L-BSE agent among cattle.

  16. Oral Transmission of L-Type Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent among Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Masujin, Kentaro; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    To determine oral transmissibility of the L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) prion, we orally inoculated 16 calves with brain homogenates of the agent. Only 1 animal, given a high dose, showed signs and died at 88 months. These results suggest low risk for oral transmission of the L-BSE agent among cattle. PMID:28098532

  17. Mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Elling, F.; Møller, T.

    1973-01-01

    In Denmark a nephropathy in pigs characterized by tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis has been identified frequently during the last 5 decades in the course of meat inspection in slaughterhouses. The disease was first described by Larsen, who recognized the connexion between feeding mouldy rye to pigs and the development of the nephropathy. In this study kidneys were examined from 19 pigs coming from a farm with an outbreak of nephropathy. The barley fed to the pigs was contaminated with the mycotoxin ochratoxin A. Histological examination revealed different degrees of change ranging from slight regressive changes in the tubular epithelium and periglomerular and interstitial fibrosis to tubular atrophy, thickened basement membranes, glomerular sclerosis, and marked fibrosis. These differences were considered to be due to differences in the length of time of exposure to the mouldy barley and differences in the amount of mycotoxin consumed by the individual pig. However, it will be necessary to carry out experiments using crystalline ochratoxin A in order to prove such a relationship. Mycotoxins have also been suggested as etiological factors in Balkan nephropathy in man, which in the initial stages is characterized by tubular lesions similar to those seen in mycotoxic nephropathy in pigs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4546872

  18. Immune response phenotype of allergic versus clinically tolerant pigs in a neonatal swine model of allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Julie; Rupa, Prithy; Garvie, Sarah; Wilkie, Bruce

    2013-07-15

    The prevalence of childhood food allergy and the duration of these allergies, particularly those considered to be transient, like egg and milk allergy, are increasing. The identification of allergic individuals using minimally invasive, non-anaphylaxis-threatening methods is therefore of increasing importance. In this experiment, correlates were sought of an allergic immune response (IR) phenotype in pigs. Using pigs pre-treated with heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components before allergic sensitization with the egg white protein ovomucoid (Ovm), differences were determined in IR phenotype of pigs in the categories treated-allergic, treated-tolerant, control-allergic (CA) and control-tolerant. Phenotype was established by measuring immunoglobulin (Ig)-associated antibody activity (AbA), cytokine profiles and the proportion of blood T-regulatory cells (T-regs) and observing late-phase allergen-specific skin tests (ST). Although 100% of pigs became sensitized to Ovm, only 33% of pigs had clinical signs of allergy after oral challenge with egg white. Pigs without clinical signs were classified as clinically tolerant. Sixty-seven percent of allergic pigs had a positive, late-phase ST classified as very strong or strong, while 84% of clinically tolerant pigs did not have late-phase ST. Treated-allergic pigs and CA pigs had greater total antibody IgG (H+L), IgE and IgG1 AbA than clinically tolerant pigs. Cytokine profiles of allergic pigs and the proportion of circulating T-regs, did not differ significantly between allergic and clinically tolerant pigs. Therefore, measurement of allergen-specific IgG, IgG1 and/or IgE activity and evaluation of late-phase ID ST may be useful in identifying allergic IR phenotypes in swine models of food allergy, which may be extended toward human use.

  19. Yeast Interactions in Inoculated Wine Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Maurizio; Capece, Angela; Comitini, Francesca; Canonico, Laura; Siesto, Gabriella; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selected starter culture is widely diffused in winemaking. In pure fermentation, the ability of inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae to suppress the wild microflora is one of the most important feature determining the starter ability to dominate the process. Since the wine is the result of the interaction of several yeast species and strains, many studies are available on the effect of mixed cultures on the final wine quality. In mixed fermentation the interactions between the different yeasts composing the starter culture can led the stability of the final product and the analytical and aromatic profile. In the present review, we will discuss the recent developments regarding yeast interactions in pure and in mixed fermentation, focusing on the influence of interactions on growth and dominance in the process. PMID:27148235

  20. Pathogenesis of a genotype C strain of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 infection in albino guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong-Fei; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Cai, Hong; Ma, Lei; Wang, Shu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xue-Zhi; Xue, Fei

    2014-08-08

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory tract agents of both young and adult cattle and widespread among cattle around the world. Up to present, three genotypes A, B and C of BPIV3 have been described on the basis of genetic and phylogenetic analysis and only limited studies on the pathogenesis of the genotype A of BPIV3 infection in calves and laboratory animals have been performed. The report about experimental infections of the genotypes B and C of BPIV3 in laboratory animals and calves was scant. Therefore, an experimental infection of guinea pigs with the Chinese BPIV3 strain SD0835 of the genotype C was performed. Sixteen guinea pigs were intranasally inoculated with the suspension of SD0835, while eight control guinea pigs were also intranasally inoculated with the same volume of supernatant from uninfected MDBK cells. The virus-inoculated guinea pigs displayed a few observable clinical signs that were related to the respiratory tract disease and two of the sixteen experimentally infected guinea pigs died at 2 and 3 days post inoculation (PI), respectively, and apparent gross pneumonic lesions were observed at necropsy. The gross pneumonic lesions in guinea pigs inoculated with SD0835 consisted of dark red, slightly depressed, irregular areas of consolidation in the lung lobes from the second to 9th day of infection at necropsy, and almost complete consolidation and atelectasis of the lung lobes were seen at 7 days PI. Histopathological changes including alveoli septa thickening and focal cellulose pneumonia were also observed in the lungs of guinea pigs experimentally infected with SD0835. Viral replication was detectable by virus isolation and titration, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in the respiratory tissues of guinea pigs as early as 24h after intranasal inoculation with SD0835. The results of virus isolation and titration showed that guinea pigs were permissive for

  1. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  2. Oral Administration of a Select Mixture of Bacillus Probiotics Affects the Gut Microbiota and Goblet Cell Function following Escherichia coli Challenge in Newly Weaned Pigs of Genotype MUC4 That Are Supposed To Be Enterotoxigenic E. coli F4ab/ac Receptor Negative.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Zhou, Dong; Wu, Qiong; Song, Dan; Dicksved, Johan; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Structural disruption of the gut microbiota and impaired goblet cell function are collateral etiologic factors in enteric diseases. Low, moderate, or high doses of a Bacillus licheniformis-B. subtilis mixture (BLS mix) were orally administered to piglets of genotype MUC4 that are supposed to be F4-expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (F4(+) ETEC) F4ab/ac receptor negative (i.e., MUC4-resistant piglets) for 1 week before F4(+) ETEC challenge. The luminal contents were collected from the mucosa of the colon on day 8 after F4(+) ETEC challenge. The BLS mix attenuated E. coli-induced expansion of Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium eligens, Acetanaerobacterium, and Sporobacter populations. Clostridium and Turicibacter populations increased following F4(+) ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with low-dose BLS mix. Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus salivarius populations increased after administration of BLS mix during E. coli infection. The beneficial effects of BLS mix were due in part to the expansion of certain Clostridium, Lactobacillus, and Turicibacter populations, with a corresponding increase in the number of goblet cells in the ileum via upregulated Atoh1 expression, in turn increasing MUC2 production and thus preserving the mucus barrier and enhancing host defenses against enteropathogenic bacteria. However, excessive BLS mix consumption may increase the risk for enteritis, partly through disruption of colonic microbial ecology, characterized by expansion of Proteobacteria and impaired goblet cell function in the ileum. Our findings suggest that oral administration of BLS mix reprograms the gut microbiota and enhances goblet cell function to ameliorate enteritis.

  3. Intracloacal inoculation, an effective screening method for determining the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates against Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Arsi, K; Donoghue, A M; Woo-Ming, A; Blore, P J; Donoghue, D J

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. It is common in poultry, and human infections are often associated with consumption of contaminated poultry products. One strategy to reduce Campylobacter colonization in poultry is the use of oral probiotics, but this produces variable results, possibly because the probiotics are destroyed in the stomach's acidic environment. Protection (e.g., encapsulation) of isolates may overcome this problem, but there is no assurance that these isolates will have efficacy in the lower gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, screening candidate isolates by directly placing them in the lower intestinal tract via cloacal inoculation may eliminate the time and expense of encapsulating ineffective isolates. Thus, the purpose of this study was to collect bacterial isolates with anti-Campylobacter activity in vitro and evaluate their efficacy in vivo upon either oral or intracloacal administration. Bacterial isolates were collected from healthy birds and were evaluated for efficacy against C. jejuni in vitro. Isolates having generally regarded as safe status and demonstrating in vitro anti-Campylobacter properties were evaluated after oral or intracloacal inoculation into chicks on day 1 (n = 10 birds per isolate per route of administration). On day 7, birds were dosed by oral gavage with a four-strain mixture of wild-type Campylobacter containing at least 1 × 10(7) CFU/ml organisms. On day 14, birds were euthanized and the ceca were collected aseptically for Campylobacter enumeration. When dosed orally, only one isolate had a 1-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts, whereas when administered intracloacally, six of these isolates produced a 1- to 3-log reduction in cecal Campylobacter counts in 14-day-old chickens. These results support the strategy of evaluating the efficacy of potential probiotic isolates via cloacal inoculation prior to undergoing the effort of encapsulating isolates for oral administration.

  4. A rare case of primary inoculation tuberculosis seen after varicella.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan; Öğüt, Betül; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis (TB) is a rare form of cutaneous TB resulting from direct introduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the skin or mucosa of a previously uninfected, nonimmune person. We herein report the first case, to our knowledge, of primary inoculation TB to be seen after varicella; this case explains the possible mechanism of varicella-zoster virus-mediated transient cellular immune suppression that predisposed the patient to cutaneous TB. In this case, we believe that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection predisposed the patient to primary inoculation TB by leading to direct inoculation of tuberculosis bacilli through vesicles or by suppressing cellular immunity.

  5. Parasite population dynamics in pigs infected with Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi Huus; Andreasen, Annette; Kringel, Helene; Roepstorff, Allan; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2014-01-17

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the population dynamics and potential interactions between Trichuris suis and Oesophagostomum dentatum in experimentally co-infected pigs, by quantification of parasite parameters such as egg excretion, worm recovery and worm location. Forty-eight helminth naïve pigs were allocated into four groups. Group O was inoculated with 20 O. dentatum L3/kg/day and Group T with 10 T. suis eggs/kg/day. Group OT was inoculated with both 20 O. dentatum L3/kg/day and 10 T. suis eggs/kg/day, while Group C was kept as an uninfected control group. All inoculations were trickle infections administered twice weekly and were continued until slaughter. Faecal samples were collected from the rectum of all pigs at day 0, and twice weekly from 2 to 9 weeks post first infection (wpi). Six pigs from each group were necropsied 5 wpi and the remaining 6 pigs from each group were necropsied 10 wpi. The faecal egg counts (FEC) and total worm burdens of O. dentatum were dramatically influenced by the presence of T. suis, with significantly lower mean FECs and worm burdens at 5 and 10 wpi compared to single infected pigs. Furthermore, in the presence of T. suis we found that O. dentatum was located more posteriorly in the gut. The changes in the Trichuris population were less prominent, but faecal egg counts, worm counts 5 wpi (57% recovered vs. 39%) and the proportion of infected animals at 10 wpi were higher in Group OT compared to Group T. The location of T. suis was unaffected by the presence of O. dentatum. These results indicate an antagonistic interaction between T. suis and O. dentatum which is dominated by T. suis.

  6. Experimental Salmonella typhi infection in the domestic pig, Sus scrofa domestica.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, E S; Almond, G W; Routh, P A; Horton, J R; Dillman, R C; Orndorff, P E

    2000-08-01

    The domestic pig, Sus scrofa domestica, was examined as a model for typhoid fever, a severe and systemic disease of humans caused by Salmonella typhi. Six pigs were inoculated 1 week post-weaning with approximately 10(10)colony forming units (cfu) of wild type Salmonella typhi strain ISP1820 intranasally and observed for 3 weeks. S. typhi was cultured from the tonsils of 50% of the pigs at necropsy. Cultures from all other organs analysed (ileum, colon, spleen and liver) were negative. No clinical or histopathological signs of disease were observed. Pigs inoculated in parallel with swine-virulent S. choleraesuis all exhibited signs of systemic salmonellosis indicating that the parameters of the experimental infection with S. typhi (e.g. route) were appropriate. Whereas the pig has a gastrointestinal tract that is very similar to humans, our results indicated that the unique features of host and microbe interaction needed to produce typhoid fever were not mimicked in swine. Nevertheless, our observation of tonsillar involvement was consistent with former observations of S. choleraesuis and S. typhimurium infections in swine and supports a role for the tonsil in all porcine salmonella infections.

  7. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad; Nielsen, Alexander; Hendriksen, Rene S; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-01-07

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/gentamicin, sulphonamide, tetracycline, hygromycin B, β-lactams and streptomycin [aac(3)-IV, sul2, tet(X), aph(4), bla TEM-1 and strA/B], with all but tet(X) located on the same conjugative plasmid. Nineteen pigs were randomly allocated into two inoculation groups, one treated with apramycin (pen 2) and one non-treated (pen 3), along with a non-inoculated control group (pen 1). Two pigs of pen 2 and 3 were inoculated intragastrically with a rifampicin resistant variant of the strain. Apramycin treatment in pen 2 was initiated immediately after inoculation. Strain colonization was assessed in the feces from all pigs. E. coli 912 was shown to spread to non-inoculated pigs in both groups. The selective effect did not persist beyond 3 days post-treatment, and the strain was not detected from this time point in pen 2. We demonstrated that E. coli 912 was able to spread between pigs in the same pen irrespective of treatment, and apramycin treatment resulted in significantly higher counts compared to the non-treated group. This represents the first demonstration of how antimicrobial treatment affects spread of resistant bacteria in pig production. The use of apramycin may lead to enhanced spread of gentamicin-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern.

  8. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  9. Oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, G T

    2001-04-01

    Oral candidoses are frequently encountered in the practice of dentistry. Although most oral candidoses are symptomless, the can indicate the presence of an underlying systemic disease, and the persistence of oral candidosis following appropriate conventional management may be one of the first signs of undiagnosed immunosuppression. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the most commonly isolated species from oral candidal lesions; however, the non-albicans Candida spp. are also implicated in the aetiology of oral candidoses. The effective management of oral candidosis is dependent on an accurate diagnosis, identification and elimination of any predisposing factors (where possible), and the prescription of either topical or systemic antifungal agents. Oral candidosis may have significant implications for the general health of immunosuppressed patients, particularly when caused by the non-albicans spp. and, in cases of severe immunosuppression, systemic candidosis can be life-threatening. This article outlines the clinical presentation and appropriate management for the commonly presenting oral candidal conditions.

  10. Immune response elicited by the oral administration of an intermediate strain of IBDV in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Carballeda, Juan Manuel; Zoth, Silvina Chimeno; Gómez, Evangelina; Lucero, María Soledad; Gravisaco, María José; Berinstein, Analía

    2014-01-01

    The immune response elicited by the oral inoculation of an intermediate strain of infectious bursal disease virus was studied in chickens. A strong over expression of IL-6, IL-8, IFNα and IFNγ was observed in bursa at 3 days post inoculation together with an increase in splenic NO2 release. An influx of T-lymphocytes was also detected. PMID:25763062

  11. Intranasal Inoculation of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Lyophilized Chronic Wasting Disease Prion Particulate Complexed to Montmorillonite Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Tracy A.; Spraker, Terry R.; Rigg, Tara D.; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Hoover, Clare; Michel, Brady; Bian, Jifeng; Hoover, Edward; Gidlewski, Thomas; Balachandran, Aru; O'Rourke, Katherine; Telling, Glenn C.; Bowen, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known prion disease endemic in wildlife, is a persistent problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations. This disease continues to spread and cases are found in new areas each year. Indirect transmission can occur via the environment and is thought to occur by the oral and/or intranasal route. Oral transmission has been experimentally demonstrated and although intranasal transmission has been postulated, it has not been tested in a natural host until recently. Prions have been shown to adsorb strongly to clay particles and upon oral inoculation the prion/clay combination exhibits increased infectivity in rodent models. Deer and elk undoubtedly and chronically inhale dust particles routinely while living in the landscape while foraging and rutting. We therefore hypothesized that dust represents a viable vehicle for intranasal CWD prion exposure. To test this hypothesis, CWD-positive brain homogenate was mixed with montmorillonite clay (Mte), lyophilized, pulverized and inoculated intranasally into white-tailed deer once a week for 6 weeks. Deer were euthanized at 95, 105, 120 and 175 days post final inoculation and tissues examined for CWD-associated prion proteins by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that CWD can be efficiently transmitted utilizing Mte particles as a prion carrier and intranasal exposure. PMID:23671598

  12. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  13. In ovo inoculation of chicken embryos with probiotic bacteria and its effect on posthatch Salmonella susceptibility.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, J E; van der Hoeven-Hangoor, E; van de Linde, I B; Montijn, R C; van der Vossen, J M B M

    2014-04-01

    The feasibility of establishing probiotic bacteria in the intestine of broiler chickens by in ovo inoculation was investigated, followed by verifying possible subsequent protection against Salmonella Enteriditis infection. In a first study, 7 commercially available probiotics were screened for compatibility with in ovo inoculation. Two of these probiotics, one being a Enterococcus faecium and the other a Bacillus subtilis, were selected for colonizing the chick gut without compromising hatchability. In a second study, these 2 products were administered in ovo and in the feed to chicks reared until 18 d in comparison with noninoculated chicks and with chicks fed an antibiotic. All chicks were orally challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis at 4 d of age. Results showed reduced performance of Salmonella Enteritidis challenged chicks fed no additives compared with challenged chicks fed antibiotic, but no significant differences in mortality was observed. Probiotics offered in ovo or through the diet could only partially recover performance compared with antibiotic-fed chicks. A significant reduction in the number of Salmonella Enteritidis positive chicks was observed when chicks were in ovo inoculated with E. faecium and continued receiving it in the diet. This work establishes standards for future in ovo colonization research and emphasizes its value as a promising method to deliver individual precise dose of probiotics to poultry in mass scale at the earliest possible age based on the competitive exclusion concept. In ovo colonization with probiotic can therefore become an important ally in combination with other approaches to combat Salmonella and other intestinal bacterial infections in poultry.

  14. Immunogenicity, Protective Efficacy, and Non-Replicative Status of the HSV-2 Vaccine Candidate HSV529 in Mice and Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Marie-Clotilde; Barban, Véronique; Pradezynski, Fabrine; de Montfort, Aymeric; Ryall, Robert; Caillet, Catherine; Londono-Hayes, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    HSV-2 vaccine is needed to prevent genital disease, latent infection, and virus transmission. A replication-deficient mutant virus (dl5-29) has demonstrated promising efficacy in animal models of genital herpes. However, the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the highly purified clinical vaccine candidate (HSV529) derived from dl5-29 have not been evaluated. Humoral and cellular immune responses were measured in mice and guinea pigs immunized with HSV529. Protection against acute and recurrent genital herpes, mortality, latent infection, and viral shedding after vaginal HSV-2 infection was determined in mice or in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication and pathogenicity were investigated in three sensitive models of virus replication: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID/Beige) mice inoculated by the intramuscular route, suckling mice inoculated by the intracranial route, and vaginally-inoculated guinea pigs. HSV529 immunization induced HSV-2-neutralizing antibody production in mice and guinea pigs. In mice, it induced production of specific HSV-2 antibodies and splenocytes secreting IFNγ or IL-5. Immunization effectively prevented HSV-2 infection in all three animal models by reducing mortality, acute genital disease severity and frequency, and viral shedding. It also reduced ganglionic viral latency and recurrent disease in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication/propagation was not detected in the muscles of SCID/Beige mice, in the brains of suckling mice, or in vaginal secretions of inoculated guinea pigs. These results confirm the non-replicative status, as well as its immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and guinea pigs, including HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. In mice, HSV529 produced Th1/Th2 characteristic immune response thought to be necessary for an effective vaccine. These results further support the clinical investigation of HSV529 in human subjects as a prophylactic vaccine

  15. Immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the HSV-2 vaccine candidate HSV529 in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marie-Clotilde; Barban, Véronique; Pradezynski, Fabrine; de Montfort, Aymeric; Ryall, Robert; Caillet, Catherine; Londono-Hayes, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    HSV-2 vaccine is needed to prevent genital disease, latent infection, and virus transmission. A replication-deficient mutant virus (dl5-29) has demonstrated promising efficacy in animal models of genital herpes. However, the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, and non-replicative status of the highly purified clinical vaccine candidate (HSV529) derived from dl5-29 have not been evaluated. Humoral and cellular immune responses were measured in mice and guinea pigs immunized with HSV529. Protection against acute and recurrent genital herpes, mortality, latent infection, and viral shedding after vaginal HSV-2 infection was determined in mice or in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication and pathogenicity were investigated in three sensitive models of virus replication: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID/Beige) mice inoculated by the intramuscular route, suckling mice inoculated by the intracranial route, and vaginally-inoculated guinea pigs. HSV529 immunization induced HSV-2-neutralizing antibody production in mice and guinea pigs. In mice, it induced production of specific HSV-2 antibodies and splenocytes secreting IFNγ or IL-5. Immunization effectively prevented HSV-2 infection in all three animal models by reducing mortality, acute genital disease severity and frequency, and viral shedding. It also reduced ganglionic viral latency and recurrent disease in naïve and HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. HSV529 replication/propagation was not detected in the muscles of SCID/Beige mice, in the brains of suckling mice, or in vaginal secretions of inoculated guinea pigs. These results confirm the non-replicative status, as well as its immunogenicity and efficacy in mice and guinea pigs, including HSV-1 seropositive guinea pigs. In mice, HSV529 produced Th1/Th2 characteristic immune response thought to be necessary for an effective vaccine. These results further support the clinical investigation of HSV529 in human subjects as a prophylactic vaccine.

  16. Changes in composition of caecal microbiota associated with increased colon inflammation in interleukin-10 gene-deficient mice inoculated with Enterococcus species.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Shalome A; Young, Wayne; Barnett, Matthew P G; Cookson, Adrian L; McNabb, Warren C; Roy, Nicole C

    2015-03-11

    Human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal disease where the resident microbiota contributes to disease development, yet the specific mechanisms remain unclear. Interleukin-10 gene-deficient (Il10-/-) mice develop inflammation similar to IBD, due in part to an inappropriate response to commensal bacteria. We have previously reported changes in intestinal morphology and colonic gene expression in Il10-/- mice in response to oral bacterial inoculation. In this study, we aimed to identify specific changes in the caecal microbiota associated with colonic inflammation in these mice. The microbiota was evaluated using pyrotag sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative real-time PCR. Microbiota profiles were influenced by genotype of the mice and by bacterial inoculation, and a strong correlation was observed between the microbiota and colonic inflammation scores. Although un-inoculated Il10-/- and C57 mice had similar microbiota communities, bacterial inoculation resulted in different changes to the microbiota in Il10-/- and C57 mice. Inoculated Il10-/- mice had significantly less total bacteria than un-inoculated Il10-/- mice, with a strong negative correlation between total bacterial numbers, relative abundance of Escherichia/Shigella, microbiota diversity, and colonic inflammation score. Our results show a putative causative role for the microbiota in the development of IBD, with potentially key roles for Akkermansia, or for Bacteroides, Helicobacter, Parabacteroides, and Alistipes, depending on the composition of the bacterial inoculum. These data support the use of bacterially-inoculated Il10-/- mice as an appropriate model to investigate human IBD.

  17. Urolithiasis in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D G D; Vrielinck, J; Millet, S; Janssens, G P J; Deprez, P

    2004-11-01

    Urolithiasis in sows and neonatal pigs is well-known, but information on its occurrence and impact in finishing pigs is sparse. This study reports three outbreaks of urolithiasis in finishing pigs. In one herd, no symptoms were observed, whereas in the other herds the presence of calculi caused obstruction of the urinary tract resulting in death. Using infra-red spectroscopy, the predominant mineral-type found in the uroliths was calcium carbonate (calcite). Only small amounts of calcium oxalate (< 1%) could be detected. A high urinary pH, small abnormalities in the mineral composition of the feed and insufficient drinking water were the most important risk factors identified. To prevent urolithiasis, it is important to ensure adequate water intake, to provide a balanced mineral diet, and to avoid urinary tract infections.

  18. Pathogenic characteristics of the Korean 2002 isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O in pigs and cattle.

    PubMed

    Oem, J K; Yeh, M T; McKenna, T S; Hayes, J R; Rieder, E; Giuffre, A C; Robida, J M; Lee, K N; Cho, I S; Fang, X; Joo, Y S; Park, J H

    2008-05-01

    Experimental infection of susceptible cattle and pigs showed that the O/SKR/AS/2002 pig strain of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an infection that is highly virulent and contagious in pigs but very limited in cattle. Pigs directly inoculated with, or exposed to swine infected with, strain O/SKR/AS/2002 showed typical clinical signs, including gross vesicular lesions in mouth and pedal sites. In addition, FMDV was isolated from, and FMDV genomic RNA was detected in, blood, serum, nasal swabs and oesophageal-pharyngeal (OP) fluid early in the course of infection. Antibodies against the non-structural protein (NSP) 3ABC were detected in both directly inoculated and contact pigs, indicating active virus replication. In contrast, the disease in cattle was atypical. After inoculation, lesions were confined to the infection site. A transient viraemia occurred 1 and 2 days after inoculation, and this was followed by the production of antibodies to NSP 3ABC, indicating subclinical infection. No clinical disease was seen, and no antibodies to NSP 3ABC were present in contact cattle. Additionally, no virus or viral nucleic acid was detected in blood, nasal swab and OP fluid samples from contact cattle. Thus, the virus appeared not to be transmitted from infected cattle to contact cattle. In its behaviour in pigs and cattle, strain O/SKR/AS/2002 resembled the porcinophilic FMDV strain of Cathay origin, O/TAW/97. However, the latter, unlike O/SKR/AS/2002, has reduced ability to grow in bovine-derived cells. The porcinophilic character of O/TAW/97 has been attributed to a deletion in the 3A coding region of the viral genome. However, O/SKR/AS/2002 has an intact 3A coding region.

  19. Lactating cow response to lucerne silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is unclear why bacterial silage inoculants improve milk production in lactating dairy cattle. However, recent in vitro results suggest that inoculated silage effects on milk production may be tied to greater production of rumen microorganisms. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage trea...

  20. Silage Inoculant Effects on In Vitro Rumen Fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four inoculants, B (Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterococcus faecium), C (Lactobacillus plantarum), D (Lactobacillus pentosus), E (Lactococcus lactis), were compared with an uninoculated treatment (A) on alfalfa (38% DM, AS), corn (36% DM, CS), and brown midrib corn (33% DM, BMR) silages. All inocul...

  1. The use of a plastic guide improves the safety and reduces the duration of endotracheal intubation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Janiszewski, Adrian; Pasławski, Robert; Skrzypczak, Piotr; Pasławska, Urszula; Szuba, Andrzej; Nicpoń, Józef

    2014-10-01

    The successful endotracheal intubation of pigs using the standard orotracheal method is challenging and technically difficult, because of the pig's oral anatomy and the presence of excess tissue in the oropharyngeal region. Hence, the operator, who is usually an anesthetist, requires extensive training in order to successfully perform the procedure in pigs. In this report, we describe a safe and quick method of successful endotracheal intubation in the pig using an 80-cm blunt-tipped plastic vascular catheter, when the pig is placed in ventral recumbency. Specifically, the use of this plastic guide wire shortened the duration of the procedure and reduced the risks of the procedure. Since the use of the guide wire also improves the ease of the procedure, its use will also enable inexperienced operators to perform successful first-time endotracheal intubation of pigs without causing injury.

  2. Microbial inoculants for small scale composting of putrescible kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Nair, J; Okamitsu, K

    2010-06-01

    This research looked at the need for ligno-cellulolytic inoculants (EM bacteria and Trichoderma sp.) in small to medium scale composting of household wastes. A mixture of household organic waste comprised of kitchen waste, paper, grass clippings and composted material was subjected to various durations of thermo composting followed by vermicomposting with and without microbial inoculants for a total of 28days. The results revealed that ligno-celluloytic inoculants are not essential to speed up the process of composting for onsite small scale household organic waste treatment as no significant difference was observed between the control and those inoculated with Trichoderma and EM in terms of C:N ratio of the final product. However, it was observed that EM inoculation enhanced reproductive rate of earthworms, and so probably created the best environment for vermicomposting, in all treatment groups.

  3. Quantification of classical swine fever virus in aerosols originating from pigs infected with strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2009-03-30

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), the route of virus introduction into a farm is often unclear. One of the suggested routes is via the air. Under experimental conditions, airborne transmission over a short distance seems possible, but analysis of outbreak data is still inconclusive. For a better understanding of the role of airborne transmission, quantitative information is needed on concentrations of virus emitted by infected pigs. This was studied in four groups of 10 pigs in which three pigs were inoculated with either a low virulent strain (Zoelen), a low or high dose of a moderately virulent strain (Paderborn), or a highly virulent strain (Brescia). The other seven pigs in each group served as contact pigs. At several moments after infection, air samples were obtained using gelatine filters. Infectious virus and viral RNA were detected in the air of rooms housing the pigs infected with the moderately and highly virulent strains with titres of 10(1.2) to 10(3.0)TCID(50)/m(3) of infectious virus, and 10(1.6) to 10(3.8)TCID(50)equiv./m(3) of viral RNA. It was observed that the higher the dose or virulence of the virus strain used for inoculation of the pigs, the sooner virus could be detected in the air samples. This is the first study describing the quantification of (infectious) CSFV in air samples of rooms housing infected pigs, enabling to quantify the contribution of individual infected pigs to virus concentrations in aerosols. This can be used as input for quantitative models of airborne spread over large distances.

