Science.gov

Sample records for pilot case study

  1. Utilizing Web-Based Case Studies for Cutting-Edge Information Services Issues: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Deborah Lynn; Li, Xiaodong

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a pilot study conducted to determine whether the benefits of the case study method as a training framework for change initiatives in academic libraries could successfully transfer from traditional instruction to a virtual Web-based format. Presents results of a survey that evaluated the study and showed positive feedback. (Author/LRW)

  2. Case studies of energy efficiency financing in the original five pilot states, 1993-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Collins, N E; Walsh, R W

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in state-level programs in energy efficiency financing programs that are linked with home energy rating systems. Case studies are presented of programs in five states using a federal pilot program to amortize the costs of home energy improvements. The case studies present background information, describe the states` program, list preliminary evaluation data and findings, and discuss problems and solution encountered in the programs. A comparison of experiences in pilot states will be used to provide guidelines for program implementers, federal agencies, and Congress. 5 refs.

  3. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  4. Cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events among airline pilots: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wirawan, I Made Ady; Larsen, Peter D; Aldington, Sarah; Griffiths, Robin F; Ellis, Chris J

    2012-05-01

    A cardiovascular risk prediction score is routinely applied by aviation authorities worldwide. We examined the accuracy of the Framingham-based risk chart used by the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority in predicting cardiovascular events among airline pilots. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of 5-yr cardiovascular risk score and cardiovascular events in Oceania-based airline pilots. Cases were pilots with cardiovascular events as recorded on their medical records. Each case was age and gender matched with four controls that were randomly selected from the pilot population. To collect data before the events, 5-yr retrospective evaluations were conducted. Over a 16-yr study period we identified 15 cases of cardiovascular events, 9 (60%) of which were sudden clinical presentations and only 6 (40%) of which were detected using cardiovascular screening. There were 8 cases (53%) and 16 controls (27%) who had a 5-yr risk of > or = 10-15%. Almost half of the events (7/15) occurred in pilots whose highest 5-yr risk was in the 5-10% range. Cases were 3.91 times more likely to have highest 5-yr risk score of > or =10-15% than controls (OR = 3.91, 95% CI 1.04-16.35). The accuracy of the highest risk scores were moderate (AUC = 0.723, 95% CI 0.583-0.863). The cutoff point of 10% is valid, with a specificity of 0.73, but low sensitivity (0.53). Despite a valid and appropriate cutoff point, the tool had low sensitivity and was unable to predict almost half of the cardiovascular events.

  5. Geographic Region, Weather, Pilot Age and Air Carrier Crashes: a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Pressley, Joyce C.; Qiang, Yandong; Grabowski, Jurek G.; Baker, Susan P.; Rebok, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Information about risk factors of aviation crashes is crucial for developing effective intervention programs. Previous studies assessing factors associated with crash risk were conducted primarily in general aviation, air taxis and commuter air carriers. Methods A matched case-control design was used to examine the associations of geographic region, basic weather condition, and pilot age with the risk of air carrier (14 CFR Part 121) crash involvement. Cases (n=373) were air carrier crashes involving aircraft made by Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Airbus, recorded in the National Transportation Safety Board’s aviation crash database during 1983 through 2002, and controls (n=746) were air carrier incidents involving aircraft of the same three makes selected at random from the Federal Aviation Administration’s aviation incident database. Each case was matched with two controls on the calendar year when the index crash occurred. Conditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results With adjustment for basic weather condition, pilot age, and total flight time, the risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska was more than three times the risk for other regions [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35 – 7.49]. Instrument meteorological conditions were associated with an increased risk for air carrier crashes involving pilot error (adjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.15 – 4.44) and a decreased risk for air carrier crashes without pilot error (adjusted OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.40 – 0.87). Neither pilot age nor total flight time was significantly associated with the risk of air carrier crashes. Conclusions The excess risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska and the effect of adverse weather on pilot-error crashes underscore the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety. PMID:19378910

  6. Geographic region, weather, pilot age, and air carrier crashes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Pressley, Joyce C; Qiang, Yandong; Grabowski, Jurek G; Baker, Susan P; Rebok, George W

    2009-04-01

    Information about risk factors of aviation crashes is crucial for developing effective intervention programs. Previous studies assessing factors associated with crash risk were conducted primarily in general aviation, air taxis, and commuter air carriers. A matched case-control design was used to examine the associations of geographic region, basic weather condition, and pilot age with the risk of air carrier (14 CFR Part 121) crash involvement. Cases (N = 373) were air carrier crashes involving aircraft made by Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Airbus recorded in the National Transportation Safety Board's aviation crash database during 1983 through 2002, and controls (N = 746) were air carrier incidents involving aircraft of the same three makes selected at random from the Federal Aviation Administration's aviation incident database. Each case was matched with two controls on the calendar year when the index crash occurred. Conditional logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. With adjustment for basic weather condition, pilot age, and total flight time, the risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska was more than three times the risk for other regions ladjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.35-7.49]. Instrument meteorological conditions were associated with an increased risk for air carrier crashes involving pilot error (adjusted OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.15-4.44) and a decreased risk for air carrier crashes without pilot error (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.37-0.96). Neither pilot age nor total flight time were significantly associated with the risk of air carrier crashes. The excess risk of air carrier crashes in Alaska and the effect of adverse weather on pilot-error crashes underscore the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  7. Training and Skill Acquisition: A Pilot Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Gerald; Roomkin, Myron

    Although it was generally recognized that the acquisition of productive skills occurred mainly in private industry, either through formal company training programs or simply through "learning by doing," very little specific information about such training was available. This study of the inplant training procedures of one company was conducted to…

  8. Extraction bradycardia: a pilot case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Significant vasovagal reaction is one of the untoward events in the course of simple extractions. The present study then aimed to record the patients’ heart rate during the extraction procedure. Materials and methods Informed consents were obtained in advance. Patients were placed in the dental chair and their heart rate was measured before /and prior to the anesthetic injection, during, and after dental extraction on a pulse oxymeter device. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. Results Sixty one patients were included. The mean heart rates of these patients prior, during, and after extraction were 88, 86 and 81, respectively. Two by two comparisons showed a significant decrease in the mean heart rate during extraction compared to the baseline and also after extraction compared to both before and during extraction (p < 0.05 for all three). Conclusions Despite the presence of sufficient local anesthesia and performing the extraction with the least trauma, a significant decrease in heart rate is evident. PMID:24456612

  9. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Greenbelt Homes, Inc. Pilot Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    In the fall of 2010, a multiyear pilot energy efficiency retrofit project was undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc., (GHI) a 1,566 home cooperative of circa 1930 and 1940 homes in Greenbelt, Maryland. GHI established this pilot project to serve as a basis for decision making for the rollout of a community-wide upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency improvements to the building envelope and mechanical equipment. With the community upgrade fully funded by the cooperative through their membership without outside subsidies, this project presents a unique opportunity to evaluate and prioritize the wide range of benefits of high-performance retrofits based on member experience with and acceptance of the retrofit measures implemented during the pilot project. Addressing the complex interactions between benefits, trade-offs, construction methods, project management implications, realistic upfront costs, financing, and other considerations, serves as a case study for energy retrofit projects that include high-performance technologies based on the long-term value to the homeowner. The pilot project focused on identifying the added costs and energy-savings benefits of improvements. Phase 1—baseline evaluation for a representative set of 28 homes sited in seven buildings; Phase 2—installation of the building envelope improvements and continued monitoring of the energy consumption for the heating season; Phase 3—energy simulations supporting recommendations for HVAC and water heating upgrades.

  10. Hospital branding in Italy: A pilot study based on the case method.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates if, and in affirmative case how, Italian hospitals are managing corporate brand communication. Thanks to results of qualitative research, this article offers insights on Italian hospital branding. The pilot study based in the case method is to be considered a starting point for wider investigations on this topic, and it is useful for managers and practitioners who want to understand the role of corporate brand in hospital communication management and to connect health care professionals with the audience in a meaningful way in those countries in which the health care system is a mix of both public and private institutions.

