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Sample records for pillars thermal spectroscopic

  1. Pillar Structured Thermal Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Graff, R; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C

    2008-06-10

    This work describes an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce an efficient device for thermal neutron detection which we have coined the 'Pillar Detector'. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B), a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. Here we review the design considerations for going from a 2-D to 3-D device and discuss the materials trade-offs. The relationship between the geometrical features and efficiency within our 3-D device is investigated by Monte Carlo radiation transport method coupled with finite element drift-diffusion carrier transport simulations. To benchmark our simulations and validate the predicted efficiency scaling, experimental results of a prototype device are illustrated. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 2 {micro}m spacing and pillar height of 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at a reverse bias of -2 V.

  2. Fabrication of Pillar-Structured Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Conway, A M; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Wang, T F; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2007-11-19

    Pillar detector is an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce a device for thermal neutron detection. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in achieving simultaneously high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a 3-dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic boron 10, ({sup 10}B) a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 4 {micro}m pitch and pillar heights of 6 and 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at 2V.

  3. Gamma discrimination in pillar structured thermal neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Q; Radev, R P; Conway, A M; Voss, L F; Wang, T F; Nikolic, R J; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2012-03-26

    Solid-state thermal neutron detectors are desired to replace {sup 3}He tube based technology for the detection of special nuclear materials. {sup 3}He tubes have some issues with stability, sensitivity to microphonics and very recently, a shortage of {sup 3}He. There are numerous solid-state approaches being investigated that utilize various architectures and material combinations. By using the combination of high-aspect-ratio silicon PIN pillars, which are 2 {micro}m wide with a 2 {micro}m separation, arranged in a square matrix, and surrounded by {sup 10}B, the neutron converter material, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible. Besides intrinsic neutron detection efficiency, neutron to gamma discrimination is an important figure of merit for unambiguous signal identification. In this work, theoretical calculations and experimental measurements are conducted to determine the effect of structure design of pillar structured thermal neutron detectors including: intrinsic layer thickness, pillar height, substrate doping and incident gamma energy on neutron to gamma discrimination.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  5. 6:1 aspect ratio silicon pillar based thermal neutron detector filled with {sup 10}B

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R. J.; Conway, A. M.; Reinhardt, C. E.; Graff, R. T.; Wang, T. F.; Deo, N.; Cheung, C. L.

    2008-09-29

    Current helium-3 tube based thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in achieving simultaneously high efficiency and low voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three-dimensional silicon p-i-n diode pillar array filled with boron-10 these constraints can be overcome. The fabricated pillar structured detector reported here is composed of 2 {mu}m diameter silicon pillars with a 4 {mu}m pitch and height of 12 {mu}m. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3+/-0.6% and a neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 10{sup 5} at 2 V reverse bias were measured for this detector. When scaled to larger aspect ratio, a high efficiency device is possible.

  6. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Qinghui; Conway, Adam M.; Voss, Lars F.; Radev, Radoslav P.; Nikolić, Rebecca J.; Dar, Mushtaq A.; Cheung, Chin L.

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  7. Petrographic, Chemical and Spectroscopic Data on Thermally Metamorphosed Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Hiroi, T.; Wang, M.-S.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    First comprehensive description of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in carbonaceous chondrites. Petrographic evidence has been checked against labile trace element temperatures. Spectroscopic data reveals the level of dehydration and possible relationship to primitive asteroids.

  8. Mixed-linker solid solutions of functionalized pillared-layer MOFs - adjusting structural flexibility, gas sorption, and thermal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Schwedler, Inke; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Bajpe, Sneha R; Cheetham, Anthony K; Fischer, Roland A

    2016-03-14

    Flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can undergo fascinating structural transitions triggered by external stimuli, such as adsorption/desorption of specific guest molecules or temperature changes. In this detailed study we investigate the potentials and limitations of tuning framework flexibility systematically by exploiting the powerful concept of mixed-linker solid solutions. We chose the prototypical family of functionalized pillared-layer MOFs of the general type Zn2(fu(1)-bdc)2x(fu(2)-bdc)(2-2x)dabco (with x = 1.00, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.00; fu-bdc = 2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate with varying alkoxy chain length, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) and examined their guest responsive, as well as intrinsic temperature dependent structural flexibility by X-ray diffraction, gas physisorption and calorimetric measurements. The ratio of the different fu-bdc linkers can be adjusted freely, offering opportunity for a targeted design of these functional materials by modulating their key features, such as magnitude of framework contraction upon guest removal, breathing behaviour upon CO2 adsorption/desorption, thermoresponsive phase behaviour, and their general thermal expansivity, by the careful choice of fu-bdc linkers and their combination.

  9. Mixed-linker solid solutions of functionalized pillared-layer MOFs - adjusting structural flexibility, gas sorption, and thermal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Schwedler, Inke; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Bajpe, Sneha R; Cheetham, Anthony K; Fischer, Roland A

    2016-03-14

    Flexible metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can undergo fascinating structural transitions triggered by external stimuli, such as adsorption/desorption of specific guest molecules or temperature changes. In this detailed study we investigate the potentials and limitations of tuning framework flexibility systematically by exploiting the powerful concept of mixed-linker solid solutions. We chose the prototypical family of functionalized pillared-layer MOFs of the general type Zn2(fu(1)-bdc)2x(fu(2)-bdc)(2-2x)dabco (with x = 1.00, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.00; fu-bdc = 2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate with varying alkoxy chain length, dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) and examined their guest responsive, as well as intrinsic temperature dependent structural flexibility by X-ray diffraction, gas physisorption and calorimetric measurements. The ratio of the different fu-bdc linkers can be adjusted freely, offering opportunity for a targeted design of these functional materials by modulating their key features, such as magnitude of framework contraction upon guest removal, breathing behaviour upon CO2 adsorption/desorption, thermoresponsive phase behaviour, and their general thermal expansivity, by the careful choice of fu-bdc linkers and their combination. PMID:26526973

  10. Viscoplasticity Behavior of a Solder Joint on a Drilled Cu Pillar Bump Under Thermal Cycling Using FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yong-Hyuk; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRACT Although the copper (Cu) pillar bump (CPB) was developed in accordance with recent trends of miniaturized, multifunctional, and high-performance technology, its thermomechanical reliability remains in question. Accordingly, a hole was drilled into a CPB to increase its thermomechanical reliability, and the viscoplasticity behaviors of the two structures were subsequently compared through finite element analysis. In particular, this study applied the Anand model, which addresses both plastic strain and creep strain, as well as a submodeling technique to increase the accuracy of the analysis and decrease the analysis time. In addition, this study confirmed the superiority of the thermomechanical reliability of drilled Cu pillar bump through a hysteresis loop, which showed the equivalent stress versus equivalent inelastic strain of the solder joint interfaces. Moreover, the study compared the inelastic strain energy density values. The results demonstrated that the drilled copper pillar bump does indeed have a smaller inelastic range and a lower inelastic strain energy density.

  11. Infrared-spectroscopic nanoimaging with a thermal source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, F.; Schnell, M.; Wittborn, J.; Ocelic, N.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2011-05-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a widely used analytical tool for chemical identification of inorganic, organic and biomedical materials, as well as for exploring conduction phenomena. Because of the diffraction limit, however, conventional FTIR cannot be applied for nanoscale imaging. Here we demonstrate a novel FTIR system that allows for infrared-spectroscopic nanoimaging of dielectric properties (nano-FTIR). Based on superfocusing of thermal radiation with an infrared antenna, detection of the scattered light, and strong signal enhancement employing an asymmetric FTIR spectrometer, we improve the spatial resolution of conventional infrared spectroscopy by more than two orders of magnitude. By mapping a semiconductor device, we demonstrate spectroscopic identification of silicon oxides and quantification of the free-carrier concentration in doped Si regions with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm. We envisage nano-FTIR becoming a powerful tool for chemical identification of nanomaterials, as well as for quantitative and contact-free measurement of the local free-carrier concentration and mobility in doped nanostructures.

  12. Thermal treatment-induced ductile-to-brittle transition of submicron-sized Si pillars fabricated by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yue-cun; Xie, De-gang; Ning, Xiao-hui; Shan, Zhi-wei

    2015-02-23

    Si pillars fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) had been reported to have a critical size of 310–400 nm, below which their deformation behavior would experience a brittle-to-ductile transition at room temperature. Here, we demonstrated that the size-dependent transition was actually stemmed from the amorphous Si (a-Si) shell introduced during the FIB fabrication process. Once the a-Si shell was crystallized, Si pillars would behave brittle again with their modulus comparable to their bulk counterpart. The analytical model we developed has been proved to be valid in deriving the moduli of crystalline Si core and a-Si shell.

  13. Thermally switchable adhesions of polystyrene-block-poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer pillar array mimicking climb attitude of geckos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Wang, Jing-Hong; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the gecko foot pad, we fabricated polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-b-PNIPAAm) copolymer pillar array to mimic climbing attitude of a gecko, alternately attach to and detach from a surface. The pillar array structure of the PS segment significantly enhances both of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic property of PNIPAAm segment tips at 25 and 50 °C, respectively, which could generate alternating adhesive forces of approximately 120 and 11 nN. The dramatic change in adhesive and friction force difference at 25 and 50 °C may guide the design of bio-inspired artificial analogues, which could approach gecko's climbing behavior.

  14. Investigation into Spectroscopic Techniques for Thermal Barrier Coating Spall Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim; Opila, Beth

    2001-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are proposed for detection of thermal barrier coating (TBC) spallation from engine hot zone components. These methods include absorption and emission of airborne marker species originally embedded in the TBC bond coat. In this study, candidate marker materials for this application were evaluated. Thermochemical analysis of candidate marker materials combined with additional constraints such as toxicity and uniqueness to engine environment, provided a short list of four potential species: platinum, copper oxide, zinc oxide. and indium. The melting point of indium was considered to be too low for serious consideration. The other three candidate marker materials, platinum, copper oxide, and zinc oxide were placed in a high temperature furnace and emission and absorption properties were measured over a temperature range from 800-1400 C and a spectral range from 250 to 18000 nm. Platinum did not provide the desired response, likely due to the low vapor Pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. It was also found, however. that platinum caused a broadening of the carbon dioxide absorption at 4300 nm. The nature of this effect is not known. Absorption and emission caused by sodium and potassium impurities in the platinum were found in the platinum tests. Zinc oxide did not provide the desired response, again, most likely due to the low vapor pressure of the metallic species and the low absorption of the oxide species. Copper oxide generated two strongly temperature dependent absorption peaks at 324.8 and 327.4 nm. The melting point of copper oxide was determined to be too low for serious consideration as marker material.

  15. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGES

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  16. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  17. Spectroscopic study of photo and thermal destruction of riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanov, Salikh; Sharipov, Mirzo Z.; Fayzullaev, Askar R.; Kurtaliev, Eldar N.; Nizomov, Negmat

    2014-08-01

    Influence of temperature and light irradiation on the spectroscopic properties of aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using linear dichroism method, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was established that in a wide temperature range 290-423 K there is a decline of absorbance and fluorescence ability, which is explained by thermodestruction of riboflavin. It is shown that the proportion of molecules, which have undergone degradation, are in the range of 4-28%, and depends on the concentration and quantity of temperature effects. Introduction of hydrochloric and sulfuric acids, as well as different metal ions leads to an increase in the photostability of riboflavin solutions by 2-2.5 times. The observed phenomena are explained by the formation protonation form of riboflavin and a complex between the metal ions and oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group of riboflavin, respectively.

  18. Thermal decomposition and vibrational spectroscopic aspects of pyridinium hexafluorophosphate (C5H5NHPF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekgoathi, M. D. S.; Kock, L. D.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal decomposition and vibrational spectroscopic properties of pyridinium hexafluorophosphate (C5H5NHPF6) have been studied. The structure of the compound is better interpreted as having a cubic space group, based on Raman and infrared vibrational spectroscopy experiments and group theoretical correlation data between site symmetry species and the spectroscopic space group. The 13C NMR data shows three significant signals corresponding to the three chemical environments expected on the pyridinium ring i.e. γ, β and α carbons, suggesting that the position of the anion must be symmetrical with respect to the pyridinium ring's C2v symmetry. The process of thermal decomposition of the compound using TGA methods was found to follow a contracting volume model. The activation energy associated with the thermal decomposition reaction of the compound is 108.5 kJ mol-1, while the pre exponential factor is 1.51 × 109 sec-1.

  19. Spectroscopic and thermal characterizations of Yb:LaF3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiaqi; Zhang, Lianhan; Hang, Yin; Xu, Min

    2016-10-01

    A Yb3+ doped LaF3 laser crystal was detailed investigated by both spectroscopic and thermal measurements. A peak absorption at 974 nm with FWHM broader than 60 nm makes the crystal suitable to InGaAs LDs. Fluorescence spectrum and calculated spectroscopic parameters show potential of Yb:LaF3 crystal to laser operations around 1009 nm. A relatively long fluorescence lifetime of 2.92 ms was detected for Yb3+:2F5/2 manifold. The thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity in the range of 300-575 K were studied to calculate the thermal conductivity of Yb:LaF3. The results indicate that the Yb:LaF3 crystal is a good candidate for diode-pumped ∼1 μm solid-state laser applications.

  20. Study of spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of nonlinear optical molecular crystals based on 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovetc, I. M.; Fokina, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of study of spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of molecular co-crystals: 2-aminopyridine-4-nitrophenol-4-mtrophenolate (2AP4N) and 2,6- diaminopyridine-4-nitrophenol-4nitrophenolate (26DAP4N). Crystals were successfully grown by slow evaporation technique. Optical transparency in the region of 190-1100 was found to be suitable for applications with cut off wavelengths 420 and 430 nm respectively. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis show good quality and thermal stability for studied crystals. Kurtz and Perry powder technique proves that the crystals are acentric and have significant nonlinear optical response.

  1. Synthesis and catalytic properties of chromia pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Host clay layer charge and chromium pillaring solution synthesis conditions have a profound effect on the resulting physical properties of chromia pillared clays. Large gallery chromia pillared clays, with gallery heights greater than 10[angstrom], can be obtained from smectite clay hosts of relatively low layer charge. As the host clay layer charge increases, chromia pillared clay gallery heights decrease. Surface areas in excess of 500 m[sup 2]/g have been observed for chromia pillared montmorillonite after calcination at 500[degrees]C. The chromia pillared clays also show interesting thermal stabilities. Chromia pillared clays are unique bifunctional catalysts which exhibit both acidic and redox properties. The chromia pillars, which prop the smectite clay layers apart, are the source of the catalytic activity. The vertical height and lateral spacing of the pillars define a two-dimensional nanoporous environment for possible catalytic shape selectivity. The acidic properties of chromia pillared clays have been examined using decane cracking and a standard gas oil microactivity test as probe reactions. In addition, since chromia is a known dehydrocyclization catalyst, the aromatization of n-octane to p-xylene has been used to study the redox and shape selective properties. While chromia pillared clays do not exhibit exceptional shape selectivity for the n-octane dehydrocyclization reaction, a pore effect on the product distribution has been observed when compared to that of a non-microporous chromia on alumina catalyst. The hydroconversion of n-heptane over a chromia pillared montmorillonite catalyst and an alumina pillared montmorillonite catalyst are also compared. The yield of cracked products closely followed the conversion for the chromia pillared clay catalyst, while the formation of isomerized products was dependent upon the pretreatment temperature in air.

  2. Short-Term and Long-Term Variability of Antenna Position Due to Thermal Bending of Pillar Monument at Permanent GNSS Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhatova, Lubomira; Hefty, Jan; Spanik, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The variability of daily site coordinates at permanent GNSS station is a sum of many disturbing factors influencing the actual satellite observations, data processing, and bias modelling. In the paper are analysed possibilities of monitoring the instability of GNSS antenna pillar monument by the independent observations using the precise inclination sensor. Long-term series from three different types of pillars show specific features in amplitude and temporal evolution of monument bending. Correlations with daily temperature and/or solar radiation changes were proved.

  3. Zinc acetylacetonate hydrate adducted with nitrogen donor ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We report synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analysis of zinc acetylacetonate complex adducted by nitrogen donor ligands, such as pyridine, bipyridine, and phenanthroline. The pyridine adducted complex crystallizes to monoclinic crystal structure, whereas other two adducted complexes have orthorhombic structure. Addition of nitrogen donor ligands enhances the thermal property of these complexes as that with parent metal-organic complex. Zinc acetylacetonate adducted with pyridine shows much higher volatility (106 °C), decomposition temperature (202 °C) as that with zinc acetylacetonate (136 °C, 220 °C), and other adducted complexes. All the adducted complexes are thermally stable, highly volatile and are considered to be suitable precursors for metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of these complexes is confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The complexes are widely used as starting precursor materials for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures by microwave irradiation assisted coating process.

  4. Petrographic, chemical and spectroscopic evidence for thermal metamorphism in carbonaceous chondrites I: CI and CM chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonui, Eric; Zolensky, Mike; Hiroi, Takahiro; Nakamura, Tomoki; Lipschutz, Michael E.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Okudaira, Kyoko

    2014-02-01

    We present a comprehensive description of petrologic, chemical and spectroscopic features of thermally metamorphosed CI-like and CM (and CM-like) chondrites. Only two such CI chondrites have so far been discovered i.e. Y-86029 and Y-82162. Thermal metamorphism in these chondrites is apparent in their low contents of H2O, C and the most thermally labile trace elements, partial dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates and abundance of thermally decomposed Ca-Mg-Fe-Mn carbonates, which apparently resulted from heating of Mg-Fe carbonate precursors. The CM chondrites exhibit a wide range of aqueous and thermal alteration characteristics. This alteration was almost complete in Y-86720 and Y-86789, which also escaped alternating episodes of oxidation and sulfidization experienced by the others. Thermal metamorphism in the CM chondrites is apparent in loss of thermally labile trace elements and also in partial to almost complete dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates: heating was less uniform in them than in CI chondrites. This dehydration is also evident in strength and shapes of integrated intensities of the 3 μm bands except in PCA 91008, which experienced extensive terrestrial weathering. Tochilinite is absent in all but Y-793321 probably due to heating. Textural evidence for thermal metamorphism is conspicuous in blurring or integration/fusion of chondrules with matrix in the more extensively heated (⩾600 °C) CM chondrites like PCA 91008 and B-7904. TEM and XRD analyses reveal that phyllosilicate transformation to anhydrous phases proceeds via poorly crystalline, highly desiccated and disordered 'intermediate' phases in the least and moderately heated (400-600 °C) carbonaceous chondrites like WIS 91600, PCA 91008 and Y-86029. These findings are significant in that they confirm that these phases occur in meteorites as well as terrestrial samples. Thermal alteration in these meteorites can be used to identify other carbonaceous chondrites that were thermally

  5. Simultaneous microscopic measurements of thermal and spectroscopic fields of a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, M.; Ryu, M.; Morikawa, J.; Batsale, J. C.; Pradere, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, simultaneous microscopic measurements of thermal and spectroscopic fields of a paraffin wax n-alkane phase change material are reported. Measurements collected using an original set-up are presented and discussed with emphasis on the ability to perform simultaneous characterization of the system when the proposed imaging process is used. Finally, this work reveals that the infrared wavelength contains two sets of important information. Furthermore, this versatile and flexible technique is well adapted to characterize many systems in which the mass and heat transfers effects are coupled.

  6. Thermal Physical, and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies on Glasses Prepared by Microwave Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesha, N.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes thermal, physical and spectroscopic properties of glasses prepared by a novel micro wave method. These studies exhibited a strong compositional dependent trend and existence of characteristic boro-vanadate groups in these glasses. The scheme of modification of borate and vanadate groups is controlled by Sanderson's electronegativity principle. Analysis of density and glass transition temperatures suggests the presence of characteristic four coordinated borate and diboro - vanadate groups in these glasses. The presence of [BO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} and [B{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9}]{sup 2-}) groups are confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy of investigated glasses.

  7. Organic Pillared Clays.

    PubMed

    Meier, L. P.; Nueesch, R.; Madsen, F. T.

    2001-06-01

    Commonly used organophilic clays are modified by alkylammonium cations which hold apart the aluminosilicate layers permanently. The cations fill the interlayer space and are contemplated as flexible pillars, resulting from the mobility of the alkyl chains. Therefore, the interlayer distance varies depending on the layer charge and on the alkyl chain length. Contrary to these cations, rigid pillaring cations guarantee a constant interlayer distance without occupying the interlayer by themselves and show special adsorption properties such as hydrophilic behavior contrary to the generally hydrophobic ones. Smectites were modified by flexible organic cations, e.g., dimethyldioctadecylammonium, and by rigid ones, e.g., tetraphenylphosphonium. Their adsorption properties are compared. Our investigations showed improved adsorption properties for rigid organic cations on smectites using 2-chlorophenol as pollutant. Best adsorption results are achieved using pillaring cations in combination with low charged smectites, especially at low pollutant concentrations. The properties of organic modified smectites are discussed by a pollution intercalation model. The intercalation process of an organic pollutant into an organic modified smectite is expressed by a two-step Born-Haber cycle process: (i) the formation of an adsorbing position by layer expansion and (ii) the occupation of the adsorbing position by the pollutant. The first step of the formation of the adsorbing position is an endothermal transition state which lowers the total intercalation energy and therefore worsens the adsorption behavior. Thus, an already expanded organophilic smectite will show improved adsorption behavior. The formed adsorbing position state on organic modified smectites is comparable to the pillared state of inorganic pillared clays. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11350131

  8. Pillars of Heaven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Remington, Bruce A.; Mizuta, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Sometimes the most beautiful things are the hardest to understand. Pillars like those of the Eagle Nebula form at the boundary between some of the hottest (10000~K) and coldest (10~K) gas in the Galaxy. Many physical processes come into play in the birth and growth of such gaseous pillars: hydrodynamic instability, photoionization, ablation, recombination, molecular heating and cooling, and probably magnetic fields. High-quality astronomical observations, quantitative numerical simulations, and scaled laser experiments provide a powerful combination for understanding their formation and evolution. We put our most recent hydrodynamic model to the test, by creating simulated observations from it and comparing them directly to the actual radioastronomical observations. Successfully reproducing major characteristics of the observations in this manner is an important step in designing appropriate laser experiments.

  9. Designer carbons templated by pillared clays: Lithium secondary battery anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, G.; Carrado, K.A.; Winans, R.E.; Brenner, J.R.; Zajac, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    This work describes the designed synthesis and physical characterization of carbons containing predictable microporosity. The approach is to pyrolyze aromatic hydrocarbons such as pyrene within a pillared clay. The pillared clay serves two functions. It performs as the inorganic template around which the designer carbon can be formed, and it acts as the acid catalyst to promote condensation of the aromatics similar to the Scholl reaction. These precursors then undergo thermal polymerization and carbonization at 700{degrees} C. Removal of the pillared clay template is accomplished by standard acid demineralization techniques, leaving behind carbons with 15 to 20 {Angstrom} holes.

  10. FT-IR spectroscopic, thermal analysis of human urinary stones and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, R.; Raja, A.; Thiruppathi, G.

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, FT-IR, XRD, TGA-DTA spectral methods have been used to investigate the chemical compositions of urinary calculi. Multi-components of urinary calculi such as calcium oxalate, hydroxyl apatite, struvite and uric acid have been studied. The chemical compounds are identified by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. The mineral identification was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction patterns as compared with JCPDS reported values. Thermal analysis techniques are considered the best techniques for the characterization and detection of endothermic and exothermic behaviors of the urinary stones. The percentages of each hydrate (COM and COD) are present together, in the presences of MAPH or UA. Finally, the present study suggests that the Urolithiasis is significant health problem in children, and is very common in some parts of the world, especially in India. So that present study is so useful and helpful to the scientific community for identification of latest human health problems and their remedies using spectroscopic techniques.

  11. In vivo Photoacoustic Spectroscopic Imaging of Hemoglobin Derivatives in Thermally Damaged Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopic measurement was performed for thermally damaged skin in a rat in vivo to analyze hemoglobin derivatives in the tissue. We observed PA signals at around 500 and 633 nm, which are center wavelengths of methemoglobin (MetHb) absorption peaks, at depths corresponding the uppermost dermis (˜0.16 mm) and hair follicles (˜0.62 mm), indicating formation of MetHb in these tissue regions. By scanning a PA detector on the tissue, two-dimensional PA images (tomograms) were produced. Subtraction imaging technique was used for multispectral PA tomograms to analyze specific components of hemoglobin derivatives in the tissue, by which the contrast of oxyhemogobin (HbO2)-associated PA signal has been improved and the distribution of PA signal that seems to reflect the concentration of MetHb has been visualized.

  12. Spectroscopic properties and thermal stability of Er3+/Yb3+-codoped fluorophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Qin-Yuan; Zhao, Chun; Feng, Zhou-Ming; Shi, Dong-Mei; Deng, Zai-De; Jiang, Zhong-Hong

    2005-06-01

    A comprehensive study on the thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+/Yb3+-codoped Al(PO3)3-based fluorophosphate glasses is reported of the 1.5μm fibre amplifiers in this paper. From optical absorption spectra, the Judd-Ofelt parameters of Er3+ in the glasses and several important optical properties, such as the radiative transition probability, the branching ratio and the spontaneous emission probability, have been calculated by using Judd-Ofelt theory. The fluorophosphate glass exhibits broadband near-infrared emission at 1.53 μm with a full width at half-maximum over 63nm and a large calculated stimulated-emission cross-section of 6.85×10-21cm2.

  13. Real-time spectroscopic assessment of thermal damage: implications for radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher D; Lin, Wei-Chiang; Buttemere, Clay R; Washington, M Kay; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Pierce, Janene; Nicoud, Ian B; Pinson, C Wright; Chari, Ravi S

    2004-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving technology used to treat unresectable liver tumors. Currently, there is no accurate method to determine RFA margins in real-time during the procedure. We hypothesized that a fiber-optic based spectroscopic monitoring system could detect thermal damage from RFA in real-time. Fluorescence (F) and diffuse reflectance (Rd) spectra were continuously acquired from within the expected ablation zone during canine hepatic RFA using a fiber-optic microinterrogation probe (MIP). The F and Rd spectral feedback were continuously monitored and ablations were stopped based on changes in spectra alone. After each ablation, the MIP tract was marked with India ink and the ablation zone was excised. The relationship of the MIP to the zone of ablation was examined grossly and microscopically. F and Rd spectral changes occurred in three characteristic phases as the ablation zone progresses past the MIP. Phase 1 indicates minimal deviation from normal lives. Phase 2 occurs as the MIP lies within the hemorrhagic zone of the ablated tissue. Phase 3 correlates with complete tissue coagulation. The absolute magnitude of spectral change correlates with the gross and histologic degree of thermal damage. Optical spectroscopy is a technology that allows real-time detection of thermal tissue damage. In this study, both F and Rd spectroscopy accurately defined the advancing hemorrhagic edge of the zone of ablation and the central coagulation zone. These results suggest that F and Rd spectroscopy can be used to create a real-time feedback system to accurately define RFA margins. PMID:15358325

  14. Pillared clays and pillared acid-activated clays: A comparative study of physical, acidic, and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mokaya, R.; Jones, W.

    1995-04-15

    The preparation, characterisation, and catalytic properties of alumina-pillared materials derived from an acid-treated host clay matrix is described. Various levels of acid treatment are studied in order to ascertain the level of acid treatment which yields pillared materials with the most suitable physicochemical properties and thermal stability. The pillared acid-activated clays prepared possess basal spacing (19.3 {angstrom} after thermal treatment at 500{degrees}C) and surface areas (315-374 m{sup 2}/g) comparable to conventional pillared clays but significantly higher pore volume (0.33-0.48 cm{sup 3}/g), average pore diameter and surface acidity. The improvement in acidity is mainly of the Broensted acid type. As a result of improved acidity, the pillared acid-activated clays are better catalysts compared to conventional pillared clays and they exhibit activity indicative of the presence of strong Broensted acid sites in the temperature range 250-400{degrees}C. 36 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. The effect of refluxing on the alkoxide-based sodium potassium niobate sol-gel system: Thermal and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Anirban; Bould, Jonathan; Londesborough, Michael G.S.; Milne, Steven J.

    2011-02-15

    A study on the effects of prolonged heating under reflux conditions of up to 70 h on alkoxides of sodium, potassium and niobium dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol for the synthesis of sols of composition Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) has been carried out using combined thermogravimetric-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses. Extended refluxing increases the homogeneity of the Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (NKN) system. Spectroscopic analyses on the non-refluxed and 70 h refluxed NKN gels reveal the existence of inorganic hydrated carbonates and bicarbonates, which we propose arise from the hydration and carbonation of the samples on standing in air. The X-ray diffraction patterns of these two types of gels show orthorhombic NKN phase evolutions at higher temperatures. -- Graphical abstract: Total organic evolution plots over time for NKN dried gels obtained under different refluxing times show different thermochemical behaviours and these were investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools to find a correlation between the extent of -M-O-M- chain link formation and the amount of solvent vapour (methoxyethanol) evolution. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Prolonged refluxing of sol-gel NKN precursor solutions improves final properties of an NKN system. > An NKN process thermo-chemistry with thermal and spectroscopic analysis tools was explored. > An FTIR of NKN gels reveals tendency of NKN systems for rehydration and recarbonation on standing.

  16. Thermal and spectroscopic characterization of a proton pumping rhodopsin from an extreme thermophile.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Sudo, Yuki

    2013-07-26

    So far retinylidene proteins (∼rhodopsin) have not been discovered in thermophilic organisms. In this study we investigated and characterized a microbial rhodopsin derived from the extreme thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus, which lives in a hot spring at around 75 °C. The gene for the retinylidene protein, named thermophilic rhodopsin (TR), was chemically synthesized with codon optimization. The codon optimized TR protein was functionally expressed in the cell membranes of Escherichia coli cells and showed active proton transport upon photoillumination. Spectroscopic measurements revealed that the purified TR bound only all-trans-retinal as a chromophore and showed an absorption maximum at 530 nm. In addition, TR exhibited both photocycle kinetics and pH-dependent absorption changes, which are characteristic of rhodopsins. Of note, time-dependent thermal denaturation experiments revealed that TR maintained its absorption even at 75 °C, and the denaturation rate constant of TR was much lower than those of other proton pumping rhodopsins such as archaerhodopsin-3 (200 ×), Haloquadratum walsbyi bacteriorhodopsin (by 10-times), and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (100 ×). Thus, these results suggest that microbial rhodopsins are also distributed among thermophilic organisms and have high stability. TR should allow the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of ion transport and protein folding.

  17. Thermal and spectroscopic properties of polystyrene/gold nanocomposite containing well-dispersed gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Yuming; Tsiang, Raymond Chien-Chao

    2009-05-01

    The thermal and spectroscopic properties of polystyrene/(gold particles) (PS(SH)/Au) nanocomposite materials containing uniformly dispersed nanoparticles in a polymer matrix have been studied. The nanocomposite comprises the thiol-terminated polystyrene (PS(SH)) which was produced by capping a living polystyrene with ethylene sulfide and the nano-sized gold particles (AuNPs) which were in-situ formed in the presence of PS(SH). The PS(SH) was characterized by NMR and the bonding between thiols and AuNPs was verified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Based on the transmission electron microscopy and the UV-vis absorption spectra, PS(SH) with a lower molecular weight leads to the formation of bigger AuNPs. The T(D) of the nanocomposite (PS(SH)/Au) increases with an increase in the Au content and at a constant Au content the PS(SH) with a higher molecular weight affords PS(SH)/Au a higher T(D). While PS(SH)/Au has a higher T(g) than the corresponding pristine PS(SH), the difference reduces with an increase in Au content (i.e., a decrease in the PS(SH):Au weight ratio) because of the formation of larger AuNPs which provide a smaller total surface area for PS(SH) to anchor or to cover.

  18. Thermal and Spectroscopic Characterization of a Proton Pumping Rhodopsin from an Extreme Thermophile*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Takashi; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Sudo, Yuki

    2013-01-01

    So far retinylidene proteins (∼rhodopsin) have not been discovered in thermophilic organisms. In this study we investigated and characterized a microbial rhodopsin derived from the extreme thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus, which lives in a hot spring at around 75 °C. The gene for the retinylidene protein, named thermophilic rhodopsin (TR), was chemically synthesized with codon optimization. The codon optimized TR protein was functionally expressed in the cell membranes of Escherichia coli cells and showed active proton transport upon photoillumination. Spectroscopic measurements revealed that the purified TR bound only all-trans-retinal as a chromophore and showed an absorption maximum at 530 nm. In addition, TR exhibited both photocycle kinetics and pH-dependent absorption changes, which are characteristic of rhodopsins. Of note, time-dependent thermal denaturation experiments revealed that TR maintained its absorption even at 75 °C, and the denaturation rate constant of TR was much lower than those of other proton pumping rhodopsins such as archaerhodopsin-3 (200 ×), Haloquadratum walsbyi bacteriorhodopsin (by 10-times), and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (100 ×). Thus, these results suggest that microbial rhodopsins are also distributed among thermophilic organisms and have high stability. TR should allow the investigation of the molecular mechanisms of ion transport and protein folding. PMID:23740255

  19. Stress reduction for pillar filled structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam; Shao, Qinghui; Voss, Lars; Cheung, Chin Li; Dar, Mushtaq A.

    2015-09-01

    According to one embodiment, an apparatus for detecting neutrons includes an array of pillars, wherein each of the pillars comprises a rounded cross sectional shape where the cross section is taken perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the respective pillar, a cavity region between each of the pillars, and a neutron sensitive material located in each cavity region.

  20. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF CAUSTIC LIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 16 MOLAR AND 8 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-12

    Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed on multiple layers formed from contacting Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent with 1 M or 3 M nitric acid. A slow chemical reaction occurs (i.e., over several weeks) between the solvent and 1 M or 3 M nitric acid as evidenced by color changes and the detection of nitro groups in the infrared spectrum of the aged samples. Thermal analysis revealed that decomposition of the resulting mixture does not meet the definition of explosive or deflagrating material.

  1. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 1 MOLARAND 3 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-07-23

    Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed on multiple layers formed from contacting Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent with 1 M or 3 M nitric acid. A slow chemical reaction occurs (i.e., over several weeks) between the solvent and 1 M or 3 M nitric acid as evidenced by color changes and the detection of nitro groups in the infrared spectrum of the aged samples. Thermal analysis revealed that decomposition of the resulting mixture does not meet the definition of explosive or deflagrating material.

  2. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  3. Densification effects of the carbon nanotube pillar array on field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Liao, Chan-Yu; Li, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a simple densification method for carbon nanotube (CNT) pillars is proposed to achieve high-performance field emission characteristics and stable emission. Through capillary force during solution evaporation, the CNT density in each pillar can be increased by about six times without causing damage to the crystallinity of CNTs. The densified CNT pillars exhibit lower series resistance, sharper pillars, better contacts, higher thermal conductivity, and better mechanical stiffness than as-grown ones. Therefore, the threshold field of the field emitter with such CNT pillars of 50 µm height can be reduced to 1.98 V/µm, as compared with 2.2 V/µm for the undensified ones. Moreover, the fluctuation of field-emission current decreases from 15.5 to 9.4% after the stress tests at a field of 2 V/µm for 1800 s. These findings imply that the densified CNT pillars are promising for the field-emission applications.

  4. Spectroscopic, thermal and X-ray structural study of the antiparasitic and antiviral drug nitazoxanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Flavia P.; Caira, Mino R.; Monti, Gustavo A.; Kassuha, Diego E.; Sperandeo, Norma R.

    2010-12-01

    Nitazoxanide [2-(acetyloxy)- N-(5-nitro-2-thiazolyl)benzamide, NTZ] is a potent antiparasitic and antiviral agent recently approved. The anti-protozoal activity of NTZ is believed to be due to interference with the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) enzyme dependent electron transfer reaction. As drug-enzyme interactions are governed by the three-dimensional stereochemistry of both participants, the crystal structure of NTZ was determined for the first time to identify the conformational preferences that may be related to biological activity. NTZ crystallizes as the carboxamide tautomer in the orthorhombic system, space group Pna2 1 with the following parameters at 100(2) K: a = 14.302(2) Å, b = 5.2800(8) Å, c = 33.183(5) Å, V = 2505.8(6) Å 3, Z = 8, D x = 1.629 g cm -3, R = 0.0319, wR2 = 0.0799 for 5121 reflections. In addition, the spectroscopic and thermal properties were determined and related to the molecular structure. The 13C CPMAS NMR spectra showed resolved signals for each carbon of NTZ, some signals being broad due to residual dipolar interaction with quadrupolar 14N nuclei. In particular, the resonance at about 127 ppm showed multiplicity, indicating more than one molecule in the asymmetric unit and this is consistent with the crystallographic data. The DSC and TG data revealed that NTZ shows a single DSC melting peak with extrapolated onset at 201 °C which is accompanied by a TG weight loss, indicating that NTZ melts with decomposition.

  5. Ground-Based Thermal-IR Spectroscopic Observations of Jupiter During the Galileo Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sada, P. V.; Jennings, D.; McCabe, G.; Deming, D.; Bjoraker, G.

    1995-12-01

    High resolution spectroscopic observations of Jupiter at selected thermal-infrared wavelengths are scheduled to be performed using CELESTE, a Goddard-developed cryogenic echelle spectrometer. These observations will be carried out in conjunction with the McMath-Pierce 60-inch Solar Telescope (KPNO/NSO) during the inital encounter phase of the Galileo spacecraft with the planet. This arrangement was successfully used in 1994-95 to perform daytime observations of Jupiter close to the Sun. The planet will be located 9(deg) away from the Sun in the sky on 7 December 1995, the day Galileo's probe is scheduled to enter the atmosphere of the planet. Galileo's entry probe is programmed to shed its heat shield and start directly sampling the atmosphere of Jupiter at a pressure level of about 100 mbar. We plan to carry out observations of a complementary nature to those of the entry probe by using molecular species which better sample the stratosphere of Jupiter. These observations, in conjunction with those obtained by Galileo, will help characterize the state of the atmosphere of Jupiter at the time of the encounter. In particular we plan to observe the 587 cm(-1) S(1) quadrupole line of H2, which yields abundance-independent temperature information on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere of Jupiter. We also plan to measure strong stratospheric emission features from molecules such as CH4, C2H6, and C2H2. These spectral observations will be used to retrieve temperature and species abundance information with some degree of spatial discrimination. Preliminary results from these observations will be presented. (1) National Research Council Resident Research Associate. (2) Hughes/STX.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Titania-Pillared Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yimin; Song, Shaoxian; Zhang, Min; Tuo, Biyang

    In this work, a Ti-pillared montmorillonite with high thermal stability has been prepared by using a Na-montmorillonite as the host clay and polyhydroxy-titania ions as the pillaring precursor. The formation of Ti-pillared montmorillonite has been confirmed from the characterizations through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimeter, and specific surface area analyses. In the preparation of Ti-pillared montmorillonite several parameters, such as the type of solvent in which the synthesis is realized, the ratio of polyhydroxy-titania ions and montmorillonite, the intercalation time, the calcining temperature, and calcining time, were tested to understand their effects on the basal spacing. It was shown that this method could produce a Ti-pillared montmorillonite with the basal spacing of 3.74 nm, specific surface area of 409 m2/g, and mean pore size of 2.94 nm, as well as a high thermal stability up to 900°C.

  7. Pillar cuvettes: capillary-filled, microliter quartz cuvettes with microscale path lengths for optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Gregor; Kriel, Frederik Hermanus; Priest, Craig

    2015-05-01

    The goal of most analytical techniques is to reduce the lower limit of detection; however, it is sometimes necessary to do the opposite. High sample concentrations or samples with high molar absorptivity (e.g., dyes and metal complexes) often require multiple dilution steps or laborious sample preparation prior to spectroscopic analysis. Here, we demonstrate dilution-free, one-step UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of high concentrations of platinum(IV) hexachloride in a micropillar array, that is, "pillar cuvette". The cuvette is spontaneously filled by wicking of the liquid sample into the micropillar array. The pillar height (thus, the film thickness) defines the optical path length, which was reduced to between 10 and 20 μm in this study (3 orders of magnitude smaller than in a typical cuvette). Only one small droplet (∼2 μL) of sample is required, and the dispensed volume need not be precise or even known to the analyst for accurate spectroscopy measurements. For opaque pillars, we show that absorbance is linearly related to platinum concentration (the Beer-Lambert Law). For fully transparent or semitransparent pillars, the measured absorbance was successfully corrected for the fractional surface coverage of the pillars and the transmittance of the pillars and reference. Thus, both opaque and transparent pillars can be applied to absorbance spectroscopy of high absorptivity, microliter samples. It is also shown here that the pillar array has a useful secondary function as an integrated (in-cuvette) filter for particulates. For pillar cuvette measurements of platinum solutions spiked with 6 μm diameter polystyrene spheres, filtered and unfiltered samples gave identical spectra. PMID:25844800

  8. Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Steven W.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    "Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools" uncovers an often overlooked truth--effective change is the product of hard work and dedication. There is no silver bullet; no matter how many programs, software packages, or new initiatives a district uses, the magic won't just "happen." Dynamic schools result from consistent and redundant focus on the fundamental…

  9. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  10. Comparison of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions' binding to calf thymus DNA: spectroscopic characterization and thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Omer Faruk; Tekiner-Gursacli, Refiye; Ozdemir, Ayse; Tekinay, Turgay

    2014-09-01

    Metals have been studied as potential chemotherapeutic agents for cancer therapies due to their high reactivity toward a wide variety of substances. The characterization of metal ion-binding capacities is essential to understand the possible effects of metals on target biomolecules. In the present study, biochemical effects of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions on calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were studied comparatively via bioanalytical, spectroscopic, and thermal methods. Briefly, UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were utilized for spectroscopic characterization, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed for thermal analysis. Our results reveal that both Au(III) and Ga(III) ions are capable of interacting with ctDNA, and Au(III) ions display a more favorable interaction and a higher binding affinity. ITC analyses indicate that the Au(III)-DNA interaction displays a binding affinity (Ka) around 1.43 × 10(6) M(-1), while a Ka around 1.17 × 10(5) M(-1) was observed for the Ga(III)-DNA binding. It was suggested that both metal ions are unlikely to change the structural B-conformation while interacting with ctDNA.

  11. Fluorine-mediated acidity of alumina-pillared fluorohectorite

    SciTech Connect

    Butruille, J.R.; Pinnavaia, T.J. ); Michot, L.J.; Barres, O. )

    1993-02-01

    Structural fluorine atoms in the 2:1 layered silicate framework of fluorohectorite have a profound effect on the acidity of alumina-pillared derivatives prepared by intercalation of Al[sub 13] polycations and subsequent calcination at elevated temperatures. The alumina-pillared clay formed by calcination at 350[degrees]C exhibits greatly enhanced catalytic activity for propylene alkylation of biphenyl, relative to nonfluorinated smectite hosts. However, calcination of the Al[sub 13] intercalate at 500[degrees]C results in a relatively inactive clay with greatly diminished NH[sub 3] and pyridine chemisorption properties. The effect of the calcination process on the clay layer structure was carefully studied by [sup 27]Al, [sup 29]Si, and [sup 19]F MAS-NMR and FTIR spectroscopic methods and by mass spectrometric analysis of volatile by-products. It was shown that between 30 and 500[degrees]C, specific lattice fluorine atoms adjacent to charged sites in the octahedral sheet of the layers are replaced by hydroxyl groups. At calcination temperatures below 350[degrees]C the Broensted acidity of protonated hydroxyl groups in the layers is enhanced by the electron-withdrawing effect of near-neighbor fluorine atoms at neutral sites in the octahedral sheet. A mechanism for fluorine hydrolysis is proposed in which gallery water molecules, formed by the dehydroxylation of the alumina pillars, migrate to hexagonal oxygen cavities above the reactive fluorine positions. Between 350 and 500[degrees]C, a second process occurs that causes dehydroxylation of the layers, and this results in a sharp decrease in the acidity and catalytic activity of the pillared clay. The relationships between structure and reactivity suggest that the acid-catalytic activity of an alumina-pillared clay can be mediated by controlling the relative amounts of hydroxyl groups at charged octahedral sites and fluorine atoms at neutral octahedral sites in the host clay. 22 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Characterization of AlFe-pillared Unye bentonite: A study of the surface acidity and catalytic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caglar, Bulent; Cubuk, Osman; Demir, Ersin; Coldur, Fatih; Catir, Mustafa; Topcu, Cihan; Tabak, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite has been prepared by incorporation of the iron mixed aluminium-polyoxocation into bentonite layers and characterized by the powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, thermal analysis and surface area measurement techniques. The characteristic d001 basal spacing of raw bentonite increased with the pillaring process and reached to 18.05 Å. The siloxane layers of bentonite were perturbed and the positions of Si-O stretching vibrations were altered by pillaring process. However, these pillars in the interlayer gallery spacing enhanced the thermal stability of bentonite. The new micropores were formed by the pillaring process and the specific surface area of raw bentonite increased by ca. 2-fold for aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite. FTIR spectra and thermal analysis curves of pyridine adsorbed samples clearly show that the surface Lewis acidity of aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite is greater than that of raw bentonite. Raw and aluminium-iron-pillared bentonites have been utilized as solid catalysts for benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride. The aluminium-iron-pillared bentonite catalyst showed promising catalytic activity whereas raw bentonite showed no catalytic activity in benzoylation of benzene with benzoyl chloride.

  13. Pillar Mountain Landslide, Kodiak, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kachadoorian, Reuben; Slater, Willard H.

    1978-01-01

    Pillar Mountain landslide on the southeast face of Pillar Mountain is about 915 m (3,000 ft) southwest of the city of Kodiak, Alaska. The landslide is about 520 m (1,700 ft) wide at its base and extends approximately from sea level to an altitude of about 343 m (1,125 ft). The slide developed on an ancient and apparently inactive landslide. Renewed movement was first detected on December 5, 1971, following removal of about 230,000 m3 (300,000 yd3) of material from the base of the slope. Although movement of the landslide has decreased since December, 1971, movement continues and the possibility exists that it could increase as a result of an earthquake, water saturation of the landslide mass, or other causes. In the most extreme case, as much as 3.8 to 7.6 million m (5-10 million ) of debris could fall into the sea at Inner Anchorage. If this took place suddenly, it could generate a wave comparable in height to the tsunami that damaged Kodiak during the Alaskan Earthquake of 1964. Therefore, we believe that the Pillar landslide is a potential hazard to the city of Kodiak and its environs that merits a thorough investigation and evaluation.

  14. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  15. Thermal stability and 2.7 μm spectroscopic properties in Er3+ doped tellurite glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying; Li, Bingpeng; Chen, Rong; Xia, Jienan; Jing, Xufeng; Zhang, Junjie; Xu, Shiqing

    2016-10-01

    In present paper, the thermal stability and 2.7 μm spectroscopic properties in Er3+ doped tellurite glasses have been investigated by 980 nm laser diode pumping. Thermal analysis indicates that GeO2 modified tellurite glass has better thermal stability and anti-crystallization ability. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters are calculated and discussed to examine the covalency characteristics based on absorption spectra. The 2.7 μm fluorescence is obtained and the lifetime can reach 124 ± 1 μs with the quantum efficiency of 61.5% in prepared samples. Moreover, higher effective emission bandwidth (136.67 nm), emission cross sections (12.75 × 10-21 cm2) and radiative transition probability (95.66s-1) at 2.7 μm are achieved. In addition, upconversion and near-infrared emission spectra are measured to elucidate energy transfer mechanism of Er3+. The results suggest that the present tellurite glass modified by GeO2 might have promising applications in mid-infrared fiber lasers.

  16. In Situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of the thermal degradation of isotactic poly(propylene).

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Xiao, Yan; Zhang, Puming; Zhu, Na; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2005-01-01

    The conformational change of isotactic poly(propylene) (iPP) during the thermal degradation process has been carefully studied by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. This new method of studying thermal degradation of iPP not only shows the conventional kinetic parameter information of thermal degradation such as the degradation activation energy DeltaE and the degradation factor n, which are in accord with the results of traditional thermogravimetry experiments, but also indicates that many significant molecular structure changes occur during the thermal degradation process that come from some characteristic absorption band changes of in situ FT-IR. A multivariate approach, principal components analysis (PCA), is applied to the analysis of infrared (IR) data, and the results further confirm the multi-step processes of the thermal degradation of iPP. Above all, this is a new application to polymer thermal degradation by in situ FT-IR that connects the intermediate conformational change with final results during thermal degradation.

  17. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Identification of Two Thermal Isomerization Pathways for Bistable Chiral Overcrowded Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-09-12

    Chiroptical molecular switches play an important role in responsive materials and dynamic molecular systems. Here we present the synthesis of four chiral overcrowded alkenes and the experimental and computational study of their photochemical and thermal behavior. By irradiation with UV light, metastable diastereoisomers with opposite helicity were generated through high yielding E-Z isomerizations. Kinetic studies on metastable 1-4 using CD spectroscopy and HPLC analysis revealed two pathways at higher temperatures for the thermal isomerization, namely a thermal E-Z isomerization (TEZI) and a thermal helix inversion (THI). These processes were also studied computationally whereby a new strategy was developed for calculating the TEZI barrier for second-generation overcrowded alkenes. To demonstrate that these overcrowded alkenes can be employed as bistable switches, photochromic cycling was performed, which showed that the alkenes display good selectivity and fatigue resistance over multiple irradiation cycles. In particular, switch 3 displayed the best performance in forward and backward photoswitching, while 1 excelled in thermal stability of the photogenerated metastable form. Overall, the alkenes studied showed a remarkable and unprecedented combination of switching properties including dynamic helicity, reversibility, selectivity, fatigue resistance, and thermal stability. PMID:27471009

  18. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Identification of Two Thermal Isomerization Pathways for Bistable Chiral Overcrowded Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-09-12

    Chiroptical molecular switches play an important role in responsive materials and dynamic molecular systems. Here we present the synthesis of four chiral overcrowded alkenes and the experimental and computational study of their photochemical and thermal behavior. By irradiation with UV light, metastable diastereoisomers with opposite helicity were generated through high yielding E-Z isomerizations. Kinetic studies on metastable 1-4 using CD spectroscopy and HPLC analysis revealed two pathways at higher temperatures for the thermal isomerization, namely a thermal E-Z isomerization (TEZI) and a thermal helix inversion (THI). These processes were also studied computationally whereby a new strategy was developed for calculating the TEZI barrier for second-generation overcrowded alkenes. To demonstrate that these overcrowded alkenes can be employed as bistable switches, photochromic cycling was performed, which showed that the alkenes display good selectivity and fatigue resistance over multiple irradiation cycles. In particular, switch 3 displayed the best performance in forward and backward photoswitching, while 1 excelled in thermal stability of the photogenerated metastable form. Overall, the alkenes studied showed a remarkable and unprecedented combination of switching properties including dynamic helicity, reversibility, selectivity, fatigue resistance, and thermal stability.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of some IIB group complexes with a new N 2-Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazerozohori, Morteza; Khani, Sara; Tavakol, Hosein; Hojjati, Ahmad; Kazemi, Mostafa

    2011-10-01

    Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal studies of some complexes of a new N 2-Schiff base ligand of N1, N2-bis((E)-2-methyl-3-phenylallylidene)ethane-1,2-diamine (L) with a general formula of MLX 2 (M = Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II); X = Cl -, Br -, I -, SCN - and N 3-) are described. The ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, UV-vis spectra, FT-IR spectra, MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. The conductivity measurement as well as spectral data indicated that the complexes are non-electrolyte. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have been studied in DMSO-d 6 and/or CDCl 3. The thermal behavior of the complexes shows weight loss by decomposition of the anions and ligand segments in the subsequent steps. Activation thermodynamic parameters of decomposition such as E*, Δ H*, Δ S* and Δ G* were calculated from TG curves.

  20. Thermal and spectroscopic properties of the nano-system (ZnO(1-x)SiO2(x))

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kabbany, F.; Taha, S.; Hafez, M.; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-05-01

    Structural and thermal properties of the investigated nano-matrix ZnO(1-x)SiO2(x) samples were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). IR spectroscopic analysis in the frequency range 400-4000 cm-1 is used here to investigate the new nano-system at room temperature. The variation of enthalpy (ΔH) with the concentration of SiO2 nanoparticles for the five systems of the ZnO(1-x)SiO2(x) matrix is determined. Seven different fundamental modes have been investigated. All of the vibrations of the investigated nano-system (ZnO(1-x)SiO2(x)) were found to be 449 cm-1, 469 cm-1, 798 cm-1, 959 cm-1, 1096 cm-1, 1630 cm-1 and 3447 cm-1 correspond to normal vibrations of stretching mode of ZnO, Si - O - Si or O - Si - O bending mode, Si - O - Si symmetric stretching, vibrational mode of Si-O - Zn, Si - O - Si asymmetric stretching, bending vibration mode of adsorbed water and stretching vibration of OH group respectively in which the variations strongly support the variation of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles concentration in the studied matrix. Measurements and interpretation of IR spectra as a function of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles concentration is reported.

  1. Transition metal oxide pillared clay. 1: A comparative study of textural and acidic properties of Fe(III) pillared montmorillonite and pillared acid activated montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, T.; Parida, K.M.; Rao, S.B.

    1996-10-15

    Fe(III) pillared montmorillonite samples have been prepared by intercalating trinuclear acetato hydroxy-iron (III) nitrate [Fe(COOCH{sub 3}){sub 7}OH 2H{sub 2}O]{sup +} NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} between the layers of both Na-exchanged and acid-activated montmorillonite, followed by calcination and characterized by various techniques. The multistep ion exchange process gave better complex loading than the single step process. FTIR and Moessbauer spectral analysis showed the presence of the complex inside the silicate layers. Materials prepared from the two starting materials are thermally stable up to 500 C, having basal spacings of 18.0 and 17.6 {angstrom} and high surface areas of 284 and 276 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The acid-activated pillared montmorillonite shows somewhat low complex intake, but has high acidity in comparison to the Na-exchanged material. Iron oxide pillared clay has gained considerable importance as it can be used in demetalization, reduction of NO by NH{sub 3}, and Fischer-Tropsch reactions.

  2. Synthesis, crystal growth, thermal and spectroscopic studies of acentric materials constructed from aminopyridines and 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovetc, Ilia M.; Draguta, Sergiu; Fokina, Maria I.; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Denisyuk, Igor Yu

    2016-03-01

    A series of single co-crystals of non-centrosymmetric complexes of different mono- and diaminopyridines, namely 4-aminopyridine, 3,4-diaminopyridine, 2-amino-6-methylpyridine, 2,6-diaminopyridine, 2-aminopyridine, with 4-nitrophenol were grown by slow evaporation technique from solution at constant temperature. Optical transparency in the region of 300-1100 nm was found to be suitable for nonlinear optical applications with cut off wavelengths at 420-474 nm for these co-crystals. Single crystal X-ray analysis confirms the non-centrosymmetric packing. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis shows good thermal stability of the studied compounds with melting point at range 99-172 °C for different co-crystals. The second harmonic generation efficiency has been measured on single crystals by comparative SHG technique relative to KTP crystal. The nonlinear optical coefficient of the compounds was found to be up to 39 pm/V.

  3. Using thermal and spectroscopic (XANES) indices to understand the biological stability of soil organic matter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, A. W.; Sanei, H.; Diochon, A.; Tarnocai, C.; Janzen, H.; Regier, T. Z.; Gregorich, E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) composition is a key property that underpins ecosystem productivity. Understanding its physical, chemical and biological properties is important for evaluating its role in carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, the stability of SOM (i.e., resistance to microbial degradation) has important implications in ecosystem processes, including nutrient cycling, emission of greenhouse gases from soil, and C sequestration. Thus there is interest in developing new ways to measure and quantify the labile and stable forms of soil organic carbon. In this presentation, we describe the combined use of thermal decomposition methods based on pyrolysis, and chemical properties using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), to describe the stability of soil organic matter. Soils (n=81) for this study were obtained from a wide geographical range and management practices. Controlled respiration studies were conducted on the soils to determine the biodegradability of organic C after 98 days. In the thermal analysis, the sample is subjected to a temperature ramp and pyrolyzed/volatilized organic C was recorded as a function of temperature. Analysis by XAS provided information on the types of C functional groups present in a soil sample. We show that biological stability is well described using a two component model which included thermal stability and C composition chemistry.

  4. New copper(II) complexes with dopamine hydrochloride and vanillymandelic acid: Spectroscopic and thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Nour El-Dien, F. A.; El-Nahas, R. G.

    2011-10-01

    The dopamine derivatives participate in the regulation of wide variety of physiological functions in the human body and in medication life. Increase and/or decrease in the concentration of dopamine in human body reflect an indication for diseases such as Schizophrenia and/or Parkinson diseases. The Cu(II) chelates with coupled products of dopamine hydrochloride (DO.HCl) and vanillymandelic acid (VMA) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) are prepared and characterized. Different physico-chemical techniques namely IR, magnetic and UV-vis spectra are used to investigate the structure of these chelates. Cu(II) forms 1:1 (Cu:DO) and 1:2 (Cu:VMA) chelates. DO behave as a uninegative tridentate ligand in binding to the Cu(II) ion while VMA behaves as a uninegative bidentate ligand. IR spectra show that the DO is coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in a tridentate manner with ONO donor sites of the phenolic- OH, -NH and carbonyl- O, while VMA is coordinated with OO donor sites of the phenolic- OH and -NH. Magnetic moment measurements reveal the presence of Cu(II) chelates in octahedral and square planar geometries with DO and VMA, respectively. The thermal decomposition of Cu(II) complexes is studied using thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, energy of activation, enthalpy, entropy and free energy change of the complexes are evaluated and the relative thermal stability of the complexes are discussed.