  4. Replication, pathogenesis and transmission of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in non-immune pigs.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Sharon M; Núñez, Alejandro; Choudhury, Bhudipa; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Essen, Stephen C; Clifford, Derek; Slomka, Marek J; Kuntz-Simon, Gaëlle; Garcon, Fanny; Nash, Bethany; Hanna, Amanda; Heegaard, Peter M H; Quéguiner, Stéphane; Chiapponi, Chiara; Bublot, Michel; Garcia, Jaime Maldonado; Gardner, Rebecca; Foni, Emanuela; Loeffen, Willie; Larsen, Lars; Van Reeth, Kristien; Banks, Jill; Irvine, Richard M; Brown, Ian H

    2010-02-05

    The declaration of the human influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (H1N1/09) raised important questions, including origin and host range [1], [2]. Two of the three pandemics in the last century resulted in the spread of virus to pigs (H1N1, 1918; H3N2, 1968) with subsequent independent establishment and evolution within swine worldwide [3]. A key public and veterinary health consideration in the context of the evolving pandemic is whether the H1N1/09 virus could become established in pig populations [4]. We performed an infection and transmission study in pigs with A/California/07/09. In combination, clinical, pathological, modified influenza A matrix gene real time RT-PCR and viral genomic analyses have shown that infection results in the induction of clinical signs, viral pathogenesis restricted to the respiratory tract, infection dynamics consistent with endemic strains of influenza A in pigs, virus transmissibility between pigs and virus-host adaptation events. Our results demonstrate that extant H1N1/09 is fully capable of becoming established in global pig populations. We also show the roles of viral receptor specificity in both transmission and tissue tropism. Remarkably, following direct inoculation of pigs with virus quasispecies differing by amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin receptor-binding site, only virus with aspartic acid at position 225 (225D) was detected in nasal secretions of contact infected pigs. In contrast, in lower respiratory tract samples from directly inoculated pigs, with clearly demonstrable pulmonary pathology, there was apparent selection of a virus variant with glycine (225G). These findings provide potential clues to the existence and biological significance of viral receptor-binding variants with 225D and 225G during the 1918 pandemic [5].

  5. "Rickettsia amblyommii" induces cross protection against lethal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Mendell, Nicole L; Walker, David H; Bouyer, Donald H

    2014-08-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a severe illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii for which there is no available vaccine. We hypothesize that exposure to the highly prevalent, relatively nonpathogenic "Rickettsia amblyommii" protects against R. rickettsii challenge. To test this hypothesis, guinea pigs were inoculated with "R. amblyommii." After inoculation, the animals showed no signs of illness. When later challenged with lethal doses of R. rickettsii, those previously exposed to "R. amblyommii" remained well, whereas unimmunized controls developed severe illness and died. We conclude that "R. amblyommii" induces an immune response that protects from illness and death in the guinea pig model of RMSF. These results provide a basis for exploring the use of low-virulence rickettsiae as a platform to develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to prevent severe rickettsioses.

  6. Changes in ruminal bacterial community composition following feeding of alfalfa silage inoculated with a commercial silage inoculant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some silage inoculants promote an increase in milk production, possibly through altering the rumen microflora. In this study, dairy cows fed alfalfa silage treated with the inoculant, Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 (LPS), were compared to cows fed untreated silage (Ctrl) with the objectives: 1) to de...

  7. St. Paul's Pig Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Penny Folley

    1982-01-01

    Describes a guinea pig (cavy) breeding and management program developed as part of an elementary school science curriculum. Includes comments on show competitions (sponsored by the American Rabbit Breeders Association) to measure the success of the breeding program and to enable children to experience the business world. (Author/JN)

  8. A Simple "Pig" Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Our pig game involves a series of tosses of a die with the possibility of a player's score improving with each additional toss. With each additional toss, however, there is also the chance of losing the entire score accumulated so far. Two different strategies for deciding how many tosses a player should attempt are developed and then compared in…

  9. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Bailey L.; Arruda, Paulo H.; Magstadt, Drew R.; Schwartz, Kent J.; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Abby R.; Visek, Callie A.; Victoria, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  10. Identification of a Divergent Lineage Porcine Pestivirus in Nursing Piglets with Congenital Tremors and Reproduction of Disease following Experimental Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Bailey L; Arruda, Paulo H; Magstadt, Drew R; Schwartz, Kent J; Dohlman, Tyler; Schleining, Jennifer A; Patterson, Abby R; Visek, Callie A; Victoria, Joseph G

    2016-01-01

    Congenital tremors is a sporadic disease of neonatal pigs characterized by action-related repetitive myoclonus. A majority of outbreaks of congenital tremors have been attributed to an unidentified virus. The objectives of this project were to 1) detect potential pathogen(s) in samples from piglets with congenital tremors and 2) develop an infection model to reproduce disease. Using next-generation sequencing, a divergent lineage pestivirus was detected in piglets with congenital tremors. The virus was originally most closely related to a bat pestivirus but is now more closely related to a recently published novel porcine pestivirus provisionally named atypical porcine pestivirus. A quantitative real-time PCR detected the virus in samples from neonatal piglets with congenital tremors from two separate farms, but not in samples from unaffected piglets from the same farm. To fulfill the second objective, pregnant sows were inoculated with either serum containing the pestivirus or PBS (control) by intravenous and intranasal routes simultaneously with direct inoculation of fetal amniotic vesicles by ultrasound-guided surgical technique. Inoculations were performed at either 45 or 62 days of gestation. All sows inoculated with the novel pestivirus farrowed piglets affected with congenital tremors while PBS-inoculated control piglets were unaffected. Tremor severity for each piglet was scored from videos taken 0, 1 and 2 days post-farrowing. Tremor severity remained relatively constant from 0 to 2 days post-farrowing for a majority of piglets. The prevalence of congenital tremors in pestivirus-inoculated litters ranged from 57% (4 out of 7 affected piglets) to 100% (10 out of 10 affected piglets). The virus was consistently detected by PCR in tissues from piglets with congenital tremors but was not detected in control piglets. Samples positive by PCR in greater than 90% of piglets sampled included brainstem (37 out of 41), mesenteric lymph node (37 out of 41

  11. Difference in severity of porcine circovirus type two-induced pathological lesions between Landrace and Pietrain pigs.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, T; Patterson, A R; Madson, D M; Pal, N; Rothschild, M; Kuhar, D; Lunney, J K; Juhan, N M; Meng, X J; Halbur, P G

    2009-05-01

    Anecdotal information from the field suggests that there are host genetic differences in susceptibility to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) associated disease among Landrace and Pietrain breeds. The objective of this study was to determine if a difference exists in PCV2 susceptibility between Landrace and Pietrain pigs under experimental conditions. Thirty-nine Landrace pigs and 39 Pietrain pigs were blocked by breed, sire, dam, and litter and randomly divided into the following 4 groups: Landrace noninoculated negative control (Landrace-NEG; n = 13), Pietrain noninoculated negative control (Pietrain-NEG; n = 13), Landrace-PCV2 (n = 26; Landrace), and Pietrain-PCV2 (n = 26; Pietrain). After waning of passively acquired anti-PCV2 antibodies, Landrace-PCV2 and Pietrain-PCV2 groups were inoculated with PCV2 isolate ISU-40895. The Landrace-NEG and Pietrain-NEG groups were housed in a separate room, remained noninoculated, and served as negative controls. All pigs in all groups were necropsied at 21 d post PCV2-inoculation. Onset of seroconversion and concentrations of anti-PCV2-IgM, anti-PCV2-IgG, and anti-PCV2 neutralizing antibodies were similar in Landrace-PCV2 and Pietrain-PCV2 groups. Furthermore, the amount of PCV2 DNA and cytokine concentrations in serum and plasma samples were not different between the 2 PCV2-inoculated groups. The severity of PCV2-associated microscopic lesions was different between Landrace and Pietrain pigs; Landrace-PCV2 pigs had significantly (P < 0.05) more severe lymphoid lesions than the Pietrain-PCV2 pigs. Although the pigs originated from the same farm where their dams were commingled, passively acquired anti-PCV2-antibodies waned in Pietrain pigs by approximately 12 wk of age, whereas the majority of the Landrace pigs remained PCV2 seropositive until 18 wk of age and beyond. The results from this study indicate that a genetic difference exists between these 2 breeds of pigs in susceptibility to PCV2-associated lesions.

  12. Cytokine gene expression in skin of susceptible guinea-pig infected with Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, V; Scarozza, A M; Ramsingh, A I; Wicher, K

    1998-01-01

    Using a semi-quantitative multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay, we examined cytokine mRNA expression for interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-2, IL-10, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in skin samples obtained from C4-deficient (C4D) guinea-pigs inoculated intradermally with virulent Treponema pallidum (VTP). Controls included unmanipulated animals, guinea-pigs injected with T. pallidum-free rabbit inflammatory testicular fluid (ITF) alone, or mixed with heat-killed organisms (HKTP). The expression of IL-1alpha, IL-12p40, and TNF-alpha mRNA [T helper type 1 (Th1)] remained within the normal range in both infected and control animals throughout the experimental period. However, a significant increase (P<0.05) in IL-10 mRNA (Th2) was found exclusively in the VTP-inoculated animals from 3 to 30 days post-infection. Another unique characteristic of the inflammatory response in infected guinea-pigs was the appearance, between 11 and 30 days post-inoculation, of a substantial number of eosinophils in addition to infiltrating mononuclear cells. The results showed a local Th2 response which is consistent with an inadequate immune response. This is reflected by the lengthy and incomplete clearance of the pathogen from the local site of entry and the chronic infection of distant organs. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9824482

  13. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH Toxocara cati IN PIGS: MIGRATORY PATTERN AND PATHOLOGICAL RESPONSE IN EARLY PHASE

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, Irma Estela; Duchene, Adriana; Daprato, Betina; Lopez, Clara María; Cardillo, Natalia; Franco, Aníbal Juan

    2014-01-01

    Experimental inoculations of approximately 100,000 infective Toxocara cati larval eggs were done in twelve pigs. The T. cati eggs used for inoculation were collected from cat's feces. Another group of three pigs served as an uninfected control. Groups of infected pigs were euthanized at seven, 14, 21, and 28 days post-inoculation (dpi). Tissue samples were taken for digestion and histopathology changes in early phase. The number of larvae recovered from the lungs peaked at seven and 14 dpi and were also present at 21, and 28 dpi. Larvae of T. cati were present in the lymph nodes of the small and large intestine at seven, 14, and 28 dpi and at seven, 14, 21, and 28 dpi respectively. In other studied tissues, no larvae or less than one larva per gram was detected. The pathological response observed in the liver and lungs at seven and 14 dpi, showed white spots on the liver surface and areas of consolidation were observed in the lungs. The lungs showed an inflammatory reaction with larvae in center at 28 dpi. In the liver we observed periportal and perilobular hepatitis. The lymph nodes of the intestines displayed eosinophil lymphadenitis with reactive centers containing parasitic forms in some of them. The granulomatous reaction was not observed in any tissues. The role of the other examined tissues had less significance. The relevance of this parasite as an etiological agent that leads to disease in paratenic hosts is evident. PMID:25076437

  14. Experimental infection with Toxocara cati in pigs: migratory pattern and pathological response in early phase.

    PubMed

    Sommerfelt, Irma Estela; Duchene, Adriana; Daprato, Betina; Lopez, Clara María; Cardillo, Natalia; Franco, Aníbal Juan

    2014-01-01

    Experimental inoculations of approximately 100,000 infective Toxocara cati larval eggs were done in twelve pigs. The T. cati eggs used for inoculation were collected from cat's feces. Another group of three pigs served as an uninfected control. Groups of infected pigs were euthanized at seven, 14, 21, and 28 days post-inoculation (dpi). Tissue samples were taken for digestion and histopathology changes in early phase. The number of larvae recovered from the lungs peaked at seven and 14 dpi and were also present at 21, and 28 dpi. Larvae of T. cati were present in the lymph nodes of the small and large intestine at seven, 14, and 28 dpi and at seven, 14, 21, and 28 dpi respectively. In other studied tissues, no larvae or less than one larva per gram was detected. The pathological response observed in the liver and lungs at seven and 14 dpi, showed white spots on the liver surface and areas of consolidation were observed in the lungs. The lungs showed an inflammatory reaction with larvae in center at 28 dpi. In the liver we observed periportal and perilobular hepatitis. The lymph nodes of the intestines displayed eosinophil lymphadenitis with reactive centers containing parasitic forms in some of them. The granulomatous reaction was not observed in any tissues. The role of the other examined tissues had less significance. The relevance of this parasite as an etiological agent that leads to disease in paratenic hosts is evident.

  15. A Malaysia 97 monovalent foot-and-mouth disease vaccine (>6PD50/dose) protects pigs against challenge with a variant FMDV A SEA-97 lineage virus, 4 and 7 days post vaccination.

    PubMed

    Nagendrakumar, Singanallur Balasubramanian; Hong, Nguyen Thi Thu; Geoffrey, Fosgate T; Jacqueline, Morris Michelle; Andrew, Davis; Michelle, Giles; Van Phuc, Kim; Ngon, Quach Vo; Phuong, Le Thi Thu; Phuc, Nguyen Ngoc Hong; Hanh, Tran Xuan; Van Hung, Vo; Quynhanh, Le Thi; Tan, Tran Minh; Long, Ngo Thanh; Wilna, Vosloo

    2015-08-26

    Pigs play a significant role during outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) due to their ability to amplify the virus. It is therefore essential to determine what role vaccination could play to prevent clinical disease and lower virus excretion into the environment. In this study we investigated the efficacy of the double oil emulsion A Malaysia 97 vaccine (>6PD50/dose) against heterologous challenge with an isolate belonging to the A SEA-97 lineage at 4 and 7 days post vaccination (dpv). In addition, we determined whether physical separation of pigs in the same room could prevent virus transmission. Statistically there was no difference in the level of protection offered by 4 and 7 dpv. However, no clinical disease or viral RNA was detected in the blood of pigs challenged 4 dpv, although three of the pigs had antibodies to the non-structural proteins (NSPs), indicating viral replication. Viral RNA was also detected in nasal and saliva swabs, but on very few occasions. Two of the pigs vaccinated seven days prior to challenge had vesicles distal from the injection site, but on the inoculated foot, and two pigs had viral RNA detected in the blood. One pig sero-converted to the NSPs. In contrast, all unvaccinated and inoculated pigs had evidence of infection. No infection occurred in any of the susceptible pigs in the same room, but separated from the infected pigs, indicating that strict biosecurity measures were sufficient under these experimental conditions to prevent virus transmission. However, viral RNA was detected in the nasal swabs of one group of pigs, but apparently not at sufficient levels to cause clinical disease. Vaccination led to a significant decrease in viral RNA in vaccinated pigs compared to unvaccinated and infected pigs, even with this heterologous challenge, and could therefore be considered as a control option during outbreaks.

  16. Quantitative Determination of Tenuazonic Acid in Pig and Broiler Chicken Plasma by LC-MS/MS and Its Comparative Toxicokinetics.

    PubMed

    Fraeyman, Sophie; Devreese, Mathias; Broekaert, Nathan; De Mil, Thomas; Antonissen, Gunther; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Rychlik, Michael; Croubels, Siska

    2015-09-30

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantitate tenuazonic acid (TeA) in pig and broiler chicken plasma was successfully developed and validated. Linear matrix-matched calibration curves ranged between 5 and 200 ng/mL. Correlation coefficients, goodness-of-fit coefficients, and within-day and between-day precision and accuracy fell well within the acceptance criteria. The limit of quantitation was 5.0 ng/mL in both pig and broiler chicken plasma. The LC-MS/MS method was applied in a comparative toxicokinetic study in both pigs and broiler chickens. TeA was completely bioavailable after oral administration in both animal species. However, absorption was deemed to be slower in broiler chickens (mean tmax 0.32 h in pigs vs 2.60 h in chickens). TeA was more slowly eliminated in broiler chickens (mean t1/2el 0.55 h in pigs vs 2.45 h in chickens after oral administration), mainly due to the significantly lower total body clearance (mean Cl 446.1 mL/h/kg in pigs vs 59.2 mL/h/kg in chickens after oral administration). Tissue residue studies and further research to elucidate the biotransformation and excretion processes of TeA in pigs, broiler chickens, and other animal species are imperative.

  17. Fermented pig liquid feed: nutritional, safety and regulatory aspects.

    PubMed

    Plumed-Ferrer, C; von Wright, A

    2009-02-01

    Fermented liquid feed has been lately much investigated in order to compensate the use of antibiotics in pig production. The fermentation process has been claimed to be the reason of the benefits associated with this type of feeding. However, contradictory results have been obtained in feeding trials due to the variable conditions in each experiment. This review focuses on the different factors that would ensure a proper fermentation with all its beneficial effects. In particular, while fermenting a liquid diet with lactic acid bacteria has been shown to improve the quality of feed and to be beneficial to the health of the animals, spontaneously fermented liquid feed appears to be unsafe for the pigs and eventually affects the consumers' safety. Consequently, the use of specific starters or inoculants to ensure the proper fermentation could be a practical solution. The regulatory status of fermented liquid feed in the EU is still unclear, but the use of specific inoculants could be considered as a special case of microbial feed additives.

  18. New topics and limits related to the use of beneficial microbes in pig feeding.

    PubMed

    Bosi, P; Trevisi, P

    2010-11-01

    Reports highlighting the positive effects of probiotics on the performance of pigs or on in vitro traits are now quite frequent, but the use of probiotics in feed compounds has not been widespread. Prerequisites for the healthy and efficient growth of young pigs are the rapid maturation of the gut mucosa and the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and the formation of a local stable and complex bacterial community. In neonatal pigs, suckling and the maternal environment shape the gut microbiota. Later, when weaning stress causes a transient drop in favourable bacteria, the oral supply of microbes could contribute to re-establish the microbiota balance. Some strains isolated from piglets were tested for their ability to settle in the intestine. After weaning, piglets experience new and often unfavourable bacteria. Probiotics have been investigated to contrast the enteropathogens, owing to their properties (production of antibacterial molecules, competition on adhesion sites, stimulation of immune response, etc.). Data in general show that their oral administration can be favourable or, at least, innocuous. However, two cases are presented here, where a probiotic given to pigs already combating enteropathogens impaired pig health, and this could be explained by their effect on the immune response. A more tolerogenic response of the host is expected when beneficial bacteria directly contrast the pathogens, probiotics are claimed to directly modulate or even activate the immune system. For one probiotic divergent effects on growth and health are presented, and these differences may be due to different experimental details or different starting microbiological environments. Scarce data are available on specific immune responses induced by commensal microbes in pigs, and on the interaction of resident microbiota with orally supplied probiotics. Increased knowledge of the role of commensal microbiota in the gut and in the pig metabolism, helps in selecting the best

  19. Experimental infection of slaughter pigs with classical swine fever virus: transmission of the virus, course of the disease and antibody response.

    PubMed

    Laevens, H; Koenen, F; Deluyker, H; de Kruif, A

    1999-08-28

    The spread of classical swine fever virus was investigated in an isolation unit containing four pens, each containing six slaughter pigs. One pig in the middle pen of three adjacent pens was inoculated intramuscularly and intranasally with the virus. The fourth pen was located in a separate compartment. The pens were visited in a strict order to study, first, the effect of indirect contact via contaminated clothing and footwear on the spread of the virus to adjacent pens and, secondly, the airborne transmission of the virus between compartments. The pigs were examined and blood samples were taken every other day for 62 days for virological and serological analyses. The virus was highly contagious for the five pigs that were in direct contact with the inoculated pig, but spread to the other pens only after all the pigs in the originally infected pen had become viraemic. The spread of the virus was promoted by contaminated clothing and footwear, but airborne transmission contributed considerably to the spread of the virus within the pighouse. The first clinical signs observed after the virus was introduced into a pen were decreased feed intake, increased mean rectal temperature and apathy. Neither the clinical course of the infection, nor the pattern of seroconversion observed over time, was affected by the differences in the intensity of contact with the virus between the pigs in the different pens.

  20. Transmission of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus during the Incubation Period in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Pacheco, Juan M.; Brito, Barbara P.; Moreno-Torres, Karla I.; Branan, Matt A.; Delgado, Amy H.; Rodriguez, Luis L.; Arzt, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the quantitative characteristics of a pathogen’s capability to transmit during distinct phases of infection is important to enable accurate predictions of the spread and impact of a disease outbreak. In the current investigation, the potential for transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) during the incubation (preclinical) period of infection was investigated in seven groups of pigs that were sequentially exposed to a group of donor pigs that were infected by simulated-natural inoculation. Contact-exposed pigs were comingled with infected donors through successive 8-h time slots spanning from 8 to 64 h post-inoculation (hpi) of the donor pigs. The transition from latent to infectious periods in the donor pigs was clearly defined by successful transmission of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) to all contact pigs that were exposed to the donors from 24 hpi and later. This onset of infectiousness occurred concurrent with detection of viremia, but approximately 24 h prior to the first appearance of clinical signs of FMD in the donors. Thus, the latent period of infection ended approximately 24 h before the end of the incubation period. There were significant differences between contact-exposed groups in the time elapsed from virus exposure to the first detection of FMDV shedding, viremia, and clinical lesions. Specifically, the onset and progression of clinical FMD were more rapid in pigs that had been exposed to the donor pigs during more advanced phases of disease, suggesting that these animals had received a higher effective challenge dose. These results demonstrate transmission and dissemination of FMD within groups of pigs during the incubation period of infection. Furthermore, these findings suggest that under current conditions, shedding of FMDV in oropharyngeal fluids is a more precise proxy for FMDV infectiousness than clinical signs of infection. These findings may impact modeling of the propagation of FMD outbreaks that initiate

  1. Dietary clays alleviate diarrhea of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Liu, Y; Soares, J A; Che, T M; Osuna, O; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether 3 different clays in the nursery diet reduce diarrhea of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli. Weaned pigs (21 d old) were housed in individual pens of disease containment chambers for 16 d [4 d before and 12 d after the first challenge (d 0)]. The treatments were in a factorial arrangement: 1) with or without an E. coli challenge (F-18 E. coli strain; heat-labile, heat-stable, and Shiga-like toxins; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose daily for 3 d from d 0) and 2) dietary treatments. The ADG, ADFI, and G:F were measured for each interval (d 0 to 6, 6 to 12, and 0 to 12). Diarrhea score (DS; 1 = normal; 5 = watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Feces were collected on d 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 and plated on blood agar to differentiate β-hemolytic coliforms (HC) from total coliforms (TC) and on MacConkey agar to verify E. coli. Their populations on blood agar were assessed visually using a score (0 = no growth; 8 = very heavy bacterial growth) and expressed as a ratio of HC to TC scores (RHT). Blood was collected on d 0, 6, and 12 to measure total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts, packed cell volume (PCV), and total protein (TP). In Exp. 1 (8 treatments; 6 replicates), 48 pigs (6.9 ± 1.0 kg of BW) and 4 diets [a nursery control diet (CON), CON + 0.3% smectite (SM), CON + 0.6% SM, and CON until d 0 and then CON + 0.3% SM] were used. The SM treatments did not affect growth rate of the pigs for the overall period. In the E. coli challenged group, the SM treatments reduced DS for the overall period (1.77 vs. 2.01; P < 0.05) and RHT on d 6 (0.60 vs. 0.87; P < 0.05) and d 9 (0.14 vs. 0.28; P = 0.083), and altered differential WBC on d 6 (neutrophils, 48 vs. 39%, P = 0.092; lymphocytes, 49 vs. 58%, P = 0.082) compared with the CON treatment. In Exp. 2 (16 treatments; 8 replicates), 128 pigs (6.7 ± 0.8 kg of BW) and 8 diets [CON and 7 clay treatments (CON + 0.3% SM

  2. Inoculation of culture plates: straightforward or is it?

    PubMed

    Carlin, E M; Hammond, J A; Boag, F C

    1997-04-01

    In view of the recent vogue in some genitourinary medicine (GUM) units towards selective microscopy we aimed to assess the adequacy of culture plate inoculation in our own GUM clinic by the visual examination of 350 consecutively inoculated plates. Seventy-five (21%) plates were inoculated so lightly that no indentation in the agar could be seen whilst in 20 (60%) the agar was shredded. Eighty-five per cent of inadequately plated samples were inoculated by the same staff members who were either relatively inexperienced, or well-distanced from their last in-service training. This has many important implications not only in the identification and control of infection but also with respect to staff training. We have now introduced practical plating instruction for all new members of clinical staff and additional in-service training. We plan to repeat the audit in 6 months' time to assess the effect of these changes.

  3. Virus excretion and antibody dynamics in goats inoculated with a field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Wu, X; Wang, Z; Bao, J; Li, L; Zhao, Y; Li, J

    2013-11-01

    A field isolate of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) from an outbreak in Tibet, China, was inoculated into goats to investigate the dynamics of virus excretion and antibody production. Further, animals received PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Ocular, nasal and oral samples were tested for the presence of virus antigen by one-step real-time qualitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); competitive ELISA (c-ELISA) was used for the measurement of specific antibodies against PPRV. Virus particles could be detected as early as day 3 post-inoculation (pi) and virus excretion lasted for up to day 26 pi. All four goats inoculated with the PPRV field isolate were seropositive as early as day 10 pi. In animals inoculated with the vaccine strain, antibody was detected at day 14 pi, and levels of neutralizing antibodies remained above the protection threshold level (1 : 8) for 8 months. Both virus particles and neutralizing antibodies were detected earlier in goats challenged with the field isolate than in those receiving the vaccine strain.

  4. Inoculant effects on alfalfa silage: fermentation products and nutritive value.

    PubMed

    Filya, I; Muck, R E; Contreras-Govea, F E

    2007-11-01

    The effect of 14 microbial inoculants on the fermentation and nutritive value of alfalfa silages was studied under laboratory conditions. The first cut (477 g of dry matter/kg) and second cut (393 g of dry matter/kg) of a second-year alfalfa stand were ensiled in 2 trials. In both trials alfalfa was harvested with standard field equipment. All inoculants were applied at 1.0 x 10(6) cfu/g of crop. Uninoculated silages served as controls. After inoculants were added, the chopped forages were ensiled in 1.0- and 0.5-L anaerobic glass jars, respectively, at a density of 500 g/L. Each trial had 15 treatments (uninoculated control and 14 inoculants), with 4 silos per treatment. Silos were stored for a minimum of 30 d at room temperature (approximately 22 degrees C). In first-cut silage, all inoculants but one reduced pH relative to the uninoculated control, and all but 2 of the homofermentative strains shifted fermentation toward lactic acid. In second-cut silage, the epiphytic lactic acid bacterial population was 2.7 x 10(7) cfu/g, and only commercial inoculants produced significant shifts in fermentation. Overall, microbial inoculants generally had a positive effect on alfalfa silage characteristics in terms of lower pH and shifting fermentation toward lactic acid with homofermentative lactic acid bacteria or toward acetic acid with heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus buchneri. These effects were stronger in the commercial products tested. In spite of the positive effects on silage fermentation, 48-h in vitro true DM digestibility was not improved by inoculation with lactic acid bacteria.

  5. Production of huitlacoche, Ustilago maydis: timing inoculation and controlling pollination.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Jerald K; Chandler, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Huitlacoche is the name given to young, fleshy, edible galls that form when ears of Zea mays are infected by Ustilago maydis. Huitlacoche is processed and sold fresh at markets in Mexico. Interest has increased recently in producing U. maydis as a specialty mushroom in the United States. Silk-channel inoculation methods developed to evaluate common smut resistance in maize can be used to produce huitlacoche commercially. This research assessed the effects of time of inoculation and preventing pollination on the severity of ear galls and yield of huitlacoche produced by inoculating silks with U. maydis. Yield of huitlacoche and severity of ear galls were closely related, as was evident from highly significant linear or curvilinear regressions. Severity and yield were greatest when ears were inoculated 4-8 d after the mid-silk growth stage. Ear galls were 5-15% more severe and yield of huitlacoche was 18-150% greater on ears that were not pollinated, compared to those that were pollinated. Maximum yield of huitlacoche was 131 g ear(-1) from unpollinated male-sterile field corn inoculated 6 d after the mid-silk growth stage and 92 g ear(-1) from detasseled sweet corn inoculated 6 d after mid-silk. About 25% of the total weight of ears consisted of marketable huitlacoche when yields were highest. Quality of huitlacoche was not affected by time of inoculation or pollination treatments, but quality of huitlacoche harvested 12-14 d after inoculation was unacceptable primarily due to lack of teliospores, which affected color and flavor.

  6. Exploitation of genetically modified inoculants for industrial ecology applications.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, John P; Walsh, Ultan F; O'Donnell, Anne; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; O'Gara, Fergal

    2002-08-01

    The major growth seen in the biotechnology industry in recent decades has largely been driven by the exploitation of genetic engineering techniques. The initial benefits have been predominantly in the biomedical area, with products such as vaccines and hormones that have received broad public approval. In the environmental biotechnology and industrial ecology sectors, biotechnology has the potential to make significant advances through the use of genetically modified (GM) microbial inoculants that can reduce agri-chemical usage or remediate polluted environments. Although many GM inoculants have been developed and tested under laboratory conditions, commercial exploitation has lagged behind. Here, we review scientific and regulatory requirements that must be satisfied as part of that exploitation process. Particular attention is paid to new European Union (EU) regulations (Directives) that govern the testing and release of genetically modified organisms and microbial plant protection inoculants in the EU. With regard to the release of GM inoculants, the impact of the inoculant and the fate of modified genes are important concerns. Long term monitoring of release sites is necessary to address these issues. Data are reported from the monitoring of a site 6 years after release of GM Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It was found that despite the absence of a host plant, the GM strains persisted in the soil for at least 6 years. Horizontal transfer and microevolution of a GM plasmid between S. meliloti strains was also observed. These data illustrate the importance of assessing the long-term persistence of GM inoculants.

  7. Endogenous Methyl Salicylate in Pathogen-Inoculated Tobacco Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Seskar, Mirjana; Shulaev, Vladimir; Raskin, Ilya

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivar Xanthi-nc (genotype NN) produces high levels of salicylic acid (SA) after inoculation with the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Gaseous methyl salicylate (MeSA), a major volatile produced in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants, was recently shown to be an airborne defense signal. Using an assay developed to measure the MeSA present in tissue, we have shown that in TMV-inoculated tobacco plants the level of MeSA increases dramatically, paralleling increases in SA. MeSA accumulation was also observed in upper, noninoculated leaves. In TMV-inoculated tobacco shifted from 32 to 24°C, the MeSA concentration increased from nondetectable levels to 2318 ng/g fresh weight 12 h after the temperature shift, but subsequently decreased with the onset of the hypersensitive response. Similar results were observed in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, in which MeSA levels were highest just before the hypersensitive response-induced tissue desiccation. Transgenic NahG plants unable to accumulate SA also did not accumulate MeSA after TMV inoculation, and did not show increased resistance to TMV following MeSA treatment. Based on the spatial and temporal kinetics of its accumulation, we conclude that tissue MeSA may play a role similar to that of volatile MeSA in the pathogen-induced defense response.