  11. Qat use and esophageal cancer in Ethiopia: A pilot case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Assefa, Mathewos; Kassa, Endale; Bane, Abate; Gemechu, Tufa; Tilahun, Yared; Endalafer, Nigatu; Ferro, Gilles; Straif, Kurt; Ward, Elizabeth; Aseffa, Abraham; Schüz, Joachim; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-01-01

    Background Qat (Catha edulis) chewing is reported to induce lesions in the buccal mucosa, irritation of the esophagus, and esophageal reflux. Case series suggest a possible etiological role in oral and esophageal cancers. This pilot study aimed to generate preliminary estimates of the magnitude and direction of the association between qat use and esophageal cancer (EC) risk and to inform the logistics required to conduct a multi-center case–control study. Methods Between May 2012 and May 2013, 73 EC cases (including 12 gastro-esophageal junction cases) and 133 controls matched individually on sex, age, and residence were enrolled at two endoscopy clinics and a cancer treatment hospital in Addis Ababa. A face-to-face structured questionnaire was administered. Qat use was defined as ever having chewed qat once a week or more frequently for at least one year. Odds ratios were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Results Only 8% of cases resided in Addis Ababa. Qat use was more frequent in cases (36%) than in controls (26%). A 2-fold elevation in EC risk was observed in ever qat chewers compared with never users in unadjusted conditional logistic regression (OR = 2.12; 95% CI = 0.94, 4.74), an association that disappeared after adjusting for differences in tobacco use, consumption of alcohol and green vegetables, education level, and religion (OR = 0.95; 0.22, 4.22). Among never tobacco users, however, a non-significant increase in EC risk was suggested in ever qat users also after adjustment. Increases in EC risk were observed with ever tobacco use, alcohol consumption, low consumption of green vegetables, a salty diet, illiteracy, and among Muslims; the four latter associations were significant. Conclusions This pilot study generated EC risk estimates in association with a habit practiced by millions of people and never before studied in a case–control design. Results must be interpreted cautiously in light of possible selection bias, with some

  12. The iPod Revolution: An Exploratory Case Study of the Implementation of an iPod Touch Pilot Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Staci A.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study was designed to investigate the implementation of an iPod touch pilot program in sixth grade science classrooms at an intermediate school in Southeast Texas. More specifically, this study explored the benefits and challenges associated with the utilization of iPod touch devices for students, teachers, and their campus…

  13. The iPod Revolution: An Exploratory Case Study of the Implementation of an iPod Touch Pilot Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Staci A.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory case study was designed to investigate the implementation of an iPod touch pilot program in sixth grade science classrooms at an intermediate school in Southeast Texas. More specifically, this study explored the benefits and challenges associated with the utilization of iPod touch devices for students, teachers, and their campus…

  14. Piloted rover technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrasher, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    This is the May 25, 1990 summary report for Space Transfer Concepts and Analyses (STCA) Study, special study task 9.1, Piloted Rovers Technology Study. Piloted rover concepts, mission scenarios, and the requirements necessary for completion of these missions resulting in the establishment of a lunar base. These tasks were intended to lead to a logical conclusion concerning which piloted rovers technologies are needed to accomplish the various missions, along with a recommended schedule for the development of these technologies.

  15. Lung cancer correlates in Lebanese adults: a pilot case--control study.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Joseph; Saleh, Nadine; Waked, Mirna; Salamé, Joseph; Salameh, Pascale

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancers. However, there are no epidemiological studies concerning lung cancer and its risk factors in Lebanon. This study was carried out to determine the association between lung cancer and its most common risk factors in a sample of the Lebanese population. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted. Patients were recruited in a tertiary health care center. A questionnaire in Arabic was designed to assess the possible risk factors for lung cancer. For females, cigarette smoking (ORa=9.76) and using fuel for heating (ORa=9.12) were found to be the main risk factors for lung cancer; for males, cigarette smoking (ORa=156.98), living near an electricity generator (ORa=13.26), consuming low quantities of fruits and vegetables (ORa=10.54) and a family history of cancer (ORa=8.75) were associated with lung cancer. Waterpipe smoking was significantly correlated with lung cancer in the bivariate analysis. In this pilot study, it was found that in addition to smoking, outdoor and indoor pollution factors were potential risk factors of lung cancer. Additional studies would be necessary to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2013 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A case-control pilot study of low-intensity IVF in good-prognosis patients.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Weghofer, Andrea; Barad, David H

    2012-04-01

    Low-intensity IVF (LI-IVF) is rapidly gaining in popularity. Yet studies comparing LI-IVF to standard IVF are lacking. This is a case-control pilot study, reporting on 14 first LI-IVF and 14 standard IVF cycles in women with normal age-specific ovarian reserve under age 38, matched for age, laboratory environment, staff and time of cycle. LI-IVF cycles underwent mild ovarian stimulation, utilizing clomiphene citrate, augmented by low-dose gonadotrophin stimulation. Control patients underwent routine ovarian stimulation. LI-IVF and regular IVF patients were similar in age, body mass index, FSH and anti-Müllerian hormone. Standard IVF utilized more gonadotrophins (P<0.001), yielded more oocytes (P<0.001) and cryopreserved more embryos (P<0.001). With similar embryo numbers transferred, after ethnicity adjustments, standard IVF demonstrated better odds for pregnancy (OR 7.07; P=0.046) and higher cumulative pregnancy rates (63.3% versus 21.4%; OR 6.6; P=0.02). Adjustments for age, ethnicity and diagnosis maintained significance but oocyte adjustment did not. Cost assessments failed to reveal differences between LI-IVF and standard IVF. In this small study, LI-IVF reduced pregnancy chances without demonstrating cost advantages, raising questions about its utility. In the absence of established clinical and/or economic foundations, LI-IVF should be considered an experimental procedure. Low-intensity IVF (LI-IVF) is increasingly propagated as an alternative to standard IVF. LI-IVF has, however, never been properly assessed in comparison to standard IVF. Such a comparison is presented in the format of a small pilot study, matching LI-IVF cycles with regular IVF cycles and comparing outcomes as well as costs. The study suggests that LI-IVF, at least in this setting, is clinically inferior and economically at best similar to standard IVF. LI-IVF should, therefore, as of this point not be offered as routine IVF treatment but only as an experimental procedure.

  17. Bisphenol a exposure in Mexico City and risk of prematurity: a pilot nested case control study.

    PubMed

    Cantonwine, David; Meeker, John D; Hu, Howard; Sánchez, Brisa N; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Mercado-García, Adriana; Fortenberry, Gamola Z; Calafat, Antonia M; Téllez-Rojo, Martha Maria

    2010-10-18

    Presence of Bisphenol A (BPA) has been documented worldwide in a variety of human biological samples. There is growing evidence that low level BPA exposure may impact placental tissue development and thyroid function in humans. The aim of this present pilot study was to determine urinary concentrations of BPA during the last trimester of pregnancy among a small subset of women in Mexico City, Mexico and relate these concentrations to risk of delivering prematurely. A nested case-control subset of 60 participants in the Early Life Exposure in Mexico to ENvironmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) study in Mexico City, Mexico were selected based on delivering less than or equal to 37 weeks of gestation and greater than 37 weeks of gestation. Third trimester archived spot urine samples were analyzed by online solid phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. BPA was detected in 80.0% (N = 48) of the urine samples; total concentrations ranged from < 0.4 μg/L to 6.7 μg/L; uncorrected geometric mean was 1.52 μg/L. The adjusted odds ratio of delivering less than or equal to 37 weeks in relation to specific gravity adjusted third trimester BPA concentration was 1.91 (95%CI 0.93, 3.91, p-value = 0.08). When cases were further restricted to births occurring prior to the 37th week (n = 12), the odds ratio for specific-gravity adjusted BPA was larger and statistically significant (p < 0.05). This is the first study to document measurable levels of BPA in the urine of a population of Mexican women. This study also provides preliminary evidence, based on a single spot urine sample collected during the third trimester, that pregnant women who delivered less than or equal to 37 weeks of gestation and prematurely (< 37 weeks) had higher urinary concentrations of BPA compared to women delivering after 37 weeks.

  18. A pilot case-cohort study of liver and pancreatic cancers in poultry workers.

    PubMed

    Felini, Martha; Johnson, Eric; Preacely, Nykiconia; Sarda, Vishnu; Ndetan, Harrison; Bangara, Saritha

    2011-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses that widely occurs occupationally in poultry workers and in the general population, may be associated with increased risks of deaths from liver and pancreatic cancers, and to identify new risk factors. A pilot case-cohort study of both cancers within a combined cohort of 30,411 highly exposed poultry workers and 16,408 control subjects was conducted, and risk assessed by logistic regression odds ratios (OR) and proportional hazards risk ratios. New occupational findings were recorded respectively for pancreatic/liver cancers, for slaughtering of poultry (OR = 8.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.7-29.3)/OR = 9.1, 95% CI: 1.9-42.9); catching of live chickens (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.2-10.9)/OR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.1-8.5); killing other types of animals for food (OR = 4.8, 95% CI: 1.5-16.6)/OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 0.2-18.2), and ever worked on a pig raising farm (OR = 3.0, 95% CI: 1.0-8.2) for pancreatic cancer only. New non-occupational findings for liver cancer were for receiving immunization with yellow fever vaccine (OR = 8.7, 95% CI: 1.0-76.3); and vaccination with typhoid vaccine (OR = 6.3, 95% CI: 1.1-37.4). The study also confirmed previously reported risk factors for both diseases. This study provides preliminary evidence that exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses may possibly be associated with the occurrence of liver and pancreatic cancers. Case-control studies nested within occupational cohorts of highly exposed subjects of sufficient statistical power may provide an efficient and valid method of investigating/confirming these findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Civil Defense Adult Education, A Case Study of an Experimental Pilot Program in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Millicent Kicklighter

    A study of the development and effectiveness of the Florida Pilot Program in Civil Defense Adult Education was conducted from the viewpoint of a participant observer and from data gathered from official records. An instrument developed to gauge the extent to which the objectives of the program were achieved was sent to the 66 counties where the…

  20. Texas Schools, Inc.: A Case Study of the Transfer of Technology at a Pilot Bilingual Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Vangie L.