  5. FTIR spectroscopic, thermal and XRD characterization of hydroxyapatite from new natural sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Allam, Moussa A.; Moharram, Mohamed A.

    2011-12-01

    The inorganic constituents of 5 different plants (leaves and stalks) were investigated by using Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis including thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These plants are Catha edulis (Khat), basil, mint, green tea and trifolium. The absorption bands of carbonate ions CO 32- was exhibited at 1446 cm -1, and the phosphate ions PO 43- was assigned at 1105 and 1035 cm -1. At high temperatures (600, 700 and 600 °C) further absorption bands of the phosphate ions PO 43- was assigned at the frequencies 572, 617, 962, 1043 and 1110 cm -1 and the vibrational absorption band of the carbonate ions CO 32- was assigned at 871, 1416 and 1461 cm -1. X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis confirm the obtained results of FITR. Results showed that the main inorganic constituents of C. edulis and basil leaves are hydroxyapatite whereas the hydroxyapatite content in the other plant samples is less than that in case of C. edulis and basil plant leaves.

  6. Stability of Pin1 as revealed by thermal and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Guo-Fei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2010-06-01

    Pin1 is a two-domain enzyme which has peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. Pin1 recognizes phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro motifs in cell-signaling proteins, and is both a cancer and an Alzheimer's disease target. The thermal stability of Pin1 was studied intensively by SDS-PAGE, enzymatic activity assay, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The activity of Pin1 gradually decreased above 40 °C, and the Tm was 57.6 ± 1.0 °C. Fluorescence experiments indicated that heat treatment induced changes in the substructures in Pin1, resulting in that the polarity in the microenvironments of the tryptophan residues increased. It is assumed that the thermal denaturation of Pin1 involved a three-state transition. The intermediate state of Pin1 at about 60 °C was confirmed by fluorescence emission spectra, the synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD measurements. Decreases in α-helix and β-sheet appeared above 40 °C, which was balanced by an enhancement in unordered coil. The Tm values calculated from α-helix transition and β-sheet transition were 54.6 ± 0.6 °C and 70.7 ± 3.3 °C, respectively. Our results illustrated that Pin1 had a relatively high thermal stability and the WW domain had a higher stability than the PPIase domain.

  7. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be left in place. (b) Before mining is started in a pillar split or lift— (1) At least two rows of... leading into the split or lift. (c) Before mining is started on a final stump— (1) At least 2 rows of... shall be installed between the lift to be started and the area where pillars have been extracted....

  8. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.207 Pillar recovery. Pillar recovery shall be... breaker posts or equivalent support shall be installed— (i) As close to the initial intended breakline...

  9. Spectroscopic, thermal analysis and DFT computational studies of salen-type Schiff base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein Pasha; Hadi, Jabbar S.; Abdulnabi, Zuhair A.; Bolandnazar, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    A new series of metal(II) complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Pb(II) have been synthesized from a salen-type Schiff base ligand derived from o-vanillin and 4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and EI-mass), molar conductance measurements and thermal analysis techniques. Coats-Redfern method has been utilized to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the metal complexes. The molecular geometry, Mulliken atomic charges of the studied compounds were investigated theoretically by performing density functional theory (DFT) to access reliable results to the experimental values. The theoretical 13C chemical shift results of the studied compounds have been calculated at the B3LYP, PBEPBE and PW91PW91 methods and standard 6-311+G(d,p) basis set starting from optimized geometry. The comparison of the results indicates that B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) yields good agreement with the observed chemical shifts. The measured low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that the metal complexes are non-electrolytes. The spectral and thermal analysis reveals that all complexes have octahedral geometry except Cu(II) complex which can attain the square planner arrangement. The presence of lattice and coordinated water molecules are indicated by thermograms of the complexes. The thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses confirm high stability for all complexes followed by thermal decomposition in different steps.

  10. Wetting on flexible hydrophilic pillar-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quanzi; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic wetting on the flexible hydrophilic pillar-arrays is studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. For the first time, the combined effect of the surface topology, the intrinsic wettability and the elasticity of a solid on the wetting process is taken into consideration. The direction-dependent dynamics of both liquid and pillars, especially at the moving contact line (MCL), is revealed at atomic level. The flexible pillars accelerate the liquid when the liquid approaches, and pin the liquid when the liquid passes. The liquid deforms the pillars, resulting energy dissipation at the MCL. Scaling analysis is performed based on molecular kinetic theory and validated by our simulations. Our results may expand our knowledge of wetting on pillars and assisting the future design of active control of wetting in practical applications. PMID:23736041

  11. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  12. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of meat batter structural changes induced by thermal treatment and salt addition.

    PubMed

    Herrero, A M; Carmona, P; López-López, I; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-27

    Raman spectroscopy, texture, proximate composition, and water binding analysis were carried out to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment and/or salt addition to meat batter. For this purpose, different meat batters were elaborated: control meat batter (no salt) and meat batters with low (1.0%) and high (2.5%) NaCl content with and without thermal treatment (70 degrees C/30 min). Increase (P < 0.05) in penetration force and hardness upon heating was observed. Results also showed hardness increasing (P < 0.05) as a function of salt addition in heated meat batter. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in alpha-helix content accompanied by an increase (P < 0.05) in beta-sheets resulting from heating. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between these secondary structural changes in meat proteins and water binding and textural properties of meat batter. In this way, a significant correlation was found between beta-sheets, salt content, hardness, and chewiness in heated samples.

  13. Change Spectroscopic, thermal and mechanical studies of PU/PVC blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hezma, A. M.; Elashmawi, I. S.; Rajeh, A.; Kamal, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Blends of polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with different concentrations were prepared by casting method. The effects of PU on PVC blends was examined by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR), Ultra-violet visible studies (UV/VIS.), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetric (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and mechanical properties (stress-strain curve). The interaction between PU and PVC was examined by FT-IR through the absorbance of the N-H groups and was correlated to mechanical/thermal properties. Ultra-violet visible said that optical energy gap decrease with increasing concentration of PU. Differential scanning calorimetry results was observed a single glass transition temperature (Tg) for blends this confirming existence miscibility within the blends. The causes for best thermal stability of some blends may be described by measurements of interactions between C=O groups of PU and the α-hydrogen of PVC or a dipole-dipole -C=O..Cl-C- interactions. Significant alterations in FTIR, X-ray and DSC examination shows an interactions between blends had good miscibility. X-ray shows some alterations in the intensity with additional PU. PU change the mechanical behavior of PVC through of the blends. When polyurethane content increase causes polyvinyl chloride tensile strength decreases and elongation at break increase.

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and electrochemical studies on thiazolyl azo based disperse dyes bearing coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkütük, Müjgan; İpek, Ezgi; Aydıner, Burcu; Mamaş, Serhat; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2016-03-01

    In this study, seven novel thiazolyl azo disperse dyes (6a-g) were synthesized and fully characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectral techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of the dyes in solvents of different polarities cover a λmax range of 404-512 nm. The absorption properties of the dyes changed drastically upon acidification. This was due to the protonation of the nitrogen in the thiazole ring, which in turn increased the donor-acceptor interplay of the π system in the dyes, and therefore increased the absorption properties of the prepared dyes. Thermal analysis showed that these dyes are thermal stable up to 269 °C. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the dyes (6a-g) were investigated using cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques, in the presence of 0.10 M tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, in dimethylsulfoxide, at a glassy carbon electrode. The number of transferred electrons, and the diffusion coefficient were determined by electrochemical methods. The results showed that, for all the dyes, one oxidation peak and two reduction peaks were observed.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of metal complexes of novel Schiff base. Synthesis, thermal and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. M.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; Ibrahim, Amr A.

    2009-07-01

    Novel Schiff base (HL) ligand is prepared via condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine and 2-aminobenzoic acid. The ligand is characterized based on elemental analysis, mass, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Metal complexes are reported and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analyses (TGA, DrTGA and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a uninegatively tridentate manner with NNO donor sites of the azomethine N, amino N and deprotonated caroxylic-O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes losses water molecules of hydration in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, E*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The synthesized ligands, in comparison to their metal complexes also were screened for their antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Escherichia Coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus Pyogones and Fungi (Candida). The activity data show that the metal complexes to be more potent/antibacterial than the parent Shciff base ligand against one or more bacterial species.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of volatile compounds produced during thermal and radiofrequency bipolar cautery on porcine liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Schramm, D.; Hahnloser, D.; Marinov, D.; Sigrist, M. W.

    2008-07-01

    The potential risks associated with the emission of by-products emitted by surgical cautery are of concern. Various investigations—mostly based on gas chromatography—have been performed to analyse the so-called surgical smoke but controversies remain in terms of composition and concentrations of compounds present in the smoke and hence the associated risk to human health. This quantitative model study uses for the first time CO2-laser-based photoacoustic spectroscopy and focuses on the analysis of volatile organic compounds produced during thermal- and radiofrequency bipolar cautery on porcine liver. The latter instrument is employed in actual human surgery. Concentrations in the ppm to sub-ppm range and molar fractions could be determined for carbon dioxide, water vapour, ammonia, ethanol and methanol. Distinct differences particularly in the methanol and ethanol contents were found between the two cautery devices employed.

  17. Chemical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Methods to Assess Biodegradation of Winery-Distillery Wastes during Composting

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Climent, A.; Gomis, P.; Martín-Mata, J.; Bustamante, M. A.; Marhuenda-Egea, F. C.; Pérez-Murcia, M. D.; Pérez-Espinosa, A.; Paredes, C.; Moral, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the co-composting process of wastes from the winery and distillery industry with animal manures, using the classical chemical methods traditionally used in composting studies together with advanced instrumental methods (thermal analysis, FT-IR and CPMAS 13C NMR techniques), to evaluate the development of the process and the quality of the end-products obtained. For this, three piles were elaborated by the turning composting system, using as raw materials winery-distillery wastes (grape marc and exhausted grape marc) and animal manures (cattle manure and poultry manure). The classical analytical methods showed a suitable development of the process in all the piles, but these techniques were ineffective to study the humification process during the composting of this type of materials. However, their combination with the advanced instrumental techniques clearly provided more information regarding the turnover of the organic matter pools during the composting process of these materials. Thermal analysis allowed to estimate the degradability of the remaining material and to assess qualitatively the rate of OM stabilization and recalcitrant C in the compost samples, based on the energy required to achieve the same mass losses. FT-IR spectra mainly showed variations between piles and time of sampling in the bands associated to complex organic compounds (mainly at 1420 and 1540 cm-1) and to nitrate and inorganic components (at 875 and 1384 cm-1, respectively), indicating composted material stability and maturity; while CPMAS 13C NMR provided semi-quantitatively partition of C compounds and structures during the process, being especially interesting their variation to evaluate the biotransformation of each C pool, especially in the comparison of recalcitrant C vs labile C pools, such as Alkyl /O-Alkyl ratio. PMID:26418458

  18. Irradiated lanoline as a prospective substance for biomedical applications: A spectroscopic and thermal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzlikova, Zuzana; Hybler, Peter; Fülop, Marko; Ondruska, Jan; Jomova, Klaudia; Porubska, Maria; Valko, Marian

    2015-08-01

    Refined wool wax products, such as lanoline and lanoline derivatives are key ingredients in some of the ointments, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, waterproof coatings and other products. Beneficial medicinal effects along with melting point near normal human body temperature designated lanoline to be used in pharmacotherapy and medical treatments. Since the general requirements for sterility of medicinal substances are very strict, especially in cases of skin contact, radiation technologies represent a valuable tool to sterilize the materials for medicinal purposes. In this work, lanoline was irradiated with accelerated electron beam in air within 0-400 kG dose to simulate sterilization for medical purposes. The irradiated lanoline showed considerable fluctuation of chemical structure. The most significant fluctuation was observed for etheric species, followed by ethylene sequences with n<4. While primary and secondary alcohols, as well as epoxides species, decreased below the initial concentration within whole range of the doses, aliphatic esters and ethylene sequences (CH2)n with n≥4 indicated the most stable species. A trace amount of organic-in origin radicals was observed and that increased slightly with dose. Depending on dose, the melting temperature varied from 39.7 to 45.7 °C and the highest values were reached for 25 kGy and 156 kGy. For these same doses the highest thermal stability was also observed and, simultaneously the thermal stability was related inversely to the destruction rate. We propose, that the chemical transformation of lanoline within 0-25 kGy dose should be tested for prospective medical purposes as well as for the need to eliminate remaining outlasting organic-in-origin radicals which were detected in the lanoline even one year after the irradiation.

  19. Chemical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Methods to Assess Biodegradation of Winery-Distillery Wastes during Composting.

    PubMed

    Torres-Climent, A; Gomis, P; Martín-Mata, J; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Pérez-Espinosa, A; Paredes, C; Moral, R

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the co-composting process of wastes from the winery and distillery industry with animal manures, using the classical chemical methods traditionally used in composting studies together with advanced instrumental methods (thermal analysis, FT-IR and CPMAS 13C NMR techniques), to evaluate the development of the process and the quality of the end-products obtained. For this, three piles were elaborated by the turning composting system, using as raw materials winery-distillery wastes (grape marc and exhausted grape marc) and animal manures (cattle manure and poultry manure). The classical analytical methods showed a suitable development of the process in all the piles, but these techniques were ineffective to study the humification process during the composting of this type of materials. However, their combination with the advanced instrumental techniques clearly provided more information regarding the turnover of the organic matter pools during the composting process of these materials. Thermal analysis allowed to estimate the degradability of the remaining material and to assess qualitatively the rate of OM stabilization and recalcitrant C in the compost samples, based on the energy required to achieve the same mass losses. FT-IR spectra mainly showed variations between piles and time of sampling in the bands associated to complex organic compounds (mainly at 1420 and 1540 cm-1) and to nitrate and inorganic components (at 875 and 1384 cm-1, respectively), indicating composted material stability and maturity; while CPMAS 13C NMR provided semi-quantitatively partition of C compounds and structures during the process, being especially interesting their variation to evaluate the biotransformation of each C pool, especially in the comparison of recalcitrant C vs labile C pools, such as Alkyl /O-Alkyl ratio.

  20. Chemical, Thermal and Spectroscopic Methods to Assess Biodegradation of Winery-Distillery Wastes during Composting.

    PubMed

    Torres-Climent, A; Gomis, P; Martín-Mata, J; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Pérez-Espinosa, A; Paredes, C; Moral, R

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the co-composting process of wastes from the winery and distillery industry with animal manures, using the classical chemical methods traditionally used in composting studies together with advanced instrumental methods (thermal analysis, FT-IR and CPMAS 13C NMR techniques), to evaluate the development of the process and the quality of the end-products obtained. For this, three piles were elaborated by the turning composting system, using as raw materials winery-distillery wastes (grape marc and exhausted grape marc) and animal manures (cattle manure and poultry manure). The classical analytical methods showed a suitable development of the process in all the piles, but these techniques were ineffective to study the humification process during the composting of this type of materials. However, their combination with the advanced instrumental techniques clearly provided more information regarding the turnover of the organic matter pools during the composting process of these materials. Thermal analysis allowed to estimate the degradability of the remaining material and to assess qualitatively the rate of OM stabilization and recalcitrant C in the compost samples, based on the energy required to achieve the same mass losses. FT-IR spectra mainly showed variations between piles and time of sampling in the bands associated to complex organic compounds (mainly at 1420 and 1540 cm-1) and to nitrate and inorganic components (at 875 and 1384 cm-1, respectively), indicating composted material stability and maturity; while CPMAS 13C NMR provided semi-quantitatively partition of C compounds and structures during the process, being especially interesting their variation to evaluate the biotransformation of each C pool, especially in the comparison of recalcitrant C vs labile C pools, such as Alkyl /O-Alkyl ratio. PMID:26418458

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  2. Microstructural Evolution of Intermetallic Compounds in TCNCP Cu Pillar Solder Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Peng-Wei, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the microstructure, especially intermetallic compounds (IMCs), formed between a Cu pillar and Cu trace joined by thermal compression bonding with nonconductive paste (NCP). Continuous, uniform layers of Cu3Sn formed on the surface of both the Cu pillar and Cu trace. However, the growth of Cu6Sn5 was suppressed, forming nonuniformly on the Cu trace due to NCP filler entrapment at the Cu-solder interface that hindered Sn diffusion flux. Multireflow induced rapid growth of IMCs within the Cu pillar solder joint. The combination of multireflow and thermal cycle testing gave rise to asymmetric growth of IMCs between the chip side and substrate side as a result of stress migration induced by thermal cycling.

  3. Cobalt dipicolinate complexes with nicotinamide and isonicotinamide ligands: Syntheses, crystal structures, spectroscopic, thermal and voltammetric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, İbrahim; Bulut, Ahmet; Karadağ, Ahmet; Kazak, Canan

    2007-06-01

    Two new dipicolinate complexes of cobalt, [Co(dpc)(na)(H 2O) 2]·H 2O ( 1) and [Co(dpc)(ina)(H 2O) 2] ( 2) [dpc is dipicolinate or pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate, na is nicotinamide and ina is isonicotinamide], have been prepared and characterized by thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The complex ( 1) crystallizes in triclinic system, whereas the complex ( 2) crystallizes in monoclinic system. The Co(II) ion in both complexes is bonded to dpc ligand through pyridine N atom together with one O atom of each carboxylate group, two aqua ligands and N pyridine atom of na ( 1) or ina ( 2), forming the distorted octahedral geometry. The complex molecules ( 1) and ( 2) are connected via N sbnd H⋯O and O sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The voltammetric behaviour of complexes ( 1) and ( 2) was also investigated in DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) solution by cyclic voltammetry using n-Bu 4NClO 4 supporting electrolyte. The complexes exhibit only metal centered electroactivity in the potential ±1.25 V versus Ag/AgCl reference electrode.

  4. Lanthanide complexes derived from hexadentate macrocyclic ligand: Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Monika; Rani, Soni; Kumar, Sumit

    2010-02-01

    The lanthanide complexes derived from (3,5,13,15-tetramethyl 2,6,12,16,21-22-hexaazatricyclo[15.3.I 1-17I 7-11]cosa-1(21),2,5,7,9,11(22),12,15,17,19-decane) were synthesized. The complexes were found to have general composition [Ln(L)X 2·H 2O]X, where Ln = La 3+, Ce 3+, Nd 3+, Sm 3+ and Eu 3+ and X = NO 3- and Cl -. The ligand was characterized by elemental analyses, IR, Mass, and 1H NMR spectral studies. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, Mass, electronic spectral techniques and thermal studies. The ligand acts as a hexadentate and coordinates through four nitrogen atoms of azomethine groups and two nitrogen of pyridine ring. The lanthanum complexes are diamagnetic while the other Ln(III) complexes are paramagnetic. The spectral parameters i.e. nephelauxetic ratio ( β), covalency factor ( b1/2), Sinha parameter ( δ%) and covalency angular overlap parameter ( η) have been calculated from absorption spectra of Nd(III) and Sm(III) complexes. These parameters suggest the metal-ligand covalent bonding. In the present study, the complexes were found to have coordination number nine.

  5. Spectroscopic, thermal analyses, structural and antibacterial studies on the interaction of some metals with ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, W. A.; El-Shwiniy, W. H.; El-Attar, M. S.; Sadeek, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Reaction between the fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ofloxacin and V(IV), Zr(IV) and U(VI) in methanol and acetone was studied. The ability of ofloxacin to form metal complexes is high. The isolated solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductance measurements, infrared, electronic, 1H NMR spectra and thermal investigation. In all complexes the ofloxacin ligand is coordinated through the pyridone and carboxylate oxygen forming 1:2 M:HOfl complexes. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(Udbnd O), in the uranyl complex are 1.73 Å and 640.83 N m-1, respectively. The metal-ligand binding of the V(IV) and Zr(IV) complexes was predicted by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP-CEP-31G level of theory and total energy, dipole moment estimation of different V(IV) and Zr(IV) ofloxacin structures. All the synthesized complexes exhibited higher biocidal activity against S. aureus K1, Bacillus subtilis K22, Br. otitidis K76, Escherichia coli K32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SW1 and Klebsiella oxytoca K42. compared to parent compounds and standard drugs.

  6. Spectrophotometric method for the determination, validation, spectroscopic and thermal analysis of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2010-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the charge-transfer complex of the drug, as n-electron donor, with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), as π-acceptor. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-vis, FTIR and 1H NMR spectra techniques and thermal analysis. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery and robustness. The linearity range for concentrations of diphenhydramine was found to be 12.5-150 μg/mL with acceptable correlation coefficients. The detection and quantification limits were found to be 2.09 and 6.27 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed and references methods were applied to the determination of drug in syrup. This preparation were also analyzed with an reference method and statistical comparison by t- and F-tests revealed that there was no significant difference between the results of the two methods with respect to mean values and standard deviations at the 95% confidence level.

  7. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of pillared stevensites: application to chromate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Bonnet, J P; Tanouti, B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the synthesis of pillared interlayered clays from Moroccan stevensite called locally 'Ghassoul'. This clay has been intercalated with cetyltrimethylammonium surfactant (CTA-Stv) and aluminium hydroxypolycation (Al13-Stv). Characterization studies were performed using XRF, XRD, FTIR and DTA/TG analysis. Basal spacing values of Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv increased respectively from 13.5 A for natural stevensite to 17.5 and 17.6 A with increasing Al13(7+)/clay and CTA+/clay ratios. The DTA/TG results showed that Al13-Stv has a relatively high thermal stability compared with CTA-Stv. A quasi-irreversible intercalation by exchanging the interlayer inorganic cations with voluminous pillars Al13(7+) or CTA+ was observed. Batch adsorption of chromate anions from aqueous solutions was investigated and the results showed that both pillared clays had great affinity for the chromate compared with untreated stevensite. The Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) model was selected to describe the adsorption isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacities for natural stevensite, Al13-Stv and CTA-Stv are 13.7, 75.4 and 195.6 mmol/kg, respectively. PMID:21780704

  9. 30 CFR 75.207 - Pillar recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unstable floor or roof, falls of roof, oil and gas well barriers or surface subsidence require that pillars... supports shall be maintained to within 7 feet of the face and the width of the roadway shall not exceed...

  10. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-01

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  11. Growing Algae Alter Spectroscopic Characteristics and Chlorine Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter from Thermally-Altered Forest Litters.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Chow, Alex T

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that wildfires alter spectroscopic characteristics of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) and increase specific disinfection byproduct formation potential (SDBP-FP). However, it is unclear whether characteristics of thermally altered DOM (TA-DOM) are altered by biogeochemical processes (e.g., transformed by growing algae) before entering water treatment facilities. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and blue-green algae Microcystis aeruginosa were separately incubated in the mixture of cultural medium and pine (Pinus palustris) litter-derived TA-DOMs (50 °C, 250 °C, and 400 °C) over 7 days to demonstrate the effects of algal growth on alterations in SDBP-FP. TA-DOM optical characteristics and SDBP-FP were quantified by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and chlorination-based DBP-FP experiments. After the inoculation with P. subcapitata, TA-DOM aromaticity (indicated by SUVA254) increased from 1.19 to 1.90 L/mg/m for 50 °C-extract but decreased from 4.95 to 3.75 L/mg/m for 400 °C-extract. The fraction of tyrosine-like components decreased from 25.9 to 9.3% for 50 °C-extract but increased from 0.9 to 1.3% for 400 °C-extract. Same patterns were also observed for M. aeruginosa. Growing algae generally increased chlorine reactivities and formations of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, and haloketones. Our data suggest that the biodegradable dissolved organic carbon in TA-DOM decreases as fire intensity (i.e., temperature) increases. Postfire algal blooms can increase chlorine reactivity of fire-affected terrestrial DOM for DBP formation. PMID:27366813

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic identification, thermal, potentiometric and antibacterial activity studies of 4-amino-5-mercapto-S-triazole Schiff's base complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.; Ammar, Reda A. A.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam

    2015-05-01

    Complexes of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) of general composition [M(L)2] have been synthesized [L = 4-pyridin-2-yl-methylene amino-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol]. The elemental analyses, molar conductance, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, mass), magnetic moment and thermal measurements studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a tridentate manner (SNN). The molar conductance of the metal complexes in fresh solution of DMSO lies in the range of 8.34-10.46 Ω-1 cm2 mol-1 indicating their non-electrolytic behavior. On the basis of analytical and spectroscopic techniques, octahedral geometry of the complexes was proposed. The Schiff base acts as tridentate ligand coordinated through deprotonated thiolic sulfur, azomethine nitrogen and pyridine nitrogen atoms. The ligand field parameters were calculated for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes and their values were found in the range reported for a octahedral structure. The data show that the complexes have composition of ML2 type. The activation of thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coast-Redfern, Horowitz-Metzger (HM), Piloyan-Novikova (PN) and Broido's equations. Protonation constants of Schiff base and stability constants of their binary metal complexes have been determined potentiometrically in 50% DMSO-water media at 25 °C and ionic strength 0.10 M potassium nitrate. Both the Schiff's base ligand and its complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities.

  13. Growing Algae Alter Spectroscopic Characteristics and Chlorine Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter from Thermally-Altered Forest Litters.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Chow, Alex T

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that wildfires alter spectroscopic characteristics of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) and increase specific disinfection byproduct formation potential (SDBP-FP). However, it is unclear whether characteristics of thermally altered DOM (TA-DOM) are altered by biogeochemical processes (e.g., transformed by growing algae) before entering water treatment facilities. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and blue-green algae Microcystis aeruginosa were separately incubated in the mixture of cultural medium and pine (Pinus palustris) litter-derived TA-DOMs (50 °C, 250 °C, and 400 °C) over 7 days to demonstrate the effects of algal growth on alterations in SDBP-FP. TA-DOM optical characteristics and SDBP-FP were quantified by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and chlorination-based DBP-FP experiments. After the inoculation with P. subcapitata, TA-DOM aromaticity (indicated by SUVA254) increased from 1.19 to 1.90 L/mg/m for 50 °C-extract but decreased from 4.95 to 3.75 L/mg/m for 400 °C-extract. The fraction of tyrosine-like components decreased from 25.9 to 9.3% for 50 °C-extract but increased from 0.9 to 1.3% for 400 °C-extract. Same patterns were also observed for M. aeruginosa. Growing algae generally increased chlorine reactivities and formations of trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, chloral hydrate, and haloketones. Our data suggest that the biodegradable dissolved organic carbon in TA-DOM decreases as fire intensity (i.e., temperature) increases. Postfire algal blooms can increase chlorine reactivity of fire-affected terrestrial DOM for DBP formation.

  14. EUV contact holes and pillars patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sarohan; De Simone, Danilo; Tao, Zheng; Vandenberghe, Geert; Hyun, Yoonsuk; Kim, Seo-Min; Lim, Chang-Moon

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we will present the experimental comparison results on contact holes (CHs) and pillars patterning in EUV lithography with several candidate processes. Firstly, we have compared the normalized image log-slope (NILS), local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU) and dose-to-size (DtS) with respect to positive tone imaging (PTI) and negative tone imaging (NTI) process by EUV stochastic simulation. From the simulation results, we found that NTI process has higher absorbed photon density that can reduce the DtS and the LCDU of pillars pattern is improved with higher NILS compared to CHs patterning with similar DtS. So we have experimentally evaluated the pillars patterning process with 0.25NA EUV scanner system and compared the process margin, LCDU and DtS with the same parameters of the CHs pattering process. Further, we have demonstrated the CHs patterning with reverse process from pillars by using the dry development rinse process (DDRP). Different to the simulation results, the experimental LCDU results of pillars pattern and CHs pattern by DDRP show worse values comparing with the reference resist CHs pattern. In order to analyze these results, we have investigated the effect of flare, target CD, PR thickness and mask stack of the experimental conditions. Furthermore, we have evaluated the pillar patterning with NTD resist and by DDRP.

  15. Effect of sucrose on the thermal denaturation of a protein: An FTIR spectroscopic study of a monoclonal antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byler, D. M.; Lee, D. L.; Sokoloski, T. D.; Dal Monte, P. R.; Baldoni, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    The three-dimensional structure of many proteins and complex polypeptides is critically sensitive to the environment to which such a biopolymer is subjected. For example, in some cases lyophilization, which entails a complete cycle of freezing, drying in vacuo, and warming to ambient, brings about unpredictable changes to the secondary structure (conformation). Various research and development groups have suggested that the addition of sucrose or other oligosaccharides to protein solutions prior to lyophilization works to maintain the structural integrity of the native macromolecule. Less information is available, however, with regard to whether or not the presence of sugar inhibits thermal denaturation of proteins in solution. In the present study, FTIR spectroscopic examination of solutions of the monoclonal antibody in D2O suggests that 6% (w/V) added sucrose produces little change in the observed mean temperature of thermal denaturation, Tm~68 °C. Yet, when the protein solution is held at constant temperature in the range between about 60 and 75 °C, the presence of sucrose significantly alters the rate at which the protein unfolds. Based on the disappearance of the strong band near 1634 cm-1 associated with intramolecular β-structure of the native protein, the unfolding process was found to follow first-order kinetics. In the absence of sugar, the slope of a plot of ln (intensity) versus time yielded a first order rate constant of kl=2.65 hr-1 at 69 °C. By contrast, when the protein solution contained 6% sucrose (w/V), kl=1.85 hr-1 at the same temperature. Measuring the rate at different temperatures around Tm indicates that protein solutions containing sucrose unfold more slowly above ~68 °C than does the protein without the excipient. At lower temperatures, however, the opposite is true; the presence of the sugar enhances the rate of denaturation. Arrhenius plots of ln kl versus 1/T indicates that Ea=~600 kJ/mol for the protein alone, but only ~330 k

  16. Montmorillonite-based porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) intercalated with silica-titania pillars-synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielarz, Lucjan; Gil, Barbara; Kustrowski, Piotr; Piwowarska, Zofia; Dudek, Barbara; Michalik, Marek

    2009-05-15

    Porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) were synthesized using natural montmorillonite as a raw material. Apart from pure silica pillars also silica-titania pillars were intercalated into the interlayer space of the parent clay. The detailed studies of the calcination process of the as-prepared PCH samples as well as thermal stability of the pillared structure of these materials were performed. The pillared structure of PCHs intercalated with both silica and silica-titania clusters was found to be thermally stable up to temperatures exceeding 600 deg. C. It was found that titanium incorporated into the silica pillars was present mainly in the form of separated tetracoordinated cations. For the samples with the higher Ti loading also small contribution of titanium in the form of the polymeric oxide species was detected. Titanium incorporated into the PCH materials significantly increased their surface acidity forming mainly Bronsted acid sites. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of the montmorillonite based porous clay heterostructures (PCHs) intercalated with silica-titania pillars has been performed. The mechanism of the thermal degradation of organic templates in the pore system of PCHs was studied. PCHs were characterized with respect to structure, texture, composition, surface acidity, thermal stability and form of introduced titanium.

  17. Pillar-Shaped Macrocyclic Hosts Pillar[n]arenes: New Key Players for Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-27

    In 2008, we reported a new class of pillar-shaped macrocyclic hosts, known as "pillar[n]arenes". Today, pillar[n]arenes are recognized as key players in supramolecular chemistry because of their facile synthesis, unique pillar shape, versatile functionality, interesting host-guest properties, and original supramolecular assembly characteristics, which have resulted in numerous electrochemical and biomedical material applications. In this Review, we have provided historical background to macrocyclic chemistry, followed by a detailed discussion of the fundamental properties of pillar[n]arenes, including their synthesis, structure, and host-guest properties. Furthermore, we have discussed the applications of pillar[n]arenes to materials science, as well as their applications in supramolecular chemistry, in terms of their fundamental properties. Finally, we have described the future perspectives of pillar[n]arene chemistry. We hope that this Review will provide a useful reference for researchers working in the field and inspire discoveries concerning pillar[n]arene chemistry. PMID:27337002

  18. Amino-functionalized pillar[5]arene.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Nathan L; Zhang, Huacheng; Schneebeli, Severin T; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-08-25

    The recently introduced pillar[n]arenes have provided chemists with receptors that, when incorporated into materials, confer unique properties upon them. The symmetrical rims and cylindrical shape of pillar[5]arene begs the question--can these pillar-like receptors be linked covalently end-to-end in order to create tubular structures by a growth-from-template approach? In our efforts to produce these one-dimensional extended structures, we have developed a new method of functionalizing pillar[5]arene in which one of the five hydroquinone units is converted into a diaminobenzoquinone analogue. The resulting diaminopillar[5]arene derivative, which undergoes a stereochemical inversion process that is slow on the (1)H NMR timescale, can be chemically modified yet further in a direction that is orthogonal to the plane of its methylene bridging carbons through the formation of oxazole heterocycles. This strategy has been employed to create rigid oligomers that resemble one-dimensional tubular arrays. As a proof-of-principle, a rigid pillar[5]arene dimer has been isolated and characterized in the solution state as a 1:1 complex with an extended viologen for which it acts as a receptor.

  19. Water condensation on ultrahydrophobic flexible micro pillar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narhe, Ramchandra

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the growth dynamics of water drops in controlled condensation on ultrahydrophobic geometrically patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cylindrical micro pillars. At the beginning, the condensed drops size is comparable to the pattern dimensions. The interesting phenomenon we observe is that, as the condensation progresses, water drops between the pillars become unstable and enforced to grow in the upward direction along the pillars surface. The capillary force of these drops is of the order of μ\\text{N} and acts on neighboring pillars. That results into bending of the pillars. Pillars bending enhances the condensation and favors the most energetically stable Wenzel state.

  20. Pillar[6]arene-based photoresponsive host-guest complexation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guocan; Han, Chengyou; Zhang, Zibin; Chen, Jianzhuang; Yan, Xuzhou; Zheng, Bo; Liu, Shiyong; Huang, Feihe

    2012-05-23

    The trans form of an azobenzene-containing guest can complex with a pillar[6]arene, while it cannot complex with pillar[5]arenes due to the different cavity sizes of the pillar[6]arene and the pillar[5]arenes. The spontaneous aggregation of its host-guest complex with the pillar[6]arene can be reversibly photocontrolled by irradiation with UV and visible light, leading to a switch between irregular aggregates and vesicle-like aggregates. This new pillar[6]arene-based photoresponsive host-guest recognition motif can work in organic solvents and is a good supplement to the existing widely used cyclodextrin/azobenzene recognition motif.

  1. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  2. Manipulating the inter pillar gap in pillar array ultra-thin layer planar chromatography platforms.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nichole A; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2016-02-21

    An advantage of separation platforms based on deterministic micro- and nano-fabrications, relative to traditional systems based on packed beds of particles, is the exquisite control of all morphological parameters. For example, with planar platforms based on lithographically-prepared pillar arrays, the size, shape, height, geometric arrangement, and inter pillar gaps can be independently adjusted. Since the inter pillar gap is expected to be important in determining resistance to mass transfer in the mobile phase as well as the flow rate, which influences the mass transfer effect and axial diffusion, we herein study the effect of reducing inter pillar gaps on capillary action-based flow and band dispersion. Atomic layer deposition is used to narrow the gap between the pillars for photo-lithographically defined pillar arrays. The plate height of gap-adjusted arrays is modeled based on predicted and observed flow rates. A reduction in the flow rate with smaller gaps hinders the efficiency in the modeled case and is correlated with actual separations. A conclusion is drawn that simultaneously reducing both the gap and the pillar diameter is the best approach in terms of improving the chromatographic efficiency. PMID:26824088

  3. Manipulating the inter pillar gap in pillar array ultra-thin layer planar chromatography platforms.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nichole A; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2016-02-21

    An advantage of separation platforms based on deterministic micro- and nano-fabrications, relative to traditional systems based on packed beds of particles, is the exquisite control of all morphological parameters. For example, with planar platforms based on lithographically-prepared pillar arrays, the size, shape, height, geometric arrangement, and inter pillar gaps can be independently adjusted. Since the inter pillar gap is expected to be important in determining resistance to mass transfer in the mobile phase as well as the flow rate, which influences the mass transfer effect and axial diffusion, we herein study the effect of reducing inter pillar gaps on capillary action-based flow and band dispersion. Atomic layer deposition is used to narrow the gap between the pillars for photo-lithographically defined pillar arrays. The plate height of gap-adjusted arrays is modeled based on predicted and observed flow rates. A reduction in the flow rate with smaller gaps hinders the efficiency in the modeled case and is correlated with actual separations. A conclusion is drawn that simultaneously reducing both the gap and the pillar diameter is the best approach in terms of improving the chromatographic efficiency.

  4. Microstructural Evolution of Cu/Solder/Cu Pillar-Type Structures with Different Diffusion Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsi-Kuei; Lin, Yu-Jie; Chen, Chih-Ming; Liu, Kuo-Chio; Wang, Ying-Lang; Liu, Tzeng-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Microstructural evolution of the Cu/solder/Cu pillar-type bonding structures with a reduced solder volume subjected to thermal aging at 423 K to 473 K(150 °C to 200 °C) was investigated. In a bonding structure employing a Ni single layer as the diffusion barrier, solder was consumed with formation of the Ni3Sn4 phase at the bonding interfaces due to an usual Sn/Ni interfacial reaction. However, an unusual Sn/Cu reaction occurred with formation of the Cu6Sn5 (and Cu3Sn) phase on the periphery of the Cu pillar due to out-diffusion of Sn toward the pillar periphery. Consumption of solder was accelerated by the above two reactions which led to the formation of a continuous gap in the bonding structure. Employment of a thicker Ni layer plus a Cu cap layer as the diffusion barrier in the bonding structure effectively blocked out-diffusion of Sn toward the periphery of the Cu pillar and therefore retarded the gap formation. The retardation effect was attributed to an increment of diffusion distance on the pillar periphery due to an effective diffusion barrier composed by Ni and thicker Cu-Sn (Cu6Sn5 + Cu3Sn) phase layers. Detailed phase identification and microstructural evolution in the bonding structures were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Elastocapillary coalescence of plates and pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Z.; Schneider, T. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, H.-Y.; Aizenberg, J.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-01-01

    When a fluid-immersed array of supported plates or pillars is dried, evaporation leads to the formation of menisci on the tips of the plates or pillars that bring them together to form complex patterns. Building on prior experimental observations, we use a combination of theory and computation to understand the nature of this instability and its evolution in both the two- and three-dimensional setting of the problem. For the case of plates, we explicitly derive the interaction torques based on the relevant physical parameters associated with pillar deformation, contact-line pinning/depinning and fluid volume changes. A Bloch-wave analysis for our periodic mechanical system captures the window of volumes where the two-plate eigenvalue characterizes the onset of the coalescence instability. We then study the evolution of these binary clusters and their eventual elastic arrest using numerical simulations that account for evaporative dynamics coupled to capillary coalescence. This explains both the formation of hierarchical clusters and the sensitive dependence of the final structures on initial perturbations, as seen in our experiments. We then generalize our analysis to treat the problem of pillar collapse in three dimensions, where the fluid domain is completely connected and the interface is a minimal surface with the uniform mean curvature. Our theory and simulations capture the salient features of experimental observations in a range of different situations and may thus be useful in controlling the ensuing patterns. PMID:25792949

  6. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, Ray J.; Bowen, William R.

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  7. Construction of microcanonical entropy on thermodynamic pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele

    2015-05-01

    A question that is currently highly debated is whether the microcanonical entropy should be expressed as the logarithm of the phase volume (volume entropy, also known as the Gibbs entropy) or as the logarithm of the density of states (surface entropy, also known as the Boltzmann entropy). Rather than postulating them and investigating the consequence of each definition, as is customary, here we adopt a bottom-up approach and construct the entropy expression within the microcanonical formalism upon two fundamental thermodynamic pillars: (i) The second law of thermodynamics as formulated for quasistatic processes: δ Q /T is an exact differential, and (ii) the law of ideal gases: P V =kBN T . The first pillar implies that entropy must be some function of the phase volume Ω . The second pillar singles out the logarithmic function among all possible functions. Hence the construction leads uniquely to the expression S =kBlnΩ , that is, the volume entropy. As a consequence any entropy expression other than that of Gibbs, e.g., the Boltzmann entropy, can lead to inconsistencies with the two thermodynamic pillars. We illustrate this with the prototypical example of a macroscopic collection of noninteracting spins in a magnetic field, and show that the Boltzmann entropy severely fails to predict the magnetization, even in the thermodynamic limit. The uniqueness of the Gibbs entropy, as well as the demonstrated potential harm of the Boltzmann entropy, provide compelling reasons for discarding the latter at once.

  8. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  9. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  10. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  11. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  12. 30 CFR 75.386 - Final mining of pillars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final mining of pillars. 75.386 Section 75.386... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.386 Final mining of pillars. When only one mine opening is available due to final mining of pillars, no more than 20 miners at a time...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140 Section 80.1140 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Pillar Point Harbor Light 6...

  14. Pillared montmorillonite catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S.

    1994-12-31

    Pillared clays contain large micropores and have considerable potential for catalytic hydrogenation and cleavage of coal macromolecules. Pillared montmorillonite-supported catalysts were prepared by the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxychromium cations and subsequent impregnation of nickel and molybdenum. Infrared and thermogravimetric studies of pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of both Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Thus, the catalysts have both acidic properties that can aid in hydrocracking and cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds as well as hydrogen-activating bimetallic sites. These catalysts were applied to the hydrodesulfurization and liquefaction of coal-derived intermediates. The reactions of model organosulfur compounds and coal liquids were carried out at 300{degrees}-400{degrees}C for 3 hours in the presence of 1000 psi of molecular hydrogen. Reaction products were analyzed by GC/FT-IR/MS/AED. The catalysts have been found to be very effective in removing sulfur from model compounds as well as liquefaction products.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antimicrobial investigations of charge-transfer complexes formed from the drug procaine hydrochloride with quinol, picric acid and TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2012-12-01

    Intermolecular charge-transfer or proton-transfer complexes between the drug procaine hydrochloride (PC-HCl) as a donor and quinol (QL), picric acid (PA) or 7,7',8,8'-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as a π-acceptor have been synthesized and spectroscopically studied in methanol at room temperature. Based on elemental analyses and photometric titrations, the stoichiometry of the complexes (donor:acceptor molar ratios) was determined to be 1:1 for all three complexes. The formation constant (KCT), molar extinction coefficient (ɛCT) and other spectroscopic data have been determined using the Benesi-Hildebrand method and its modifications. The newly synthesized CT complexes have been characterized via elemental analysis, IR, Raman, 1H NMR, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The morphological features of these complexes were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the sharp, well-defined Bragg reflections at specific 2θ angles have been identified from the powder X-ray diffraction patterns. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGAs) and kinetic thermodynamic parameters were also used to investigate the thermal stability of the synthesized solid CT complexes. Finally, the CT complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities against various bacterial and fungal strains, and only the complex obtained using picric acid exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against all of the tested strains.

  16. Phase front design with metallic pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Verslegers, Lieven; Catrysse, Peter B; Yu, Zongfu; Shin, Wonseok; Ruan, Zhichao; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate numerically, using a three-dimensional finite-difference frequency-domain method, the ability to design a phase front using an array of metallic pillars. We show that in such structures, the local phase delay upon transmission can be tuned by local geometry. We apply this knowledge to demonstrate a metallic microlens. The presented design principles apply to a wider range of wavelength-size integrated photonic components.

  17. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wade, K.L.; Morgan, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Pillared Layered Materials (PLMs) are layered inorganic ion exchangers propped apart by metal oxide pillars. PLMs have been synthesized to sorb strontium from liquid nuclear wastes. A study that compared over 60 sorbers for their ability to sorb strontium from Hanford simulants showed that PLMs were the best sorbers; strontium distribution coefficients ({sup Sr}K{sub d}) > 20000 mL/g were obtained. In addition, PLMs showed a high degree of selectivity for strontium over cesium, transition metals, lanthanides and actinides. The sorption of strontium is, however, inhibited by complexants (EDTA); {sup Sr}K{sub d} values drop to <20 mL/g when they are present. The most promising PLMs were the Cr, Ti, Zr, and Si pillared tantalum tungstate. The K{sub d} values for Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} show a strong pH dependence; K{sub d} values increase to >10{sup 4} above pH 12. The general surface complexation mechanism explains the sorption of these cations on PLMs.

  18. Influence of M2O3 (M = Al, Ga) glass modifiers on structure, thermal and spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in lead phosphate based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sołtys, Marta; Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Goryczka, Tomasz; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2014-05-01

    Influence of M2O3 (M = Al, Ga) modifiers oxide on local structure and spectroscopic properties of lead phosphate glasses containing rare earth ions was studied. Among the rare earths, the trivalent europium and erbium ions were selected as an optically active dopants. The thermal properties were examined using DSC, whereas the X-ray diffraction analysis was used in order to verify the structure glass matrix. Luminescence of rare earth ions in lead phosphate glasses was registered in visible and NIR spectral region. The excitation and emission spectra of lead-based systems are presented and discussed in relation to the effect of modifiers oxide M2O3 (M = Al, Ga). Luminescence lifetimes (τm) for the 5D0 state of Eu3+ ions and 4I13/2 state of Er3+ ions were also evaluated.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterisation, thermal analysis, DNA interaction and antibacterial activity of copper(I) complexes with N, N‧- disubstituted thiourea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetana, P. R.; Srinatha, B. S.; Somashekar, M. N.; Policegoudra, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    copper(I) complexes [Cu(4MTU)2Cl] (2), [Cu(4MTU) (B)Cl] (3), [Cu(6MTU)2Cl] (5) and [Cu(6MTU) (B)Cl] (6) where 4MTU = 1-Benzyl-3-(4-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-thiourea (1) and 6MTU = 1-Benzyl-3-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-thiourea (4), B is a N,N-donor heterocyclic base, viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen 3, 6), were synthesized, characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The elemental analysis suggests that the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand) for 2, 5 1:1:1 (metal:ligand:B) for 3, 6. X-ray powder diffraction illustrates that the complexes have crystalline nature. IR data coupled with electronic spectra and molar conductance values suggest that the complex 2, 5 show the presence of a trigonal planar geometry and the complex 3, 6 show the presence of a tetrahedral geometry about the Cu(I) centre. The binding affinity towards calf thymus (CT) DNA was determined using UV-Vis, fluorescence spectroscopic titrations and viscosity studies. These studies showed that the tested phen complexes 3, 6 bind moderately (in the order of 105 M-1) to CT DNA. The complex 2, 5 does not show any apparent binding to the DNA and hence poor cleavage efficiency. Complex 3, 6 shows efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 involving hydroxyl radical species as evidenced from the control data showing inhibition of DNA cleavage in the presence of DMSO and KI. The in vitro antibacterial assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. Anti-bacterial activity is higher when thiourea coordinates to metal ion than the thiourea alone.

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterisation, thermal analysis, DNA interaction and antibacterial activity of copper(I) complexes with N, N‧- disubstituted thiourea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetana, P. R.; Srinatha, B. S.; Somashekar, M. N.; Policegoudra, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    copper(I) complexes [Cu(4MTU)2Cl] (2), [Cu(4MTU) (B)Cl] (3), [Cu(6MTU)2Cl] (5) and [Cu(6MTU) (B)Cl] (6) where 4MTU = 1-Benzyl-3-(4-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-thiourea (1) and 6MTU = 1-Benzyl-3-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-yl)-thiourea (4), B is a N,N-donor heterocyclic base, viz. 1,10-phenanthroline (phen 3, 6), were synthesized, characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The elemental analysis suggests that the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand) for 2, 5 1:1:1 (metal:ligand:B) for 3, 6. X-ray powder diffraction illustrates that the complexes have crystalline nature. IR data coupled with electronic spectra and molar conductance values suggest that the complex 2, 5 show the presence of a trigonal planar geometry and the complex 3, 6 show the presence of a tetrahedral geometry about the Cu(I) centre. The binding affinity towards calf thymus (CT) DNA was determined using UV-Vis, fluorescence spectroscopic titrations and viscosity studies. These studies showed that the tested phen complexes 3, 6 bind moderately (in the order of 105 M-1) to CT DNA. The complex 2, 5 does not show any apparent binding to the DNA and hence poor cleavage efficiency. Complex 3, 6 shows efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 involving hydroxyl radical species as evidenced from the control data showing inhibition of DNA cleavage in the presence of DMSO and KI. The in vitro antibacterial assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. Anti-bacterial activity is higher when thiourea coordinates to metal ion than the thiourea alone.

  1. Radionuclide separations using pillared layered materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clearfield, A.

    1995-08-31

    The objective of this project is to prepare an all inorganic strontium specific sorbent or ion exchanger for the removal of highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions. A series of clays and layered titanates were pillared and calcined to convert their essentially two dimensional structure to three dimensional porous structures with high surface areas. The pillaring agents were alumina, zirconia, chromia and silica based. The pillared clays, particularly those containing Zr pillars, achieved moderate (Kd as high at 13,700 ml/g with V:m = 28) selectivities for Sr{sup 2+}. In contrast, the silica pillared titanates showed exceptional affinities for Sr{sup 2+} with Kd values in excess of 100,000 ml/g in 5M NaNO{sup 3} + 1M NaOH. These latter results suggest a more detailed study of the pillared titanates in the presence of simulants closely resembling real waste solutions.

  2. Effect of SiO2 content on the thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er/Yb co-doped tellurite borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tiefeng; Zhang, Xudong; Dai, Shixun; Nie, Qiuhua; Shen, Xiang; Zhang, Xianghua

    2007-02-01

    Er/Yb co-doped (85-x) TeO2- 15B2O3- xSiO2 (TBS x=0, 5, 10, 15, 20 mol%) glasses had been prepared. Effect of SiO2 content on the thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er/Yb co-doped tellurite borate glasses have been investigated. With SiO2 content increasing from 0 to 20 mol%, the Tg and Tx, the fluorescence full width at half maximum (FWHM), the peak of stimulated emission cross-section ( σpeak), the measured lifetime ( τm) and quantum efficiency ( η) change from 398C, 530C, 75 nm, 5.7×10-21 cm2, 1.84 ms, 56.4% to 419C, 593C, 71 nm, 7.5×10-21 cm2, 2.38 ms, 70.6%, respectively. The results indicate that for Er/Yb co-doped tellurite borate glasses, introducing a suitable amount of SiO2 content is helpful for the improvement of thermal stability and the incremental of the lifetime of I13/24 level and quantum efficiency of Er:I13/24→I15/24 transition, while keeping the FWHM relatively large.

  3. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis of organic matter degradation and humification during composting of pig slurry in different scenarios.

    PubMed

    Martín-Mata, J; Lahoz-Ramos, C; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Moral, R; Santos, A; Sáez, J A; Bernal, M P

    2016-09-01

    In this work, different analytical techniques (thermal analysis, (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy) have been used to study the organic matter changes during the co-composting of pig slurry with cotton gin waste. To ensure the validity of the findings, the composting process was developed in different scenarios: under experimental pilot plant conditions, using the static pile system, and under real conditions on a pig farm, using the turning pile system. Also, the thermal stability index (R1) was determined before and after an extraction with water, to evaluate the effect of eliminating water-soluble inorganic salts on the thermal analysis. The results of the thermal methods showed the degradation of the most labile organic matter during composting; R1 increased during composting in all piles, without any influence of the presence of water-soluble inorganic ions in the sample. The NMR showed a decrease in the abundance of the carbohydrate molecules and an increase in the aliphatic materials during composting, due to a concentration effect. Also, FT-IR spectroscopy was a useful technique to study the trends of polysaccharides and nitrate, as indicators of organic matter transformations during composting. PMID:27230139

  4. Thermal and spectroscopic analysis of organic matter degradation and humification during composting of pig slurry in different scenarios.

    PubMed

    Martín-Mata, J; Lahoz-Ramos, C; Bustamante, M A; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Moral, R; Santos, A; Sáez, J A; Bernal, M P

    2016-09-01

    In this work, different analytical techniques (thermal analysis, (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy) have been used to study the organic matter changes during the co-composting of pig slurry with cotton gin waste. To ensure the validity of the findings, the composting process was developed in different scenarios: under experimental pilot plant conditions, using the static pile system, and under real conditions on a pig farm, using the turning pile system. Also, the thermal stability index (R1) was determined before and after an extraction with water, to evaluate the effect of eliminating water-soluble inorganic salts on the thermal analysis. The results of the thermal methods showed the degradation of the most labile organic matter during composting; R1 increased during composting in all piles, without any influence of the presence of water-soluble inorganic ions in the sample. The NMR showed a decrease in the abundance of the carbohydrate molecules and an increase in the aliphatic materials during composting, due to a concentration effect. Also, FT-IR spectroscopy was a useful technique to study the trends of polysaccharides and nitrate, as indicators of organic matter transformations during composting.

  5. Thermal, spectroscopic and laser properties of Nd3+ in gadolinium scandium gallium garnet crystal produced by optical floating zone method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Li; Wang, Shuxian; Wu, Kui; Wang, Baolin; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Cai, Huaqiang; Huang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    A neodymium-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:GSGG) single crystal with dimensions of Φ 5 × 20 mm2 has been grown by means of optical floating zone (OFZ). X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) result shows that the as-grown Nd:GSGG crystal possesses a cubic structure with space group Ia3d and a cell parameter of a = 1.2561 nm. Effective elemental segregation coefficients of the Nd:GSGG as-grown crystal were calculated by using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The thermal properties of the Nd:GSGG crystal were systematically studied by measuring the specific heat, thermal expansion and thermal diffusion coefficient, and the thermal conductivity of this crystal was calculated. The absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd:GSGG were measured at room temperature (RT). By using the Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory, the theoretical radiative lifetime was calculated and compared with the experimental result. Continuous wave (CW) laser performance was achieved with the Nd:GSGG at the wavelength of 1062 nm when it was pumped by a laser diode (LD). A maximum output power of 0.792 W at 1062 nm was obtained with a slope efficiency of 11.89% under a pump power of 7.36 W, and an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 11.72%.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of mudstones in a hydrocarbon-bearing depression, South China Sea: Implications for thermal maturity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Entao; Song, Yinxian; Wang, Hua; Liu, Haibo; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2016-01-15

    A better understanding of mineral transformations in sedimentary rocks and the controls on thermal maturity have become essential in the petroleum exploration industry in recent years. The Fushan Depression is an important hydrocarbon-bearing depression in South China Sea, which can be subdivided into three structural zones: the western, central and eastern zones. In this study, a series of mudstone samples selected from 13 drilling cores with depths ranging from 2100 to 3800 m were studied using infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) methods. And another 10 samples have been chosen for vitrinite reflectance measurement so as to investigate the ability of using infrared spectroscopy for thermal maturity evaluations. The infrared spectra results show that quartz and silicates (e.g. illite, kaolinite, smectite) are the dominant minerals in all samples. The semi-quantitative XRD analysis reveals a clear trend in illite content as the eastern zone (mean 80.81%)>the western zone (mean 73.52%)>the central zone (mean 55.04%) as well as a contrary trend in kaolinite content. This study documents that the peak height and position of Si-O antisymmetric stretching bands at ~1025 cm(-1) and ~1000 cm(-1) have a significant correlation with the degree of kaolinite illitization, suggesting that the utility of infrared spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the study of thermal maturity in sedimentary basins. The infrared spectra and XRD results together with vitrinite reflectance data indicate that the thermal maturity in the eastern zone is anomalously high, followed by the western zone, and that in the central zone is lowest. The igneous intrusion in the eastern zone has a significant impact on thermal maturation, resulting in high degree of kaolinite illitization. By contrast, the abundance in kaolinite in the central zone represents relatively low degree of kaolinite illitization, which should be attributed to shallow burial depth.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopic characterization of mudstones in a hydrocarbon-bearing depression, South China Sea: Implications for thermal maturity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Entao; Song, Yinxian; Wang, Hua; Liu, Haibo; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2016-01-15

    A better understanding of mineral transformations in sedimentary rocks and the controls on thermal maturity have become essential in the petroleum exploration industry in recent years. The Fushan Depression is an important hydrocarbon-bearing depression in South China Sea, which can be subdivided into three structural zones: the western, central and eastern zones. In this study, a series of mudstone samples selected from 13 drilling cores with depths ranging from 2100 to 3800 m were studied using infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) methods. And another 10 samples have been chosen for vitrinite reflectance measurement so as to investigate the ability of using infrared spectroscopy for thermal maturity evaluations. The infrared spectra results show that quartz and silicates (e.g. illite, kaolinite, smectite) are the dominant minerals in all samples. The semi-quantitative XRD analysis reveals a clear trend in illite content as the eastern zone (mean 80.81%)>the western zone (mean 73.52%)>the central zone (mean 55.04%) as well as a contrary trend in kaolinite content. This study documents that the peak height and position of Si-O antisymmetric stretching bands at ~1025 cm(-1) and ~1000 cm(-1) have a significant correlation with the degree of kaolinite illitization, suggesting that the utility of infrared spectroscopy is a valuable tool for the study of thermal maturity in sedimentary basins. The infrared spectra and XRD results together with vitrinite reflectance data indicate that the thermal maturity in the eastern zone is anomalously high, followed by the western zone, and that in the central zone is lowest. The igneous intrusion in the eastern zone has a significant impact on thermal maturation, resulting in high degree of kaolinite illitization. By contrast, the abundance in kaolinite in the central zone represents relatively low degree of kaolinite illitization, which should be attributed to shallow burial depth. PMID:26318698

  8. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we "observe" the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  9. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    2005-07-01

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we “observe” the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  10. Spectroscopic, thermal and cw dual-wavelength laser characteristics of Nd:LaF3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiaqi; Zhang, Lianhan; Li, Jing; Wang, Zhaowei; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Peixiong; Wang, Yaqi; Hang, Yin

    2016-03-01

    A Nd-doped LaF3 crystal was grown by Czochralski method, and the rocking curves of (0 0 2) and (1 1 0) diffraction planes show good crystallinity quality of the as-grown crystal. Room-temperature fluorescence spectrum and transmittance spectrum of Nd:LaF3 crystal were investigated, both indicating probable dual-wavelength emissions at ∼1.04 μm and ∼1.06 μm. The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of Nd:LaF3 crystal were detailed studied. Cw dual-wavelength laser operation of Nd:LaF3 single crystal at 1040 nm and around 1065 nm with LD pumping was demonstrated. A maximum output power of 302 mW was obtained with a slope efficiency of about 18.5% with respect to the pump power. The results of our study indicate the Nd:LaF3 crystal a promising laser crystal.