  8. Animal models for oral transmission of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    D'Orazio, Sarah E. F.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as a food borne pathogen in humans since the 1980s, but we still understand very little about oral transmission of L. monocytogenes or the host factors that determine susceptibility to gastrointestinal infection, due to the lack of an appropriate small animal model of oral listeriosis. Early feeding trials suggested that many animals were highly resistant to oral infection, and the more reproducible intravenous or intraperitoneal routes of inoculation soon came to be favored. There are a fair number of previously published studies using an oral infection route, but the work varies widely in terms of bacterial strain choice, the methods used for oral transmission, and various manipulations used to enhance infectivity. This mini review summarizes the published literature using oral routes of L. monocytogenes infection and highlights recent technological advances that make oral infection a more attractive model system. PMID:24575393

  9. The effect of temperature on the growth and persistence of Salmonella in fermented liquid pig feed.

    PubMed

    Beal, J D; Niven, S J; Campbell, A; Brooks, P H

    2002-11-15

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the effect of temperature on the fate of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium DT104:30 in fermented liquid pig feed. These were (1) by co-inoculation of feed with S. typhimurium DT104:30 and Pediococcus pentosaceus, as the fermenting organism, and (2) by fermenting feed for 48, 72 or 96 h prior to inoculation with S. typhimurium DT104:30. In co-inoculated feed incubated at 20 degrees C, S. typhimurium DT104:30 persisted for at least 72 h. In contrast, in feed incubated at 30 degrees C, no S. typhimurium DT104:30 were detectable 48 h after inoculation. In prefermented feed, S. typhimurium DT104:30 died four to five times faster in feed maintained at 30 degrees C (D(value) 34-45 min) compared with feed maintained at 20 degrees C (D(value) 137-250 min). This was not entirely due to differences in lactic acid concentration as feed fermented for 72 or 96 h at 20 degrees C and feed fermented for 48 h at 30 degrees C contained similar concentrations of lactic acid (160-170 mM). Low numbers of S. typhimurium DT104:30 were still detectable in fermented feed 24 h after inoculation at 20 degrees C. In contrast, none were detectable 6-7 h after inoculation at 30 degrees C. The results of these studies indicate that it would be advisable for pig producers to control the temperature of liquid feed tanks to reduce the risk of Salmonella contamination.

  10. The effect of dietary carbohydrates and Trichuris suis infection on pig large intestine tissue structure, epithelial cell proliferation and mucin characteristics.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L E; Knudsen, K E Bach; Hedemann, M S; Roepstorff, A

    2006-11-30

    Two experiments (Exps. 1 and 2) were performed to study the influence of Trichuris suis infection and type of dietary carbohydrates on large intestine morphology, epithelial cell proliferation and mucin characteristics. Two experimental diets based on barley flour were used; Diet 1 was supplemented with resistant carbohydrates from oat hull meal, while Diet 2 was supplemented with fermentable carbohydrates from sugar beet fibre and inulin. In Experiment 1, 32 pigs were allocated randomly into four groups. Two groups were fed Diet 1 and two groups Diet 2. Pigs from one of each diet group were inoculated with a single dose of 2000 infective T. suis eggs and the other two groups remained uninfected controls. In Experiment 2, 12 pigs were allocated randomly into two groups and fed Diet 1 or Diet 2, respectively, and inoculated with a single dose of 2000 infective T. suis eggs. All the pigs were slaughtered 8 weeks post inoculation (p.i.). The worm counts were lower in pigs fed Diet 2 in both experiments, but not significantly so. Both diet and infection status significantly influenced the tissue weight of the large intestine. In both experiments, pigs fed Diet 2 had heavier large intestines than pigs fed Diet 1 and in Experiment1 the infected pigs of both diets had heavier large intestines than their respective control groups. Diet and infection also significantly affected the morphological architecture and mucin production in both experiments. Pigs fed Diet 1 had larger crypts both in terms of area and height than pigs fed Diet 2 and T. suis infected pigs on both diets in Experiment 1 had larger crypts than their respective control groups. The area of the mucin granules in the crypts constituted 22-53% of the total crypt area and was greatest in the T. suis infected pigs fed Diet 1. Epithelial cell proliferation was affected neither by diet nor infection in any of the experiments. The study showed that both T. suis infection and dietary carbohydrates significantly

  11. Xenotransplantation and pig endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Magre, Saema; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Bartosch, Birke

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human patients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and virological factors considered with regard to xenotransplantation. Among the issues reviewed are the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology and the immunological hindrances with regard to the various types of rejection and attempts at abrogating rejection. Advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection by creating genetically modified pigs that are more suited to the human microenvironment are also discussed. Finally, with regard to virology, possible zoonotic infections emanating from pigs are reviewed, with special emphasis on the pig endogenous retrovirus (PERV). An in depth account of PERV studies, comprising their discovery as well as recent knowledge of the virus, is given. To date, all retrospective studies on patients with pig xenografts have shown no evidence of PERV transmission, however, many factors make us interpret these results with caution. Although the lack of PERV infection in xenograft recipients up to now is encouraging, more basic research and controlled animal studies that mimic the pig to human xenotransplantation setting more closely are required for safety assessment.

  12. Characterisation of a novel pestivirus associated with an outbreak of stillbirths and pre-weaning deaths in pigs due to myocarditis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A syndrome of stillbirths and preweaning losses with myocarditis occurred on 2 Australian pig farms in 2003. While extensive investigations excluded a wide range of know agents, a foetal inoculation study confirmed an infectious agent was present and likely to be viral. This paper describes the iden...

  13. Concurrent vaccination of pigs with type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protects against type 1 PRRSV but not against type 2 PRRSV on dually challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Jeong, Jiwoon; Kang, Ikjae-; Park, Su-Jin; Chae, Chanhee

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of concurrent vaccination of pigs with both type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine against heterologous dual challenge of both genotypes and compare with single vaccination of pigs against heterologous single challenge of both genotypes. Pigs were administered both type 1 and type 2 PRRSV vaccine concurrently into separate anatomical sites at 28 days of age and inoculated intranasally with both genotypes at 63 days of age. Neutralizing antibodies (NA) were not detected in any pigs in any group (NA titer <2 log2) throughout the experiment. In addition, concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes had significantly lower numbers of type 1 and type 2 PRRSV-specific interferon-γ secreting cells (IFN-γ-SC) compared to vaccination of pigs with type 1 or type 2 PRRSV only. Despite the decreased induction of type 1 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC, concurrent vaccination is still able to reduce type 1 PRRSV viremia whereas the decreased induction of type 2 PRRSV-specific IFN-γ-SC by concurrent vaccination correlates with lack of reduction of type 2 PRRSV viremia after dual challenge. The results of this study demonstrated that concurrent vaccination of pigs with two PRRSV genotypes is able to reduce the levels of type 1 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions but not able to reduce the levels of type 2 PRRSV viremia and lung lesions.

  14. Threonine and tryptophan supplementation enhance porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS) vaccine-induced immune responses of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyu; Zhao, Yingfei; Shen, Jie; Lin, Yan; Fang, Zhengfeng; Che, Lianqiang; Wu, De

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate influences of threonine and tryptophan supplementation (TTS) on immune response of growing pigs inoculated with modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine. Twenty growing barrows (Landrace × Yorkshire) were randomly assigned to four groups according to the PRRS vaccination and TTS. Serum samples were collected from all pigs at days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 49 post-vaccination (day 0 defined as the day of vaccination). Pigs were euthanized and samples collected at day 49 post-vaccination. The results showed that TTS tended to increase weight gain and average daily gain (ADG) of pigs (P < 0.1). PRRS vaccine enhanced serum PRRSV-specific antibody, serum virus neutralizing (SVN) antibody and interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-1β concentrations (P < 0.05). The expression of TLR3 and TLR7 mRNA in lymph nodes were higher in TTS than in the control group after PRRS vaccine inoculation (P < 0.05). TTS diet mitigated lung damage which is induced by PRRS vaccination from microscopic evaluation. These results suggest that dietary TTS could improve growth performance of growing pigs, which may be ascribed to the improved immune response and mitigated lung damage.

  15. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  16. Kinetics of lung lesion development and pro-inflammatory cytokine response in pigs with vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease induced by challenge with pandemic (2009) A/H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Gauger, P C; Vincent, A L; Loving, C L; Henningson, J N; Lager, K M; Janke, B H; Kehrli, M E; Roth, J A

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this report was to characterize the enhanced clinical disease and lung lesions observed in pigs vaccinated with inactivated H1N2 swine δ-cluster influenza A virus and challenged with pandemic 2009 A/H1N1 human influenza virus. Eighty-four, 6-week-old, cross-bred pigs were randomly allocated into 3 groups of 28 pigs to represent vaccinated/challenged (V/C), non-vaccinated/challenged (NV/C), and non-vaccinated/non-challenged (NV/NC) control groups. Pigs were intratracheally inoculated with pH1N1 and euthanized at 1, 2, 5, and 21 days post inoculation (dpi). Macroscopically, V/C pigs demonstrated greater percentages of pneumonia compared to NV/C pigs. Histologically, V/C pigs demonstrated severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia with necrotizing bronchiolitis accompanied by interlobular and alveolar edema and hemorrhage at 1 and 2 dpi. The magnitude of peribronchiolar lymphocytic cuffing was greater in V/C pigs by 5 dpi. Microscopic lung lesion scores were significantly higher in the V/C pigs at 2 and 5 dpi compared to NV/C and NV/NC pigs. Elevated TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at all time points in V/C pigs compared to NV/C pigs. These data suggest H1 inactivated vaccines followed by heterologous challenge resulted in potentiated clinical signs and enhanced pulmonary lesions and correlated with an elevated proinflammatory cytokine response in the lung. The lung alterations and host immune response are consistent with the vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD) clinical outcome observed reproducibly in this swine model.

  17. Biodegradation of Pig Manure by the Housefly, Musca domestica: A Viable Ecological Strategy for Pig Manure Management

    PubMed Central

    Čičková, Helena; Pastor, Berta; Kozánek, Milan; Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Rojo, Santos; Takáč, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The technology for biodegradation of pig manure by using houseflies in a pilot plant capable of processing 500–700 kg of pig manure per week is described. A single adult cage loaded with 25,000 pupae produced 177.7±32.0 ml of eggs in a 15-day egg-collection period. With an inoculation ratio of 0.4–1.0 ml eggs/kg of manure, the amount of eggs produced by a single cage can suffice for the biodegradation of 178–444 kg of manure. Larval development varied among four different types of pig manure (centrifuged slurry, fresh manure, manure with sawdust, manure without sawdust). Larval survival ranged from 46.9±2.1%, in manure without sawdust, to 76.8±11.9% in centrifuged slurry. Larval development took 6–11 days, depending on the manure type. Processing of 1 kg of wet manure produced 43.9–74.3 g of housefly pupae and the weight of the residue after biodegradation decreased to 0.18–0.65 kg, with marked differences among manure types. Recommendations for the operation of industrial-scale biodegradation facilities are presented and discussed. PMID:22431982

  18. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  19. Leucine pulses enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis during continuous feeding in neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infants unable to maintain oral feeding can be nourished by orogastric tube. We have shown that orogastric continuous feeding restricts muscle protein synthesis compared with intermittent bolus feeding in neonatal pigs. To determine whether leucine leu infusion can be used to enhance protein synthes...

  20. Chlorate Concentration in the Jejunum and Cecum in Growing Pigs when Supplemented in Drinking Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior research has demonstrated that oral administration of chlorate and nitrate results in reduced risk and / or concentration of Salmonella enterica fecal shedding of infected pigs, poultry and ruminants. The effect of chlorate is concentration dependent in vitro, but the concentrations of chlorat...

  1. Efficacy of antiserum produced in goats and pigs to passively protect piglets against virulent transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, R D; Wesley, R D

    1992-01-01

    The protective effect of sera produced in swine and goats exposed to virulent transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) or modified-live TGEV was tested in hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived three-day-old pigs. Pigs were given serum with their daily ration of milk, and their immunity to virulent TGEV was determined. The pigs were observed for ten days for clinical signs of TGEV infection. One of nine pigs receiving goat serum was protected whereas all three pigs receiving three doses of swine serum per day were protected. Because virus was not isolated from the goats after oral/intranasal vaccination, it is suggested the virus did not replicate in either the respiratory or digestive tract of the goat. PMID:1317247

  2. Induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis: intracerebral versus systemic Abeta inoculation.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Yvonne S; Bolmont, Tristan; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Langer, Franziska; Jacobson, Laura H; Yan, Zheng-Xin; Roth, Klaus; Aguzzi, Adriano; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2009-08-04

    Despite the importance of the aberrant polymerization of Abeta in the early pathogenic cascade of Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the induction of Abeta aggregation in vivo. Here we show that induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis can be achieved in many different brain areas of APP23 transgenic mice through the injection of dilute Abeta-containing brain extracts. Once the amyloidogenic process has been exogenously induced, the nature of the induced Abeta-deposition is determined by the brain region of the host. Because these observations are reminiscent of a prion-like mechanism, we then investigated whether cerebral beta-amyloidosis also can be induced by peripheral and systemic inoculations or by the intracerebral implantation of stainless steel wires previously coated with minute amounts of Abeta-containing brain extract. Results reveal that oral, intravenous, intraocular, and intranasal inoculations yielded no detectable induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis in APP23 transgenic mice. In contrast, transmission of cerebral beta-amyloidosis through the Abeta-contaminated steel wires was demonstrated. Notably, plasma sterilization, but not boiling of the wires before implantation, prevented the induction of beta-amyloidosis. Our results suggest that minute amounts of Abeta-containing brain material in direct contact with the CNS can induce cerebral beta-amyloidosis, but that systemic cellular mechanisms of prion uptake and transport to the CNS may not apply to Abeta.

  3. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rocheli; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria. PMID:26537605

  4. Plant growth-promoting bacteria as inoculants in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rocheli de; Ambrosini, Adriana; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2015-12-01

    Plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are the determinants of plant health, productivity and soil fertility. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) are bacteria that can enhance plant growth and protect plants from disease and abiotic stresses through a wide variety of mechanisms; those that establish close associations with plants, such as the endophytes, could be more successful in plant growth promotion. Several important bacterial characteristics, such as biological nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, ACC deaminase activity, and production of siderophores and phytohormones, can be assessed as plant growth promotion (PGP) traits. Bacterial inoculants can contribute to increase agronomic efficiency by reducing production costs and environmental pollution, once the use of chemical fertilizers can be reduced or eliminated if the inoculants are efficient. For bacterial inoculants to obtain success in improving plant growth and productivity, several processes involved can influence the efficiency of inoculation, as for example the exudation by plant roots, the bacterial colonization in the roots, and soil health. This review presents an overview of the importance of soil-plant-microbe interactions to the development of efficient inoculants, once PGPB are extensively studied microorganisms, representing a very diverse group of easily accessible beneficial bacteria.

  5. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n = 10), control vaccinated (CV, n = 20), and experimental — received doxycycline (DOXY, n = 20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day − 1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8 + cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications. - Highlights: • We examine the postvaccinal immune response in pigs treated with doxycycline. • Doxycycline negatively influenced the specific proliferation after recall stimulation. • Doxycycline negatively influenced secretion of IFN-γ after recall stimulation. • The lower number of

  6. Technology And Pregnant Pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    One of the interesting things about aerospace spinoff is the way it keeps cropping up in uncommon applications unimaginably remote from the original technology. For example, the pig pregnancy detector. The pig pregnancy detector? City folk may be surprised to learn that there is such a thing-and wonder why. The why is because it is a sow's job to produce piglets and farmers can't afford to keep those who don't; it costs about a half-dollar a day in feed, labor and facilities, and even in small herds that's intolerable. So the barren sow must go. Until recently, the best method of determining pig pregnancy was "eyeballing," daily visual examination over a period of time. The problem with eyeballing is that pregnancy is not evident until well advanced; when there is no pregnancy, the farmer learns too late that he has been feeding a sow that won't give him a litter. Advancing technology provided an answer: the quick, easy-to-use, accurate automatic detector for early evaluation of pregnancy status. Among the most popular of these devices are Scanopreg and Scanoprobe, to whose development NASA technology contributed. Scanopreg is an ultrasonic system which detects pregnancy about 30 days after breeding, long before eyeballing can provide an answer. The companion Scanoprobe is a dual-function unit which not only determines pregnancy but also gives farmers an analysis of a hog's meat-fat ratio, an important factor in breeding. Only a short time on the market, Scanopreg and Scanoprobe have already found wide acceptance among meat producers because they rapidly repay their cost.

  7. [Abortive infection of mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Chlamydia ovis].

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A

    1976-01-01

    A mouse adaptated strain of Chlamydia ovis, when inoculated in the peritoneal cavity, caused the death of both pregnant and non pregnant mice. In addition, mice inoculated late in pregnancy (12 to 16 days after breeding) aborted 4 to 6 days after inoculation. Chlamydia was recovered from foetuses and from the organs of the mice (Liver, Spleen, Lungs). The severity of the disease was related to the inoculum concentration, so it was possible to induce late abortions with a rapid recovery of the females, like in the natural infection of the ewes. In the same conditions, the original Chlamydia strain maintained by passage on yolk sac, induced only an inapparent disease transmissible to the young mice.

  8. Earthworm Effects without Earthworms: Inoculation of Raw Organic Matter with Worm-Worked Substrates Alters Microbial Community Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Aira, Manuel; Domínguez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthworms are key organisms in organic matter decomposition because of the interactions they establish with soil microorganisms. They enhance decomposition rates through the joint action of direct effects (i.e. effects due to direct earthworm activity such as digestion, burrowing, etc) and indirect effects (i.e. effects derived from earthworm activities such as cast ageing). Here we test whether indirect earthworm effects affect microbial community functioning in the substrate, as when earthworms are present (i. e., direct effects). Methodology/Principal Findings To address these questions we inoculated fresh organic matter (pig manure) with worm-worked substrates (vermicompost) produced by three different earthworm species. Two doses of each vermicompost were used (2.5 and 10%). We hypothesized that the presence of worm-worked material in the fresh organic matter will result in an inoculum of different microorganisms and nutrients. This inoculum should interact with microbial communities in fresh organic matter, thus promoting modifications similar to those found when earthworms are present. Inoculation of worm-worked substrates provoked significant increases in microbial biomass and enzyme activities (β-glucosidase, cellulase, phosphatase and protease). These indirect effects were similar to, although lower than, those obtained in pig manure with earthworms (direct and indirect earthworm effects). In general, the effects were not dose-dependent, suggesting the existence of a threshold at which they were triggered. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that the relationships between earthworms and microorganisms are far from being understood, and suggest the existence of several positive feedbacks during earthworm activity as a result of the interactions between direct and indirect effects, since their combination produces stronger modifications to microbial biomass and enzyme activity. PMID:21298016

  9. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  10. [Delayed hypersensitivity after anthrax vaccination. I--Study of guinea pigs vaccinated against anthrax].

    PubMed

    Shlyakhov, E; Rubinstein, E

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate delayed hypersensitivity after anthrax vaccination, an Anthraxin skin test was performed in 682 guinea pigs at various times after immunization with veterinary unencapsulated active anthrax vaccine. Results were compared with those obtained in unimmunized control guinea pigs (n = 216), in guinea pigs that received a non-immunizing dose of live vaccine (n = 183) and in guinea pigs inoculated with inactivated vaccine (n = 120). Anthraxin skin tests were positive in the first postvaccination days. The incidence and intensity of positive tests peaked between two weeks and one month after vaccination and then gradually decreased during the first year. Study of resistance of guinea pigs to an inoculum at a lethal dose of a virulent strain of Bacillus anthracis showed a close correlation between positive tests and resistance. These findings demonstrate development of cell-mediated immunity after anthrax vaccination. The Anthraxin skin test should have practical applications for the production of vaccines and for evaluation of the immune status of vaccinated livestock [corrected].

  11. Experimental Infection of Domestic Pigs with African Swine Fever Virus Lithuania 2014 Genotype II Field Isolate.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Cano, C; Pelayo, V; Sánchez, M A; Pridotkas, G; Fernandez-Pinero, J; Briones, V; Arias, M

    2017-02-01

    An experimental infection was conducted to evaluate horizontal transmission, clinical, virological and humoral response induced in domestic pigs infected with African swine fever (ASF) genotype II virus circulating in 2014 into the European Union (EU). Ten naive pigs were placed in contact with eight pigs experimentally inoculated with the Lithuanian LT14/1490 ASF virus (ASFV) responsible for the first ASF case detected in wild boar in Lithuania in January 2014. Clinical examination and rectal temperature were recorded each day. Blood sampling from every animal was carried out twice weekly. Blood samples were examined for presence of ASF virus-specific antibodies and for determining the ASFV viral load. From the obtained results, it was concluded that the Lithuanian ASFV induced an acute disease which resulted in 94, 5% mortality. The disease was easily detected by real-time PCR prior to the onset of clinical signs and 33% of the animals seroconverted. All findings were in accordance with observations previously made in domestic pigs and wild boar when infected with ASF genotype II viruses characterized by a high virulence. One in-contact pig remained asymptomatic and survived the infection. The role of such animals in virus transmission would need further investigation.

  12. Comparison of guinea pig and protozoan models for determining virulence of Legionella species.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, B S; Barbaree, J M; Shotts, E B; Feeley, J C; Morrill, W E; Sanden, G N; Dykstra, M J

    1986-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila organisms are able to infect and multiply within the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. This ability may be associated with virulence, because an attenuated strain of L. pneumophila fails to multiply within this protozoan, whereas a virulent strain increases 10,000-fold in number when coincubated with T. pyriformis. Seventeen strains (11 species) of legionellae were evaluated for virulence by intraperitoneal injection of guinea pigs and inoculation of protozoan cultures. Analysis of the data indicates that there are four categories of legionellae with respect to virulence as follows: organisms that infect and kill guinea pigs and multiply in T. pyriformis; organisms that infect but do not kill guinea pigs and multiply in T. pyriformis; organisms that do not infect guinea pigs but are lethal at high concentrations and multiply in T. pyriformis; and organisms that neither infect nor kill guinea pigs and fail to multiply in T. pyriformis. Evidence suggests that these distinctions are based on two virulence factors: intracellular multiplication in a host and toxic activity. Images PMID:3744550

  13. Salmonella prevalence of lymph nodes and synovial fluid of orally inoculated swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that may be associated with the consumption of meat products. Failure of current interventions to control Salmonella in the food supply of the U.S. has led researchers to believe that atypical carcass reservoirs may be responsible for harboring this pathogen. In th...

  14. Reproductive failure in mink and ferrets after intravenous or oral inoculation of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J A; Manning, D D

    1990-01-01

    Four pregnant mink and seven pregnant ferrets, including five with previous exposure and specific antibody, were injected intravenously with 10(8)-10(10) colony-forming units of Campylobacter jejuni. All 11 pregnancies failed 1-16 days after infection, with results ranging from fetal resorption to expulsion of dead or premature living kits. In every case, uterine contents (placenta, uterine fluid and/or kits) were culture-positive for C. jejuni. Three pregnant mink and nine pregnant ferrets, including four with previous exposure and antibody, were fed 10(9)-10(11) C. jejuni. Two of the mink aborted; kits of all three were culture-positive, but those of one female survived. Seven of the nine ferrets aborted, with two having culture-positive uterine contents. None of 28 uninfected ferret control pregnancies ended in abortion. The most prominent histological feature observed was severe placentitis, which appears to be a more likely cause of Campylobacter-induced abortion than direct pathogenic effects on infected kits. These results suggest that infection of mink or ferrets with C. jejuni during pregnancy poses a serious risk of reproductive failure, even for previously exposed females. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2249178

  15. Inducing Resistance to Conspiracy Theory Propaganda: Testing Inoculation and Metainoculation Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banas, John A.; Miller, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the boundaries of inoculation theory by examining how inoculation can be applied to conspiracy theory propaganda as well as inoculation itself (called metainoculation). A 3-phase experiment with 312 participants compared 3 main groups: no-treatment control, inoculation, and metainoculation. Research questions explored…

  16. Veterinary high pressure injection injuries with inoculations for larger animals.

    PubMed

    Couzens, G; Burke, F D

    1995-08-01

    Equipment used in the mass vaccination of farm stock is a source of high pressure injection injury. We present four cases due to chicken vaccine, and one due to pig vaccine. Unlike injuries caused by paint or oil guns the vaccination delivers a fixed volume. Although the vaccine is in a mineral oil carrier it appears to elicit little inflammatory reaction in a small dose. The outcome is related to the volume injected. In chicken vaccine the dose is small enough to allow conservative or minimally invasive management. The large volume in pig vaccine requires treatment as for conventional high pressure injection injuries.

  17. Protection of Lassa virus-infected guinea pigs with Lassa-immune plasma of guinea pig, primate, and human origin.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B

    1983-01-01

    Lassa virus-immune plasma has been used to treat human Lassa fever patients; however, criteria for plasma selection were based arbitrarily on available serologic tools and protective efficacy was never directly assessed. To test the validity of plasma therapy for Lassa virus infections in an animal model, and to develop biologically relevant criteria for selection of protective immune plasma, inbred, strain 13 guinea pigs were infected with a lethal dose of Lassa virus and treated with various Lassa-immune plasmas obtained from guinea pigs, primates, and convalescent human patients. Neutralizing antibody titers were determined in a virus dilution, plaque reduction test, and were expressed as a log10 plaque-forming units (PFU) neutralization index (LNI). All guinea pigs treated with immune plasma 6 ml/kg/treatment on days 0, 3, and 6 after virus inoculation were protected, provided the LNI exceeded 2.0. Plasmas obtained from donors in early convalescence (32-45 days) had low titers of N-antibody (LNI less than 2) and failed to confer protection, despite high titers of Lassa antibody measured in the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test. Higher doses of marginally titered plasma conferred increased protection. The degree of protection and suppression of viremia was closely associated with LNI an not IFA titers. Administration of low-titered plasma did not result in immune enhancement. A high dose of human plasma from Liberia (12 ml/kg/treatment) was required to confer complete protection to guinea pigs infected with a Lassa virus strain from Sierra Leone (LNI = 1.6), while a lower dose (3 ml/kg/treatment) was sufficient for protection against a Liberian strain (LNI = 2.8), suggesting that a geographic matching of immune plasma and Lassa virus strain origin may increase treatment success. These studies support the concept of plasma therapy for Lassa infection and suggest that the plaque reduction neutralization test is more appropriate than the IFA test for

  18. Automatic inoculating apparatus. [includes movable carraige, drive motor, and swabbing motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automatic inoculating apparatus for agar trays is described and using a simple inoculating element, such as a cotton swab or inoculating loop. The apparatus includes a movable carriage for supporting the tray to be inoculated, a drive motor for moving the tray along a trackway, and a swabbing motor for automatically swabbing the tray during the movement. An actuator motor controls lowering of the inoculating element onto the tray and lifting of the inoculating element. An electrical control system, including limit microswitches, enables automatic control of the actuator motor and return of the carriage to the initial position after inoculating is completed.

  19. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Miscellaneous Exotic Companion Mammals.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Angela M; Miwa, Yasutsugu

    2016-09-01

    Unusual mammalian species such as the hedgehog, sugar glider, and miniature pig are encountered with increasing frequency in exotic companion medicine. Disease of the oral cavity can occur in any species; although occasionally encountered in exotic mammalian species, it is rarely described in the literature. Anatomy and dentition vary significantly; diagnosis and treatment are often extrapolated from that known in other species. The best-documented disease of the oral cavity in this group of species is oral neoplasia in the hedgehog.

  20. Effect of actinobacteria agent inoculation methods on cellulose degradation during composting based on redundancy analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Lu, Qian; Wei, Yuquan; Cui, Hongyang; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Xueqin; Shan, Si; Wei, Zimin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, actinobacteria agent including Streptomyces sp. and Micromonospora sp. were inoculated during chicken manure composting by different inoculation methods. The effect of different treatments on cellulose degradation and the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria were investigated during composting. The results showed that inoculation in different stages of composting all improved the actinobacteria community diversity particularly in the cooling stage of composting (M3). Moreover, inoculation could distinctly accelerate the degradation of organic matters (OM) especially celluloses. Redundancy analysis indicated that the correlation between indigenous actinobacteria and degradation of OM and cellulose were regulated by inoculants and there were significant differences between different inoculation methods. Furthermore, synergy between indigenous actinobacteria and inoculants for degradation of OM and cellulose in M3 was better than other treatments. Conclusively, we suggested an inoculation method to regulate the indigenous actinobacteria based on the relationship between inoculants and indigenous actinobacteria and degradation content.

  1. The immunogenicity of DNA constructs co-expressing GP5 and M proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus conjugated by GPGP linker in pigs.