    Texas Schools, Inc. (TSI) developed a pilot program in bilingual education for Mexican-American vocational workers in the Department of Diesel Mechanics at Texas Tech University. This study assesses the transfer of technology in that environment using quantitative and qualitative measures. TSI, a technical and vocational school in Lubbock, Texas,…

  1. Conservative Approach in Patients with Pemphigus Gingival Vulgaris: A Pilot Study of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gambino, Alessio; Carbone, Mario; Arduino, Paolo G.; Carbone, Lucio; Broccoletti, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this pilot study was to describe the clinical efficacy of a conservative oral hygiene protocol in patients affected by gingival pemphigus vulgaris (PV) applied in a case series. Methods. Subjects suffering from PV with gingival localisation and slightly responsive to conventional treatment with systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs were selected among individuals treated in the Unit of Oral Medicine Section of the University of Turin. Five subjects received nonsurgical periodontal therapy, over a 7-day period, including oral hygiene instructions; patients were instructed about domiciliary oral hygiene maintenance and instructions were reinforced at each visit and personalised if necessary. Clinical outcome variables were recorded at baseline (before starting) and 16 weeks after intervention, including full mouth plaque score (FMPS), bleeding scores (FMBS), probing pocket depth (PPD), oral pemphigus clinical score (OPCS), and patient related outcomes (visual analogue score of pain). Results. Five patients were treated and, after finishing the proposed therapy protocol, a statistical significant reduction was observed for FMBS (P = 0.043) and OPCS (P = 0.038). Conclusions. Professional oral hygiene procedures with nonsurgical therapy are related to an improvement of gingival status and a decrease of gingival bleeding in patients affected by PV with specific gingival localization. PMID:25505912

  2. Evaluating a Non-Randomized Trial: A Case Study of a Pilot to Increase Pre-Collegiate Math Course Success Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaManque, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a two-year pilot to increase pre-collegiate math course success rates at a large community college. The EnableMath pilot involved the use of computerized software that allowed students to practice math problems in a lab during class time. Additional components of the program included the administration of the…

  3. A fighter pilot case of pulmonary sequestration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Xu, Xian-Rong; Chui, Jian-Guo; Fu, Zhao-Jun; Bi, Yong-Ming; Wang, Jian-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. The diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration is based on the identification of an abnormal arterial supply. Conventional treatment for pulmonary sequestration is surgical removal of the tissue, which may induce serious trauma and requires a long recovery time. Recently, endovascular treatment has become feasible as a safer and less invasive method to treat pulmonary sequestration. To the best of our knowledge, pulmonary sequestration has not been reported in pilots. In this study, we report a fighter pilot case of intralobar pulmonary sequestration detected with the assistance of spiral computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography. The young fighter pilot had experienced recurrent hemoptysis and pulmonary infections for approximately 10 yr before the pulmonary sequestration was diagnosed. We performed a transcatheter arterial embolization and a subsequent CT angiography confirmed complete infarction of the sequestration. After the treatment, no clinical complications were observed and the patient, with normal lung function restored, was qualified to serve as a fighter pilot again. Compared with conventional removal surgery, endovascular treatment is a superior treatment for pulmonary sequestration in a fighter pilot in maintenance of pilot qualification.

  4. Influence of Cultural, Organizational, and Automation Capability on Human Automation Trust: A Case Study of Auto-GCAS Experimental Test Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koltai, Kolina; Ho, Nhut; Masequesmay, Gina; Niedober, David; Skoog, Mark; Cacanindin, Artemio; Johnson, Walter; Lyons, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a case study that examined the influence of cultural, organizational and automation capability upon human trust in, and reliance on, automation. In particular, this paper focuses on the design and application of an extended case study methodology, and on the foundational lessons revealed by it. Experimental test pilots involved in the research and development of the US Air Force's newly developed Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System served as the context for this examination. An eclectic, multi-pronged approach was designed to conduct this case study, and proved effective in addressing the challenges associated with the case's politically sensitive and military environment. Key results indicate that the system design was in alignment with pilot culture and organizational mission, indicating the potential for appropriate trust development in operational pilots. These include the low-vulnerability/ high risk nature of the pilot profession, automation transparency and suspicion, system reputation, and the setup of and communications among organizations involved in the system development.

  5. A Usability and Learnability Case Study of Glass Flight Deck Interfaces and Pilot Interactions through Scenario-based Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cino, Thomas J., II

    In the aviation industry, digitally produced and presented flight, navigation, and aircraft information is commonly referred to as glass flight decks. Glass flight decks are driven by computer-based subsystems and have long been a part of military and commercial aviation sectors. Over the past 15 years, the General Aviation (GA) sector of the aviation industry has become a recent beneficiary of the rapid advancement of computer-based glass flight deck (GFD) systems. While providing the GA pilot considerable enhancements in the quality of information about the status and operations of the aircraft, training pilots on the use of glass flight decks is often delivered with traditional methods (e.g. textbooks, PowerPoint presentations, user manuals, and limited computer-based training modules). These training methods have been reported as less than desirable in learning to use the glass flight deck interface. Difficulties in achieving a complete understanding of functional and operational characteristics of the GFD systems, acquiring a full understanding of the interrelationships of the varied subsystems, and handling the wealth of flight information provided have been reported. Documented pilot concerns of poor user experience and satisfaction, and problems with the learning the complex and sophisticated interface of the GFD are additional issues with current pilot training approaches. A case study was executed to explore ways to improve training using GFD systems at a Midwestern aviation university. The researcher investigated if variations in instructional systems design and training methods for learning glass flight deck technology would affect the perceptions and attitudes of pilots of the learnability (an attribute of usability) of the glass flight deck interface. Specifically, this study investigated the effectiveness of scenario-based training (SBT) methods to potentially improve pilot knowledge and understanding of a GFD system, and overall pilot user

  6. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  8. The Pilot Training Study: Personnel Flow and the PILOT Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooz, W. E.

    The results of the Rand study of pilot flows and the computer-operated decision model, called the PILOT model, are described. The flows of pilots within the Air Force are caused by policies that require the career-development rotation of pilots from cockpit jobs to desk jobs, the maintenance of a supplement of pilots in excess of cockpit-related…

  9. Impact of preoperative immunonutrition on morbidity following cystectomy for bladder cancer: a case-control pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J; Siegler, N; Murez, T; Poinas, G; Segui, B; Ayuso, D; Gres, P; Wagner, L; Thuret, R; Costa, P; Droupy, S

    2014-02-01

    To compare postoperative complications in patients with or without preoperative immunonutrition before cystectomy. A prospective, multicenter, pilot, case-control study was conducted during 6 months. Patients with 7-day preoperative immunonutrition were prospectively included and compared with a retrospective, matched control group without immunonutrition. Early complication rates and the length of hospital stay were analyzed. The bilateral type I error was <0.05; the power was 90%. Thirty patients in each group were required. Thirty patients were included in each group, on a comparable basis. In the immunonutrition group, fewer postoperative complications (40 vs. 76.7%; p = 0.008), less paralytic ileus at D7 (6.6 vs. 33.3%; p = 0.02), fewer infections (23.3 vs. 60%; p = 0.008), and in particular less pyelonephritis (16.7 vs. 46.7%; p = 0.03) occurred. Clavien's grades for complications were higher in the control group (p = 0.04). Mortality, pulmonary embolism, anastomotic fistulae, and wound dehiscence were similar between two groups. The length of stay was reduced by 3 days in the immunonutrition group. In this pilot case-control study, immunonutrition is associated with a decrease in postoperative complications, urinary tract infections, Clavien's grade for complications, and paralytic ileus in patients undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer. Prospective randomized placebo control studies are needed to confirm these promising results.