  11. Calorimetric and Spectroscopic Analysis of the Thermal Stability of Short Duplex DNA-Containing Sugar and Base-Modified Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fakhfakh, Kareem; Hughesman, Curtis B; Louise Creagh, A; Kao, Vincent; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Base- and sugar-modified analogs of DNA and RNA are finding ever expanding use in medicine and biotechnology as tools to better tailor structured oligonucleotides by altering their thermal stability, nuclease resistance, base-pairing specificity, antisense activity, or cellular uptake. Proper deployment of these chemical modifications generally requires knowledge of how each affects base-pairing properties and thermal stabilities. Here, we describe in detail how differential scanning calorimetry and UV spectroscopy may be used to quantify the melting thermodynamics of short dsDNA containing chemically modified nucleosides in one or both strands. Insights are provided into why and how the presence of highly stable base pairs containing modified nucleosides can alter the nature of calorimetry or melting spectroscopy data, and how each experiment must therefore be conducted to ensure high-quality melting thermodynamics data are obtained. Strengths and weaknesses of the two methods when applied to chemically modified duplexes are also addressed.

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and thermal behavior of metal complexes formed with N'-(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethylidene)-2-oxo-2-(phenylamino) acetohydrazide (H 3OPAH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sara F.; El-Gammal, Ola A.; El-Reash, Gaber Abu

    2011-12-01

    Complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Hg(II) and U(IV)O 22+ with N'-(1-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethylidene)-2-oxo-2-(phenylamino) acetohydrazide (H 3OPAH) are reported and have been characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like IR, UV-visible, 1H NMR and ESR as well as magnetic and thermal (TG and DTA) measurements. It is found that the ligand behaves as a neutral bidentate, monoanionic tridentate or tetradentate and dianionic tetradentate. An octahedral geometry for [Mn(H 3OPAH) 2Cl 2], [Co 2(H 2OPAH) 2Cl 2(H 2O) 4] and [(UO 2) 2(HOPAH)(OAc) 2(H 2O) 2] complexes, a square planar geometry for [Cu 2(H 2OPAH)Cl 3(H 2O)]H 2O complex, a tetrahedral structure for [Cd(H 3OPAH)Cl 2], [Zn(H 3OPAH)(OAc) 2] and [Hg(H 3OPAH)Cl 2]H 2O complexes. The binuclear [Ni 2(HOPAH)Cl 2(H 2O) 2]H 2O complex contains a mixed geometry of both tetrahedral and square planar structures. The protonation constants of ligand and stepwise stability constants of its complexes at 298, 308 and 318 K as well as the thermodynamic parameters are being calculated. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moments have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes. Also, thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all compounds are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters ( Ea, A, Δ H, Δ S and Δ G) of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods.

  13. Determination of the succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol phase diagrams by thermal and UV spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B.

    1984-01-01

    Equilibrium temperature-composition diagrams were determined for the two organic systems, succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol. Measurements were made using the common thermal analysis methods and UV spectrophotometry. Succinonitrile-benzene monotectic was chosen for its low affinity for water and because UV analysis would be simplified. Succinonitrile-cyclohexanol was chosen because both components are transparent models for metallic solidification, as opposed to the other known succinonitrile-based monotectics.

  14. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of spin-on dopant layers used in proximity rapid thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Borja, Fernando; Grabiec, Piotr B.; Zagozdzon-Wasik, Wanda; Wood, Lowell L.

    1994-01-01

    A new rapid thermal diffusion (proximity RTD) method, utilizing spin-on dopant (SOD) layers, was reported recently. This technique is based on an evaporation-gas phase diffusion- adsorption-surface reaction-diffusion in Si scheme. In this paper we use FTIR spectroscopy to investigate a relationship between the SOD layer structure/composition and its doping efficiency, as determined by sheet resistance (RS) measurements, for a phosphorus diffusion case.

  15. Chemical Degradation of Siloxane Stress Cushions (M97 and S5370) by Thermal, Mechanical and Spectroscopic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R S; Gee, R; Balazs, B; Cohenour, R; Sung, B

    2002-04-19

    We are currently investigating the long term aging of weapon organics in an effort to develop predictive capabilities for functional service life. As part of this effort, we have been studying multimechanism aging of M97 and 53370 stress cushions. Ionizing radiation, thermal degradation, and desiccation all affect the crosslink density and motional dynamics and thus the engineering performance of these materials. Our approach has been to develop molecular level understanding of the effects of such aging mechanisms on polymer properties by a combined approach utilizing solvent swelling, thermal, DMA, molecular modeling, and solid state NMR. This presentation will offer a survey of our current work, concentrating on the application of solid state NMR for correlating structure and polymer dynamics. An overview of the relationships between crosslink density, NMR relaxation times, polymer chain dynamics, and storage modulus measurements will be presented and the advantages of NMR will be discussed. It will be shown that silicone based polymers tend to crosslink upon exposure to {gamma}-radiation, undergo chain scission upon thermal degradation, and stiffen upon desiccation.

  16. Synthesis, structure and photoluminescent behavior of a novel pillar-layered {Zn3}-based metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue-Zhi; Mu, Wen-Sheng; Han, Bing-Yan; Yan, Yang

    2016-09-01

    A novel 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) {[Zn3(bpdc)3 (p-4-bpmb)](DMF)2}n ( 1) (H2bpdc=biphenyl-4,4‧-dicarboxylic acid; p-4-bpmb=1,4-bis(pyridine-4-ylmethoxy)benzene) has been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 1 exhibits a 3D pillar-layered framework based on the trinuclear {Zn3} building blocks, consisting of Zn-dicarboxylate layers and bipyridyl-derivative pillars. Furthermore, it features three-fold interpenetrating 8-connected hex-type topology. In addition, its thermal stability and luminescent property have also been investigated.

  17. A combined study by XRD, FTIR, TG and HRTEM on the structure of delaminated Fe-intercalated/pillared clay.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Annabi-Bergaya, Faïza; Tao, Qi; Fan, Mingde; Liu, Zongwen; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping; Chen, Tianhu

    2008-08-01

    Fe-PILC samples were synthesized by the reaction between Na(+)- and/or Ca(2+)-montmorillonite (Mt) and base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe(III) nitrate. Different from the known usual microporous pillared structure, a meso-microporous delaminated structure containing intercalated or pillared fragments was found in the respective resulting Fe-intercalated or -pillared clays. XRD patterns of Na(+)-Mt-based Fe-intercalated/pillared clays show one large d-spacing above 6.4 nm corresponding to the mesoporous delaminated part, whereas another d-spacing of ca. 1.5 nm was indicative of the microporous pillared part. Fe-intercalated/pillared clays based on Ca(2+)-Mt lead to similar results, but with a d-spacing less than 6 nm and a second low intense d-spacing less than 1.5 nm. In the delaminated Fe-intercalated clays, NO(-)(3) anions were retained even after thorough washing process. They play as counterions to neutralize the positive-charged iron aggregates in the delaminated structure, and can be exchanged by heteropolyanions as [PW(12)O(40)](3-). The delaminated Fe-pillared clays show good thermal stability at 500 degrees C and exhibit at this temperature dramatically higher specific surface area and porosity than the starting montmorillonites. However, calcination at a higher temperature leads to the formation of nanocrystalline hematite. Air-drying after ethanol extraction (EAD) method has an advantage over air-drying (AD) method in preserving the delaminated structure. PMID:18502444

  18. Supercapacitors based on pillared graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Zhong, Jiebin; Bao, Duoduo; Reiber-Kyle, Jennifer; Wang, Wei; Vullev, Valentine; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2012-03-01

    We describe the fabrication of highly conductive and large-area three dimensional pillared graphene nanostructure (PGN) films from assembly of vertically aligned CNT pillars on flexible copper foils for applications in electric double layer capacitors (EDLC). The PGN films synthesized via a one-step chemical vapor deposition process on flexible copper foils exhibit high conductivity with sheet resistance as low as 1.6 ohms per square and possessing high mechanical flexibility. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and their morphology can be controlled by the growth conditions. It was discovered that nitric acid treatment can significantly increase the specific capacitance of the devices. EDLC devices based on PGN electrodes (surface area of 565 m2/g) demonstrate enhanced performance with specific capacitance value as high as 330 F/g extracted from the current density-voltage (CV) measurements and energy density value of 45.8 Wh/kg. The hybrid graphene-CNT nanostructures are attractive for applications including supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries. PMID:22754980

  19. Intermolecular dimerization with pillared layered clay templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G. P.; Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Seifert, S.; Chemistry

    2001-11-19

    Solutions of pyrene in the presence of a pillared, layered montmorillonite clay produce hybrid organic-inorganic materials with substantial molecular loading in the gallery regions between the clay layers. The results are in sharp contrast to other aromatics, such as benzene, naphthalene, or perylene, which show minimal incorporation of the molecules into the gallery regions of the clay. We present evidence that the unusual affinity for pyrene to form intermolecular dimers is the reason for the high loading. Pyrene monomers are easily introduced to the layers. Through steric hindrance, subsequent intermolecular dimer formation is allowed, and they are captured by the pillared, layered structure. CW and time-resolved emission spectra strongly indicate the presence of face-to-face intermolecular dimers (excimers) within the clay galleries. The combination of the ease of high molecular loading into an inorganic, high aspect ratio template and the collective optical properties of the organic layer may be useful as a new means to create hybrid structures.

  20. A near infrared spectroscopic study of the structural modifications of lime (Tilia cordata Mill.) wood during hydro-thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Popescu, Maria-Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The modifications and/or degradation of lime (Tillia cordata) wood components during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity were evaluated. The aim of this study was to obtain results by simple NIR coupled with second derivative, principal component analysis and two dimensional correlation spectroscopy in order to better understand how these techniques are able to evaluate structural differences resulted under hydro-thermal treatment of the wood over a period of 504 h. The NIR spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference one. Due to the broad bands in the NIR spectra, the assignment and modifications occurring during treatment is difficult, therefore the second derivative principal component analysis were applied. Principal component analysis by first two components was able to differentiate the samples series, PC1 being considered as the time axis, and PC2 as the axis representing the structural modification of wood components. 2D NIR correlation spectroscopy was able to estimate the sequential order of the groups variations under the hydro-thermal treatment time as external perturbation, indicating as first moment changes the OH and Csbnd O groups from carbohydrates and lignin, followed by Carsbnd H, Csbnd H and CH2 groups from lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses.

  1. A near infrared spectroscopic study of the structural modifications of lime (Tilia cordata Mill.) wood during hydro-thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela; Popescu, Maria-Cristina

    2013-11-01

    The modifications and/or degradation of lime (Tillia cordata) wood components during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140°C and 10% percentage of relative humidity were evaluated. The aim of this study was to obtain results by simple NIR coupled with second derivative, principal component analysis and two dimensional correlation spectroscopy in order to better understand how these techniques are able to evaluate structural differences resulted under hydro-thermal treatment of the wood over a period of 504h. The NIR spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference one. Due to the broad bands in the NIR spectra, the assignment and modifications occurring during treatment is difficult, therefore the second derivative principal component analysis were applied. Principal component analysis by first two components was able to differentiate the samples series, PC1 being considered as the time axis, and PC2 as the axis representing the structural modification of wood components. 2D NIR correlation spectroscopy was able to estimate the sequential order of the groups variations under the hydro-thermal treatment time as external perturbation, indicating as first moment changes the OH and CO groups from carbohydrates and lignin, followed by CarH, CH and CH2 groups from lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses.

  2. Thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the boro silicate mineral datolite - CaBSiO4(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Horta, Laura Frota Campos; Lopez, Andres

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the thermal stability and vibrational spectra of datolite CaBSiO4(OH) and relate these properties to the structure of the mineral. The thermal analysis of datolite shows a mass loss of 5.83% over a 700-775 °C temperature range. This mass loss corresponds to 1 water (H2O) molecules pfu. A quantitative chemical analysis using electron probe was undertaken. The Raman spectrum of datolite is characterized by bands at 917 and 1077 cm-1 assigned to the symmetric stretching modes of BO and SiO tetrahedra. A very intense Raman band is observed at 3498 cm-1 assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units in the structure of datolite. BOH out-of-plane vibrations are characterized by the infrared band at 782 cm-1. The vibrational spectra are based upon the structure of datolite based on sheets of four- and eight-membered rings of alternating SiO4 and BO3(OH) tetrahedra with the sheets bonded together by calcium atoms.

  3. Transition metal complexes of Vanillin- 4N-(2-pyridyl) thiosemicarbazone (H 2VPT); thermal, structural and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Reash, Gaber Abu; El-Ayaan, Usama; Gabr, I. M.; El-Rachawy, El-Bastawesy

    2010-04-01

    The present work carried out a study on the ligational behavior of the new ligand, Vanillin- 4N-(2-pyridyl) thiosemicarbazone (H 2VPT) 1 towards some transition metal ions namely, Mn 2+, Co 2+, Ni 2+, Cu 2+, Zn 2+,Cd 2+, Hg 2+ and U 6+. These complexes namely [Mn(HVPT)Cl] 2, [Co(VPT)(H 2O)] 2H 2O 3, [Ni(HVPT)Cl(H 2O)] 4, [Cu(HVPT)Cl(H 2O)] 5, [Zn(VPT)(H 2O)]H 2O 6, [Cd(HVPT)Cl(H 2O)] 7, [Hg(VPT)(H 2O)]H 2O 8 and [UO 2(H 2VPT)(OAc) 2]H 2O 9, were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, 1H NMR and UV-vis) and magnetic moment measurements. The suggested structures were confirmed by applying geometry optimization and conformational analysis. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all compounds are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters ( E, A, Δ H, Δ S and Δ G) of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equation. ESR spectra of [Cu(HVPT)Cl]H 2O at room temperature show broad signal, indicating spin-exchange interactions between copper(II) ions.

  4. Growth, Structure, Thermal Properties and Spectroscopic Characteristics of Nd3+-Doped KGdP4O12 Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tongqing; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Pai; Zhang, Zichang; Chen, Shaolin; Kong, Yongfa; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-01

    A single crystal of Nd3+-doped KGdP4O12 was successfully grown with the top-seeded solution growth and slow cooling (TSSG−SC) technique. It crystallizes in space group C2/c with cell parameters a = 7.812(2) Å, b = 12.307(3) Å, c = 10.474(2) Å, β = 110.84(3)° and Z = 4. The IR and Raman spectra also indicated that the phosphoric polyhedra of Nd:KGdP4O12 has a cyclic symmetry. The chemical composition of the crystal was analyzed and the distribution coefficient of Nd3+ was calculated. The crystal morphology of KGdP4O12 was identified using X-ray diffraction. The compound has good thermal stability to 920°C. Its specific heat and thermal conductivity were determined for potential applications. The spectral properties of Nd:KGdP4O12 indicates that it exhibits broad absorption and emission bands, which are attributed to low symmetry of the crystal. The broad absorption band around 798 nm has a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 14.8 nm and is suitable for AlGaAs laser diode pumping. Moreover, 5 at% Nd3+-doped KGdP4O12 crystal has a long luminescence lifetime of 300 μs and a high quantum efficiency of 96%. PMID:24968165

  5. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-12-01

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm-1, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83-473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ˜0.97 W m-1 K-1 was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  6. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu

    2015-12-07

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83–473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ∼0.97 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  7. Thermal and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2}: Comparison of spectroscopic and electric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Chittaranjan Henkel, Karsten; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; Gargouri, Hassan; Kärkkänen, Irina; Schneidewind, Jessica; Gruska, Bernd; Arens, Michael

    2015-01-15

    Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used as a protective layer in photocatalytic water splitting system as well as a dielectric in resistive memory switching. The way ALD is performed (thermally or plasma-assisted) may change the growth rate as well as the electronic properties of the deposited films. In the present work, the authors verify the influence of the ALD mode on functional parameters, by comparing the growth rate and electronic properties of TiO{sub 2} films deposited by thermal (T-) and plasma-enhanced (PE-) ALD. The authors complete the study with the electrical characterization of selected samples by means of capacitance–voltage and current–voltage measurements. In all samples, the authors found a significant presence of Ti{sup 3+} states, with the lowest content in the PE-ALD grown TiO{sub 2} films. The observation of Ti{sup 3+} states was accompanied by the presence of in-gap states above the valence band maximum. For films thinner than 10 nm, the authors found also a strong leakage current. Also in this case, the PE-ALD films showed the weakest leakage currents, showing a correlation between the presence of Ti{sup 3+} states and leakage current density.

  8. Thermal analysis and vibrational spectroscopic characterization of the boro silicate mineral datolite - CaBSiO4(OH).

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei; Scholz, Ricardo; Lima, Rosa Malena Fernandes; Horta, Laura Frota Campos; Lopez, Andres

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the thermal stability and vibrational spectra of datolite CaBSiO4(OH) and relate these properties to the structure of the mineral. The thermal analysis of datolite shows a mass loss of 5.83% over a 700-775°C temperature range. This mass loss corresponds to 1 water (H2O) molecules pfu. A quantitative chemical analysis using electron probe was undertaken. The Raman spectrum of datolite is characterized by bands at 917 and 1077cm(-1) assigned to the symmetric stretching modes of BO and SiO tetrahedra. A very intense Raman band is observed at 3498cm(-1) assigned to the stretching vibration of the OH units in the structure of datolite. BOH out-of-plane vibrations are characterized by the infrared band at 782cm(-1). The vibrational spectra are based upon the structure of datolite based on sheets of four- and eight-membered rings of alternating SiO4 and BO3(OH) tetrahedra with the sheets bonded together by calcium atoms.

  9. Spectroscopic and thermal properties of short wavelength metal (II) complexes containing α-isoxazolylazo-β-diketones as co-ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fuxin; Wu, Yiqun; Gu, Donghong; Gan, Fuxi

    2005-10-01

    Two new azo dyes of α-isoxazolylazo-β-diketones and their Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with blue-violet light wavelength were synthesized using a coupling component, different diazo components and metal (II) ions (Ni 2+ and Cu 2+). Based on the elemental analysis, MS spectra and FT-IR spectral analyses, azo dyes were unequivocally shown to exist as hydrazoketo and azoenol forms which were respectively obtained from the solution forms and from the solid forms. The action of sodium methoxide (NaOMe) on azo dyes in solutions converts hydrazoketo form into azoenol form, so azo dyes are coordinated with metal (II) ions as co-ligands in the azoenol forms. The solubility of all the compounds in common organic solvents such as 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propanol (TFP) or chloroform (CHCl 3) and absorption properties of spin-coating thin films were measured. The difference of absorption maxima from the complexes to their ligands was discussed. In addition, the TG analysis of the complexes was also determined, and their thermal stability was evaluated. It is found that these new metal (II) complexes had potential application for high-density digital versatile disc-recordable (HD-DVD-R) system due to their good solubility in organic solvents, reasonable and controllable absorption spectra in blue-violet light region and high thermal stability.

  10. Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The organizers of the Decade for Childhood have formulated Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood as basic requirements for an optimal childhood. The pillars can be used to analyze the quality of childhood in homes and nations, and to guide policies and practices related to the experience of childhood. In this article, the author shall illustrate, pillar…

  11. Biomechanical Characterization of Cardiomyocyte Using PDMS Pillar with Microgrooves

    PubMed Central

    Oyunbaatar, Nomin-Erdene; Lee, Deok-Hyu; Patil, Swati J.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the surface-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pillar arrays for enhancing cell alignment and contraction force in cardiomyocytes. The PDMS micropillar (μpillar) arrays with microgrooves (μgrooves) were fabricated using a unique micro-mold made using SU-8 double layer processes. The spring constant of the μpillar arrays was experimentally confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After culturing cardiac cells on the two different types of μpillar arrays, with and without grooves on the top of μpillar, the characteristics of the cardiomyocytes were analyzed using a custom-made image analysis system. The alignment of the cardiomyocytes on the μgrooves of the μpillars was clearly observed using a DAPI staining process. The mechanical force generated by the contraction force of the cardiomyocytes was derived from the displacement of the μpillar arrays. The contraction force of the cardiomyocytes aligned on the μgrooves was 20% higher than that of the μpillar arrays without μgrooves. The experimental results prove that applied geometrical stimulus is an effective method for aligning and improving the contraction force of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27517924

  12. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  13. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  14. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... EXPLORATION AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  15. 43 CFR 3931.100 - Boundary pillars and buffer zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Boundary pillars and buffer zones. 3931... AND LEASES Plans of Development and Exploration Plans § 3931.100 Boundary pillars and buffer zones. (a... prior written consent or on the BLM's order. For in-situ operations, a 50-foot buffer zone from...

  16. Biomechanical Characterization of Cardiomyocyte Using PDMS Pillar with Microgrooves.

    PubMed

    Oyunbaatar, Nomin-Erdene; Lee, Deok-Hyu; Patil, Swati J; Kim, Eung-Sam; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the surface-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pillar arrays for enhancing cell alignment and contraction force in cardiomyocytes. The PDMS micropillar (μpillar) arrays with microgrooves (μgrooves) were fabricated using a unique micro-mold made using SU-8 double layer processes. The spring constant of the μpillar arrays was experimentally confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). After culturing cardiac cells on the two different types of μpillar arrays, with and without grooves on the top of μpillar, the characteristics of the cardiomyocytes were analyzed using a custom-made image analysis system. The alignment of the cardiomyocytes on the μgrooves of the μpillars was clearly observed using a DAPI staining process. The mechanical force generated by the contraction force of the cardiomyocytes was derived from the displacement of the μpillar arrays. The contraction force of the cardiomyocytes aligned on the μgrooves was 20% higher than that of the μpillar arrays without μgrooves. The experimental results prove that applied geometrical stimulus is an effective method for aligning and improving the contraction force of cardiomyocytes. PMID:27517924

  17. Fabrication of nano-structured hemispheres and pillars using laterally migrating polymer templates.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hye Jin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Jeong, Seong-Hun; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Jung, Duk-Young

    2009-10-01

    We report herein a reliable method of fabricating 2D periodic gold nanopillars with well-defined anisotropic shapes by the combinational actions of colloidal crystals and gold evaporation. The deposition of gold on a polymer template produced dual functional Janus-like nanopillars up to 633 nm in height as well as hemispherical shells with 120 nm. The thermal-induced active migration of the nanopillars from the pristine position in the lateral direction occurred at the colloidal defects while some cavity space was formed inside the gold pillars. The nano-structured gold pillars exhibited a strong surface plasmon resonance at 598 nm, as compared to that of the solid gold nanospheres at 520 nm, and a noticeable red shift to 640 nm was induced by the removal of the polymer template.

  18. Enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai Jun; Chan, Yu Fei; Su, Lei; Li, De Yao; Sun, Xiao Ming

    2010-12-01

    A large scale heterostructure array of ZnO nanowires/silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) was prepared by a self-catalytic thermal evaporation and vapor-phase transport method, and an ultrahigh field emission current density of 1.55 mA cm-2 was obtained under an operating electric field of 4.0 V μm-1, with a low turn-on field of 1.65 V μm-1. The enhancement factor calculated according to the Fowler-Nordheim theory was ˜3141. The excellent field emission performance was attributed to the unique structure of ZnO/Si-NPA, especially the formation of ZnO nanowires on regular Si pillar array. Our work indicated that ZnO/Si-NPA might be an ideal candidate cathode of potential applications in flat panel displays and high brightness electron sources.

  19. Spectroscopic, solvent influence and thermal studies of ternary copper(II) complexes of diester and dinitrogen base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Adel A. A.; Abu-Hussein, Azza A. A.; Taha, Ahmed A.; Mahmoud, Nelly H.

    2010-10-01

    New mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes containing the bidentate dinitrogen ligands [ N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)] and the bidentate dioxygen ligands [diethylmalonate (DEM), ethylacetoacetate (EAA) and ethylbenzoylacetate (EBA)] were prepared. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, mass and ESR spectral data, magnetic and molar conductance measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis. From the investigation, the geometries of the complexes are square planar for perchlorate complexes and a square pyramid or octahedral for the nitrate complexes. Solvatochromic behavior of the Cu(II) complexes indicates strong solvatochromism of their solutions in polar and non-polar solvents. The observed solvatochromism is due to the solute-solvent interaction between the chelate cation and the solvent molecules.

  20. Spectroscopic determination of thermal impulse in sub-second heating events using lanthanide-doped oxide precursors and phenomenological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin R.; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Price, Patrick; Eilers, Hergen

    2016-08-01

    Using a mixture of crystalline-Ho:ZrO2, precursor-Dy:Y2O3, and precursor-Eu:ZrO2 nanoparticles we develop thermal impulse sensors capable of measuring equivalent isothermal temperatures and durations during a heating event, with response times of <100 ms, and a temperature range of at least 673 K to 1173 K. In order to determine the temperature and duration from the sensors after the heating event we measure the sensors' fluorescence spectrum, which is then compared with lab based calibration data. By using two precursor materials with different reaction kinetics we are able to extract both temperature and duration. Based on blind sample testing we find that the sensors and calculation method are accurate for measuring temperature and duration, but currently suffer a lack of precision due to difficulties in producing homogeneously heated samples.

  1. Thermal stability of electron-irradiated poly(tetrafluoroethylene) - X-ray photoelectron and mass spectroscopic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1990-01-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was subjected to 3 keV electron bombardment and then heated in vacuum to 300 C. The behavior of the material as a function of radiation dose and temperature was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the surface and mass spectroscopy of the species evolved. Lightly damaged material heated to 300 C evolved saturated fluorocarbon species, whereas unsaturated fluorocarbon species were evolved from heavily damaged material. After heating the heavily damaged material, those features in the XPS spectrum that were associated with damage diminished, giving the appearance that the radiation damage had annealed. The observations were interpreted by incorporating mass transport of severed chain fragments and thermal decomposition of severely damaged material into the branched and cross-linked network model of irradiated PTFE. The apparent annealing of the radiation damage was due to covering of the network by saturated fragments that easily diffused through the decomposed material to the surface region upon heating.

  2. Spectroscopic, solvent influence and thermal studies of ternary copper(II) complexes of diester and dinitrogen base ligands.

    PubMed

    Emara, Adel A A; Abu-Hussein, Azza A A; Taha, Ahmed A; Mahmoud, Nelly H

    2010-10-15

    New mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes containing the bidentate dinitrogen ligands [N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)] and the bidentate dioxygen ligands [diethylmalonate (DEM), ethylacetoacetate (EAA) and ethylbenzoylacetate (EBA)] were prepared. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, mass and ESR spectral data, magnetic and molar conductance measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis. From the investigation, the geometries of the complexes are square planar for perchlorate complexes and a square pyramid or octahedral for the nitrate complexes. Solvatochromic behavior of the Cu(II) complexes indicates strong solvatochromism of their solutions in polar and non-polar solvents. The observed solvatochromism is due to the solute-solvent interaction between the chelate cation and the solvent molecules. PMID:20688561

  3. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antimicrobial studies of neodymium(III) and samarium(III) complexes derived from tetradentate ligands containing N and S donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, Qurratul; Pandey, S. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Sengupta, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Trivalent lanthanide complexes of the type [Ln(L)Cl(H2O)2] (where Ln = Nd(III) or Sm(III) and LH2 = Schiff bases derived by the condensation of 3-(phenyl/substitutedphenyl)-4-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with diacetyl/benzil) have been synthesized by the reactions of anhydrous lanthanide(III) chloride with Schiff bases in methanol. The structures of the complexes have been proposed on the basis of elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic moment, spectroscopic measurements (IR, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-vis spectra) and X-ray diffraction studies. The spectral data reveal that the Schiff base ligands behave as dibasic tetradentate chelating agents having coordination sites at two thiol sulfur atoms and two azomethine nitrogen atoms. The presence of coordinated water in metal complexes was confirmed by thermal and IR data of the complexes. All the Schiff bases and their metal complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Curvularia pallescens and Colletotrichum capsici.

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, thermal analyses, biological activity of tridentate coordinated transition metal complexes of bi(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)amine]ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Halim, Hanan F.; Mohamed, Gehad G.

    2016-01-01

    A new tridentate acyclic pincer ligand, [bi(pyridin-2-methyl)amine] (bpma, HL), was synthesized and reacted to form complexes with copper(II), nickel(II), iron(II), cobalt(II) and zinc(II) ions. Both the ligand and its complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductance, infrared, 1H-NMR-spectroscopy, mass and thermal analyses. According to the spectroscopic data, all of the complexes share the same coordination environment around the metal atoms, consisting two nitrogen-pyridine entities, one nitrogen-methylamine entity, one/two water molecules and/or one/two chloride or bromide ions. Complexes also showed molar conductivity according to the presence of two halide anions outer the coordination sphere except Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes are non electrolytes. Analysis indicates that the metal ions have trigonal bipyramidal structure. Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus (G+) and Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (G-) bacteria. They showed remarkable antimicrobial activity.

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antimicrobial studies of neodymium(III) and samarium(III) complexes derived from tetradentate ligands containing N and S donor atoms.

    PubMed

    Ain, Qurratul; Pandey, S K; Pandey, O P; Sengupta, S K

    2015-04-01

    Trivalent lanthanide complexes of the type [Ln(L)Cl(H2O)2] (where Ln=Nd(III) or Sm(III) and LH2=Schiff bases derived by the condensation of 3-(phenyl/substitutedphenyl)-4-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with diacetyl/benzil) have been synthesized by the reactions of anhydrous lanthanide(III) chloride with Schiff bases in methanol. The structures of the complexes have been proposed on the basis of elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic moment, spectroscopic measurements (IR, 1H, 13C NMR and UV-vis spectra) and X-ray diffraction studies. The spectral data reveal that the Schiff base ligands behave as dibasic tetradentate chelating agents having coordination sites at two thiol sulfur atoms and two azomethine nitrogen atoms. The presence of coordinated water in metal complexes was confirmed by thermal and IR data of the complexes. All the Schiff bases and their metal complexes have also been screened for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Curvularia pallescens and Colletotrichum capsici.

  6. Nanomedicine Pillars and Monitoring Nano-biointeractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagkiozaki, V.; Logothetidis, S.; Vavoulidis, E.

    The current revolution in medicine is strongly associated with the availability of new tools, methods and materials that enable the visualization and handling of molecules and even atoms in order to explore the etiology of many diseases and foster the insights within the biological nano-world. This chapter describes the main nanomedicine pillars that involve nanodiagnostics, targeted drug delievery and regenerative medicine. It gives an overview of key nanotechnologies that will advance the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Several experiments are employed to help the reader to understand how nanomedicine can advance mainly the study of mechanisms of bio and non- bio interactions for the design and development of highly performed implants. The hazards and risks for nanomedicines and the future challenges and perspectives of their application in clinical practice will also be discussed.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on the thermodynamic and thermal denaturation of the ct-DNA binding of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudasir; Wahyuni, Endang Tri; Tjahjono, Daryono H.; Yoshioka, Naoki; Inoue, Hidenari

    2010-10-01

    The ct-DNA binding properties of methylene blue (MB) including binding constant, thermodynamic parameter and thermal denaturation ( Tm) have been systematically studied by spectrophotometric method. The binding of MB to ct-DNA is quite strong as indicated by remarkable hypochromicity, red shift and equilibrium binding constant ( Kb). Van't Hoff plot of 1/ T versus ln Kb suggests that the MB dye binds exothermically to ct-DNA which is characterized by large negative enthalpy and entropy changes. According to polyelectrolyte theory, the charge release ( Z) when ct-DNA interacts with MB is +1.09 which corresponds very well to the one positive charge carried by the MB dye. The Kb at a low concentration of salt is dominated by electrostatic interaction (90%) while that at a high concentration of salt is mostly controlled by non-electrostatic process (85%). However, the stabilization of the DNA binding event in both cases is governed by non-electrostatic process. A moderate stabilization of double helix ct-DNA occurs when the MB dye binds to ct-DNA as indicated by the increase in Tm of ct-DNA of about 5.5 °C in the presence of MB. This suggests that MB dye possibly binds to ct-DNA via electrostatic and intercalation modes.

  8. Spectroscopic, optical, thermal, antimicrobial and density functional theory studies of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthiga Devi, P.; Venkatachalam, K.; Poonkothai, M.

    2016-09-01

    The organic crystal 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate was grown using slow evaporation method. Various characterization techniques such as single crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TG-DSC) were employed to assay the structure and properties of the grown crystal. The antimicrobial evaluation of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate crystal was also performed against some bacteria and fungi. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 4-aminopyridinium 4-hydroxy benzoate hydrate were determined for bacterial and fungal strains. The assessment of optimized structure of the molecule and vibrational frequencies were done using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-31 G (d, p) basis set. The stability of the molecule, hyperconjugative interactions, delocalization of charges and intermolecular hydrogen bond were studied by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. TD-DFT method employing polarizable continuum model (PCM) was used to examine the electronic absorption spectrum. Evaluation of molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), Mulliken population charges and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were also carried out. In addition, from the optimized geometry, frontier molecular orbitals analysis was executed.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A2Σ+(ν=0,1)→X2Π(Δν =0) at 308 nm and A2Σ+(ν=0,1)→X2Π(Δν =1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p5P→3s5S0 at 777.41 nm, and 3p3P→3s3S0 at 844.6 nm, N2(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C3Πu→B3Πg in the range of 300-450 nm and N2+(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B2Σu+→X2Σg+(Δν =0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p3P0→2s3S at 388.8 nm, 3p1P0→ 2s1S at 501.6 nm, 3d3D→2p3P0 at 587.6 nm, 3d1D→2p1P0 at 667.8 nm, 3s3S1→2p3P0 at 706.5 nm, 3s1S0→2p1P0 at 728.1 nm, and Hα transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 ± 25 K and 340 ± 25 K and it increases to 320 ± 25 K and 360 ± 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture

  10. Cloud disruption via ionized feedback: tracing pillar dynamics in Vulpecula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Dale, J. E.; Juhasz, A.

    2014-06-01

    The major physical processes responsible for shaping and sculpting pillars in the clouds surrounding massive stars (i.e. the `Pillars of Creation') are now being robustly incorporated into models quantifying the ionizing radiation from massive stars. The detailed gas dynamics within these pillars can now be compared with observations. Our goal is to quantify the gas dynamics in a pillar being sculpted by a nearby massive star. To do this, we use the CO, 13CO and C18O J = 1-0 emission towards a pillar in the Vulpecula Rift. These data are a combination of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy and Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory observations providing high-resolution (˜5) imaging of large-scale pillar structures (>100 arcsec). We find that this cold (˜18 K), low-density (8 × 103 cm-3) material is fragmenting on Jeans scales, has very low velocity dispersions (˜0.5 km s-1), and appears to be moving away from the ionizing source. We are able to draw direct comparisons with three models from the literature, and find that those with lower velocity dispersions best fit our data, although the dynamics of any one model do not completely agree with our observations. We do, however, find that our observed pillar exhibits many of the characteristics expected from simulations.

  11. Effect of intraluminal pillars on particle motion in bifurcated microchannels.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Aslihan; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Lin, Miao; Miele, Lino; Lee, Grace; Mentzer, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    A central feature of intussusceptive angiogenesis is the development of an intravascular pillar that bridges the opposing sides of the microvessel lumen. In this report, we created polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) microchannels with geometric proportions based on corrosion casts of the colon microcirculation. The structure of the PDMS microchannels was a bifurcated channel with an intraluminal pillar in the geometric center of the bifurcation. The effect of the intraluminal pillar on particle flow paths was investigated using an in vitro perfusion system. The microchannels were perfused with fluorescent particles, and the particle movements were recorded using fluorescence videomicroscopy. We found that the presence of an intravascular pillar significantly decreased particle velocity in the bifurcation system (p < 0.05). In addition, the pillar altered the trajectory of particles in the center line of the flow stream. The particle trajectory resulted in prolonged pillar contact as well as increased residence time within the bifurcation system (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that the intravascular pillar not only provides a mechanism of increasing resistance to blood flow but may also participate in spatial redistribution of cells within the flow stream.

  12. Combined influences of micro-pillar geometry and substrate constraint on microplastic behavior of compressed single-crystal micro-pillar: Two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyanga, Chaojun; Lia, Zhenhuan; Huanga, Minsheng; Hua, Lili; Houa, Chuantao

    2009-11-01

    2D discrete dislocation dynamic modeling of compressed micro-pillars attached on a huge base is executed to study the size-dependent microplastic behavior of micro-pillars and the corresponding size effect. In addition to the conventional dimensional parameters of the micro-pillar such as the micro-pillar size and the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper angle and the dislocation slip plane orientation angle in the micro-pillar are also considered to address the size effect and its rich underlying mechanism. Computational results show that there are at least two operating mechanisms responsible for the plastic behavior of micro-pillars. One is associated with the dislocation free slip-out from the micro-pillar sidewall; the other is related to the dislocation pile-up at the base and the top end of the pillar. The overall mechanism governing the size effect of the micro-pillar rests with multi-factors, including the micro-pillar size, the height-to-width ratio, the micro-pillar taper and the slip plane orientation angle; however, whether the "free slip band" exists or not is the most important denotation. The well-known Schmid law still validates in the slender micro-pillars due to existence of the free slip band, whereas it may fail in the podgier micro-pillars due to absence of the free slip band; as a result, a complicated even "reverse" size effect appears.

  13. Ring-shaped polariton lasing in pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalevich, V. K. Afanasiev, M. M.; Lukoshkin, V. A.; Kavokin, K. V.; Tsintzos, S. I.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2014-03-07

    Optically generated exciton-polaritons in cylindric semiconductor pillar microcavity with embedded GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells demonstrate a clear polariton lasing regime. When exciting in the center of the pillar, we detect a ring-shaped emission, where the peak of intensity can be separated from the excitation spot by more than 10 μm. The spatial coherence of the ring emission is verified by interferometry measurements. These observations are interpreted by drift of the exciton polariton condensate away from the excitation spot due to its repulsion from the exciton reservoir and by its spatial confinement by the pillar boundary.

  14. Iron oxide pillared clay with large gallery height: Synthesis and properties as a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Rightor, E.G.; Tsou, Mingshin; Pinnavaia, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    New iron oxide pillared montmorillonites have been prepared by the reaction of Na{sup +} montmorillonite with base-hydrolyzed solutions of Fe{sup 3+} salts and subsequent thermal conversion of the intercalated polycations. Depending on the hydrolysis conditions used to generate the pillaring solutions, pillared products with basal spacings in the range 18 to 25 {angstrom} were obtained. Under optimum hydrolysis conditions (base/metal = 2.0 meq/mol, aging time = 23-147 hr) the pillared products contained 6.8-9.8 Fe{sup 3+} ions per O{sub 20}(OH){sub 4} unit cell and exhibited basal spacings of 25-29 {angstrom}. These latter spacings corresponded to exceptionally large gallery heights of 15-19 {angstrom}. Upon calcination at 300C, the spacings decreased to 23-27 {angstrom}. N{sub 2} BET surface areas after outgassing at 350C were in the range 270 to 350 m{sup 2}/g. The pillared products are active catalysts that have undergone Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons at 275 C and 120 {minus}psi (CO:H{sub 2}=1:2). The hydrocarbon distribution in the C{sub 1}-C{sub 6} range (1.3% conversion) followed Anderson-Schulz-Flory statistics with a chain propagation probability of {alpha} = 0.49. X-ray energy dispersive analysis indicated that substantial amounts of the intercalated iron migrated to the edge sites of the clay particles under reaction conditions. The redistribution of iron resulted in a distribution of gallery heights sufficiently heterogeneous to preclude Bragg X-ray scattering along the 001 direction. Iron migration also occurred upon exposure of the pillared products to the ambient atmosphere for prolonged periods ({ge}3 months).

  15. Pillared and open-framework uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect

    Adelani, Pius O.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-09-15

    The hydrothermal reactions of uranium trioxide, uranyl acetate, or uranyl nitrate with 1,4-benzenebisphosphonic acid in the presence of very small amount of HF at 200 deg. C results in the formation of three different uranyl diphosphonate compounds, [H{sub 3}O]{sub 2}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3})(PO{sub 2}OH)]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ubbp-1), [H{sub 3}O]{sub 4}{l_brace}(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}[C{sub 6}H{sub 4}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}F{sub 4}{r_brace}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-2), and {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O (Ubbp-3). The crystal structures of these compounds were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Ubbp-1 consists of UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged by the phosphonate moieties to form a three-dimensional pillared structure. Ubbp-2 is composed of UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged through the phosphonate oxygen atoms into one-dimensional chains that are cross-linked by the phenyl spacers into a pillared structure. The structure of Ubbp-3 is a three-dimensional open-framework with large channels containing water molecules with internal dimensions of approximately 10.9x10.9 A. Ubbp-1 and Ubbp-2 fluoresce at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: Illustration of the three-dimensional open-framework structure of {l_brace}(UO{sub 2})[C{sub 6}H{sub 2}F{sub 2}(PO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){r_brace}{sub 2}.H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} units, pentagonal bipyramids=green, oxygen=red, phosphorus=magenta, carbon=black, hydrogen=white. Highlights: > The influence of the uranyl salt anions and pH were critically examined in relation to structural variation. > The acetate and nitrate counter ions of uranyl may be acting as structure directing agents. > The use of rigid phenyl spacer yield

  16. 16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. LIGHTING AND PILLAR DETAIL VIEW ON HYPERION BOULEVARD VIADUCT AT OVERCROSSING OF RIVERSIDE DRIVE. LOOKING NORTH. - Glendale-Hyperion Viaduct, Spanning Golden State Freeway (I-5) & Los Angeles River at Glendale Boulevard, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Partial elevation of west side showing pillar, central and southern sections, from San Antonio Highway Bridge. - Puente Ferroviario San Antonio, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-1, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  18. Preparation of silica or alumina pillared crystalline titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Udomsak, S.; Nge, R.; Dufner, D.C.; Anthony, R.G.; Lott, S.E.

    1994-05-01

    Layered crystalline titanates (CT) [Anthony and Dosch, US Patent 5 177 045 (1993)] are pillared with tetraethyl orthosilicate, 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, and aluminum acetylacetonate to prepare porous and high surface area supports for sulfided NiMo catalyst. Tetra-ethyl orthosilicate or aluminum acetylacetonate intercalated CT are prepared by stepwise intercalation. First, the basal distance is increased by n-alkylammonium ions prior to intercalation with inorganic compounds. However, an aqueous solution of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane could directly pillar CT without first swelling the titanate with n-alkylamine. The catalytic activities for hydrogenation of pyrene of sulfided NiMo supported silica or alumina pillared CT were higher than those of commercial catalysts (Shell324 and Amocat1C). The silicon and aluminum contents of the pillared CT, used as supports, have a considerable effect on the catalytic activities and physical properties of the supports.

  19. Transparent conductor-Si pillars heterojunction photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong; Park, Yun Chang

    2014-08-14

    We report a high-performing heterojunction photodetector by enhanced surface effects. Periodically, patterned Si substrates were used to enlarge the photo-reactive regions and yield proportionally improved photo-responses. An optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) was deposited on a Si substrate and spontaneously formed an ITO/Si heterojunction. Due to an electrical conductive ITO film, ITO/Si heterojunction device can be operated at zero-bias, which effectively suppresses the dark current, resulting in better performances than those by a positive or a negative bias operation. This zero-bias operating heterojunction device exhibits a short response time (∼ 22.5 ms) due to the physical reaction to the incident light. We revealed that the location of the space charge region (SCR) is crucial for a specific photon-wavelength response. The SCR space has the highest collection efficiency of the photo-generated carriers. The photo-response can be maximized when we design the photodetector by superposing the SCR space over a corresponding photon-absorption length. The surface enhanced Si pillar devices significantly improved the photo-responses ratios from that of a planar Si device. According to this design scheme, a high photo-response ratio of 5560% was achieved at a wavelength of 600 nm. This surfaced-enhanced heterojunction design scheme would be a promising approach for various photoelectric applications.

  20. The old pillars of new retailing.

    PubMed

    Berry, L L

    2001-04-01

    Despite the harsh realities of retailing, the illusion persists that magical tools can help companies overcome the problems of fickle consumers, price-slashing competitors, and mood swings in the economy. Such wishful thinking holds that retailers will thrive if only they communicate better with customers through e-mail, employ hidden cameras to learn how customers make purchase decisions, and analyze scanner data to tailor special offers and manage inventory. But the truth is, there are no quick fixes. In the course of his extensive research on dozens of retailers, Leonard Berry found that the best companies create value for their customers in five interlocking ways. Whether you're running a physical store, a catalog business, an e-commerce site, or a combination of the three, you have to offer your customers superior solutions to their needs, treat them with respect, and connect with them on an emotional level. You also have to set prices fairly and make it easy for people to find what they need, pay for it quickly, and then move on. None of these pillars is new, and each sounds exceedingly simple, but don't be fooled--implementing these axioms in the real world is surprisingly difficult. The author illustrates how some retailers have built successful operations by attending to these commonsense ways of dealing with their customers and how others have failed to do so. PMID:11299689

  1. A comparative study of the acidity toward the aqueous phase and adsorptive properties of Al{sub 13}-pillared montmorillonite and Al{sub 13}-pillared saponite

    SciTech Connect

    Bergaoui, L.; Mrad, I.; Ghorbel, A.; Lambert, J.F.

    1999-04-15

    The selectivity of an Al{sub 13}-pillared saponite and an Al{sub 13}-pillared montmorillonite for Cd{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} adsorption was studied. The quantity of metal adsorbed on both pillared clays depends on the pH of the solution and the pillars density. Adsorption equilibria are regulated by the protonation equilibria of the amphoteric sites on the pillars. Pillared clays adsorb more cadmium and copper than classic aluminum hydroxides which is simply attributable to a higher density of surface aluminum groups. Significant differences in behavior are observed between pillared montmorillonite and pillared saponite. Pillared montmorillonite appears to be more acidic, which is correlated with a more advanced degree of structural modification of the pillars on calcination. The authors propose a tentative, partial structural model of pillar transformation compatible with these differences. At the same time, both pillared clays have similar affinities for cadmium II at low pH (5--6), but pillared montmorillonite seems to be a more efficient cadmium trap at pH = 8 when its surface groups are negatively ionized. Thus, the nature of the clay layers conditions the structural modifications of the intercalated [Al{sub 13}] polycations, which in turn determine adsorptive behavior.

  2. Parallel-plate submicron gap formed by micromachined low-density pillars for near-field radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Kota; Miura, Atsushi; Iizuka, Hideo; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi

    2015-02-23

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has been a subject of great interest due to the applicability to thermal management and energy conversion. In this letter, a submicron gap between a pair of diced fused quartz substrates is formed by using micromachined low-density pillars to obtain both the parallelism and small parasitic heat conduction. The gap uniformity is validated by the optical interferometry at four corners of the substrates. The heat flux across the gap is measured in a steady-state and is no greater than twice of theoretically predicted radiative heat flux, which indicates that the parasitic heat conduction is suppressed to the level of the radiative heat transfer or less. The heat conduction through the pillars is modeled, and it is found to be limited by the thermal contact resistance between the pillar top and the opposing substrate surface. The methodology to form and evaluate the gap promotes the near-field radiative heat transfer to various applications such as thermal rectification, thermal modulation, and thermophotovoltaics.

  3. Hybrid molecular simulation of methane storage inside pillared graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Atieh; Hamed Mosavian, Mohammad Taghi; Ahmadpour, Ali; Farhadian, Nafiseh

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a hybrid molecular dynamics—grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to investigate the storage capacity of methane in a new nanostructure adsorbent called pillared graphene. This new nanostructure is composed of graphene sheets in parallel with vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which act as their holders. The adsorption ability of this new structure is compared to graphene sheets to evaluate its potential for methane storage. The results show that in a specific adsorbent volume, applying pillared graphene increases the number of adsorbed methane up to 22% in comparison to graphene sheets. Given the application of various isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, and Toth and calculation of their parameters, it is predicted that methane adsorption on pillared graphene displays a heterogeneous behavior. Furthermore, the effects of geometry parameters such as CNTs diameter, the number of CNTs, and graphene sheets layer spacing on the methane uptake are investigated. The results show that the pillared graphene containing 1 CNT per 30 nm2 graphene sheet areas provides the best configuration for methane adsorption. This optimum structure is characterized by a small diameter of about 0.938 nm and an optimal layer spacing of about 1.2 nm. Finally, our results show that this kind of pillared structure can be suitable for methane storage.

  4. Synthesis of SnO2 pillared carbon using long chain alkylamine grafted graphene oxide: an efficient anode material for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Jeevan Kumar; Ryu, Sung Hun; Shanmugharaj, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    With the objective of developing new advanced composite materials that can be used as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), herein we describe the synthesis of SnO2 pillared carbon using various alkylamine (hexylamine; dodecylamine and octadecylamine) grafted graphene oxides and butyl trichlorotin precursors followed by its calcination at 500 °C for 2 h. While the grafted alkylamine induces crystalline growth of SnO2 pillars, thermal annealing of alkylamine grafted graphene oxide results in the formation of amorphous carbon coated graphene. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) results reveal the successful formation of SnO2 pillared carbon on the graphene surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy characterization corroborates the formation of rutile SnO2 crystals on the graphene surface. A significant rise in the BET surface area is observed for SnO2 pillared carbon, when compared to pristine GO. Electrochemical characterization studies of SnO2 pillared carbon based anode materials showed an enhanced lithium storage capacity and fine cyclic performance in comparison with pristine GO. The initial specific capacities of SnO2 pillared carbon are observed to be 1379 mA h g-1, 1255 mA h g-1 and 1360 mA h g-1 that decrease to 750 mA h g-1, 643 mA h g-1 and 560 mA h g-1 depending upon the chain length of grafted alkylamine on the graphene surface respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectral analysis reveals that the exchange current density of SnO2 pillared carbon based electrodes is higher, corroborating its enhanced electrochemical activity in comparison with GO based electrodes.With the objective of developing new advanced composite materials that can be used as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), herein we describe the synthesis of SnO2 pillared carbon using various alkylamine (hexylamine; dodecylamine and octadecylamine) grafted graphene oxides and butyl trichlorotin precursors

  5. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films. 1: Film batch variations of reciprocity failure in IIaO film. 2: Thermal and aging effects in relationship to reciprocity failure. 3: Shifting of reciprocity failure points as a function of thermal and aging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, K. A.; Atkinson, P. F.; Hammond, E. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Reciprocity failure was examined for IIaO spectroscopic film. Three separate experiments were performed in order to study film batch variations, thermal and aging effects in relationship to reciprocity failure, and shifting of reciprocity failure points as a function of thermal and aging effects. The failure was examined over ranges of time between 5 and 60 seconds. The variation to illuminance was obtained by using thirty neutral density filters. A standard sensitometer device imprinted the wedge pattern on the film as exposure time was subjected to variation. The results indicate that film batch differences, temperature, and aging play an important role in reciprocity failure of IIaO spectroscopic film. A shifting of the failure points was also observed in various batches of film.

  6. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films. Part 1: Film batch variations of reciprocity failure in IIaO film. Part 2: Thermal and aging effects in relationship to reciprocity failure. P art 3: Shifting of reciprocity failure points as a function of thermal and aging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kevin A.; Atkinson, Pamela F.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr

    1987-01-01

    Reciprocity failure was examined for IIaO spectroscopic film. Three separate experiments were performed in order to study film batch variations, thermal and aging effects in relationship to reciprocity failure, and shifting of reciprocity failure points as a function of thermal and aging effects. The failure was examined over ranges of time between 5 and 60 seconds. The variation to illuminance was obtained by using thirty neutral density filters. A standard sensitometer device imprinted the wedge pattern on the film as exposure time was subjected to variation. Results indicate that film batch differences, temperature, and aging play an important role in reciprocity failure of IIaO spectroscopic film. A shifting of the failure points was also observed in various batches of film.

  7. Effects of PCB Pad Metal Finishes on the Cu-Pillar/Sn-Ag Micro Bump Joint Reliability of Chip-on-Board (COB) Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsoon; Lee, Seyong; Shin, Ji-won; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2016-06-01

    While solder bumps have been used as the bump structure to form the interconnection during the last few decades, the continuing scaling down of devices has led to a change in the bump structure to Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bumps. Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bump interconnections differ from conventional solder bump interconnections in terms of their assembly processing and reliability. A thermo-compression bonding method with pre-applied b-stage non-conductive films has been adopted to form solder joints between Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps and printed circuit board vehicles, using various pad metal finishes. As a result, various interfacial inter-metallic compounds (IMCs) reactions and stress concentrations occur at the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps joints. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the influence of pad metal finishes on the structural reliability of fine pitch Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps flip chip packaging. In this study, four different pad surface finishes (Thin Ni ENEPIG, OSP, ENEPIG, ENIG) were evaluated in terms of their interconnection reliability by thermal cycle (T/C) test up to 2000 cycles at temperatures ranging from -55°C to 125°C and high-temperature storage test up to 1000 h at 150°C. The contact resistances of the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump showed significant differences after the T/C reliability test in the following order: thin Ni ENEPIG > OSP > ENEPIG where the thin Ni ENEPIG pad metal finish provided the best Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump interconnection in terms of bump joint reliability. Various IMCs formed between the bump joint areas can account for the main failure mechanism.

  8. Retention in Porous Layer Pillar Array Planar Separation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Danielle R; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the retention capabilities and surface area enhancement of highly ordered, high-aspect-ratio, open-platform, two-dimensional (2D) pillar arrays when coated with a thin layer of porous silicon oxide (PSO). Photolithographically prepared pillar arrays were coated with 50-250 nm of PSO via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and then functionalized with either octadecyltrichlorosilane or n-butyldimethylchlorosilane. Theoretical calculations indicate that a 50 nm layer of PSO increases the surface area of a pillar nearly 120-fold. Retention capabilities were tested by observing capillary-action-driven development under various conditions, as well as by running one-dimensional separations on varying thicknesses of PSO. Increasing the thickness of PSO on an array clearly resulted in greater retention of the analyte(s) in question in both experiments. In culmination, a two-dimensional separation of fluorescently derivatized amines was performed to further demonstrate the capabilities of these fabricated platforms. PMID:27510171

  9. Gold-Tipped Elastomeric Pillars for Cellular Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, S; Rossier, O; Sheetz, M P; Wind, S J; Hone, J

    2009-11-01

    We describe a technique for the fabrication of arrays of elastomeric pillars whose top surfaces are treated with selective chemical functionalization to promote cellular adhesion in cellular force transduction experiments. The technique involves the creation of a rigid mold consisting of arrays of circular holes into which a thin layer of Au is deposited while the top surface of the mold and the sidewalls of the holes are protected by a sacrificial layer of Cr. When an elastomer is formed in the mold, the Au adheres to the tops of the molded pillars. This can then be selectively functionalized with a protein that induces cell adhesion, while the rest of the surface is treated with a repellent substance. An additional benefit is that the tops of the pillars can be fluorescently labeled for improved accuracy in force transduction measurements. PMID:20526428

  10. Formation of the Pillars of the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc; Kane, Jave; Ryutov, Dmitri; Remington, Bruce; Mizuta, Akira; Sudano, Matthew; Arnett, David

    2002-11-01

    We are developing a model for the formation of the Pillars of Creation' of the Eagle Nebula, using observation, numerical modeling and scaled verification experiments on intense lasers. Recently, Our two-dimensional numerical simulations of the Spitzer-Frieman 'rocket-effect' RT model produce results consistent with measurements of fluid velocities and column densities in the Pillars (Pound, M. W. 1998, ApJ 493, L113), assuming a thin compressible initial cloud. Hydrodynamic effects due to the directionality of the radiation, radiative cooling, magnetic fields, and designs for experiments will be discussed.

  11. Activation-Enabled Syntheses of Functionalized Pillar[5]arene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Hou, Xisen; Ke, Chenfeng; Zhang, Huacheng; Strutt, Nathan L; Stern, Charlotte L; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-07-01

    A series of regioselective di- and trifunctionalized pillar[5]arene derivatives have been synthesized by a deprotection-followed-by-activation strategy, and their constitutions have been established as a result of having access to their solid-state structures. De-O-methylation occurs in a stepwise manner at lower temperatures under kinetic control, affording the desired oligo-substituted pillar[5]arene derivatives. In addition, the regioisomers of these derivatives can be isolated by installing triflate groups on the free hydroxyl groups. PMID:26083303

  12. Pillared smectite clay coatings for ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jagota, S.; Harmer, M.A.; Lemon, M.F.; Jagota, A.; McCarron, E.M. III.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a novel route for the low-temperature formation of mullite, from pillared smectite clay precursors, for use as fiber coatings in ceramic-matrix composites. In particular, alumina-pillared bentonite converts in part to mullite at the unusually low temperature of about 800 C. The clay precursors display excellent film-forming capability and have been coated onto silicon carbide fibers. Mechanical tests on composites of the coated fibers and a borosilicate glass demonstrate their success as debond coatings, suggesting that this approach is a viable and simple route to oxide coatings for fibers.