    PubMed

    Chia, Min-Yuan; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Chan, Hui-Ting; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling; Chang, Hui-Wen; Tsai, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Chun-Ming; Pang, Victor Fei; Jeng, Chian-Ren

    2010-12-15

    The heterodimer of glycoprotein 5 (GP5) and non-glycosylated matrix protein (M) is the leading target for the development of new generation of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. It has been demonstrated that DNA vaccine co-expressing GP5 and M proteins as a fusion protein aroused better immunogenicity than that expressing GP5 or M alone, but it was no better than the DNA vaccine co-expressing GP5 and M proteins with two different promoters. Altered natural conformation of the co-expressed GP5 and M fusion protein was considered as the major cause. Glycine-proline-glycine-proline (GPGP) linker can minimize the conformational changes in tertiary structure and provide flexibility of the peptide chain. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the immunogenicity of DNA constructs co-expressing GP5 and M proteins linked by GPGP could be enhanced in pigs. Three recombinant DNA constructs expressing GP5/M fusion protein without GPGP linker (pcDNA-56), GP5/M fusion protein conjugated by GPGP linker (pcDNA-5L6), and M/GP5 fusion protein conjugated by GPGP linker (pcDNA-6L5) were established. Sixteen PRRSV-free pigs were randomly assigned to four groups and inoculated intramuscularly with 3 consecutive doses of 500 μg of empty vector pcDNA3.1, pcDNA-56, pcDNA-5L6 or pcDNA-6L5 each at a 2-week interval followed by challenge with 5 × 10(5) TCID(50) PRRSV at 3 weeks after the final inoculation. All pcDNA-56-, pcDNA-5L6-, and pcDNA-6L5- but not pcDNA-3.1-inoculated pigs developed neutralizing antibodies (NAs) 3 weeks after the final inoculation and a gradual increase in NA titers after PRRSV challenge, indicating that pigs inoculated with these DNA constructs could establish a sufficient immune memory. The pcDNA-5L6- and pcDNA-6L5-inoculated pigs displayed lower level and shorter period of viremia and lower tissue viral load following PRRSV challenge than did the pcDNA-56-inoculated pigs. The strategy of co

  2. Normal Oral Flora and the Oral Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Lakshman; Matsubara, Victor H

    2017-04-01

    The oral ecosystem comprises the oral flora, so-called oral microbiome, the different anatomic microniches of the oral cavity, and its bathing fluid, saliva. The oral microbiome comprises a group of organisms and includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The oral microbiome exists suspended in saliva as planktonic phase organisms or attached to oral surfaces as a plaque biofilm. Homeostasis of the plaque biofilm and its symbiotic relationship with the host is critical for oral health. Disequilibrium or dysbiosis within the plaque biofilms is the initiating event that leads to major oral diseases, such as caries and periodontal disease.

  3. Early pathogenesis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains in Danish pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Uttenthal, Ase

    2012-10-12

    Host-virus interactions play an important role for the clinical outcome of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infections in pigs. Strain virulence, host characteristics and environment are all factors that markedly influence disease severity. We tested CSFV strains of varying virulence in an experimental set-up, reducing the influence of host and environmental factors. Thus, weaner pigs were inoculated with one of 4 CSFV strains in order to compare the pathogenesis for a 3-week-period after infection. CSFV strains selected were 2 new and 2 previously characterized. None of these strains had been tested in Danish outbred pigs before. Clinical observations grouped the infected pigs into two different categories reflecting either non-specific, mainly gastro-intestinal, problems, or severe disease including high fever within the first week after inoculation. Gross-pathological findings varied between strains, however, lymphoid atrophy and growth retardation represented a consistent finding for all 4 strains. Virus distribution, viral load and in particular virus persistence differed, but supported present practice that recommends lymphoid tissue, most optimal tonsil and lymph nodes, as target material to be applied for early laboratory diagnosis. The present study demonstrated constraints associated with early detection of infections with CSFV strains of low virulence. Since neither clinical symptoms nor pathological lesions observed with these strains constituted characteristic signs of CSF, the risk of neglecting a CSF suspicion is immediate. Therefore, topical information on new outbreaks and continuous enhancement of an efficient surveillance system is of great importance to prevent further spread of CSF within the pig population.

  4. Ascaris suum infection negatively affects the response to a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination and subsequent challenge infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Steenhard, Nina R; Jungersen, Gregers; Kokotovic, Branko; Beshah, Ethiopia; Dawson, Harry D; Urban, Joseph F; Roepstorff, Allan; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2009-08-13

    Since their first introduction more than a century ago, vaccines have become one of the most cost-effective tools to prevent and manage infectious diseases in human and animal populations. It is vital to understand the possible mechanisms that may impair optimal vaccine efficacy. The hypothesis posed in this study was that a concurrent Ascaris suum infection of pigs vaccinated with a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh) vaccine would modulate the protective immune response to a subsequent challenge infection. Four groups of pigs were either (1) untreated (group C), (2) vaccinated against Mh 3 weeks after the start of the study (group V), (3) given a trickle infection with A. suum throughout the study (group A), or (4) given a trickle infection with A. suum and vaccinated against Mh (group AV). All pigs were subsequently inoculated with live Mh bacteria 4 weeks after the Mh vaccination and necropsied after another 4 weeks. All pigs in group V sero-converted 3 weeks after vaccination (100%), as opposed to only 33% of group AV pigs that were Mh-vaccinated and given A. suum. At the end of the study, only 78% of pigs in group AV had sero-converted. Pigs in group AV had a higher mean percentage of lung pathology and the variation was significantly higher in these pigs compared to pigs in group V. The pattern of gene expression in the lungs and draining lymph nodes indicated a local Th2-skewed response induced by A. suum. Our study indicated that A. suum significantly compromised the effect of Mh vaccination. The impact of reduced vaccine efficacy caused by a common gastrointestinal helminth emphasises the importance of parasite control. More focus should be put into this area of research to outline the practical consequences of this interaction, and to be able to predict, prevent and correct negative interactions.

  5. Pathogenic and Genotypic Characterization of a Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolate Associated with Reproductive Failure in an Indian Pig Herd

    PubMed Central

    Desingu, P. A.; Ray, Pradeep K.; Patel, B. H. M.; Singh, R.; Singh, R. K.; Saikumar, G

    2016-01-01

    Background India is endemic to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and recurrent outbreaks occur mainly in rice growing areas. Pigs are considered to be the amplifying host for JEV and infection in gestating pigs results in reproductive failure. Most studies conducted on JEV infection in Indian pigs have been serological surveys and very little is known about JEV genotypes circulating in pigs. So the potential risk posed by pigs in JEV transmission and the genetic relationship between viruses circulating in pigs, mosquitoes and humans is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in pigs with a history of reproductive failure characterized by stillborn piglets with neuropathological lesions. Japanese encephalitis (JE) suspected brain specimens inoculated intracerebrally into mice and Vero cells resulted in successful isolation of JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014. Clinicopathological observations in infected mice, demonstration of JEV antigen in brain, and analysis of the envelope protein identified the swine isolate as being neurovirulent. Phylogenetic analysis based on prM and E gene sequences showed that it belonged to genotype III. This swine isolate was closely related to JEV associated with the 2005 outbreak in India and JaoArS982 from Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of JEV strains collected between 1956 and 2014 in India categorized the GIII viruses into different clades blurring their spatial distribution, which has been discernible in the previous century. Conclusions/Significance Isolation of JEV from stillborn piglets and its close genetic relationship with viruses detected at least three decades ago in humans and mosquitoes in Japan suggests that the virus may have been circulating among Indian pigs for several decades. The close similarity between the present swine isolate and those detected in humans affected in the 2005 outbreak in Uttar Pradesh, India, suggests the need for more intensive surveillance of pigs and implementation of

  6. Oral myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P.; Chande, Mayura S.; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency. PMID:22114438

  7. Chito-oligosaccharide reduces diarrhea incidence and attenuates the immune response of weaned pigs challenged with Escherichia coli K88.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Piao, X S; Thacker, P A; Zeng, Z K; Li, P F; Wang, D; Kim, S W

    2010-12-01

    Seventy-two barrows (Landrace × Large White, initial BW of 4.9 ± 0.3 kg and 17 ± 3 d old) were used to determine if dietary chito-oligosaccharides can replace antibiotics as a means to reduce signs associated with infection in weaned pigs challenged with Escherichia coli. Pigs were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a randomized complete block design using 6 pens per treatment with 3 pigs per pen. The treatments consisted of pigs fed the unsupplemented corn-soybean meal diet challenged or unchallenged with E. coli K88 and pigs fed the same diet supplemented with 160 mg of chito-oligosaccharides or 100 mg of cyadox/kg and challenged with E. coli K88. On d 7, 1 group of pigs fed the unsupplemented diet, as well as all pigs fed diets containing chito-oligosaccharides or cyadox, were orally dosed with 30 mL of an alkaline broth containing E. coli K88. Another group of pigs fed the unsupplemented diet was orally dosed with 30 mL of sterilized alkaline broth. Fecal consistency was visually assessed each morning from d 7 to 14. Blood samples were collected at 0, 24, 48, and 168 h postinfection. On d 14 postchallenge, all pigs were killed to evaluate intestinal morphology and determine E. coli concentrations in the intestine. During the postchallenge period (wk 2), unsupplemented pigs challenged with E. coli had decreased (P < 0.05) BW gain, feed intake, fecal consistency, villus height, villus height:crypt depth ratio, and plasma IGF-1, and increased (P < 0.05) diarrhea incidence, E. coli counts in the intestine, plasma interleukin-1β, plasma IL-10, and IGA-positive cells in the jejunal and ileal lamina propria, compared with unchallenged pigs. Supplementation with cyadox largely mitigated these effects. Although chito-oligosaccharide reduced the incidence of diarrhea, the growth performance of E. coli-challenged pigs supplemented with chito-oligosaccharide was not better than that of unsupplemented pigs challenged with E. coli. Therefore, chito-oligosaccharide, at the

  8. Field experiences with intelligent pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.N.; Duvivier, J.P.; Lefevre, D.E.; Robb, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Oil and gas production operations use intelligent pigs for corrosion inspection of gathering systems and pipelines worldwide. The authors have been involved with intelligent pig inspections which have been conducted on over 155 different pipelines owned by one international corporation. A variety of intelligent pig vendors have been used with tools ranging from standard first generation magnetic flux leakage (MFL) to high-resolution MFL to standard and custom made ultrasonic (UT) tools. Experiences encountered during these inspections are discussed and resolutions to many of the problems are described.

  9. Extraction of an incisor embedded within the nasal cavity in two guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ONO, Kaori; OMIYA, Tomoko; OGUCHI, Yukio; SETOGAWA, Moemi; MACHIDA, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Oral examination of two guinea pigs revealed that the unilateral incisor was absent. On radiographic examination, the incisor was identified within the nasal cavity in both patients. Under anesthesia in both patients, the skin was incised from the nostril to 1.5 cm proximal, and the premaxilla and part of the maxilla were exposed. The bone was removed using a surgical drill, and the incisor was exposed in the nasal cavity. The root was grasped with forceps and carefully extracted as it was degraded and very fragile. Diagnosis was easy using oral and radiographic examination. In guinea pig patients where an incisor is absent on oral examination, this condition should be considered. PMID:26118492

  10. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni inoculated into ground beef.

    PubMed

    Stern, N J; Kotula, A W

    1982-11-01

    Ground beef was inoculated with mixed cultures of Campylobacter jejuni, and the samples were subjected to various cooking and cold-storage temperatures. When samples were heated in an oven at either 190 or 218 degrees C, approximately 10(7) cells of C. jejuni per g were inactivated (less than 30 cells per g) in less than 10 min after the ground beef reached an internal temperature of 70 degrees C. When the samples were held at -15 degrees C over 14 days of storage, the numbers of C. jejuni declined by 3 log10. When inoculated samples were stored with an equal amount of Cary-Blair diluent at 4 degrees C, no changes in viability were observed over 14 days of storage. Twenty-five times as much C. jejuni was recovered from inoculated ground beef when either 10% glycerol or 10% dimethyl sulfoxide was added to an equal amount of ground beef before freezing as was recovered from peptone-diluted ground beef. Twice as much inoculated C. jejuni was recovered from ground beef plus Cary-Blair diluent as was recovered from ground beef plus peptone diluent.

  11. Inoculating against Pro-Plagiarism Justifications: Rational and Affective Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Josh; Pfau, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism continues to threaten academic integrity. This investigation assessed whether an inoculation message strategy could combat university plagiarism by protecting student attitudes against pro-plagiarism justification arguments. Additionally, we sought theoretical confirmation of previous findings on involvement and accessibility in…

  12. Matching Stress Inoculation's Treatment Components to Clients' Anxiety Mode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Speech-anxious students (N=69) classified as experiencing primarily cognitive or somatic symptoms of anxiety received cognitive restructuring, coping relaxation, a combined cognitive-somatic treatment (stress inoculation) or no treatment. Cognitive indices of anxiety indicated that matched treatments resulted in more facilitative patterns of…

  13. Three inoculation methods for evaluating Sclerotinia blight resistance in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-based assays for screening germplasm for resistance to Sclerotinia blight in peanuts can be conducted year-round, and thus may accelerate progress in breeding for resistant plants. Three previously proposed inoculation methods (using main stems of intact plants, detached main stems, or de...

  14. Investigation of the disposal of dead pigs by pig farmers in mainland China by simulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linhai; Xu, Guoyan; Li, Qingguang; Hou, Bo; Hu, Wuyang; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Dead pigs are a major waste by-product of pig farming. Thus, safe disposal of dead pigs is important to the protection of consumer health and the ecological environment by preventing marketing of slaughtered and processed dead pigs and improper dumping of dead pigs. In this study, a probability model was constructed for the disposal of dead pigs by pig farmers by selecting factors affecting disposal. To that end, we drew on the definition and meaning of behavior probability based on survey data collected from 654 pig farmers in Funing County, Jiangsu Province, China. Moreover, the role of influencing factors in pig farmers' behavioral choices regarding the disposal of dead pigs was simulated by simulation experiment. The results indicated that years of farming had a positive impact on pig farmers' choice of negative disposal of dead pigs. Moreover, there was not a simple linear relationship between scale of farming and pig farmers' behavioral choices related to the disposal of dead pigs. The probability for farmers to choose the safe disposal of dead pigs increased with the improvement of their knowledge of government policies and relevant laws and regulations. Pig farmers' behavioral choice about the disposal of dead pigs was also affected by government subsidy policies, regulation, and punishment. Government regulation and punishment were more effective than subsidy. The findings of our simulation experiment provide important decision-making support for the governance in preventing the marketing of dead pigs at the source.

  15. Oral vaccination against swine erysipelas--field experiences in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, C R; Bilkei, G

    2006-01-01

    In order to prove the effects of mass application of oral erysipelas vaccine via drinking water, in a farrow-to-finish production unit in Croatia, the growing-finishing animals were divided into 3 groups and treated as follows:--Group 1 (n=199) was vaccinated intramuscularly against swine erysipelas at 1 week and 3 weeks after arrival in the growing-finishing facility with a swine erysipelas bacterin.--Group 2 (n=199) were vaccinated at the same time with an avirulent culture of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae oral vaccine through drinking water.--Group 3 (n=200) was not vaccinated. Animals with clinical signs of swine erysipelas, chronic progressive arthritis at slaughter, mortality, average daily weight gain during the growing-finishing phase were evaluated. None of the pigs in the groups 1 and 2 showed clinical signs typical for acute swine erysipelas. Twenty-four of the pigs (12 %) in group 3 had pyrexia and skin lesions typical for swine erysipelas. Fifteen pigs in group 1, 13 pigs in group 2, and 63 pigs in group 3 had chronic progressive arthritis (group 1 and 2 vs. group 3: P < 0.01). No significant differences in mortality were recorded between the groups. Group 1 and 2 had higher (P < 0.05) average daily weight gains compared with the group 3.

  16. Role of alpha-2-macroglobulin and bacterial elastase in guinea-pig pseudomonal septic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. M.; Shibuya, Y.; Kambara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    An essential role of alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) was revealed in the prevention of septic shock induced in guinea-pigs by an elastase producing strain (IFO-3455) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When bacterial peritonitis was induced by inoculating fibrin-thrombin clot containing viable bacteria at a dose of 10(9) c.f.u./kg body weight, the guinea-pigs (n = 6) died within 7-8 hours due to septic shock. Prior to the shock, consumption of two-thirds of the circulating alpha 2M was observed. When circulating alpha 2M was depleted 4 hours after the bacterial inoculation, the guinea-pigs immediately developed shock and died within one hour. This shock was prevented either with a specific elastase inhibitor, HONHCOCH(CH2C6H5)CO-Ala-Gly-NH2, zincov (6 microM), or with human alpha 2M. Simultaneous depletion of circulating Hageman factor also prevented shock in the alpha 2M-depleted animals. These results indicate that septic shock was induced through activation of the Hageman factor dependent system by the bacteria-produced elastase which survived alpha 2M in the circulation. PMID:7537522

  17. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  18. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  19. Activity and Safety of Inhaled Itraconazole Nanosuspension in a Model Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection in Inoculated Young Quails.

    PubMed

    Wlaź, Piotr; Knaga, Sebastian; Kasperek, Kornel; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Jeżewska-Witkowska, Grażyna; Winiarczyk, Stanisław; Wyska, Elżbieta; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Rundfeldt, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is frequently reported in parrots, falcons, and other birds held in captivity. Inhalation is the main route of infection for Aspergillus fumigatus, resulting in both acute and chronic disease conditions. Itraconazole (ITRA) is an antifungal commonly used in birds, but its administration requires repeated oral dosing, and the safety margin is narrow. To investigate the efficacy of inhaled ITRA, six groups of ten young quails (Coturnix japonica) were inoculated intratracheally with 5 × 10(6) spores (3 groups) or 5 × 10(7) spores (3 groups). Animals were exposed to nebulized ITRA nanosuspension as 10 % suspension or 4 % suspension, once daily for 30 min, starting 2 h after inoculation for 6 days. Control groups were exposed to nebulized saline for the same period of time. Survival and clinical scores were evaluated, and animals were subjected to gross pathology. In control animals, aspergillosis resulted in systemic disease without pulmonary or air sac granulomas. Animals died from multiple organ failure. Inhalation of 10 % ITRA nanosuspension blocked lethality and prevented disease-related symptoms in the quails exposed to the low dose of spores, while the disease course in quails inoculated with the high-spore dose was retarded. Inhalation of 4 % ITRA nanosuspension was less effective. Both inhalations were well tolerated, and gross pathology did not reveal signs of local toxicity. The data indicate that inhaled administration of 10 % ITRA nanosuspension is capable of alleviating an acute A. fumigatus infection in quails. A lower ITRA concentration may be only active in chronic pulmonary aspergillosis.

  20. 13C-urea breath test for diagnosis of experimental Helicobacter pylori infection in barrier born pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rosberg, K; Gustavsson, S

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies with Helicobacter pylori infected barrier born pigs indicate that the infection has a patchy distribution, resulting in false negative culture results on endoscopic biopsy specimens. This study aimed to adapt the 13C-urea breath test as used in humans to diagnose H pylori infection in barrier born pigs. The breath test was also performed after bismuth as a single treatment and after triple therapy (bismuth, ampicillin, metronidazole). In control pigs the median excess of 13CO2 in expired air was 2.2 (range 0-12 n = 22) ppm. The infected pigs (n = 4) showed consistently high values (median 23 range 14-43) when examined on four occasions (n = 16) four to 10 weeks after inoculation. Biopsy specimens for culture had lower sensitivity than the breath test. No reduction in excess 13CO2 was seen after three days' single bismuth treatment, but after two weeks' triple therapy the breath test results had returned to normal. This suppression was temporary only, however, as the breath test was positive again four weeks after stopping treatment. In conclusion, the 13C-urea breath test is a simple and reliable test for determining H pylori infection and monitoring treatment effects in barrier born pigs. Because the test can be performed in awake pigs anaesthesia and gastroscopy are unnecessary. Images Figure 1 PMID:8504957

  1. Estimation of the sensitivity of four sampling methods for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae detection in live pigs using a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Fablet, C; Marois, C; Kobisch, M; Madec, F; Rose, N

    2010-07-14

    Four sampling techniques for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae detection, namely nasal swabbing, oral-pharyngeal brushing, tracheo-bronchial swabbing and tracheo-bronchial washing, were compared in naturally infected live pigs. In addition, a quantitative real-time PCR assay for M. hyopneumoniae quantification was validated with the same samples. 60 finishing pigs were randomly selected from a batch of contemporary pigs on a farm chronically affected by respiratory disorders. Each pig was submitted to nasal swabbing, oral-pharyngeal brushing, tracheo-bronchial swabbing and tracheo-bronchial washing. Nested-PCR and real-time PCR assays were performed on all samples. A Bayesian approach was used to analyze the nested-PCR results of the four sampling methods (i.e. positive or negative) to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of each method. M. hyopneumoniae was detected by nested-PCR in at least one sample from 70% of the pigs. The most sensitive sampling methods for detecting M. hyopneumoniae in live naturally infected pigs were tracheo-bronchial swabbing and tracheo-bronchial washing, as compared to oral-pharyngeal brushing and nasal swabbing. Swabbing the nasal cavities appeared to be the least sensitive method. Significantly higher amounts of M. hyopneumoniae DNA were found at the sites of tracheo-bronchial sampling than in the nasal cavities or at the oral-pharyngeal site (p<0.001). There was no difference between the tracheo-bronchial washing and the tracheo-bronchial swabbing results (p>0.05). Our study indicated that tracheo-bronchial swabbing associated with real-time PCR could be an accurate diagnostic tool for assessing infection dynamics in pig herds.

  2. Transmission of influenza B viruses in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Pica, Natalie; Chou, Yi-Ying; Bouvier, Nicole M; Palese, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Epidemic influenza is typically caused by infection with viruses of the A and B types and can result in substantial morbidity and mortality during a given season. Here we demonstrate that influenza B viruses can replicate in the upper respiratory tract of the guinea pig and that viruses of the two main lineages can be transmitted with 100% efficiency between inoculated and naïve animals in both contact and noncontact models. Our results also indicate that, like in the case for influenza A virus, transmission of influenza B viruses is enhanced at colder temperatures, providing an explanation for the seasonality of influenza epidemics in temperate climates. We therefore present, for the first time, a small animal model with which to study the underlying mechanisms of influenza B virus transmission.

  3. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  4. Effect of inoculation process on lycopene production by Blakeslea trispora in a stirred-tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Feng, Ling-Ran; Luo, Wei; Li, Han-Guang; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Xiao-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene biosynthesis by Blakeslea trispora was greatly enhanced in a stirred-tank reactor when a nonsynchronous inoculation process, in which the (+) mating type was inoculated after the (-) mating type has been grown for a certain period of time, was applied. The lycopene concentration with nonsynchronous inoculation in a 24-h inoculation interval was 33 % higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The optimum inoculation ratio was 1:2 (+/-) at the 36 and 48 h inoculum age of mating types (+) and (-), respectively. Fermentation time for the individual strains and mated conditions showed that the (+) mating type grows faster than the (-) mating type. Morphological observation showed that the mycelium ratio of B. trispora (-) in mating culture with nonsynchronous inoculation was higher than that with synchronous inoculation. The results indicated that nonsynchronous inoculation process increased the dominance of B. trispora (-) in joint cultivation and hence stimulated lycopene biosynthesis.

  5. Dogs are more permissive than cats or guinea pigs to experimental infection with a human isolate of Bartonella rochalimae.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B; Henn, Jennifer B; Kasten, Rickie W; Nieto, Nathan C; Foley, Janet; Papageorgiou, Sophia; Allen, Claire; Koehler, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    Bartonella rochalimae was first isolated from the blood of a human who traveled to Peru and was exposed to multiple insect bites. Foxes and dogs are likely natural reservoirs for this bacterium. We report the results of experimental inoculation of two dogs, five cats and six guinea pigs with the only human isolate of this new Bartonella species. Both dogs became bacteremic for 5-7 weeks, with a peak of 10(3)-10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/mL blood. Three cats had low bacteremia levels (< 200 CFU/mL) of 6-8 weeks' duration. One cat that remained seronegative had two bacterial colonies isolated at a single culture time point. A fifth cat never became bacteremic, but seroconverted. None of the guinea pigs became bacteremic, but five seroconverted. These results suggest that dogs could be a reservoir of this strain of B. rochalimae, in contrast to cats and guinea pigs.

  6. Two clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae showed differing pattern of lameness and pathogen detection in experimentally challenged pigs

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Matthew; Bower, Leslie; Ramirez, Alejandro; Madson, Darin M.; Strait, Erin L.; Rosey, Everett L.; Rapp-Gabrielson, Vicki J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma (M.) hyosynoviae is known to colonize and cause disease in growing-finishing pigs. In this study, two clinical isolates of M. hyosynoviae were compared by inoculating cesarean-derived colostrum-deprived and specific-pathogen-free growing pigs. After intranasal or intravenous inoculation, the proportion and distribution pattern of clinical cases was compared in addition to the severity of lameness. Tonsils were found to be the primary site of colonization, while bacteremia was rarely detected prior to the observation of clinical signs. Regardless of the clinical isolate, route of inoculation, or volume of inocula, histopathological alterations and tissue invasion were detected in multiple joints, indicating an apparent lack of specific joint tropism. Acute disease was primarily observed 7 to 10 days post-inoculation. The variability in the severity of synovial microscopic lesions and pathogen detection in joint cavities suggests that the duration of joint infection may influence the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, these findings demonstrate that diagnosis of M. hyosynoviae-associated arthritis can be influenced by the clinical isolate, and provides a study platform to investigate the colonization and virulence potential of field isolates. This approach can be particularly relevant to auxiliate in surveillance and testing of therapeutic and/or vaccine candidates. PMID:27297416

  7. Efficacy of active carbon towards the absorption of deoxynivalenol in pigs.

    PubMed

    Devreese, Mathias; Antonissen, Gunther; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2014-10-21

    In order to assess the in vivo efficacy of mycotoxin binders, specific toxicokinetic parameters should be measured according to European guidelines. For this purpose, an absorption model in pigs is described with emphasis on absorption kinetics. Pigs received a single oral bolus of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol alone or in combination with active carbon (applied as mycotoxin binder). After administration of deoxynivalenol alone, significant plasma amounts of deoxynivalenol were detected and kinetic parameters were calculated using a one compartmental model. Activated carbon completely prevented the absorption of deoxynivalenol as no plasma amounts could be detected.

  8. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  9. Pathogenesis of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus isolate (US/Iowa/18984/2013) in 3-week-old weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Madson, D M; Magstadt, D R; Arruda, P H E; Hoang, H; Sun, D; Bower, L P; Bhandari, M; Burrough, E R; Gauger, P C; Pillatzki, A E; Stevenson, G W; Wilberts, B L; Brodie, J; Harmon, K M; Wang, C; Main, R G; Zhang, J; Yoon, K J

    2014-11-07

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is associated with clinical diarrhea in naïve swine of all ages. This report describes timing of antibody generation and disease progression following infection with a US PEDV isolate by assessing fecal viral shedding, morphometric analysis of intestinal lesions, and magnitude of immunohistochemical staining. Sixty-three, 3-week-old pigs were randomly allocated into control (n=27) and challenged (n=36) groups. Challenged pigs were administered 1 mL of 1 × 10(3) PFU/mL of US/Iowa/18984/2013 PEDV isolate by oro-gastric gavage. Three control and four challenged pigs were necropsied on days post-inoculation (dpi) 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and weekly thereafter, until study termination on dpi 35. Clinical disease, fecal shedding, body weight, and temperature were monitored during the study period. Diarrhea was observed in challenged pigs beginning for some on dpi 2, affecting a majority of pigs by dpi 6 and subsiding by dpi 10. Average daily gain was significantly lower (P<0.001) for one week post-infection in challenged pigs. PEDV was detected in feces by PCR on dpi 1 and continued in a subset of pigs until dpi 24. PEDV-specific antigen was detected in villous enterocytes of challenged pigs by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on dpi 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14. Microscopic lesions included severe diffuse atrophic enteritis with significantly reduced (P<0.001) villous length observed on dpi 3, 4, and 7. Under the conditions of this study, fecal shedding of PEDV and IHC staining can precede and continue beyond the observation of clinical signs, thus increasing the risk of viral transmission.

  10. Contralateral compartment syndrome inoculated by invasive group A streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiwen; Mcphillips, Sean Thomas; Chundi, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a rare but a well-documented complication in patients with trauma-induced group A streptococcus infection. Here, we present a case of a male who developed compartment syndrome on the left lower extremity after an injury inoculated by group A streptococcus on the right lower extremity. The patient was resuscitated with antibiotics, urgent fasciotomy, and immunoglobulin. The patient was eventually transferred to a burn center for further care. PMID:27802865

  11. Degradation of PAHs in soil by indigenous and inoculated bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aamand, J.; Bruntse, G.; Jepsen, M.; Joergensen, C.; Jensen, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    In soil heavily polluted by coal tar, the inherent mineralization of radio-labeled phenanthrene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was relatively slow, and a stimulation of degradation was observed by inoculation with a mixed population of PAH-degrading bacteria. A much faster inherent mineralization of phenanthrene was observed in soil slightly polluted by coal tar, and inoculation of this soil had no effect. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from different soils. Two strains were further characterized as an Arthrobacter sp. and a Pseudomonas sp. In an organic medium without phenanthrene, growth rates of 0.52 h{sup {minus}1} and 0.71 h{sup {minus}1} were measured for the Arthrobacter sp. and the Pseudomonas sp., respectively. Most isolates grown in the phenanthrene-free medium, including the Arthrobacter sp., rapidly adapted to phenanthrene degradation following transfer to a phenanthrene-containing medium. In contrast, the phenanthrene-degrading capability of other strains, including the Pseudomonas sp., was lost during growth in the phenanthrene-free medium. Growth in an organic medium without phenanthrene of strains that retain the ability to degrade phenanthrene could prove to be a useful technique for production of PAH-degrading bacteria on a larger scale for soil inoculation.