  10. Pilot study of using GIS to visualize health status distribution: case study of Songjiang District, Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua; Umezaki, Masahiro; Nakamura, Keiko; Chen, Ping; Chen, Jing; Shi, Hui-Jing; Takano, Takehito

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the geographic variation in mortality indicators in Songjiang District of Shanghai under rapid change with urbanization. Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to visualize the distributions of health status and to test the extent of spatial auto-correlation in the indictors. In 2001, total crude mortality was 687/100,000 for the district; the rates for the townships (N=15) in the district ranged from 444/100,000 to 805/100,000. GIS maps indicated that the mortality was higher in the marginal areas of the district. Significant positive auto-correlations were found in total crude mortality rates, death rate for infectious diseases, and death rates for digestive diseases. The measures that consider intra-region inequality in health needs will be required in the regions under urbanization.

  11. What a difference two days make: "personalized" embryo transfer (pET) paradigm: a case report and pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Alonso, M; Galindo, N; Pellicer, A; Simón, C

    2014-06-01

    Embryo implantation requires that the blastocyst will attach during the receptive stage of the endometrium, known as window of implantation (WOI). Historically, it has been assumed that the WOI is always constant in all women. However, molecular analyses of endometrial receptivity demonstrates a personalized WOI (pWOI) that is displaced in one out of four patients suffering from recurrent implantation failure (RIF) of endometrial origin and illustrates the utility of a personalized endometrial diagnostic approach. Here, we report a clinical case of successful personalized embryo transfer (pET) after four IVF and three oocyte donation failed attempts in which different embryo transfer strategies were attempted. This case report is complemented by a pilot study of 17 patients undergoing oocyte donation and who suffered failed implantations with routine embryo transfer (ET) but were then treated with pET after the personalized diagnosis of their WOI.

  12. Nurse case-manager vs multifaceted intervention to improve quality of osteoporosis care after wrist fracture: randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S R; Johnson, J A; Bellerose, D; McAlister, F A; Russell, A S; Hanley, D A; Garg, S; Lier, D A; Maksymowych, W P; Morrish, D W; Rowe, B H

    2011-01-01

    Few outpatients with fractures are treated for osteoporosis in the years following fracture. In a randomized pilot study, we found a nurse case-manager could double rates of osteoporosis testing and treatment compared with a proven efficacious quality improvement strategy directed at patients and physicians (57% vs 28% rates of appropriate care). Few patients with fractures are treated for osteoporosis. An intervention directed at wrist fracture patients (education) and physicians (guidelines, reminders) tripled osteoporosis treatment rates compared to controls (22% vs 7% within 6 months of fracture). More effective strategies are needed. We undertook a pilot study that compared a nurse case-manager to the multifaceted intervention using a randomized trial design. The case-manager counseled patients, arranged bone mineral density (BMD) tests, and prescribed treatments. We included controls from our first trial who remained untreated for osteoporosis 1-year post-fracture. Primary outcome was bisphosphonate treatment and secondary outcomes were BMD testing, appropriate care (BMD test-treatment if bone mass low), and costs. Forty six patients untreated 1-year after wrist fracture were randomized to case-manager (n = 21) or multifaceted intervention (n = 25). Median age was 60 years and 68% were female. Six months post-randomization, 9 (43%) case-managed patients were treated with bisphosphonates compared with 3 (12%) multifaceted intervention patients (relative risk [RR] 3.6, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.1-11.5, p = 0.019). Case-managed patients were more likely than multifaceted intervention patients to undergo BMD tests (81% vs 52%, RR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1-2.4, p = 0.042) and receive appropriate care (57% vs 28%, RR 2.0, 95%CI 1.0-4.2, p = 0.048). Case-management cost was $44 (CDN) per patient vs $12 for the multifaceted intervention. A nurse case-manager substantially increased rates of appropriate testing and treatment for osteoporosis in

  13. Cephalometric risk factors associated with myocardial infarction in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davoudmanesh, Zeinab; Bayat, Mohamad; Abbasi, Mohsen; Rakhshan, Vahid; Shariati, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its craniofacial anatomic risk factors might play a role in several cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI). However, there are no data about cephalometric findings among OSA patients with MI. In this pilot case-control study, about 2000 individuals referred to the sleep center were evaluated according to apnea - hypopnea index (AHI) and other inclusion criteria. Included were 62 OSA male patients (AHI > 10), of whom 6 had an MI history. In both control (n = 56) and MI groups (n = 6), 18 cephalometric parameters were traced. Data were analyzed using independent samples t-test. Compared with control OSA patients, OSA patients with MI showed a significantly larger tongue length (p = 0.015). The other cephalometric variables were not significantly different between the two groups. An elongated tongue might be considered a risk factor for MI in OSA patients. The role of other variables remains inconclusive and open to investigation with larger samples (determined based on pilot studies such as this report) collected in longitudinal fashion.

  14. Electroacupuncture for children with autism spectrum disorder: pilot study of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Xiong; Wu-Li, Liu; Wong, Virginia C N

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to observe for efficacy, safety, and compliance of electroacupuncture for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Two (2) children with ASD received electroacupuncture for 24 sessions over 8 weeks and were assessed pre- and postacupuncture. We defined a positive or negative change as an improvement or deterioration of 25%, respectively, in total score or any subscales of Aberrant Behavioral Checklist (ABC), Ritvo-Freeman Real Life Scale (RFRLS), WeeFIM, and as a rating of much improved or much worse on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. For ABC, positive changes in "Irritability" and "Stereotypy" was noted in case 1 but no changes occurred for case 2. For RFRLS, positive changes were found for both cases in "Sensory motor," "Sensory response," and "Total score," although negative change was noted for case 2 in "Affectual response." For WeeFIM, there were no positive or negative changes in both cases. For CGI-I, positive change in case 1 with much improved in "Social relatedness, Communication, and Stereotypy behavior" was reported. A short intensive course of electroacupuncture might improve some core features of children with ASD.

  15. Salvage intraperitoneal chemotherapy for relapsed type II endometrial cancer: A pilot case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chen; Chang, Yen-Hou; Yi-Chang; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Epithelial ovarian cancer and relapsed type II endometrial cancer share common characteristics. Although the role of intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer has been well-established, its role in the treatment of relapsed type II endometrial cancer remains to be elucidated. Material and Methods From January 2000 to December 2012, patients who were diagnosed with relapsed type II endometrial cancer and underwent secondary cytoreductive surgery, patients with residual tumors less than 1 cm in diameter were initially screened for this study. Of the screened patients, consecutive patients who received salvage IP chemotherapy (IP platinum plus intravenous paclitaxel) were considered the case group. The case study group was matched to a control group that was composed of patients who received salvage systemic chemotherapy (intravenous platinum plus intravenous paclitaxel) in a 1:2 ratio. The overall survival was compared between the case group and the control group, and the IP treatment-related toxicities were reported. Results In total, 11 patients were assigned into the case group and 22 patients were assigned into the control group. The median overall survival (95% confidence interval) was 40.5 (25.5–56.2) months for the case group versus 28.0 (18.0–37.0) for the control group (hazard ratio=0.37 (95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.95); p=0.032, by the log-rank test). The most commonly observed toxicity was of gastrointestinal origin (81.8%). Toxicities that stemmed from hematological, cardiovascular, neurological, and catheter-related complications were similar to results published in other studies on IP chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Conclusion Salvage IP chemotherapy may potentially confer a longer overall survival than conventional systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of relapsed type II endometrial cancer. PMID:27990084

  16. Salvage intraperitoneal chemotherapy for relapsed type II endometrial cancer: A pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chen; Chang, Yen-Hou; Yi-Chang; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer and relapsed type II endometrial cancer share common characteristics. Although the role of intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer has been well-established, its role in the treatment of relapsed type II endometrial cancer remains to be elucidated. From January 2000 to December 2012, patients who were diagnosed with relapsed type II endometrial cancer and underwent secondary cytoreductive surgery, patients with residual tumors less than 1 cm in diameter were initially screened for this study. Of the screened patients, consecutive patients who received salvage IP chemotherapy (IP platinum plus intravenous paclitaxel) were considered the case group. The case study group was matched to a control group that was composed of patients who received salvage systemic chemotherapy (intravenous platinum plus intravenous paclitaxel) in a 1:2 ratio. The overall survival was compared between the case group and the control group, and the IP treatment-related toxicities were reported. In total, 11 patients were assigned into the case group and 22 patients were assigned into the control group. The median overall survival (95% confidence interval) was 40.5 (25.5-56.2) months for the case group versus 28.0 (18.0-37.0) for the control group (hazard ratio=0.37 (95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.95); p=0.032, by the log-rank test). The most commonly observed toxicity was of gastrointestinal origin (81.8%). Toxicities that stemmed from hematological, cardiovascular, neurological, and catheter-related complications were similar to results published in other studies on IP chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Salvage IP chemotherapy may potentially confer a longer overall survival than conventional systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of relapsed type II endometrial cancer.