  13. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  14. Eco-Friendly Magnetic Iron Oxide Pillared Montmorillonite for Advanced Catalytic Degradation of Dichlorophenol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eco-friendly pillared montmorillonites, in which the pillars consist of iron oxide are expected to have interesting and unusual magnetic properties that are applicable for environmental decontamination. Completely “green” and effective composite was synthesized using mild reactio...

  15. Superhydrophobic Analyte Concentration Utilizing Colloid-Pillar Array SERS Substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Charlton, Jennifer J.; Kirchner, Teresa B.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2014-11-04

    In order to detect a few molecules present in a large sample it is important to know the trace components in the medicinal and environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute numbers. However, detection at trace concentration levels in real samples requires properly designed delivery and detection systems. Moreover, the following work involves superhydrophobic surfaces that includes silicon pillar arrays formed by lithographic and dewetting protocols. In order to generate the necessary plasmonic substrate for SERS detection, simple and flow stable Ag colloid was added tomore » the functionalized pillar array system via soaking. The pillars are used native and with hydrophobic modification. The pillars provide a means to concentrate analyte via superhydrophobic droplet evaporation effects. A 100-fold concentration of analyte was estimated, with a limit of detection of 2.9 10-12 M for mitoxantrone dihydrochloride. Additionally, analytes were delivered to the surface via a multiplex approach in order to demonstrate an ability to control droplet size and placement for scaled-up applications in real world applications. Finally, a concentration process involving transport and sequestration based on surface treatment selective wicking is demonstrated.« less

  16. Superhydrophobic Analyte Concentration Utilizing Colloid-Pillar Array SERS Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Ryan A.; Charlton, Jennifer J.; Kirchner, Teresa B.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Datskos, Panos G.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2014-11-04

    In order to detect a few molecules present in a large sample it is important to know the trace components in the medicinal and environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute numbers. However, detection at trace concentration levels in real samples requires properly designed delivery and detection systems. Moreover, the following work involves superhydrophobic surfaces that includes silicon pillar arrays formed by lithographic and dewetting protocols. In order to generate the necessary plasmonic substrate for SERS detection, simple and flow stable Ag colloid was added to the functionalized pillar array system via soaking. The pillars are used native and with hydrophobic modification. The pillars provide a means to concentrate analyte via superhydrophobic droplet evaporation effects. A 100-fold concentration of analyte was estimated, with a limit of detection of 2.9 10-12 M for mitoxantrone dihydrochloride. Additionally, analytes were delivered to the surface via a multiplex approach in order to demonstrate an ability to control droplet size and placement for scaled-up applications in real world applications. Finally, a concentration process involving transport and sequestration based on surface treatment selective wicking is demonstrated.

  17. Mechanical thinning pillar peach trees - second year results and observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnar (pillar) form peach trees were mechanically thinned at 50 days after full bloom during the pit hardening stage of development. A spike-drum mechanical shaker, which showed promise for peach fruit thinning, during preliminary tests in 2005 was used to remove the young fruits. The shaker wa...

  18. A hydrogen storage nanotank: lithium-organic pillared graphite.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Soo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2009-09-28

    From first-principle based grand canonical Monte-Carlo simulations, we propose a new hydrogen storage material, lithium-organic pillared graphite, showing high H2 uptake of 4.0 wt% and 41.9 kg m(-3) at 300 K and 100 bar.

  19. Rapid implantation of dissolving microneedles on an electrospun pillar array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Soyoung; Huh, Inyoung; Kim, Suyong; Lahiji, Shayan F; Kim, Miroo; Jung, Hyungil

    2015-09-01

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs), designed to release drugs and dissolve after skin insertion, have been spotlighted as a novel transdermal delivery system due to their advantages such as minimal pain and tissue damage, ability to self-administer, and no associated hazardous residues. The drug delivery efficacy of DMNs, however, is limited by incomplete insertion and the extended period required for DMN dissolution. Here, we introduce a novel DMN delivery system, DMN on an electrospun pillar array (DEPA), which can rapidly implant DMNs into skin. DMNs were fabricated on a pillar array covered by a fibrous sheet produced by electrospinning PLGA solution (14%, w/v). DMNs were implanted into the skin by manual application (press and vibration for 10 s) by tearing of the fibers hung on the 300-μm pillars. Separation of DMNs from the fibrous sheet was dependent on both pillar height and the properties of the fibrous sheet. After evaluation of the implantation and dissolution of DMNs with diffusion of red dye by taking cross-sectional images of porcine skin, the hypoglycemic effect of insulin loaded DEPA was examined using a healthy mouse model. This DMN array overcomes critical issues associated with the low penetration efficiency of flat patch-based DMNs, and will allow realization of patient convenience with the desired drug efficacy. PMID:26117659

  20. Modeling the interactions between compliant microcapsules and pillars in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangdong; Alexeev, Alexander; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Balazs, Anna C.

    2007-07-01

    Using a computational model, we investigate the motion of microcapsules inside a microchannel that encompasses a narrow constriction. The microcapsules are composed of a compliant, elastic shell and an encapsulated fluid; these fluid-filled shells model synthetic polymeric microcapsules or biological cells (e.g., leukocytes). Driven by an imposed flow, the capsules are propelled along the microchannel and through the constricted region, which is formed by two pillars that lie in registry, extending from the top and bottom walls of the channels. The tops of these pillars (facing into the microchannel) are modified to exhibit either a neutral or an attractive interaction with the microcapsules. The pillars (and constriction) model topological features that can be introduced into microfluidic devices or the physical and chemical heterogeneities that are inherently present in biological vessels. To simulate the behavior of this complex system, we employ a hybrid method that integrates the lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) for fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model (LSM) for the micromechanics of elastic solids. Through this LBM/LSM technique, we probe how the capsule's stiffness and interaction with the pillars affect its passage through the chambers. The results yield guidelines for regulating the movement of microcarriers in microfluidic systems and provide insight into the flow properties of biological cells in capillaries.

  1. Aircraft Image Representing NASA's Three Pillars for Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (ASTT) Enterprise is focused on long-term, high-payoff research and technology. The Enterprise has set bold goals to sustain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space. These goals are grouped into Three Pillars: Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps and Access to Space.

  2. Pillars of Progress. Lumina Foundation Focus. Spring 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, David S., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) often go above and beyond the call of duty to encourage engagement and provide support to traditionally underrepresented students. This issue of Lumina Foundation Focus magazine, titled "Pillars of progress," examines MSIs and their efforts to maximize student success. Following the President's Message, In…

  3. Extension of silicon emission model to silicon pillar oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageshima, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Kenji; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Missing Si in the oxidation of Si pillar structures is investigated by extending the Si emission model to the oxidation of planar structures. The original Si emission model [H. Kageshima et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38, L971 (1999)] assumes the emission of excess Si from the interface into the oxide during the oxidation process, the diffusion of the excess Si through the oxide, and the control of the oxidation rate by the concentration of remaining excess Si around the interface. By assuming the sublimation of the excess Si from the oxide surface in addition to the assumptions of the original Si emission model, the origin of the missing Si is consistently explained. It is suggested that the amount of the missing Si is enhanced by the geometrical effect of the pillar structure because the concentration of excess Si is inversely proportional to the radial position. This also suggests that the missing Si is inevitable for the thin pillar structures. Careful approaches to the oxidation process are recommended for pillar structures.

  4. The Sixth Pillar of Reading Instruction: Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervetti, Gina N.; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.

    2015-01-01

    The National Reading Panel (NRP) identified five pillars, or essential components, of reading instruction that lead to the highest chance of reading success--phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. A decade after the NRP's report, the majority of US states adopted the Common Core State Standards/English Language Arts…

  5. Measurements of the Stability of the Pillars by Clinometry at CERGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laclare, F.; Cormier, P.

    1981-02-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of stability measurements of pillars bearing astronomical instruments at CERGA observatory. These inclination deviation measurements have been carried out by means of horizontal pendulums like those used elsewhere for determination of Earth tide horizontal components. These instruments allow to obtain a considerable amplification of very low variations of inclination of the support where they have been situated. The measures obtained at different points of the observatory reveal a diurnal inclination variation up to 1 ' probably of thermal origin, and variations up to 10" that could be linked to hydro-geologic effects. A study on long periods will allow us to decide if movements exist affecting the whole site of the observatory. The results show the weight to be ascribed to different stability factors i.e. form and pillars implantation, nature of the socle and the material. At last we must underline the interest of such measures in case of astrometric applications of interferometric techniques and in case of very exact guiding of an altazimutal instrument.

  6. Acidic and Hydrophobic Microporous Clays Pillared with Mixed Metal Oxide Nano-Sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang-Su; Yamanaka, Shoji; Choy, Jin-Ho

    1999-04-01

    Silica-metal oxide sol pillared clays have been synthesized from montmorillonite by exchanging interlamellar (Na+) ions with silica sol particles modified with polyhydroxy metal cations. Though the silica sol particle itself is negatively charged in the pH range used in present experiment, 1.5-2.7, the ion-exchange-type intercalation of the silica sol into montmorillonite was realized by modifying the surface charge of the sol particles from negative to positive. The positively charged silica sol particles were prepared by titrating metal aqueous solutions (Mz+=Fe3+, Al3+, Cr3+, and Zr4+) with NaOH in the presence of silica sol particles, which were easily intercalated inbetween the silicate layers of clay. On pillaring of oxide sols and subsequent calcining at 400°C, new porous materials were obtained with high BET surface areas of 320-720 m2/g, pore volumes of 0.24-0.50 ml/g, and basal spacings in the range 40-60 Å. Furthermore, their thermal stability could be remarkably improved up to 700°C. According to the adsorption measurements of nitrogen and solvent vapors, the micropores in the samples of size 9-13 Å dominate due to the multilayer stacking of interlayer sol particles inbetween silicate layers. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) spectra of ammonia revealed that the microporous samples are weakly acidic, but with different strengths, depending on the doped metal species.

  7. Thermally induced solid-state transformation of cimetidine. A multi-spectroscopic/chemometrics determination of the kinetics of the process and structural elucidation of one of the products as a stable N3-enamino tautomer.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Natalia L; Simonetti, Sebastian O; Maggio, Rubén M; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2015-05-22

    Exposure of cimetidine (CIM) to dry heat (160-180°C) afforded, upon cooling, a glassy solid containing new and hitherto unknown products. The kinetics of this process was studied by a second order chemometrics-assisted multi-spectroscopic approach. Proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopic data were jointly used, whereas multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was employed as the chemometrics method to extract process information. It was established that drug degradation follows a first order kinetics. One of the products was structurally characterized by mono- and bi-dimensional NMR experiments. It was found to be the N3-enamino tautomer (TAU) of CIM, resulting from the thermal isomerization of the double bond of the cyanoguanidine moiety of the drug, from the imine form to its N3-enamine state. The thus generated tautomer demonstrated to be stable for months in the glassy solid and in methanolic solutions. A theoretical study of CIM and TAU revealed that the latter is less stable; however, the energy barrier for tautomer interconversion is high enough, precluding the process to proceed rapidly at room temperature.

  8. Vibrational, 1H-NMR spectroscopic, and thermal characterization of gladiolus root exudates in relation to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli resistance.

    PubMed

    Taddei, P; Tugnoli, V; Bottura, G; Dallavalle, E; Zechini D'Aulerio, A

    2002-01-01

    Fourier transform Raman (FT Raman) and IR (FTIR) and (1)H-NMR spectroscopies coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were applied to the characterization of root exudates from two cultivars of gladiolus (Spic Span and White Prosperity) with different degrees of resistance and susceptibility to Fusarium oxysporum gladioli, the main pathogen of gladiolus. This work was aimed at correlating the composition of root exudates with the varietal resistance to the pathogen. Spectroscopic analysis showed that White Prosperity root exudate differs from Spic Span root exudate by a higher relative amount of the aromatic-phenolic and sugarlike components and a lower relative amount of carbonylic and aliphatic compounds. DSC analysis confirmed the spectroscopic results and showed that White Prosperity root exudate is characterized by an aromatic component that is present in a higher amount than in the Spic Span root exudate. The results are discussed in relation to the spore germination tests showing that White Prosperity, which is characterized by a remarkable resistance toward F. oxysporum gladioli, exudes substances having a negative influence on microconidial germination of the pathogen; root exudates from Spic Span, one of the most susceptible cultivars to F. oxysporum gladioli, proved to have no effect. White Prosperity's ability to inhibit conidial germination of F. oxysporum gladioli can be mainly related to the presence of a higher relative amount of aromatic-phenolic compounds.

  9. IR spectroscopic and thermal desorption studies of the interaction of the SO2 + O2 mixture with the 9% Ni-Cu-Cr/2% Ce/(θ + α)-Al2O3 catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosumov, K.; Popova, N. M.; Umbetkaliev, A. K.; Brodskii, A. R.; Tungatarova, S. A.; Zheksenbaeva, Z. T.

    2012-10-01

    Data on the formation of surface structures during the adsorption of sulfur dioxide on alumina-supported metal and oxide catalysts in the presence of oxygen were reviewed. The results of our IR spectroscopic and thermal desorption studies of the interaction of the SO2+O2 mixture with the 9% Ni-Cu-Cr/2% Ce/(θ + α)-Al2O3 catalyst are presented. At 673 K chemisorption of SO2 takes place (absorption band 1165 cm-1, T {des/m} = 673 K), and SO2 is oxidized to form sulfate structures (absorption bands 1235, 1140, 1100, 985, and 615 cm-1, T {des/m} = 973 K), which decompose into SO2 and O2 at 973 K and decay when reduced in H2.

  10. Effects of various longwall chain pillar configurations on gate road stability

    SciTech Connect

    Listak, J.M.; Zelanko, J.C.; Barton, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted a field study to assess the performance of various chain pillar configurations in terms of gate road entry stability. This study is discussed in the book. Vibrating wire stressmeters (VWS's) were installed in four consecutive gate road chain pillars. Field data collected during panel retreat were analyzed to gain a better understanding of the mechanics of vertical load redistribution in gate road chain pillars as it relates to ground control problems. Several different pillar configurations were investigated including abutment-yield and yield-abutment-yield designs. VWS data indicate that average pillar loads were lower and appeared to stabilize when an abutment-yield pillar arrangement was utilized. Data analyses also support the occurrence of severe roof and pillar deterioration that was visually observed in the tailgate entries during panel extraction.

  11. Preparation of Zeolite-like Pillared Metal(IV) Phosphate Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. Santamaría.; Jiménez-López, A.; Lara, María. Martínez

    1995-12-01

    It is possible to obtain mixed aminopropyl sil-aluminum sesquioxanes by simultaneous hydrolysis of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and aluminum (III) diisopropoxide-2,4-pentanedionate with the stoichiometric amount of water in methanol. These oligomers are intercalated in a M(IV)-phosphate in which the number of POH groups are controlled substituting POH groups by phenyl phosphonates. The zeolite-like pillared materials obtained after thermal treatment at 600°C have high surface areas (up to 126 m 2 g -1) and high total acidity (up to 2.11 mmol of NH 3 desorbed between 100-500°C). XPS reveals that Al has tetrahedral coordination in these materials.

  12. Pave Pillar in-house research final report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Jesse L.; Powers, Philip

    The authors report on the concepts and technologies required to develop, integrate, and test the Pave Pillar architecture in an avionics system. Hardware and software issues relating to multiprocessing, multitasking, and real-time reconfiguration are discussed. The issues involved in developing and integrating the VHSIC avionic modular processors (VAMPs), high-speed data bus networks, and Ada software are examined. An avionic hot bench simulation was integrated to provide a closed-loop real-time test set-up called the integrated testbed (ITB) facility. The configuration and test setup for the common avionics modules were selected to provide a realistic environment and to be as close to the defined Pave Pillar architecture as possible.

  13. Retention in porous layer pillar array planar separation platforms

    DOE PAGES

    Lincoln, Danielle R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2016-08-11

    Here, this work presents the retention capabilities and surface area enhancement of highly ordered, high-aspect-ratio, open-platform, two-dimensional (2D) pillar arrays when coated with a thin layer of porous silicon oxide (PSO). Photolithographically prepared pillar arrays were coated with 50–250 nm of PSO via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and then functionalized with either octadecyltrichlorosilane or n-butyldimethylchlorosilane. Theoretical calculations indicate that a 50 nm layer of PSO increases the surface area of a pillar nearly 120-fold. Retention capabilities were tested by observing capillary-action-driven development under various conditions, as well as by running one-dimensional separations on varying thicknesses of PSO. Increasing the thicknessmore » of PSO on an array clearly resulted in greater retention of the analyte(s) in question in both experiments. In culmination, a two-dimensional separation of fluorescently derivatized amines was performed to further demonstrate the capabilities of these fabricated platforms.« less

  14. Behaviour of abandoned room and pillar mines in Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marino, G.G.; Bauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Little comprehensive information has been reported on the behaviour of room-and-pillar mines. The objective of this paper is to present case data on mine failures in the Illinois basin for use in practice. Presented are results of an ongoing study and details on the site characteristics of cases where sags have developed on the surface. Site data are reported to show the geologic, mining, and sag conditions that existed. Sags mainly develop from pillar, floor, or pillar-floor failure. The character of the sags depends upon the type of mine failure as well as the overburden response. Preliminary results show that the statistical no-risk tributary pressure decreases over 300% as the mine age increases from about 2 to 100 years at a long-term value of approximately 300 psi (2070 kPa). As more information is collected and more analysis is done, the allowable tributary pressure can be determined for different site conditions. A plot is also reported that depicts the relationship of the maximum subsidence to site conditions. It was found that the modified subsidence factor was heavily dependent upon the overburden rock thickness. ?? 1989 Chapman & Hall Ltd.

  15. Process Development for Stamping Á-Pillar Covers with Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Rohatgi, Aashish; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-02-20

    In this work, performed in close collaboration with PACCAR and Magna International, a 6XXX series aluminum alloy was used for the development of A-Pillar cover for the cab of a typical heavy-duty Class-8 truck. The use of Al alloy for the A-pillar cover represents an approximately 40% weight savings over its steel or molded fiberglass composite counterpart. For the selected Al alloy, a small amount of cold work (5% tensile strain), following prior hot-forming, was found to significantly improve the subsequent age-hardening response. The role of solutionizing temperature and rate of cooling on the age-hardening response after paint-bake treatment were investigated. For the temperature range selected in this work, higher solutionizing temperature correlated with greater subsequent age-hardening and vice-versa. However, the age-hardening response was insensitive to the mode of cooling (water quench vs. air cooling). Finally, a two-step forming process was developed where, in the first step, the blank was heated to solutionizing temperature, quenched, and then partially formed at room temperature. For the second step, the pre-form was re-heated and quenched as in the first step, and the forming was completed at room temperature. The resulting A-pillars had sufficient residual ductility to be compatible with hemming and riveting

  16. Hydroconversion reactions catalyzed by highly stable pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, S.A.; Mosqueira, L.; Espinosa, J.; Fuentes, G.A.

    1993-12-31

    Al-pillared clays (Al-PILC) and Al-X-PILC (X = Ga, Ni), structurally stable at high temperature - in the case of Ga above 800{degrees}C-have been synthesized by controlling intercalation steps and stabilization procedures. New bidimensional materials with an interlaminar distance about 10-12{angstrom} and with different chemical reactivities in the pillars have thus been produced. The analytical techniques employed to characterize the materials and the processes involved during stabilization include N{sub 2} adsorption, AA, XRD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, TGA-DTA, HR- and MAS-NMR (Al, Si, and Ga) and in-situ IR and DRIFTS. Chemical characterization using high pressure reactions with probe molecules such as diphenylmethane and tert-butylbenzene shows selectivity patterns than can be clearly associated with the microstructure of the PILC used, as well as an effect due to the composition of the pillars. Similar studies with zeolites give patterns that differ from those of PILC, probably because of the change in dimensionality of the internal structure. Poisoning studies with metal porphyrins prove that PLIC have improved resistance compared to standard catalysts. Hydrotreatment of Maya crude results a significant reduction in total sulfur under conditions suitable for commercial operation.

  17. Synthetic Hectorite: Preparation, Pillaring and Applications in Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chun-Hui; Tong, Dongshen; Li, Xiaonian

    This chapter makes a comprehensive and critical overview on the preparation of hectorite-like solids, pillaring, properties and catalytic applications of pillared interlayered synthetic hectorite clays (PILCs). Hectorite, with some specific properties, is a natural mineral among the most common smectite group of clay minerals. However, hectorite in natural occurrence is scarce. The general synthesis of hectorite-like solids is by means of hydrothermal process or solid-state reaction. The synthesis variables, crystallization, structure of synthetic hectorite along with their characteristics are discussed. Using synthetic hectorite clays with tuneable composition and high purity as layered host precursors is much conducive to designed features and specific applications of PILCs, in contrast to using natural clay minerals with impurities plus other uncertain factors arising from natural deposits. The various intercalation methods and intercalated species in PILC products have been reported with an objective to improve the porous structure and properties of the resultant PILCs. Among many potential uses of pillared synthetic hectorite, the important applications concerning catalysis are emphasized. Finally, the prospects of synthetic hectorite-based materials are briefly remarked.

  18. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  19. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  20. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films: Reciprocity failure and thermal responses of IIaO film at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, E. C., Jr.; Peters, K. A.; Gunther, S. O.; Cunningham, L. M.; Wright, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Reciprocity failure was examined for IIaO spectroscopic film. The results indicate reciprocity failure occurs at three distinct minimum points in time; 15 min, 30 min and 90 min. The results are unique because theory suggests only one minimum reciprocity failure point should occur. When incubating 70mm IIaO film for 15 and 30 min at temperatures of 30, 40, 50, and 60 C and then placing in a liquid nitrogen bath at a temperature of -190 C the film demonstrated an increase of the optical density when developed at a warm-up time of 30 min. Longer warm-up periods of 1, 2 and 3 hrs yield a decrease in optical density of the darker wedge patterns; whereas, shorter warm-up times yield an overall increase in the optical densities.

  1. Phosphonium pillar[5]arenes as a new class of efficient biofilm inhibitors: importance of charge cooperativity and the pillar platform.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Roymon; Kaizerman, Dana; Herzog, Ido M; Hadar, Maya; Feldman, Mark; Fridman, Micha; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-08-23

    Biofilm formation, which frequently occurs in microbial infections and often reduces the efficacy of antibiotics, also perturbs many industrial and domestic processes. We found that a new class of water soluble pillar[5]arenes bearing phosphonium moieties (1, 2) and their respective ammonium analogues (3, 4) inhibit biofilm formation with IC50 values in the range of 0.67-1.66 μM. These compounds have no antimicrobial activity, do not damage red blood cell membranes, and do not affect mammalian cell viability in culture. Comparison of the antibiofilm activities of the phosphonium-decorated pillar[5]arene derivatives 1 and 2 with their respective ammonium counterparts 3 and 4 and their monomers 5 and 6, demonstrate that while positive charges, charge cooperativity and the pillararene platform are essential for the observed antibiofilm activity the nature of the charges is not. PMID:27503150

  2. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    Amine-functionalized solid adsorbents have gained attention within the last decade for their application in carbon dioxide capture, due to their many advantages such as low energy cost for regeneration, tunable structure, elimination of corrosion problems, and additional advantages. However, one of the challenges facing this technology is to accomplish both high CO 2 capture capacity along with high CO2 diffusion rates concurrently. Current amine-based solid sorbents such as porous materials similar to SBA-15 have large pores diffusion entering molecules; however, the pores become clogged upon amine inclusion. To meet this challenge, our group's solution involves the creation of a new type of material which we are calling-amino-pillared nanosheet (APN) adsorbents which are generated from layered nanosheet precursors. These materials are being proposed because of their unique lamellar structure which exhibits ability to be modified by organic or inorganic pillars through consecutive swelling and pillaring steps to form large mesoporous interlayer spaces. After the expansion of the layer space through swelling and pillaring, the large pore space can be functionalized with amine groups. This selective functionalization is possible by the choice of amine group introduced. Our choice, large amine molecules, do not access the micropore within each layer; however, either physically or chemically immobilized onto the surface of the mesoporous interlayer space between each layer. The final goal of the research is to investigate the ability to prepare APN adsorbents from a model nanoporous layered materials including nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3. MCM-22(P) contains 2-dimensional porous channels, 6 membered rings (MB) openings perpendicular to the layers and 10 MB channels in the plane of the layers. However, the transport limiting openings (6 MB) to the layers is smaller than CO2 gas molecules. In contrast, AMH-3 has

  3. Europium-152 depth profile of a stone bridge pillar exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb: 152Eu activities for analysis of the neutron spectrum.

    PubMed

    Hasai, H; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hoshi, M; Yokoro, K; Sawada, S; Kosako, T; Morishima, H

    1987-09-01

    The 152Eu activity depth profile of a granite pillar of the Motoyasu bridge located 132 m from the Hiroshima atomic bomb hypocenter was assessed. The pillars each measured 82 cm in depth, 82 cm in width and 193 cm in height. One of the pillars was bored and 6.8-cm-diameter core samples were removed and cut into 2-cm-thick disks. Two gamma rays of 152Eu, 122 keV and 344 keV, in each disk were measured using a low background, gamma-ray spectrometer, and the activity distribution was determined as a function of depth in the granite. A concentration of stable Eu in the granite was determined by activation analysis. The specific radioactivity of 152Eu and 154Eu at the pillar surface was determined to have been 117 and 24 Bq per mg Eu, respectively, at the time of detonation. The value of 152Eu agrees within 20% of that calculated by Loewe. The depth profile of 152Eu in granite demonstrates a distinct difference from the estimates made only by thermal neutrons. Present data provide valuable information for the analysis of the neutron spectrum of the Hiroshima atomic bomb and its intensity.

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and thermal behavior of metal complexes formed with ( Z)-2-oxo-2-(2-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)hydrazinyl)- N-phenylacetamide (H 2OI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Rakha, T. H.; El Ayaan, Usama; Abu El Reash, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and U(IV)O 2 with ( Z)-2-oxo-2-(2-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene)hydrazinyl)- N-phenylacetamide (H 2OI) are reported and have been characterized by various spectroscopic techniques like (IR, UV-Vis, ESR 1H and 13C NMR) as well as magnetic and thermal (TG and DTA) measurements. It is found that the ligand behaves as a neutral tridentate, neutral tetradentate, monoanionic tridentate, monoanionic tridentate and dianionic tridentate. An octahedral geometry for all complexes except [Cu 2(H 2OI)(OAc) 4](H 2O) 2 and [Cu(HOI)Cl](H 2O) 2 which have a square planar geometry. Furthermore, kinetic parameters were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some studied complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The bond lengths, bond angles, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moments have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and the investigated complexes.

  5. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L=An, DMF, Py and Et3N).

    PubMed

    Zordok, Wael A

    2014-08-14

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4⋅nH2O, where L=aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E(*); entropies, ΔS(*); enthalpies, ΔH(*); Gibbs free energies, ΔG(*), of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  6. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: Spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L = An, DMF, Py and Et3N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, Wael A.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4ṡnH2O, where L = aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E*; entropies, ΔS*; enthalpies, ΔH*; Gibbs free energies, ΔG*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and structural elucidation of 5-amino-2-methoxypyridine ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester: A new material with an infinite pseudo-layered structure and manifested NLO application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, Tsonko; Koleva, Bojidarka B.; Spassov, Tony; Cherneva, Emilya; Spiteller, Michael; Mayer-Figge, Heike; Sheldrick, William S.

    2008-03-01

    The novel squaric acid derivative, 5-amino-2-methoxypyridin ester amide of squaric acid ethyl ester with second order NLO application in solution and in the bulk has been synthesized and is structure and properties elucidated in detail spectroscopic, thermally and structurally, using single crystal X-ray diffraction, linear-polarized solid state IR-spectroscopy, UV-spectroscopy, and TGA, DSC, DTA, MS and SHG methods. Quantum chemical calculations were used for obtain in the electronic structure, vibrational data and NLO properties. At room temperature the studied compound crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric space group Cc and exhibits a pseudo-layer structure (solid phase 1) with molecules linked by NH⋯O dbnd C intermolecular hydrogen bonds with length of 2.955 Å and NH⋯O angle of 153.41°, respectively. At 200 °C a phase transition is observed, with the solid phase 2 exhibiting new intermolecular NH⋯N interactions, as elucidated by IR-spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The obtained large powder SHG efficiency of 609 times urea proves the NLO application of studied compound in the bulk.

  8. Stress Changes and Deformation Monitoring of Longwall Coal Pillars Located in Weak Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kuang, Tiejun; Liu, Jinrong

    2016-08-01

    Coal pillar stability is strongly influenced by the site-specific geological and geotechnical conditions. Many geological structures such as faults, joints, or rock intrusions can be detrimental to mining operations. In order to evaluate the performance of coal pillars under weak roof degraded by igneous rock intrusion, stress and deformation monitoring was conducted in the affected tailgate areas of Nos. 8208 and 8210 longwalls in Tashan coal mine, Shanxi Province, China. The measurements in the 8208 longwall tailgate showed that the mining-induced stresses in 38-m-wide coal chain pillars under the overburden depth of 300-500 m started to increase at about 100 m ahead of the 8208 longwall working face and reached its peak level at approximately 50 m ahead of the longwall face. The peak stress of 9.16 MPa occurred at the depth of 8-9 m into the pillar from the tailgate side wall. In comparison, disturbance of the headgate block pillar area was negligible, indicating the difference of abutment pressure distribution between the tailgate and headgate sites where the adjacent unmined longwall block carried most of the overburden load. However, when the longwall face passed the headgate monitoring site by 360-379 m, the pillar stress increased to a peak value of 21.4 MPa at the pillar depth of 13 m from the gob side mainly due to stress redistribution in the chain pillar. In contrast to the headgate, at the tailgate side, the adjacent goaf was the dominant triggering factor for high stress concentrations in the chain pillar. Convergence measurements in the tailgate during longwall mining further indicated the evolution characteristics of coal pillar deformation, clearly showing that the gateroad deformation is mainly induced by the longwall extraction it serves. When predicting the future pillar loads from the monitored data, two stress peaks appeared across the 38-m-wide tailgate coal pillar, which are separated by the lower stress area within the pillar center. This

  9. Thermal infrared (2.5-13.5 μm) spectroscopic remote sensing of igneous rock types on particulate planetary surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, John W.; Walter, Louis S.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamental molecular vibration bands are significantly diminished by scattering. Thus such bands in spectra of fine particulate regoliths (i.e., dominated by <5-μm particles), or regoliths displaying a similar scale of porosity, are difficult to use for mineralogical or rock type identification. Consequently, other spectral features have been sought that may be more useful in spectroscopic remote sensing of composition. We find that mineralogical information is retained in overtones and combination tones of the fundamental molecular vibrations in the 3.0- to 7.0-μm region, but that relatively few minerals have a sufficiently distinctive band structure to be unambiguously identified with currently available techniques. More significantly, identification of general rock type, as defined by the SCFM chemical index (SCFM = SiO2/SiO2 + CaO + FeO + MgO), is possible using spectral features associated with the principal Christiansen frequency and with a region of relative transparency between the Si-O stretching and bending bands. However, environmental factors may affect the appearance and wavelengths of these features. Finally, prominent absorption bands may result from the presence of relatively small amounts of water, hydroxyl or carbonate, because absorption bands exhibited by these materials in the 2.7- to 4.0-μm region, where silicate spectra are otherwise featureless, increase strongly in spectral contrast with decreasing particle size. Such materials are thus detectable in very small amounts in a particulate regolith composed predominantly of silicate minerals.

  10. Spectroscopic studies of non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure formed in low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. P.; Melnichuk, S. V.; Demkin, O. V.; Kingma, H.; Van de Berg, R.

    2016-04-01

    The optical and electrophysical characteristics of the nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma formed by a low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron are experimentally investigated in the present work. It is demonstrated that experimental data on the optical diagnostics of the plasma jet can provide a basis for the construction of a self-consistent physical and mathematical plasma model and for the creation of plasma sources with controllable electrophysical parameters intended for the generation of the required concentration of active particles. Results of spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma of the low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron confirm that the given source is efficient for the generation of charged particles and short-wavelength radiation—important plasma components for biomedical problems of an increase in the efficiency of treatment of biological tissues by charged particles. Measurement of the spatial distribution of the plasma jet potential by the probe method has demonstrated that a negative space charge is formed in the plasma jet possibly due to the formation of electronegative oxygen ions.

  11. Ordered microporous layered lanthanide 1,3,5-benzenetriphosphonates pillared with cationic organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Araki, Takahiro; Kondo, Atsushi; Maeda, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-13

    Novel isomorphous pillared-layer-type crystalline lanthanide 1,3,5-benzenetriphosphonates were prepared with bpy and dbo as organic pillars (LnBP-bpy and LnBP-dbo; Ln: Ce, Pr, and Nd). Ab initio crystal structure solution using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data revealed that the organic pillars do not exist as neutral coordinating ligands but as cationic molecules. Especially the LnBP-dbo phases have ordered interlayer space filled with water molecules between the dbo pillars, and the interlayer water is successfully removed by heating under vacuum with slightly distorted but basically retained pillared layer structures. Microporosity of the materials is confirmed by adsorption of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen gases. Such microporous layered metal phosphonates pillared with cationic molecules should be unprecedented and should offer new strategies to design ordered microporous materials.

  12. Dimeric and polymeric mercury(II) complexes of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrazole-5-thiol: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization, and thermal analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheriha, Mohammad; Ghadermazi, Mohammad; Amani, Vahid

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional coordination polymer of [Hg(μ3-mmtz)2]n (1) and centrosymmetric dinuclear complexes of {[H2en][Hg2(mmtz)4(μ-Br)2]} (2) and {[H2en][Hg2(mmtz)4(μ-I)2]} (3) (where Hmmtz is 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrazole-5-thiol and en is ethylene diamine) were synthesized from the reaction of Hmmtz and en with HgCl2, HgBr2 and HgI2, respectively, in CH3OH. Complex 1 was also synthesized from the reaction of Hmmtz and en with HgX2 (X = OAc and SCN) in CH3OH. These three complexes were thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis (CHN), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analyses (DTA), infrared, UV-vis, 1H NMR, and luminescence spectroscopy, and their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antifungal studies on lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives of 1,1-diacetylferrocenyl hydrazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S. K.; Pandey, O. P.; Rai, Anita; Sinha, A.

    2006-09-01

    A series of new coordination complexes of La(III) and Pr(III) with hydrazones, derived from 1,1-diacetylferrocene and different aromatic acid hydrazides have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic moment, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis spectra and molar conductance. The thermal behaviour of the complexes under non-isothermal condition was investigated by TG and DTG techniques. The antifungal activity of hydrazones and their corresponding complexes were also investigated.

  14. Characterization of the physico-chemical properties of polymeric materials for aerospace flight. [differential thermal and atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodes and electrolytes of nickel cadmium sealed batteries were analyzed. Different thermal analysis of negative and positive battery electrodes was conducted and the temperature ranges of occurrence of endotherms indicating decomposition of cadmium hydroxide and nickel hydroxide are identified. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for traces of nickel, cadmium, cobalt, and potassium. Calibration curves and data are given for each sample analyzed. Instrumentation and analytical procedures used for each method are described.

  15. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antifungal studies on lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives of 1,1-diacetylferrocenyl hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S K; Pandey, O P; Rai, Anita; Sinha, A

    2006-09-01

    A series of new coordination complexes of La(III) and Pr(III) with hydrazones, derived from 1,1-diacetylferrocene and different aromatic acid hydrazides have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic moment, IR, (1)H NMR, UV-vis spectra and molar conductance. The thermal behaviour of the complexes under non-isothermal condition was investigated by TG and DTG techniques. The antifungal activity of hydrazones and their corresponding complexes were also investigated.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure, and spectroscopic and thermal properties of the polymeric compound catena-poly[[bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoato)zinc(II)]-μ-isonicotinamide].

    PubMed

    Homzová, Katarína; Györyová, Katarína; Koman, Marián; Melník, Milan; Juhászová, Žofia

    2015-09-01

    Zinc(II) carboxylates with O-, S- and N-donor ligands are interesting for their structural features, as well as for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The one-dimensional zinc(II) coordination complex catena-poly[[bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoato-κO)zinc(II)]-μ-isonicotinamide-κ(2)N(1):O], [Zn(C7H3Cl2O2)2(C6H6N2O)]n, has been prepared and characterized by IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray analysis and thermal analysis. The tetrahedral ZnO3N coordination about the Zn(II) cation is built up by the N atom of the pyridine ring, an O atom of the carbonyl group of the isonicotinamide ligand and two O atoms of two dichlorobenzoate ligands. Isonicotinamide serves as a bridge between tetrahedra, with a Zn···Zn distance of 8.8161 (7) Å. Additionally, π-π interactions between the planar benzene rings contribute to the stabilization of the extended structure. The structure is also stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino and carboxylate groups of the ligands, forming a two-dimensional network. During thermal decomposition of the complex, isonicotinamide, dichlorobenzene and carbon dioxide were evolved. The final solid product of the thermal decomposition heated up to 1173 K was metallic zinc. PMID:26322615

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure, and spectroscopic and thermal properties of the polymeric compound catena-poly[[bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoato)zinc(II)]-μ-isonicotinamide].

    PubMed

    Homzová, Katarína; Györyová, Katarína; Koman, Marián; Melník, Milan; Juhászová, Žofia

    2015-09-01

    Zinc(II) carboxylates with O-, S- and N-donor ligands are interesting for their structural features, as well as for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The one-dimensional zinc(II) coordination complex catena-poly[[bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoato-κO)zinc(II)]-μ-isonicotinamide-κ(2)N(1):O], [Zn(C7H3Cl2O2)2(C6H6N2O)]n, has been prepared and characterized by IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray analysis and thermal analysis. The tetrahedral ZnO3N coordination about the Zn(II) cation is built up by the N atom of the pyridine ring, an O atom of the carbonyl group of the isonicotinamide ligand and two O atoms of two dichlorobenzoate ligands. Isonicotinamide serves as a bridge between tetrahedra, with a Zn···Zn distance of 8.8161 (7) Å. Additionally, π-π interactions between the planar benzene rings contribute to the stabilization of the extended structure. The structure is also stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino and carboxylate groups of the ligands, forming a two-dimensional network. During thermal decomposition of the complex, isonicotinamide, dichlorobenzene and carbon dioxide were evolved. The final solid product of the thermal decomposition heated up to 1173 K was metallic zinc.

  18. Spectroscopic and thermal investigations on the charge transfer interaction between risperidone as a schizophrenia drug with some traditional π-acceptors: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Habeeb, Abeer A.; Al-Saif, Foziah A.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2013-03-01

    The focus of present investigation was to assess the utility of non-expensive techniques in the evaluation of risperidone (Ris) in solid and solution states with different traditional π-acceptors and subsequent incorporation of the analytical determination into pharmaceutical formulation for a faster release of risperidone. Charge-transfer complexes (CTC) of risperidone with picric acid (PA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinon (DDQ), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), tetracyano ethylene (TCNE), tetrabromo-p-quinon (BL) and tetrachloro-p-quinon (CL) have been studied spectrophotometrically in absolute methanol at room temperature. The stoichiometries of the complexes were found to be 1:1 ratio by the photometric molar ratio between risperidone and the π-acceptors. The equilibrium constants, molar extinction coefficient (ɛCT) and spectroscopic-physical parameters (standard free energy (ΔGo), oscillator strength (f), transition dipole moment (μ), resonance energy (RN) and ionization potential (ID)) of the complexes were determined upon the modified Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Risperidone in pure form was applied in this study. The results indicate that the formation constants for the complexes depend on the nature of electron acceptors and donor, and also the spectral studies of the complexes were determined by (infrared, Raman, and 1H NMR) spectra and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The most stable mono-protonated form of Ris is characterized by the formation of +Nsbnd H (pyrimidine ring) intramolecular hydrogen bonded. In the high-wavenumber spectral region ˜3400 cm-1, the bands of the +Nsbnd H stretching vibrations and of the pyrimidine nitrogen atom could be potentially useful to discriminate the investigated forms of Ris. The infrared spectra of both Ris complexes are confirming the participation of +Nsbnd H pyrimidine ring in the donor-acceptor interaction.

  19. Amino acids, precursors for cationic and anionic intercalation synthesis and characterization of amino acid pillared materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudala, Á.; Pálinkó, I.; Kiricsi, I.

    1999-05-01

    The preparation and characterization of amino acid pillared materials are reported in this contribution. Host substances were Na-montmorillonite for cationic and hydrotalcite for anionic pillaring. Guest molecules were L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine. The pillared materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, BET measurements and FT-IR spectroscopy. Pillaring was successful: the layers propped open and the basal distances increased significantly. For hydrotalcite this increase was always significantly larger than for montmorillonite. This fact indicated that the spatial arrangement of the amino acid moieties is widely different. A model for this arrangement is given.

  20. Terahertz surface plasmons propagation through periodically tilted pillars and control on directional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Maidul; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a terahertz (THz) plasmonic waveguide using periodically arranged tilted pillars and control the propagation properties of the guided modes with the bending of pillars. A metal surface approximated as a perfect electrical conductor at terahertz frequencies is periodically corrugated with sub-wavelength scale tilted pillars thereby forming a plasmonic waveguide. The tilted pillars plasmonic waveguide supports highly confined guided terahertz modes at specific frequencies depending upon the pillar dimensions. We confirm the propagation of terahertz modes through a semi-analytical model that we employ specifically for our geometry. We observe that the propagation properties of the terahertz modes can be controlled by changing the bending of the pillars. We have examined in detail, the propagation properties of the guided modes for different angles and direction through which the pillars are tilted. We further examine terahertz waveguides comprising of pillars with increasing height and investigate their ability in confining terahertz waves at a certain position where the resonant frequency of a pillar matches with the incident frequency.

  1. Extending and lowing band gaps in one-dimensional phononic crystal strip with pillars and holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chunyang; Guo, Jianwen; Liu, Yongfu

    2015-12-01

    Effectiveness of extending and lowing gaps in one-dimensional phononic crystal strips is conducted by periodically patterning pillar-type strip with holes. Finite element method is applied to the hybrid unit to calculate band structures and eigen modes. Transmission spectra and displacement fields are investigated to confirm the gap effect in the studied hybrid strips. Numerical results show that, the one-dimensional hybrid strip can open lower and wider gaps. Compared with two-dimensional phononic crystal plate, band structures of phononic crystal strip show different group velocities and frequencies in low-order bands, different eigen modes of gap edge because of boundary condition difference. The effectiveness of modulating gaps with strip width is investigated. Gap degeneration happens to adjust lower gap edge downward. Besides, hybrid structure with double-side pillar leads to more resonance bands than that with single-side pillar. Vibration mode of pure pillar type structure located in lower edge of the gap of hybrid single-side pillar-type structure, and some resonance modes in the hole-type strip are reserved in hybrid single-side pillar structure. Resonance in hybrid double-side pillar structure is introduced by vibration of the double-pillar character, to create more flat bands. Furthermore, gap sensitivity to geometrical parameters of pillars and holes is also investigated.

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of sulpiride complexes of iron, manganese, copper, cobalt, nickel, and zinc salts. Antibacterial and antifungal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Soliman, Madiha H.

    2010-08-01

    Sulpiride (SPR; L) is a substituted benzamide antipsychotic which is reported to be a selective antagonist of central dopamine receptors and claimed to have mood-elevating properties. The ligation behaviour of SPR drug is studied in order to give an idea about its potentiality towards some transition metals in vitro systems. Metal complexes of SPR have been synthesized by reaction with different metal chlorides. The metal complexes of SPR with the formula [MCl 2(L) 2(H 2O) 2]· nH 2O [M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); n = 0-2] and [FeCl 2(HL)(H 2O) 3]Cl·H 2O have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis (CHN), electronic (infrared, solid reflectance and 1H NMR spectra) and thermal analyses (TG and DTA). The molar conductance data reveal that the bivalent metal chelates are non-electrolytes while Fe(III) complex is 1:1 electrolyte. IR spectra show that SPR is coordinated to the metal ions in a neutral monodentate manner with the amide O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, octahedral geometry is suggested. The thermal decomposition processes of these complexes were discussed. The correlation coefficient, the activation energies, E*, the pre-exponential factor, A, and the entropies, Δ S*, enthalpies, Δ H*, Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves. The synthesized ligand and its metal complexes were also screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activity against bacterial species ( Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and fungi ( Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes are found to have antibacterial and antifungal activity than the parent drug and less than the standard.

  3. Thermodynamic stability of ribonuclease A in alkylurea solutions and preferential solvation changes accompanying its thermal denaturation: a calorimetric and spectroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Poklar, N.; Petrovcic, N.; Oblak, M.; Vesnaver, G.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of methylurea, N,N'-dimethylurea, ethylurea, and butylurea as well as guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), urea and pH on the thermal stability, structural properties, and preferential solvation changes accompanying the thermal unfolding of ribonuclease A (RNase A) has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The results show that the thermal stability of RNase A decreases with increasing concentration of denaturants and the size of the hydrophobic group substituted on the urea molecule. From CD measurements in the near- and far-UV range, it has been observed that the tertiary structure of RNase A melts at about 3 degrees C lower temperature than its secondary structure, which means that the hierarchy in structural building blocks exists for RNase A even at conditions at which according to DSC and UV measurements the RNase A unfolding can be interpreted in terms of a two-state approximation. The far-UV CD spectra also show that the final denatured states of RNase A at high temperatures in the presence of different denaturants including 4.5 M GuHCl are similar to each other but different from the one obtained in 4.5 M GuHCl at 25 degrees C. The concentration dependence of the preferential solvation change delta r23, expressed as the number of cosolvent molecules entering or leaving the solvation shell of the protein upon denaturation and calculated from DSC data, shows the same relative denaturation efficiency of alkylureas as other methods. PMID:10211829

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic, fluorescent, thermal properties and EPR spectra of doped Cu2+ ions in [Cd(sac)2(H2O)2(meim)2] single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidan, M.; Semerci, F.; Şahin, E.; Yeşilel, O. Z.; Tapramaz, R.; Şahin, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structures of the six-coordinate complexes [Cd(sac)2(H2O)2(meim)2] (complex 1) formed by reaction of 4-methylimidazole(meim) with [Cd(sac)2(H2O)4]·2H2O (saccharinate = sac), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray single crystal diffraction. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that complex 1 crystallized in the monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/c. The Cd(II) center was six-coordinated with four nitrogen atoms from two sac and two 4-meim ligands, two oxygen atoms from two aqua ligands. Spectral and thermal analysis data for complex 1 was in agreement with the crystal structures. In addition complex 1 displayed blue fluorescent emission in the solid state at room temperature. Single crystal EPR spectra at room temperature are resolved and have exhibited that two different Cu2+ complexes were located in different chemical environments which contained two magnetically nonequivalent Cu2+ sites. In low temperature EPR spectra down to 110 °C did show no considerable change. At higher temperatures, however, both thermo gravimetric analyses (TGA) and EPR spectra showed detectable changes around 140 °C; the causes and the mechanisms of changes are discussed.

  5. Supercritical hydrothermal synthesis of Cu{sub 2}O(SeO{sub 3}): Structural characterization, thermal, spectroscopic and magnetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Larranaga, Aitor

    2009-01-08

    Cu{sub 2}O(SeO{sub 3}) has been synthesized in supercritical hydrothermal conditions, using an externally heated steel reactor with coupled hydraulic pump for the application of high pressure. The compound crystallizes in the P2{sub 1}3 cubic space group. The unit cell parameter is a = 9.930(1) A with Z = 12. The crystal structure has been refined by the Rietveld method. The limit of thermal stability is, approximately, 490 deg. C. Above this temperature the compound decomposes to SeO{sub 2}(g) and CuO(s). The IR spectrum shows the characteristic bands of the (SeO{sub 3}){sup 2-} oxoanion. In the diffuse reflectance spectrum two intense absorptions characteristic of the Cu(II) cations in five-coordination are observed. The ESR spectra are isotropic from room temperature to 5 K, with g = 2.11(2). The thermal evolution of the intensity and line width of the signals suggest a ferromagnetic transition in the 50-45 K range. Magnetic measurements, at low temperatures, confirm the existence of a ferromagnetic transition with a critical temperature of 55 K.

  6. Thermal inkjet application in the preparation of oral dosage forms: dispensing of prednisolone solutions and polymorphic characterization by solid-state spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Peter A; Kane, Kevin M; Ashvar, Claudine S; Albrecht, Mary; Smith, Pamela A

    2008-07-01

    The utility of thermal inkjet (TIJ) technology for preparing solid dosage forms of drugs was examined. Solutions of prednisolone in a solvent mixture of ethanol, water, and glycerol (80/17/3 by volume) were dispensed onto poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-coated fiberglass films using TIJ cartridges and a personal printer and using a micropipette for comparison. The post-dried, TIJ-dispensed samples were shown to contain a mixture of prednisolone Forms I and III based on PXRD analyses that were confirmed by Raman analyses. The starting commercial material was determined to be Form I. Samples prepared by dispensing the solution from a micropipette initially showed only Form I; subsequent Raman mapping of these samples revealed the presence of two polymorphs. Raman mapping of the TIJ-dispensed samples also showed both polymorphs. The results indicate that the solvent mixture used in the dispensing solution combined with the thermal treatment of the samples after dispensing were likely the primary reason for the generation of the two polymorphs. The advantages of using a multidisciplinary approach to characterize drug delivery systems are demonstrated using solid state mapping techniques. Both PXRD and Raman spectroscopy were needed to fully characterize the samples. Finally, this report clarifies prednisolone's polymorphic nomenclature existent in the scientific literature.

  7. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the length scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.

  8. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-05-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  9. Two new barium sulfonates with pillared layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Li; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng

    2006-08-01

    The reactions of BaCl 2·2H 2O with NaHL a and K 3L b (H 2L a=4-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid, H 3L b=4-hydroxy-5-nitro-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid) gave two pillared layered coordination polymers: Ba(HL a)(Cl) 1 and KBaL b(H 2O) 32, respectively. The crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction method and refined by full-matrix least-squares methods to R=0.0509 and wR=0.1216 using 1455 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 1; and R=0.0288 and wR=0.0727 using 2661 reflections with I>2 σ( I) for 2. The interesting feature of compound 1 is the coordination actions of chloride anions, which help to form the polymeric layers by bridging barium cations. In compound 2 the Lb3- anion acts as an unusual dodecadente ligand to form a coordination polymer with pillared layered structure.

  10. Length scale selects directionality of droplets on vibrating pillar ratchet

    DOE PAGES

    Agapov, Rebecca L.; Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2014-09-22

    Directional control of droplet motion at room temperature is of interest for applications such as microfluidic devices, self-cleaning coatings, and directional adhesives. Here, arrays of tilted pillars ranging in height from the nanoscale to the microscale are used as structural ratchets to directionally transport water at room temperature. Water droplets deposited on vibrating chips with a nanostructured ratchet move preferentially in the direction of the feature tilt while the opposite directionality is observed in the case of microstructured ratchets. This remarkable switch in directionality is consistent with changes in the contact angle hysteresis. To glean further insights into the lengthmore » scale dependent asymmetric contact angle hysteresis, the contact lines formed by a nonvolatile room temperature ionic liquid placed onto the tilted pillar arrays were visualized and analyzed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. As a result, the ability to tune droplet directionality by merely changing the length scale of surface features all etched at the same tilt angle would be a versatile tool for manipulating multiphase flows and for selecting droplet directionality in other lap-on-chip applications.« less

  11. Periodic mesoporous organosilica with a hexagonally pillared lamellar structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Ik; Kim, Ji Man; Stucky, Galen D

    2009-10-14

    Ordered mesoporous materials (OMMs) with well-defined pore sizes (>2 nm) and pore geometries are important in various applications that require fast mass transfer or deal with large molecules. Extensive research has resulted in the discovery of OMMs with three types of mesostructures: (i) bi- or multicontinuous, (ii) columnar, and (iii) discontinuous (cagelike). However, another type, the pillared lamellar structure, which has long been sought and has been mathematically computed and known to exist in the research fields of surfactant and multiblock-copolymer mesophases, still remains a mesostructure that has not been observed in real OMMs for any specific symmetry. Herein, we report an unprecedented type of ordered mesoporous material with a hexagonally pillared lamellar (HPL) structure (P6(3)/mmc) that can be synthesized via a phase transformation from a lamellar mesophase by hydrothermal reaction in the presence of an organosilica precursor and a high concentration of a designed Gemini surfactant (Gem(16-3-16)) that has a large g value. The present GMO-HPL, which has an unique three-dimensional periodic structure with two-dimensionally connected pore channels running between the framework layers, provides a fascinating topological link between the lamellar and columnar (2D hexagonal) mesophases. It is unique in its application potential by making possible selective 2D diffusion in different directions.

  12. Three-dimensional image analytical detection of intussusceptive pillars in murine lung.

    PubMed

    Föhst, S; Wagner, W; Ackermann, M; Redenbach, C; Schladitz, K; Wirjadi, O; Ysasi, A B; Mentzer, S J; Konerding, M A

    2015-12-01

    A variety of diseases can lead to loss of lung tissue. Currently, this can be treated only symptomatically. In mice, a complete compensatory lung growth within 21 days after resection of the left lung can be observed. Understanding and transferring this concept of compensatory lung growth to humans would greatly improve therapeutic options. Lung growth is always accompanied by a process called angiogenesis forming new capillary blood vessels from preexisting ones. Among the processes during lung growth, the formation of transluminal tissue pillars within the capillary vessels (intussusceptive pillars) is observed. Therefore, pillars can be understood as an indicator for active angiogenesis and microvascular remodelling. Thus, their detection is very valuable when aiming at characterization of compensatory lung growth. In a vascular corrosion cast, these pillars appear as small holes that pierce the vessels. So far, pillars were detected visually only based on 2D images. Our approach relies on high-resolution synchrotron microcomputed tomographic images. With a voxel size of 370 nm we exploit the spatial information provided by this imaging technique and present the first algorithm to semiautomatically detect intussusceptive pillars. An at least semiautomatic detection is essential in lung research, as manual pillar detection is not feasible due to the complexity and size of the 3D structure. Using our algorithm, several thousands of pillars can be detected and subsequently analysed, e.g. regarding their spatial arrangement, size and shape with an acceptable amount of human interaction. In this paper, we apply our novel pillar detection algorithm to compute pillar densities of different specimens. These are prepared such that they show different growing states. Comparing the corresponding pillar densities allows to investigate lung growth over time.

  13. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves.

  14. Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic behaviors of metal-drug complexes: La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) amoxicillin trihydrate antibiotic drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; Al-Maydama, Hussein M A; Al-Azab, Fathi M; Amin, Ragab R; Jamil, Yasmin M S

    2014-07-15

    The metal complexes of Amoxicillin trihydrate with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) are synthesized with 1:1 (metal:Amox) molar ratio. The suggested formula structures of the complexes are based on the results of the elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons, as well as the thermal analysis (TG), and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results obtained suggested that Amoxicillin reacted with metal ions as tridentate ligands, coordinating the metal ion through its amino, imino, and β-lactamic carbonyl. The kinetic thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*) were estimated from the DTG curves.

  15. Synthesis, thermal, XRD and spectroscopic studies characterization of Tutton salt K2M (SO4)2·6H2O (M = Mg, Ni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzougui, H.; Attia-Essaies, S.; Ben Hassen-Chehimi, D.

    2016-09-01

    Tutton's salts K2M(SO4)2·6H2O (M = Mg, Ni) have been synthesized by the slow evaporation method at room temperature. A complete structural characterization has been carried out by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that the structure of these salts is monoclinic system with the space group P21/a (Z = 2). IR and Raman spectra of KMS6 (M = Mg,Ni) have been recorded and analyzed. From the spectra, the vibrations due to SO42- ion, the complex [M(H2O)6]2+ and the water molecules have been identified. Thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and XRD at high-temperature investigations show that the dehydration of these salts occurs between 300 and 500 K. This indicates the removal of all water molecules around 426 K.

  16. New organic single crystal of (benzylthio)acetic acid: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR) and thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, Justyna; Tarasiuk, Bogdan; Mazur, Liliana

    2016-04-01

    (Benzylthio)acetic acid (Hbta) was synthesized with 78% yield from benzyl chloride and thiourea as substrates. Well-shaped crystals of Hbta were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique from pure methanol. The compound was investigated by single-crystal X-ray and powder diffraction techniques and was also characterized by other analytical methods, like ATR-FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR and TG/DSC. The acid molecule adopts bent conformation in the solid state. The crystal structure of Hbta is stabilized by numerous intermolecular interactions, including O-H···O, C-H···O, C-H···S and C-H···π contacts. Thermal decomposition of the obtained material takes place above 150 °C.

  17. Spectroscopic investigations of neptunium`s and plutonium`s oxidation states in sol-gel glasses as a function of initial valance and thermal history

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, N.A.; Haire, R.G.; Dai, S.

    1996-12-01

    Several oxidation states of neptunium and plutonium, Pu(III),Pu (IV), PU(VI), Np(IV), Np(V) and Np (VI), were studied in glasses prepared by a sol-gel technology. The oxidation state of these actinides was determined primarily by absorption spectrometry and followed as a function of the solidification process, subsequent aging and thermal treatments. It was determined that the initial oxidation state of the actinides in the starting solutions was essentially maintained through the solidification process to form the glasses. However, during densification and removal of residual solvents at elevated temperatures, both actinides in the different sol-gel products converted completely to their tetravalent states. These results are discussed in terms of our findings in comparable studies that only the tetravalent states of plutonium and neptunium are formed in glasses prepared by dissolving their dioxides in different molten- glass formulations.