  12. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  13. Stability of Bradyrhizobium japonicum Inoculants after Introduction into Soil

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Brigitte; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Normand, Philippe; Bardin, Rene

    1988-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 125-Sp, USDA 138, and USDA 138-Sm had been used as inoculants for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in soils previously free of B. japonicum. At 8 to 13 years after their release, these strains were reisolated from soil samples. A total of 115 isolates were obtained through nodules, and seven colonies were obtained directly by a serological method. The stability of the inoculants was confirmed by comparing the reisolated cultures with their respective parental strains which had been preserved by being lyophilized or stored on a yeast extract-mannitol agar slant at 4°C. Comparisons were made on morphological and serological characters, carbon compound utilization (8 tested), intrinsic antibiotic resistance (9 tested), and enzymatic activity (19 tested). Mucous and nonmucous isolates of serogroup 125 were analyzed for symbiotic effectiveness and restriction fragment hybridization with a DNA probe. Our data suggest that the B. japonicum inoculants have survived for up to 13 years in the soils without significant mutation except for two reisolates with a slightly increased kanamycin resistance level. Images PMID:16347768

  14. Successful inoculation of mature pine with Tricholoma matsutake.

    PubMed

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Matsushita, Norihisa; Lapeyrie, Frédéric; Shindo, Katsumi; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2005-06-01

    Our finding demonstrates, for the first time, that the roots of mature pine trees can be successfully inoculated with a symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungus, the valuable matsutake mushroom. Long root segments (ca. 5-10 mm in diameter, ca. 50 cm in length) of 50-year-old Pinus densiflora trees were excavated, washed, auxin-treated (2-5 mg indole butyric acid, IBA, per root) and incubated in moist Spagnum moss. Twelve months later, short roots were regenerated, of which approximately 90% were free of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhiza-free short roots were inoculated with mycelial pieces of Tricholoma matsutake and incubated further in a sterilized substrate. Four-and-a-half months later, roots putatively colonized by Matsutake were sampled near the inoculation points. A T. matsutake-specific ITS-rDNA fragment was amplified by nested PCR from approximately 80% of the root samples analyzed, whereas approximately 66% of the root samples processed for staining with Chlorazol black E displayed characteristic T. matsutake Hartig net structures. These results confirm the symbiotic infection of mature P. densiflora roots by matsutake.

  15. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  16. A modified live PRRSV vaccine and the pathogenic parent strain induce regulatory T cells in pigs naturally infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    LeRoith, T; Hammond, S; Todd, S M; Ni, Y; Cecere, T; Pelzer, K D

    2011-04-15

    The lack of heterologous protection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccines is currently a major problem in the field. Heterologous protection by PRRS vaccines depends on the ability of the vaccine to induce an interferon gamma (IFN-γ) response. One mechanism by which the virus evades the immune system is by activating regulatory T cells (T(regs)), resulting in induction of interleukin 10 rather than IFN-γ. Our hypothesis that current PRRS vaccines do not differ from pathogenic strains in the ability to induce T(regs) was tested by inoculating three groups of pigs with two pathogenic viruses and an attenuated vaccine strain and evaluating the number of T(regs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Before inoculation, the pigs, although vaccinated became infected naturally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae before shipment to our research facility. Our results show that the PRRSV vaccine strain and parent strain are equally able to induce T(regs) in pigs naturally infected with M. hyopneumoniae. Pigs in the vaccine and PRRSV groups had higher lung lesion scores than pigs in the control groups. The results suggest that the exacerbation M. hyopneumoniae respiratory disease may be due to the ability of PRRSV vaccination and viral infection to induce regulatory T cells.

  17. Expression of toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in subplacental trophoblasts from guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) following infection with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; DiVerde, K D; Sahin, O; Plummer, P J; Zhang, Q; Yaeger, M J

    2011-03-01

    Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) are well-characterized cell surface receptors that recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns and play an important role in pathogen recognition and activation of the innate immune system. Variable expression of TLR2 and TLR4 has been described in trophoblasts from normal and diseased placentas; yet, there are limited data regarding trophoblast TLR expression in response to specific placental pathogens, and TLR expression in the guinea pig placenta has not been described. The guinea pig is an effective model for Campylobacter-induced abortion of small ruminants, and the authors have shown by immunohistochemistry that C jejuni localizes within syncytiotrophoblasts of the guinea pig subplacenta. The present study was designed to determine if the expression of either TLR2 or TLR4 would be affected in subplacental trophoblasts following infection with C jejuni. Immunohistochemistry for TLR2 and TLR4 was performed on placenta from guinea pigs that aborted following inoculation with C jejuni and from sham-inoculated controls. Quantitative assessment of TLR expression was performed, and mean immunoreactivity for TLR2 was significantly higher in subplacental trophoblasts from animals that aborted compared with uninfected controls (P = .0283), whereas TLR4 expression was not statistically different (P = .5909). These results suggest that abortion in guinea pigs following infection with C jejuni is associated with increased TLR2 expression in subplacental trophoblasts and may reveal a possible role for TLR2 in the pathogenesis of Campylobacter-induced abortion.

  18. Postnatal mandibular cheek tooth development in the miniature pig based on two-dimensional and three-dimensional X-ray analyses.

    PubMed

    Ide, Yoshiaki; Nakahara, Taka; Nasu, Masanori; Matsunaga, Satoru; Iwanaga, Takehiro; Tominaga, Noriko; Tamaki, Yuichi

    2013-08-01

    The miniature pig is a useful large laboratory animal model. Various tissues and organs of miniature pigs are similar to those of humans in terms of developmental, anatomical, immunological, and physiological characteristics. The oral and maxillofacial region of miniature pigs is often used in preclinical studies of regenerative dentistry. However, there is limited information on the dentition and tooth structure of miniature pigs. The purpose of this study was to examine the time-course changes of dentition and tooth structure (especially the root) of the miniature pig mandibular cheek teeth through X-ray analyses using soft X-ray for two-dimensional observations and micro-CT for three-dimensional observations. The mandibles of male Clawn strain miniature pigs (2 weeks and 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 17, and 29 months of age) were used. X-ray analysis of the dentition of miniature pig cheek teeth showed that the eruption pattern of the miniature pig is diphyodont and that the replacement pattern is vertical. Previous definitions of deciduous and permanent teeth often varied and there has been no consensus on the number of teeth (dentition); however, we found that three molars are present in the deciduous dentition and that four premolars and three molars are present in the permanent dentition. Furthermore, we confirmed the number of tooth roots and root canals. We believe that these findings will be highly useful in future studies using miniature pig teeth.

  19. Detection of African swine fever virus DNA in blood samples stored on FTA cards from asymptomatic pigs in Mbeya region, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Braae, U C; Johansen, M V; Ngowi, H A; Rasmussen, T B; Nielsen, J; Uttenthal, Å

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether blood samples collected onto FTA(®) cards could be used in combination with real-time PCR for the detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in samples from resource-poor settings under the assumption that asymptomatically (sub-clinically) infected pigs may be present. Blood samples were collected from clinically healthy pigs from Mbeya Region, Tanzania. The blood samples were stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed by real-time PCR assays in duplicate; three pigs had high levels of viral DNA (Ct values of 27-29), and three pigs had a low level of viral DNA (Ct 36-45). Four pigs were positive in one of the duplicate samples only, but clear products of the expected size were obtained when the reactions were analysed by gel electrophoresis. For comparison, blood samples from pigs experimentally infected with either a pathogenic (OURT T88/1) or a non-pathogenic (OURT T88/3) isolate of ASFV were collected, stored on FTA(®) cards and analysed in the same way. The blood from pigs infected with the OURT T88/1 isolate showed high levels of viral DNA (Ct 22-33), whereas infection with non-pathogenic OURT T88/3 isolate resulted in only low levels of viral DNA (Ct 39) in samples collected at 10-14 days after inoculation.

  20. Insulinoma in 2 guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes an insulinoma in 2 guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus). Both guinea pigs presented with neurologic signs and low blood glucose readings. The neurologic signs resolved with dextrose administration. Insulinoma was confirmed on postmortem examination. PMID:15943120

  1. Effect of wheat distillers dried grains with solubles or sugar beet pulp on prevalence of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Thomson, L W; Pieper, R; Marshall, J K; Van Kessel, A G

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (ST) is of concern in the swine industry with relevance for animal health and consumer safety. Nutritional strategies might help to reduce ST infection and transmission. This study examined the potential of wheat (Triticum aestivum) distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) pulp (SBP) to alter intestinal microbial communities and ST shedding using a Trojan model. Weaned pigs (n = 105; 28.5 ± 3.5 d of age) were separated into 3 treatment groups (7 pigs/pen) and fed a wheat-based control diet or the control diet formulated with 15% wheat DDGS or 6% SBP inclusion. Following 12 d of diet adaptation, 2 pigs/pen were inoculated with 2 x 10(9) cfu ST, resistant to novobiocin and nalidixic acid. Fecal swabs were taken from infected pigs and pen-mates (contact pigs) for 9 d following challenge, enriched in nutrient broth for 24 h, and plated on selective media to determine prevalence of ST. The ranges of prevalence of ST in feces were from 90 to 100% in challenged pigs and 74 to 78% in contact pigs. No influence of treatment on rectal temperature and prevalence of ST in contact pigs were observed. Fifteen contact pigs were euthanized per treatment group on 9 and 10 d postchallenge to enumerate in intestinal contents (ileum, cecum, and proximal colon), Lactobacillus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridium clusters I, VI, and XVIa by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and to determine ST prevalence by selective culture. No significant effects of diet were observed with respect to ST prevalence in feces, ileum, cecum, colon, and lymph nodes of contact pigs. Compared with the control diet, DGGS and SBP diets showed a trend towards increased (P < 0.1) number of Lactobacillus species in the cecum and colon. Although both wheat DGGS and SBP tended to increase the Lactobacillus spp. neither of the feed ingredients affected ST prevalence.

  2. Experimental aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Shamblin, J D; Wollen, S E; Pitt, L M; Sizemore, D R; Ogg, M M; Johnston, S C

    2015-01-01

    Eight guinea pigs were aerosolized with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) and developed lethal interstitial pneumonia that was distinct from lesions described in guinea pigs challenged subcutaneously, nonhuman primates challenged by the aerosol route, and natural infection in humans. Guinea pigs succumbed with significant pathologic changes primarily restricted to the lungs. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in many alveolar macrophages. Perivasculitis was noted within the lungs. These changes are unlike those of documented subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs and aerosolized filoviral infections in nonhuman primates and human cases. Similar to findings in subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs, there were only mild lesions in the liver and spleen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aerosol challenge of guinea pigs with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga). Before choosing this model for use in aerosolized ebolavirus studies, scientists and pathologists should be aware that aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

  3. Thiamphenicol disposition in pigs.

    PubMed

    Castells, G; Prats, C; El Korchi, G; Pérez, B; Arboix, M; Cristòfol, C; Martì, G

    1999-06-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of thiamphenicol (TAP) were determined after intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 30 mg kg-1 of TAP in pigs. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) Intravenous TAP kinetics were fitted to a bi-exponential equation, with a first rapid disposition phase followed by a slower disposition phase. Elimination half-life was short, at 59.3 (29.4) minutes; volume of distribution at steady state was 0.62 (0.24) 1 kg-1; and plasma clearance was 13.4 (4.5) ml min-1 kg-1. After i.m. administration, the peak plasma concentration (Cmax= 4.1 microg ml-1) was reached in about 60 minutes; these concentrations are lower than those reported in other species. The TAP elimination half-life after i.m. administration, 250.2 (107.1) minutes was longer after than i.v. administration, probably due to the slow rate of absorption from the muscle. The mean bioavailability value for i.m. administration was 76 (12) per cent.

  4. Effect of vaccination of pigs against experimental infection with high and low virulence Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, I; Maes, D; Vranckx, K; Calus, D; Pasmans, F; Haesebrouck, F

    2011-02-17

    This study investigated the infection pattern and lung lesion development in pigs caused by a low and highly virulent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain at 4 and 8 weeks (w) post infection (PI). It also determined the efficacy of a commercial inactivated whole-cell vaccine against infection with each one of these M. hyopneumoniae strains. Ninety piglets free of M. hyopneumoniae were selected, and 40 of them were randomly vaccinated during their first week of life. At weaning, all piglets were allocated to 10 different groups and housed in pens with absolute filters. At 4 weeks of age, pigs were inoculated intratracheally with either a highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain, a low virulent strain or with sterile culture medium. Half of all animals were euthanized at 4 w PI, while the remaining half was euthanized at 8 w PI. Coughing was assessed daily, and lung lesions, immunofluorescence (IF), bacteriological analysis and nested PCR were assessed after necropsy. It was demonstrated that contrary to the highly virulent strain, the low virulent strain required more than 4 weeks PI (commonly accepted as the standard infection model) to reach maximum clinical symptoms. Vaccination significantly reduced clinical symptoms, macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions in pigs infected with the highly virulent strain. This effect was more pronounced at 4 than at 8 weeks PI. Protective efficacy was also observed in pigs infected with the low virulent strain, but the effect was less pronounced than on the highly virulent strain.

  5. Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; White, H J; Hough, A J; Pasley, J N; Barron, A L

    1982-11-01

    Female guinea pigs were treated daily with 1 mg of beta-estradiol-3-benzoate intramuscularly beginning 14 days before intravaginal inoculation with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and continuing during the course of the infection. Treatment with estradiol was found to markedly influence the course of genital infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, producing infections of greater intensity and longer duration than those in control animals. Moreover, pathogenesis was altered in that ascending infection was observed, resulting in endometritis, cystic salpingitis, and cystitis. Infection in the controls was limited to the cervix and vagina. Estradiol treatment increased the apparent number of infected cells in the cervix and vagina as detected by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis were comparable in estradiol-treated and untreated animals. These data indicate that hormonal manipulation may have profound effects on the course of chlamydial genital infections.

  6. Noninvasive in vivo structural and vascular imaging of human oral tissues with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Bahar; Lindenmaier, Andras; Standish, Beau A.; Allo, Ghassan; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system and an oral imaging probe have been developed to visualize the microstructural morphology and microvasculature in the human oral cavity. Structural OCT images of ex vivo pig oral tissues with the histology of the same sites were acquired and compared for correlations. Structural in vivo OCT images of healthy human tissue as well as a pathologic site (ulcer) were obtained and analyzed based on the results of the ex vivo pig study, drawing on the similarity between human and swine oral tissues. In vivo Doppler and speckle variance OCT images of the oral cavity in human volunteers were also acquired, to demonstrate the feasibility of microvascular imaging of healthy and pathologic (scar) oral tissue. PMID:22567578

  7. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  8. Pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation: development of an animal model in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Niedermeier, Katharina; Braun, Susanne; Fauser, Claudius; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Stark, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    In 2002 an increased number of cochlear implant related meningitis cases was reported by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The most commonly identified causative agent was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although most cases of meningitis were related to a special electrode design, the risk for post-operative pneumococcal meningitis might nonetheless be enhanced by opening of the cochlea during implantation. In the present study, a threshold model for middle ear inoculation of S. pneumoniae was established in the guinea pig after cochlear implantation to assess the post-operative risk of meningitis. Guinea pigs were implanted unilaterally with a silicone cochlear implant electrode dummy. Five weeks after implantation, animals were challenged via the middle ear with a clinically relevant strain of S. pneumoniae and monitored over a period of five days for signs of meningitis. Meningitis was confirmed by clinical outcome in the animals, histological investigation of brains, as well as by pleocytosis and presence of bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). By inoculation of varying numbers of bacteria (between 1 × 10(4) and 1 × 10(9) CFU/ml in 10 μl), a threshold model was established. The attack rate, pattern and onset of meningitis depended on number of inoculated bacteria. An increased meningitis rate in different experimental groups shows that greater bacterial burden leads to an increased attack rate after intratympanal inoculation. The established animal model provides a potential tool to assess the meningitis risk after cochlear implantation. Its implementation in future studies will allow the investigation of existing and newly developed prostheses for postoperatively infection risk.

  9. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura C; Jiang, Zhihua; Sang, Yongming; Harhay, Gregory P; Lager, Kelly M

    2014-06-15

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the current annotation of pig IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, IFITM5, IFITM1L1 and IFITM1L4, manually annotated IFITM1L2, IFITM1L3, IFITM5L, IFITM3L1 and IFITM3L2, and provide expressed sequence tag (EST) and/or mRNA evidence, not contained with the NCBI Reference Sequence database (RefSeq), for the existence of IFITM6, IFITM7 and a new IFITM1-like (IFITM1LN) gene in pigs. Phylogenic analyses showed seven porcine IFITM genes with highly conserved human/mouse orthologs known to have anti-viral activity. Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling (DGETP) of swine tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) of pigs infected with swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus or porcine circovirus type 2 over 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) showed that gene expression abundance differs dramatically among pig IFITM family members, ranging from 0 to over 3000 tags per million. In particular, SIV up-regulated IFITM1 by 5.9 fold at 3 dpi. Bayesian framework further identified pig IFITM1 and IFITM3 as differentially expressed genes in the overall transcriptome analysis. In addition to being a component of protein complexes involved in homotypic adhesion, the IFITM1 is also associated with pathways related to regulation of cell proliferation and IFITM3 is involved in immune responses.

  10. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  11. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  12. Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study,...

  13. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  14. Omnivores Going Astray: A Review and New Synthesis of Abnormal Behavior in Pigs and Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Brunberg, Emma I; Rodenburg, T Bas; Rydhmer, Lotta; Kjaer, Joergen B; Jensen, Per; Keeling, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Pigs and poultry are by far the most omnivorous of the domesticated farm animals and it is in their nature to be highly explorative. In the barren production environments, this motivation to explore can be expressed as abnormal oral manipulation directed toward pen mates. Tail biting (TB) in pigs and feather pecking (FP) in laying hens are examples of unwanted behaviors that are detrimental to the welfare of the animals. The aim of this review is to draw these two seemingly similar abnormalities together in a common framework, in order to seek underlying mechanisms and principles. Both TB and FP are affected by the physical and social environment, but not all individuals in a group express these behaviors and individual genetic and neurobiological characteristics play an important role. By synthesizing what is known about environmental and individual influences, we suggest a novel possible mechanism, common for pigs and poultry, involving the brain-gut-microbiota axis.

  15. Omnivores Going Astray: A Review and New Synthesis of Abnormal Behavior in Pigs and Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Brunberg, Emma I.; Rodenburg, T. Bas; Rydhmer, Lotta; Kjaer, Joergen B.; Jensen, Per; Keeling, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Pigs and poultry are by far the most omnivorous of the domesticated farm animals and it is in their nature to be highly explorative. In the barren production environments, this motivation to explore can be expressed as abnormal oral manipulation directed toward pen mates. Tail biting (TB) in pigs and feather pecking (FP) in laying hens are examples of unwanted behaviors that are detrimental to the welfare of the animals. The aim of this review is to draw these two seemingly similar abnormalities together in a common framework, in order to seek underlying mechanisms and principles. Both TB and FP are affected by the physical and social environment, but not all individuals in a group express these behaviors and individual genetic and neurobiological characteristics play an important role. By synthesizing what is known about environmental and individual influences, we suggest a novel possible mechanism, common for pigs and poultry, involving the brain–gut–microbiota axis. PMID:27500137

  16. A model of type 2 diabetes in the guinea pig using sequential diet-induced glucose intolerance and streptozotocin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ackart, David F.; Richardson, Michael A.; DiLisio, James E.; Pulford, Bruce; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among noncommunicable diseases, and additional animal models that more closely replicate the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes are needed. The goal of this study was to develop a model of type 2 diabetes in guinea pigs, in which diet-induced glucose intolerance precedes β-cell cytotoxicity, two processes that are crucial to the development of human type 2 diabetes. Guinea pigs developed impaired glucose tolerance after 8 weeks of feeding on a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, as determined by oral glucose challenge. Diet-induced glucose intolerance was accompanied by β-cell hyperplasia, compensatory hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia with hepatocellular steatosis. Streptozotocin (STZ) treatment alone was ineffective at inducing diabetic hyperglycemia in guinea pigs, which failed to develop sustained glucose intolerance or fasting hyperglycemia and returned to euglycemia within 21 days after treatment. However, when high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet-fed guinea pigs were treated with STZ, glucose intolerance and fasting hyperglycemia persisted beyond 21 days post-STZ treatment. Guinea pigs with diet-induced glucose intolerance subsequently treated with STZ demonstrated an insulin-secretory capacity consistent with insulin-independent diabetes. This insulin-independent state was confirmed by response to oral antihyperglycemic drugs, metformin and glipizide, which resolved glucose intolerance and extended survival compared with guinea pigs with uncontrolled diabetes. In this study, we have developed a model of sequential glucose intolerance and β-cell loss, through high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet and extensive optimization of STZ treatment in the guinea pig, which closely resembles human type 2 diabetes. This model will prove useful in the study of insulin-independent diabetes pathogenesis with or without comorbidities, where the guinea pig serves as a relevant model species. PMID:28093504

  17. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity on peanut infection by Sclerotinia minor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. minor. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DOE), and five were closed for d...

  18. The Potential of Inoculation in Promoting Resistance to the Effectiveness of Comparative Advertising Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Examines the potential of the inoculation message strategy to deflect the persuasiveness of comparative advertisements. Indicates modest potential for inoculation, confirming that inoculation pretreatments confer resistance to a comparative ad's influence on consumer attitudes, especially on behalf of high-involving products. (SR)

  19. Effect of post-inoculation relative humidity (RH) on peanut infection by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stems of six-week-old plants of the cv Okrun (susceptible to Sclerotinia blight) were inoculated with S. sclerotiorum, isolated from pumpkin. Two post-inoculation humidity regimes of 100% RH were used. In the first RH regime, one inoculation chamber was kept open for the duration of experiment (DO...

  20. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The methods for isolation and purification of a guinea-pig serum protein with homocytotropic antibody activity and characteristics of IgE are described. By precipitation in the equivalence zone or immunoadsorption and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, we isolated an homocytotropic antibody, that was not able to give a precipitin line when it was reacted directly with the antigen. It was capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA after a latent period of 24–48 hours but not after 3 hours; it was sensitive to treatment with mercaptoethanol. It had antigenic determinants present in the other guinea-pig immunoglobulins and particular antigenic determinants. All these properties make us believe that this protein belongs to an immunoglobulin different from γ1 and similar to the reaginic antibody (IgE) described in other species. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4126261

  1. A neonatal gnotobiotic pig model of human enterovirus 71 infection and associated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Kocher, Jacob; Jortner, Bernard S; Vonck, Marlice; Pelzer, Kevin; Deng, Jie; Zhu, Runan; Li, Yuyun; Qian, Yuan; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development and pathogenesis studies for human enterovirus 71 are limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report the development of a novel neonatal gnotobiotic pig model using the non-pig-adapted neurovirulent human enterovirus 71 strain BJ110, which has a C4 genotype. Porcine small intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural cells were infected in vitro. Oral and combined oral–nasal infection of 5-day-old neonatal gnotobiotic pigs with 5×108 fluorescence forming units (FFU) resulted in shedding up to 18 days post-infection, with viral titers in rectal swab samples peaking at 2.22×108 viral RNA copies/mL. Viral capsid proteins were detected in enterocytes within the small intestines on post-infection days (PIDs) 7 and 14. Additionally, viral RNA was detected in intestinal and extra-intestinal tissues, including the central nervous system, the lung and cardiac muscle. The infected neonatal gnotobiotic pigs developed fever, forelimb weakness, rapid breathing and some hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms. Flow cytometry analysis revealed increased frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-γ-producing T cells in the brain and the blood on PID 14, but reduced frequencies were observed in the lung. Furthermore, high titers of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies were generated in both orally and combined oral–nasally infected pigs on PIDs 7, 14, 21 and 28. Together, these results demonstrate that neonatal gnotobiotic pigs represent a novel animal model for evaluating vaccines for human enterovirus 71 and for understanding the pathogenesis of this virus and the associated immune responses. PMID:26038741

  2. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs.

    PubMed

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n=10), control vaccinated (CV, n=20), and experimental - received doxycycline (DOXY, n=20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day -1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8+ cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications.

  3. Kinetics and pathogenicity of oral infection by equine herpesvirus-9 in mice and suckling hamsters.

    PubMed

    El-Nahass, E; El-Habashi, N; Abdelaziz, A A; Nayel, M; Kasem, S; Fukushi, H; Tuji, H; Hirata, A; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis and kinetics of oral infection by equine herpesvirus (EHV)-9 were studied in mice and hamsters. After oral inoculation of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus, 1-week-old suckling hamsters showed varying severity of neurological disease from 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) and all of these animals had died by 96 hpi. Four-week-old ICR mice inoculated orally with 4 × 10(4)PFU of virus showed no clinical signs, but they developed erosive and ulcerative gastritis from 36 hpi. Varying degrees of encephalitis were seen in infected mice and hamsters, and the hamsters also developed myelitis by 96 hpi. Immunohistochemistry performed on whole body sections of suckling hamsters revealed the kinetics of spread of the virus to the central nervous system. EHV-9 antigen was detected initially in macrophages of the oral and lingual submucosa. At 36 hpi virus antigen was detected in the nerve fibres and pseudounipolar neurons of the trigeminal ganglion and at 96 hpi antigen was present in the myenteric plexuses of the intestine. Virus antigen was also detected in the liver, lungs and heart of affected animals. EHV-9 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the brain, blood and spinal cord of suckling hamsters at 36, 48 and 96 hpi. These findings show that EHV-9 may spread via the trigeminal nerve when mice and hamsters are inoculated orally with virus.

  4. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Imaging Reveals a Long-Lasting Chlamydial Infection in the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract following Genital Tract Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yumeng; Gong, Siqi; Yang, Zhangsheng; Sun, Xin; Schenken, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal infection with Chlamydia muridarum in mice can ascend to the upper genital tract, resulting in hydrosalpinx, a pathological hallmark for tubal infertility in women infected with C. trachomatis. Here, we utilized in vivo imaging of C. muridarum infection in mice following an intravaginal inoculation and confirmed the rapid ascent of the chlamydial organisms from the lower to upper genital tracts. Unexpectedly, the C. muridarum-derived signal was still detectable in the abdominal area 100 days after inoculation. Ex vivo imaging of the mouse organs revealed that the long-lasting presence of the chlamydial signal was restricted to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which was validated by directly measuring the chlamydial live organisms and genomes in the same organs. The C. muridarum organisms spreading from the genital to the GI tracts were detected in different mouse strains and appeared to be independent of oral or rectal routes. Mice prevented from orally taking up excretions also developed the long-lasting GI tract infection. Inoculation of C. muridarum directly into the upper genital tract, which resulted in a delayed vaginal shedding of live organisms, accelerated the chlamydial spreading to the GI tract. Thus, we have demonstrated that the genital tract chlamydial organisms may use a systemic route to spread to and establish a long-lasting infection in the GI tract. The significance of the chlamydial spreading from the genital to GI tracts is discussed. PMID:26099591

  5. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  6. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Today! Limited Edition T-Shirt Buy Today! The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national ... trustworthy health information: verify here. Social Networks The Oral Cancer Foundation 3419 Via Lido #205 Newport Beach Ca ...

  7. Oral Lichen Planus

    MedlinePlus

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  8. Isolation of influenza A(H3N2)v virus from pigs and characterization of its biological properties in pigs and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Jin, Young-Hwa; Yeoul, Jeong-Ji; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Park, Choi-Kyu

    2013-11-01

    Recently, a novel reassortant virus, influenza A(H3N2)v [A(H3N2)v], was identified as the causative pathogen in 307 human cases of influenza in the United States. A(H3N2)v contains the matrix gene from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus, while its other genes originate from H3N2 viruses with triple-reassorted internal genes. In this study, we isolated three A(H3N2)v viruses from commercial pigs in Korea that showed similarities with published human A(H3N2)v viruses in eight segment sequence alignments. After genetic characterization, the pathogenicity of one of these viruses was assessed in pigs and mice. Infection of pigs with this novel virus resulted in mild interstitial pneumonia with marked oronasal shedding of viral RNA for about 14 days. In mice, the virus replicated efficiently in the lungs; viral RNA was detected up to 9 days post-inoculation. However, the virus did not cause severe disease or death in mice, despite the administration of a high infectious dose (10(5.2) TCID50). This study demonstrates that A(H3N2)v causes a high morbidity rate with low virulence; however, global monitoring of A(H3N2)v outbreaks in mammals will be needed to determine whether this novel subtype will shift to a highly pathogenic virus.

  9. Resistance to colistin: what is the fate for this antibiotic in pig production?

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Colistin, a cationic polypeptide antibiotic, has reappeared in human medicine as a last-line treatment option for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). Colistin is widely used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. GNB resistant to colistin owing to chromosomal mutations have already been reported both in human and veterinary medicine, however several recent studies have just identified a plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene encoding for colistin resistance in Escherichia coli colistin resistance. The discovery of a non-chromosomal mechanism of colistin resistance in E. coli has led to strong reactions in the scientific community and to concern among physicians and veterinarians. Colistin use in food animals and particularly in pig production has been singled out as responsible for the emergence of colistin resistance. The present review will focus mainly on the possible link between colistin use in pigs and the spread of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. First we demonstrate a possible link between Enterobacteriaceae resistance emergence and oral colistin pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and its administration modalities in pigs. We then discuss the potential impact of colistin use in pigs on public health with respect to resistance. We believe that colistin use in pig production should be re-evaluated and its dosing and usage optimised. Moreover, the search for competitive alternatives to using colistin with swine is of paramount importance to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections in human medicine.

  10. Itraconazole, a new triazole that is orally active in aspergillosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cutsem, J; Van Gerven, F; Van de Ven, M A; Borgers, M; Janssen, P A

    1984-01-01

    Itraconazole is a new orally active triazole derivative with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. This drug is effective in experimental aspergillosis and possesses in vitro activity against various species and strains of Aspergillus. Morphological destruction of inoculated hyphae and complete inhibition of hyphal outgrowth in culture is obtained from 0.07 micrograms ml-1 (10(-7)M) onward. These properties make itraconazole a likely candidate for clinical evaluation in disseminated aspergillosis. Images PMID:6097167

  11. Apoptosis in lymph nodes and changes in lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of pigs infected with porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ropón, A; Hernández-Jauregui, P; Sánchez-Torres, L; Favila-Castillo, L; Estrada-Parra, S; Moreno-López, J; Kennedy, S

    2003-01-01

    In a first experiment, five pigs were inoculated intranasally with porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) at 5 days of age and killed 7 days post-infection (pi). In a second experiment, four pigs were infected with the same virus at 17 days of age and killed at 9 or 15 days pi. Control piglets in each experiment received uninfected cell culture supernate. All PoRV-infected pigs developed respiratory and nervous signs, and histological lesions of non-suppurative encephalitis and interstitial pneumonia. All control pigs remained clinically normal and did not have histological lesions. Significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) in tonsil and lymph nodes of the pigs infected at 7 days of age and killed at 7 days pi. Significantly increased percentages of CD2(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were also found in peripheral blood of these animals at this time, while the percentages of CD4(+) and MHC class II lymphocytes were significantly reduced. Significantly increased numbers of apoptotic cells were detected in lymphoid tissues of the pigs infected at 17 days of age and killed at 9 days pi. The percentages of CD2(+), CD8(+) and MHC class II lymphocytes in peripheral blood were also significantly increased at this time; the percentage of MHC class II lymphocytes remained elevated at 15 days pi. These results indicate that induction of apoptosis is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of PoRV infection in young pigs, and that this virus induces changes in lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood.