  17. Buruli ulcer in Nigeria: results of a pilot case study in three rural districts.

    PubMed

    Ukwaja, Kingsley N; Meka, Anthony O; Chukwuka, Alphonsus; Asiedu, Kingsley B; Huber, Kristina L; Eddyani, Miriam; Chukwu, Joseph N; Anyim, Moses C; Nwafor, Charles C; Oshi, Daniel C; Madichie, Nelson O; Ekeke, Ngozi; Njoku, Martin; Ntana, Kentigern

    2016-04-22

    Buruli ulcer (BU), also known as Mycobacterium ulcerans disease, is the third most common mycobacterial disease worldwide. Although BU disease has been diagnosed among Nigerians in neighbouring West African countries, data on the burden of the disease in Nigeria itself are scanty. This study aimed to assess the magnitude and epidemiology of BU in the South South region of Nigeria. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in the Ogoja territory (comprising 31 communities). We undertook sensitisation programmes centred on BU in 10 of the communities. Participants were asked to identify community members with long-standing ulcers, who were then invited for evaluation. We also contacted traditional healers to refer their clients who had non-healing ulcers. All suspected cases had a full clinical evaluation and laboratory testing. Confirmed cases were given treatment in a referral hospital in the territory. We diagnosed 41 clinical BU cases; 36 (87.8 %) of which were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). These 36 PCR-confirmed cases were diagnosed in a total population of 192,169 inhabitants. Therefore, the estimated crude prevalence of BU was 18.7 per 100,000 population, varying from 6.0 to 41.4 per 100,000 in the districts surveyed. The majority (66.7 %) of the cases were females. About 92 % of the BU lesions were located on the patients' extremities. No differences were observed between the sexes in terms of the location of the lesions. The age of the patients ranged from four to 60 years, with a median age of 17 years. All 35 (100 %) patients who consented to treatment completed chemotherapy as prescribed. Of the treated cases, 29 (82.9 %) needed and received surgery. All cases healed, but 29 (82.9 %) had some limitations in movement. Healing with limitations in movement occurred in 18/19 (94.7 %) and 8/10 (80.0 %) of patients with lesions >15 cm (Category III) and 6-15 cm in diameter (Category II), respectively. The median duration of treatment

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  19. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  20. Campania Region (Italy) spontaneous reporting system and preventability assessment through a case-by-case approach: a pilot study on psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Maurizio; Rafaniello, Concetta; Sportiello, Liberata; Mascolo, Annamaria; Scavone, Cristina; Maccariello, Alessandra; Iannaccone, Teresa; Fabrazzo, Michele; Berrino, Liberato; Rossi, Francesco; Capuano, Annalisa

    2016-12-01

    We conducted the first pilot Italian study to assess the preventability of adverse drug reactions involving psychotropic drugs reported through spontaneous reporting system from 01/07/2012 to 31/12/2014 in Campania Region. Preventability was assessed, case-by-case, using an adapted version of the P-method. The evaluation was performed only for those reports that had, as suspected drug, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anxiolytic and/or sedative-hypnotic. Eighty-one cases (19.2%) out of 421 reported during the study period were preventable. In seventy-seven (95.1%) out of 81 preventable cases, the underlying mechanism of the adverse drug reactions was dose-related, in four (4.9%) preventable cases the underlying mechanism of the adverse drug reactions was respectively susceptibility- (1; 1.2%), unknown- (1; 1.2%) and time-related (2; 2.5%). In the 81 preventable cases, 97 critical criteria were detected of which 29/97 (29.9%) related to healthcare professionals' practices, 0/97 (0.0%) to drug quality and 68/97 (70.1%) to patient behaviour. We proved that it was possible to apply and adapt the P-Method to assess the preventability of the adverse drug reactions involving psychotropic drugs, analysing individual case safety report sent through Campania Region spontaneous reporting system. Information acquired will be used to organize educational activities for both physicians and patients to promote a more appropriate drug use.

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  2. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  3. The Use of Educational Knowledge; Evaluation of the Pilot State Dissemination Program. Volume II: Part VIII, Case Studies of Field Agents in Action. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieber, Sam D.; And Others

    This volume, a continuation of Volume I, presents Part VIII of the report and 12 appendixes. Part VIII is comprised of case studies of the activities of field agents in three states that are the target areas of the Pilot State Dissemination Program. The areas are designated "Southern Small Town,""The Hazelton Districts," and…

  4. Pilot Field Test Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherriff, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The Field Test study is currently in full swing, preceded by the successful completion of the Pilot Field Test study that paved the way for collecting data on the astronauts in the medical tent in Kazakhstan. Abigail Sherriff worked alongside Logan Dobbe on one Field Test aspect to determine foot clearance over obstacles (5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) using APDM Inc. Internal Measurement Units (IMU) worn by the astronauts. They created a program to accurately calculate foot clearance using the accelerometer, magnetometer, and gyroscope data with the IMUs attached to the top of the shoes. To validate the functionality of their program, they completed a successful study on test subjects performing various tasks in an optical motion studio, considered a gold standard in biomechanics research. Future work will include further validation and expanding the program to include other analyses.

  5. Developing role models for health in the fire service: a pilot case study

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Michelle L; Bailey, Maryanne M; Burnett, Monica; Frutchey, Robin; Goheer, Attia; Ram, Anita; Pollack, Keshia M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The objectives of this case study were to develop role models for health in the fire service through knowledge and behaviour change, to improve the role models’ own health, and to facilitate behaviour change in other firefighters through their example. Design Volunteers interested in improving their own health and serving as role models to others in the fire service were identified at a statewide Maryland fire service leadership meeting. Setting Participants worked with the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center to learn how to improve their own health and shared that knowledge with others in their fire departments. Participants Three Maryland fire service leaders were recruited at a leadership meeting with the goal of improving their own health and becoming role models. One participant dropped out shortly after beginning, while two male participants, aged 57 and 61, completed the study. Main outcome measures Quantitative measures were collected at baseline and 12 months, and included weight, blood pressure and fasting glucose and cholesterol. Semi-structured interviews were conducted approximately 14 months postintervention to determine the participants’ perceptions of their own health and impact on others in the fire service. Results Each participant had biweekly to monthly visits over a one-year period to learn the knowledge and skills that would assist him with improving dietary behaviours, increasing fitness and achieving a healthy weight. Case study participants experienced reductions in body weight (−13% and −11% of total body weight), glucose and blood pressure. Qualitative one-on-one interviews conducted postintervention with the participants revealed that they embraced their status as role models and felt their success inspired other firefighters. Their experiences suggest that role models can play an important role in helping firefighters increase self-efficacy, self-regulation and social support in the workplace environment

  6. Functional electrical stimulation with cycling in the critically ill: a pilot case-matched control study.

    PubMed

    Parry, Selina M; Berney, Sue; Warrillow, Stephen; El-Ansary, Doa; Bryant, Adam L; Hart, Nicholas; Puthucheary, Zudin; Koopman, Renè; Denehy, Linda

    2014-08-01

    The purpose was to determine (a) safety and feasibility of functional electrical stimulation (FES)-cycling and (b) compare FES-cycling to case-matched controls in terms of functional recovery and delirium outcomes. Sixteen adult intensive care unit patients with sepsis ventilated for more than 48 hours and in the intensive care unit for at least 4 days were included. Eight subjects underwent FES-cycling in addition to usual care and were compared to 8 case-matched control individuals. Primary outcomes were safety and feasibility of FES-cycling. Secondary outcomes were Physical Function in Intensive Care Test scored on awakening, time to reach functional milestones, and incidence and duration of delirium. One minor adverse event was recorded. Sixty-nine out of total possible 95 FES sessions (73%) were completed. A visible or palpable contraction was present 80% of the time. There was an improvement in Physical Function in Intensive Care Test score of 3.9/10 points in the intervention cohort with faster recovery of functional milestones. There was also a shorter duration of delirium in the intervention cohort. The delivery of FES-cycling is both safe and feasible. The preliminary findings suggest that FES-cycling may improve function and reduce delirium. Further research is required to confirm the findings of this study and evaluate the efficacy of FES-cycling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Case Production and Analysis: CLIPIR Pilot Observational Study, 1976. Research Series No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Annabelle; Weinshank, Annette

    The objectives of the Clinical Information Processes in Reading Project (CLIPIR) were to create simulated cases of reading difficulty, observe experienced reading diagnosticians as they interacted with those cases, and analyze the protocols of their proceedings. Cases were designed to represent commonly encountered reading difficulties. By…