  18. The Eagle Nebula: Pillars of Creation, EGGs, and PMS Stars in NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Gagné, M.; Mytyk, A.; McCaughrean, M.; Andersen, M.

    2008-04-01

    We report on Chandra ACIS-I observations of the Eagle Nebula containing the young Galactic cluster NGC~6611 and the dark columns called the ``Pillars of Creation''. We find that NGC~6611 contains a rich collection of young X-ray emitting stars, but the EGGs at the edge of the pillars are not detected at levels below the Orion young stellar objects.

  19. The Sloan-C Pillars: Towards a Balanced Approach to Measuring Organizational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Kee Meng; Mayadas, A. Frank

    2010-01-01

    The Sloan Pillars have set the standard for university-wide online learning program assessment for more than a dozen years. In this paper, the authors propose the extension of the Pillars to corporate e-learning, offering an alternative to traditional enterprise learning assessments. Claiming that conventional methods stress individual courses or…

  20. Biological potential study of metal complexes of sulphonylurea glibenclamide on the house fly, Musca domestica (Diptera—Muscidae): Preparation, spectroscopic and thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Abdallah, S. M.; Zayed, M. A.; Nassar, M. M. I.

    2009-10-01

    The ligatation behaviour of sulphonylurea glibenclamide drug is studied in order to give an idea about its potentiality towards some transition metals in vitro systems. Metal complexes of glibenclamide (GCA; H 3L) drug are prepared and characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, diffused reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance and thermal analysis (TG and DTG) techniques. From the elemental analyses data, the complexes are proposed to have the general formulae [M(H 3L)Cl n(H 2O) m]· yH 2O (where M = Cr(III) ( n = 3, m = 1, y = 3); Mn(II) ( n = 2, m = 0, y = 1); Fe(III) ( n = 3, m = 1, y = 0), Co(II) ( n = 2, m = 2, y = 0); Ni(II) ( n = 2, m = 2, y = 3); Cu(II) ( n = 2, m = 2, y = 2) and Zn(II) ( n = 2, m = 0, y = 0). The molar conductance data reveal that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes. IR spectra show that GCA is coordinated to the metal ions in a neutral bidentate manner with OO donor sites of the amide- O and sulphone -O. From the magnetic and solid reflectance spectra, it is found that the geometrical structures of these complexes are octahedral except Mn(II) and Zn(II) complexes which have tetrahedral structure. The thermal behaviour of these chelates is studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TG and DTG) technique. The activation thermodynamic parameters are calculated using Coats-Redfern method. The GCA drug, in comparison to its metal complexes also is screened for its biological activity against house fly, Musca domestica (Diptera—Muscidae). Dose of 5 μg/insect of GCA is topically applied against 3 days old larval instar of M. domestica. Survival of pupal and adult stages has been affected by the complexes of GCA more than larval instars. Morphogenic abnormalities of larvae, pupae and adults are studied. On the other hand pupation and adult emergence program is deteriorated by the effect of different chemicals.

  1. Clickable di- and tetrafunctionalized pillar[n]arenes (n = 5, 6) by oxidation-reduction of pillar[n]arene units.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamafuji, Daiki; Kotera, Daisuke; Aoki, Takamichi; Fujinami, Shuhei; Yamagishi, Tada-aki

    2012-12-21

    We report a new route for the selective synthesis of di- and tetrafunctionalized pillararenes via oxidation and reduction of the pillararene units. Hypervalent-iodine oxidation of perethylated pillar[5]arene afforded pillar[5]arene derivatives containing one benzoquinone unit and two benzoquinones at the A,B- and A,C-units. A pillar[6]arene derivative containing one benzoquinone unit was also synthesized. Reduction of the benzoquinone units yielded position-selective di- and tetrahydroxylated pillararene derivatives. This methodology avoids the generation of many constitutional isomers and overcomes the isolation problem of numerous constitutional isomers. From these hydroxylated pillararenes, Huisgen reaction-based clickable di- and tetraalkynylated pillar[5]arenes were prepared. Because of the highly selective and reactive nature of Huisgen alkyne-azide cycloaddition, these pillar[5]arenes can serve as key compounds for a large library of di- and tetrafunctionalized pillararenes. Based on these di- and tetrafunctionalized pillar[5]arenes as key compounds, fluorescent sensors were created by the modification of di- and tetrapyrene moieties via Huisgen-type click reactions.

  2. Coordination behavior of new bis Schiff base ligand derived from 2-furan carboxaldehyde and propane-1,3-diamine. Spectroscopic, thermal, anticancer and antibacterial activity studies.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Gehad G; Zayed, Ehab M; Hindy, Ahmed M M

    2015-06-15

    Novel bis Schiff base ligand, [N1,N3-bis(furan-2-ylmethylene)propane-1,3-diamine], was prepared by the condensation of furan-2-carboxaldehyde with propane-1,3-diamine. Its conformational changes on complexation with transition metal ions [Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III)] have been studied on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, spectral (infrared, (1)H NMR, electronic), magnetic and thermogravimetric studies. The conductance data of the complexes revealed their electrolytic nature suggesting them as 1:2 (for bivalent metal ions) and 1:3 (for Fe(III) ion) electrolytes. The complexes were found to have octahedral geometry based on magnetic moment and solid reflectance measurements. Thermal analysis data revealed the decomposition of the complexes in successive steps with the removal of anions, coordinated water and bis Schiff base ligand. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation. The Anticancer screening studies were performed on human colorectal cancer (HCT), hepatic cancer (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines. The antimicrobial activity of all the compounds was studied against Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris) and Gram positive (Bacillus vulgaris and Staphylococcus pyogones) bacteria. It was observed that the coordination of metal ion has a pronounced effect on the microbial activities of the bis Schiff base ligand. All the metal complexes have shown higher antimicrobial effect than the free bis Schiff base ligand.

  3. Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of new Schiff base ligand: Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Sayed, Mohamed Y.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2013-04-01

    Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) complexes were synthesized from 2-[(5-o-chlorophenylazo-2-hydroxybenzylidin)amino]-phenol Schiff base (H2L). Metal ions coordinate in a tetradentate or hexadentate features with these O2N donor ligand, which are characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, infrared, Raman laser, electronic, and 1H NMR spectral studies. The elemental analysis suggests the stoichiometry to be 1:1 (metal:ligand). Reactions with Cu(II), Co(II) and Ni(II), resulted [Cu(H2L)(H2O)2(Cl)]Cl, [Co(H2L)(H2O)3]Cl2ṡ3H2O and [Ni(H2L)(H2O)2]Cl2ṡ6H2O. The thermal decomposition behavior of H2L complexes has been investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) at a heating rate of 10 °C min-1 under nitrogen atmosphere. The brightness side in this study is to take advantage for the preparation and characterizations of single phases of CuO, CoO and NiO nanoparticles using H2L complexes as precursors via a solid-state decomposition procedure. The crystalline structures of products using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), morphology of particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were investigated.

  4. Syntheses, spectroscopic characterization and thermal behavior on novel binuclear transition metal complexes of hydrazones derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and oxalyldihydrazine.

    PubMed

    Emara, Adel A A; El-Sayed, Badr A; Ahmed, El-Sayed A E

    2008-03-01

    4,6-Diacetylresorcinol (DAR) serves as precursor for the formation of different hydrazone ligands, which are di-, tetra- or hexa-basic with two symmetrical sets of O(2)N tridentate, O(2)N(2) tetradentate or O(4)N(2) hexadentate chelating sites. The condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol (DAR) with oxalyldihydrazine (ODH), in the molar ratio 1:1 and 1:2, yields the corresponding hydrazone, H(6)L(a) and H(4)L(b), ligands, respectively. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses and IR, mass, (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectra. Reactions of the hydrazone ligands with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), iron(III) and chromium(III) ions in 1:2 molar ratio afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. A variety of binuclear transition metal complexes were obtained in its di-, tetra- or hexa-deprotonated forms. The structures of the newly prepared complexes were identified by elemental analyses and IR, UV-vis, mass, (1)H NMR and ESR spectra, as well as, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The bonding sites are the azomethine and CO oxygen atoms in either keto or enol forms and amino nitrogen atoms, and phenolic oxygen atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical structures such as tetrahedral and octahedral arrangements. PMID:17627871

  5. Syntheses, spectroscopic characterization and thermal behavior on novel binuclear transition metal complexes of hydrazones derived from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and oxalyldihydrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Adel A. A.; El-Sayed, Badr A.; Ahmed, El-Sayed A. E.

    2008-03-01

    4,6-Diacetylresorcinol (DAR) serves as precursor for the formation of different hydrazone ligands, which are di-, tetra- or hexa-basic with two symmetrical sets of O 2N tridentate, O 2N 2 tetradentate or O 4N 2 hexadentate chelating sites. The condensation of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol (DAR) with oxalyldihydrazine (ODH), in the molar ratio 1:1 and 1:2, yields the corresponding hydrazone, H 6L a and H 4L b, ligands, respectively. The structures of these ligands were elucidated by elemental analyses and IR, mass, 1H NMR and UV-vis spectra. Reactions of the hydrazone ligands with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II), iron(III) and chromium(III) ions in 1:2 molar ratio afforded the corresponding transition metal complexes. A variety of binuclear transition metal complexes were obtained in its di-, tetra- or hexa-deprotonated forms. The structures of the newly prepared complexes were identified by elemental analyses and IR, UV-vis, mass, 1H NMR and ESR spectra, as well as, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The bonding sites are the azomethine and C dbnd O oxygen atoms in either keto or enol forms and amino nitrogen atoms, and phenolic oxygen atoms. The metal complexes exhibit different geometrical structures such as tetrahedral and octahedral arrangements.

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal, voltammetric studies and biological activity of crystalline complexes of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid and 8-hydroxyquinoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Alper Tolga; Çolak, Ferdağ; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2009-11-01

    Two new compounds (8-H 2Q) 2[M(dipic) 2]·6H 2O (M = Co ( 1) and Ni ( 2), 8-HQ = 8-hydroxyquinoline, dipic = dipicolinate) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR and UV-vis), thermal analyses, magnetic measurements and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Both 1 and 2 consist two 8-hydroxyquinolinium cations, one bis(dipicolinate)M(II) anion [M = Co(II), Ni(II)] and six uncoordinated water molecules. Both 1 and 2 crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/c. In the compounds anion, each dipic ligand simultaneously exhibits tridentate coordination modes through N atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atoms of the carboxylate groups. The crystal packing of 1 and 2 is a composite of intermolecular hydrogen bonding and C-O⋯π interactions. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of 1 and 2 were evaluated by the agar well diffusion method by MIC tests. Both new compounds showed the same antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and yeast and fungi expect Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal studies, catalytic epoxidation and biological activity of chromium and molybdenum hexacarbonyl bound to a novel N 2O 2 Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A.

    2010-08-01

    Complexes of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr and Mo) with novel Schiff base N,N'-bis(salicylidene)4,5-dichloro-1,2-phenylenediamine (H 2L) were prepared in benzene in two different conditions: (i) under reduced pressure resulting the dicarbonyl precursors [Cr(CO) 2(H 2L)] and [Mo(CO) 2(L)] and (ii) in air resulting the oxo complex [Cr(O)(L)] and the dioxo complex [Mo(O) 2(L)]. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, mass spectrometry, and magnetic measurement. Thermal behaviors of the complexes were also studied by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic activity of the novel complexes in the epoxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene, 1-octene and 1-hexene with tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (TBHP) in methylene chloride was investigated. The antimicrobial activities of the ligand and their complexes have been screened against various strains of bacteria and fungi and the results have been compared with some known antibiotics.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and anticancer studies of metal-antibiotic chelations: Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) chloramphenicol complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khodir, Fatima A. I.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2016-09-01

    Four Ca(II), Fe(III), Pd(II) and Au(III) complexes of chloramphenicol drug have been synthesized and well characterized using elemental analyses, (infrared, electronic, and 1H-NMR) spectra, magnetic susceptibility measurement, and thermal analyses. Infrared spectral data show that the chloramphenicol drug coordinated to Ca(II), Pd(II) and Au(III) metal ions through two hydroxyl groups with 1:1 or 1:2 M ratios, but Fe(III) ions chelated towards chloramphenicol drug via the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of amide group with 1:2 ratio based on presence of keto↔enol form. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to identify the nano-size particles of both iron(III) and gold(III) chloramphenicol complexes. The antimicrobial assessments of the chloramphenicol complexes were scanned and collected the results against of some kind of bacteria and fungi. The cytotoxic activity of the gold(III) complex was tested against the human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2) tumor cell lines.

  9. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B S

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X₂ and M(L)₂X₂ (M=Ni(II), Zn(II), X=Cl(-1), OAc(-1)) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by (1)H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  10. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal analysis and electrical conductivity studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) vitamin B2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Moussa, Mohamed A. A.; Mohamed, Soha F.

    2011-05-01

    Riboflavin (RF) complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) were successfully synthesized. Structures of metal complexes obtained were confirmed and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and infrared spectra. DC electrical conductivity measurements indicated that the alkaline earth metal (II) complexes of RF ligand are non-electrolytes. Elemental analysis of chelates suggest that the metal(II) ligand ratio is 1:2 with structure formula as [M(RF) 2( X) 2]· nH 2O. Infrared assignments clearly show that RF ligand coordinated as a bidentate feature through azomethine nitrogen of pyrazine ring and C dbnd O of pyrimidine-2,4-dione. Thermal analyses of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) complexes were investigated using (TG/DSC) under atmospheric nitrogen between 30 and 800 °C. The surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM. The electrical conductivities of RF and its metal complexes were also measured with DC electrical conductivity in the temperature range from room to 483 K.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antimicrobial studies of toluene-3,4-dithiolatoarsenic(III) derivatives with some oxygen and sulphur donor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H. P. S.; Bhatiya, Sumit

    2012-11-01

    Replacement reactions of toluene-3,4-dithiolatoarsenic(III) chloride with oxygen and sulphur donor ligands like benzoic acid, thiobenzoic acid, anhydrous sodium acetate, thioacetic acid, phenol, thiophenol, sodium salicylate and thio glycolic acid in 1:1 molar ratio as well as disodium oxalate in 2:1 molar ratio in refluxing anhydrous benzene yielded toluene-3,4-dithiolatoarsenic(III) mono oxo or thio carboxylic or phenolic derivatives of the general formula SC6H3(CH3)SAsR {where R = OOCC6H5, SOCC6H5, OOCCH3, SOCCH3, OC6H5, SC6H5, OOCC6H4(OH), SCH2COOH} and SC6H3(CH3)SAsOOC-COOAsS(CH3)C6H3S. These synthesized derivatives are yellow, yellow-brown solids/ liquids and are soluble in common organic solvents like benzene, chloroform, dichloromethane, dimethyl formamide, dimethyl sulphoxide etc. These derivatives have been characterized by melting point determination, molecular weight determination, elemental analysis (C, H, S and As), spectral {UV, IR, NMR (1H and 13C), ESI-Mass, SEM and powder X-ray diffraction} and thermal (TGA, DTA and DSC) studies. Some of these compounds have been screened for their antimicrobial activities using the disc diffusion method. These derivatives have shown good activity as antibacterial and antifungal agents on some selected bacterial and fungal strains, which increased on increasing the concentration. Chloroamphenicol and terbinafin were used as standards for the comparison.

  12. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  13. Utility of charge-transfer complexation for the assessment of macrocyclic polyethers: Spectroscopic, thermal and surface morphology characteristics of two highly crown ethers complexed with acido acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Adam, Abdel Majid A.; Saad, Hosam A.

    2015-04-01

    The study of the complexing ability of macrocyclic compounds to organic and inorganic substances is of great interest. The aim of this work is to provide basic data that can be used to the assessment of macrocyclic crown ethers quantitatively based on charge-transfer (CT) complexation. This goal was achieved by preparing CT complexes of two interesting mixed nitrogen-oxygen crown ethers with acido acceptors (chloranilic and picric acid), which were fully structurally characterized. The crown ethers are 4,7,13,16,21,24-hexaoxa-1,10-diazabicyclo[8.8.8]hexacosane (HDHC) and 1,4,10-trioxa-7,13-diaza-cyclopentadecane (TDPD). The obtained complexes were structurally characterized via elemental analysis, IR, Raman, 1H NMR, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Thermal properties of these complexes were also studied, and their kinetic thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Furthermore, the microstructure properties of these complexes have also been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  14. Coordination behavior of new bis Schiff base ligand derived from 2-furan carboxaldehyde and propane-1,3-diamine. Spectroscopic, thermal, anticancer and antibacterial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Zayed, Ehab M.; Hindy, Ahmed M. M.

    2015-06-01

    Novel bis Schiff base ligand, [N1,N3-bis(furan-2-ylmethylene)propane-1,3-diamine], was prepared by the condensation of furan-2-carboxaldehyde with propane-1,3-diamine. Its conformational changes on complexation with transition metal ions [Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III)] have been studied on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, spectral (infrared, 1H NMR, electronic), magnetic and thermogravimetric studies. The conductance data of the complexes revealed their electrolytic nature suggesting them as 1:2 (for bivalent metal ions) and 1:3 (for Fe(III) ion) electrolytes. The complexes were found to have octahedral geometry based on magnetic moment and solid reflectance measurements. Thermal analysis data revealed the decomposition of the complexes in successive steps with the removal of anions, coordinated water and bis Schiff base ligand. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation. The Anticancer screening studies were performed on human colorectal cancer (HCT), hepatic cancer (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines. The antimicrobial activity of all the compounds was studied against Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris) and Gram positive (Bacillus vulgaris and Staphylococcus pyogones) bacteria. It was observed that the coordination of metal ion has a pronounced effect on the microbial activities of the bis Schiff base ligand. All the metal complexes have shown higher antimicrobial effect than the free bis Schiff base ligand.

  15. Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 2-((thiophen-2-ylmethylene)amino)benzamide: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, DFT and anticancer activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Prateek; Chandra, Sulekh; Saraswat, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the synthesis of Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of general composition M(L)X2 and M(L)2X2 (M = Ni(II), Zn(II), X = Cl-1, OAc-1) with Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminobenzamide with thiophene-2-carbaldehyde. The characterization of newly formed complexes was done by 1H NMR, UV-VIS, TGA, IR, mass spectrophotometry and molar conductivity studies. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In DFT studies the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31+g(d,p) basis set. On the basis of the spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry for Zn(II) complexes. The effect of these complexes on proliferation of human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were studied and compared with those of free ligand.

  16. Spectroscopic Study of the Thermal Degradation of PVP-capped Rh and Pt Nanoparticles in H2 and O2 Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Borodko, Yuri; Lee, Hyun Sook; Joo, Sang Hoon; Zhang, Yawen; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-09-15

    Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) capped platinum and rhodium nanoparticles (7-12 nm) have been studied with UV-VIS, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The absorption bands in the region 190-900 nm are shown to be sensitive to the electronic structure of surface Rh and Pt atoms as well as to the aggregation of the nanoparticles. In-situ FTIR-DRIFT spectroscopy of the thermal decay of PVP stabilized Rh and Pt nanoparticles in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmospheres in temperatures ranging from 30 C-350 C reveal that decomposition of PVP above 200 C, PVP transforms into a 'polyamidpolyene' - like material that is in turn converted into a thin layer of amorphous carbon above 300 C. Adsorbed carbon monoxide was used as a probing molecule to monitor changes of electronic structure of surface Rh and Pt atoms and accessible surface area. The behavior of surface Rh and Pt atoms with ligated CO and amide groups of pyrrolidones resemble that of surface coordination compounds.

  17. Validated spectrophotometric method for the determination, spectroscopic characterization and thermal structural analysis of duloxetine with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2012-03-01

    A novel, selective, sensitive and simple spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of the antidepressant duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the reaction of duloxetine hydrochloride with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline media to yield orange colored product. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-visible, FTIR, 1H NMR, Mass spectra techniques and thermal analysis. This method was validated for various parameters according to ICH guidelines. Beer's law is obeyed in a range of 5.0-60 μg/mL at the maximum absorption wavelength of 480 nm. The detection limit is 0.99 μg/mL and the recovery rate is in a range of 98.10-99.57%. The proposed methods was validated and applied to the determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The results were statistically analyzed and compared to those of a reference UV spectrophotometric method.

  18. Spectroscopic Survey of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J.

    This program will obtain far-UV spectra of cool stars that span a broad range of spectral type and luminosity class. It is our intention to obtain these spectra early in the FUSE program and to provide the spectra quickly to the user community in order to guide potential guest investigators in designing their observing programs. The specific science objectives include: (1) studying transition region dynamics (winds and downflows), (2) modeling the thermal structure of transition regions, (3) measuring electron densities, (4) search for low temperature coronae, (5) studying molecular excitation and fluorescence processes, and (6) inferring how the transition regions of spectroscopic binary systems differ from those of single stars.

  19. Extraordinary optical transmission through a subwavelength composite hole-pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wei-Jia; Li, Wei-Min; Xu, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Hui-Jie; Wu, Yi-Zhi; Yu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    We numerically investigate the transmission properties of a subwavelength composite hole-pillar array. As the radius of the pillar increases, the transmission properties experience a complex evolution. It is found that the magnetic dipole resonance of the pillar suppresses the surface plasmon polariton resonance (SPPR) at the gold-air interface. There are two strong transmission peaks associated with the magnetic dipole resonance of pillar and SPPR at the gold-silica interface. A peak associated with magnetic quadrupole resonance of the pillar is observed. Moreover, there is a weak peak associated with the coupling between the whispering-gallery plasmon (WGP) mode and magnetic dipole. Our work is helpful for making a dual band optical filter.

  20. Stress Distribution on Blasting Gallery Barrier Pillar due to Goaf Formation During Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Reddy, Sandi; Sastry, Vedala Rama

    2015-09-01

    Semi-mechanised blasting gallery mining is a sustainable option to achieve higher production and productivity from underground thick coal seams. Judicious design of underground blasting gallery panel requires understanding of stress distribution on barrier pillars during different stages of extraction. This paper presents a study of stress distribution in and around barrier pillar for the different stages of extraction in the blasting gallery panel. Finite difference analysis taken up for final excavation (depillaring) in the panel with different stages of extraction. Analysis revealed that the stress transferred on barrier pillar increased as progress of excavation increased. Maximum stress was observed at a distance of 10 and 12 m from the pillar edge for virgin and goaved out panel sideby respectively, which gradually decreased towards centre of the pillar.

  1. Sorption of wastewater containing reactive red X-3B on inorgano-organo pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiu-qiong

    2006-04-01

    Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its interlamellar cations with various soluble cations, such as quaternary ammonium cations and inorganic metal ions, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. In this study, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA), CaCl(2), MgCl(2), FeCl(3), AlCl(3) were used as organic and inorganic pillared materials respectively to produce several kinds of Ca-, Mg-, Fe-, Al-organo pillared bentonites. Sorption of reactive red X-3B on them was studied to determine their potential application as sorbents in wastewater treatment. The results showed that these pillared bentonites had much improved sorption properties, and that the dye solutions' pH value had some effect on the performance of these inorgano-organo pillared bentonites. Isotherms of reactive X-3B on these pillared bentonites suggested a Langmuir-type sorption mechanism. PMID:16532535

  2. Influence of Sample Volume and Solvent Evaporation on Absorbance Spectroscopy in a Microfluidic "Pillar-Cuvette".

    PubMed

    Kriel, Frederik H; Priest, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of solutions containing samples at high concentrations or molar absorptivity can present practical challenges. In absorbance spectroscopy, short optical path lengths or multiple dilution is required to bring the measured absorbance into the range of the Beer's Law calibration. We have previously reported an open "pillar-cuvette" with a micropillar array that is spontaneously filled with a precise (nL or μL) volume to create the well-defined optical path of, for example, 10 to 20 μm. Evaporation should not be ignored for open cuvettes and, herein, the volume of loaded sample and the rate of evaporation from the cuvette are studied. It was found that the volume of loaded sample (between 1 and 10 μL) had no effect on the Beer's Law calibration for methyl orange solutions (molar absorptivity of (2.42 ± 0.02)× 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1)) for cuvettes with a 14.2 ± 0.2 μm path length. Evaporation rates of water from methyl orange solutions were between 2 and 5 nL s(-1) (30 - 40% relative humidity; 23°C), depending on the sample concentration and ambient conditions. Evaporation could be reduced by placing a cover slip several millimeters above the cuvette. Importantly, the results show that a "drop-and-measure" method (measurement within ∼3 s of cuvette loading) eliminates the need for extrapolation of the absorbance-time data for accurate analysis of samples.

  3. Spectroscopic, thermal characterization and cytotoxic activity of bi-, tri- and tetra-nuclear Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes with diSchiff base ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Wael Hussein

    2014-10-01

    In this paper; new di-, tri-, and tetra-nuclear Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes of N,N‧-bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)ethan-1,2-diamine (EDH4), N,N‧-bis(3,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-benzene-1,2-diamine (PDH4) and N,N‧-bis-(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)-4,5-dimethyl-1,2-diamine (MPDH4) ligands were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involve the synthesis of the three ligands from condensation reaction of 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (L‧H2) with ethylenediamine (en), o-phenylenediamine (o-PD), or 4,5-dimethyl-1,2-phenylendiamine (DMPD) in a mole ratio of 2:1 followed by the reaction of the resulting Schiff bases ligands with Pd(II) or Pt(II) ions in the presence of 2,2‧-dipyridyl (L) to form the di- and tri-nuclear metal complexes. The second method involve the condensation of the Pd complex LPd(II)L‧, (L = 2,2‧-dipyridyl, L‧ = 4-formylbenzene-1,2-bis(olate)) with en, o-PD, or DMPD in a mole ratio of 2:1, respectively, followed by reaction with PdCl2 to form di-, tri-, and tetra-nuclear palladium(II) complexes, respectively. Structures of ligands and metal complexes are characterized by physical properties, FT-IR spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance. The geometries of metal complexes are suggested according to elemental analysis, electronic absorption spectra, thermal analysis, atomic absorption, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. Cytotoxic activity against lung large cell carcinoma (H460), prostate carcinoma (DU145), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), amelanotic melanoma (M-14), colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) is also reported.

  4. Preparation and structure investigation of novel Schiff bases using spectroscopic, thermal analyses and molecular orbital calculations and studying their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayed, Ehab M.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Desawy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel Schiff's bases (EB1 and L1) as new macrocyclic compounds were prepared via condensation reactions between bisaldehyde (2,2‧-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(oxy))dibenzaldehyde): firstly with hydrazine carbothioamide to give (EB1), secondly with 4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol to give (L1). EB1 has a general formula C18H20N6O2S2 of mole mass = 416.520, and IUPAC name ((N,N‧Z,N,N‧E)-N,N‧-(((ethane1,2diylbis(oxy))bis(2,1phenylene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(1hydrazinylmethanethioamide). L1 has a general formula C20H16N4O2S of mole mass = 376.10; and IUPAC name 1,2-bis(2-vinylphenoxy)ethane4,6-diaminopyrimidine-2-thiol). The structures of the compounds obtained were characterized based on elemental analysis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra, mass, and thermogravimetric analysis (TG, DTG). The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, ΔE*, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were calculated from the TG curves using Coats-Redfern method. It is important to investigate their structures to know the active groups and weak bond responsible for their biological activities. The obtained thermal (TA) and mass (MS) practical results are confirmed by semi-empirical MO-calculation using PM3 procedure, on the neutral and positively charged forms of these novel Schiff bases. Therefore, comparison between MS and TA helps in selection of the proper pathway representing the decomposition of these compounds to give indication about their structures and consequently their biological activities. Their biological activities have been tested in vitro against Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillissubtilies and Staphylococcus aurous bacteria in order to assess their antimicrobial potential.

  5. Capillary Oscillations of Drops on a Fan-Shaped Pillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Fontelos, Marco A.; Hwang, Hyung Ju

    2016-07-01

    We study the capillary oscillations of the surface of a 2D drop attached to a fan-shaped pillar. The fluid flow is modeled by means of a velocity potential and we assume a no-flux condition at the liquid-solid interface. The natural oscillation frequencies and oscillation modes are computed for two different physical situations depending on the contact line behavior: (1) free-end, when the contact line moves along the solid with a constant contact angle and (2) pinned-end when the contact line is pinned to the solid and does not move. We also study the linearized initial value problem and prove well-posedness results in both free-end and pinned-end cases. Hence, for capillary oscillations when the fluid is in partial contact with a solid, not only initial conditions must be prescribed but also the behavior of the contact line.

  6. Evaporation-driven clustering of microscale pillars and lamellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-02-01

    As a liquid film covering an array of micro- or nanoscale pillars or lamellae evaporates, its meniscus pulls the elastic patterns together because of capillary effects, leading to clustering of the slender microstructures. While this elastocapillary coalescence may imply various useful applications, it is detrimental to a semiconductor manufacturing process called the spin drying, where a liquid film rinses patterned wafers until drying. To understand the transient mechanism underlying such self-organization during and after liquid evaporation, we visualize the clustering dynamics of polymer micropatterns. Our visualization experiments reveal that the patterns clumped during liquid evaporation can be re-separated when completely dried in some cases. This restoration behavior is explained by considering adhesion energy of the patterns as well as capillary forces, which leads to a regime map to predict whether permanent stiction would occur. This work does not only extend our understanding of micropattern stiction, but also suggests a novel path to control and prevent pattern clustering.

  7. Spectroscopic studies, thermal analyses and biological evaluation of new V(IV), Zr(IV) and U(VI) moxifloxacin complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.; Zordok, Wael A.; Kotb, Essam

    2011-12-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(MOX) 2H 2O]SO 4·11H 2O, [ZrO(MOX) 2Cl]Cl·15H 2O and [UO 2(MOX) 3](NO 3) 2·3H 2O formed in the interaction of moxifloxacin (MOX) with VOSO 4·H 2O, ZrOCl 2·8H 2O and UO 2(NO 3) 2·6H 2O in methanol and acetone as a solvents at room temperature were reported. The isolated solid complexes have been characterized with melting points, elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moments studies, spectral (UV-Visible, IR and 1HNMR) as well as thermal analyses (TGA and DTG). The results support the formation of the complexes and indicate that moxifloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand chelate to the metal ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as activation energies, E*, enthalpies, Δ H*, entropies, Δ S* and Gibbs free energies, Δ G*, have been evaluated by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The proposed structure of the ligand and their complexes were detected by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The bond stretching force constant and length of the U dbnd O for the [UO 2(MOX) 3](NO 3) 2·3H 2O complex were calculated. The antibacterial activity of the free moxifloxacin ligand and their metal complexes have been tested against some selected bacterial strains such as: Streptococcus aureus K1, Bacillus subtilis K22, Brevibacterium otitidis K76, Escherichia coli K32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SW1 and Klebsiella oxytoca K42. The complexes showed good antibacterial effect to the selected bacterial strains as compared to the free ligand and Zr(IV) complex is very highly significant compared with the other two complexes.

  8. Dimensional Crossover of Thermal Transport in Hybrid Boron Nitride Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sakhavand, Navid; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-08-26

    Although boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) and hexagonal-BN (hBN) are superb one-dimensional (1D) and 2D thermal conductors respectively, bringing this quality into 3D remains elusive. Here, we focus on pillared boron nitride (PBN) as a class of 3D BN allotropes and demonstrate how the junctions, pillar length and pillar distance control phonon scattering in PBN and impart tailorable thermal conductivity in 3D. Using reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, our results indicate that although a clear phonon scattering at the junctions accounts for the lower thermal conductivity of PBN compared to its parent BNNT and hBN allotropes, it acts as an effective design tool and provides 3D thermo-mutable features that are absent in the parent structures. Propelled by the junction spacing, while one geometrical parameter, e.g., pillar length, controls the thermal transport along the out-of-plane direction of PBN, the other parameter, e.g., pillar distance, dictates the gross cross-sectional area, which is key for design of 3D thermal management systems. Furthermore, the junctions have a more pronounced effect in creating a Kapitza effect in the out-of-plane direction, due to the change in dimensionality of the phonon transport. This work is the first report on thermo-mutable properties of hybrid BN allotropes and can potentially impact thermal management of other hybrid 3D BN architectures. PMID:26158661

  9. Nondestructive characterization of musical pillars of Mahamandapam of Vitthala Temple at Hampi, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T; Rao, C Babu; Sharma, Govind K; Rajkumar, K V; Raj, Baldev; Arundhati, P

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the first scientific investigation on the musical pillars of the Vitthala Temple at Hampi, India. The solid stone columns in these pillars produce audible sound, when struck with a finger. Systematic investigations on the acoustic characteristics of the musical pillars of mahamandapam (great stage) of the Vitthala Temple have been carried out. The 11 most popular pillars that produce sounds of specific musical instruments are considered for the investigations. The sound produced from these 11 most popular musical pillars was recorded systematically and different nondestructive testing techniques such as low frequency ultrasonic testing, impact echo testing, and in situ metallography were employed on the musical columns of these pillars. The peak frequencies in the amplitude spectrum of the sound produced from various columns in these pillars are correlated with the dimensional measurements and ultrasonic velocity determined using impact echo technique. The peak frequencies obtained experimentally have been found to have excellent correlation with the calculated flexural frequencies based on the dimensional measurements and ultrasonic velocities of the columns.

  10. Pillared-clay catalysts containing mixed-metal complexes I. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.; Tatarchuk, B.J. ); Raythatha, R.H. )

    1989-01-01

    High-surface-area pillared clays were prepared from naturally occurring montmorillonites by exchanging interlayer ions with polyoxocations containing (i) iron, (ii) aluminum, (iii) discrete mixtures of (i) and (ii), or (iv) iron and aluminum located within the same complex. The valence state, solid-state properties, and stability of these pillars were determined following reduction and oxidation using Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and BET surface area measurements. Controlled atmosphere electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were also used to follow the nucleation and sintering behavior of the pillars during reduction. Moessbauer data suggested interlayer formation of metallic iron domains following reduction of types (i) and (iii) pillared systems. The magnetic properties and the oxidation behavior deduced from Moessbauer analysis and the complementary insights provided by XRD strongly indicated that these crystallites were in the form of thin-film/pancake-shape islands most likely conforming to the geometry of the interlayer region. The expanded structures of types (ii) and (iii) pillared systems were found to be relatively stable following reduction up to 723 K due to the irreducible nature of discrete aluminum pillars under these conditions. Intercalation of clays with mixtures of chemically distinct pillars appears to provide a unique method for preparing highly dispersed metallic or even bimetallic catalysts possessing two-dimensional sieve-like behavior with high overall surface areas and high loadings of the active metal.

  11. Ga[sub 13], Al[sub 13], GaAl[sub 12], and chromium-pillared montmorillonites: Acidity and reactivity for cumene conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, S.M.; Kydd, R.A. )

    1993-05-01

    A comparison has been made of the acidic characters of a series of metal polyoxocation pillar interlayered clay minerals (M-PILCs) by studying the infrared spectra of adsorbed pyridine. These comparisons were made for Ga[sub 13]-, Al[sub 13]- and GaAl[sub 12]-PILCs, and for Na[sup +]-exchanged montmorillonite (Na-STx-1). The Ga[sub 13]-PILC, was found to exhibit the strongest Lewis acid sites, followed by the AL[sub 13]-, and GaAl[sub 12]-PILCs and then by the Ns-STx-1. The relative number of Lewis acid sites, however, was found to be much greater for the GaAl[sub 12]-PILC, particularly after calcination at higher temperatures, indicating that the Ga[sub 13] Lewis acid sites did not have as high a thermal stability. The Broensted acidic characters for the pillared clays depend on the pillar, and follow the general decreasing order of abundance of GaAl[sub 12]-, Al[sub 13], and Ga[sub 13]-PILC when expressed as absorbance per unit mass. When the acidities per unit surface area were estimated, however, the Ga[sub 13]-PILCs were found to have the greatest number. This indicated that while the pillars contribute to the PILC acidities primarily through increasing the exposed phyllosilicate sheet surface areas, there is also a significant effect arising from the acidic characters of the pillars themselves. The dehydrogenation activities of Ga[sub 13]-, GaAl[sub 12]-, Al[sub 13]-, and Na-STx-1, in addition to a chromium polyoxocation-PILC, were compared by observing the products formed upon reaction with the model compound cumene. The Ga[sub 13]- and chromium-PILCs and the Na-Stx-1 exhibited almost exclusively dehydrogenation activities, whereas the Al[sub 13]- and GaAl[sub 12]-PILCs exhibited both cracking and dehydrogenation behaviors. These results prove that the pillars themselves can very strongly effect the catalytic activities of the PILCs. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Crystal structure, magnetic, thermal behavior, and spectroscopic studies of two new bimetallic hydrogenselenites: [Cu2-xNix (HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O], (x = 0.62; 0.91)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentech, I.; Zehani, K.; Kabadou, A.; Ben Salah, A.; Loukil, M.; Bessais, L.

    2016-08-01

    Two new iso-structural bimetallic hydrogenselenites [Cu2-xNix(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O] (x = 0.62; 0.91) have been synthesized from solution and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. They crystallized in the orthorhombic Pnma space group with the following lattice parameters: for Cu1.09Ni0.91(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (2) Å, b = 17.7717 (4) Å, c = 7.1620 (2) Å, Z = 4, and for Cu1.38Ni0.62(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (4) Å, b = 17.7467 (7) Å, c = 7.1717 (3) Å; Z = 4. The crystal structure of this compound consists by a three-dimensional framework, but it may be described as a bi-dimensional structure consisting of layers, parallel to the (010) plane formed by two types of (Cu/Ni) octahedral and (HSeO3)- trigonal pyramids. The magnetic measurement, thermal and spectroscopic studies were performed for these compounds. The magnetic results reveal the appearance of a weak ferromagnetic behavior at low temperature (Tc = 16 K for x = 0.91 and 18.8 K for x = 0.62). The DSC analysis enabled us to locate two endothermic peaks. The first peak can be attributed to a completely dehydration of the material, in this transformation, the compounds undergo a structural phase transition which can favor a non-centrosymmetric phase at high temperature confirmed by the thermodiffractograms measurement. The second peak for these samples is due to the ferro-paraelectric phase transition which can be explained by an order- disorder transition.

  13. Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Silicon Nanoporous Pillar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-fen; Li, Long-yu; Xiao, Shun-hua; Yang, Xiao-hui; Jia, Min; Li, Xin-jian

    2007-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Surface morphologies and microstructure of the resultant were studied by a field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectrum, transmission electron microscope, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The composition of samples was determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that a great deal of CNTs, with diameter in the range of 20-70 nm, incorporated with Si-NPA and a large scale nest array of CNTs/Si-NPA (NACNT/Si-NPA) was formed. EDS analysis showed that the composition of carbon nanotubes was carbon. Field emission measurements showed that a current density of 5 mA/cm2 was obtained at an electric field of 4.26 V/μm, with a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The enhancement factor calculated according to the Fowler-Nordheim theory was ~11,000. This excellent field emission performance is attributed to the unique structure and morphology of NACNT/Si-NPA, especially the formation of a nest-shaped carbon nanotube array. A schematic drawing that illustrates the experimental configuration is given. These results indicate that NACNT/Si-NPA might be an ideal candidate cathode for potential applications in flat panel displays.

  14. Numerical Investigation of the Dynamic Mechanical State of a Coal Pillar During Longwall Mining Panel Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongwei; Jiang, Yaodong; Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Jie; Liu, Shuai

    2013-09-01

    This study presents a numerical investigation on the dynamic mechanical state of a coal pillar and the assessment of the coal bump risk during extraction using the longwall mining method. The present research indicates that there is an intact core, even when the peak pillar strength has been exceeded under uniaxial compression. This central portion of the coal pillar plays a significant role in its loading capacity. In this study, the intact core of the coal pillar is defined as an elastic core. Based on the geological conditions of a typical longwall panel from the Tangshan coal mine in the City of Tangshan, China, a numerical fast Lagrangian analysis of continua in three dimensions (FLAC3D) model was created to understand the relationship between the volume of the elastic core in a coal pillar and the vertical stress, which is considered to be an important precursor to the development of a coal bump. The numerical results suggest that, the wider the coal pillar, the greater the volume of the elastic core. Therefore, a coal pillar with large width may form a large elastic core as the panel is mined, and the vertical stress is expected to be greater in magnitude. Because of the high stresses and the associated stored elastic energy, the risk of coal bumps in a coal pillar with large width is greater than for a coal pillar with small width. The results of the model also predict that the peak abutment stress occurs near the intersection between the mining face and the roadways at a distance of 7.5 m from the mining face. It is revealed that the bump-prone zones around the longwall panel are within 7-10 m ahead of the mining face and near the edge of the roadway during panel extraction.

  15. Investigation of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays by {sup 129}Xe NMR.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsaio, C.-J.; Carrado, K. A.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

    1998-04-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays has been used to glean information on the interlayer gallery height of clays before and after pillaring. Two clay minerals were studied, a Ca{sup 2+}-montmorillonite and Bentonite L. The NMR results indicate that the effective interlamellar spacing of the montmorillonite increased from 5.4 to 8.0 Angstroms after pillaring with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. These data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in gallery height from 5.6 to 8.4 Angstroms.

  16. Xenon-129 NMR study of the microporous structure of clays and pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiao, C.; Carrado, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    {sup 129}Xe NMR studies have been carried out using xenon gas adsorbed in clays and pillared clays. Data from the measurements provide information on the pore structure of clays before and after pillaring. The results indicate that the effective pore diameter of montmorillonite increases, for example, from 5.4 {Angstrom} to 8.0 {Angstrom} after pillaring cheto-montmorillonite with aluminum polyoxohydroxy Keggin cations. The data are consistent with X-ray powder diffraction results, which show a corresponding increase in the interlamellar gallery height from 5.6 {Angstrom} to 8.4 {Angstrom}.

  17. Diffusion and separation of CH4/N2 in pillared graphene nanomaterials: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sainan; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Zhonghua; Jin, Dongliang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Maohuai; Wei, Shuxian

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion and separation of CH4/N2 in pillared graphene were investigated by molecular dynamics. The pillared graphene with (6, 6) carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibited the higher diffusion and selectivity of CH4 over N2 than that with (7, 7) CNT due to the cooperative effect of pore topological characteristics and interaction energy. The stronger interaction facilitated CH4 to enter CNT prior to N2, and higher pressure promoted CH4 to pass CNT more easily. The relative concentrations profiles showed that CH4 reached equilibrium state faster than N2 at low pressure. Our results highlight potential use of pillared graphene in gas purification and separation.

  18. Study of the acidic properties of ZrO2-pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseno, Ahmad; Priyono; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-02-01

    Research on pillared clays prepared from purified bentonite of Boyolali Central Jawa, Indonesia, and polycation Zr at various concentration and calcination temperature had been done. Effect of acidity characteristic and structure of resulting materials were studied. The nature of acidic site of the material was identified on the basis of FTIRspectra of pyridine adsorbed on ZrO2- pillared bentonite catalysts. Analysis showed that increasing calcination temperature was followed by decreasing acidity and increasing ZrO2 content in the pillared bentonite accompanied by the increase of its acidity. FTIR spectra showed there was an intensity increase of the characteristic band of 1635 cm-1that indicates a Bronsted acid.

  19. Influence of the nature of titanium alkoxide and of the acid of hydrolysis in the preparation of titanium-pillared montmorillonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Castillo, H. L.; Gil, A.; Grange, P.

    1997-07-01

    Titanium-pillared montmorillonites using Ti(OC2H5)4, Ti(O-nC3H7)4, Ti(O-iC3H7)4 and Ti(O-nC4H,)4 as sources of titanium, and HCl, HClO4, HNO3, H2SO4, CH3CO2H and H3PO4 as acids for hydrolysis, have been prepared. The preparation of titanium-pillared clays (Ti-PILCS) is mainly affected by the acid/alkoxide mole ratio. The nature of the alkoxide influences both the basal spacing and the specific surface area. The use of Ti(OC2H5)4 as a source of titanium yielded the best textural and thermal stability results. The differences observed in the titanium-pillared clays as a function of the acid used for the hydrolysis seem to be mainly related to the pH of the solution of intercalation.

  20. Intercalation of niobium and tantalum M/sub 6/Cl/sub 12//sup n+/ cluster cations in montmorillonite: a new route to pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, S.P.; Wang, J.; Pinnavaia, T.J.

    1985-04-10

    A new synthetic route to pillared clays is described that is based on the intercalation and subsequent oxidation of metal cluster cations in montmorillonite. Niobium and tantalum clusters of the type M/sub 6/Cl/sub 12//sup n+/ (n = 2, 3) are shown to bind to the clay by ion exchange for interlayer sodium. The maximum cluster loading is larger than expected on the basis of formal cation charge and clay ion-exchange capacity, indicating that reduction of cluster charge occurs through hydrolysis on the intracrystal surfaces. The intercalated products exhibit regular basal spacings of 18.4 +/- 0.2 A (M = Nb) and 18.9 +/- 0.5 A (M = Ta). Oxidation of the intercalated cluster cations by water at 240/sup 0/C results in the in situ formation of metal oxide aggregates that function as molecular size pillars. The niobium and tantalum oxide pillared clays exhibit basal spacings of 19.9 +/- 0.5 A and are thermally stable to 400/sup 0/C.

  1. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  2. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  3. Enhanced field emission from a nest array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin Jian; Jiang, Wei Fen

    2007-02-01

    A large scale nest array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NACNT) was grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapour deposition. Field emission measurements showed that a current density of 6.8 mA cm-2 was obtained at an electric field of 3.1 V µm-1, with a turn-on field of 0.56 V µm-1. The enhancement factor calculated according to the Fowler-Nordheim theory was ~25 000. This excellent field emission performance was attributed to the unique structure and morphology of NACNT/Si-NPA, especially the formation of NACNT, and the presence of numerous iron particles encapsulated in the CNTs. These results indicated that NACNT/Si-NPA might be an ideal candidate cathode for potential applications in flat panel displays.

  4. Polycationic pillar[5]arene derivatives: interaction with DNA and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Nierengarten, Iwona; Nothisen, Marc; Sigwalt, David; Biellmann, Thomas; Holler, Michel; Remy, Jean-Serge; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2013-12-16

    Dendritic pillar[5]arene derivatives have been efficiently prepared by grafting dendrons with peripheral Boc-protected amine subunits onto a preconstructed pillar[5]arene scaffold. Upon cleavage of the Boc-protected groups, water-soluble pillar[5]arene derivatives with 20 (13) and 40 (14) peripheral ammonium groups have been obtained. The capability of these compounds to form stable nanoparticles with plasmid DNA has been demonstrated by gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) investigations. Transfection efficiencies of the self-assembled 13/pCMV-Luc and 14/pCMV-Luc polyplexes have been evaluated in vitro with HeLa cells. The transfection efficiencies found for both compounds are good, and pillar[5]arenes 13 and 14 show very low toxicity if any.

  5. Electrochemistry and photoelectrochemistry of pillared-clay-modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Daiting; Kim, Yeong Il; Mallouk, T.E. )

    1990-04-18

    Clay-modified electrodes (CME) were made by binding Al{sub 13}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 28}{sup 3+}-pillared montmorillonite to SnO{sub 2} and Pt surfaces via a thin (2-4 monolayer thick) coating of polymerized silane. The polymer provides a binding site for multiply charged anions such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}} and Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 4{minus}}, while the clay external surface strongly binds large cations such as Os(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}. Charge-trapping behavior, which is a consequence of spatial ordering of the electroactive anions and cations, is observed in cyclic voltammetry of the CME in aqueous KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} solution. With Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} exchanged onto the clay surface, photocathodic currents are generated with a quantum efficiency (per photon absorbed) of ca. 1%. This photocurrent is attributed to electron donor quenching of the Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} excited state by Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}} or Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 4{minus}}. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  7. Design and construction of porous metal-organic frameworks based on flexible BPH pillars

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Xiang-Rong; Yang, Guang-sheng; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min; Yuan, Gang; Wang, Xin-Long

    2013-02-15

    Three metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), [Co{sub 2}(BPDC){sub 2}(4-BPH){center_dot}3DMF]{sub n} (1), [Cd{sub 2}(BPDC){sub 2}(4-BPH){sub 2}{center_dot}2DMF]{sub n} (2) and [Ni{sub 2}(BDC){sub 2}(3-BPH){sub 2} (H{sub 2}O){center_dot}4DMF]{sub n} (3) (H{sub 2}BPDC=biphenyl-4,4 Prime -dicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}BDC=terephthalic acid, BPH=bis(pyridinylethylidene)hydrazine and DMF=N,N Prime -dimethylformamide), have been solvothermally synthesized based on the insertion of heterogeneous BPH pillars. Framework 1 has 'single-pillared' MOF-5-like motif with inner cage diameters of up to 18.6 A. Framework 2 has 'double pillared' MOF-5-like motif with cage diameters of 19.2 A while 3 has 'double pillared' 8-connected framework with channel diameters of 11.0 A. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) shows that 3 is a dynamic porous framework. - Graphical abstract: By insertion of flexible BPH pillars based on 'pillaring' strategy, three metal-organic frameworks are obtained showing that the porous frameworks can be constructed in a much greater variety. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Frameworks 1 and 2 have MOF-5 like motif. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cube-like cages in 1 and 2 are quite large, comparable to the IRMOF-10. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Framework 1 is 'single-pillared' mode while 2 is 'double-pillared' mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PXRD and gas adsorption analysis show that 3 is a dynamic porous framework.

  8. Fe-pillared clay as a Fenton-type heterogeneous catalyst for cinnamic acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Djamel; Saidi, Mohamed; Houari, Mohamed; Pichat, Pierre; Khalaf, Hussein

    2006-09-01

    Fe-pillared montmorillonite has been used as a Fenton-type heterogeneous catalyst for the removal of cinnamic acid in water. The influences of the cinnamic acid, catalyst and H2O2 concentrations and pH on the removal rate of cinnamic acid have been studied. The results show that the efficiency of Fe-pillared montmorillonite is higher than that of the Fe ions in the homogeneous phase, and less sensitive to pH. PMID:16546315

  9. Planarization of High Aspect Ratio P-I-N Diode Pillar Arrays for Blanket Electrical Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, L F; Shao, Q; Reinhardt, C E; Graff, R T; Conway, A M; Nikolic, R J; Deo, N; Cheung, C L

    2009-03-05

    Two planarization techniques for high aspect ratio three dimensional pillar structured P-I-N diodes have been developed in order to enable a continuous coating of metal on the top of the structures. The first technique allows for coating of structures with topography through the use of a planarizing photoresist followed by RIE etch back to expose the tops of the pillar structure. The second technique also utilizes photoresist, but instead allows for planarization of a structure in which the pillars are filled and coated with a conformal coating by matching the etch rate of the photoresist to the underlying layers. These techniques enable deposition using either sputtering or electron beam evaporation of metal films to allow for electrical contact to the tops of the underlying pillar structure. These processes have potential applications for many devices comprised of 3-D high aspect ratio structures. Two separate processes have been developed in order to ensure a uniform surface for deposition of an electrode on the {sup 10}Boron filled P-I-N pillar structured diodes. Each uses S1518 photoresist in order to achieve a relatively uniform surface despite the non-uniformity of the underlying detector. Both processes allow for metallization of the final structure and provide good electrical continuity over a 3D pillar structure.

  10. Molecular excitation of a strongly irradiated pillar in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The Carina Nebula is the best site to study in detail the physics of violent massive star formation and the resulting feedback effects of cloud dispersal and triggered star formation. The prominent pillar structures are a dramatic illustration of how the radiative feedback from the massive stars shapes the surrounding clouds. In the context of our comprehensive multi-wavelength studies of the Carina Nebula we have recently performed a large-scale mapping survey with Herschel and used APEX to map a particularly interesting, strongly irradiated pillar in the CO J=3-2, 4-3, 6-5, and 7-6 lines. Here we propose to observe selected positions in this pillar in the CO J=11-10, 12-11, 13-12, and 16-15 lines and the [CII] line in order to study the molecular excitation and the physical properties of this pillar in detail. An excitation diagram will provide us with crucial information about the nature of the irradiation at different positions in the pillar, and in particular will constrain the relative importance of the X-ray irradiation compared to stellar UV irradiation. These data will also yield a unique basis for detailed comparisons to our numerical simulations of the creation and evolution of pillars in star forming regions with high levels of massive star feedback.

  11. Photonic crystals composed of virtual pillars with magnetic walls: Photonic band gaps and double Dirac cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Han; Kim, Soeun; Kee, Chul-Sik

    2016-08-01

    Photonic crystals composed of virtual pillars with magnetic walls are proposed. A virtual pillar with a magnetic wall can be created inside a parallel perfect electric conductor plate waveguide by introducing a circular perfect magnetic conductor patch in the upper perfect electric conductor plate of the waveguide. The virtual pillar mimics a perfect magnetic conductor pillar with a radius less than that of the circular patch because electromagnetic waves can slightly penetrate the wall. Furthermore, the photonic band structures of a triangular photonic crystal composed of virtual pillars for the transverse electromagnetic modes of the waveguide are investigated. They are very similar to those of a triangular photonic crystal composed of infinitely long perfect electric conductor cylinders for transverse magnetic modes. The similarity between the two different photonic crystals is well understood by the boundary conditions of perfect electric and magnetic conductor surfaces. A double Dirac cone at the center of the Brillouin zone is observed and thus the virtual pillar triangular photonic crystal can act a zero-refractive-index material at the Dirac point frequency.

  12. Surface properties of bionic micro-pillar arrays with various shapes of tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhao, Aiwu; Jiang, Rui; Li, Da; Zhang, Maofeng; Gan, Zibao; Tao, Wenyu; Guo, Hongyan; Mei, Tao

    2012-10-01

    Gecko-inspired micro-pillar arrays with various tip structures including spatular, spherical and concave tips were fabricated by a facile soft-molding method. The tip structures of micro-pillar arrays strongly depend on different curing processes in soft-molding using the same template. The adhesion and the wetting properties of these micro-pillar arrays are investigated by means of triboindenter and optical contact angle measurement. The results suggest that the surface properties are determined by different tip structures of micro-pillars. The spatular tip and concave tip are helpful for the adhesion enhancement and the shape of tip can control the contact angles and stabilities of water droplets on the micro-pillar arrays. In addition, the procedures demonstrate that the present route to fabricate gecko-inspired micro-pillar arrays with various tip structures is reliable and convenient. We believe that this research may pave the road to further understanding the gecko-inspired attachment systems and designing new artificial structures for dry adhesives.

  13. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  14. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  15. Spectroscopic and thermal degradation behavior of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.

    2013-04-01

    A new series of Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been synthesized with thiopental sodium anesthesia drug. The elemental analyses of the complexes are confined to stoichiometry of the formulas [M(TPL)3]ṡnH2O (M = Cr(III) or Fe(III); n = 6 or 5), [M(TPL)2(H2O)2]ṡnH2O (M = Mn(II), Co(II) or Ni(II); n = 0 or 4), and [M(TPL)2] (M = Cu(II) or Zn(II); n = 2 or 0) respectively, where TPL is thiopental chelating agent. Structures have been discussed and suggested upon elemental analyses, infrared, Raman, electronic, electron spin resonance, 1H NMR spectral data and magnetic studies. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed of metal complexes. The XRD patterns indicate crystalline nature for the complexes. The measured low molar conductance values in dimethylsulfoxide indicate that the complexes are non-electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic discussion refer that coordination take place through three types: Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Cr(III), Mn(II) and Fe(III), C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen and C2sbnd S (2-thiolate group) for Co(II) and Ni(II), and Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions coordinated via Cdbnd N (pyrimidine moiety) nitrogen, C2dbnd S (2-thiolate group) and C6dbnd O (amido group) oxygen, respectively. The thermal behavior (TG/DTG/DTA) of the complexes was studied and kinetic parameters were determined by Horowitz-Metzger and Coats-Redfern methods. The thiopental and its complexes have been screened for their antimicrobial (G+ and G-) bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans) activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method.

  16. Integrated Spectroscopic Studies of MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Pieters, C. M.; Hiroi, T.; Lane, M. D.; Marchand, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of the SNC meteorites continue to be of great interest because they provide the only "ground truth" available for ongoing Mossbauer, thermal emittance, MidIR, nearIR, and visible spectral analysis of the martian surface. We present here results of an integrated series of measurements made on the same split of MIL03346, in order to expand our understanding of the properties of these materials and to relate them to other SNCs.

  17. Relations between Eastern Four Pillars Theory and Western Measures of Personality Traits

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated the validity of personality classification using four pillars theory, a tradition in China and northeastern Asia. Materials and Methods Four pillars analyses were performed for 148 adults on the basis of their birth year, month, day, and hour. Participants completed two personality tests, the Korean version of Temperament and Character Inventory-Revised-Short Version (TCI) and the Korean Inventory of Interpersonal Problems; scores were correlated with four pillars classification elements. Mean difference tests (e.g., t-test, ANOVA) were compared with groups classified by four pillars index. Results There were no significant correlations between personality scale scores and total yin/yang number (i.e., the 8 heavenly or earthly stems), and no significant between-groups results for classifications by yin/yang day stem and the five elements. There were significant but weak (r=0.18-0.29) correlations between the five elements and personality scale scores. For the six gods and personality scales, there were significant but weak (r=0.18-0.25) correlations. Features predicted by four pillars theory were most consistent when participants were grouped according to the yin/yang of the day stem and dominance of yin/yang numbers in the eight heavenly or earthly stems. Conclusion Although the major criteria of four pillars theory were not independently correlated with personality scale scores, correlations emerged when participants were grouped according to the composite yin/yang variable. Our results suggest the utility of four pillars theory (beyond fortune telling or astrology) for classifying personality traits and making behavioral predictions. PMID:25837175

  18. The extraction of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 89}Sr from waste simulants using pillared montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, P.; Clearfield, A.