  12. Fermented liquid feed for pigs.

    PubMed

    Missotten, Joris A M; Michiels, Joris; Ovyn, Anneke; De Smet, Stefaan; Dierick, Noël A

    2010-12-01

    Since the announcement of the ban on the use of antibiotics as antimicrobial growth promoters in the feed of pigs in 2006 the investigation towards alternative feed additives has augmented considerably. Although fermented liquid feed is not an additive, but a feeding strategy, the experimental work examining its possible advantages also saw a rise. The use of fermented liquid feed (FLF) has two main advantages, namely that the simultaneous provision of feed and water may result in an alleviation of the transition from the sow milk to solid feed and may also reduce the time spent to find both sources of nutrients, and secondly, that offering FLF with a low pH may strengthen the potential of the stomach as a first line of defence against possible pathogenic infections. Because of these two advantages, FLF is often stated as an ideal feed for weaned piglets. The results obtained so far are rather variable, but in general they show a better body weight gain and worse feed/gain ratio for the piglets. However, for growing-finishing pigs on average a better feed/gain ratio is found compared to pigs fed dry feed. This better performance is mostly associated with less harmful microbiota and better gut morphology. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of FLF for pigs,dealing with the FLF itself as well as its effect on the gastrointestinal tract and animal performance.

  13. Alteration of the Microbiota and Virulence Gene Expression in E. coli O157:H7 in Pig Ligated Intestine with and without AE Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Feng, Yanni; Ying, Xin; Gong, Joshua; Gyles, Carlton L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously we found that E. coli O157:H7 inoculated into ligated pig intestine formed attaching and effacing (AE) lesions in some pigs but not in others. The present study evaluated changes in the microbial community and in virulence gene expression in E. coli O157:H7 in ligated pig intestine in which the bacteria formed AE lesions or failed to form AE lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The intestinal microbiota was assessed by RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The DGGE banding patterns showed distinct differences involving two bands which had increased intensity specifically in AE-negative pigs (AE- bands) and several bands which were more abundant in AE-positive pigs. Sequence analysis revealed that the two AE- bands belonged to Veillonella caviae, a species with probiotic properties, and Bacteroides sp. Concurrent with the differences in microbiota, gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR showed that, compared with AE negative pigs, E. coli O157:H7 in AE positive pigs had upregulated genes for putative adhesins, non-LEE encoded nleA and quorum sensing qseF, acid resistance gene ureD, and genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrated that AE-positive pigs had reduced activities or populations of Veillonella caviae and Bacterioides sp. compared with AE-negative pigs. Further studies are required to understand how the microbiota was changed and the role of these organisms in the control of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26090813

  14. Experimental Inoculation of Egyptian Rousette Bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) with Viruses of the Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Genera.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan E B; Schuh, Amy J; Amman, Brian R; Sealy, Tara K; Zaki, Sherif R; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S

    2015-06-25

    The Egyptian rousette bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) is a natural reservoir for marburgviruses and a consistent source of virus spillover to humans. Cumulative evidence suggests various bat species may also transmit ebolaviruses. We investigated the susceptibility of Egyptian rousettes to each of the five known ebolaviruses (Sudan, Ebola, Bundibugyo, Taï Forest, and Reston), and compared findings with Marburg virus. In a pilot study, groups of four juvenile bats were inoculated with one of the ebolaviruses or Marburg virus. In ebolavirus groups, viral RNA tissue distribution was limited, and no bat became viremic. Sudan viral RNA was slightly more widespread, spurring a second, 15-day Sudan virus serial euthanasia study. Low levels of Sudan viral RNA disseminated to multiple tissues at early time points, but there was no viremia or shedding. In contrast, Marburg virus RNA was widely disseminated, with viremia, oral and rectal shedding, and antigen in spleen and liver. This is the first experimental infection study comparing tissue tropism, viral shedding, and clinical and pathologic effects of six different filoviruses in the Egyptian rousette, a known marburgvirus reservoir. Our results suggest Egyptian rousettes are unlikely sources for ebolaviruses in nature, and support a possible single filovirus-single reservoir host relationship.

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  16. Antiparasitic efficacy of a novel plant-based functional food using an Ascaris suum model in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R M; Storey, B E; Vidyashankar, A N; Bissinger, B W; Mitchell, S M; Howell, S B; Mason, M E; Lee, M D; Pedroso, A A; Akashe, A; Skrypec, D J

    2014-11-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the most prevalent soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection of human beings worldwide. Chemotherapy with synthetic anthelmintics such as albendazole, mebendazole, and pyrantel pamoate is the current method of treatment; however, the emergence of anthelmintic resistance could substantially decrease the efficacy of such treatments and the sustainability of STH control programs. Additionally, benzimidazoles are not recommended for pregnant women or children under age one. A blinded, controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of two microencapsulated, plant-based essential oil blends, TTN1013 (α-pinene, linalyl acetate, p-cymene, and thymol octanoate) and TTN1014 (α-pinene, linalyl acetate, p-cymene, and thymol acetate) as functional foods against Ascaris suum infection in pigs, an important pathogen that closely resembles human infections with A. lumbricoides. Four groups of 16 female, 21-24 day old, Yorkshire-cross pigs were treated daily with 0.5 or 1.0mg/kg TTN1013, 1.0mg/kg TTN1014, or 1.0mg/kg equivalent of empty capsules, delivered inside a cream-filled sandwich cookie for 14 weeks. Three days after the initiation of daily treatments, pigs were inoculated daily with A. suum eggs for four weeks. Pigs were weighed weekly and fecal egg counts (FEC) were conducted weekly starting five weeks after initial inoculation with A. suum eggs. Fourteen weeks after first infection with eggs, pigs were necropsied and worms were recovered, counted and separated according to sex. TTN1013 administered daily at a dose of 1.0mg/kg yielded a statistically significant reduction in total worm counts (76.8%), female worm counts (75.5%), FEC (68.6%), and worm volume (62.9%) when compared to control group. Reduction of total and female worm numbers and FEC were not significant for TTN1014 or at the 0.5mg/kg dose of TTN1013. All treatments were well-tolerated by all pigs and did not cause any adverse reactions. All pigs remained clinically normal

  17. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated eggshells.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Maike; Wiacek, Claudia; Koethe, Martin; Braun, Peggy G

    2017-03-20

    Contamination of eggshells with Salmonella Enteritidis remains a food safety concern. In many cases human salmonellosis within the EU can be traced back to raw or undercooked eggs and egg products. Atmospheric pressure plasma is a novel decontamination method that can reduce a wide range of pathogens. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using an effective short time cold plasma treatment to inactivate Salmonella Enteritidis on the eggshell. Therefore, artificially contaminated eggshells were treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet under different experimental settings with various exposure times (15-300s), distances from the plasma jet nozzle to the eggshell surface (5, 8 or 12mm), feed gas compositions (Ar, Ar with 0.2, 0.5 or 1.0% O2), gas flow rates (5 and 7slm) and different inoculations of Salmonella Enteritidis (10(1)-10(6)CFU/cm(2)). Atmospheric pressure plasma could reduce Salmonella Enteritidis on eggshells significantly. Reduction factors ranged between 0.22 and 2.27 log CFU (colony-forming units). Exposure time and, particularly at 10(4)CFU/cm(2) inoculation, feed gas had a major impact on Salmonella reduction. Precisely, longer exposure times led to higher reductions and Ar as feed gas was more effective than ArO2 mixtures.

  18. Comparative volatile profiles in soy sauce according to inoculated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Sang Mi; Choi, Yong Ho; Hurh, Byung Serk; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    We compared the volatile profiles in soy sauce according to inoculation with Tetragenococcus halophilus and/or Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Totals of 107 and 81 volatiles were respectively identified by using solid-phase microextraction and solvent extraction. The various volatile compounds identified included acids, aldehydes, esters, ketones, furans and furan derivatives, and phenols. The major volatiles in the samples treated with T. halophilus were acetic acid, formic acid, benzaldehyde, methyl acetate, ethyl 2-hydroxypropanoate, 2-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, while those in the samples inoculated with Z. rouxii were mainly ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl propanoate, 2/3-methylbutanol, 1-butanol, 2-phenylethanol, ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, and 4-hydroxy-2-ethyl-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone. The results indicate that T. halophilus produced significant acid compounds and could affect the Z. rouxii activity, supporting the notion that yeasts and lactic acid bacteria respectively have different metabolic pathways of alcoholic fermentation and lactic acid fermentation, and produce different dominant volatile compounds in soy sauce.

  19. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways. PMID:23453730

  20. Probiotics and colostrum/milk differentially affect neonatal humoral immune responses to oral rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak A; Siegismund, Christine; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-04-08

    Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model. Col/milk did not affect probiotic colonization in AttHRV vaccinated pigs. However, unvaccinated pigs fed col/milk shed higher numbers of probiotic bacteria in feces than non-col/milk fed colonized controls. In AttHRV vaccinated pigs, col/milk feeding with probiotic treatment resulted in higher mean serum IgA HRV antibody titers and intestinal IgA antibody secreting cell (ASC) numbers compared to col/milk fed, non-colonized vaccinated pigs. In vaccinated pigs without col/milk, probiotic colonization did not affect IgA HRV antibody titers, but serum IgG HRV antibody titers and gut IgG ASC numbers were lower, suggesting that certain probiotics differentially impact HRV vaccine responses. Our findings suggest that col/milk components (soluble mediators) affect initial probiotic colonization, and together, they modulate neonatal antibody responses to oral AttHRV vaccine in complex ways.

  1. Diets containing inulin but not lupins help to prevent swine dysentery in experimentally challenged pigs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, C F; Phillips, N D; La, T; Hernandez, A; Mansfield, J; Kim, J C; Mullan, B P; Hampson, D J; Pluske, J R

    2010-10-01

    Swine dysentery is a contagious mucohemorrhagic diarrheal disease caused by the intestinal spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae that colonizes and induces inflammation of the cecum and colon. It has been reported that a diet containing chicory root and sweet lupin can prevent swine dysentery. This experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that inulin in the chicory root rather than galactans in lupins was responsible for protective effects. An experiment with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was undertaken using pigs fed barley- and triticale-based diets, with the main effects being protein source [185 g/kg of canola meal (decreased galactans) or 220 g/kg of lupins (greater galactans)] and inulin supplementation (0 or 80 g/kg). Forty Large White × Landrace pigs weighing 21 ± 3 kg, with 10 pigs per diet, were allowed to adapt to the diets for 2 wk, and then each pig was challenged orally 4 times with a broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae on consecutive days. Pigs were killed when they showed clinical signs of dysentery or 6 wk postchallenge. Pigs fed diets without inulin had 8.3 times greater risk (P = 0.017) of developing swine dysentery and were 16 times more likely (P = 0.004) to have colon contents that were culture-positive for B. hyodysenteriae, compared with the pigs fed a diet with 80 g/kg of inulin. Diets containing lupins did not prevent pigs from developing clinical swine dysentery; however, inclusion of lupins or inulin or both in the diets delayed the onset of disease compared with the diet based mainly on canola meal (P < 0.05). Diet did not influence the total concentration of organic acids in the ileum, cecum, or upper and lower colon; however, the molar proportions of the organic acids were influenced (P < 0.05). Consequently the pH values in the cecum, and upper and lower colon were not influenced (P > 0.05) by diet. However the pH values of the ileal digesta were decreased in pigs fed the diet with both lupins and

  2. Pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and protective immunity against Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Juan J; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Alvarado, Gilberth; Taylor, Lizeth; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Hun, Laya; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Morales, Juan Alberto; Troyo, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' is a spotted fever group rickettsia that is not considered pathogenic, although there is serologic evidence of possible infection in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' in guinea pigs and determine its capacity to generate protective immunity against a subsequent infection with a local strain of Rickettsia rickettsii isolated from a human case. Six guinea pigs were inoculated with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' strain 9-CC-3-1 and two controls with cell culture medium. Health status was evaluated, and necropsies were executed at days 2, 4, and 13. Blood and tissues were processed by PCR to detect the gltA gene, and end titers of anti-'Candidatus R. amblyommii' IgG were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. To evaluate protective immunity, another 5 guinea pigs were infected with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' (IGPs). After 4 weeks, these 5 IGPs and 3 controls (CGPs) were inoculated with pathogenic R. rickettsii. Clinical signs and titers of anti-Rickettsia IgG were determined. IgG titers reached 1:512 at day 13 post-infection with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii'. On day 2 after inoculation, two guinea pigs had enlarged testicles and 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' DNA was detected in testicles. Histopathology confirmed piogranulomatous orchitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate in the epididymis. In the protective immunity assay, anti-Rickettsia IgG end titers after R. rickettsii infection were lower in IGPs than in CGPs. IGPs exhibited only transient fever, while CGP showed signs of severe disease and mortality. R. rickettsii was detected in testicles and blood of CGPs. Results show that the strain 9-CC-3-1 of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' was able to generate pathology and an antibody response in guinea pigs. Moreover, its capacity to generate protective immunity against R. rickettsii may modulate the epidemiology and severity of Rocky

  3. Embryonation and infectivity of Ascaris suum eggs isolated from worms expelled by pigs treated with albendazole , pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin or piperazine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Boes, J; Eriksen, L; Nansen, P

    1998-02-28

    The effect of anthelmintic treatment of pigs on the embryonation and infectivity of Ascaris suum eggs isolated from expelled worms was investigated. Four groups of two naturally infected pigs were dosed with albendazole, pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin or piperazine dihydrochloride, respectively. Following worm expulsion, the eggs were removed from the uteri of female worms and embryonated in sulphuric acid. The infectivity of the embryonated eggs was tested through mouse inoculation. Egg development appeared normal in cultures from worms of the piperazine. pyrantel and ivermectin treated groups. In the albendazole cultures, egg development was largely arrested at the one-cell stage (81%). Where development occurred, irregular cell division was observed and only 7% of the eggs in the culture developed into fullgrown larvae. Following mouse inoculation with 2500 embryonated eggs, significantly lower lung larval counts on day 8 post inoculation (p.i.) were observed for mice in the piperazine and pyrantel treated groups (P < 0.01) compared to untreated controls. The larvae that developed in the eggs from ivermectin and albendazole treated groups appeared fully infective for mice. It was concluded that ovicidal activity of albendazole in vivo inhibits subsequent A. suum egg development in vitro; albendazole is, therefore, not suitable to obtain worms for egg embryonation to produce experimental inoculums. The anthelmintic treatment of pigs with ivermectin had only a limited effect on both embryonation and infectivity of A. suum eggs isolated from expelled worms.

  4. Influence of Age and Dose of African Swine Fever Virus Infections on Clinical Outcome and Blood Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Post, Jacob; Weesendorp, Eefke; Montoya, Maria; Loeffen, Willie L

    African swine fever (ASF) is a fatal disease for domestic pigs, leading to serious economic losses in countries where ASF is endemic. Despite extensive research, efficient vaccines against ASF are lacking. Since peripheral blood cells are important mediators for vaccines, we study the impact of ASF on blood parameters in pigs with different ages and infected with different doses of ASF virus. Four different groups were studied: (1) 12 weeks of age/low virus dose; (2) 12 weeks of age/high virus dose; (3) 18 weeks of age/low virus dose; and (4) 18 weeks of age/high virus dose. By varying in age and/or ASFV inoculation dose, we monitor blood parameters during different degrees of disease. Thirty percent of the pigs survived the infection with a moderately virulent strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). Animals that did survive infection were generally older, independent from the inoculation dose used. A firm reduction in many different cell types at 3-5 days postinfection (DPI) was accompanied by an increase in body temperature, followed by clinical signs and mortality from day 6 PI. While blood parameters generally normalized in survivors, γδ T cells and IL-10 levels could be related to mortality. These conclusions should be considered in new approaches for protection against ASF.

  5. Isolation and maintenance of Balantidium coli (Malmsteim, 1857) cultured from fecal samples of pigs and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alynne da Silva; Bastos, Otilio Machado Pereira; Uchôa, Claudia M Antunes; Pissinatti, Alcides; Ferreira Filho, Paulo Ricardo; Dib, Lais Verdan; Azevedo, Eduarda Peixoto; de Siqueira, Mayara Perlingeiro; Cardozo, Matheus Lessa; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2015-06-15

    Balantidium coli is a protozoa that can determine dysentery in humans, pigs and non-human primates having zoonotic potential. The lack of standardization in isolation and maintenance hinders the development of research on its biology and epidemiology. This study is aimed to standardize the isolation and maintenance of this parasite from animal feces, in culture medium, Pavlova modified. From 2012 to 2014, 1905 fecal samples were collected from captive animals of Rio de Janeiro. Were selected for isolation samples with a minimum of 10 trophozoites and/or 30 cysts of B. coli, totaling 88 pigs, 26 Cynomolgus and 90 rhesus macaques. In the presence of cysts, the sample was homogenized in saline solution, 500 μL was removed and inoculated into culture medium. The material that contained trophozoites the inoculum was made from 240 μL of fecal solution. All inoculate tubes with the subcultures were kept at 36°C, and sterile rice starch was always added to the medium. The parasites isolate from pigs, 34%, and from Cynomolgus 38.4% were maintained in vitro for a period of more than 24 months. These procedures proved to be adequate for isolation and maintenance of B. coli from different animals, they were found to be inexpensive and easy to perform.

  6. Pigs taking wing with transposons and recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Karl J; Carlson, Daniel F; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2007-01-01

    Swine production has been an important part of our lives since the late Mesolithic or early Neolithic periods, and ranks number one in world meat production. Pig production also contributes to high-value-added medical markets in the form of pharmaceuticals, heart valves, and surgical materials. Genetic engineering, including the addition of exogenous genetic material or manipulation of the endogenous genome, holds great promise for changing pig phenotypes for agricultural and medical applications. Although the first transgenic pigs were described in 1985, poor survival of manipulated embryos; inefficiencies in the integration, transmission, and expression of transgenes; and expensive husbandry costs have impeded the widespread application of pig genetic engineering. Sequencing of the pig genome and advances in reproductive technologies have rejuvenated efforts to apply transgenesis to swine. Pigs provide a compelling new resource for the directed production of pharmaceutical proteins and the provision of cells, vascular grafts, and organs for xenotransplantation. Additionally, given remarkable similarities in the physiology and size of people and pigs, swine will increasingly provide large animal models of human disease where rodent models are insufficient. We review the challenges facing pig transgenesis and discuss the utility of transposases and recombinases for enhancing the success and sophistication of pig genetic engineering. 'The paradise of my fancy is one where pigs have wings.' (GK Chesterton). PMID:18047690

  7. A Simple Model for Learning Improvement: Weigh Pig, Feed Pig, Weigh Pig. Occasional Paper #23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Keston H.; Good, Megan R.; Coleman, Chris M.; Smith, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    Assessing learning does not by itself result in increased student accomplishment, much like a pig never fattened up because it was weighed. Indeed, recent research shows that while institutions are more regularly engaging in assessment, they have little to show in the way of stronger student performance. This paper clarifies how assessment results…

  8. Beginning reading intervention as inoculation or insulin: first-grade reading performance of strong responders to kindergarten intervention.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Michael D; Kame'enui, Edward J; Simmons, Deborah C; Harn, Beth A

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the first-grade reading progress of children who participated in an intensive beginning reading intervention in kindergarten. Specifically, the study investigated whether kindergarten intervention could prevent first-grade reading difficulties, or produce an "inoculation" effect, for some children under certain instructional conditions. Participants included children at risk for developing reading difficulties who received a 7-month beginning reading intervention in kindergarten. In October of first grade, 59 children who had achieved criterion levels on measures of phonological awareness and alphabetic knowledge were randomly assigned to one of two types of first-grade reading instruction: (a) code-based classroom instruction and a supplemental maintenance intervention, or (b) only code-based classroom instruction. February posttest measures assessed oral reading fluency, word reading, nonword reading, and comprehension. Between-group analyses indicated that instructional groups did not differ on any posttest measure. The students' absolute levels of achievement were compared to national and local normative samples. These results indicated that between 75% and 100% of students in both conditions attained posttest levels and demonstrated growth comparable to their average-achieving peers. These results support the hypothesis that strong responders to kindergarten intervention can experience an inoculation effect through the middle of first grade with research-validated classroom reading instruction.

  9. Lymphatic Dissemination of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus after Penile Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Dutra, Joseph; Fritts, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is primarily transmitted by heterosexual contact, and approximately equal numbers of men and women worldwide are infected with the virus. Understanding the biology of HIV acquisition and dissemination in men exposed to the virus by insertive penile intercourse is likely to help with the rational design of vaccines that can limit or prevent HIV transmission. To characterize the target cells and dissemination pathways involved in establishing systemic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, we necropsied male rhesus macaques at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days after penile SIV inoculation and quantified the levels of unspliced SIV RNA and spliced SIV RNA in tissue lysates and the number of SIV RNA-positive cells in tissue sections. We found that penile (glans, foreskin, coronal sulcus) T cells and, to a lesser extent, macrophages and dendritic cells are primary targets of infection and that SIV rapidly reaches the regional lymph nodes. At 7 days after inoculation, SIV had disseminated to the blood, systemic lymph nodes, and mucosal lymphoid tissues. Further, at 7 days postinoculation (p.i.), spliced SIV RNA levels were the highest in the genital lymph nodes, indicating that this is the site where the infection is initially amplified. By 14 days p.i., spliced SIV RNA levels were high in all tissues, but they were the highest in the gastrointestinal tract, indicating that the primary site of virus replication had shifted from the genital lymph nodes to the gut. The stepwise pattern of virus replication and dissemination described here suggests that vaccine-elicited immune responses in the genital lymph nodes could help prevent infection after penile SIV challenge. IMPORTANCE To be the most effective, vaccines should produce antiviral immune responses in the anatomic sites of virus replication. Thus, understanding the path taken by HIV from the mucosal surfaces, which are the site of virus exposure, to the deeper tissues where

  10. Dry Transfer Inoculation of Low-Moisture Spices Containing Antimicrobial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Ian M; Hu, Chuxuan; Grasso-Kelley, Elizabeth M; Ye, Peiran; Anderson, Nathan M; Keller, Susanne E

    2017-02-01

    Inoculation of a food product for use in subsequent validation studies typically makes use of a high concentration cocktail of microorganisms suspended in aqueous media. However, this inoculation method may prove difficult particularly when the food product is a low-moisture food containing antimicrobial compounds, such as some dried spices. In this study, a dry transfer method for inoculation of clove powder, oregano leaves, ginger powder, and ground black pepper with a five-serovar cocktail of Salmonella was developed and compared with a traditional aqueous inoculation procedure. Spices were inoculated at three levels, 10, 8, and 6 log CFU/g, by using both an aqueous suspension of Salmonella and a dry transfer of Salmonella from previously inoculated silica beads. At the highest inoculation level, the dry transfer method resulted in a significantly higher microbial load (P < 0.05) for ground cloves and oregano, but not for ginger and ground black pepper. At the intermediate inoculation level, differences were apparent only for ginger and black pepper. Inoculation levels of 6 log CFU/g resulted in recoveries below detection limits for both methods of inoculation. Additional examination on the survival of Salmonella on silica beads after inoculation and in clove powder after dry transfer from silica beads showed linear rates of decline, with a rate of -0.011 log CFU/g/day for beads and -0.015 log CFU/g/day for clove powder. The results suggest that dry transfer of Salmonella via inoculated silica beads is a viable alternative when traditional aqueous inoculation is not feasible.

  11. Detecting mitochondrial signatures of selection in wild Tibetan pigs and domesticated pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Jin, Long; Ma, Jideng; Tian, Shilin; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Selection in genomic regions is prevalent in mammals; however, the effects of selection on the mitogenome are not clearly understood. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from six wild Tibetan pigs from the Tibetan plateau and four domestic pig breeds from the lowland of neighboring southwest China. Nucleotide diversity analysis using the sliding window method showed that the nucleotide diversity of wild Tibetan pigs in most regions of the mitogenome was higher than that of domestic pigs. The 12 s ribosomal RNA showed relatively lower nucleotide diversity in Tibetan pigs, suggesting purifying selection of these genes during high-altitude adaptation. More non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions in the ATP6 were found in wild Tibetan pigs, indicating adaptive selection in Tibetan pigs. The results suggested distinct impacts of natural selection and artificial selection upon the mitogenome, especially the mitochondrial signatures of adaptive evolution in wild Tibetan pigs under natural selection.

  12. Feeding NOD mice with pig splenocytes induces transferable mechanisms that modulate cellular and humoral xenogeneic reactions against pig spleen or islet cells

    PubMed Central

    YOU, S; GOUIN, E; SAÏ, P

    2002-01-01

    We have reported previously that oral administration of pig cells to NOD mice modified xenogeneic cellular response against pig islet cells (PICs), and hypothesized that it may have induced active suppression. This preliminary report evaluated only the effect of feeding pig cells by ‘primary’ proliferation, i.e. when splenocytes from fed mice are confronted with pig cells in vitro. The present study also considered ‘secondary’ proliferation and cytokine production after feeding and subsequent in vivo graft of pig cells. Additionally, serum IgM and IgG isotypes were quantified by ELISA using pig target cells. Induction of active mechanism by feeding was hypothetical, which led us here to transfer splenocytes from mice fed pig spleen cells (PSC) and evaluate ‘primary’ (after transfer) and ‘secondary’ (after transfer and subsequent graft of pig cells) proliferations and cytokine secretions in recipient mice. We also determined whether the effects of feeding pig cells persisted after depression of suppressor mechanisms by cyclophosphamide. Mice fed with PSC displayed increased ‘primary’ splenocyte proliferation to PSC or PIC (P < 0·0001), while ‘secondary’ responses were decreased (P < 0·03) in those fed PSC and subsequently grafted with PSC. The increased ‘primary’ and decreased ‘secondary’ proliferations were reduced (P < 0·04) by pretreatment with cyclophosphamide. The IL-10/ and IL-4/IFNγ ratios produced in response to PSC increased (P < 0·04) in mice fed and grafted with PSC compared to those grafted only with PSC. IgM and IgG levels against pig cells were, respectively, increased (P < 0·04) and decreased (P < 0·04) in mice fed and grafted with PSC. IgG2a and IgG2b, but not IgG1, levels were lower (P < 0·01). These effects of feeding PSC on ‘secondary’ proliferation, cytokine and antibody productions, were not detected when mice were fed PSC only after graft with PSC. Transfer with splenocytes from mice fed PSC increased

  13. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  14. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current study was designed to compare experimental oral and intraperitoneal inoculation on early host immune responses to MAP infection. Blood samples were obtained on d -5 and -4, 7, 14, 21, 28, and monthly thereafter for the 12 month term of the study. Isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear...

  15. Analysis of the temperature sensitivity of Japanese rubella vaccine strain TO-336.vac and its effect on immunogenicity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kiyoko; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    The marker of Japanese domestic rubella vaccines is their lack of immunogenicity in guinea pigs. This has long been thought to be related to the temperature sensitivity of the viruses, but supporting evidence has not been described. In this study, we generated infectious clones of TO-336.vac, a Japanese domestic vaccine, TO-336.GMK5, the parental virus of TO-336.vac, and their mutants, and determined the molecular bases of their temperature sensitivity and immunogenicity in guinea pigs. The results revealed that Ser(1159) in the non-structural protein-coding region was responsible for the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac dominantly, while the structural protein-coding region affected the temperature sensitivity subordinately. The findings further suggested that the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac affected the antibody induction in guinea pigs after subcutaneous inoculation.

  16. Inoculation and scoring methods for rice sheath blight disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Liu, Guangjie; Park, Dong-Soo; Yang, Yinong

    2013-01-01

    Sheath blight disease of rice caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani has been a major disease of rice with a serious threat to stable rice production worldwide. Although various cultural practices have been used to manage the disease, it is advantageous and important to screen rice germplasm and identify resistant rice cultivars for more effective disease control. Recent advances in methods for the fungal inoculation and disease evaluation have enabled a better measurement of host resistance by minimizing confounding factors from plant architectures and environmental conditions. This chapter introduces five such methods: (1) detached leaf method; (2) micro-chamber method; (3) mist-chamber method; (4) parafilm sachet method; and (5) aluminum foil method. These methods are useful for screening and evaluating disease reactions of rice germplasm and facilitating the genetic mapping of disease resistance genes.

  17. Decomposition Rate and Pattern in Hanging Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Aird, Jeanne; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-09-01

    Accurate prediction of the postmortem interval requires an understanding of the decomposition process and the factors acting upon it. A controlled experiment, over 60 days at an outdoor site in the northwest of England, used 20 freshly killed pigs (Sus scrofa) as human analogues to study decomposition rate and pattern. Ten pigs were hung off the ground and ten placed on the surface. Observed differences in the decomposition pattern required a new decomposition scoring scale to be produced for the hanging pigs to enable comparisons with the surface pigs. The difference in the rate of decomposition between hanging and surface pigs was statistically significant (p=0.001). Hanging pigs reached advanced decomposition stages sooner, but lagged behind during the early stages. This delay is believed to result from lower variety and quantity of insects, due to restricted beetle access to the aerial carcass, and/or writhing maggots falling from the carcass.

  18. [Prevention of oral diseases].

    PubMed

    Vodanović, Marin

    2013-06-01

    Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. Ever more people are affected with oral diseases. Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral diseases and they can be prevented. Oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programs should be incorporated in national health strategies. Inability to understand health information can be a profound disadvantage to patients when asked to take responsibility for their health. Increasing the level of oral health literacy and improvement of communication between patients and dentists by avoiding the usage of professional dental terminology should be included in each oral prevention program.