  8. Evaluation of melatonin levels in saliva in gingivitis and periodontitis cases: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Karuna; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Khan, Mohammad Akhlaq; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the melatonin levels in saliva in gingivitis and periodontitis cases. Background: Melatonin has strong antioxidant, free radical scavenging, and immunomodulating properties, acts on osteoblasts directly to stimulate cell proliferation and synthesis of Type I collagen, and promotes bone formation. Materials and Methods: A total of thirty participants were selected and divided into three groups (control group, gingivitis group, and periodontitis group). In each group, ten participants were taken. Salivary melatonin was estimated in each of the three groups. Results: Results from this study showed that the mean levels of salivary melatonin increased as severity increased from control to periodontitis, i.e., the mean levels were highest in periodontitis followed by gingivitis and least in control group. The melatonin level of all participants was positively and significantly (P < 0.01) correlated with their gingival index (r = 0.85, P < 0.01) and probing depth (r = 0.72, P < 0.01). Conclusion: Salivary melatonin level varied with the severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. With increased severity of periodontal disease, the level of salivary melatonin also increased suggesting that salivary melatonin may act as a diagnostic biomarker for periodontal diseases. PMID:27994421

  9. Can facial proportions taken from images be of use for ageing in cases of suspected child pornography? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Cristina; Obertová, Zuzana; Ratnayake, Melanie; Marasciuolo, Laura; Tutkuviene, J; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Gabriel, Peter; Ritz-Timme, S

    2012-01-01

    The age of the victim plays a crucial role for the legal implications concerning pornography. Judges therefore often call on forensic experts to verify the age of individuals depicted on photographs or videos. However, there is no scientifically established protocol available for forensic practice in such cases. The conventional methods such as the evaluation of secondary sexual characteristics provide unsatisfactory results particularly when the legally relevant ages for child pornography (i.e. 14 and 18 years) are concerned. To overcome these limits, a European research group has explored the applicability of facial proportions as an age indicator on images. In this pilot study, standardized facial images of 353 females and 20 males from four age groups (6, 10, 14 and 18 years) were randomly selected for the metric analysis from a large data set including German, Italian and Lithuanian subjects. In this sample, several indices extracted from the frontal and lateral photographs were closely correlated to their respective indices taken from the living individuals. Furthermore, age-related changes were identified for indices taken from the photographs. The discriminant analysis showed that for the pooled sample, 60.3% of the cases were correctly classified into the respective age group. The percentage of correctly classified cases increased in the respective country samples as follows: 69.9% for Germany, 69.4% for Lithuania and 80.5% for Italy. The present study suggests that the metric assessment of the face may be used for age estimation on images. Nonetheless, more work needs to be done in order to verify the reliability of these findings on a large sample.

  10. Effects of acupuncture during labor and delivery in a U.S. hospital setting: a case-control pilot study.

    PubMed

    Citkovitz, Claudia; Klimenko, Elena; Bolyai, Melani; Applewhite, Liat; Julliard, Kell; Weiner, Zeev

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess clinical effects and logistical feasibility of acupuncture given during labor and delivery in a U.S. hospital setting. A case-control pilot study was conducted with 45 parturients receiving acupuncture during labor and delivery alongside standard care. Primary outcome endpoints were incidence of cesarean section, amount of parenteral opioids used, use of epidural anesthesia, and duration of labor. Secondary endpoints included patient satisfaction and nursing staff acceptance as assessed by postpartum questionnaire, maximum flow rate of oxytocin, incidence of instrumental delivery, Apgar score, and incidence of adverse event. Forty-five (45) patients receiving acupuncture were compared to 127 historical controls matched for maternal age, gestational age, parity, and use of oxytocin (augmentation and induction were matched separately). Acupuncture patients underwent significantly fewer cesarean sections (7% versus 20%, p = 0.004). No significant differences were noted in other clinical endpoints. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of nurses reported a subjective perception of improvement in patients' comfort with acupuncture, while 83% reported that the acupuncturists' presence never interfered with their work. Eighty-seven percent (87%) of patients reported that acupuncture had helped them. Acupuncture during labor and delivery is well tolerated by patients and medical staff. It should be further evaluated for its promise in potentially reducing the incidence of cesarean section.

  11. An interprofessional education pilot program in maternity care: findings from an exploratory case study of undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Meffe, Filomena; Claire Moravac, Catherine; Espin, Sherry

    2012-05-01

    An interprofessional team of maternity care providers and academics developed a pilot interprofessional education (IPE) program in maternity care for undergraduate students in nursing, midwifery and medicine. There are few published studies examining IPE programs in maternity care, particularly at the undergraduate level, that examine long-term outcomes. This paper outlines findings from a case study that explored how participation in an IPE program in maternity care may enhance student knowledge, skills/attitudes, and may promote their collaborative behavior in the practice setting. The program was launched at a Canadian urban teaching hospital and consisted of six workshops and two clinical shadowing experiences. Twenty-five semi-structured, in-depth interviews were completed with nine participants at various time points up to 20 months post-program. Qualitative analysis of transcripts revealed the emergence of four themes: relationship-building, confident communication, willingness to collaborate and woman/family-centered care. Participant statements about their intentions to continue practicing interprofessional collaboration more than a year post-program lend support to its sustained effectiveness. The provision of a safe learning environment, the use of small group learning techniques with mixed teaching strategies, augmented by exposure to an interprofessional faculty, contributed to the program's perceived success.

  12. Application of digital human modeling and simulation for vision analysis of pilots in a jet aircraft: a case study.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sougata; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Majumdar, Deepti; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomic evaluation of visual demands becomes crucial for the operators/users when rapid decision making is needed under extreme time constraint like navigation task of jet aircraft. Research reported here comprises ergonomic evaluation of pilot's vision in a jet aircraft in virtual environment to demonstrate how vision analysis tools of digital human modeling software can be used effectively for such study. Three (03) dynamic digital pilot models, representative of smallest, average and largest Indian pilot population were generated from anthropometric database and interfaced with digital prototype of the cockpit in Jack software for analysis of vision within and outside the cockpit. Vision analysis tools like view cones, eye view windows, blind spot area, obscuration zone, reflection zone etc. were employed during evaluation of visual fields. Vision analysis tool was also used for studying kinematic changes of pilot's body joints during simulated gazing activity. From present study, it can be concluded that vision analysis tool of digital human modeling software was found very effective in evaluation of position and alignment of different displays and controls in the workstation based upon their priorities within the visual fields and anthropometry of the targeted users, long before the development of its physical prototype.

  13. Pilot case control study of postural sway and balance performance in aging adults with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Maura D; Kale, Madhuri K; Sullivan, Joseph T

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), a degenerative disease encountered in adults > 65 years, is a leading cause of back and lower extremity pain, weakness, impaired sensation and balance. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether patients with LSS demonstrate increased postural sway and impaired balance, compared to healthy counterparts. Patients with varying severity of LSS and age and gender matched controls were recruited from a tertiary care hospital, yielding 6 case-control pairs. Subjects completed generic health status (SF-36), disease specific scales (LSS) and demographic forms. Medical comorbidities were extracted from medical records. Patients received a musculoskeletal examination and performed the Functional Reach (FR) and Timed "Up & Go" (TUG) tests. Stabilogram diffusion analysis (SDA) measured center of pressure (COP). Patients reported moderately impaired physical function, lumbar flexibility and walked with a slightly wider base of support. TUG scores did not differ across groups. Significantly limited FR scores indicated that patients had impaired dynamic balance and were at a greater risk of falls. SDA demonstrated no significant difference in sway for patients and controls; however, patients demonstrated significantly higher critical values for antero-posterior (AP) displacement than controls. Patients with LSS, even those with mild symptoms, demonstrate decreased function and balance, particularly in the AP direction. Physical examination measures and TUG are not adequate to assess balance impairments or risk of falls in these patients. Measures such as the FR and SDA may be useful in detecting the aspects of balance impairments perceived by patients.

  14. Revision of Viable Environmental Monitoring in a Development Pilot Plant Based on Quality Risk Assessment: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ildikó; Borbély-Jakab, Judit; Sugó, Lilla; Kovács, Réka J

    2017-01-01

    In this case study, the principles of quality risk management were applied to review sampling points and monitoring frequencies in the hormonal tableting unit of a formulation development pilot plant. In the cleanroom area, premises of different functions are located. Therefore a general method was established for risk evaluation based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) method to evaluate these premises (i.e., production area itself and ancillary clean areas) from the point of view of microbial load and state in order to observe whether the existing monitoring program met the emerged advanced monitoring practice.LAY ABSTRACT: In pharmaceutical production, cleanrooms are needed for the manufacturing of final dosage forms of drugs-intended for human or veterinary use-in order to protect the patient's weakened body from further infections. Cleanrooms are premises with a controlled level of contamination that is specified by the number of particles per cubic meter at a specified particle size or number of microorganisms (i.e. microbial count) per surface area. To ensure a low microbial count over time, microorganisms are detected and counted by environmental monitoring methods regularly. It is reasonable to find the easily infected places by risk analysis to make sure the obtained results really represent the state of the whole room. This paper presents a risk analysis method for the optimization of environmental monitoring and verification of the suitability of the method. © PDA, Inc. 2017.