    1998-08-01

    Two samples of a silica-pillared montmorillonite produced using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane and an alumina-pillared montmorillonite were evaluated for the removal of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 89}Sr from a simulated nuclear waste solution and a simulated groundwater, and the results were compared to the parent montmorillonite and two zeolites, AW500 (chabazite) and clinoptilolite. The parent and pillared clays were characterized using x-ray powder diffraction and surface area analysis by nitrogen adsorption/desorption studies. The pillared clays exhibited d-spacings of between 17.43 and 18.32 {angstrom} after calcination, and surface areas ranging from 71.3 to 264.4 m{sup 2}/g. Both of the silica-pillared clays and the alumina-pillared clay exhibited excellent K{sub d}s for {sup 137}Cs from simulated groundwater with values of 23,650, 23,260 and 144,570 mL/g, respectively. These were far better than the K{sub d}s obtained by clinoptilolite and AW500 which had K{sub d}s of only 14,560 and 9,650 mL/g, respectively. None of the pillared clays showed a high selectivity for {sup 89}Sr from groundwater or {sup 137}Cs from simulated alkaline tank waste. They did, however, show a slight selectivity for {sup 89}Sr in the simulated Hanford tank wastes, but this is thought to be due to a precipitation mechanism rather than to ion exchange.

  19. A three-pillar approach to assessing climate impacts on low flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaha, Gregor; Parajka, Juraj; Viglione, Alberto; Koffler, Daniel; Haslinger, Klaus; Schöner, Wolfgang; Zehetgruber, Judith; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a framework for assessing climate impacts on future low flows that combines different sources of information, termed pillars. To illustrate the framework three pillars are chosen: (a) extrapolation of observed low-flow trends into the future, (b) rainfall-runoff projections based on climate scenarios and (c) extrapolation of changing stochastic rainfall characteristics into the future combined with rainfall-runoff modelling. Alternative pillars could be included in the overall framework. The three pillars are combined by expert judgement based on a synoptic view of data, model outputs and process reasoning. The consistency/inconsistency between the pillars is considered an indicator of the certainty/uncertainty of the projections. The viability of the framework is illustrated for four example catchments from Austria that represent typical climate conditions in central Europe. In the Alpine region where winter low flows dominate, trend projections and climate scenarios yield consistently increasing low flows, although of different magnitudes. In the region north of the Alps, consistently small changes are projected by all methods. In the regions in the south and south-east, more pronounced and mostly decreasing trends are projected but there is disagreement in the magnitudes of the projected changes. The process reasons for the consistencies/inconsistencies are discussed. For an Alpine region such as Austria the key to understanding low flows is whether they are controlled by freezing and snowmelt processes, or by the summer moisture deficit associated with evaporation. It is argued that the three-pillar approach offers a systematic framework of combining different sources of information aimed at more robust projections than that obtained from each pillar alone.

  20. High photon extraction efficiency from GaAs pillar with InAs quantum dots embedded in Niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Daimotsu; Idutsu, Yasuhiro; Takada, Makoto; Ito, Saki; Sato, Hiroyasu; Huh, Jae-Hoon; Ida, Sotaro; Sasakura, Hirotaka; Kumano, Hidekazu; Suemune, Ikuo

    2009-08-01

    We studied the novel structure for improving the emission properties of semiconductor light sources both theoretically and experimentally. The proposed structure is a semiconductor pillar buried in a metal except for one end surface of the pillar. Photons are extracted only from the air-exposed surface. The structure consists of the GaAs nanopillar structures embedded in metal and is analyzed by the finite-difference-time-domain method. InAs quantum dots buried in a GaAs pillar are assumed to be the photon emitters. Simulations are performed on GaAs pillars with different diameters buried in Niobium. Consequently, the simulation showed 75% light extraction efficiency from the pillar to air with the optimization of the structure. In addition, we experimentally measured photoluminescence intensities of up to 40 times enhancement in embedded structures compared to normal pillar structure. These are promising for future applications to overcome single photon sources.

  1. Systematic evaluation of textural properties, activation temperature and gas uptake of Cu2(pzdc)2L [L = dipyridyl-based ligands] porous coordination pillared-layer networks.

    PubMed

    García-Ricard, Omar J; Silva-Martínez, Juan C; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2012-08-01

    In situ high temperature X-ray diffraction, nitrogen porosimetry and gas adsorption at room temperature were used to elucidate the effect of the degassing or activation temperature on the long-range and micropore textural properties of a series of coordination polymers with pillared-layer structures. Ramp-and-soak thermal gravimetric analysis performed at selected activation temperatures were used to verify the thermal stability of a CPL-n series [Cu(2)(pzdc)(2)L; pzdc = pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate; L = 4,4-azopyridine (apy) for CPL-4, 1,2-di-(4-pyridil)-ethylene (bpe) for CPL-5, N-(4-pyridyl)-isonicotinamide (pia) for CPL-6, and 1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)-glycol (dpyg) for CPL-7]. Although the activation temperatures were far below the decomposition point of the complexes, these resulted in significant and unique changes in micropore surface area and volume, even for CPL-4, -5 and -6, which contained pillar ligands with similar dimensions and similar structural long-range order. For the case of CPL-7, however, the framework appeared to be non-porous at any given activation temperature. Pure component equilibrium adsorption data gathered for CO(2), CH(4), and N(2) were used to elucidate the CPL-n materials potential for storage and separations at room temperature. All of the materials exhibited considerable selectivity toward CO(2), particularly at moderate pressures. Meanwhile, CO(2) isosteric heats of adsorption indicated that the pore functionalities arising from the pillar ligands provided similar interactions with the adsorbate in the cases of CPL-4 and -5. For CPL-6, the presence of the carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) group appeared to enhance interactions with CO(2) at low loadings. PMID:22714718

  2. Three different pillared assemblies with abundant topological architectures based on 4-sulfobenzoic ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Long-Guan

    2014-05-01

    One unprecedented three-dimensional 4-sbe complex [K(4-sbe)]n (1) and two proton-transfer compounds of 4-Hsb with amines, named as [(4-Hsb)·(NH4)·(H2O)]n (2) and {[(4-Hsb)]2·(H2bpe)·2(H2O)}n (3) have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses, elemental analyses, IR spectra, TG analyses, and fluorescence studies, where 4-sbe is 4-sulfobenzoic ester, 4-Hsb is 4-sulfobenzoate monoanion and H2bpe is protonated 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene. All of the complexes share the common pillared architectures. Complex 1 is the first example of 4-sbe complexes with a 5-c bnn hexagonal BN net. In contrast, compounds 2 and 3 are two hydrogen-bonded 3D structures. In 2, 4-Hsb ligands brace the adjacent layers constructed by NH4+ and water molecules through hydrogen bonds, generating a new 4, 5, 9-c 3-nodal net. In 3, H2bpe species further assemble the 2-D hydrogen-bonding network comprising of 4-Hsb and water molecules into a 3D InS net with channels. Basically, 4-sbe/4-Hsb either coordinates to metal centers or serves as hydrogen-bonding acceptors/donors giving 5, 9 and 4-connected nodes in the topological networks of compounds 1-3 respectively. Solid state properties such as luminescence and thermal stability of the complexes have been investigated.

  3. Process optimization of high aspect ratio sub-32nm HSQ/AR3 bi-layer resist pillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Su; Tsai, Ming-Jinn

    2011-04-01

    RRAM is the candidate of next generation new non-volatile memory. The etched stacking film thickness of RRAM cell pillar is not easy to reduce below 50 nm during CD scaling down since part of RRAM cell pillar height is removed during CMP polishing of dielectric passivation to expose the pillar top surface for the following metallization process. Therefore resist pillar pattern with high aspect ratio (AR) is needed to act as etch mask for defining thick RRAM cell pillar structure. Bilayer resist (BLR) process is most suitable for forming high AR pattern. Dry develop process is the key step for generating sub-32 nm high AR BLR pillar pattern. In this study optimization of dry develop process is investigated for high AR pillar with hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) as upper thin imaging layer for e-beam exposure and AR3-600 as the thick underlayer for etching resistant. Experimental results are summarized below. Highest AR of ~6 for HSQ/AR3 BLR semi-dense L/S=1/2 pillar with vertical profile is obtained under optimized dry develop condition with O2, N2, Ar flow rates, chamber pressure, top and bottom power of 8, 5, 0 sccm, 1 mTorr, 200 and 100 watts respectively. AR is lower for looser pattern density. CD variation between HSQ/AR3-600 BLR pillars with different pattern density is optimized to 5.6 nm. The pillar profile is vertical in vacuum for pattern of any density but distorts more severe for denser pattern during ventilation to atmosphere. The most critical process parameters for obtaining high aspect ratio BLR pillar are O2 flow rate and top power. Sidewall profile angle of pillar is mainly dependent on chamber pressure and bottom power.

  4. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-06-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars.

  5. Comparative stability analyses of traditional and selective room-and-pillar mining techniques for sub-horizontal tungsten veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Torres, Vidal Félix; Dinis da Gama, Carlos; Costa E Silva, Matilde; Neves, Paula Falcão; Xie, Qiang

    2011-02-01

    The stability and productivity concerning a modification on the traditional room and pillar for a new selective technique at the Portuguese Panasqueira Mine have been described. The traditional room-and-pillar stoping uses 5.0-m wide rooms with 3.0 m ×3.0 m pillars, while the selective room-and-pillar mining technique consists in stoping with rooms of 4.0 m wide and pillars of 4 m ×4 m with a subsequent selective cutting of the quartz veins at the mid pillar of approximately 0.5 m high, to obtain a pillar section with an area of 3.0 m × 3.0 m. The stability and productivity analyses indicate that the selective technique obtains smaller average pillar safety factor, more rock mass displacement, more extraction and selectivity ratios, and ore grade improvement, compared with the traditional technique. These results show that the selective technique is also more convenient. This proposed selective room-and-pillar mining technique is applicable to any sub-horizontal narrow quartz veins with wolfram, gold, etc. such as the famous La Rinconada gold mine in the Peruvian Andes.

  6. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-01-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars. PMID:27353231

  7. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-01-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars.

  8. Evolution and Engineering of Precisely Controlled Ge Nanostructures on Scalable Array of Ordered Si Nano-pillars

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Zhou, Tong; Li, Dehui; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2016-01-01

    The scalable array of ordered nano-pillars with precisely controllable quantum nanostructures (QNs) are ideal candidates for the exploration of the fundamental features of cavity quantum electrodynamics. It also has a great potential in the applications of innovative nano-optoelectronic devices for the future quantum communication and integrated photon circuits. Here, we present a synthesis of such hybrid system in combination of the nanosphere lithography and the self-assembly during heteroepitaxy. The precise positioning and controllable evolution of self-assembled Ge QNs, including quantum dot necklace(QDN), QD molecule(QDM) and quantum ring(QR), on Si nano-pillars are readily achieved. Considering the strain relaxation and the non-uniform Ge growth due to the thickness-dependent and anisotropic surface diffusion of adatoms on the pillars, the comprehensive scenario of the Ge growth on Si pillars is discovered. It clarifies the inherent mechanism underlying the controllable growth of the QNs on the pillar. Moreover, it inspires a deliberate two-step growth procedure to engineer the controllable QNs on the pillar. Our results pave a promising avenue to the achievement of desired nano-pillar-QNs system that facilitates the strong light-matter interaction due to both spectra and spatial coupling between the QNs and the cavity modes of a single pillar and the periodic pillars. PMID:27353231

  9. Using submarine lava pillars to record mid-ocean ridge eruption dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Tracy K.P.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Perfit, Michael R.; Ridley, W. Ian; Kurz, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    Submarine lava pillars are hollow, glass-lined, basaltic cylinders that occur at the axis of the mid-ocean ridge, and within the summit calderas of some seamounts. Typically, pillars are ~1-20 m tall and 0.25-2.0 m in diameter, with subhorizontal to horizontal glassy selvages on their exterior walls. Lava pillars form gradually during a single eruption, and are composed of lava emplaced at the eruption onset as well as the last lava remaining after the lava pond has drained. On the deep sea floor, the surface of a basaltic lava flow quenches to glass within 1 s, thereby preserving information about eruption dynamics, as well as chemical and physical properties of lava within a single eruption. Investigation of different lava pillars collected from a single eruption allows us to distinguish surficial lava-pond or lava-lake geochemical processes from those operating in the magma chamber. Morphologic, major-element, petrographic and helium analyses were performed on portions of three lava pillars formed during the April 1991 eruption near 9°50'N at the axis of the East Pacific Rise. Modeling results indicate that the collected portions of pillars formed in ~2-5 h, suggesting a total eruption duration of ~8-20 h. These values are consistent with observed homogeneity in the glass helium concentrations and helium diffusion rates. Major-element compositions of most pillar glasses are homogeneous and identical to the 1991 flow, but slight chemical variations measured in the outermost portions of some pillars may reflect post-eruptive processes rather than those occurring in subaxial magma bodies. Because lava pillars are common at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), the concepts and techniques we present here may have important application to the study of MOR eruptions, thereby providing a basis for quantitative comparisons of volcanic eruptions in geographically and tectonically diverse settings. More research is needed to thoroughly test the hypotheses presented here. (C) 2000

  10. The uniaxial compressive strength of coal: Should it be used to design pillars?

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, C.; Barton, T.

    1996-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines has recently completed a comprehensive study of coal strength. More than 4000 individual test results from over 60 scams were extracted from the literature and combined in the most complete data base of the uniaxial compressive strength of coal ever assembled. In addition, more than 100 case studies of in-mine pillar performance were available in the Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar Stability (ARMPS) data base. Statistical analysis of this wealth of data has yielded valuable results. The data shows clearly that the {open_quotes}size effect{close_quotes} is related to coal structure. The widely-used Gaddy formula, which predicts a significant strength reduction as the specimen size is increased, was found to apply only to {open_quotes}blocky{close_quotes} coals. For friable coals, the size effect was much less pronounced or even non-existent. Case histories of failed pillars are the best available data on in situ coal strength. This study found no correlation between the ARMPS stability factor of failed pillars and coal specimen strength. Pillar design was much more reliable when a uniform coal strength was used in all case histories.

  11. Estimating the coordinates of pillars and posts in the parking lots for intelligent parking assist system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Hyung; Kuk, Jung Gap; Kim, Young Il; Cho, Nam Ik

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm for the detection of pillars or posts in the video captured by a single camera implemented on the fore side of a room mirror in a car. The main purpose of this algorithm is to complement the weakness of current ultrasonic parking assist system, which does not well find the exact position of pillars or does not recognize narrow posts. The proposed algorithm is consisted of three steps: straight line detection, line tracking, and the estimation of 3D position of pillars. In the first step, the strong lines are found by the Hough transform. Second step is the combination of detection and tracking, and the third is the calculation of 3D position of the line by the analysis of trajectory of relative positions and the parameters of camera. Experiments on synthetic and real images show that the proposed method successfully locates and tracks the position of pillars, which helps the ultrasonic system to correctly locate the edges of pillars. It is believed that the proposed algorithm can also be employed as a basic element for vision based autonomous driving system.

  12. Experimental investigation of Eagle nebula pillars using a multiple hohlraum array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David; Kane, Jave; Villette, Bruno; Pound, Mark; Casner, Alexis; Heeter, Robert; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The ``pillars of creation'' are stunningly beautiful and physically puzzling molecular cloud structure in the Eagle nebula. Formation of these pillars has been subject of debate since their observation. Although extensive observation and modeling have attempted to answer the creation of the observed pillars, experiments have not adequately tested the theoretical models surrounding the photoevaporation of the molecular clouds. Recent Omega EP experiments at the LLE developed a 30 ns x-ray drive using a multiple hohlraum array (``Gatling gun'' approach) to drive the photoevaporation process and test pillar formation. This proof of principle experiment imaged the initial stages of a pillar using Ti area backlighter through a driven 50 mg/cc R/F foam with an embedded solid density CH ball. This presentation will give an overview of the experimental design and results from the experiment. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-656872.

  13. Subwavelength waveguiding of surface phonons in pillars-based phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addouche, Mahmoud; Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A.; Elayouch, Aliyasin; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we theoretically analyze the guiding of surface phonons through locally resonant defects in pillars-based phononic crystal. Using finite element method, we simulate the propagation of surface phonons through a periodic array of cylindrical pillars deposited on a semi-infinite substrate. This structure displays several band gaps, some of which are due to local resonances of the pillar. By introducing pillar defects inside the phononic structure, we show the possibility to perform a waveguiding of surface phonons based on two mechanisms that spatially confine the elastic energy in very small waveguide apertures. A careful choice of the height of the defect pillars, allows to shift the frequency position of the defect modes inside or outside the locally resonant band gaps and create two subwavelenght waveguiding mechanisms. The first is a classical mechanism that corresponds to the presence of the defect modes inside the locally resonant band gap. The seconde is due to the hybridation between the phonon resonances of defect modes and the surface phonons of the semi-infinite homogenous medium. We discuss the nature and the difference between both waveguiding phenomena.

  14. Penile intracavernosal pillars: lessons from anatomy and potential implications for penile prosthesis placement.

    PubMed

    Pagano, M J; Weinberg, A C; Deibert, C M; Hernandez, K; Alukal, J; Zhao, L; Wilson, S K; Egydio, P H; Valenzuela, R J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to anatomically describe the relationship of penile intracavernosal pillars to penile surgery, specifically corporal dilation during penile prosthesis placement. Corpora cavernosa from four embalmed male cadavers were dissected and subjected to probe dilation. Corpora were cross-sectioned and examined for the gross presence and location of pillars and dilated spaces. Infrapubic penile prosthesis insertion was performed on one fresh-frozen cadaveric male pelvis, followed by cross-sectioning. A single patient had intracavernosal pillars examined intraoperatively during Peyronie's plaque excision and penile prosthesis insertion. Intracavernosal pillars were identified in all cadavers and one surgical patient, passing obliquely from the dorsolateral tunica albuginea across the sinusoidal space to the ventral intercorporal septum. This delineated each corpus into two potential compartments for dilation: dorsomedial and ventrolateral. Dorsal dilation seated instruments and prosthetics satisfactorily in the dorsal mid glans and provided additional tissue coverage over weak ventral areas of the tunica albuginea, while ventrolateral dilation appeared to result in ventral seating and susceptibility to perforation. Intracavernosal pillars are an important anatomic consideration during penile prosthesis placement. Dorsal dilation appears to result in improved distal seating of cylinder tips, which may be protective against tip malposition, perforation or subsequent erosion. PMID:27053154

  15. Recent advances in pillar[n]arenes: synthesis and applications based on host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Pei, Yuxin; Wen, Jia; Pei, Zhichao

    2016-07-19

    Pillar[n]arenes (n = 5-15) are a novel class of macrocyclic molecules with hydroquinone as the repeating unit linked by methylene bridges at para-positions. Introduced by T. Ogoshi for the first time in 2008, pillararenes have attracted increasing interest and have been widely studied during the last eight years, due to their unique structural advantages as host molecules, such as symmetrical rigid architecture, electron-rich cavities and facile functional modification. In this review, we first describe the syntheses of pillar[n]arenes including cyclooligomerization of pillar[n]arenes and modification of pillar[n]arenes after cyclooligomerization, summarising almost twenty different kinds of guest motifs and dividing them into three types: cationic, neutral and anionic motifs. The main section of this review examines the applications of pillar[n]arenes based on the host-guest interactions in different research fields, including biology, materials science and environmental science. Finally, future research directions and potential for novel applications are discussed. PMID:27332040

  16. Flexible Pillared Graphene-Paper Electrodes for High-Performance Electrochemical Supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gongkai; Sun, Xiang; Lu, Fengyuan; Sun, Hongtao; Yu, Mingpeng; Jiang, Weilin; Liu, Changsheng; Lian, Jie

    2011-12-08

    Flexible graphene paper (GP) pillared by carbon black (CB) nanoparticles using a simple vacuum filtration method is developed as a high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Through the introduction of CB nanoparticles as spacers, the self-restacking of graphene sheets during the filtration process is mitigated to a great extent. The pillared GP-based supercapacitors exhibit excellent electrochemical performances and cyclic stabilities compared with GP without the addition of CB nanoparticles. At a scan rate of 10 mV s-1, the specific capacitance of the pillared GP is 138 F g-1 and 83.2 F g-1 with negligible 3.85% and 4.35% capacitance degradation after 2000 cycles in aqueous and organic electrolytes, respectively. At an extremely fast scan rate of 500 mV s-1, the specific capacitance can reach 80 F g-1 in aqueous electrolyte. No binder is needed for assembling the supercapacitor cells and the pillared GP itself may serve as a current collector due to its intrinsic high electrical conductivity. Finally, the pillared GP has great potential in the development of promising flexible and ultralight-weight supercapacitors for electrochemical energy storage.

  17. Measurement of turbulent wall shear-stress using micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Nottebrock, B.; Große, S.; Sullivan, J. P.; Schröder, W.

    2013-12-01

    In experimental fluid mechanics, measuring spatially and temporally resolved wall shear-stress (WSS) has proved a challenging problem. The micro-pillar shear-stress sensor (MPS3) has been developed with the goal of filling this gap in measurement techniques. The MPS3 comprises an array of flexible micro-pillars flush mounted on the wall of a wall-bounded flow field. The deflection of these micro-pillars in the presence of a shear field is a direct measure of the WSS. This paper presents the MPS3 development work carried out by RWTH Aachen University and Purdue University. The sensor concept, static and dynamic characterization and data reduction issues are discussed. Also presented are demonstrative experiments where the MPS3 was used to measure the WSS in both water and air. The salient features of the measurement technique, sensor development issues, current capabilities and areas for improvement are highlighted.

  18. Compression of granular pillars with constant width at top and bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Yuka; Rieser, Jennifer; Gollub, Jerry; Durian, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    Granular media display both elastic and plastic behavior, including the formation of shear bands under extreme loading. In this study, we performed two-dimensional granular pillar compression experiments and tracked of grain- and macro- scale flows via video imaging and force measurement. Especially we focus on the condition that the top and bottom widths of the granular pillars are constrained to avoid free expansion along the contact edge. This causes more energy to be stored elastically deep inside of the pillars, which gives rise to a different kind of shear banding than for free top/bottom widths. Furthermore we tried several series of experiments with different elastic/frictional particles and also ordered/disordered systems. We demonstrate how the micro properties and packing structure contribute to the formation of shear band to discuss the mechanical failure in disordered packing.

  19. Microscopic Pillars and Tubes Fabricated by Using Fish Dentine as a Molding Template

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaowei; Lu, Yang; Yao, Haimin

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials in nature exhibit delicate structures that are greatly beyond the capability of the current manufacturing techniques. Duplicating these structures and applying them in engineering may help enhance the performance of traditional functional materials and structures. Inspired by gecko’s hierarchical micro- and nano-fibrillar structures for adhesion, in this work we fabricated micro-pillars and tubes by adopting the tubular dentine of black carp fish teeth as molding template. The adhesion performances of the fabricated micro-pillars and tubes were characterized and compared. It was found that the pull-off force of a single pillar was about twice of that of the tube with comparable size. Such unexpected discrepancy in adhesion was analyzed based on the contact mechanics theories. PMID:25158231

  20. Structural and textural properties of Al,Fe-pillared clay catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banković, P.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A.; Rosić, A.; Jović-Jovičić, N.; Jovanović, D.

    2009-09-01

    Metal oxide pillared interlayered clays (PILCs) represent a new class of materials that have found a wide range of potential applications including catalytic oxidative degradation of organic pollutants in water. Al,Fe-pillared smectite clays with different Fe content were synthesized for possible catalytic application. Starting clay and the obtained PILCs were characterized. Phase composition, textural and morphological properties of the starting clay and synthesized PILCs were determined using X-ray diffraction, physisorption of nitrogen and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical composition of the PILCs was determined using EDX. It was found that the synthesized PILCs have similar phasal composition, textural and morphological properties differing only in Fe content in accordance with the amount of Fe introduced to clay during the pillaring process.

  1. MAMA Spectroscopic Throughputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This activity sets new baseline post-SM4 sensitivity/throughput measurements for all the STIS/MAMA spectroscopic modes, and establishes if there changes with respect to perfomance prior to the LVPS failure. It also checks the NUV focus of STIS and its dependence on wavelength.

  2. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, M.; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, E. G.; Carassiti, F.; Pharr, G. M.

    2015-06-01

    The fracture toughness of thin ceramic films is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of this important class of engineering materials. Unfortunately, measurement of thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these issues based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the upper portion of the pillar is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behaviour. Cohesive finite element simulations are used for analysis and development of a simple relationship between the critical load at failure, pillar radius and fracture toughness for a given material. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. In addition, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparison of the indentation results obtained on the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings created by physical vapour deposition, namely titanium nitride, chromium nitride and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  3. Pillar[5]arene as a co-factor in templating rotaxane formation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Chenfeng; Strutt, Nathan L; Li, Hao; Hou, Xisen; Hartlieb, Karel J; McGonigal, Paul R; Ma, Zhidong; Iehl, Julien; Stern, Charlotte L; Cheng, Chuyang; Zhu, Zhixue; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Meade, Thomas J; Botros, Youssry Y; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-11-13

    After the manner in which coenzymes often participate in the binding of substrates in the active sites of enzymes, pillar[5]arene, a macrocycle containing five hydroquinone rings linked through their para positions by methylene bridges, modifies the binding properties of cucurbit[6]uril, such that the latter templates azide-alkyne cycloadditions that do not occur in the presence of only the cucurbit[6]uril, a macrocycle composed of six glycoluril residues doubly linked through their nitrogen atoms to each other by methylene groups. Here, we describe how a combination of pillar[5]arene and cucurbit[6]uril interacts cooperatively with bipyridinium dications substituted on their nitrogen atoms with 2-azidoethyl- to 5-azidopentyl moieties to afford, as a result of orthogonal templation, two [4]rotaxanes and one [5]rotaxane in >90% yields inside 2 h at 55 °C in acetonitrile. Since the hydroxyl groups on pillar[5]arene and the carbonyl groups on cucurbit[6]uril form hydrogen bonds readily, these two macrocycles work together in a cooperative fashion to the extent that the four conformational isomers of pillar[5]arene can be trapped on the dumbbell components of the [4]rotaxanes. In the case of the [5]rotaxane, it is possible to isolate a compound containing two pillar[5]arene rings with local C5 symmetries. In addition to fixing the stereochemistries of the pillar[5]arene rings, the regiochemistries associated with the 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions have been extended in their constitutional scope. Under mild conditions, orthogonal recognition motifs have been shown to lead to templation with positive cooperativity that is fast and all but quantitative, as well as being green and efficient.

  4. Graphitized Wavy Traces of Iron Particles Observed in Amorphous Carbon Nano-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Jun-ichi; Ishida, Masahiko; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Ochiai, Yukinori; Kaito, Takashi; Matsui, Shinji

    2004-06-01

    We show evidence of solid-phase nanotube growth where traces of iron nano-particles were graphitized in an amorphous carbon nano-pillar fabricated by electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition (EB-CVD). The random walk of iron particles in the carbon nano-pillar caused continuous growth of wavy graphite tubes behind the iron particles as they moved during vacuum annealing at 800°C for 30 min. The graphite sheet in this solid-phase graphitization seemed to be produced at the tail of the iron nanoparticles, and some of the graphite tubes were multi-wall ones containing bamboo-joint-like cap sheets.

  5. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO2 from simulated flue gas.

    PubMed

    Elsaidi, Sameh K; Mohamed, Mona H; Schaef, Herbert T; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2015-11-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas is considered to be a feasible approach to mitigate the effects of anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we report that an isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) of general formula [M(linker)2(pillar)], linker = pyrazine, pillar = hexaflourosilicate and M = Zn, Cu, Ni and Co exhibits highly selective removal of CO2 from dry and wet simulated flue gas. Two members of the family, M = Ni and Co, SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-3-Co, respectively, are reported for the first time and compared with the previously reported Zn and Cu analogs.

  6. Three dimensional finite element simulations of room and pillar mines in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1996-05-01

    3-D quasistatic finite element codes are being used at Sandia to simulate large room and pillar mines in rock salt. The two examples presented in this paper are of mines supported by US DOE, under the auspices of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve program. One of the mines is presently used as an oil storage facility. These simulations, validated by field measurements and observations, have provided valuable insight into the failure mechanisms of room and pillar mines in rock salt. The calculations provided the basis for further investigation and the ultimate decision to decommission the DOE oil storage facility.

  7. Fabrication of elastomer Pillar Arrays with Modulated Stiffness for Cellular Force Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, S.; Biais, N.; Maniura, K.; Wind, S. J.; Sheetz, M. P.; Hone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a cell's environment can alter behavior such as migration and spreading, and control the differentiation path of stem cells. Here we describe a technique for fabricating substrates whose rigidity can be controlled locally without altering the contact area for cell spreading. The substrates consist of elastomeric pillar arrays in which the top surface is uniform but the pillar height is changed across a sharp step. Preliminary results demonstrate the effects on cell migration and morphology at the step boundary. PMID:20526426

  8. Structural, textural and catalytic properties of Al-, Ti-pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos-Galvan, C.E.; Dominguez, J.M.; Sandoval-Robles, G.; Castillo-Mares, A.; Nava E, N.

    1996-12-31

    Al-, Ti- and Zr-pillared clays were characterized and NiMo/Pilc`s were tested in HDS reactions. The combination of activity measurements with Moessbauer Spectroscopy and x-ray microanalysis at microscopical scale give insight in the metal phases migration during pillaring, reaction and regeneration steps. {Alpha}-Fe phase in free Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} islands predominate together with structural Fe{sup 3+} phase, but during the catalytic reaction Fe{sup 2+} forms. Delamination of the Ti- and Zr-Clay supports, together with high Lewis acidity might enhance their catalytic properties.

  9. Development of sequence-tagged site markers linked to the pillar growth type in peach (Prunus persica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], trees showing columnar [also termed pillar or broomy] growth habit are of interest for high density production systems. While the selection of the columnar homozygote (pillar) phenotype (brbr) can be carried out prior to field planting, the intermediate hetero...

  10. Effect of the presence of an ordered micro-pillar array on the formation of silica monoliths.

    PubMed

    Detobel, Frederik; Eghbali, Hamed; De Bruyne, Selm; Terryn, Herman; Gardeniers, Han; Desmet, Gert

    2009-10-30

    We report on the synthesis of siloxane-based monoliths in the presence of a two-dimensional, perfectly ordered array of micro-pillars. Both methyltrimethoxysilane- and tetramethoxysilane-based monoliths were considered. The obtained structures were analyzed using scanning-electron microscopy and can be explained from the general theory of surface-directed phase separation in confined spaces. The formed structures are to a large extent nearly exclusively determined by the ratio between the bulk domain size of the monolith on the one hand and the distance between the micro-pillars on the other hand. When this ratio is small, the presence of the pillars has nearly no effect on the morphology of the produced monoliths. However, when the ratio approaches unity and ascends above it, some new types of monolith morphologies are induced, two of which appear to have interesting properties for use as novel chromatographic supports. One of these structures (obtained when the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio is around unity) is a 3D network of linear interconnections between the pillars, organized such that all skeleton branches are oriented perpendicular to the micro-pillar surface. A second interesting structure is obtained at even higher values of the domain size/inter-pillar distance ratio. In this case, each individual micro-pillar is uniformly coated with a mesoporous shell.

  11. "Brown" Policy and the Moral Pillars of Democracy: Exploring Justice as the Organizing Principle of Educational Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sherick; Snauwaert, Dale T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to revisit "Brown" as a paradigmatic understanding of social justice and its barriers, by reconsidering "Brown" in light of the three moral pillars of democracy identified by Cornel West (2004). West maintains that authentic deep democracy is grounded in three fundamental capacities and dispositions, or pillars: (a)…

  12. Physics of band-gap formation and its evolution in the pillar-based phononic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, the interplay of Bragg scattering and local resonance is theoretically studied in a phononic crystal (PnC) structure composed of a silicon membrane with periodic tungsten pillars. The comparison of phononic band gaps (PnBGs) in three different lattice types (i.e., square, triangular, and honeycomb) with different pillar geometries shows that different PnBGs have varying degrees of dependency on the lattice symmetry based on the interplay of the local resonances and the Bragg effect. The details of this interplay is discussed. The significance of locally resonating pillars, specially in the case of tall pillars, on PnBGs is discussed and verified by examining the PnBG position and width in perturbed lattices via Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the PnBGs caused by the local resonance of the pillars are more resilient to the lattice perturbations than those caused by Bragg scattering.

  13. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  14. Effect of ultrasound on the structural and textural properties of copper-impregnated cerium-modified zirconium-pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomul, Fatma

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the synthesis of zirconium-pillared bentonite modified with cerium was performed via two different methods by the application of conventional and ultrasonic treatments during the intercalation stage. To synthesise copper-impregnated pillared clays by wet impregnation, cerium-modified zirconium-pillared clays were used as supportive materials after being calcined at 300 °C. Ultrasonic treatment significantly decreased the required processing time compared with the conventional treatment of the synthesised pillared bentonites. Chemical analysis confirmed the incorporation of Zr 4+, Ce 4+ and Cu 2+ species into the pillared bentonites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of zirconium- and cerium/zirconium-pillared bentonites prepared by conventional treatment show that one large d-spacing above 3.5 nm corresponds to the mesoporous delaminated part, and another small d-spacing above 1.7 nm is indicative of the microporous pillared part. Zirconium- and cerium/zirconium-pillared bentonites prepared via ultrasonic treatment exhibited similar results, with the same high d-spacing but with a second low-intensity d-spacing above 1.9 nm. The delaminated structures of the pillared bentonites synthesised by both methods were conserved after copper impregnation. Nitrogen-adsorption isotherm analysis showed that the textural characteristics of products synthesised by ultrasonic treatment were comparable to those of products synthesised by conventional treatment. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses showed the presence of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites, and zirconium-pillared clays synthesised by conventional treatment exhibited increased numbers of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites after cerium addition and copper impregnation. However, the products synthesised by ultrasonic treatment exhibited an increased number of Brønsted- and Lewis-acid sites after cerium addition, but a decreased number of acid sites after copper impregnation.

  15. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  16. Spectroscopically Unlocking Exoplanet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nikole

    2016-05-01

    Spectroscopy plays a critical role in a number of areas of exoplanet research. The first exoplanets were detected by precisely measuring Doppler shifts in high resolution (R ~ 100,000) stellar spectra, a technique that has become known as the Radial Velocity (RV) method. The RV method provides critical constraints on exoplanet masses, but is currently limited to some degree by robust line shape predictions. Beyond the RV method, spectroscopy plays a critical role in the characterization of exoplanets beyond their mass and radius. The Hubble Space Telescope has spectroscopically observed the atmospheres of exoplanets that transit their host stars as seen from Earth giving us key insights into atmospheric abundances of key atomic and molecular species as well as cloud optical properties. Similar spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet atmospheres will be carried out at higher resolution (R ~ 100-3000) and with broader wavelength coverage with the James Webb Space Telescope. Future missions such as WFIRST that seek to the pave the way toward the detection and characterization of potentially habitable planets will have the capability of directly measuring the spectra of exoplanet atmospheres and potentially surfaces. Our ability to plan for and interpret spectra from exoplanets relies heavily on the fidelity of the spectroscopic databases available and would greatly benefit from further laboratory and theoretical work aimed at optical properties of atomic, molecular, and cloud/haze species in the pressure and temperature regimes relevant to exoplanet atmospheres.

  17. A diabetic retinopathy detection method using an improved pillar K-means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gogula, Susmitha Valli; Divakar, Ch; Satyanarayana, Ch; Rao, Allam Appa

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a new approach for medical image segmentation. Exudates are a visible sign of diabetic retinopathy that is the major reason of vision loss in patients with diabetes. If the exudates extend into the macular area, blindness may occur. Automated detection of exudates will assist ophthalmologists in early diagnosis. This segmentation process includes a new mechanism for clustering the elements of high-resolution images in order to improve precision and reduce computation time. The system applies K-means clustering to the image segmentation after getting optimized by Pillar algorithm; pillars are constructed in such a way that they can withstand the pressure. Improved pillar algorithm can optimize the K-means clustering for image segmentation in aspects of precision and computation time. This evaluates the proposed approach for image segmentation by comparing with Kmeans and Fuzzy C-means in a medical image. Using this method, identification of dark spot in the retina becomes easier and the proposed algorithm is applied on diabetic retinal images of all stages to identify hard and soft exudates, where the existing pillar K-means is more appropriate for brain MRI images. This proposed system help the doctors to identify the problem in the early stage and can suggest a better drug for preventing further retinal damage.

  18. 30 CFR 75.334 - Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered. 75.334 Section 75.334 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... ventilation plan shall specify the following: (1) Measures to detect methane, carbon monoxide, and...

  19. 30 CFR 75.334 - Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered. 75.334 Section 75.334 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.334 Worked-out areas and areas...

  20. 30 CFR 75.334 - Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered. 75.334 Section 75.334 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.334 Worked-out areas and areas...

  1. 30 CFR 75.334 - Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered. 75.334 Section 75.334 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... ventilation plan shall specify the following: (1) Measures to detect methane, carbon monoxide, and...

  2. 30 CFR 75.334 - Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Worked-out areas and areas where pillars are being recovered. 75.334 Section 75.334 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... ventilation plan shall specify the following: (1) Measures to detect methane, carbon monoxide, and...

  3. Al13-pillared anatase TiO2 as a cathode for a lithium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. D.; Ma, C. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Li, H. D.

    2004-11-01

    Al13-pillared anatase TiO2 is used as a cathode of a lithium battery for the first time. First, a layered titanium dioxide with cationic surfactant ions of cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA+) in the interlayers is synthesized by self-assembly. Then, pillared TiO2 is obtained by exchange of polyoxo cations of aluminium, [Al13O4(OH)24(H2O)12]7+, with CTA+ and subsequent calcination at 300 °C for 1 h in the air. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface area (BET) methods are used to characterize the layered and pillared forms of titanium dioxide. A lithium battery with the Al13-pillared TiO2 as the cathode and Li metal foil as the anode is studied within the 1-2.2 V voltage range. The specific capacity of the closed button cell (size 2025) that is delivered on the initial discharge reached 191.4 mA h g-1 at the rate of 25 mA g-1. The cell shows good cycling performance over 50 cycles.

  4. Preparation of porous clay minerals with organic-inorganic hybrid pillars using solvent-extraction route.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Minori; Ishii, Ryo; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Ooi, Kenta

    2004-04-01

    A microporous clay mineral with organic-inorganic hybrid pillars was synthesized using a hydrochloric acid (HCl)/ethanol extraction method after intercalation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) or TEOS/methyltriethoxysilane (MTS) into the cetyltrimetylammonium ion (CTA)-exchanged vermiculite. The products retained their layered structure, due to the formation of stable pillars by the polymerization of hydrolyzed TEOS and MTS during the HCl/ethanol treatment. The BET surface areas, which increased to above 500 m2g(-1) with an increase in the HCl concentration up to 0.4 moldm(-3), are nearly equal to that of the calcined product obtained by the conventional method. However, the pore sizes of HCl/ethanol-treated materials were narrower than those of the calcined product, owing to the formation of the polysiloxane networks in the gallery. A water adsorption study showed that the product treated with a TEOS/MTS mixture had a hydrophobic surface as a result of the successful incorporation of methyl groups at the surface of the pillars. This novel method is advantageous for the synthesis of organophilic pillared clays with different kinds of organic materials in the interlayers. PMID:14985033

  5. A pillar[5]arene-fused cryptand: from orthogonal self-assembly to supramolecular polymer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Cheng, Ming; Zhao, Yue; Wu, Lin; Jiang, Juli; Wang, Leyong; Pan, Yi

    2015-02-28

    A pillar[5]arene-fused cryptand with two different cavities was synthesized successfully. It was found that the novel tricyclic host could associate with two different guest species in an orthogonal manner. And based on this orthogonal self-assembly of two host-guest interactions, a novel type of supramolecular polymer was constructed easily and conveniently. PMID:25636005

  6. Ionothermal synthesis of homochiral framework with acetate-pillared cobalt-camphorate architecture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shumei; Zhang, Jian; Bu, Xianhui

    2008-07-01

    A new organically templated homochiral material (EMIm)[Co 2( d-cam) 2(ac)] ( 1; d-H 2cam = d-camphoric acid; ac = acetate; EMIm = 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium) has been ionothermally synthesized, and it features an unusual acetate-pillared cobalt-camphorate architecture encapsulating the cationic component of the ionic liquid.

  7. Promoting Family Literacy through the Five Pillars of Family and Community Engagement (FACE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Nai-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Family literacy involves factors beyond what is done at home between parents and children. To help preservice teachers develop their understanding of the multiple dimensions of family literacy, this study uses the five pillars of family and community engagement (FACE)--early literacy, family involvement, access to books, expanded learning, and…

  8. Investigation on Ge surface diffusion via growing Ge quantum dots on top of Si pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuwen; Mo, Delin; Hu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuguang; Chen, Yulu; Lin, Dongdong; Fan, Yongliang; Yang, Xinju; Zhong, Zhengyang; Jiang, Zuimin

    2016-08-01

    We report on a simple and intuitionistic experimental method to quantitatively measure surface diffusion lengths of Ge adatoms on Si(001) substrates and its activation energy Ea, which is achieved by growing Ge quantum dots (QDs) on top surfaces of Si pillars with different radii and taking an advantage of preferential nucleation and growth of Ge QDs at the top surface edge of the pillars. Diffusion length of Ge adatom can directly be measured and determined by the radius of the pillar below which no QDs will nucleate and grow at the central region of the top surface of the Si pillar. With a growth rate v fixed at 0.1 Å/s, by changing the growth temperature, the diffusion lengths at different temperatures would be obtained. Arrhenius plot of diffusion length as a function of growth temperature gives the value of Ea of 1.37 eV. Likewise, with a growth rate v fixed at 0.05 Å/s, the Ea value is obtained to be 1.38 eV. Two Ea values agree well with each other, implying that the method is reliable and self-consistent. Moreover, for a fixed growth temperature, the surface diffusion lengths are found to be directly proportional to 1 / √{ ν } . It also agrees well with the theoretical prediction, further demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  9. Discovery, synthesis, and characterization of an isomeric coordination polymer with pillared kagome net topology.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hyungphil; Moon, Jumi

    2007-05-28

    A topological isomer based on Zn2 paddlewheel, dicarboxylate, and diamine ligands is synthesized by solvothermal methods after careful modulation of the reaction conditions. The new framework is characterized by a pillared Kagome net topology and possesses a sustainable pore structure with high surface area (approximately 2400 m2/g) and large hexagonal channels (approximately 15 A).

  10. Effects of the Four Pillars on Statewide High School Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Harry M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship of statewide high school graduation rates of student ethnic groups from 2002 to 2006 to the four policy pillars of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001: Accountability for Results; Expanded Flexibility and Local Control; Expanded Options for Parents, Strengthening Teacher Quality. The quantitative,…

  11. The Sloan-C Pillars and Boundary Objects As a Framework for Evaluating Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, Mark; Graham, Charles; Dziuban, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The authors contend that blended learning represents a boundary object; a construct that brings together constituencies from a variety of backgrounds with each of these cohorts defining the object somewhat differently. The Sloan-C Pillars (learning effectiveness, access, cost effectiveness, student satisfaction, and faculty satisfaction) provide…

  12. A pillar-based microfilter for isolation of white blood cells on elastomeric substrate.

    PubMed

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Bahadorimehr, Alireza; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2013-01-01

    Our goal is to design, fabricate, and characterize a pillar-based microfluidic device for size-based separation of human blood cells on an elastomeric substrate with application in the low-cost rapid prototyping of lab-chip devices. The single inlet single outlet device is using parallel U-shape arrays of pillars with cutoff size of 5.5 μm for trapping white blood cells (WBCs) in a pillar chamber with internal dead-volume of less than 1.0 μl. The microstructures are designed to limit the elastomeric deformation against fluid pressures. Numerical analysis showed that at maximum pressure loss of 15 kPa which is lower than the device conformal bonding strength, the pillar elastomeric deformation is less than 5% for flow rates of up to 1.0 ml min(-1). Molding technique was employed for device prototyping using polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) resin and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. Characterization of the dual-layer device with beads and blood samples is performed. Tests with blood injection showed that ∼18%-25% of WBCs are trapped and ∼84%-89% of red blood cells (RBCs) are passed at flow rates of 15-50 μl min(-1) with a slight decrease of WBCs trap and improve of the RBCs pass at higher flow rates. Similar results were obtained by separation of mixed microspheres of different size injected at flow rates of up to 400 μl min(-1). Tests with blood samples stained by fluorescent gel demonstrated that the WBCs are accumulated in the arrays of pillars that later end up to blockage of the device. Filtration results of using elastomeric substrate present a good consistency with the trend of separation efficiencies of the similar silicon-based filters. PMID:24403994

  13. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  14. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and whenmore » indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.« less

  15. Evaluation of Pillars4life: a virtual coping skills program for cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; O’Donnell, Jonathan D.; Abernethy, Amy P.; MacDermott, Kristin; Staley, Tina; Samsa, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pillars4Life is an educational program that teaches coping skills to cancer patients in a virtual group setting; it was recently implemented at 17 hospitals across the USA. The cost-effective, scalable, and assessable Pillars4Life curriculum targets psychosocial resources (e.g., self-efficacy and coping skills) as a means to reduce symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress) and enhance quality of life. Methods Cancer patients were recruited from hospitals that received the LIVESTRONG Community Impact Project Award to enroll in a pilot study of Pillars4Life. Consenting participants met with a certified instructor weekly for 10 weeks in a virtual environment; the manualized intervention trained participants in personal coping skills. Longitudinal assessments over 6 months were assessed using validated instruments to determine changes in Pillars4Life targeted resources and outcomes. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between changes in targeted resources and changes in outcome from baseline to 3 months post-intervention. Results Participants (n = 130) had the following characteristics: mean age of 56 ± 11 years, 87% women, 11% non-Caucasian, and 77% with college degree. At 3- and 6-month follow-up, mean scores improved on all key outcome measures such as depression (Patient Health Questionnaire), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder), posttraumatic stress (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy—Fatigue), and well-being (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—General) from baseline (all p<0.01); results were most pronounced among participants who reported ≥4/10 on the Distress Thermometer at baseline (all p<0.001). Changes in each targeted resource were associated with 3-month improvements in at least one outcome. Conclusions Participation in the Pillars4Life program was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements in

  16. The Pillars of Creation revisited with MUSE: gas kinematics and high-mass stellar feedback traced by optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. F.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Ercolano, B.; Gritschneder, M.; Ramsay, S.; Testi, L.

    2015-06-01

    Integral field unit (IFU) data of the iconic Pillars of Creation in M16 are presented. The ionization structure of the pillars was studied in great detail over almost the entire visible wavelength range, and maps of the relevant physical parameters, e.g. extinction, electron density, electron temperature, line-of-sight velocity of the ionized and neutral gas are shown. In agreement with previous authors, we find that the pillar tips are being ionized and photoevaporated by the massive members of the nearby cluster NGC 6611. They display a stratified ionization structure where the emission lines peak in a descending order according to their ionization energies. The IFU data allowed us to analyse the kinematics of the photoevaporative flow in terms of the stratified ionization structure, and we find that, in agreement with simulations, the photoevaporative flow is traced by a blueshift in the position-velocity profile. The gas kinematics and ionization structure have allowed us to produce a sketch of the 3D geometry of the Pillars, positioning the pillars with respect to the ionizing cluster stars. We use a novel method to detect a previously unknown bipolar outflow at the tip of the middle pillar and suggest that it has an embedded protostar as its driving source. Furthermore we identify a candidate outflow in the leftmost pillar. With the derived physical parameters and ionic abundances, we estimate a mass-loss rate due to the photoevaporative flow of 70 M⊙ Myr-1 which yields an expected lifetime of approximately 3 Myr.

  17. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2014-07-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate. As a national large scientific project, LAMOST project was proposed formally in 1996. The construction was started in 2001 and completed in 2008. After commission period, LAMOST pilot survey was started in October 2011 and spectroscopic survey began in September 2012. From October 2011 to June 2013, LAMOST has obtained more than 2 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 1.7 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, metalicitiy and radial velocity) of more than 1 million stars was obtained. In the first period of spectroscopic survey of LAMOST, 5 million of stellar spectra will be obtained and will make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  18. Substrate and underlayer dependence of sub-32nm e-beam HSQ pillar patterning process for RRAM application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Su; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Wei, Hung-Wen; Chen, Frederick T.; Tsai, Ming-Jinn; Ku, Tzu-Kun

    2012-03-01

    High AR bi-layer resist (BLR) pillar with organic underlayer (UL) is inevitable for etching of thick RRAM film stacking considering etch selectivity to avoid collapse. Selection of UL is a key factor to determine the AR of BLR pillar and selectivity during etching of hard mask (HM) and RRAM film stacking. In this work, e-beam patterning of HSQ pillar under various e-beam dose conditions, pattern density and HSQ thicknesses are studied on carbon highly contained UL TBLC-100PM. Hard mask layer of low temperature nitride (LTN) or oxide (LTO) above TiN/Ti/HfOx RRAM film stacking are also studied for achieving highest HSQ CD resolution by reducing e-beam proximity effect. Fogging effect is studied with various e-beam dose of the L/S=1/20 isolated pillar array which is far from the other arrays of 36 μm. Experimental results are summarized below. Etch rates (etch resistance) of TBLC-100PM UL under fluorine or chlorine-based plasmas are lower (higher) than that of AR3-600 UL with low carbon contained. Thicker LTN HM is necessary for higher HSQ pillar CD resolution. HSQ pillar CD resolution on LTO HM is higher than that on LTN HM. Smallest CD of HSQ pillar is 23.1 nm. Fogging effect is strong for TBLC-100PM where e-beam dose could affect the shape of HSQ pillar of neighboring array. This is not observed for AR3-600 UL. HSQ pillar CD resolution is highest for HSQ coated at 2000 rpm. Small change of HSQ coating speed could degrade CD resolution and imaging contrast drastically which may come from the fogging effect.

  19. Superlensing effect for surface acoustic waves in a pillar-based phononic crystal with negative refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Addouche, Mahmoud Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A. Choujaa, Abdelkrim Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate super resolution imaging for surface acoustic waves using a phononic structure displaying negative refractive index. This phononic structure is made of a monolithic square lattice of cylindrical pillars standing on a semi-infinite medium. The pillars act as acoustic resonator and induce a surface propagating wave with unusual dispersion. We found, under specific geometrical parameters, one propagating mode that exhibits negative refraction effect with negative effective index close to −1. Furthermore, a flat lens with finite number of pillars is designed to allow the focusing of an acoustic point source into an image with a resolution of (λ)/3 , overcoming the Rayleigh diffraction limit.

  20. Effect of Al and Ce on Zr-pillared bentonite and their performance in catalytic oxidation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnasri-Ghnimi, Saida; Frini-Srasra, Najoua

    2016-09-01

    Catalysts based on pillared clays with Zr and/or Al and Ce-Zr and/or Al polycations have been synthesized from a Tunisian bentonite and tested in catalytic oxidation of phenol at 298 K. The Zr-pillared clay showed higher activity than the Al-one in phenol oxidation. Mixed Zr-Al pillars lead to an enhancement of the catalytic activity due to the modification of the zirconium properties. The clays modified with Ce showed high conversions of phenol and TOC thus showing to be very selective towards the formation of CO2 and H2O.

  1. Pillars and globules at the edges of H ii regions. Confronting Herschel observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, P.; Minier, V.; Schneider, N.; Audit, E.; Hill, T.; Didelon, P.; Peretto, N.; Arzoumanian, D.; Motte, F.; Zavagno, A.; Bontemps, S.; Anderson, L. D.; André, Ph.; Bernard, J. P.; Csengeri, T.; Di Francesco, J.; Elia, D.; Hennemann, M.; Könyves, V.; Marston, A. P.; Nguyen Luong, Q.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roussel, H.; Sousbie, T.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Herschel far-infrared imaging observations have revealed the density structure of the interface between H ii regions and molecular clouds in great detail. In particular, pillars and globules are present in many high-mass star-forming regions, such as the Eagle nebula (M 16) and the Rosette molecular cloud, and understanding their origin will help characterize triggered star formation. Aims: The formation mechanisms of these structures are still being debated. The initial morphology of the molecular cloud and its turbulent state are key parameters since they generate deformations and curvatures of the shell during the expansion of the H ii region. Recent numerical simulations have shown how pillars can arise from the collapse of the shell in on itself and how globules can be formed from the interplay of the turbulent molecular cloud and the ionization from massive stars. The goal here is to test this scenario through recent observations of two massive star-forming regions, M 16 and the Rosette molecular cloud. Methods: First, the column density structure of the interface between molecular clouds and associated H ii regions was characterized using column density maps obtained from far-infrared imaging of the Herschel HOBYS key programme. Then, the DisPerSe algorithm was used on these maps to detect the compressed layers around the ionized gas and pillars in different evolutionary states. Column density profiles were constructed. Finally, their velocity structure was investigated using CO data, and all observational signatures were tested against some distinct diagnostics established from simulations. Results: The column density profiles have revealed the importance of compression at the edge of the ionized gas. The velocity properties of the structures, i.e. pillars and globules, are very close to what we predict from the numerical simulations. We have identified a good candidate of a nascent pillar in the Rosette molecular cloud that presents the velocity

  2. From random sphere packings to regular pillar arrays: analysis of transverse dispersion.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Khirevich, Siarhei; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2012-09-28

    We study the impact of microscopic order on transverse dispersion in the interstitial void space of bulk (unconfined) chromatographic beds by numerical simulations of incompressible fluid flow and mass transport of a passive tracer. Our study includes polydisperse random sphere packings (computer-generated with particle size distributions of modern core-shell and sub-2 μm particles), the macropore space morphology of a physically reconstructed silica monolith, and computer-generated regular pillar arrays. These bed morphologies are analyzed by their velocity probability density distributions, transient dispersion behavior, and the dependence of asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients on the mobile phase velocity. In our work, the spherical particles, the monolith skeleton, and the cylindrical pillars are all treated as impermeable solid phase (nonporous) and the tracer is unretained, to focus on the impact of microscopic order on flow and (particularly transverse) hydrodynamic dispersion in the interstitial void space. The microscopic order of the pillar arrays causes their velocity probability density distributions to start and end abruptly, their transient dispersion coefficients to oscillate, and the asymptotic transverse dispersion coefficients to plateau out of initial power law behavior. The microscopically disordered beds, by contrast, follow power law behavior over the whole investigated velocity range, for which we present refined equations (i.e., Eq.(13) and the data in Table 2 for the polydisperse sphere packings; Eq.(17) for the silica monolith). The bulk bed morphologies and their intrinsic differences addressed in this work determine how efficient a bed can relax the transverse concentration gradients caused by wall effects, which exist in all confined separation media used in chromatographic practice. Whereas the effect of diffusion on transverse dispersion decreases and ultimately disappears at increasing velocity with the microscopically

  3. Spectroscopic survey of LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    LAMOST is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope. LAMOST breaks through the bottleneck of the large scale spectroscopic survey observation with both large aperture (effective aperture of 3.6 - 4.9m) and wide field of view (5 degrees). It is an innovative active reflecting Schmidt configuration achieved by changing mirror surface continuously to achieve a series different reflecting Schmidt system in different moments. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, the focal surface of 1.75 meters in diameter accommodates 4000 optical fibers. Also, LAMOST has 16 spectrographs with 32 CCD cameras. LAMOST is the telescope of the highest spectrum acquiring rate.In the spectroscopic survey of LAMOST from October 2011 to June 2014, LAMOST has obtained more than 4.13 million spectra of celestial objects. There are 3.27 million spectra of stars, in which the stellar parameters of 2.16 million stars were obtained.In the five-year regular survey upto 2017, LAMOST will obtaine 5 million stellar spectra, which would make substantial contribution to the study of the stellar astrophysics and the structure of the Galaxy, such as the spheroid substructure of the Galaxy, the galactic gravitational potential and the distribution of the dark matter in the Galaxy, the extremely metal poor stars and hypervelocity stars, the 3D extinction in the Galaxy, the structure of thin and thick disks of the Galaxy, and so on.

  4. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  5. Theoretical study of a novel imino bridged pillar[5]arene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju; Zuo, Tongfei; Huang, Zhiling; Huan, Long; Gu, Qixin; Gao, Chenxi; Shao, Jingjing

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report a novel imino bridged pillar[5]arene derivative (P5N) for the first time. Four conformers (P5N0, P5N1, P5N12, and P5N13, arising due to the different orientation of Nsbnd H bond of imino bridging group) are obtained by quantum chemical calculations at the CAM-B3LYP/6-31+G(d, p) level of theory. The geometries, energies, electronic structures, and absorption spectra of P5N conformers as well as pillar[5]arene (P5) are discussed in detail. The inclusion complexes of paraquat (Pq) with P5N and P5, respectively, are also obtained at the same level of theory. Compared to P5, P5N exhibits better performance in inclusion complexation toward Pq.