  19. Oxidation of methane in biotrickling filters inoculated with methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Manuel; Dorado, Antonio D; Gentina, Juan C; Aroca, Germán

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of methane (CH4) using biofilters has been proposed as an alternative to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions with a low concentration of CH4 that cannot be used as a source of energy. However, conventional biofilters utilize organic packing materials that have a short lifespan, clogging problems, and are commonly inoculated with non-specific microorganisms leading to unpredictable CH4 elimination capacities (EC) and removal efficiencies (RE). The main objective of this work was to characterize the oxidation of CH4 in two biotrickling filters (BTFs) packed with polyethylene rings and inoculated with two methanotrophic bacteria, Methylomicrobium album and Methylocystis sp., in order to determine EC and CO2 production (pCO2) when using a specific inoculum. The repeatability of the results in both BTFs was determined when they operated at the same inlet load of CH4. A dynamic mathematical model that describes the CH4 abatement in the BTFs was developed and validated using mass transfer and kinetic parameters estimated independently. The results showed that EC and pCO2 of the BTFs are not identical but very similar for all the conditions tested. The use of specific inoculum has shown a faster startup and higher EC per unit area (0.019 gCH4 m(-2) h(-1)) in comparison to most of the previous studies at the same CH4 load rate (23.2 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1)). Global mass balance showed that the maximum reduction of CO2 equivalents was 98.5 gCO2eq m(-3) h(-1). The developed model satisfactorily described CH4 abatement in BTFs for a wide range of conditions.

  20. Growth performance and gastrointestinal microbial ecology responses of piglets receiving Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products after an oral challenge with Escherichia coli (K88).

    PubMed

    Kiarie, E; Bhandari, S; Scott, M; Krause, D O; Nyachoti, C M

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products (YFP) on growth performance and gastrointestinal (GIT) microbial ecology in 90 weanling pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli K88(+) (ETEC) were investigated. The YFP were an original YFP product (XPC) and a water-suspendable yeast fermentation prototype (WSYFP) from a commercial company. Treatments consisted of a negative control (NC, no in-feed or in-water additive), carbadox (AB, 55 mg of carbadox/kg of feed), XPC (in feed, 0.2%), and WSYFP (in water, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/pig per day), and each was allotted to 5 pens (3 pigs/pen). The diets met the 1998 NRC specifications. Pigs were acclimated to treatments for a 7-d period before an ETEC challenge. On d 8, blood was collected from pigs to determine the baseline packed cell volume (PCV) measurement, and pigs were orally challenged with ETEC. At various time points postchallenge, blood samples were taken, performance measures and fecal consistency scores were recorded, and gut digesta and tissue samples were taken to evaluate GIT morphology, microbial ecology, and metabolites. Preplanned contrasts were used for comparison. Pigs receiving YFP had greater ADFI than NC pigs on d 3 (424 vs. 378 g/d; P = 0.01) and d 7 (506 vs. 458 g/d; P = 0.03) postchallenge. This effect of YFP on ADFI was similar to that of AB on d 3, but pigs receiving AB ate more (576 vs. 506 g/d; P = 0.03) at d 7 than pigs receiving YFP. Pigs exhibited reduced (P < 0.001) PCV upon ETEC challenge; however, pigs receiving additives sustained a greater (P < 0.05) PCV at 72 h compared with the NC group. Compared with the NC pigs, pigs receiving YFP showed a smaller (P < 0.05) number of ileal mucosa adherent ETEC and prevalence of the order Enterobacteriales in the ileal digesta, which corresponded to less (5.09 vs. 6.97 mg/dL; P = 0.03) colonic ammonia on d 7 postchallenge. Most of the indices for ileal digesta bacterial richness and diversity were greater (P < 0.01) for YFP pigs compared

  1. Identification of Rhizobium spp. in peat-based inoculants by DNA hybridization and PCR and its application in inoculant quality control.

    PubMed Central

    Tas, E; Saano, A; Leinonen, P; Lindström, K

    1995-01-01

    Procedures based on DNA hybridization and PCR were developed for quality control of Rhizobium inoculants. Inoculants for pea and goat's rue were produced by Elomestari Ltd., Juva, Finland, in sterile dry fine peat by the standard procedure used by the company. The inoculants contained Rhizobium galegae HAMBI 1174 and HAMBI 1207 and an R. leguminosarum biovar vicia strain, 16HSA, either solely or in combinations of two or three strains. DNA was isolated from 1-g samples of each peat inoculant and analyzed by nonradioactive DNA-DNA hybridization and by PCR. The hybridization probes were total DNAs from pure cultures of R. galegae HAMBI 1207 and R. leguminosarum biovar viciae 16HSA and a 264-bp strain-specific fragment from the genome of R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The total DNA probes distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae or R. leguminosarum, and the strain-specific probe distinguished inoculants containing R. galegae HAMBI 1174. The hybridization results for R. galegae were verified in a PCR experiment by amplifying an R. galegae species-specific fragment and an R. galegae HAMBI 1174 strain-specific fragment in the same reaction. When suitable probes and primers are available, the methods described here offer promising alternatives for the quality control of peat-based inoculants. PMID:7646020

  2. Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu; De Hert, Karl; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2015-09-24

    Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

  3. Molecular studies on pig cryptosporidiosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Rzeżutka, A; Kaupke, A; Kozyra, I; Pejsak, Z

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium intestinal parasites have been detected in farmed pigs worldwide. Infections are usually asymptomatic with a low number of oocysts shed in pig feces. This makes the recognition of infection difficult or unsuccessful when microscopic methods are used. The aim of this study was molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in pig herds raised in Poland with regard to the occurrence of zoonotic species. In total, 166 pig fecal samples were tested. The examined pigs were aged 1 to 20 weeks. Overall, 39 pig farms were monitored for parasite presence. The detection and identification of Cryptosporidium DNA was performed on the basis of PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequence analysis of the amplified 18 SSU rRNA and COWP gene fragments. Infected animals were housed in 21 (53.8%) of the pig farms monitored. The presence of Cryptosporidum was confirmed in 46 (27.7%) samples of pig feces. Among positive fecal samples, 34 (29.3%) were collected from healthy animals, and 12 (24%) from diarrheic pigs. Most infected animals (42.1%) were 2 to 3 months old. The following parasite species were detected: C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum. Indeed, asymptomatic infections caused by C. scrofarum were observed in the majority of the herds. Mixed infections caused by C. suis and C. scrofarum were not common; however, they were observed in 8.6% of the positive animals. C. parvum DNA was found only in one sample collected from a diarrheic pig. The application of molecular diagnostic tools allowed for detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species in pigs. The sporadic findings of C. parvum are subsequent evidence for the contribution of pigs in the transmission of cryptosporidiosis from animals to humans.

  4. The roles of inoculants' carbon source use in the biocontrol of potato scab disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Zhao, Xinbei; Shangguan, Nini; Chang, Dongwei; Ma, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Despite the application of multiple strains in the biocontrol of plant diseases, multistrain inoculation is still constrained by its inconsistency in the field. Nutrients, especially carbons, play an important role in the biocontrol processes. However, little work has been done on the systematic estimation of inoculants' carbon source use on biocontrol efficacies in vivo. In the present study, 7 nonpathogenic Streptomyces strains alone and in different combinations were inoculated as biocontrol agents against the potato scab disease, under field conditions and greenhouse treatments. The influence of the inoculants' carbon source use properties on biocontrol efficacies was investigated. The results showed that increasing the number of inoculated strains did not necessarily result in greater biocontrol efficacy in vivo. However, single strains with higher growth rates or multiple strains with less carbon source competition had positive effects on the biocontrol efficacies. These findings may shed light on optimizing the consistent biocontrol of plant disease with the consideration of inoculants' carbon source use properties.

  5. Growth response of Pinus densiflora seedlings inoculated with three indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi in combination.

    PubMed

    Dalong, M; Luhe, W; Guoting, Y; Liqiang, M; Chun, L

    2011-07-01

    Pinus densiflora seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi (Cenococcum geophilum, Rhizopogon roseolus and Russula densifolia) in single-, two-, and three-species treatments. After 8 months, the colonization rates of each ectomycorrhizal species, seedling growth and the nutrition were assessed in each treatment. P. densiflora seedlings inoculated with different ECM species composition showed an increase in height and basal diameter and improved seedling root and shoot nutrition concentrations compared to control treatment. Generally, combined inoculation had a more positive influence on the seedlings than the single inoculation. The three-species inoculation presented the highest growth and basal diameter and concentration of most nutrients except potassium. In conclusion, the results provided strong evidence for benefits of combined inoculation with the indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi on P. densiflora seedlings under controlled conditions.

  6. Growth response of maize plantlets inoculated with Enterobacter spp., as a model for alternative agriculture.

    PubMed

    Morales-García, Yolanda E; Juárez-Hernández, Dalia; Aragón-Hernández, Celia; Mascarua-Esparza, Miguel A; Bustillos-Cristales, María R; Fuentes-Ramírez, Luis E; Martinez-Contreras, Rebeca D; Munoz-Rojas, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    A maize rhizosphere isolate was phenotypically and genotypically characterized and identified as Enterobacter spp. bacterium. Germinated seeds were inoculated, the plantlets were sown in vermiculite and in soil and grown under laboratory and field conditions, respectively. The adherence, colonization and plant growth promotion capability of Enterobacter sp. UAPS03001 was evaluated in "Rojo-Criollo" maize under laboratory conditions. Twenty days after inoculation, the treated plantlets showed larger biomass than non-inoculated ones. In field grown plants, the kernel biomass was also greater in inoculated than in non-inoculated plants. The inoculation of maize sprouts with plant growth- promoting bacteria before their sowing in the field would be an alternative practice for achieving successful yield in temporal agriculture.

  7. Experimental infection of pigs with the human 1918 pandemic influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Albrecht, Randy A; Lager, Kelly M; Babiuk, Shawn; Marszal, Peter; Neufeld, James; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Lekcharoensuk, Porntippa; Tumpey, Terrence M; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Richt, Jürgen A

    2009-05-01

    Swine influenza was first recognized as a disease entity during the 1918 "Spanish flu" pandemic. The aim of this work was to determine the virulence of a plasmid-derived human 1918 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (reconstructed 1918, or 1918/rec, virus) in swine using a plasmid-derived A/swine/Iowa/15/1930 H1N1 virus (1930/rec virus), representing the first isolated influenza virus, as a reference. Four-week-old piglets were inoculated intratracheally with either the 1930/rec or the 1918/rec virus or intranasally with the 1918/rec virus. A transient increase in temperature and mild respiratory signs developed postinoculation in all virus-inoculated groups. In contrast to other mammalian hosts (mice, ferrets, and macaques) where infection with the 1918/rec virus was lethal, the pigs did not develop severe respiratory distress or become moribund. Virus titers in the lower respiratory tract as well as macro- and microscopic lesions at 3 and 5 days postinfection (dpi) were comparable between the 1930/rec and 1918/rec virus-inoculated animals. In contrast to the 1930/rec virus-infected animals, at 7 dpi prominent lung lesions were present in only the 1918/rec virus-infected animals, and all the piglets developed antibodies at 7 dpi. Presented data support the hypothesis that the 1918 pandemic influenza virus was able to infect and replicate in swine, causing a respiratory disease, and that the virus was likely introduced into the pig population during the 1918 pandemic, resulting in the current lineage of the classical H1N1 swine influenza viruses.

  8. Genetically modified pig models for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Fan, Nana; Lai, Liangxue

    2013-02-20

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies. Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases, some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology. Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy, physiology, and genome. Thus, pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases. This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological, cardiovascular, and diabetic disorders. We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  9. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  10. Changes in gut microbial populations, intestinal morphology, expression of tight junction proteins, and cytokine production between two pig breeds after challenge with Escherichia coli K88: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y; Han, F; Huang, X; Rong, Y; Yi, H; Wang, Y

    2013-12-01

    This study hypothesized that the gut microbial populations, intestinal morphology, and cytokine production are differentially altered in 2 different pig breeds, namely, Chinese native Jinhua pigs and European Landrace pigs, after orally challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88. A total of 12 Jinhua pigs and 12 Landrace pigs were allocated to either the nonchallenged or the challenged groups (6 pigs per group). The challenged pigs were orally administered ETEC K88, and their nonchallenged counterparts were given sterile Luria-Bertani broth. Selected gut microbial populations, intestinal morphology, mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, and the levels of ileal cytokines and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) production were measured in Jinhua and Landrace pigs. The results showed that the challenged Jinhua pigs exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) lower incidence of diarrhea compared with their Landrace counterparts. The Escherichia coli (E.coli) population and the percentage of E. coli in the total bacteria population were increased in response to ETEC K88 challenge in both Jinhua and Landrace pigs. The challenged Landrace pigs shed more E. coli (P < 0.05) and had higher percentage of E. coli in the total bacteria population in the colon (P < 0.05) compared with their Jinhua counterparts. Both pig breeds tended to exhibit greater villous atrophy and crypt depth reduction in all of the intestinal segments with challenge. The expression of tight junction proteins decreased in response to ETEC K88 challenge in both pig breeds. The levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6 and the secretion of sIgA were positively altered whereas the levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were negatively altered by ETEC K88 challenge in both breeds. Jinhua pigs exhibited significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and TGF-β (P < 0.05) in the challenged group. Our

  11. Inoculated Titanium Aluminide Alloys and Their Predicted Propensity for Grain Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosslar, D.; Günther, R.

    2014-08-01

    This work centers on grain-size model calculations of titanium diboride-inoculated titanium aluminide-based alloys. The model uses the free-growth criterion of grain initiation after heterogeneous nucleation, which implies that grains initiate once their interfacial curvature reaches a maximum. The presented calculations identify quantitatively the influence of inoculation process parameters on the amount of achievable grain refinement. A benchmark test against experimental results allows a discussion of the grain size reduction efficiency of titanium-diboride inoculants.

  12. Analysis of 30 patients with acupuncture-induced primary inoculation tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangbo; Pan, Jingye; Jin, Keke; Liu, Cailong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Li; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis is a skin condition that develops at the site of inoculation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis-free individuals. This report describes the diagnosis, treatment and >1 year follow-up of 30 patients presenting with acupuncture-induced primary inoculation tuberculosis. Our data provide a deeper insight into this rare route of infection of tuberculosis. We also review effective treatment options.

  13. Comparative host specificity of human- and pig- associated Staphylococcus aureus clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Arshnee; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Nielsen, Søren S; McCarthy, Alex J; Lindsay, Jodi A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a crucial step in colonization of the skin. In this study, we investigated the differential adherence to human and pig corneocytes of six Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to three human-associated [ST8 (CC8), ST22 (CC22) and ST36(CC30)] and two pig-associated [ST398 (CC398) and ST433(CC30)] clonal lineages, and their colonization potential in the pig host was assessed by in vivo competition experiments. Corneocytes were collected from 11 humans and 21 pigs using D-squame® adhesive discs, and bacterial adherence to corneocytes was quantified by a standardized light microscopy assay. A previously described porcine colonization model was used to assess the potential of the six strains to colonize the pig host. Three pregnant, S. aureus-free sows were inoculated intravaginally shortly before farrowing with different strain mixes [mix 1) human and porcine ST398; mix 2) human ST36 and porcine ST433; and mix 3) human ST8, ST22, ST36 and porcine ST398] and the ability of individual strains to colonize the nasal cavity of newborn piglets was evaluated for 28 days after birth by strain-specific antibiotic selective culture. In the corneocyte assay, the pig-associated ST433 strain and the human-associated ST22 and ST36 strains showed significantly greater adhesion to porcine and human corneocytes, respectively (p<0.0001). In contrast, ST8 and ST398 did not display preferential host binding patterns. In the in vivo competition experiment, ST8 was a better colonizer compared to ST22, ST36, and ST433 prevailed over ST36 in colonizing the newborn piglets. These results are partly in agreement with previous genetic and epidemiological studies indicating the host specificity of ST22, ST36 and ST433 and the broad-host range of ST398. However, our in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed an unexpected ability of ST8 to adhere to porcine corneocytes and persist in the nasal cavity of pigs.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis and Functional Characterization of the Polyadenylation Site in Pigs Using RNAseq Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyang; Li, Rui; Zhou, Xiang; Xue, Liyao; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Bang

    2016-11-04

    Polyadenylation, a critical step in the production of mature mRNA for translation in most eukaryotes, involves cleavage and poly(A) tail addition at the 3' end of mRNAs at the polyadenylation site (PAS). Sometimes, one gene can have more than one PAS, which can produce the alternative polyadenylation (APA) phenomenon and affect the stability, localization and translation of the mRNA. In this study, we discovered 28,363 PASs using pig RNAseq data, with 13,033 located in 7,403 genes. Among the genes, 41% were identified to have more than one PAS. PAS distribution analysis indicated that the PAS position was highly variable in genes. Additionally, the analysis of RNAseq data from the liver and testis showed a difference in their PAS number and usage. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm our findings by detecting the expression of 3'UTR isoforms for five candidate genes. The analysis of RNAseq data under a different androstenone level and salmonella inoculation indicated that the functional usage of PAS might participate in the immune response and may be related to the androstenone level in pigs. This study provides new insights into pig PAS and facilitates further functional research of PAS.

  15. Predominant involvement of the cerebellum in guinea pigs infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Horiuchi, M; Yamakawa, Y; Sata, T

    2011-05-01

    This study reports the experimental transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to guinea pigs and describes the cerebellar lesions in these animals. Guinea pigs were inoculated intracerebrally with 10% brain homogenates from BSE-affected cattle. These animals were designated as the first passage. Second and third passages were subsequently performed. All guinea pigs developed infection at each passage. The mean incubation period of the first passage was 370 days post-infection (dpi) and this decreased to 307 dpi and 309 dpi for the second and third passages, respectively. Mild to severe spongiform degeneration and gliosis were observed in the cerebral cortex, thalamus and brainstem. In addition, the affected animals had marked pathological changes in the cerebellum characterized by severe cortical atrophy associated with Bergmann radial gliosis of the molecular layer and reduction in the width of the granular cell layer. Immunohistochemically, intense PrP(Sc) deposition and scattered plaque-like deposits were observed in the molecular and granular cell layers. Cerebellar lesions associated with severe atrophy of the cortex have not been reported in animal prion diseases, including in the experimental transmission of PrP(Sc) to small rodents. These lesions were similar to the lesions of human kuru or the VV2 variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, although typical kuru plaques or florid plaques were not observed in the affected animals.

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis and Functional Characterization of the Polyadenylation Site in Pigs Using RNAseq Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyang; Li, Rui; Zhou, Xiang; Xue, Liyao; Xu, Xuewen; Liu, Bang

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation, a critical step in the production of mature mRNA for translation in most eukaryotes, involves cleavage and poly(A) tail addition at the 3′ end of mRNAs at the polyadenylation site (PAS). Sometimes, one gene can have more than one PAS, which can produce the alternative polyadenylation (APA) phenomenon and affect the stability, localization and translation of the mRNA. In this study, we discovered 28,363 PASs using pig RNAseq data, with 13,033 located in 7,403 genes. Among the genes, 41% were identified to have more than one PAS. PAS distribution analysis indicated that the PAS position was highly variable in genes. Additionally, the analysis of RNAseq data from the liver and testis showed a difference in their PAS number and usage. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR were performed to confirm our findings by detecting the expression of 3′UTR isoforms for five candidate genes. The analysis of RNAseq data under a different androstenone level and salmonella inoculation indicated that the functional usage of PAS might participate in the immune response and may be related to the androstenone level in pigs. This study provides new insights into pig PAS and facilitates further functional research of PAS. PMID:27812017

  17. Impact of dietary betaine and conjugated linoleic acid on insulin sensitivity, protein and fat metabolism of obese pigs.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fígares, I; Lachica, M; Martín, A; Nieto, R; González-Valero, L; Rodríguez-López, J M; Aguilera, J F

    2012-07-01

    To determine possible mechanisms of action that might explain the nutrient partitioning effect of betaine and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in Iberian pigs and to address potential adverse effects, twenty gilts were restrictively fed from 20 to 50 kg BW Control, 0.5% betaine, 1% CLA or 0.5% betaine + 1% CLA diets. Serum hormones and metabolites profile were determined at 30 kg BW and an oral glucose test was performed before slaughter. Pigs were slaughtered at 50 kg BW and livers were obtained for chemical and histological analysis. Decreased serum urea in pigs fed betaine and betaine + CLA diets (11%; P = 0.0001) indicated a more efficient N utilization. The increase in serum triacylglycerol (58% and 28%, respectively; P = 0.0098) indicated that CLA and betaine + CLA could have reduced adipose tissue triacylglycerol synthesis from preformed fatty acids. Serum glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids were unaffected. CLA and betaine + CLA altered serum lipids profile, although liver of pigs fed CLA diet presented no histopathological changes and triglyceride content was not different from Control pigs. Compared with controls, serum growth hormone decreased (20% to 23%; P = 0.0209) for all treatments. Although serum insulin increased in CLA, and especially in betaine + CLA pigs (28% and 83%; P = 0.0001), indices of insulin resistance were unaffected. In conclusion, CLA, and especially betaine + CLA, induced changes in biochemical parameters and hormones that may partially explain a nutrient partitioning effect in young pigs. Nevertheless, they exhibited weak, although detrimental, effects on blood lipids. Moreover, although livers were chemically and histologically normal, pigs fed CLA diet challenged with a glucose load had higher serum glucose than controls.

  18. Carbon decomposition by inoculating Phanerochaete chrysosporium during drum composting of agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Ramu, Kamma; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation during drum composting of agricultural waste was performed at different composting stages. Three trials were carried out with (5:4:1) combination of vegetable waste, cattle manure, and sawdust along with 10 kg of dried leaves with a total mass of 100 kg in a 550 L rotary drum composter. Trial 1 was a control without inoculation of fungus, while trial 2 was inoculated during the initial day (0th day of composting), and trial 3 was inoculated after the thermophilic phase, i.e., on the 8th day of composting period. The inoculation of fungus increased the volatile solids reduction by 1.45-fold in trial 2 and 1.7-fold in trial 3 as compared to trial 1 without any fungal inoculation. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) was observed with 2.31, 2.62, and 2.59% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, at the end of 20 days of composting period. Hence, it can be concluded that inoculation of white-rot fungus increased the decomposition rate of agricultural waste within shorter time in drum composting. However, inoculation after the thermophilic phase was found more effective than inoculation during initial days of composting for producing more stabilized and nutrient-rich compost.

  19. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in mice after various routes of inoculation.

    PubMed Central

    Renis, H E; Eidson, E E; Mathews, J; Gray, J E

    1976-01-01

    The pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 was compared after inoculation of mice by different routes. Intravaginal inoculation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 produced a local infection, with virus recovery from the vagina through 5 days. Virus was recovered from the spinal cords 4 to 5 days after inoculation but not from liver, kidney, lung, spleen, or blood. Intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation of HSV-2 produced a focal necrotic hepatitis similar to that described previously (S. C. Mogenson, B. Teisner, and H.K. Andersen, 1974). The viral etiology of the liver lesions was confirmed by virus isolation (through 4 days) and electron microscopy. No evidence of infection of the kidney, lung, blood, or spleen was observed, although virus was isolated from spinal cord homogenates 7 days after inoculation. HSV-1 inoculation by the intraperitoneal or intravenous route resulted in virus isolation from the kidney during the 7-day harvest period, without producing overt pathological changes. Virus was isolated from spinal cord homogenates 2 to 3 days after HSV-1 inoculation but not from homogenates prepared from spleen, lung, or blood. Increases in serum transaminase activity were observed after systemic (intravenous) inoculation of HSV-2 but not after HSV-1 inoculation. Images PMID:184048

  20. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae): effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Zapata, José A; Orellana, Roger; Allen, Edith B

    2006-03-01

    Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual). Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm.

  1. Effects of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on maize grown in multi-metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chang-Cong; Li, Tao; Xiao, Yan-ping; Liu, Mao-Jun; Zhang, Han-Bo; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Pot culture experiments were established to determine the effects of colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus mosseae and G. sp) on maize (Zea mays L.) grown in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils. AMF and non-AMF inoculated maize were grown in sterilized substrates and subjected to different soil heavy metal (Pb, Zn, Cd) concentrations. The root and shoot biomasses of inoculated maize were significantly higher than those of non-inoculated maize. Pb, Zn, and Cd concentrations in roots were significantly higher than those in shoots in both the inoculated and non-inoculated maize, indicating the heavy metals mostly accumulated in the roots of maize. The translocation rates of Pb, Zn, and Cd from roots to shoots were not significantly difference between inoculated and non-inoculated maize. However, at high soil heavy metal concentrations, Pb, Zn, and Cd in the shoots and Pb in the roots of inoculated maize were significantly reduced by about 50% compared to the non-inoculated maize. These results indicated that AMF could promote maize growth and decrease the uptake of these heavy metals at higher soil concentrations, thus protecting their hosts from the toxicity of heavy metals in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils.

  2. Ultraviolet Light (UV) Inactivation of Porcine Parvovirus in Liquid Plasma and Effect of UV Irradiated Spray Dried Porcine Plasma on Performance of Weaned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Javier; Rodríguez, Carmen; Ródenas, Jesús; Russell, Louis E.; Campbell, Joy M.; Crenshaw, Joe D.; Torrallardona, David; Pujols, Joan

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultraviolet light irradiation (UV-C, 254 nm) process was designed as an additional safety feature for manufacturing of spray dried porcine plasma (SDPP). In Exp. 1, three 10-L batches of bovine plasma were inoculated with 105.2±0.12 tissue culture infectious dose 50 (TCID50) of porcine parvovirus (PPV) per mL of plasma and subjected to UV-C ranging from 0 to 9180 J/L. No viable PPV was detected in bovine plasma by micro-titer assay in SK6 cell culture after UV-C at 2295 J/L. In Exp. 2, porcine plasma was subjected to UV-C (3672 J/L), then spray dried and mixed in complete mash diets. Diets were a control without SDPP (Control), UV-C SDPP either at 3% (UVSDPP3) or 6% (UVSDPP6) and non-UV-C SDPP at 3% (SDPP3) or 6% (SDPP6). Diets were fed ad libitum to 320 weaned pigs (26 d of age; 16 pens/diet; 4 pigs/pen) for 14 d after weaning and a common diet was fed d 15 to 28. During d 0 to 14, pigs fed UVSDPP3, UVSDPP6, or SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control. During d 0 to 28, pigs fed UVSDPP3 and UVSDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control and SDPP3, and SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) feed intake than control. Also, pigs fed UVSDPP had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain than pigs fed SDPP. In conclusion, UV-C inactivated PPV in liquid plasma and UVSDPP used in pig feed had no detrimental effects on pig performance. PMID:26171968

  3. Ultraviolet Light (UV) Inactivation of Porcine Parvovirus in Liquid Plasma and Effect of UV Irradiated Spray Dried Porcine Plasma on Performance of Weaned Pigs.

    PubMed

    Polo, Javier; Rodríguez, Carmen; Ródenas, Jesús; Russell, Louis E; Campbell, Joy M; Crenshaw, Joe D; Torrallardona, David; Pujols, Joan

    2015-01-01

    A novel ultraviolet light irradiation (UV-C, 254 nm) process was designed as an additional safety feature for manufacturing of spray dried porcine plasma (SDPP). In Exp. 1, three 10-L batches of bovine plasma were inoculated with 10(5.2 ± 0.12) tissue culture infectious dose 50 (TCID50) of porcine parvovirus (PPV) per mL of plasma and subjected to UV-C ranging from 0 to 9180 J/L. No viable PPV was detected in bovine plasma by micro-titer assay in SK6 cell culture after UV-C at 2295 J/L. In Exp. 2, porcine plasma was subjected to UV-C (3672 J/L), then spray dried and mixed in complete mash diets. Diets were a control without SDPP (Control), UV-C SDPP either at 3% (UVSDPP3) or 6% (UVSDPP6) and non-UV-C SDPP at 3% (SDPP3) or 6% (SDPP6). Diets were fed ad libitum to 320 weaned pigs (26 d of age; 16 pens/diet; 4 pigs/pen) for 14 d after weaning and a common diet was fed d 15 to 28. During d 0 to 14, pigs fed UVSDPP3, UVSDPP6, or SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control. During d 0 to 28, pigs fed UVSDPP3 and UVSDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain and feed intake than control and SDPP3, and SDPP6 had higher (P < 0.05) feed intake than control. Also, pigs fed UVSDPP had higher (P < 0.05) weight gain than pigs fed SDPP. In conclusion, UV-C inactivated PPV in liquid plasma and UVSDPP used in pig feed had no detrimental effects on pig performance.

  4. Dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of finishing pigs after ciprofloxacin administration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; Xia, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; Lei, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance.

  5. Dynamics of Quinolone Resistance in Fecal Escherichia coli of Finishing Pigs after Ciprofloxacin Administration

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, Kang; XU, Chang-Wen; ZENG, Bo; XIA, Qing-Qing; ZHANG, An-Yun; LEI, Chang-Wei; GUAN, Zhong-Bin; CHENG, Han; WANG, Hong-Ning

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance. PMID:24919413

  6. Invited Review: The preterm pig as a model in pediatric gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Sangild, P. T.; Thymann, T.; Schmidt, M.; Stoll, B.; Burrin, D. G.; Buddington, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    At birth, the newborn mammal undergoes a transition from a sterile uterine environment with a constant nutrient supply, to a microbe-rich environment with intermittent oral intake of complex milk nutrients via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These functional challenges partly explain the relatively high morbidity and mortality of neonates. Preterm birth interrupts prenatal organ maturation, including that of the GIT, and increases disease risk. Exemplary is necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which is associated closely with GIT immaturity, enteral feeding, and bacterial colonization. Infants with NEC may require resection of the necrotic parts of the intestine, leading to short bowel syndrome (SBS), characterized by reduced digestive capacity, fluid loss, and dependency on parenteral nutrition. This review presents the preterm pig as a translational model in pediatric gastroenterology that has provided new insights into important pediatric diseases such as NEC and SBS. We describe protocols for delivery, care, and handling of preterm pigs, and show how the immature GIT responds to delivery method and different nutritional and therapeutic interventions. The preterm pig may also provide a sensitive model for postnatal adaptation of weak term piglets showing high mortality. Attributes of the preterm pig model include close similarities with preterm infants in body size, organ development, and many clinical features, thereby providing a translational advantage relative to rodent models of GIT immaturity. On the other hand, the need for a sow surgical facility, a piglet intensive care unit, and clinically trained personnel may limit widespread use of preterm pigs. Studies on organ adaptation in preterm pigs help to identify the physiological basis of neonatal survival for hypersensitive newborns and aid in defining the optimal diet and rearing conditions during the critical neonatal period. PMID:23942716

  7. Rifapentine is not more active than rifampin against chronic tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Noton K; Illei, Peter B; Peloquin, Charles A; Pinn, Michael L; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E; Nuermberger, Eric L; Grosset, Jacques H; Karakousis, Petros C

    2012-07-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ~200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening.