  15. Consumption of foods by young children with diagnosed campylobacter infection - a pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Scott; Ried, Karin; Worsley, Anthony; Topping, David

    2004-02-01

    To determine whether parentally reported habitual intake of specific foods differed between children with diagnosed Campylobacter jejuni infection and children of a comparison group without diagnosed infection. Information was collected from the parents or primary caregivers of South Australian children aged 1-5 years with diagnosed C. jejuni (cases, n=172) and an age- and gender-matched group of uninfected children (controls, n=173). Frequency of consumption of 106 food and drink items was determined for the preceding two months by food-frequency questionnaire. Four children in the control group had recorded diarrhoeal episodes during the assessment period and were excluded, so 169 responses were evaluated for this group. Information was gathered on possible confounders including socio-economic status. Response frequencies were classified into three levels of consumption (rarely, weekly or daily) and statistical comparison was made by frequency of consumption of foods versus the 'rarely' classification for cases and controls, respectively. Frequency of consumption of most foods, including starchy foods and fruits and vegetables, did not differ between cases and controls. However, reported consumption of eight food items (block and processed cheese (slices and spread), salami/fritz (a form of processed sausage), chicken nuggets, pasteurised milk, fish (canned or fresh) and hot French fries) was significantly higher by controls. The hypothesis that reported consumption of starchy foods was lower by cases than by controls was not supported by the data. However, consumption of some processed and unprocessed foods was higher by controls. Some of these foods have established bactericidal actions in vitro that may indicate a possible mechanism for this apparent protection.

  16. The association between dental and periodontal diseases and sickle cell disease. A pilot case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Haidar; Al-Jawad, Abdulfatah; Al-Shayeb, Mahdi; Al-Ali, Ali; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa

    2014-01-01

    Objective This is a pilot case-control study conducted to investigate the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal disease and examine the possible association between oral health deterioration and SCD severity in a sample of Saudi SCD patients residing in the city of Al-Qatif, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods Dental examination to determine the Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth index (DMFT), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and plaque index system were recorded for 33 SCD patients and 33 age and sex-matched controls in the Al-Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia. Self-administered surveys used to assess socio-economic status; oral health behaviors for both SCD patients and controls were recorded. In addition, the disease severity index was established for all patients with SCD. SPSS data analysis software package version 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. Numerical variables were described as mean with a standard deviation. Results Decayed teeth were significantly more in individuals with ages ranging from 18 to 38 years with SCD compared to the control group (p = 0.036) due to oral hygiene negligence. The mean number of filled teeth was significantly lower in individuals with SCD when compared to the control group (p = 0.015) due to the lack of appropriate and timely treatment reflected in the survey responses of SCD patients as 15.2% only taking oral care during hospitalization. There were differences between the cases and controls in the known caries risk factors such as income level, flossing, and brushing habit. The DMFT, CPI, and plaque index systems did not differ significantly between the SCD patients and the control group. Conclusion Data suggest that patients with SCD have increased susceptibility to dental caries, with a higher prevalence of tooth decay and lower prevalence of filled teeth. Known caries risk factors influenced oral health more markedly than did factors related to SCD. PMID:25544813

  17. Peer Mentoring for International Students in a UK Law School: Lessons from a Pilot Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragavan, Shamini K.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study discusses the impact of a support network for international students of culturally diverse backgrounds using a peer mentoring scheme. The scheme focused on facilitating cultural integration in the international student community in Newcastle and sought to engender a cooperative community among new students. Data obtained…

  18. Peer Mentoring for International Students in a UK Law School: Lessons from a Pilot Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragavan, Shamini K.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study discusses the impact of a support network for international students of culturally diverse backgrounds using a peer mentoring scheme. The scheme focused on facilitating cultural integration in the international student community in Newcastle and sought to engender a cooperative community among new students. Data obtained…

  19. Cases of Impaired Oxidative Burst in HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants’ Neutrophils—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Maloupazoa Siawaya, Anicet Christel; Mveang-Nzoghe, Amandine; Mvoundza Ndjindji, Ofilia; Mintsa Ndong, Armel; Essone, Paulin N.; Djoba Siawaya, Joel Fleury

    2017-01-01

    An increased risk of serious bacterial infections in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants has been demonstrated. Although neutrophils are essential for the protection of infants against bacterial infections, no study has investigated their profile in HEU infants to date. In this study, we assessed the function of neutrophils in HEU infants using the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test. Among 25 HEU infants, 9 (36%) showed a reduced ability of their neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species upon stimulation with bacteria. No alteration of total neutrophil counts was noted in the blood of HEU infants indicating that the alteration observed in the 36% of HEU infants may only be functional. Conclusively, impaired neutrophil function could be a factor of vulnerability in HEU infants. PMID:28337206

  20. The Rorschach test and Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome: a pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Balottin, Umberto; Rossi, Maura; Rossi, Giorgio; Viganò, Lucia; Nanti, Marta; Salini, Silvia; Lanzi, Giovanni; Termine, Cristiano

    2009-10-01

    To date only three studies, all lacking a control group, have investigated the personality style underlying tic disorders or Tourette's syndrome (TS), using the projective Rorschach test. Despite the recent controversy about its proper use in clinical practice and research, the Rorschach test may be useful to explore personality organization in TS. The research hypothesis under investigation in this exploratory study was that young TS patients exhibit a peculiar personality organization, with significantly increased indicators of poor emotional control, aggression, anxiety and depression, on the Rorschach test, compared to healthy controls. We analyed the Rorschach protocols of 17 newly diagnosed paediatric TS patients and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Compared with the controls young TS patients recorded significantly lower mean percentages of F and F+ responses and a significantly higher number of FM and FC responses, thus showing reduced control of emotions and difficulty in integrating aggressivity. Furthermore, associations emerged between comorbidity with ADHD and increased emotional instability and between severity of tics and of OCD and a pattern of emotional hyper-control and application of rigid defensive mechanisms. These results seem to confirm the existence of a peculiar personality style in young TS patients and may have important implications, both pathogenetic and therapeutic.

  1. Immediate placement in extraction sites followed by immediate loading: a pilot study and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Aires, Ian; Berger, Joel

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the results of implants immediately loaded in edentulous sites with implants loaded immediately in extraction sites. Since December 1998, we selected a small group of patients for immediate or early loading. Seventy-five implants were placed in nine jaws of seven patients. Two of the patients received implants in both the maxilla and mandible. Of the 75 implants placed, 29 were placed in immediate extraction sites. Twenty-six of the 29 that were placed in immediate extraction sites were loaded in less than 3 weeks. Of the 75 implants placed, 62 were loaded early (less than 3 weeks). Two implants have been lost. The remaining 13 implants were buried and allowed to heal in the customary manner. None of the buried implants failed. One of the implants lost was in an extraction site and one was in a nonextraction site. Of the 33 implants that were placed in edentulous areas and immediately loaded, one was lost. This is compared with the 29 implants placed in extraction sites that were immediately loaded. We conclude that the success rates for implants immediately loaded in extraction sites and edentulous sites are comparable.

  2. An analysis of co-piloting in the teaching-learning process: a case study of science class debate.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Grégory; Minassian, Laure; Vinatier, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    In an ergonomic psychology approach, the teaching-learning process is considered a dynamic environment which emphasizes co-piloting by the teacher and the pupils. We suggest identifying exactly who takes charge in various co-piloting situations. This stems from observations of two videos of one teacher during two separate sessions of the same science class debate, carried out in different classes (the teacher's own class and an unknown class). The consideration of the teacher's and the pupils' positions towards a common reference point, comprised of posters presented by groups of pupils, as well as through pointing and indicating, allows for joint attention. This aims to identify traces of interactional modalities around a specific point of reference. This study has found that the teacher intervenes more often in a situation with an unknown class.

  3. The costs of change: a case study of the process of implementing individual budgets across pilot local authorities in England.

    PubMed

    Jones, Karen; Netten, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Individual budgets form a key element in the objective of the English Government to promote independence among people with needs for social care support. The initiative was designed to provide greater user control but the wider consequences, in terms of the implications for local authorities and their other responsibilities, remain to be addressed. An evaluation of the implementation of individual budgets in 13 local authorities was funded by the Department of Health, using a mixed methods approach to explore the impact of individual budgets both in terms of service user experiences and the implications for the local authority social services. One aspect of the evaluation concentrated on the cost implications of implementing individual budgets for the local authorities. All pilot local authorities were invited to take part in an interview designed to obtain the resources required to implement individual budget. Twelve of the 13 local authorities were part of the study reported in this article. All quantitative analysis was carried out using SPSS 13. Excluding all expenses that might be at least in part associated with the pilot process, in the first year, the estimated mean average cost was 290,000 pounds (median 270,000 pounds). This article will describe the initial approach adopted in estimating set-up costs, followed by a description of the findings for the first year of implementation and likely subsequent set-up costs. We also identify the range of factors that might affect reported costs.