  6. Fully integrated micro-separator with soft-magnetic micro-pillar arrays for filtrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Karlsen, Frank; Jakobsen, Henrik; Egeland, Eirik Bentzen; Hjelseth, Snorre

    2010-01-01

    A fully integrated micro-separator with soft-magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed, which merely employs one independent Lab-On-Chip to realize the lymphocytes isolation from the human whole blood. The simulation, fabrication and experiment are executed to realize this novel microseparator. The simulation results show that, the soft-magnetic micro-pillars array can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the microcoils. The tests certify desirable separation efficiency can be realized using this new separator at low current. No extra cooling system is required for such a micro-separator. This micro-separator can also be used to separate other target cells or particles with the same principle. PMID:21096497

  7. Analysis of roof and pillar failure associated with weak floor at a limestone mine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michael M.; Ellenberger, John L.; Esterhuizen, Gabriel S.; Miller, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A limestone mine in Ohio has had instability problems that have led to massive roof falls extending to the surface. This study focuses on the role that weak, moisture-sensitive floor has in the instability issues. Previous NIOSH research related to this subject did not include analysis for weak floor or weak bands and recommended that when such issues arise they should be investigated further using a more advanced analysis. Therefore, to further investigate the observed instability occurring on a large scale at the Ohio mine, FLAC3D numerical models were employed to demonstrate the effect that a weak floor has on roof and pillar stability. This case study will provide important information to limestone mine operators regarding the impact of weak floor causing the potential for roof collapse, pillar failure, and subsequent subsidence of the ground surface. PMID:27088041

  8. A superhydrophobic chip based on SU-8 photoresist pillars suspended on a silicon nitride membrane.

    PubMed

    Marinaro, Giovanni; Accardo, Angelo; De Angelis, Francesco; Dane, Thomas; Weinhausen, Britta; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian

    2014-10-01

    We developed a new generation of superhydrophobic chips optimized for probing ultrasmall sample quantities by X-ray scattering and fluorescence techniques. The chips are based on thin Si3N4 membranes with a tailored pattern of SU-8 photoresist pillars. Indeed, aqueous solution droplets can be evaporated and concentrated at predefined positions using a non-periodic pillar pattern. We demonstrated quantitatively the deposition and aggregation of gold glyconanoparticles from the evaporation of a nanomolar droplet in a small spot by raster X-ray nanofluorescence. Further, raster nanocrystallography of biological objects such as rod-like tobacco mosaic virus nanoparticles reveals crystalline macro-domain formation composed of highly oriented nanorods.

  9. Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett Films from Amphiphilic Pillar[5]arene-Containing [2]Rotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thi Minh Nguyet; Nierengarten, Iwona; Holler, Michel; Gallani, Jean-Louis; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2015-05-26

    Amphiphilic pillar[5]arene-containing [2]rotaxanes have been prepared and fully characterized. In the particular case of the [2]rotaxane incorporating a 1,4-diethoxypillar[5]arene subunit, the structure of the compound was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis. Owing to a good hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, stable Langmuir films have been obtained for these rotaxanes and the size of the peripheral alkyl chains on the pillar[5]arene subunit has a dramatic influence on the reversibility during compression-decompression cycles. Indeed, when these are small enough, molecular reorganization of the rotaxane by gliding motions are capable of preventing strong π-π interactions between neighboring macrocycles in the thin film.

  10. Microscopic Receding Contact Line Dynamics on Pillar and Irregular Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Yong Han; Milionis, Athanasios; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S.

    2015-01-01

    Receding angles have been shown to have great significance when designing a superhydrophobic surface for applications involving self-cleaning. Although apparent receding angles under dynamic conditions have been well studied, the microscopic receding contact line dynamics are not well understood. Therefore, experiments were performed to measure these dynamics on textured square pillar and irregular superhydrophobic surfaces at micron length scales and at micro-second temporal scales. Results revealed a consistent “slide-snap” motion of the microscopic receding line as compared to the “stick-slip” dynamics reported in previous studies. Interface angles between 40–60° were measured for the pre-snap receding lines on all pillar surfaces. Similar “slide-snap” dynamics were also observed on an irregular nanocomposite surface. However, the sharper features of the surface asperities resulted in a higher pre-snap receding line interface angle (~90°). PMID:25670630

  11. Pentavalent pillar[5]arene-based glycoclusters and their multivalent binding to pathogenic bacterial lectins.

    PubMed

    Galanos, Nicolas; Gillon, Emilie; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Anti-adhesive glycoclusters offer potential as therapeutic alternatives to classical antibiotics in treating infections. Pillar[5]arenes functionalised with either five galactose or five fucose residues were readily prepared using CuAAC reactions and evaluated for their binding to three therapeutically relevant bacterial lectins: LecA and Lec B from Pseudomonas aeuruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria. Steric interactions were demonstrated to be a key factor in achieving good binding to LecA with more flexible galactose glycoclusters showing enhanced activity. In contrast binding to the fucose-selective lectins confirmed the importance of topology of the glycoclusters for activity with the pillar[5]arene ligand proving a selective ligand for BambL.

  12. Hybrid waveguide-plasmon resonances in gold pillar arrays on top of a dielectric waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Likang; Bai, Wenli; Song, Guofeng

    2010-10-15

    We propose a hybrid waveguide-plasmon system consisting of gold pillar arrays on top of a dielectric waveguide. The formation of extraordinary transmissions induced by the hybrid waveguide-plasmon resonances is investigated by rigorous coupled-wave analysis. The characteristics of the hybrid resonances can be predicted by introducing the photonic crystal slab theory. Extremely narrow absorption peaks and the electromagnetically induced transparency-like optical property are demonstrated in our hybrid system.

  13. Optical Properties of InGaN Quantum Dots in Monolithic Pillar Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M.; Sebald, K.; Dartsch, H.; Tessarek, C.; Figge, S.; Kruse, C.; Hommel, D.; Florian, M.; Jahnke, F.; Gutowski, J.

    2011-12-01

    InGaN quantum dots were successfully implemented into fully epitaxially grown nitride-based monolithic microcavities. Measured discrete modes of airpost pillar microcavities prepared out of the planar sample are compared to theoretical simulations based on a vectorial-transfer matrix method. Quality factors of up to 280 have been achieved and the emission of a single quantum dot was traced up to a temperature of 125 K.

  14. Fabrication and chromatographic performance of porous-shell pillar-array columns.

    PubMed

    Detobel, Frederik; De Bruyne, Selm; Vangelooven, Joris; De Malsche, Wim; Aerts, Tim; Terryn, Herman; Gardeniers, Han; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Desmet, Gert

    2010-09-01

    We report on a new approach to obtain highly homogeneous silica-monolithic columns, applying a sol-gel fabrication process inside a rectangular pillar-array column (1 mm in width, 29 microm in height and 33.75 mm in length) having a cross-sectional area comparable to that of a 200 microm diameter circular capillary. Starting from a silicon-based pillar array and working under high phase-separation-tendency conditions (low poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-concentration), highly regular silica-based chromatographic systems with an external porosity in the order of 66-68% were obtained. The pillars, 2.4 microm in diameter, were typically clad with a 0.5 microm shell layer of silica, thus creating a 3.4 microm total outer pillar diameter and leaving a minimal through-pore size of 2.2 microm. After mesopore creation by hydrothermal treatment and column derivatization with octyldimethylchlorosilane, the monolithic column was used for chip-based liquid-chromatographic separations of coumarin dyes. Minimal plate heights ranging between 3.9 microm (nonretaining conditions) and 6 mum (for a retention factor of 6.5) were obtained, corresponding to domain-size-reduced plate heights ranging between 0.7 and 1.2. The column permeability was in the order of 1.3 x 10(13) m(2), lower than theoretically expected, but this is probably due to obstructions induced by the sol-gel process in the supply channels. PMID:20687586

  15. Protein Adsorption Switch Constructed by a Pillar[5]arene-Based Host-Guest Interaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Nie, Guanrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tian, Demei; Li, Haibing

    2016-01-18

    The interfacial properties of solid substrates are of importance for protein adsorption. Herein, we report a reversible protein adsorption switch based on the host-guest interaction of the butoxy pillar[5]arene and adipic acid. By the detector of the contact angle (CA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and luminoscope on the silicon substrate, the intelligent protein switch exhibits excellent adsorptivity for BSA and switch performance by pH regulation.

  16. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel; Voss, Lars F.; Wang, Tzu Fang; Shao, Qinghui

    2013-10-15

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The open space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.

  17. Significantly Reducing Post-Tonsillectomy Haemorrhage Requiring Surgery by Suturing the Faucial Pillars: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Senska, Götz; Schröder, Hilal; Pütter, Carolin; Dost, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Background The tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures. Given the comparatively frequent postsurgical bleeding associated with this procedure, particular attention has been paid to reduction of the postoperative bleeding rate. In 2006, we introduced routine suturing of the faucial pillars at our clinic to reduce postoperative haemorrhage. Methods Two groups from the years 2003–2005 (n = 1000) and 2007–2009 (n = 1000) have been compared. We included all patients who had an elective tonsillectomy due to a benign, non-acute inflammatory tonsil illness. In the years 2007–2009, we additionally sutured the faucial pillars after completing haemostasis. For primary haemostasis we used suture ligation and bipolar diathermy. Results The rate of bleeding requiring second surgery for haemostasis was 3.6% in 2003–2005 but only 2.0% in 2007–2009 (absolute risk reduction 1.6% (95% CI 0.22%–2.45%, p = 0.04)). The median surgery time—including adenoidectomy and paracentesis surgery—increased from 25 to 31 minutes (p<0.01). Conclusions We have been able to substantiate that suturing of the faucial pillars nearly halves the rate of postoperative haemorrhage. Surgery takes 8 minutes longer on average. Bleeding occurs later, mostly after 24 h. The limitations of this study relate to its retrospective character and all the potential biases related to observational studies. PMID:23118902

  18. Rockburst Disaster Prediction of Isolated Coal Pillar by Electromagnetic Radiation Based on Frictional Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tongbin; Yin, Yanchun; Xiao, Fukun; Tan, Yunliang; Zou, Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the understanding that charges generated during coal cracking are due to coal particle friction, a microstructure model was developed by considering four different variation laws of friction coefficient. Firstly, the frictional energy release of coal sample during uniaxial compressive tests was investigated and discussed. Then electromagnetic radiation method was used to predict the potential rockburst disaster in isolated coal pillar mining face, Muchengjian Colliery. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of coal particles decreases linearly with the increase of axial loading force. In predicting the strain-type rockburst, the high stress state of coal must be closely monitored. Field monitoring shows that electromagnetic radiation signal became abnormal before the occurrence of rockburst during isolated coal pillar mining. Furthermore, rockburst tends to occur at the early and ending stages of isolated coal pillar extraction. Mine-site investigation shows the occurrence zone of rockburst is consistent with the prediction, proving the reliability of the electromagnetic radiation method to predict strain-type rockburst disaster. PMID:25054186

  19. Aluminum oxide passivated radial junction sub-micrometre pillar array textured silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Elam, David; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2013-06-01

    We report radial, p-n junction, sub-micrometre, pillar array textured solar cells, fabricated on an n-type Czochralski silicon wafer. Relatively simple processing schemes such as metal-assisted chemical etching and spin on dopant techniques were employed for the fabrication of the proposed solar cells. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was employed as a surface passivation layer on the B-doped emitter surface. In spite of the fact that the sub-micrometre pillar array textured surface has a relatively high surface-to-volume ratio, we observed an open circuit voltage (VOC) and a short circuit current density (JSC) as high as 572 mV and 29.9 mA cm-2, respectively, which leads to a power conversion efficiency in excess of 11.30%, for the optimized structure of the solar cell described herein. Broadband omnidirectional antireflection effects along with the light trapping property of the sub-micrometre, pillar array textured surface and the excellent passivation quality of the ALD-grown Al2O3 on the B-doped emitter surface were responsible for the enhanced electrical performance of the proposed solar cells.

  20. Porous Structures in Stacked, Crumpled and Pillared Graphene-Based 3D Materials

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Creighton, Megan; Chen, Yantao; Hurt, Robert; Külaots, Indrek

    2015-01-01

    Graphene, an atomically thin material with the theoretical surface area of 2600 m2g−1, has great potential in the fields of catalysis, separation, and gas storage if properly assembled into functional 3D materials at large scale. In ideal non-interacting ensembles of non-porous multilayer graphene plates, the surface area can be adequately estimated using the simple geometric law ~ 2600 m2g−1/N, where N is the number of graphene sheets per plate. Some processing operations, however, lead to secondary plate-plate stacking, folding, crumpling or pillaring, which give rise to more complex structures. Here we show that bulk samples of multilayer graphene plates stack in an irregular fashion that preserves the 2600/N surface area and creates regular slot-like pores with sizes that are multiples of the unit plate thickness. In contrast, graphene oxide deposits into films with massive area loss (2600 to 40 m2g−1) due to nearly perfect alignment and stacking during the drying process. Pillaring graphene oxide sheets by co-deposition of colloidal-phase particle-based spacers has the potential to partially restore the large monolayer surface. Surface areas as high as 1000 m2g−1 are demonstrated here through colloidal-phase deposition of graphene oxide with water-dispersible aryl-sulfonated ultrafine carbon black as a pillaring agent. PMID:26478597

  1. Parallel optical read-out of micromechanical pillars applied to prostate specific membrane antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Tardivo, Martina; Toffoli, Valeria; Fracasso, Giulio; Borin, Daniele; Dal Zilio, Simone; Colusso, Andrea; Carrato, Sergio; Scoles, Giacinto; Meneghetti, Moreno; Colombatti, Marco; Lazzarino, Marco

    2015-10-15

    Micro and nanomechanical resonators represent a promising platform for proteins label-free detection because of their extreme sensitivity, fast response and low cost. Micro-pillars are columnar resonators that can be easily arranged in dense arrays of several thousand sensors in a squared mm. To exploit such a large density, however, a method for tracking independently micropillars resonance frequency is required. Here we present a detection method based on CCD imaging and software image analysis, which can measure the resonance frequency of tens of pillars in parallel. Acquiring simultaneously the frequency shift of up to 40 sensors and applying a proper statistical analysis, we were able to overcome the variability of the single measures improving the device sensitivity at low analyte concentration range. As a proof of concept, this method has been tested for the detection of a tumor marker, the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA). Pillars have been functionalized with an antibody against PSMA. The tumor marker (PSMA) has been detected in a range of concentrations between 300 pM and 100 nM, in buffer and in diluted bovine serum. The sensitivity of our method was limited only by the affinity constant of the antigen-antibody recognition. Moreover, this detection technique demonstrated to be effective in the 1-6 nM range, which is the window of PSMA concentration of clinical interest.

  2. Influence of orientation on the size effect in BCC pillars with different critical temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Arzt, Eduard; Gruber, Patrick A.; Clark, Blythe G.; Frick, Carl P.; Schneider, Andreas S.

    2010-09-01

    The size effect in body-centered cubic metals is comprehensively investigated through micro/nano-compression tests performed on focused ion beam machined tungsten (W), molybdenum (Mo) and niobium (Nb) pillars, with single slip [2 3 5] and multiple slip [0 0 1] orientations. The results demonstrate that the stress-strain response is unaffected by the number of activated slip systems, indicating that dislocation-dislocation interaction is not a dominant mechanism for the observed diameter dependent yield strength and strain hardening. Furthermore, the limited mobility of screw dislocations, which is different for each material at ambient temperature, acts as an additional strengthening mechanism leading to a material dependent size effect. Nominal values and diameter dependence of the flow stress significantly deviate from studies on face-centered cubic metals. This is demonstrated by the correlation of size dependence with the material specific critical temperature. Activation volumes were found to decrease with decreasing pillar diameter further indicating that the influence of the screw dislocations decreases with smaller pillar diameter.

  3. Rockburst disaster prediction of isolated coal pillar by electromagnetic radiation based on frictional effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongbin; Yin, Yanchun; Xiao, Fukun; Tan, Yunliang; Zou, Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the understanding that charges generated during coal cracking are due to coal particle friction, a microstructure model was developed by considering four different variation laws of friction coefficient. Firstly, the frictional energy release of coal sample during uniaxial compressive tests was investigated and discussed. Then electromagnetic radiation method was used to predict the potential rockburst disaster in isolated coal pillar mining face, Muchengjian Colliery. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of coal particles decreases linearly with the increase of axial loading force. In predicting the strain-type rockburst, the high stress state of coal must be closely monitored. Field monitoring shows that electromagnetic radiation signal became abnormal before the occurrence of rockburst during isolated coal pillar mining. Furthermore, rockburst tends to occur at the early and ending stages of isolated coal pillar extraction. Mine-site investigation shows the occurrence zone of rockburst is consistent with the prediction, proving the reliability of the electromagnetic radiation method to predict strain-type rockburst disaster.

  4. Estimation of long-term stability of mine pillars in underground pit

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, S.; Sugimoto, F.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuzumi, M.

    1996-12-01

    Recently in Japan, unexpected degradation (surface subsidence) at old underground quarry sites, such as `Ohya-Ishi` (pumice tuff) pit field has often occurred. At these quarry sites, the excavation was started 20 or 30 years ago with mechanical chain cutter and the Room and Pillar method, and stopped 7 or more years ago. Therefore, a reliable method has been required for an estimation of long term mechanical properties of the rock and for an observation of a stability of rock-pillars or structures. In this study, creep tests under uniaxial compressive load were carried out on the `Ohya-Ishi`, with the aim of estimating the long term stability of the rock. From these results, a creep mechanism of the rock was discussed using the failure mechanism hypothesis proposed by Bieniawski and by others. On this basis, critical time to failure was predicted by the relationship between the logarithm of life time and stress ratio of the sustained axial creep load. Additionally, outline of the monitoring system of AE/MS activity in the field, which have set by the Ohya Aria Consolidate Public Corporation and the others to predict or to prevent the degradation of those residual pillars, is to be reported.

  5. Light-Driven Reversible Shaping of Individual Azopolymeric Micro-Pillars

    PubMed Central

    Pirani, Federica; Angelini, Angelo; Frascella, Francesca; Rizzo, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Serena; Descrovi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Azopolymers are known to exhibit a strong light responsivity known as athermal photofluidization. Although the underlying physics is still under debate, athermal photofluidization has been demonstrated to trigger mass-migration according to the polarization of a proper illumination light. Here, a polymer blend is proposed wherein a commercial azo-polyelectrolyte is mixed with a passive polymer. The blend is patterned as an array of micro-pillars that are individually exposed to visible laser illumination. Thanks to the interplay between the two blend components, a reversible and controlled deformation of the micro-pillars by periodically tuning the laser polarization in time is demonstrated. A reduced mobility of the azo-compound allows to repeatibly elongate and rotate micro-pillars along specific directions, with no significant material flow outisde the initial volume and no significant degradation of the structure morphology over several cycles. The proposed work suggests new degrees of freedom in controlling the mechanical features of micro-patterned light-responsive materials that can be usefully exploited in many application fields. PMID:27531219

  6. Hierarchical superhydrophobic/hydrophilic substrates based on nanospheres self-assembly onto micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pengcheng; Wang, Yifei; Feng, Kaijun; Chen, Zhuojie; Wu, Wengang

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel superhydrophobic/hydrophilic substrate with micro-/nano-hierarchical structures by mimicking the lotus effect. Intrinsic hydrophobic polystyrene nanospheres or intrinsic hydrophilic silica nanospheres, via evaporation-induced self-assembly, are deposited on the surfaces of silicon pillars, including on tops as well as sidewalls. The obtained hierarchical structures with the polystyrene nanosphere deposition could amplify its intrinsic hydrophobicity, because gas interstices between both the nanospheres and micro-pillars jointly enhance the liquid-gas contact fraction significantly. Related theoretical analysis indicates that such structures could easily achieve an apparent contact angle (CA) of higher than 150°. In experiments, we measure the apparent CA of such kinds of hierarchical structures with the silicon pillars in different geometries, and find that the maximum value is up to 163.8°, with a 3.2° slide angle. The hierarchical structures with the silica nanosphere deposition could amplify its intrinsic hydrophilicity as well, because the double structures greatly increase the liquid-solid contact area. The corresponding experiment results show that the apparent CA can be as low as 7.6°.

  7. Pillaring Studies on Some Layered Oxides with Ruddlesden-Popper Related Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, R. A. Mohan; Clearfield, A.

    1994-10-01

    Pillaring studies on four layered oxides, KCa2Nb3O10, KCa3Nb3 TiO13, KCa4Nb3Ti2O16, and KCa2Sr0.5Nb3Ti0.5O11.5, possessing Ruddlesden-Popper related structures have been carried out. The aluminum keggin ion, [Al13O4(OH)24(H2O)12]7+, was used as the polymeric cation for the pillar. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, and sorption studies. X-ray diffraction and other structural studies suggest that the polymeric cations were incorporated into the interlayer and upon calcination the layer thicknesses observed correspond to that expected for the formation of the dehydrated polymers in between the layers as a composite. BET surface area measurements and sorption experiments indicate that these products are nonporous oxides suggesting that the interlayer regions are stuffed rather than pillared.

  8. Pillar[5]arene-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles: size control and sensing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Montes-García, Verónica; Fernández-López, Cristina; Gómez, Borja; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; García-Río, Luis; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple procedure for the synthesis of quasi-spherical Au nanoparticles in a wide size range mediated by macrocyclic host molecules, ammonium pillar[5]arene (AP[5]A). The strategy is based on a seeded growth process in which the water-soluble pillar[5]arene undergoes complexation of the Au salt through the ammonium groups, thereby avoiding Au nucleation, while acting as a stabilizer. The presence of the pillar[5]arene onto the Au nanoparticle particle surface is demonstrated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, and the most probable conformation of the molecule when adsorbed on the Au nanoparticles surface is suggested on the basis of theoretical calculations. In addition, we analyze the host-guest interactions of the AP[5]A with 2-naphthoic acid (2NA) by using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and the results are compared with theoretical calculations. Finally, the promising synergetic effects of combining supramolecular chemistry and metal nanoparticles are demonstrated through SERS detection in water of 2NA and a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, pyrene (PYR).

  9. Rockburst disaster prediction of isolated coal pillar by electromagnetic radiation based on frictional effect.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongbin; Yin, Yanchun; Xiao, Fukun; Tan, Yunliang; Zou, Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the understanding that charges generated during coal cracking are due to coal particle friction, a microstructure model was developed by considering four different variation laws of friction coefficient. Firstly, the frictional energy release of coal sample during uniaxial compressive tests was investigated and discussed. Then electromagnetic radiation method was used to predict the potential rockburst disaster in isolated coal pillar mining face, Muchengjian Colliery. The results indicate that the friction coefficient of coal particles decreases linearly with the increase of axial loading force. In predicting the strain-type rockburst, the high stress state of coal must be closely monitored. Field monitoring shows that electromagnetic radiation signal became abnormal before the occurrence of rockburst during isolated coal pillar mining. Furthermore, rockburst tends to occur at the early and ending stages of isolated coal pillar extraction. Mine-site investigation shows the occurrence zone of rockburst is consistent with the prediction, proving the reliability of the electromagnetic radiation method to predict strain-type rockburst disaster. PMID:25054186

  10. Light-Driven Reversible Shaping of Individual Azopolymeric Micro-Pillars.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Federica; Angelini, Angelo; Frascella, Francesca; Rizzo, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Serena; Descrovi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Azopolymers are known to exhibit a strong light responsivity known as athermal photofluidization. Although the underlying physics is still under debate, athermal photofluidization has been demonstrated to trigger mass-migration according to the polarization of a proper illumination light. Here, a polymer blend is proposed wherein a commercial azo-polyelectrolyte is mixed with a passive polymer. The blend is patterned as an array of micro-pillars that are individually exposed to visible laser illumination. Thanks to the interplay between the two blend components, a reversible and controlled deformation of the micro-pillars by periodically tuning the laser polarization in time is demonstrated. A reduced mobility of the azo-compound allows to repeatibly elongate and rotate micro-pillars along specific directions, with no significant material flow outisde the initial volume and no significant degradation of the structure morphology over several cycles. The proposed work suggests new degrees of freedom in controlling the mechanical features of micro-patterned light-responsive materials that can be usefully exploited in many application fields. PMID:27531219

  11. Light-Driven Reversible Shaping of Individual Azopolymeric Micro-Pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirani, Federica; Angelini, Angelo; Frascella, Francesca; Rizzo, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Serena; Descrovi, Emiliano

    2016-08-01

    Azopolymers are known to exhibit a strong light responsivity known as athermal photofluidization. Although the underlying physics is still under debate, athermal photofluidization has been demonstrated to trigger mass-migration according to the polarization of a proper illumination light. Here, a polymer blend is proposed wherein a commercial azo-polyelectrolyte is mixed with a passive polymer. The blend is patterned as an array of micro-pillars that are individually exposed to visible laser illumination. Thanks to the interplay between the two blend components, a reversible and controlled deformation of the micro-pillars by periodically tuning the laser polarization in time is demonstrated. A reduced mobility of the azo-compound allows to repeatibly elongate and rotate micro-pillars along specific directions, with no significant material flow outisde the initial volume and no significant degradation of the structure morphology over several cycles. The proposed work suggests new degrees of freedom in controlling the mechanical features of micro-patterned light-responsive materials that can be usefully exploited in many application fields.

  12. A novel high performance SemiSJ-CSTBT with p-pillar under the bottom of the trench gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Hong, Chen; Ji, Tan; Shuojin, Lu; Yangjun, Zhu

    2016-08-01

    A novel high performance SemiSJ-CSTBT is proposed with the p-pillar under the bottom of the trench gate. The inserted p-pillar with the neighbouring n-drift region forms a lateral P/N junction, which can adjust the electric distribution in the forward-blocking mode to achieve a higher breakdown voltage compared to the conventional CSTBT. Also, the p-pillar can act as a hole collector at turn-off, which significantly enhances the turn-off speed and obtains a lower turn-off switching loss. Although the turn-off switching loss decreases as the depth of the p-pillar increases, there is no need for a very deep p-pillar. The associated voltage overshoot at turn-off increases dramatically with increasing the depth of p-pillar, which may cause destruction of the devices. Plus, this will add difficulty and cost to the manufacturing process of this new structure. Therefore, the proposed SemiSJ-CSTBT offers considerably better robustness compared to the conventional CSTBT and SJ-CSTBT. The simulation results show that the SemiSJ-CSTBT exhibits an increase in breakdown voltage by 160 V (13%) and a reduction of turn-off switching loss by approximately 15%. Project supported by the National Major Science and Technology Special Project of China (No. 2013ZX02305005-002) and the Major Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51490681).

  13. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XVII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine)

    SciTech Connect

    Potocnak, Ivan Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Kajnakova, Marcela; Radvakova, Alena; Steinborn, Dirk; Zvyagin, Sergei A.; Wosnitza, Jochen; Feher, Alexander

    2009-01-15

    The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {l_brace}[Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen){sub 2}]{sup 2+} units to form a chain-like structure along the a axis. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane belonging to two molecules of bidentate bmen ligands with average Cu-N distance of 2.043(18) A. The axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions at a longer axial Cu-N distance of 2.490(4) A. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k{sub B}=0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {l_brace}[Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}]{r_brace}{sub n} (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen){sub 2}]{sup 2+} units to form a chain-like structure. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k{sub B}=-0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen){sub 2}][Pt(CN){sub 4}] behaves as a two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling.

  14. DETAILED NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS ON THE FORMATION OF PILLARS AROUND H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2010-11-10

    We study the structural evolution of turbulent molecular clouds under the influence of ionizing radiation emitted from a nearby massive star by performing a high-resolution parameter study with the iVINE code. The temperature is taken to be 10 K or 100 K, the mean number density is either 100 cm{sup -3} or 300 cm{sup -3}. Furthermore, the turbulence is varied between Mach 1.5 and Mach 12.5, the main driving scale of the turbulence is varied between 1 pc and 8 pc. We vary the ionizing flux by an order of magnitude, corresponding to allowing between 0.5% and 5% of the mass in the domain to be ionized immediately. In our simulations, the ionizing radiation enhances the initial turbulent density distribution and thus leads to the formation of pillar-like structures observed adjacent to H II regions in a natural way. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly at the tips of the structures. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cold cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures formed. The most favorable regime for the formation of pillars is Mach 4-10. Structures and therefore stars only form if the initial density contrast between the high-density unionized gas and the gas that is going to be ionized is lower than the temperature contrast between the hot and the cold gas. The density of the resulting pillars is determined by a pressure equilibrium between the hot and the cold gas. A thorough analysis of the simulations shows that the complex kinematical and geometrical structure of the formed elongated filaments reflects that of observed pillars to an impressive level of detail. In addition, we find that the observed line-of-sight velocities allow for a distinct determination of different formation mechanisms. Comparing the current simulations to previous results and recent observations, we conclude that, e.g., the pillars of creation in M16 formed by the mechanism proposed here and not by the radiation driven

  15. Spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 3-acetylcoumarin-isonicotinoylhydrazone and their antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Chandrashekhar, V. M.; Muchchandi, I. S.

    2010-11-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with a new heterocyclic Schiff base derived by the condensation of isonicotinoylhydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin have been synthesized. 1H, 13C and 2D HETCOR NMR analyses confirm the formation of title compound and existence of the same in two isomeric forms. The metal complexes were characterized on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques like electronic, EPR, IR, 1H and 13C NMR studies, elemental analysis, magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis, and also by the aid of molar conductivity measurements. It is found that the Schiff base behaves as a monobasic tridentate ligand coordinating in the imidol form with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry. Trigonal bipyramidal geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, while tetrahedral for Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity screening using serial broth dilution method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) is determined. Zn(II) complex has shown significant antifungal activity with an MIC of 6.25 μg/mL while Cu(II) complex is noticeable for antibacterial activity at the same concentration. Anti-TB activity of the ligand has enhanced on complexation with Co(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  16. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography

    PubMed Central

    Adie, Steven G.; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F.; John, Renu; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  17. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  18. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response. PMID:21164898

  19. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  20. Characterization of spiral ganglion neurons cultured on silicon micro-pillar substrates for new auditory neuro-electronic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattotti, M.; Micholt, L.; Braeken, D.; Kovačić, D.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. One of the strategies to improve cochlear implant technology is to increase the number of electrodes in the neuro-electronic interface. The objective was to characterize in vitro cultures of spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) cultured on surfaces of novel silicon micro-pillar substrates (MPS). Approach. SGN from P5 rat pups were cultured on MPS with different micro-pillar widths (1-5.6 μm) and spacings (0.6-15 μm) and were compared with control SGN cultures on glass coverslips by immunocytochemistry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main results. Overall, MPS support SGN growth equally well as the control glass surfaces. Micro-pillars of a particular size-range (1.2-2.4 μm) were optimal in promoting SGN presence, neurite growth and alignment. On this specific micro-pillar size, more SGN were present, and neurites were longer and more aligned. SEM pictures highlight how cells on micro-pillars with smaller spacings grow directly on top of pillars, while at wider spacings (from 3.2 to 15 μm) they grow on the bottom of the surface, losing contact guidance. Further, we found that MPS encourage more monopolar and bipolar SGN morphologies compared to the control condition. Finally, MPS induce longest neurite growth with minimal interaction of S100+ glial cells. Significance. These results indicate that silicon micro-pillar substrates create a permissive environment for the growth of primary auditory neurons promoting neurite sprouting and are a promising technology for future high-density three-dimensional CMOS-based auditory neuro-electronic interfaces.

  1. [Catalytic activity of TiO2 pillared bentonite for degradation of gaseous toluene: relationship between the effect of humidity and the catalyst structure].

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-jun; Chen, Xia-sheng; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xing-wang; Shen, Xue-you

    2008-12-01

    Titania pillared bentonite was prepared by the sol method. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption showed that the specific surface areas of the catalysts calcined at 573, 673 and 773 K were 140.15, 110.13 and 88.38 m2/g, respectively. Their catalytic activities were evaluated for the gas phase degradation of toluene. The effects of humidity on the activity were studied in a continuous system. Results indicated that competitive adsorption between toluene and water molecules occurred on the catalyst surface, thus the photoactivities decreased with the increasing humidity. The photodegradation matched well with the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) kinetic model, and the adsorption constants of water for the catalysts calcined at 573, 673, and 773 K were 2.8 x 10(-5) , 4.1 x 10(-5) and 1.8 x 10(-4) m3 x mg(-1), respectively. The photoactivity of the catalyst calcined at 573 K was worst under low humidity but was best under high humidity compared with those of the catalysts calcined at 673 K and 773 K, suggesting it was most capable of resisting the impact of humidity. The thermal desorption was adopted to analyse the adsorption capability of toluene on catalysts. As the relative humidity increased from 25% to 75%, the adsorption amount of toluene for the catalysts calcined at 573, 673, and 773 K decreased from 184.8 to 3.25 microg/g, 130.5 to 1.92 microg/g, 77.6 to 1.65 microg/g, respectively. Adsorption capability of catalysts increased with the specific surface area, thus the apparent adsorption constant of water was reduced and the ability to resist the effect of humidity was enhanced. Experimental results indicate that during practical application of titania pillared bentonite for gaseous pollutants degradation, the environmental humidity and catalyst structure should be considered to screen out the catalyst with best activity.

  2. Nondestructive Handheld Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Analysis of Spectroscopic Changes and Multivariate Modeling of Thermally Degraded Plain Portland Cement Concrete and its Slag and Fly Ash-Based Analogs.

    PubMed

    Leung Tang, Pik; Alqassim, Mohammad; Nic Daéid, Niamh; Berlouis, Leonard; Seelenbinder, John

    2016-05-01

    Concrete is by far the world's most common construction material. Modern concrete is a mixture of industrial pozzolanic cement formulations and aggregate fillers. The former acts as the glue or binder in the final inorganic composite; however, when exposed to a fire the degree of concrete damage is often difficult to evaluate nondestructively. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy through techniques such as transmission, attenuated total reflectance, and diffuse reflectance have been rarely used to evaluate thermally damaged concrete. In this paper, we report on a study assessing the thermal damage of concrete via the use of a nondestructive handheld FT-IR with a diffuse reflectance sample interface. In situ measurements can be made on actual damaged areas, without the need for sample preparation. Separate multivariate models were developed to determine the equivalent maximal temperature endured for three common industrial concrete formulations. The concrete mixtures were successfully modeled displaying high predictive power as well as good specificity. This has potential uses in forensic investigation and remediation services particularly for fires in buildings.

  3. Chandra Observations of the Eagle Nebula. I. Embedded Young Stellar Objects near the Pillars of Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Gagné, Marc; Mytyk, Anna; McCaughrean, Mark; Andersen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    We present and analyze the first high-resolution X-ray images ever obtained of the Eagle Nebula star-forming region. On 2001 July 30 the Chandra X-Ray Observatory obtained a 78 ks image of the Eagle Nebula (M16) that includes the core of the young galactic cluster NGC 6611 and the dark columns of dust and cold molecular gas in M16 known as the ``Pillars of Creation.'' We find a total of 1101 X-ray sources in the 17'×17' ACIS-I field of view. Most of the X-ray sources are low-mass pre-main-sequence or high-mass main-sequence stars in this young cluster. A handful of hard X-ray sources in the pillars are spatially coincident with deeply embedded young stellar objects seen in high-resolution near-infrared images recently obtained with the VLT (McCaughrean & Andersen). In this paper, we focus on the 40 X-ray sources in and around pillars 1-4 at the heart of the Eagle Nebula. None of the X-ray sources are associated with the evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) first observed by Hester and coworkers) in HST WFPC2 images of M16, implying either that the EGGs do not contain protostars or that the protostars have not yet become X-ray active. Eight X-ray counts are coincident with the Herbig-Haro object HH 216, implying logLX~30.0.

  4. Uncertainty quantification based on pillars of experiment, theory, and computation. Part I: Data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elishakoff, I.; Sarlin, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a general methodology of analysis and design of systems involving uncertainties. Available experimental data is enclosed by some geometric figures (triangle, rectangle, ellipse, parallelogram, super ellipse) of minimum area. Then these areas are inflated resorting to the Chebyshev inequality in order to take into account the forecasted data. Next step consists in evaluating response of system when uncertainties are confined to one of the above five suitably inflated geometric figures. This step involves a combined theoretical and computational analysis. We evaluate the maximum response of the system subjected to variation of uncertain parameters in each hypothesized region. The results of triangular, interval, ellipsoidal, parallelogram, and super ellipsoidal calculi are compared with the view of identifying the region that leads to minimum of maximum response. That response is identified as a result of the suggested predictive inference. The methodology thus synthesizes probabilistic notion with each of the five calculi. Using the term "pillar" in the title was inspired by the News Release (2013) on according Honda Prize to J. Tinsley Oden, stating, among others, that "Dr. Oden refers to computational science as the "third pillar" of scientific inquiry, standing beside theoretical and experimental science. Computational science serves as a new paradigm for acquiring knowledge and informing decisions important to humankind". Analysis of systems with uncertainties necessitates employment of all three pillars. The analysis is based on the assumption that that the five shapes are each different conservative estimates of the true bounding region. The smallest of the maximal displacements in x and y directions (for a 2D system) therefore provides the closest estimate of the true displacements based on the above assumption.

  5. Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

    1997-08-01

    During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

  6. Synthesis of mesoporous iron-incorporated silica-pillared clay and catalytic performance for phenol hydroxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shengjun; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan; Mao, Huihui

    2013-11-01

    Fe-incorporated silica-pillared clays (Fe-SPCs) with ordered interlayer mesoporous structure have been synthesized through a new two-step procedure including the modification of the silica nano-pillars with potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) and successive calcination. X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray fluorescence analyses, diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra were used to characterize the structures and the synthesizing mechanism of Fe-SPCs. Results show that all iron species were tetrahedrally coordinated with the interlayer silica nano-pillars, and the cationic surfactant molecule plays an important role in the intercalation of tetraethoxysilane and the introduction of iron into the intragallery silica framework. Moreover, the structural parameters of Fe-SPC can be adjusted by controlling the concentration of K3Fe(CN)6, as the concentration of K3Fe(CN)6 increases from 1 M to 2 M, the gallery height of Fe-SPC increases from 2.51 to 2.66 nm, while the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, pore volume and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size decrease from 856 to 794 m2/g, 0.75 to 0.69 cm3/g, and 2.2 to 2.0 nm, respectively. The Fe-SPCs show good catalytic activity in phenol hydroxylation using H2O2 as oxidant (phenol:H2O2 = 1:1, water), specifically, the phenol conversion is 46.2%, and the selectivity of dihydroxybenzenes is 70.6% at 343 K.

  7. An interpenetrated pillared-layer MOF: Synthesis, structure, sorption and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Li-Na; Zhao, Yang; Hou, Lei; Cui, Lin; Wang, Hai-Hua; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2014-02-15

    A new three-dimensional porous framework [Co{sub 2}(bpdc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}bpz)]∙2(DMF)·5(H{sub 2}O) (1) (H{sub 2}bpdc=4,4′-biphenyldicarboxylic acid, H{sub 2}bpz=3,3′,5,5′-tetramethyl-4,4′-bipyrazole) has been solvothermally synthesized by employing mixed H{sub 2}bpdc and H{sub 2}bpz ligands. 1 is a pillared-layer framework based on a binuclear paddle-wheel Co{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C-R){sub 4} cluster, and exhibits a 2-fold interpenetrated 6-connected pcu topology. H{sub 2}bpz bridges Co{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C-R){sub 4} clusters with an angular coordination configuration to form interesting left- and right-handed helical chains. 1 possesses a two-dimensional porous system decorated by uncoordinated pyrazole –NH groups of H{sub 2}bpz, leading to high adsorption selectivities for CO{sub 2} over N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. In addition, the strong antiferromagnetic interactions between the Co{sup 2+} ions in cluster were observed. - Graphical abstract: A new pillared-layer porous framework has been constructed by paddle-wheel Co{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C-R){sub 4} cluster and H{sub 2}bpdc–H{sub 2}bpz mixed ligands, displaying adsorption selectivity and antiferromagnetic properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We present a new pillared-layer framework based on paddle-wheel Co{sub 2}(O{sub 2}C-R){sub 4} cluster. • The framework possesses a 2-fold interpenetrated pcu topology. • The framework displays adsorption selectivity and antiferromagnetic properties.

  8. A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays for cell isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Tao; Su, Qianhua; Yang, Zhaochu; Zhang, Yulong; Egeland, Eirik B.; Gu, Dan D.; Calabrese, Paolo; Kapiris, Matteo J.; Karlsen, Frank; Minh, Nhut T.; Wang, K.; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    A smart fully integrated micromachined separator with soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays has been developed and demonstrated, which can merely employ one independent lab-on-chip to realize cell isolation. The simulation, design, microfabrication and test for the new electromagnetic micro separator were executed. The simulation results of the electromagnetic field in the separator show that special soft magnetic micro-pillar arrays can amplify and redistribute the electromagnetic field generated by the micro-coils. The separator can be equipped with a strong magnetic field to isolate the target cells with a considerably low input current. The micro separator was fabricated by micro-processing technology. An electroplating bath was hired to deposit NiCo/NiFe to fabricate the micro-pillar arrays. An experimental system was set up to verify the function of the micro separator by isolating the lymphocytes, in which the human whole blood mixed with Dynabeads® FlowComp Flexi and monoclonal antibody MHCD2704 was used as the sample. The results show that the electromagnetic micro separator with an extremely low input current can recognize and capture the target lymphocytes with a high efficiency, the separation ratio reaching more than 90% at a lower flow rate. For the electromagnetic micro separator, there is no external magnetizing field required, and there is no extra cooling system because there is less Joule heat generated due to the lower current. The magnetic separator is totally reusable, and it can be used to separate cells or proteins with common antigens.

  9. Evaluation of newly installed SWEPOS mast stations, individual vs. type PCV antenna models and comparison with pillar stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Jivall, Lotti; Lilje, Christina; Steffen, Holger; Lidberg, Martin; Johansson, Jan; Jarlemark, Per

    2016-04-01

    For about two decades, SWEPOS (the Swedish Permanent GNSS network) pillar stations have been used in different geodetic and geodynamic studies. To keep continuous measurements of these long lived pillar stations and at the same time modernizing the SWEPOS network, it has been decided to install new truss mast stations, equipped with modern and individually calibrated antennas and radomes, capable of tracking all new GNSS satellites. Installation of mast stations started in 2011. Today, each pillar station in the SWEPOS permanent GNSS network has a close-by truss mast station, mostly in 10 meters distance with individual calibrated Leica choke ring antenna and its attachment (LEIAR25.R3, LEIT). Due to their closeness to pillars, the modern mast stations may provide additional information for the analysis of ground movements in Sweden e.g. to distinguish between tectonic and geodynamic processes (e.g. land uplift in Sweden). In this study, we have used two datasets from two different seasons for 21 pillars and 21 mast stations and formed different networks. The mast network has been processed using both IGS standard (type) and individually calibrated PCV (Phase Center Variation) models and therefore the effect of these two different PCV models on height components has been investigated. In a combined network, we processed all 42 stations (21 pillars+21 mast) to see how this multi-baseline network (861 baselines) combination differs from independent mast or pillar networks with much less baselines (210 baselines). For our analysis, we used the GAMIT-GLOBK software and compared different networks. Ambiguity resolutions, daily coordinate repeatability and differences between height components in different solutions are presented. Moreover, the GAMIT and BERNESE solutions for combined mast and pillar networks are compared. Our results suggest that the SWEPOS truss mast stations can reliably be used for crustal deformation studies. The comparison between pillar and mast

  10. Optimized 2D array of thin silicon pillars for efficient antireflective coatings in the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Proust, Julien; Fehrembach, Anne-Laure; Bedu, Frédéric; Ozerov, Igor; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-04-25

    Light reflection occuring at the surface of silicon wafers is drastically diminished by etching square pillars of height 110 nm and width 140 nm separated by a 100 nm gap distance in a square lattice. The design of the nanostructure is optimized to widen the spectral tolerance of the antireflective coatings over the visible spectrum for both fundamental polarizations. Angle and polarized resolved optical measurements report a light reflection remaining under 5% when averaged in the visible spectrum for both polarizations in a wide angular range. Light reflection remains almost insensitive to the light polarization even in oblique incidence.

  11. Optimized 2D array of thin silicon pillars for efficient antireflective coatings in the visible spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Julien; Fehrembach, Anne-Laure; Bedu, Frédéric; Ozerov, Igor; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Light reflection occuring at the surface of silicon wafers is drastically diminished by etching square pillars of height 110 nm and width 140 nm separated by a 100 nm gap distance in a square lattice. The design of the nanostructure is optimized to widen the spectral tolerance of the antireflective coatings over the visible spectrum for both fundamental polarizations. Angle and polarized resolved optical measurements report a light reflection remaining under 5% when averaged in the visible spectrum for both polarizations in a wide angular range. Light reflection remains almost insensitive to the light polarization even in oblique incidence. PMID:27109643

  12. Measurement of near-wall 3D flow velocity from wave-guiding micro-pillars.

    PubMed

    Bruecker, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    The measurement of near-wall flow in a plane close to the wall is achieved using the wave-guiding feature of transparent flexible micro-pillars which are attached in a 2D array to a surface and bend with the flow. Optical detection of bending from below the surface and application of auto-correlation methods provide mean and fluctuating part of the components of the wall-parallel velocity components. In addition, the wall-normal fluid motion is determined from spatial gradients in the array. The data provide the three-component velocity vector field in a plane close to the wall as well as their statistics.

  13. Wetting state and maximum spreading factor of microdroplets impacting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces with anisotropic arrays of pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dae Hee; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behaviors of microdroplets that impact on textured surfaces with various patterns of microscale pillars are experimentally investigated in this study. A piezoelectric inkjet is used to generate the microdroplets that have a diameter of less than 46 μm and a controlled Weber number. The impact and spreading dynamics of an individual droplet are captured by using a high-speed imaging system. The anisotropic and directional wettability and the wetting states on the textured surfaces with anisotropically arranged pillars are revealed for the first time in this study. The impalement transition from the Cassie-Baxter state to the partially impaled state is evaluated by balancing the wetting pressure P wet and the capillary pressure P C even on the anisotropic textured surfaces. The maximum spreading factor is measured and compared with the theoretical prediction to elucidate the wettability of the textured surfaces. For a given Weber number, the maximum spreading factor decreases as the texture area fraction of the textured surface decreases. In addition, the maximum spreading factors along the direction of longer inter-pillar spacing always have smaller values than those along the direction of shorter inter-pillar spacing when a droplet impacts on the anisotropic arrays of pillars.

  14. A new bioactive Schiff base ligands derived from propylazo-N-pyrimidin-2-yl-benzenesulfonamides Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes: Synthesis, thermal and spectroscopic characterization biological studies and 3D modeling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdelrazak M.; El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Abu-El-Wafa, Samy M.; Ahmed, Naglaa M.

    2012-11-01

    New series of Schiff base ligand H2L and their Cu(II) and Mn(II) complexes derived from azosulfapyrimidine were synthesized and characterized by elemental and thermal studies conductance measurements IR, electronic and EPR spectra. 3D modeling of the ligand indicate that azo group does not participate in complex formation and surface potential on one of the ligand under study indicate that electron density around azomethine groups are much higher than the azo group therefore coordination takes place around azomethine groups. The variety in the geometrical structures depends on the nature of both the metal ions and the Schiff base ligands. The thermo kinetic parameters are calculated and discussed. The biological activities of the ligands and complexes have been screened in vitro against some bacteria and fungi to study their capacity to inhibit their growth and to study the toxicity of the compounds.

  15. Saccharinato complexes of Ce(V) with 2-hydroxypyridine: Synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of [Ce(sac) 2(SO 4)(H 2O) 4] and [Ce(sac) 2(SO 4)(PyOH) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Müller, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of Ce(IV) complexes [Ce(sac) 2(SO 4)(H 2O) 4] ( 1) and [Ce(sac) 2 (SO 4)(PyOH) 2] ( 2) (sac = saccharinate, PyOH = 2-hydroxypyridine) starting with sodium saccharinate is described. Their vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H, 13C) spectra as well as their thermal mode of degradation were investigated. The data indicate that sac in complex 1 behaves as a monodentate ligand through the nitrogen atoms. Saccharinato ligand in complex 2 shows different mode of coordination, where it behaves as tridentate and binds Ce(IV) through its carbonylic oxygen, nitrogen and sulphonylic oxygen atoms. The most probable structure in complex 2 is that, units of [Ce(sac) 2(SO 4)(PyOH) 2] are linked by bridges of the O- of sac sulphonyl leading to polymeric chains.

  16. Saccharinato complexes of Ce(V) with 2-hydroxypyridine: synthesis, spectroscopic and thermal characteristics of [Ce(sac)2(SO4)(H2O)4] and [Ce(sac)2(SO4)(PyOH)2].

    PubMed

    Gaballa, Akmal S; Teleb, Said M; Müller, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    The synthesis of Ce(IV) complexes [Ce(sac)2(SO4)(H2O)4] (1) and [Ce(sac)2 (SO4)(PyOH)2] (2) (sac=saccharinate, PyOH=2-hydroxypyridine) starting with sodium saccharinate is described. Their vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H, 13C) spectra as well as their thermal mode of degradation were investigated. The data indicate that sac in complex 1 behaves as a monodentate ligand through the nitrogen atoms. Saccharinato ligand in complex 2 shows different mode of coordination, where it behaves as tridentate and binds Ce(IV) through its carbonylic oxygen, nitrogen and sulphonylic oxygen atoms. The most probable structure in complex 2 is that, units of [Ce(sac)2(SO4)(PyOH)2] are linked by bridges of the O- of sac sulphonyl leading to polymeric chains. PMID:18077205

  17. Spectroscopic, Elemental and Thermal Analysis, and Positron Annihilation Studies on Ca(II), Sr(II), Ba(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) Penicillin G Potassium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, M. S.; Sharshara, T.

    2015-11-01

    The [Pb(Pin)2] · 3H2O, [M(Pin)(H2O)2(Cl)] · nH2O (M = SrII, CaII or BaII; n = 0-1), and [Fe(Pin)2(Cl)(H2O)] · H2O penicillin G potassium (Pin) complexes were synthesized and characterized using elemental analyses, molar conductivity, thermal analysis and electronic spectroscopy techniques. The positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) and Doppler broadening (DB) techniques have been employed to probe the defects and structural changes of Pin ligand and its complexes. The PAL and DB line-shape parameters were discussed in terms of the structure, molecular weight, ligand-metal molar ratio, and other properties of the Pin complexes.

  18. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and antimicrobial studies of some novel metal complexes of Schiff base derived from [ N1-(4-methoxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl)sulfanilamide] and 2-thiophene carboxaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaby, Carmen M.

    2007-04-01

    Keeping in view the chemotherapeutic of the sulfa-drugs, Schiff base namely 2-thiophene carboxaldehyde-sulfametrole (HL) and its tri-positive and di-positive metal complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, mass spectra, UV-vis and thermal analysis (TGA and DrTG). The low molar conductance values suggest the non-electrolytic nature of these complexes. IR spectra show that HL is coordinated to the metal ions in a tetradentate manner through hetero five-membered ring-S and azomethine-N, enolic sulfonamide-OH and thiadiazole-N, respectively. Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO 2(II) complexes are found to be diamagnetic (as expected). The proposed general formulae of the prepared complexes are [M 2X 4(HL)(H 2O) 4] (where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II), X = Cl, [Fe 2Cl 6(HL)(H 2O) 2], [(FeSO 4) 2(HL)(H 2O) 4] and [(UO 2) 2(HL) (NO 3) 4]·H 2O. The thermal behaviour of these chelates shows that the hydrated complexes loss water of hydration in first step in case of uranium complexes followed loss coordinated water followed immediately by decomposition of the anions and ligand molecules in the subsequent steps. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as Δ E*, Δ H*, Δ S*, and Δ G* are calculated from the DrTG curves using Coats-Redfern method. The antimicrobial activity of the obtained products was performed using Chloramphenicol and Grisofluvine as standards, indicate that in some cases metallation increase activity than the ligand.

  19. Effect of sulfuric acid concentration of bentonite and calcination time of pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara, Ady; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryati, Wega; Mudasir

    2016-04-01

    An activation of natural clay has been developed. Activation was applied by refluxing the natural bentonite in variation of the sulfuric acid concentration and calcination time of pillared bentonite (PLC). Calcination was applied using oven in microwave 2,45 GHz. Determination of acidity was applied by measuring the amount of adsorbed ammonia and pyridine. Morphological, functional groups and chrystanility characterizations were analyzed using SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD. Porosity was analyzed using SSA. The results showed that the greater of the concentration of sulfuric acid and calcination time was, the greater the acidity of bentonite as well as the pore diameter were. FTIR spectra showed no fundamental changes in the structure of the natural bentonite, SEM, and TEM images were showing an increase in space or field due to pillarization while the XRD patterns showed a shift to a lower peak. Optimization was obtained at a concentration of 2 M of sulfuric acid and calcination time of 20 minutes, keggin ion of 2.2 and suspension of 10 mmol, respectively each amounted to 11.7490 mmol/gram of ammonia and 2.4437 mmol/gram of pyridine with 154.6391 m2/gram for surface area, 0.130470 m3/gram of pore volume and 3.37484 nm of pore diameter.

  20. Morphology dependent field emission characteristics of ZnS/silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Li; Zhao, Cheng Zhou; Kang, Li Ping; Liu, De Wei; Zhao, Hui Chun; Hao, Shan Peng; Zhang, Yuan Kai; Chen, Zhen Ping; Li, Xin Jian

    2016-10-01

    Through depositing zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticals on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) and crater-shaped silicon nanoporous pillar array (c-Si-NPA) by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method, ZnS/Si-NPA and c-ZnS/Si-NPA were prepared and the field emission (FE) properties of them were investigated. The turn-on electric fields of were 3.8 V/mm for ZnS/Si-NPA and 5.0 V/mm for c-ZnS/Si-NPA, respectively. The lower turn-on electric fields of ZnS/Si-NPA than that of c-ZnS/Si-NPA were attributed to the different electric distribution of the field emitters causing by the different surface morphology of the two samples, which was further demonstrated via the simulated results by finite element modeling. The FN curves for the ZnS/Si-NPA showed two-slope behavior. All the results indicate that the morphology play an important role in the FE properties and designing an appropriate top morphology for the emitter is a very efficient way to improve the FE performance.

  1. Field emission from zinc oxide nanorod bundles grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Li; Gong, Shang Dong; Wu, Li Hong; Li, Xin Jian

    2013-04-01

    A large-area zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod bundle array was grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) substrate by a chemical vapor deposition method, and its field-emission properties was studied. The structural characterization disclosed that the bundles were composed of hexagonal ZnO nanorods growing along c-axis and taking roots into the silicon pillars of Si-NPA. The average diameter and length of the ZnO nanorods were ∼145 nm and ∼10 μm, respectively. The field-emission measurements showed that the turn-on field of ZnO/Si-NPA was 4.6 V/μm with an emission current density (ECD) of 1 μA/cm2, and an ECD of 420 μA/cm2 was achieved at an applied field of 8.89 V/μm. The field enhancement factor was calculated to be ∼1700 based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory. According to the obtained charge coupled device (CCD) image, the density and brightness of the emission dots increased with the applied field, and the high emission dot density was attributed to the formation of a large number of ZnO nanorod emitting tips. Our results indicated that ZnO/Si-NPA might be a promising electron emission source.

  2. Bifurcation and chaos in spin-valve pillars in a periodic applied magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Murugesh, S; Lakshmanan, M

    2009-12-01

    We study the bifurcation and chaos scenario of the macromagnetization vector in a homogeneous nanoscale-ferromagnetic thin film of the type used in spin-valve pillars. The underlying dynamics is described by a generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The LLG equation has an especially appealing form under a complex stereographic projection, wherein the qualitative equivalence of an applied field and a spin-current induced torque is transparent. Recently, chaotic behavior of such a spin vector has been identified by Li et al. [ Phys. Rev. B 74, 054417 (2006)] using a spin-polarized current passing through the pillar of constant polarization direction and periodically varying magnitude, owing to the spin-transfer torque effect. In this paper, we show that the same dynamical behavior can be achieved using a periodically varying applied magnetic field in the presence of a constant dc magnetic field and constant spin current, which is technically much more feasible, and demonstrate numerically the chaotic dynamics in the system for an infinitely thin film. Further, it is noted that in the presence of a nonzero crystal anisotropy field, chaotic dynamics occurs at much lower magnitudes of the spin current and dc applied field.

  3. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between H II Regions and Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Akira; Kane, Jave O.; Pound, Marc W.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Takabe, Hideaki

    2006-08-01

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly, the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm H I region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regime does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and of the density in the H II region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  4. Formation of Pillars at the Boundaries between HII Regions and Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J O; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D; Takabe, H

    2006-04-20

    We investigate numerically the hydrodynamic instability of an ionization front (IF) accelerating into a molecular cloud, with imposed initial perturbations of different amplitudes. When the initial amplitude is small, the imposed perturbation is completely stabilized and does not grow. When the initial perturbation amplitude is large enough, roughly the ratio of the initial amplitude to wavelength is greater than 0.02, portions of the IF temporarily separate from the molecular cloud surface, locally decreasing the ablation pressure. This causes the appearance of a large, warm HI region and triggers nonlinear dynamics of the IF. The local difference of the ablation pressure and acceleration enhances the appearance and growth of a multimode perturbation. The stabilization usually seen at the IF in the linear regimes does not work due to the mismatch of the modes of the perturbations at the cloud surface and in density in HII region above the cloud surface. Molecular pillars are observed in the late stages of the large amplitude perturbation case. The velocity gradient in the pillars is in reasonably good agreement with that observed in the Eagle Nebula. The initial perturbation is imposed in three different ways: in density, in incident photon number flux, and in the surface shape. All cases show both stabilization for a small initial perturbation and large growth of the second harmonic by increasing amplitude of the initial perturbation above a critical value.