  8. Rifapentine Is Not More Active than Rifampin against Chronic Tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Illei, Peter B.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Pinn, Michael L.; Mdluli, Khisimuzi E.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Rifamycins are key sterilizing drugs in the current treatment of active tuberculosis (TB). Daily dosing of rifapentine (P), a potent rifamycin with high intracellular accumulation, in place of rifampin (R) in the standard antitubercular regimen significantly shortens the duration of treatment needed to prevent relapse in a murine model of active TB. We undertook the current study to compare directly the activities of human-equivalent doses of P and R in a guinea pig model of chronic TB, in which bacilli are predominantly extracellular within human-like necrotic granulomas. Hartley strain guinea pigs were aerosol infected with ∼200 bacilli of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and treatment given 5 days/week was initiated 6 weeks later. R at 100 mg/kg of body weight and P at 100 mg/kg were given orally alone or in combination with isoniazid (H) at 60 mg/kg and pyrazinamide (Z) at 300 mg/kg. Culture-positive relapse was assessed in subgroups of guinea pigs after completion of 1 and 2 months of treatment. Human-equivalent doses of R and P showed equivalent bactericidal activity when used alone and in combination therapy. In guinea pigs treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide (RHZ) or PHZ, microbiological relapse occurred in the lungs of 8/10 animals treated for 1 month and in 0/10 animals treated for 2 months. Substitution of P for R in the standard antitubercular regimen did not shorten the time to cure in this guinea pig model of chronic TB. Data from ongoing clinical trials comparing the activity of these two drugs are awaited to determine the relevance of the guinea pig TB model in preclinical drug screening. PMID:22547623

  9. Metabolism, Distribution, and Elimination of Mequindox in Pigs, Chickens, and Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lingli; Yin, Fujun; Pan, Yuanhu; Chen, Dongmei; Li, Juan; Wan, Dan; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-11-11

    Mequindox (MEQ), a quinoxaline-N,N-dioxide antibacterial agent used to control bacterial enteritis in various food-producing animals, is a potential violative residue in food animal-derived products. The disposition and elimination of MEQ in rats, pigs, and chickens was comprehensively investigated to identify the marker residue and target tissue of MEQ in food animals for residue monitoring. Following a single oral administration, 62-71% of MEQ was rapidly excreted via urine and feces in all species within 24 h. Urinary excretion of radioactivity was 84 and 83.5% of the administered dose in rats and pigs, respectively. More than 92% of the administered dose was excreted in all species within 15 days. Radioactivity was found in nearly all tissues at the first 6 h after dosing, with the majority of radioactivity cleared within 4-6 days. The highest radioactivity and longest persisting time were found to be in the liver and kidney. Totals of 11, 12, and 7 metabolites were identified in rats, chickens, and pigs, respectively. No parent drug could be detected in any of the tissues of pigs and chickens. 3-Methyl-2-acetyl quinoxaline (M1), 3-methyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl) quinoxaline-N4-monoxide (M4), and 3-methyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl) quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide (M6) were the common and major metabolites of MEQ in all three species. Additionally, 3-methyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl) quinoxaline (M5), 3-hydroxymethyl-2-ethanol quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide (M7), and 3-methyl-2-(1-hydroxyethyl) quinoxaline-N1-monoxide (M8) were the major metabolites of MEQ in rats, pigs, and chickens, respectively. M1 was designated to be the marker residue of MEQ in pigs and chickens. These results provide scientific data for the determination of marker residues and withdrawal time of MEQ in food animals and improve the understanding of the toxicity and disposition of MEQ in animals.

  10. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp.

  11. Can Taenia solium latent post-oncospheral stages be found in muscle tissue of cysticercosis-infected pigs (Sus scrofa)?

    PubMed

    Rodrìguez, Mary L; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Verastegui, Manuela; Bernal, Teresa; Jimenez, Juan A; Garcia, Hector H

    2006-02-01

    The existence of latent Taenia solium post-oncospheral stages in the tissues of infected pigs has been postulated. To assess whether such structures exist and can be detected, we examined muscle samples from cysticercosis-infected and uninfected pigs. Pork samples were homogenized, centrifuged, and resuspended in saline solution. Round microscopic structures of approximately 10 microm with variable refringence were found in the pellets of all samples from both infected and uninfected pigs. These became homogeneously red after staining with Sudan IV and disappeared after ether extraction. The only difference between samples from infected and uninfected pigs was the presence of inflammatory cells and tissue necrosis debris in the former group. Taenia solium oncospheres were stained and observed for comparative purposes, before and after inoculation into pork. Control oncospheres were ellipsoidal, had nucleated basophile cells in their interior, and showed red aggregates on their surfaces when stained with 3% Sudan IV. While rounded microscopical structures similar to those previously reported were found, these differed morphologically from oncospheres, were of a lipid nature, and occurred in both infected and uninfected animals. No evidence supporting the presence of latent post-oncospheral stages of Taenia solium was generated in this series of experiments.

  12. Soil inoculation with symbiotic microorganisms promotes plant growth and nutrient transporter genes expression in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Sergio; Rappa, Vito; Ruisi, Paolo; Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Sunseri, Francesco; Giambalvo, Dario; Frenda, Alfonso S.; Martinelli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    In a field experiment conducted in a Mediterranean area of inner Sicily, durum wheat was inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), or with both to evaluate their effects on nutrient uptake, plant growth, and the expression of key transporter genes involved in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) uptake. These biotic associations were studied under either low N availability (unfertilized plots) and supplying the soil with an easily mineralizable organic fertilizer. Regardless of N fertilization, at the tillering stage, inoculation with AMF alone or in combination with PGPR increased the aboveground biomass yield compared to the uninoculated control. Inoculation with PGPR enhanced the aboveground biomass yield compared to the control, but only when N fertilizer was added. At the heading stage, inoculation with all microorganisms increased the aboveground biomass and N. Inoculation with PGPR and AMF+PGPR resulted in significantly higher aboveground P compared to the control and inoculation with AMF only when organic N was applied. The role of microbe inoculation in N uptake was elucidated by the expression of nitrate transporter genes. NRT1.1, NRT2, and NAR2.2 were significantly upregulated by inoculation with AMF and AMF+PGPR in the absence of organic N. A significant down-regulation of the same genes was observed when organic N was added. The ammonium (NH4+) transporter genes AMT1.2 showed an expression pattern similar to that of the NO3- transporters. Finally, in the absence of organic N, the transcript abundance of P transporters Pht1 and PT2-1 was increased by inoculation with AMF+PGPR, and inoculation with AMF upregulated Pht2 compared to the uninoculated control. These results indicate the soil inoculation with AMF and PGPR (alone or in combination) as a valuable option for farmers to improve yield, nutrient uptake, and the sustainability of the agro-ecosystem. PMID:26483827

  13. Thermophile-fermented compost extract as a possible feed additive to enhance fecundity in the laying hen and pig: Modulation of gut metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Hirokuni; Kumagai, Yoshifumi; Udagawa, Motoaki; Shinmyo, Toshihito; Mori, Kenichi; Ogawa, Kazuo; Miyamoto, Hisashi; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we reported that the oral administration of an extract of compost fermented with marine animal resources and thermophilic Bacillus species should confer health benefits in fish, pigs and rodents. Herein, the relations between fecundity and gut metabolites in laying hens and pigs on farms after oral exposure to compost were investigated. On the hen farms, the egg production of hens continuously administered the extract was maintained at significantly higher levels compared with the hens not administered the extract. On the swine farms, after the compost treatment, the shipping dates of fattening pigs were shortened, with an improvement in the death rate of the pigs. When the levels of fecal organic acids, such as short-chain fatty acids, lactate, and ammonium, as indicators of gut metabolism and energy sources for peripheral tissues, were examined, the levels of the acetate, propionate, and butyrate in the feces of the hens and pigs in the compost-treated group were not always different from those in the untreated control group. However, the levels of lactate were consistently low in the feces of both animals after the compost treatment. The fecal ammonium concentrations in old hens (age 597-672 days) and 2-month-old piglets from the compost-fed mother sows were low when compared with the untreated groups. The concentrations of free organic acids and their related compounds in the animal products (eggs and pig loins) were nearly equal to those in the untreated control products. Thus, the oral administration of the thermophile-fermented compost should improve the fecundity of hens and pigs by modifying their gut metabolism.

  14. Differential effects of leucine on translation initiation factor activation and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle, renal and adipose tissues of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In adult rats, protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue increases in response to pharmacological doses of leucine (Leu) administered orally. In neonatal pigs, a physiological increase in plasma leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle without increasing hepatic protein...

  15. Detection of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus RNA and capsid protein in lymphoid tissues of convalescent pigs does not indicate existence of a carrier state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the potential of pigs to maintain persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) infection. Infectious virus could not be recovered from sera, oral, nasal- or oropharyngeal fluids obtained after resolution of clinical infection with FMDV serotypes A, O...

  16. Sweating Like a Pig: Physics or Irony?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    In his interesting and informative book "Is That a Fact?," Joe Schwarcz avers that pigs do not sweat and the saying "sweating like a pig" originates in iron smelting. Oblong pieces of hot iron, with a fancied resemblance to a sow with piglets, cool in sand to the dew point of the surrounding air, and hence water condenses on…

  17. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions.

  18. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  19. Blastocystis tropism in the pig intestine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blastocystis subtype 5, a subtype known to infect humans, was detected by molecular methods in the feces of 36 naturally infected market age pigs. At necropsy, 6 heavily infected pigs were selected to determine the tropism of the infection within the gastrointestinal tract. Because so little is know...

  20. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  1. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity.

  2. Preliminary attempts to biolistic inoculation of grapevine fanleaf virus.

    PubMed

    Valat, L; Mode, F; Mauro, M C; Burrus, M

    2003-03-01

    Biolistics has been studied to inoculate grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), a Nepovirus, to its natural woody host, Vitis sp., and its herbaceous host, Chenopodium quinoa. At first, bombardment conditions for in vitro and greenhouse grown plants were set using the uidA reporter gene. The infectious feature of the cartridges was then evaluated by studying infection of C. quinoa plants. Systemic infection was obtained with either GFLV particles or RNA extracts in experimental conditions which gave also the highest transient uidA gene expression. Concerning grapevine, our results indicate that extrapolation to this plant is difficult. In only 1 out of 8 independent bombardment experiments done with GFLV and 41B, we were able to detect the virus in freshly bombarded leaves. Similarly, later after bombardment, Pol mRNAs were detected once, at days 7 and 14 only. Incubating the plants in darkness, as suggested in the literature, or using Rupestris Saint Georges, an indicator for GFLV presence, did not yield any improvement. Finely, our observations suggest that detection of GFLV in bombarded grapevine tissues by immunological or molecular techniques remains a limiting factor, probably due to an excess of inhibitory compounds released during the biolistic process.

  3. Effect of dietary mannanoligosaccharide and sodium chlorate on the growth performance, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding of weaned pigs challenged with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Burkey, T E; Dritz, S S; Nietfeld, J C; Johnson, B J; Minton, J E

    2004-02-01

    A 28-d experiment evaluated the growth, acute-phase response, and bacterial shedding patterns in pigs (n = 96; initially 6.8 +/- 1.3 kg) fed mannanoligosaccharides (MANNAN) and sodium chlorate (CHLORATE) before and after oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST). The negative control diet contained no antimicrobial (CON), and the positive control contained carbadox (CARB; 55 ppm). Test diets contained (as-fed basis) MANNAN (1,500 ppm) or CHLORATE (800 ppm). Pigs were fed diets for 14 d and then given ST orally. Pigs fed CARB had greater ADG over the entire study than pigs from other treatments (P < 0.05). During wk 1 to 2, before ST challenge, feed intake (as-fed basis) was lower for pigs fed MANNAN and CHLORATE than pigs fed CARB (P < 0.05). During the final 2 wk, pigs fed CARB had greater feed intake than pigs on other treatments (P < 0.05). Gain/feed was greater for pigs fed CARB in the 2 wk before ST (P < 0.05); however, in wk 3 to 4 after ST, gain/feed was reduced for CON pigs compared to pigs on other treatments (P < 0.05). Serum IGF-I was decreased at 2 and 4 d after ST (P < 0.001), and, overall, IGF-I was greater in pigs fed CARB than CON or CHLORATE (P < 0.05). Serum haptoglobin concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) for all treatments at d 6 compared with d 13 after ST. Overall, haptoglobin was greater for MANNAN than for CARB and CHLORATE (P < 0.05) and tended to be increased (P < 0.06) relative to CON. Interleukin-6 was not affected by treatment or day post-ST challenge. Fecal shedding of salmonellae organisms was less for CHLORATE (P < 0.05) than all other treatments at 7 d after ST. Shedding scores decreased from d 7 to 14 after ST (P < 0.05) for the CON, CARB, and MANNAN treatments. We conclude that feeding MANNAN and CHLORATE before acute enteric disease challenge may support improved gut function as evidenced by improved gain/feed, and that CHLORATE may decrease bacterial shedding. But neither MANNAN nor CHLORATE enhanced

  4. Effect of vitamin E and selenium on iron utilization in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Hill, G M; Link, J E; Meyer, L; Fritsche, K L

    1999-07-01

    Supplying adequate iron (Fe) to neonatal pigs to support normal growth and hematological and antioxidant status, while preventing iron toxicity, is a challenge for producers. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of frequency and route of Fe administration with or without vitamin E (E) and selenium (Se) on growth, Fe, and antioxidant status of neonatal pigs. In Exp. 1, 12 pigs from dams with reduced E status were fed a semipurified diet without added Fe from d 3 to d 14 of age. At d 6 of age, pigs received the following i.m. injections: 1) FE, 1 mL containing 200 mg of Fe (iron dextran); 2) FEE, treatment FE plus 1 mL containing 300 IU of vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol); or 3) FESEE, 1.03 mL containing 200 mg of Fe (iron dextran), .15 mg of Se (sodium selenite), and 15 IU of vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol). Pigs were weighed daily and blood was collected at 3, 7, and 14 d of age. From d 8 to 14, growth was depressed (P < .05) in pigs injected with FESEE. At 14 d of age, pigs injected with FE or FEE had increased (P < .05) hemoglobin (Hb) concentration. Ceruloplasmin activity (CP) was greater (P < .05) at d 7 of age than at d 3 or 14 regardless of treatment. In Exp. 2, 3-d-old pigs (n = 94) received the following: 1) FE, 200 mg Fe (iron dextran) i.m.; (2) FEE, treatment FE plus 300 IU vitamin E i.m.; 3) EFE, 300 IU vitamin E i.m. followed by 200 mg Fe (iron dextran) i.m. 24 h later; or 4) OFE, 100 mg Fe and 10 mg Cu orally. On d 21 of age, one-half of the pigs in each treatment received a second dose of their respective treatment. Blood samples (n = 60) were obtained on d 3 and 21 of age. Pigs injected with FE, FEE, or EFE had greater (P < .05) Hb at d 21 than pigs given OFE. Copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) activity was greater (P < .05) at d 21 with OFE than with the other treatments. At 65 d of age, ADG did not differ among treatments. In Exp. 3, pigs (n = 150, in three farrowing groups) were injected with 200 mg of Fe (iron dextran

  5. A Review of Pain Assessment in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Sarah H.; Clutton, R. Eddie; Di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Rutherford, Kenneth M. D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a moral obligation to minimize pain in pigs used for human benefit. In livestock production, pigs experience pain caused by management procedures, e.g., castration and tail docking, injuries from fighting or poor housing conditions, “management diseases” like mastitis or streptococcal meningitis, and at parturition. Pigs used in biomedical research undergo procedures that are regarded as painful in humans, but do not receive similar levels of analgesia, and pet pigs also experience potentially painful conditions. In all contexts, accurate pain assessment is a prerequisite in (a) the estimation of the welfare consequences of noxious interventions and (b) the development of more effective pain mitigation strategies. This narrative review identifies the sources of pain in pigs, discusses the various assessment measures currently available, and proposes directions for future investigation. PMID:27965968

  6. Wild pig populations in the National Parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Francis J.

    1981-05-01

    Populations of introduced European wild boar, feral pigs, and combinations of both types (all Sus scrola L.) inhabit thirteen areas in the National Park Service system. All parks have relatively stable populations, with the exception of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which reported a rapidly expanding wild boar population. Suspected and documented impacts were apparently related to pig densities and sensitivity of the ecosystem; the three largest units with dense wild pig populations reported the most damage. Overall, wild pigs are a relatively minor problem for the Park Service; however, problems are severe in at least three parks, and there is potential for invasion of wild boars into several additional parks in the Appalachian Mountains. More specific information is needed on numbers of wild pigs and their impacts in the various parks.

  7. The role of computed tomography in the assessment of dental disease in 66 guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Schweda, M C; Hassan, J; Böhler, A; Tichy, A; Reiter, A M; Künzel, F

    2014-11-29

    Sixty-six guinea pigs with dental disease were presented to the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria, from 2006 to 2010. Almost all patients had a history of eating difficulties (95 per cent) and underwent clinical and oral examination as well as CT of the head. Findings on extra- and intraoral examination were asymmetric elongation (n=28) and symmetric bridging (n=24) of cheek teeth, obliquely worn incisors (n=17), palpable lower jaw swellings (n=13), exophthalmos (n=10) and incisor macrodontia (n=6). Eighty per cent of guinea pigs with exophthalmos showed ipsilateral periapical disease of the maxillary cheek teeth on CT. Ninety-two per cent of patients with palpable lower jaw swellings showed corresponding dental pathologies on CT. Periapical disease of incisors (n=11) and cheek teeth (n=32) were the most common findings on CT. All abnormally large incisors were found on oral examination and CT, but macrodontia of cheek teeth could only be visualised by CT. Deviation of the lower jaw evaluated in awake animals by visual inspection appeared to correlate with cheek teeth abnormalities. Results emphasise the importance of diagnostic imaging, in particular CT, in guinea pigs with dental disease in order to localise lesions and underlying aetiologies.

  8. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  9. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  10. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  11. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  12. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  13. Silage inoculant effects on milk production and why that may be important to you

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage inoculants are the most common additives used in making corn and hay crop silages. The main active ingredients in these products are lactic acid bacteria that help ensure the fermentation in the silo goes in a direction that helps preserve the crop. While inoculants have been available for ma...

  14. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silage microbial inoculants can enhance animal performance, but the mechanisms involved in these effects are not clear. Our hypothesis was that an extractable factor from inoculated silage enhances rumen microbial activity. One alfalfa haylage (58% DM) and two corn silages (30% and 50% DM) were made...

  15. Presurgical Anxiety and Postsurgical Pain and Adjustment: Effects of a Stress Inoculation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Judith K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Surgery patients (N=24) were randomly assigned either to a stress inoculation intervention or to a standard hospital instructions control. The results demonstrated the utility of stress inoculation training in providing surgical patients with a self-regulation technique to reduce their experiences of anxiety and pain and to improve their…

  16. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  17. Rethinking the Inoculation Analogy: Effects on Subjects with Differing Preexisting Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Michelle L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Inoculation messages employed in past studies have been consistently preventative. Yet, if inoculation strategies are to be used in mass media campaigns, researchers need to know what the effects will be on all audience members--not just those known to support a message sponsor's position. A 3-phase experiment was conducted involving 558…

  18. Silage extracts used to study the mode of action of silage inoculants in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa and two corn crops were ensiled with and without Lactobacillus plantarum MTD/1 silage inoculant and fermented for 4 or 60 d to assess the effect of the inoculant on in vitro rumen fermentation of the resulting silages. Water and 80% ethanol extracts of the silages with added glucose were als...

  19. Milk production response to feeding alfalfa silage inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mini-silo trials, silages treated with a Lactobacillus plantarum silage inoculant (Ecosyl, Yorkshire, UK) had increased in vitro rumen microbial biomass production compared to untreated. Our objective was to determine if alfalfa silage treated with this inoculant could produce a milk production r...

  20. Salmonella persistance within the peripheral lymph nodes of cattle following experimental inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Utilizing a transdermal method of inoculation developed in our laboratory, the duration of infection of Salmonella in the peripheral lymph nodes of steers was examined. Thirty-six Holstein steers (mean body weight of 137 kg) were inoculated with Salmonella Montevideo (day 0) on each lower leg and b...

  1. Enhanced phytoremediation of toxic metals by inoculating endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 expressing bifunctional glutathione synthase.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-02-28

    To engineer plant-bacteria symbionts for remediating complex sites contaminated with multiple metals, the bifunctional glutathione (GSH) synthase gene gcsgs was introduced into endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 to improve phytoremediation efficiency of host plant Brassica juncea. The GSH contents of shoots inoculated with CBSB1 is 0.4μMg(-1) fresh weight. However, the GSH concentration of shoots with engineered CBSB1-GCSGS increased to 0.7μMg(-1) fresh weight. The shoot length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings inoculated with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 67%, 123%, and 160%, compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The Cd and Pb concentration in shoots with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 48% and 59% compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The inoculation of CBSB1 and CBSB1-GCSGS could increase the Cd and Pb extraction amounts of seedlings significantly compared with those without inoculation (P<0.05), the seedlings inoculated with CBSB1-GCSGS showed the highest Cd and Pb extraction amounts. It was concluded that the gcsgs gene introduced into Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 upgraded the phytoremediation efficacy of B. juncea. So the engineered Enterobacter sp. CBSB1-GCSGS showed potentials in remediation sites contaminated with complex contaminants by inoculating into remediating plants.

  2. Effect of wetland plants and bacterial inoculation on dissipation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weisong; Wu, Chuan; Wang, Qiming; Su, Zhaohong; Zhou, Hui; Chung, Anna King Chuen; Hartley, William; Ge, Long

    2017-03-21

    This study attempts to evaluate the capacity of wetland plants' ability to dissipate phenanthrene (PHE) under waterlogged conditions. The results indicate that Typha latifolia and Vertiveria zizanioides may efficiently degrade PHE, and were much more effective when under combined plant cultivation with the inoculation of Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis (ATCC BAA-257). Concentrations of PHE declined from 200 mg kg(-1) to less than 52 mg kg(-1) in all treatments with plant cultivation. At the end of the experimental period, PHE was undetectable in combined plant cultivation in the presence of bacteria inoculation. Microbial biomass (carbon) C, N and P were significantly different (p<0.05) in the presence and absence of bacteria inoculation, with bacteria inoculation significantly (p<0.05) increased microbial biomass P. The presence of bacteria inoculation and different plant species significantly (p<0.05) decreased the PHE concentrations in the microcosms. The inoculation of bacteria and release of exudates from plant roots further enhanced the dissipation of PHE in sand. Concentrations of citric and malic acids were decreased up to 69% in bacteria inoculated treatments compared the absence bacteria inoculation treatments, showing large citric and malic acids serving as a food source and growth substrate for bacteria.

  3. A Stress Inoculation Program for Parents Whose Children Are Undergoing Painful Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Susan M.; Elliott, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Compared program efficacy in helping parents cope with children's painful medical procedures. Parents (n=72) of pediatric leukemia patients participated in either stress inoculation program or observed child participating in cognitive behavior therapy. Found parents in stress inoculation program reported lower anxiety scores and higher positive…

  4. Experimental aerosol inoculation of Mycobacterium bovis in North American opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Scott D; Zwick, Laura S; Diegel, Kelly L; Berry, Dale E; Church, Steven V; Sikarskie, James G; Kaneene, John B; Reed, Willie M

    2003-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of North American opossums (Didelphis virginiana) to aerosol inoculation of Mycobacterium bovis at two dose levels in order to gain information on disease pathogenesis, fecal shedding of the organism, and the potential role that opossums play in the spread of this disease in nature. Six opossums received high dose (1 x 10(7) colony forming units (cfu) by aerosol inoculation, six opossums received low dose (1 x 10(3) cfu inoculation, and six opossums were sham-inoculated with sterile water and served as controls. Lungs were the most frequently infected tissues, with nine of 12 inoculated opossums positive for M. bovis on culture. Gross lesions consisted of multifocal pneumonia and enlarged lymph nodes. Microscopically, granulomatous pneumonia and granulomatous lymphadenitis associated with acid-fast bacilli were present in eight of 12 inoculated opossums. Fecal shedding of M. bovis was uncommon at both inoculation doses. While opossums were highly susceptible to aerosol inoculation of M. bovis, they did not become emaciated or develop widely disseminated lesions. From this study, opossums may transmit tuberculosis by aerosol infection to other opossums in close contact and serve as a source of infection to carnivores that feed upon them, however, transmission of the disease to large herbivores by fecal shedding or direct contact may be less likely.

  5. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  6. Boosting the Potency of Resistance: Combining the Motivational Forces of Inoculation and Psychological Reactance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Claude H.; Ivanov, Bobi; Sims, Jeanetta; Compton, Josh; Harrison, Kylie J.; Parker, Kimberly A.; Parker, James L.; Averbeck, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of inoculation theory has been confirmed by decades of empirical research, yet optimizing its effectiveness remains a vibrant line of investigation. The present research turns to psychological reactance theory for a means of enhancing the core mechanisms of inoculation--threat and refutational preemption. Findings from a multisite…

  7. Rice resistance to blast caused by leaf surface moistening prior to inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effect of water droplets placed onto rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves before inoculation with blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr on disease severity and superoxide radical generation by the leaves was investigated. The leaves were inoculated by placement of spore suspension droplets. One da...

  8. The Effect of LAB Silage Inoculants on the Rumen Environment--Current Research Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants containing mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common additives used in making silage. Their function is to promote intensive production of lactic acid and rapid decrease in pH and so minimize fermentation losses. Some LAB inoculants reduce aerobic spoilage. In addition, feedin...

  9. [The effect of soil inoculation with microbial pesticide destructors on plant growth and development].

    PubMed

    Lisina, T O; Garan'kina, N G; Kruglov, Iu V

    2001-01-01

    Soil inoculation with liquid cultures of Bacillus megaterium 501 and Exophiala nigrum A-29 capable of degrading several organophosphorus pesticides accelerated growth and development of experimental plants, formation of their generative organs, and improved their productivity. This was particularly observed under stress plant growth conditions on phytotoxic peach substrates. The microorganisms inoculated can probably degrade phytotoxins present in soils, thereby favoring the plant development.

  10. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  11. The non-nucleoside antiviral, BAY 38-4766, protects against cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and mortality in immunocompromised guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Schleiss, Mark R.; Bernstein, David I.; McVoy, Michael A.; Stroup, Greg; Bravo, Fernando; Creasy, Blaine; McGregor, Alistair; Henninger, Kristin; Hallenberger, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    New antiviral drugs are needed for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. These studies evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of the non-nucleosidic CMV inhibitor, BAY 38-4766, against guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV). Plaque reduction assays indicated that BAY 38-4766 was active against GPCMV, with an IC50 of 0.5 μM. Yield reduction assays demonstrated an ED90 and ED99 of 0.4 and 0.6 μM, respectively, of BAY 38-4766 against GPCMV. Guinea pigs tolerated oral administration of 50 mg/kg/day of BAY 38-4766 without evidence of biochemical or hematologic toxicity. Plasma concentrations of BAY 38-4766 were high following oral dosing, with a mean peak level at 1-h post-dose of 26.7 mg/ml (n = 6; range, 17.8-35.4). Treatment with BAY 38-4766 reduced both viremia and DNAemia, as determined by a real-time PCR assay, following GPCMV infection of cyclophosphamide-immunosuppressed strain 2 guinea pigs (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney test). BAY 38-4766 also reduced mortality following lethal GPCMV challenge in immunosuppressed Hartley guinea pigs, from 83% (20/24) in placebo-treated guinea pigs, to 17% (4/24) in BAY 38-4766-treated animals (p < 0.0001, Fisher’s exact test). Mortality differences were accompanied by reduction in DNAemia in Hartley guinea pigs. Based upon its favorable safety, pharmacokinetic, and therapeutic profiles, BAY 38-4766 warrants further investigation in the GPCMV model. PMID:15652969

  12. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  13. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  14. Cultural and Economic Motivation of Pig Raising Practices in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Nazmun; Uddin, Main; Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions that pig raisers in Bangladesh have with their pigs could increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. Since raising pigs is a cultural taboo to Muslims, we aimed at understanding the motivation for raising pigs and resulting practices that could pose the risk of transmitting disease from pigs to humans in Bangladesh, a predominantly Muslim country. These understandings could help identify acceptable strategies to reduce the risk of disease transmission from pigs to people. To achieve this objective, we conducted 34 in-depth interviews among pig herders and backyard pig raisers in eight districts of Bangladesh. Informants explained that pig raising is an old tradition, embedded in cultural and religious beliefs and practices, the primary livelihood of pig herders, and a supplemental income of backyard pig raisers. To secure additional income, pig raisers sell feces, liver, bile, and other pig parts often used as traditional medicine. Pig raisers have limited economic ability to change the current practices that may put them at risk of exposure to diseases from their pigs. An intervention that improves their financial situation and reduces the risk of zoonotic disease may be of interest to pig raisers. PMID:26122206

  15. 9 CFR 113.38 - Guinea pig safety test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guinea pig safety test. 113.38 Section... Standard Procedures § 113.38 Guinea pig safety test. The guinea pig safety test provided in this section... be injected either intramuscularly or subcutaneously into each of two guinea pigs and the...

  16. Cultural and Economic Motivation of Pig Raising Practices in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Nazmun; Uddin, Main; Gurley, Emily S; Jahangir Hossain, M; Sultana, Rebeca; Luby, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    The interactions that pig raisers in Bangladesh have with their pigs could increase the risk of zoonotic disease transmission. Since raising pigs is a cultural taboo to Muslims, we aimed at understanding the motivation for raising pigs and resulting practices that could pose the risk of transmitting disease from