  5. The Eagle Nebula: Pillars of Creation, EGGs, and PMS Stars in NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Gagne, M.; Mytyk, A.; McCaughrean, M.; Andersen, M.

    2006-12-01

    We report on our 78 ks Chandra ACIS-I observation of the Eagle Nebula (M16) and the young cluster NGC 6611. We detected a total of 1101 X-ray sources, most of which are PMS stars in the cluster. Near the tip of the one of the Pillars of Creation, we detect a luminous X-ray source M16ES-1 which we believe is a high mass embedded protostar perhaps heated by magnetically channeled wind shocks. We detected no X-rays from the EGGs, the evaporating gaseous globules first observed in a WFPC2 image by Hester et al. (1996) near the edges of the Pillars. The EGGs could contain condensations that are very early stages of low mass star formation. The nondetection of EGGs with embedded infrared sources at X-ray luminosities well below the low-mass PMS stars in Orion indicates either that the EGGs do not contain protostars or that at the very early stage of evolution low-mass protostars have not yet become X-ray active. We also report on the X-ray properties of the YSOs in NGC 6611 and compare their properties to the YSOs in the Orion Nebula Cluster and other young clusters. This work is supported by NASA through grant H-04630D to the University of Colorado.

  6. Synthesis and field emission of β-SiC nanowires on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Zijiong; Kang, Liping; Li, Xinjian

    2012-10-01

    Nonaligned β-SiC nanowires (nw-SiC) were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method with nickel as the catalyst. The curly hair like SiC nanowires and the silicon pillar array formed a nanometer-micron hierarchy structure. The field-emission measurements to nw-SiC/Si-NPA showed that a lower turn-on field of 2.9 V μm-1 was obtained, and the enhancement factor of nw-SiC/Si-NPA according to the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory reached 5200. The excellent field-emission performance was attributed to the nanometer-micron hierarchy structure of nw-SiC/Si-NPA, including the high aspect ratio of the SiC nanowires and the regular surface undulation of Si-NPA which increased the emission sites density and might have reduced the electrostatic shielding among the emitters.

  7. Writing and functionalisation of suspended DNA nanowires on superhydrophobic pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Miele, Ermanno; Accardo, Angelo; Falqui, Andrea; Marini, Monica; Giugni, Andrea; Leoncini, Marco; De Angelis, Francesco; Krahne, Roman; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Nanowire arrays and networks with precisely controlled patterns are very interesting for innovative device concepts in mesoscopic physics. In particular, DNA templates have proven to be versatile for the fabrication of complex structures that obtained functionality via combinations with other materials, for example by functionalisation with molecules or nanoparticles, or by coating with metals. Here, the controlled motion of the a three-phase contact line (TCL) of DNA-loaded drops on superhydrophobic substrates is used to fabricate suspended nanowire arrays. In particular, the deposition of DNA wires is imaged in situ, and different patterns are obtained on hexagonal pillar arrays by controlling the TCL velocity and direction. Robust conductive wires and networks are achieved by coating the wires with a thin layer of gold, and as proof of concept conductivity measurements are performed on single suspended wires. The plastic material of the superhydrophobic pillars ensures electrical isolation from the substrate. The more general versatility of these suspended nanowire networks as functional templates is outlined by fabricating hybrid organic-metal-semiconductor nanowires by growing ZnO nanocrystals onto the metal-coated nanowires.

  8. Percolation and diffusion in two-dimensional microporous media: Pillared clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Kim, H.; Mahanti, S. D.; Pinnavaia, T. J.; Cai, Z. X.

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated the adsorptive and diffusive properties of N2, H2O, and rare gas atoms (Ar and He) in the pillared layered silicate clay systems [Cr(en)3+3]x[Co(en)3+2-(en)]1-x-L, where L is vermiculite (V), fluorohectorite (FHT), or montmorillonite (M), and (en) is an ethylenediamine ligand. In these mixed ion intercalates the intercalated [Cr(en)3+3] cation, where all three en ligands are coordinated to chromium, represents a laterally small pillaring agent, whereas [Co(en)3+2-en] represents a laterally large, ligand-dissociated species. Such systems are excellent models for two-dimensional microporous media. Adsorption measurements were carried out for N2, H2O, and Ar and diffusion studies were performed using simulation methods for both Ar and He. We find that the adsorptive and diffusive properties depend sensitively on the size of the diffusing species and the concentrations x and (1-x) of the intercalants. For Ar adsorption in the FHT system we observe a percolative response when x reaches 0.79. Using simple geometrical models to describe these microporous media, along with computer simulation, we can understand the x=0.79 percolation threshold. In addition, simulation studies of the relative diffusion rates of He and Ar for x=0 and 1, and comparison of these rates with experimental measurements by Zhou and Solin, suggest that He diffusion near narrow constrictions may be strongly suppressed by quantum effects.

  9. Writing and functionalisation of suspended DNA nanowires on superhydrophobic pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Miele, Ermanno; Accardo, Angelo; Falqui, Andrea; Marini, Monica; Giugni, Andrea; Leoncini, Marco; De Angelis, Francesco; Krahne, Roman; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Nanowire arrays and networks with precisely controlled patterns are very interesting for innovative device concepts in mesoscopic physics. In particular, DNA templates have proven to be versatile for the fabrication of complex structures that obtained functionality via combinations with other materials, for example by functionalisation with molecules or nanoparticles, or by coating with metals. Here, the controlled motion of the a three-phase contact line (TCL) of DNA-loaded drops on superhydrophobic substrates is used to fabricate suspended nanowire arrays. In particular, the deposition of DNA wires is imaged in situ, and different patterns are obtained on hexagonal pillar arrays by controlling the TCL velocity and direction. Robust conductive wires and networks are achieved by coating the wires with a thin layer of gold, and as proof of concept conductivity measurements are performed on single suspended wires. The plastic material of the superhydrophobic pillars ensures electrical isolation from the substrate. The more general versatility of these suspended nanowire networks as functional templates is outlined by fabricating hybrid organic-metal-semiconductor nanowires by growing ZnO nanocrystals onto the metal-coated nanowires. PMID:25131422

  10. Large spin current injection in nano-pillar-based lateral spin valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kohei; Kimura, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the influence of the injection of a large pure spin current on a magnetization process of a non-locally located ferromagnetic dot in nano-pillar-based lateral spin valves. Here, we prepared two kinds of the nano-pillar-type lateral spin valve based on Py nanodots and CoFeAl nanodots fabricated on a Cu film. In the Py/Cu lateral spin valve, although any significant change of the magnetization process of the Py nanodot has not been observed at room temperature. The magnetization reversal process is found to be modified by injecting a large pure spin current at 77 K. Switching the magnetization by the nonlocal spin injection has also been demonstrated at 77 K. In the CoFeAl/Cu lateral spin valve, a room temperature spin valve signal was strongly enhanced from the Py/Cu lateral spin valve because of the highly spin-polarized CoFeAl electrodes. The room temperature nonlocal switching has been demonstrated in the CoFeAl/Cu lateral spin valve.

  11. Attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of surface-fixed micro-pillars by human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Moerke, Caroline; Mueller, Petra; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Cells are sensitive to their underlying micro- and nano-topography, but the complex interplay is not completely understood especially if sharp edges and ridges of stochastically modified surfaces interfere with an attached cell body. Micro-topography offers cues that evoke a large range of cell responses e.g. altered adhesion behavior and integrin expression resulting in disturbed cell functions. In this study, we analyzed why osteoblastic cells mimic the underlying geometrical micro-pillar structure (5 × 5 × 5 μm, spacing of 5 μm) with their actin cytoskeleton. Interestingly, we discovered an attempted caveolae-mediated phagocytosis of each micro-pillar beneath the cells, which was accompanied by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and reduced intracellular ATP levels. This energy consuming process hampered the cells in their function as osteoblasts at the interface. The raft-dependent/caveolae-mediated phagocytic pathway is regulated by diverse cellular components including caveolin-1 (Cav-1), cholesterol, actin cytoskeleton as well as actin-binding proteins like annexin A2 (AnxA2). Our results show a new aspect of osteoblast-material interaction and give insight into how cells behave on extraordinary micro-structures. We conclude that stochastically structured implants used in orthopedic surgery should avoid any topographical heights which induce phagocytosis to prevent their successful ingrowth.

  12. Integrating Continuing Professional Development With Health System Reform: Building Pillars of Support.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical failures sparked a widespread desire for health system reform at the beginning of the 21st century, but related efforts have resulted in changes that are either slow or nonexistent. In response, academic medicine has moved in two directions: (1) system-wide reform using electronic health records, practice networks, and widespread data applications (a macro pathway); and (2) professional development of individual clinicians through continuous performance improvement (a micro pathway). Both pathways exist to improve patient care and population health, yet each suffers from limitations in widespread implementation. The authors call for a better union between these two parallel pathways through four pillars of support: (1) an acknowledgment that both pathways are essential to each other and to the final outcome they intend to achieve, (2) a strong faculty commitment to educate about quality improvement and patient safety at all education levels, (3) a reengineering of tools for professional development to serve as effective change agents, and (4) the development of standards to sustain this alignment of pathways. With these pillars of support integrating continuing professional development with health system reform, the authors envision a better functioning system, with improved metrics and value to enhance patient care and population health. PMID:26556296

  13. Integrating Continuing Professional Development With Health System Reform: Building Pillars of Support.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

    2016-01-01

    Clinical failures sparked a widespread desire for health system reform at the beginning of the 21st century, but related efforts have resulted in changes that are either slow or nonexistent. In response, academic medicine has moved in two directions: (1) system-wide reform using electronic health records, practice networks, and widespread data applications (a macro pathway); and (2) professional development of individual clinicians through continuous performance improvement (a micro pathway). Both pathways exist to improve patient care and population health, yet each suffers from limitations in widespread implementation. The authors call for a better union between these two parallel pathways through four pillars of support: (1) an acknowledgment that both pathways are essential to each other and to the final outcome they intend to achieve, (2) a strong faculty commitment to educate about quality improvement and patient safety at all education levels, (3) a reengineering of tools for professional development to serve as effective change agents, and (4) the development of standards to sustain this alignment of pathways. With these pillars of support integrating continuing professional development with health system reform, the authors envision a better functioning system, with improved metrics and value to enhance patient care and population health.

  14. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  15. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  16. CWPO of 4-CP and industrial wastewater with Al-Fe pillared clays.

    PubMed

    Molina, C B; Zazo, J A; Casas, J A; Rodriguez, J J

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts based on pillared clays with Al-Fe have been synthesised from a commercial bentonite and tested for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of aqueous 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) solution and industrial wastewater from cosmetics manufacture. The effect of the synthesis procedure, the iron load and reaction temperature on the catalytic activity was studied using 4-CP as target compound. A lower temperature in the preparation of the pillaring solution, as well as a higher Fe load, gave rise to a higher catalytic activity, but also a higher leaching of the active phase. The best catalyst, in terms of catalytic activity, was also tested for treating cosmetic wastewater by CWPO. Experiments were carried out at 90 degrees C and atmospheric pressure and the influence of Fe load, catalyst concentration and H(2)O(2)/COD ratio (between 0.5 and 2 times the stoichiometric ratio) were analysed. Higher values of these parameters favour COD reduction. The Fe leaching in all cases was lower than 1.2 mg/L, indicating that these catalysts have a high stability under these experimental conditions. PMID:20389016

  17. All-solid-state lithium organic battery with composite polymer electrolyte and pillar[5]quinone cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Meiling; Guo, Dongsheng; Shi, Jifu; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2014-11-26

    The cathode capacity of common lithium ion batteries (LIBs) using inorganic electrodes and liquid electrolytes must be further improved. Alternatively, all-solid-state lithium batteries comprising the electrode of organic compounds can offer much higher capacity. Herein, we successfully fabricated an all-solid-state lithium battery based on organic pillar[5]quinone (C35H20O10) cathode and composite polymer electrolyte (CPE). The poly(methacrylate) (PMA)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-LiClO4-3 wt % SiO2 CPE has an optimum ionic conductivity of 0.26 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, pillar[5]quinine cathode in all-solid-state battery rendered an average operation voltage of ∼2.6 V and a high initial capacity of 418 mAh g(-1) with a stable cyclability (94.7% capacity retention after 50 cycles at 0.2C rate) through the reversible redox reactions of enolate/quinonid carbonyl groups, showing favorable prospect for the device application with high capacity.

  18. Pillared Graphene: A New 3-D Innovative Network Nanostructure Augments Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgios, Dimitrakakis K.; Emmanuel, Tylianakis; George, Froudakis E.

    2009-08-01

    Nowadays, people have turned into finding an alternative power source for everyday applications. One of the most promising energy fuels is hydrogen. It can be used as an energy carrier at small portable devices (e.g. laptops and/or cell phones) up to larger, like cars. Hydrogen is considered as the perfect fuel. It can be burnt in combustion engines and the only by-product is water. For hydrogen-powered vehicles a big liming factor is the gas tank and is the reason for not using widely hydrogen in automobile applications. According to United States' Department of Energy (D.O.E.) the target for reversible hydrogen storage in mobile applications is 6% wt. and 45 gr. H2/L and these should be met by 2010. After their synthesis Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) were considered as ideal candidates for hydrogen storage especially after some initially incorrect but invitingly results. As it was proven later, pristine carbon nanotubes cannot achieve D.O.E.'s targets in ambient conditions of pressure and temperature. Therefore, a way to increase their hydrogen storage capacity should be found. An attempt was done by doping CNTs with alkali metal atoms. Although the results were promising, even that increment was not enough. Consequently, new architectures were suggested as materials that could potentially enhance hydrogen storage. In this work a novel three dimensional (3-D) nanoporous carbon structure called Pillared Graphene (Figure 1) is proposed for augmented hydrogen storage in ambient conditions. Pillared Graphene consists of parallel graphene sheets and CNTs that act like pillars and support the graphene sheets. The entire structure (Figure 1) can be resembled like a building in its early stages of construction, where the floors are represented by graphene sheets and the pillars are the CNTs. As shown in Figure 1, CNTs do not penetrate the structure from top to bottom. Instead, they alternately go up and down, so that on the same plane do not exist two neighboring CNTs with the

  19. Synthesis and characterization of TiO2-pillared Romanian clay and their application for azoic dyes photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Dvininov, E; Popovici, E; Pode, R; Cocheci, L; Barvinschi, P; Nica, V

    2009-08-15

    The synthesis and properties of metal oxide pillared cationic clays (PILCs) has been subject to numerous studies in the last decades. In order to obtain TiO(2)-pillared type materials, sodium montmorillonite from Romania-areal of Valea Chioarului, having the following composition (% wt): SiO(2)-72.87; Al(2)O(3)-14.5; MgO-2.15; Fe(2)O(3)-1.13; Na(2)O-0.60; K(2)O-0.60; CaO-0.90; PC-5.70 and cation exchange capacity, determined by ammonium acetate method, of 82 meq/100g, as matrix, was used. Sodium form of the clay was modified, primarily, by intercalation of cetyl-trimethylammonium cations between negatively charged layers which will lead to the expansion of the interlayer space. For the preparation of the TiO(2)-pillared clay, the alkoxide molecules, as titania precursor, were adsorbed onto/into clay samples (1 mmol Ti/g clay), in hydrochloric acid environment, the resulted species being converted into TiO(2) pillars by calcination. The as-prepared materials have been used as catalysts for Congo Red dye photodegradation, under UV. The photocatalytic activity of the pillared clays is a function of TiO(2) pillars size, their increase leading to the enhancement of the contact areas between dye solution and photoactive species present in the interlayer space. The structural characteristics and properties of the obtained materials were investigated by X-ray Diffraction, Thermogravimetry Analysis, UV-vis Diffuse Reflectance, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis. PMID:19250741

  20. Preparation, spectroscopic and thermal characterization of new La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) complexes of enalapril maleate drug. In vitro antimicrobial assessment studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Al-Azab, Fathi M.; Al-Maydama, Hussein M. A.; Amin, Ragab R.; Jamil, Yasmin M. S.

    2014-02-01

    The 1:1 M ratio metal complexes of enalapril maleate hypertensive drug with La(III), Ce(III), Sm(III) and Y(III) were synthesized. The suggested structures of the resulted complexes based on the results of elemental analyses, molar conductivity, (infrared, UV-visible and fluorescence) spectra, effective magnetic moment, thermal analysis (TG), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were discussed. The infrared spectral data were suggested that enalapril reacts with metal ions as an ionic bidentate ligand through its carboxylate oxygen and the amide carbonyl oxygen, but in case of the Sm(III) complex, it reacted as a monodentate through its amide carbonyl oxygen. Maleate moiety acts with all these metals as bidentate ligand through its carboxylate or carbonyl oxygen. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters such as: Ea, ΔH*, ΔS* and ΔG* were estimated from the DTG curves. The antibacterial evaluation of the enalapril maleate and their complexes were also performed against some gram positive and negative bacteria as well as fungi.

  1. Preparation, spectroscopic, thermal, antihepatotoxicity, hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacity characterizations of Cd(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) mononuclear complexes of paracetamol anti-inflammatory drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-10-01

    Keeping in view that some metal complexes are found to be more potent than their parent drugs, therefore, our present paper aimed to synthesized Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) complexes of paracetamol (Para) anti-inflammatory drug. Paracetamol complexes with general formula [M(Para)2(H2O)2]·nH2O have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, conductivity, IR and thermal (TG/DTG), 1H NMR, electronic spectral studies. The conductivity data of these complexes have non-electrolytic nature. Comparative antimicrobial (bacteria and fungi) behaviors and molecular weights of paracetamol with their complexes have been studied. In vivo the antihepatotoxicity effect and some liver function parameters levels (serum total protein, ALT, AST, and LDH) were measured. Hematological parameters and liver antioxidant capacities of both Para and their complexes were performed. The Cd2+ + Para complex was recorded amelioration of antioxidant capacities in liver homogenates compared to other Para complexes treated groups.

  2. Analytical determination of the constitutive behavior from micro-pillar testing: Application to a tempered martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchuk, N. Spätig, P.; Seifert, H.-P.

    2014-04-15

    Micro-compression experiments were carried out on micro-pillars, with nominal diameter of 10 μm and height 20 μm, and fabricated from a high-chromium tempered martensitic steels developed for nuclear applications. An analytical method was proposed to calculate the imposed compressive displacement on the pillar that allows determining the constitutive behavior up to about 5% of plastic strain. The experimental micro-compression curves were showed to be adequately modeled by the finite element simulations, which were used to validate the main assumption considered for the analytical model development.

  3. Quantitative constraints on the growth of submarine lava pillars from a monitoring instrument that was caught in a lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, William W.

    2003-11-01

    Lava pillars are hollow, vertical chimneys of solid basaltic lava that are common features within the collapsed interiors of submarine sheet flows on intermediate and fast spreading mid-ocean ridges. They are morphologically similar to lava trees that form on land when lava overruns forested areas, but the sides of lava pillars are covered with distinctive, evenly spaced, thin, horizontal lava crusts, referred to hereafter as "lava shelves." Lava stalactites up to 5 cm long on the undersides of these shelves are evidence that cavities filled with a hot vapor phase existed temporarily beneath each crust. During the submarine eruption of Axial Volcano in 1998 on the Juan de Fuca Ridge a monitoring instrument, called VSM2, became embedded in the upper crust of a lava flow that produced 3- to 5-m-high lava pillars. A pressure sensor in the instrument showed that the 1998 lobate sheet flow inflated 3.5 m and then drained out again in only 2.5 hours. These data provide the first quantitative constraints on the timescale of lava pillar formation and the rates of submarine lava flow inflation and drainback. They also allow comparisons to lava flow inflation rates observed on land, to theoretical models of crust formation on submarine lava, and to previous models of pillar formation. A new model is presented for the rhythmic formation of alternating lava crusts and vapor cavities to explain how stacks of lava shelves are formed on the sides of lava pillars during continuous lava drainback. Each vapor cavity is created between a stranded crust and the subsiding lava surface. A hot vapor phase forms within each cavity as seawater is syringed through tiny cracks in the stranded crust above. Eventually, the subsiding lava causes the crust above to fail, quenching the hot cavity and forming the next lava crust. During the 1998 eruption at Axial Volcano, this process repeated itself about every 2 min during the 81-min-long drainback phase of the eruption, based on the thickness

  4. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [CuL {sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] complexes (L=ethylenediamine or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine)

    SciTech Connect

    Potocnak, Ivan . E-mail: ivan.potocnak@upjs.sk; Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Tibenska, Katarina; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Steinborn, Dirk; Wagner, Christoph; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla; Schmidt, Harry; Muller, Thomas; Orendac, Martin; Feher, Alexander

    2006-07-15

    Violet crystals of [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] and blue crystals of [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] were crystallized from the water-methanol solution containing CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, ethylenediamine (en) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (dmen) and K{sub 2}[Pt(China){sub 4}].3H{sub 2}O. Both compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, infrared and UV-VIS spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, specific heat measurements and thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis revealed chain-like structure in both compounds. The covalent chains are built of Cu(II) ions linked by [Pt(China){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions in the [111] and [101] direction, respectively. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane from two molecules of bidentate ligands L with average Cu-N distance of 2.022(2) and 2.049(4) A, respectively. Axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(China){sub 4}]{sup 2-} anions at longer Cu-N distance of 2.537(2) and 2.600(5) A, respectively. Both materials are characterized by the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] behaves as two-dimensional (2D) spatially anisotropic square lattice Heisenberg magnet, while more pronounced influence of interlayer coupling is observed in [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}]. - Graphical abstract: Chain-like structure in [Cu(en){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] (R=H) and [Cu(dmen){sub 2}][Pt(China){sub 4}] (R=CH{sub 3}) compounds.

  5. Thermal behaviour, surface properties and vibrational spectroscopic studies of the synthesized Co3xNi3-3x(PO4)2·8H2O (0 ≤ x ≤ 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullyakool, Saifon; Danvirutai, Chanaiporn; Siriwong, Khatcharin; Noisong, Pittayagorn

    2013-10-01

    Co3xNi3-3x(PO4)2·8H2O (x = 1, 0.8, 0.6, 0.4, 0.2, and 0) were synthesized via simple wet chemical reaction and energy saving route method. The final decomposition products of hydrates are corresponding anhydrous tri(cobalt nickel) diphosphates. The metal and water contents of the synthesized hydrates were confirmed by AAS and TG/DTG/DTA techniques, respectively. The observed metal and water contents agree well with the formula of the title compounds. The crystal structures and lattice parameters as well as crystallite sizes of the studied compounds were determined using XRD data. The results from XRD and TG/DTG/DTA techniques confirmed that Co3xNi3-3x(PO4)2·8H2O at all ratios were the single phase. The FTIR spectra of studied compounds were recorded and assigned. The thermal behaviours of single and binary tri(cobalt nickel) diphosphate octahydrates were studied for the first time. The morphologies of the studied compounds were investigated by using the SEM technique. The micrographs of all studied compounds exhibited the thin plated morphology. The surface area and the pore size data of anhydrous forms were measured by N2 adsorption at -190 °C according to the BET method. The anhydrous forms of binary metal phosphate at x = 0.8, Co2.4Ni0.6(PO4)2, exhibits the highest surface area and expects to improve the catalytic activity.

  6. Ligational behavior of clioquinol antifungal drug towards Ag(I), Hg(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III) metal ions: Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal, morphological and antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a synthesis, characterization, theoretical and biological (anti-bacterial, and anti-fugal) evaluation studies of Ag(I), Hg(II), Cr(III) and Fe(III) complexes of clioquinol (CQ) drug ligand. Structures of the titled complexes cited herein were discussed using elemental analyses and spectral measurements e.g., IR, 1H NMR, and electronic studies. The results confirmed the formation of the clioquinol complexes by three molar ratios (1:1) for Ag(I), (1:2) for Hg(II) and (1:3) for both Cr(III) and Fe(III) metal ions. The clioquinol reacts as a bidentate chelate bound to all respected metal ions through the oxygen and nitrogen of quinoline-8-ol. The metal(II) ions coordinated to clioquinol ligand through deprotonation of sbnd OH terminal group. Infrared and 1H NMR spectral data confirm that coordination is via the oxygen of phenolic group and nitrogen atom of quinoline moiety. The molar conductance measurements of the CQ complexes in DMSO correspond to be non-electrolyte nature. Thus, these complexes may be formulated as [Ag(CQ)(H2O)2] H2O, [Hg(CQ)2]ṡ2H2O, [Cr(CQ)3] and [Fe(CQ)3]H2O. The Coats-Redfern method, the kinetic thermodynamic parameters like activation energies (E∗), entropies (ΔS∗), enthalpies (ΔH∗), and Gibbs free energies (ΔG∗) of the thermal decomposition reactions have been deduced from thermogravimetric curves (TG) with helpful of differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves. The narrow size distribution in nano-scale range for the clioquinol complexes have been discussed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer (EDX) analyzer.

  7. Silver(I)-saccharin coordination polymers with 2-pyridylmethanol and 2,6-pyridinedimethanol. Synthetic, spectroscopic, thermal and structural studies of [Ag(sac)( μ-mpy)] n and [Ag( μ-sac)(dmpy)] n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamci, Sevim; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Harrison, William T. A.; Thöne, Carsten

    2005-04-01

    Two new coordination polymers of saccharinato-silver(I) complexes with 2-pyridylmethanol (mpy) and 2,6-pyridinedimethanol (dmpy), [Ag(sac)( μ-mpy)] n ( 1) and [Ag( μ-sac)(dmpy)] n ( 2), (sac = saccharinate), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystal data: 1, monoclinic, P2/c, with a=13.3584(14) Å, b=8.3040(10) Å, c=13.0430(14) Å, β=106.227(3)°, Z=4; 2, monoclinic, P2/n, with a=7.3538(1) Å, b=13.0444(3) Å, c=15.7315(3) Å, β=98.8976(13)°, Z=4. In 1, [Ag 2(sac) 2(mpy) 2] building blocks are connected into a two-dimensional framework by bridging OH groups of mpy, and they are further stacked by O sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds, and weak π(sac)⋯ π(py) and π(py)⋯ π(py) interactions to form a three-dimensional supramolecular framework. In 2, [Ag 2(sac)(dmpy)] units are linked by the O sulfonyl bridges of sac, leading to one-dimensional polymeric chains, which are reinforced by the O sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π(sac)⋯ π(py) interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular network. The coordination polymers 1 and 2 exhibit three- and four- coordinated silver(I) centers, respectively, and the intra-chain Ag⋯Ag separations in 1 and 2 are 3.2988(4) and 4.1429(2) Å, respectively.

  8. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure, thermal behavior and spectroscopic and magnetic properties of two new organically templated fluoro-vanadyl-hydrogenarsenates: (R){sub 0.5}[(VO)(HAsO{sub 4})F] (R: Ethylenediammonium and piperazinium)

    SciTech Connect

    Berrocal, Teresa

    2008-04-15

    Two new fluoro-vanadyl-hydrogenarsenate compounds templated by ethylenediamine and piperazine with formula, (C{sub 2}N{sub 2}H{sub 10}){sub 0.5}[(VO)(HAsO{sub 4})F] (1) and (C{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 12}){sub 0.5}[(VO)(HAsO{sub 4})F] (2), respectively, have been synthesized by using mild hydrothermal conditions under autogenous pressure. The crystal structures have been solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The phases crystallize in the P2{sub 1}/c monoclinic space group with the unit-cell parameters a=7.8634(4) A, b=7.7658(4) A, c=10.4195(6) A, {beta}=101.524(5){sup o} for compound (1) and a=6.301(1) A, b=10.244(1) A, c=10.248(1) A and {beta}=95.225(1){sup o} for compound (2). These phases exhibit a layered inorganic framework. In both cases, the structure is built from secondary building units (SBU) which are formed by [V{sub 2}O{sub 8}F{sub 2}] edge-shared dimeric vanadyl octahedra, connected by the vertices to two hydrogenarsenate tetrahedra. The repetition of this SBU unit originates sheets along the [1 0 0] direction. The ethylenediammonium and piperazinium cations are located inside the interlayer space. The limit of thermal stability for compounds (1) and (2) is, approximately, 250 and 230 deg. C, respectively. Near this temperature, both phases loose their organic cations and the fluoride anions. The diffuse reflectance spectra confirm the presence of vanadyl ions, in which the vanadium(IV) cations have a d{sup 1} electronic configuration in a slightly distorted octahedral environment. ESR spectra of both phases are isotropic with mean g-values of 1.93 and 1.96 for ethylendiamine and piperazine phases, respectively. Magnetic measurements for (1) and (2) indicate the existence of antiferromagnetic exchange couplings. - Graphical abstract: Polyhedral view of the layered crystal structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 10}N{sub 2}){sub 0.5} [(VO)(HAsO{sub 4})F].

  10. Porous Carbon Fibers Containing Pores with Sizes Controlled at the Ångstrom Level by the Cavity Size of Pillar[6]arene.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yoshikoshi, Kumiko; Sueto, Ryuta; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki

    2015-05-26

    We report a new synthesis method of fibrous carbon material with pores sizes that are precisely controlled at the Ångstrom level, by carbonization of two dimensional (2D) porous sheets of pillar[6]arenes. The 2D porous sheets were prepared by 2D supramolecular polymerization induced by oxidation of hydroquinone units of pillar[6]arenes. Owing to the hexagonal structure of pillar[6]arene, the assembly induced by 2D supramolecular polymerization gave hexagonal 2D porous sheets, and the highly ordered structure of the 2D porous sheets formed regular fibrous structures. Then, carbonization of the 2D porous sheets afforded fibrous carbon materials with micropores. The micropore size of the fibrous porous carbon prepared from pillar[6]arene was the same size as that of the starting material pillar[6]arene assembly.

  11. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution by hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxy-iron and hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonites.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang-guo; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Yu, Hai-qin; Xin, Xiao-dong; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2010-07-15

    Phosphorus removal is important for the control of eutrophication, and adsorption is an efficient treatment process. In this study, three modified inorganic-bentonites: hydroxy-aluminum pillared bentonite (Al-Bent), hydroxy-iron pillared bentonite (Fe-Bent), and mixed hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonite (Fe-Al-Bent), were prepared and characterized, and their phosphate adsorption capabilities were evaluated in batch experiments. The results showed a significant increase of interlayer spacing, BET surface area and total pore volume which were all beneficial to phosphate adsorption. Phosphate adsorption capacity followed the order: Al-Bent>Fe-Bent>Fe-Al-Bent. The adsorption rate of phosphate on the adsorbents fits pseudo-second-order kinetic models (R(2)=1.00, 0.99, 1.00, respectively). The Freundlich and Langmuir models both described the adsorption isotherm data well. Thermodynamic studies illustrated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Finally, phosphate adsorption on the inorganic pillared bentonites significantly raised the pH, indicating an anion/OH(-) exchange reaction.

  12. Single macroscopic pillars as model system for bioinspired adhesives: influence of tip dimension, aspect ratio, and tilt angle.

    PubMed

    Micciché, Maurizio; Arzt, Eduard; Kroner, Elmar

    2014-05-28

    The goal of our study is to better understand the design parameters of bioinspired dry adhesives inspired by geckos. For this, we fabricated single macroscopic pillars of 400 μm diameter with different aspect ratios and different tip shapes (i.e., flat tips, spherical tips with different radii, and mushroom tips with different diameters). Tilt-angle-dependent adhesion measurements showed that although the tip shape of the pillars strongly influences the pull-off force, the pull-off strength is similar for flat and mushroom-shaped tips. We found no tilt-angle dependency of adhesion for spherical tip structures and, except for high tilt angle and low preload experiments, no tilt-angle effect for mushroom-tip pillars. For flat-tip pillars, we found a strong influence of tilt angle on adhesion, which decreased linearly with increasing aspect ratio. The experiments show that for the tested aspect ratios between 1 and 5, a linear decrease of tilt-angle dependency is found. The results of our studies will help to design bioinspired adhesives for application on smooth and rough surfaces.

  13. Selective and effective binding of pillar[5,6]arenes toward secondary ammonium salts with a weakly coordinating counteranion.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunju; Shu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jian; Fan, Jiazeng; Chen, Zhenxia; Weng, Linhong; Jia, Xueshun

    2012-08-17

    The selective and effective binding of secondary ammoniums with a weakly coordinating tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BArF) counteranion by per-ethylated pillar[5,6]arenes is reported. The construction of a first pillararene-based self-sorting system consisting of two wheels and two axles is also described. PMID:22866893

  14. Determination of Ti-6242 α and β slip properties using micro-pillar test and computational crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jun, Tea-Sung; Britton, T. Benjamin; Dunne, Fionn P. E.

    2016-10-01

    The properties and behaviour of an α-β colony Ti-6242 alloy have been investigated at 20 °C utilising coupled micro-pillar stress relaxation tests and computational crystal plasticity. The β-phase slip strength and intrinsic slip system strain rate sensitivity have been determined, and the β-phase shown to have stronger rate sensitivity than that for the α phase. Close agreement of experimental observations and crystal plasticity predictions of micro-pillar elastic-plastic response, stress relaxation, slip activation in both α and β-phases, and strain localisation within the α-β pillars with differing test strain rate, β morphology, and crystal orientations is achieved, supporting the validity of the properties extracted. The β-lath thickness is found to affect slip transfer across the α-β-α colony, but not to significantly change the nature of the slip localisation when compared to pure α-phase pillars with the same crystallographic orientation. These results are considered in relation to rate-dependent deformation, such as dwell fatigue, in complex multiphase titanium alloys.

  15. Ditopic CMPO-pillar[5]arenes as unique receptors for efficient separation of americium(III) and europium(III).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuyu; Yuan, Xiangyang; Wu, Lei; Peng, Zhiyong; Feng, Wen; Liu, Ning; Xu, Dingguo; Li, Shoujian; Sengupta, Arijit; Mohapatra, Prasanta K; Yuan, Lihua

    2015-03-11

    A unique host-guest recognition process involving a new class of homoditopic CMPO-pillar[5]arenes and lanthanides was revealed to proceed in a stepwise manner, and correlated with the efficient separation of americium(III) and europium(III) under acidic feed conditions. PMID:25671799

  16. Single-step direct fabrication of pillar-on-pore hybrid nanostructures in anodizing aluminum for superior superhydrophobic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chanyoung; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    Conventional electrochemical anodizing processes of metals such as aluminum typically produce planar and homogeneous nanopore structures. If hydrophobically treated, such 2D planar and interconnected pore structures typically result in lower contact angle and larger contact angle hysteresis than 3D disconnected pillar structures and, hence, exhibit inferior superhydrophobic efficiency. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the anodizing parameters can be engineered to design novel pillar-on-pore (POP) hybrid nanostructures directly in a simple one-step fabrication process so that superior surface superhydrophobicity can also be realized effectively from the electrochemical anodization process. On the basis of the characteristic of forming a self-ordered porous morphology in a hexagonal array, the modulation of anodizing voltage and duration enabled the formulation of the hybrid-type nanostructures having controlled pillar morphology on top of a porous layer in both mild and hard anodization modes. The hybrid nanostructures of the anodized metal oxide layer initially enhanced the surface hydrophilicity significantly (i.e., superhydrophilic). However, after a hydrophobic monolayer coating, such hybrid nanostructures then showed superior superhydrophobic nonwetting properties not attainable by the plain nanoporous surfaces produced by conventional anodization conditions. The well-regulated anodization process suggests that electrochemical anodizing can expand its usefulness and efficacy to render various metallic substrates with great superhydrophilicity or -hydrophobicity by directly realizing pillar-like structures on top of a self-ordered nanoporous array through a simple one-step fabrication procedure.

  17. A family of porous lonsdaleite-e networks obtained through pillaring of decorated kagomé lattice sheets.

    PubMed

    Schoedel, Alexander; Boyette, Wesley; Wojtas, Lukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2013-09-25

    A new and versatile class of metal-organic materials (MOMs) with augmented lonsdaleite-e (lon-e-a) topology is presented herein. This family of lon-e nets are built by pillaring of hexagonal two-dimensional kagomé (kag) lattices constructed from well-known [Zn2(CO2R)4] paddlewheel molecular building blocks (MBBs) connected by 1,3-benzenedicarboxylate (bdc(2-)) linkers. The pillars are [Cr3(μ3-O)(RCO2)]6 trigonal prismatic primary MBBs decorated by six pyridyl moieties (tp-PMBB-1). The three-fold symmetry (D3h) of tp-PMBB-1 is complementary with the alternating orientation of the axial sites of the paddlewheel MBBs and enables triple cross-linking of the kag layers by each pillar. These MOMs represent the first examples of axial-to-axial pillared undulating kag layers, and they are readily fine-tuned because the bdc(2-) moieties can be varied at their 5-position without changing the overall structure. This lon-e platform possesses functionalized hexagonal channels since the kag lattices are necessarily eclipsed. The effects of the substituent at the 5-positions of the bdc(2-) linkers upon gas adsorption, particularly the heats of adsorption of carbon dioxide and methane, were studied.

  18. Photoinduced catalytic adsorption of model contaminants on Bi/Cu pillared montmorillonite in the visible light range

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 clay was pillared with BiCl3 and Cu(NO3)2 to extend its applicability as catalytic adsorbent to degrade aqueous solution of anionic azo-dye Methyl Orange (MO) in the presence of visible light irradiation. The preparation of Bi/Cu-montmorillonite utilized benig...

  19. One-dimensional channels constructed from per-hydroxylated pillar[6]arene molecules for gas and vapour adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Sueto, Ryuta; Yoshikoshi, Kumiko; Yamagishi, Tada-aki

    2014-12-14

    Per-hydroxylated pillar[6]arene molecules formed highly ordered one-dimensional channels with a diameter of 6.7 Å. The channels can capture various gases, such as CO2, N2 and n-butane, and vapours of saturated hydrocarbons such as n-hexane and cyclohexane. PMID:25339195

  20. Measurement of near-wall 3D flow velocity from wave-guiding micro-pillars.

    PubMed

    Bruecker, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    The measurement of near-wall flow in a plane close to the wall is achieved using the wave-guiding feature of transparent flexible micro-pillars which are attached in a 2D array to a surface and bend with the flow. Optical detection of bending from below the surface and application of auto-correlation methods provide mean and fluctuating part of the components of the wall-parallel velocity components. In addition, the wall-normal fluid motion is determined from spatial gradients in the array. The data provide the three-component velocity vector field in a plane close to the wall as well as their statistics. PMID:27661882

  1. [The first pillar of patient blood management. Types of anemia and diagnostic parameters].

    PubMed

    Basora Macaya, M; Bisbe Vives, E

    2015-06-01

    Patient Blood Management (PBM) is the design of a personalized, multimodal multidisciplinary plan for minimizing transfusion and simultaneously achieving a positive impact on patient outcomes. The first pillar of PBM consists of optimizing the erythrocyte mass. The best chance for this step is offered by preoperative preparation. In most cases, a detailed medical history, physical examination and laboratory tests will identify the cause of anemia. A correct evaluation of parameters that assess the state and function of iron, such as ferritin levels, and the parameters that measure functional iron, such as transferrin saturation and soluble transferrin receptor levels, provide us with essential information for guiding the treatment with iron. The new blood count analyzers that measure hypochromia (% of hypochromic red blood cells and reticulocyte hemoglobin concentrations) provide us useful information for the diagnosis and follow-up of the response to iron treatment. Measuring serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels is essential for treating deficiencies and thereby achieving better hemoglobin optimization.

  2. Hydrophobic pillared square grids for selective removal of CO 2 from simulated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaidi, Sameh K.; Mohamed, Mona H.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kumar, Amrit; Lusi, Matteo; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A.; Space, Brian; Xu, Wenqian; Halder, Gregory J.; Liu, Jun; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2015-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from flue gas or air is considered as feasible way to reduce the anthropogenic emission of CO2. Herein we reported the impact of metal substitution on tuning the physicochemical properties in isostructural family of metal organic materials (MOMs) based on pyrazine as organic linker, hexaflouro silicate as anionic pillar and Zn, Cu, Ni and Co as metal centres. Two new isostructural square grid networks namely SIFSIX-3-Ni and SIFSIX-Co are fully characterized and compared with the parent Zn(II) and Cu(II). Interestingly the new Ni(II) and Co (II) analogues higher loading capacity for CO2 at 0.15 bar and higher CO2/N2 selectivity at condition relevant to flue gas separation. Our data show that a small change in the structure could lead to dramatic enhancement in the physicochemical properties of MOMs.

  3. Layer rigidity effects on dynamical properties of mixed ion pillared clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-10-01

    We have discussed a peculiar composition dependent torsional mode frequency shift for mixed ion pillared vermiculite compounds in terms of the phenomenological contact interaction. We have also constructed a plot of the normalized basal spacing versus normalized torsional mode frequency for two vermiculite intercalation compounds, CsxRb1- x- Vm and [( CH3) 4N+] x[( CH3) 3NH+] 1- x- Vm. This plot shows a striking "scaling-like" behavior for the two different mixed-ion systems. An attempt to understand this behavior based on the virtual crystal approximation has been made. This model calculation reveals a very close relationship between the basal spacing and the gallery ion-oxygen interaction.

  4. Ultra-wide acoustic band gaps in pillar-based phononic crystal strips

    SciTech Connect

    Coffy, Etienne Lavergne, Thomas; Addouche, Mahmoud; Euphrasie, Sébastien; Vairac, Pascal; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2015-12-07

    An original approach for designing a one dimensional phononic crystal strip with an ultra-wide band gap is presented. The strip consists of periodic pillars erected on a tailored beam, enabling the generation of a band gap that is due to both Bragg scattering and local resonances. The optimized combination of both effects results in the lowering and the widening of the main band gap, ultimately leading to a gap-to-midgap ratio of 138%. The design method used to improve the band gap width is based on the flattening of phononic bands and relies on the study of the modal energy distribution within the unit cell. The computed transmission through a finite number of periods corroborates the dispersion diagram. The strong attenuation, in excess of 150 dB for only five periods, highlights the interest of such ultra-wide band gap phononic crystal strips.

  5. Adsorption of probe molecules in pillared interlayered clays: Experiment and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, A. Guil, J. M.; Lomba, E.; Almarza, N. G.; Khatib, S. J.; Cabrillo, C.; Sanz, A.; Pires, J.

    2014-06-14

    In this paper we investigate the adsorption of various probe molecules in order to characterize the porous structure of a series of pillared interlayered clays (PILC). To that aim, volumetric and microcalorimetric adsorption experiments were performed on various Zr PILC samples using nitrogen, toluene, and mesitylene as probe molecules. For one of the samples, neutron scattering experiments were also performed using toluene as adsorbate. Various structural models are proposed and tested by means of a comprehensive computer simulation study, using both geometric and percolation analysis in combination with Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations in order to model the volumetric and microcalorimetric isotherms. On the basis of this analysis, we propose a series of structural models that aim at accounting for the adsorption experimental behavior, and make possible a microscopic interpretation of the role played by the different interactions and steric effects in the adsorption processes in these rather complex disordered microporous systems.

  6. Pillar[5]arene-Based Glycoclusters: Synthesis and Multivalent Binding to Pathogenic Bacterial Lectins.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Kevin; Nierengarten, Iwona; Galanos, Nicolas; Gillon, Emilie; Holler, Michel; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien; Vincent, Stéphane P; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis of pillar[5]arene-based glycoclusters has been readily achieved by CuAAC conjugations of azido- and alkyne-functionalized precursors. The lectin binding properties of the resulting glycosylated multivalent ligands have been studied by at least two complementary techniques to provide a good understanding. Three lectins were selected from bacterial pathogens based on their potential therapeutic applications as anti-adhesives, namely LecA and LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria. As a general trend, multivalency improved the binding to lectins and a higher affinity can be obtained by increasing to a certain limit the length of the spacer arm between the carbohydrate subunits and the central macrocyclic core.

  7. Structural optimization of interpenetrated pillared-layer coordination polymers for ethylene/ethane separation.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Keisuke; Horike, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Tahara, Mina; Inubushi, Yasutaka; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-06-01

    With the goal of achieving effective ethylene/ethane separation, we evaluated the gas sorption properties of four pillared-layer-type porous coordination polymers with double interpenetration, [Zn2(tp)2(bpy)]n (1), [Zn2(fm)2(bpe)]n (2), [Zn2(fm)2(bpa)]n (3), and [Zn2(fm)2(bpy)]n (4) (tp = terephthalate, bpy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, fm = fumarate, bpe = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene and bpa = 1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethane). It was found that 4, which contains the narrowest pores of all of these compounds, exhibited ethylene-selective sorption profiles. The ethylene selectivity of 4 was estimated to be 4.6 at 298 K based on breakthrough experiments using ethylene/ethane gas mixtures. In addition, 4 exhibited a good regeneration ability compared with a conventional porous material.

  8. Supramolecular Drug Delivery Systems Based on Water-Soluble Pillar[n]arenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuan; Gao, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Leyong

    2016-06-01

    Supramolecular drug delivery systems (SDDSs), including various kinds of nanostructures that are assembled by reversible noncovalent interactions, have attracted considerable attention as ideal drug carriers owing to their fascinating ability to undergo dynamic switching of structure, morphology, and function in response to various external stimuli, which provides a flexible and robust platform for designing and developing functional and smart supramolecular nano-drug carriers. Pillar[n]arenes represent a new generation of macrocyclic hosts, which have unique structures and excellent properties in host-guest chemistry. This account describes recent progress in our group to develop pillararene-based stimuli-responsive supramolecular nanostructures constructed by reversible host-guest interactions for controllable anticancer drug delivery. The potential applications of these supramolecular drug carriers in cancer treatment and the fundamental questions facing SDDSs are also discussed.

  9. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

    2000-09-01

    Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

  10. A Survey of Irradiated Pillars, Globules, and Jets in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Reiter, M.; Smith, N.; Bally, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present wide-field, deep narrowband H2, Brγ, Hα, [S ii], [O iii], and broadband I- and K-band images of the Carina star formation region. The new images provide a large-scale overview of all the H2 and Brγ emission present in over a square degree centered on this signature star-forming complex. By comparing these images with archival Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer images we observe how intense UV radiation from O and B stars affects star formation in molecular clouds. We use the images to locate new candidate outflows and identify the principal shock waves and irradiated interfaces within dozens of distinct areas of star-forming activity. Shocked molecular gas in jets traces the parts of the flow that are most shielded from the intense UV radiation. Combining the H2 and optical images gives a more complete view of the jets, which are sometimes only visible in H2. The Carina region hosts several compact young clusters, and the gas within these clusters is affected by radiation from both the cluster stars and the massive stars nearby. The Carina Nebula is ideal for studying the physics of young H ii regions and photodissociation region (PDR), as it contains multiple examples of walls and irradiated pillars at various stages of development. Some of the pillars have detached from their host molecular clouds to form proplyds. Fluorescent H2 outlines the interfaces between the ionized and molecular gas, and after removing continuum, we detect spatial offsets between the Brγ and H2 emission along the irradiated interfaces. These spatial offsets can be used to test current models of PDRs once synthetic maps of these lines become available.

  11. Fabrication and efficient photocatalytic activity of porous CdS-pillared tetratitanate nanohybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Guohua; He, Liwen; Liu, Peide; Lin, Bizhou

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Heterostructured CdS–H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} nanohybrid exhibits a wide spectral response. • The nanohybrid gave a H{sub 2} evolution rate of 895 μmol h{sup –1} g{sup –1} in water splitting. • The electronic coupling was evidenced by XPS and photocurrent results. - Abstract: Heterostructured CdS-pillared tetratitanate nanohybrid was fabricated by electrostatically driven self-assembly of the exfoliated tetratitanate nanosheets and CdS nanosol particles. It was revealed that the present nanohybrid is porous with a specific surface area of 65 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and that the tetratitanate nanosheets were restacked in a well-ordered arrangement with a gallery height of 2.3 nm. The formation of an electronic coupling between the titanate nanosheets and the encapsulated CdS pillars was supported by XPS and photocurrent measurements. The nanohybrid exhibits a highly photocatalytic activity of 895 μmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1} in H{sub 2} evolution from water splitting under 300 W Xe lamp irradiation, which is about 11 and 7 times higher than its parents H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}·H{sub 2}O and CdS, respectively. Loading 3 wt% Pt resulted in that its activity was further improved to 1897 μmol h{sup −1} g{sup −1}. It was showed that the as-prepared nanohybrid has an excellent stability and recurrence performance in hydrogen generation.

  12. A survey of irradiated pillars, globules, and jets in the Carina nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Reiter, M.; Smith, N.; Bally, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present wide-field, deep narrowband H{sub 2}, Brγ, Hα, [S ii], [O iii], and broadband I- and K-band images of the Carina star formation region. The new images provide a large-scale overview of all the H{sub 2} and Brγ emission present in over a square degree centered on this signature star-forming complex. By comparing these images with archival Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer images we observe how intense UV radiation from O and B stars affects star formation in molecular clouds. We use the images to locate new candidate outflows and identify the principal shock waves and irradiated interfaces within dozens of distinct areas of star-forming activity. Shocked molecular gas in jets traces the parts of the flow that are most shielded from the intense UV radiation. Combining the H{sub 2} and optical images gives a more complete view of the jets, which are sometimes only visible in H{sub 2}. The Carina region hosts several compact young clusters, and the gas within these clusters is affected by radiation from both the cluster stars and the massive stars nearby. The Carina Nebula is ideal for studying the physics of young H ii regions and photodissociation region (PDR), as it contains multiple examples of walls and irradiated pillars at various stages of development. Some of the pillars have detached from their host molecular clouds to form proplyds. Fluorescent H{sub 2} outlines the interfaces between the ionized and molecular gas, and after removing continuum, we detect spatial offsets between the Brγ and H{sub 2} emission along the irradiated interfaces. These spatial offsets can be used to test current models of PDRs once synthetic maps of these lines become available.

  13. Spectroscopic neutron detection using composite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, I.; Foster, A.; Kukharev, V.; Mayer, M.; Meddeb, A.; Nattress, J.; Ounaies, Z.; Trivelpiece, C.

    2016-09-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM), especially highly enriched uranium, is exceptionally difficult to detect without the use of active interrogation (AI). We are investigating the potential use of low-dose active interrogation to realize simultaneous high-contrast imaging and photofission of SNM using energetic gamma-rays produced by low-energy nuclear reactions, such as 11B(d,nγ)12C and 12C(p,p‧)12C. Neutrons produced via fission are one reliable signature of the presence of SNM and are usually identified by their unique timing characteristics, such as the delayed neutron die-away. Fast neutron spectroscopy may provide additional useful discriminating characteristics for SNM detection. Spectroscopic measurements can be conducted by recoil-based or thermalization and capture-gated detectors; the latter may offer unique advantages since they facilitate low-statistics and event-by-event neutron energy measurements without spectrum unfolding. We describe the results of the development and characterization of a new type of capture-gated spectroscopic neutron detector based on a composite of scintillating polyvinyltoluene and lithium-doped scintillating glass in the form of millimeter-thick rods. The detector achieves >108 neutron-gamma discrimination resulting from its geometric properties and material selection. The design facilitates simultaneous pulse shape and pulse height discrimination, despite the fact that no materials intrinsically capable of pulse shape discrimination have been used to construct the detector. Accurate single-event measurements of neutron energy may be possible even when the energy is relatively low, such as with delayed fission neutrons. Simulation and preliminary measurements using the new composite detector are described, including those conducted using radioisotope sources and the low-dose active interrogation system based on low-energy nuclear reactions.

  14. Crystal structure, magnetic, thermal behavior, and spectroscopic studies of two new bimetallic hydrogenselenites: [Cu2-xNix (HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O], (x = 0.62; 0.91)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentech, I.; Zehani, K.; Kabadou, A.; Ben Salah, A.; Loukil, M.; Bessais, L.

    2016-08-01

    Two new iso-structural bimetallic hydrogenselenites [Cu2-xNix(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O] (x = 0.62; 0.91) have been synthesized from solution and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. They crystallized in the orthorhombic Pnma space group with the following lattice parameters: for Cu1.09Ni0.91(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (2) Å, b = 17.7717 (4) Å, c = 7.1620 (2) Å, Z = 4, and for Cu1.38Ni0.62(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (4) Å, b = 17.7467 (7) Å, c = 7.1717 (3) Å; Z = 4. The crystal structure of this compound consists by a three-dimensional framework, but it may be described as a bi-dimensional structure consisting of layers, parallel to the (010) plane formed by two types of (Cu/Ni) octahedral and (HSeO3)- trigonal pyramids. The magnetic measurement, thermal and spectroscopic studies were performed for these compounds. The magnetic results reveal the appearance of a weak ferromagnetic behavior at low temperature (Tc = 16 K for x = 0.91 and 18.8 K for x = 0.62). The DSC analysis enabled us to locate two endothermic peaks. The first peak can be attributed to a completely dehydration of the material, in this transformation, the compounds undergo a structural phase transition which can favor a non-centrosymmetric phase at high temperature confirmed by the thermodiffractograms measurement. The second peak for these samples is due to the ferro-paraelectric phase transition which can be explained by an order- disorder transition.

  15. Single and multi-component adsorptive removal of bisphenol A and 2,4-dichlorophenol from aqueous solutions with transition metal modified inorganic-organic pillared clay composites: Effect of pH and presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Martínez, Krisiam; Reddy, Pratap; Cabrera-Lafaurie, Wilman A; Román, Félix R; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2016-07-15

    Pillared clay based composites containing transition metals and a surfactant, namely MAlOr-NaBt (Bt=bentonite; Or=surfactant; M=Ni(2+), Cu(2+)or Co(2+)), were prepared to study selectivity and capacity toward single and multiple-component adsorption of bisphenol A (BPA) and 2,4-diclorophenol (DCP) from water. Tests were also performed to account for the presence of natural organic matter in the form of humic acid (HA). Equilibrium adsorption capacities for single components increased as follows: NaBtpillared clay capacities. Inclusion of the transition metal brought an increase of nearly two-fold in adsorption capacity over the materials modified only with surfactant. The MAlOr-NaBt adsorbents displayed remarkable selectivity for BPA. Multi-component fixed-bed tests, however, revealed competition between the adsorbates, with the exception of the CuAlOr-NaBt beds. Inclusion of HA, surprisingly, enhanced the phenols adsorption capacity. Preliminary regeneration tests suggested that the adsorbent capacity can be recovered via thermal treatment or by washing with alkaline solutions. The former strategy, however, requires surfactant replenishment. More complex schemes would be needed to deal with absorbed HA. PMID:27037481

  16. Mechanical and spectroscopic properties of metal-containing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. T.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of specific metal ions into polyimides is described. Detailed studies have included various compounds of copper, lithium, and palladium as dopants. Addition of the metal during polymerization or after formation of the polyamic acid precedes the thermal imidization step. With many dianhydride-diamine-dopant combinations high quality variously colored films are produced. Many metal doped films exhibit (1) improved high temperature adhesive properties, (2) increased electrical conductivity, (3) excellent thermal stability, (4) improved acid/base resistance, (5) increased modulus in flexible films and (6) excellent high temperature tensile strength. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopic study of these films suggests that many of the additives undergo chemical modification during thermal imidization. Palladium dopants appear to be partially reduced to the metallic state, while lithium and copper dopants are probably converted to their oxides. Ion etching experiments with Auger electron spectroscopy monitoring are discussed.

  17. The 1997 spectroscopic GEISA databank.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Arie, E.; Ballard, J.; Barbe, A.; Bjoraker, G.; Bonnet, B.; Brown, L. R.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Champion, J. P.; Chedin, A.; Chursin, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Duxbury, G.; Flaud, J.-M.; Fourrie, N.; Fayt, A.; Graner, G.; Gamache, R.; Goldman, A.; Golovko, V.; Guelachvili, G.; Hartmann, J. M.; Hilico, J. C.; Hillman, J.; Lefevre, G.; Lellouch, E.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Naumenko, O. V.; Nemtchinov, V.; Newnham, D. A.; Nikitin, A.; Orphal, J.; Perrin, A.; Reuter, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.; Rosenmann, L.; Rothman, L. S.; Scott, N. A.; Selby, J.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Sirota, J. M.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, K. M.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Tipping, R. H.; Urban, S.; Varanasi, P.; Weber, M.

    1999-05-01

    The current version GEISA-97 of the computer-accessible database system GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) is described. This catalogue contains 1,346,266 entries. These are the spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located between 0 and 22656 cm-1. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the giant planets. GEISA-97 contains also a catalog of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. The modifications and improvements made to the earlier edition (GEISA-92) and the data management software are described.

  18. Mid-infrared spectroscopic investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Vergo, Norma; Walter, Louis

    1987-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic research efforts are discussed. The development of a new instrumentation to permit advanced measurements in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, the development of a special library of well-characterized mineral and rock specimens for interpretation of remote sensing data, and cooperative measurements of the spectral signatures of analogues of materials that may be present on the surfaces of asteroids, planets or their Moons are discussed.

  19. Spectroscopic ellipsometry on lamellar gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, R.; Ohlidal, I.; Mistrik, J.; Murakami, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Pistora, J.; Horie, M.; Visnovsky, S.

    2005-05-01

    Deep lamellar diffraction gratings fabricated by etching a transparent quartz plate are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis is used to calculate the optical response of the gratings. Three parameters of the rectangular profile are determined by utilizing the least-square method. Detailed investigation of the spectral dependences demonstrates the uniqueness of the solution. Observing the spectral dependences of Wood anomalies suggests that even complicated profiles can be fitted with high authenticity.

  20. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.