  4. A Piloted Simulation Study of Wake Turbulence on Final Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1998-01-01

    A piloted simulation study has been conducted in a research simulator to provide a means to estimate the effects of different levels of wake turbulence on final approach. A worst-case methodology was used to ensure conservative estimates. Fourteen airline pilots voluntarily participated in the study and flew almost 1000 approaches. The pilots rated the subjective severity of the disturbances using a special rating scale developed for this study. Several objective measures of the airplane/pilot response to the simulated wake turbulence were also made. All the data showed a large amount of variation between pilots and to a lesser extent for a given pilot. Therefore, the data were presented at 50, 70, 90 percentile levels as a function of vortex strength. The data allow estimates of the vortex strength for a given subjective or objective response and vice versa. The results of this study appear to be more conservative than the results of previous studies.

  5. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
.

  6. Framework for planning and conducting pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa Janette; Harrison, Margaret B

    2009-12-01

    Researchers working with partners in home care to plan a pragmatic multicenter community-based, randomized, controlled trial for leg ulcer compression treatment realized a smaller pilot study would be necessary. Because no framework for conducting pilot studies could be found, the authors developed a framework for pilot study methodology to inform the planning of such research. To this end, an integrative literature review was conducted, guided by an explicit search strategy, retrieval procedures, and appraisal process, to identify recognized pilot study aims, processes, and methodologies used in previously reported community pilot studies. Factors influencing study inclusion were recognized pilot study aims and purposes and a concise working definition of pilot study. Methodologies used in previously conducted community pilot studies were reviewed. Although relevant published research was limited, 11 pilot studies met the inclusion criteria for this review and contained suggestions to further develop or improve plans for larger definitive trials to enable a better fit of protocols within the delivery systems and scopes of practice. Pilot research processes could be divided into two stages: early planning and pilot trial. Direction for procedures and methods was gained relative to planning for an effective pilot study regarding eligibility, recruitment and data collection, management, and analysis. The results were used to develop an organizing framework for the authors' pilot study and named the Pilot Research Process (PReP) Framework. The process was instrumental in working with the authors' research team and clinical partners in the planning of their leg ulcer treatment pilot study. This framework may provide a foundation for others to analyze or develop a pilot study methodology in planning a large-scale study.

  7. [Organized Post-Stroke Care through Case Management on the Basis of a Standardized Treatment Pathway : Results of a Single-Centre Pilot Study].

    PubMed

    Barlinn, J; Barlinn, K; Helbig, U; Siepmann, T; Pallesen, L-P; Urban, H; Pütz, V; Schmitt, J; Reichmann, H; Bodechtel, U

    2016-08-01

    Post-stroke care programs based on a standardized treatment pathway supported by case management may prevent secondary stroke and minimize risk factors. We aimed to determine the feasibility of a standardized treatment pathway and its impact on risk factor control, life-style changes and adherence to secondary prevention medication. We conducted a prospective pilot study in consecutive stroke patients. The 12-month post-stroke care program included regular perosnal and phone contact with a certified case manager. Target values for vascular risk factors following current recommendations of stroke guidelines were monitored and treated if necessary. In the case of deviations from the treatment pathway the case manager intervened. Patients were screened for recurrent stroke at the end of the program after 12 months. We enrolled 101 patients: 57.4 % were male, the median age was 72 (IQR, 62-80) years, median baseline NIHSS score was 2(IQR, 1-5), 79.2 % had an ischemic stroke, 3 % a hemorrhagic stroke, and 17.8 % a transient ischemic attack (TIA). Eighty-six (85.1 %) patients completed the program, 12 (11.9 %) withdrew from the program and 3 died of malignant diseases. In total, 628 personal (6.2/patient) and 2,683 phone contacts (26.6/patient) were conducted by the case manager. Three hundred-seventy-nine specific interventions were necessary mostly because of missing medication, non-compliance, and social needs. After 12 months, target goals for blood pressure, body mass index, nicotine use, and cholesterol were more frequently (p < 0.05) achieved than at baseline. No recurrent stroke occurred during the program. Our pilot data demonstrate that case management-based post-stroke care is feasible and may contribute to effective secondary prevention of stroke.

  8. Early tailored assertive community case management for hard-to-engage adolescents suffering from psychiatric disorders: an exploratory pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baier, Vanessa; Favrod, Jérôme; Ferrari, Pascale; Koch, Nathalie; Holzer, Laurent

    2013-02-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of assertive community treatment (ACT) on the mental health and overall functioning of adolescents suffering from severe psychiatric disorders and who refuse any traditional child psychiatric care. There are a few studies evaluating the effects of ACT on a population of adolescents with psychiatric disorders. This short report highlights the impact of an ACT programme tailored to the needs of these patients, not only as an alternative to hospitalization, but also as a new form of intervention for patients that are difficult to engage. The effect of ACT on 35 adolescents using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA) as a measuring tool in pre- and post-intervention was evaluated. The results show that the intervention was associated with a significant improvement on the HoNOSCA overall score, with the following items showing significant amelioration: hyperactivity/focus problems, non-organic somatic symptoms, emotional symptoms, scholastic/language skills, peer relationships, family relationships and school attendance. ACT appears as a feasible intervention for hard-to-engage adolescents suffering from psychiatric disorders. The intervention seems to improve their mental health and functioning. This pilot study may serve as a basis to prepare a controlled study that will also take the costs of the intervention into account. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Virtual patients: the influence of case design and teamwork on students’ perception and knowledge – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Virtual patient (VP) cases are an effective teaching method, although little is known about how to design and implement them for maximum effectiveness. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of case design and teamwork on students’ learning outcome. Methods One hundred forty-six undergraduate medical students participated in a mandatory medical computer science course consisting of five seminars. At the end of each seminar, they worked on one VP case, either in teams of two or individually. Each student filled out an introductory and a final survey and a feedback sheet after completing each case. Additionally, there was a surprise multiple choice (MC) test after the last seminar with three questions regarding each case. Results Students with more clinical experience and students who had worked in a team performed significantly better on MC questions. Students with less clinical experience more frequently used information which had been positioned less prominently on the case material. Certain aspects of case design were rated more positively by students who had an interest in e-learning. In general, students preferred to work on cases for less than 15 minutes. Conclusions Clinically more advanced students and students working with a partner seem to benefit most from short VP cases with prominently presented information. PMID:25000965

  10. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  11. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, A.; Moses, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Currently on the International Space Station (ISS) and other space vehicles Caution & Warning (C&W) alerts are represented with various auditory tones that correspond to the type of event. This system relies on the crew's ability to remember what each tone represents in a high stress, high workload environment when responding to the alert. Furthermore, crew receive a year or more in advance of the mission that makes remembering the semantic meaning of the alerts more difficult. The current system works for missions conducted close to Earth where ground operators can assist as needed. On long duration missions, however, they will need to work off-nominal events autonomously. There is evidence that speech alarms may be easier and faster to recognize, especially during an off-nominal event. The Information Presentation Directed Research Project (FY07-FY09) funded by the Human Research Program included several studies investigating C&W alerts. The studies evaluated tone alerts currently in use with NASA flight deck displays along with candidate speech alerts. A follow-on study used four types of speech alerts to investigate how quickly various types of auditory alerts with and without a speech component - either at the beginning or at the end of the tone - can be identified. Even though crew were familiar with the tone alert from training or direct mission experience, alerts starting with a speech component were identified faster than alerts starting with a tone. The current study replicated the results from the previous study in a more rigorous experimental design to determine if the candidate speech alarms are ready for transition to operations or if more research is needed. Four types of alarms (caution, warning, fire, and depressurization) were presented to participants in both tone and speech formats in laboratory settings and later in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA). In the laboratory study, the alerts were presented by software and participants were

  12. Speech Alarms Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Moses, Haifa

    2016-01-01

    Speech alarms have been used extensively in aviation and included in International Building Codes (IBC) and National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Life Safety Code. However, they have not been implemented on space vehicles. Previous studies conducted at NASA JSC showed that speech alarms lead to faster identification and higher accuracy. This research evaluated updated speech and tone alerts in a laboratory environment and in the Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) in a realistic setup.

  13. Case conferences between general practitioners and specialist teams to plan end of life care of people with end stage heart failure and lung disease: an exploratory pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Geoffrey; Zhang, Jianzhen; Burridge, Letitia; Senior, Hugh; Miller, Elizabeth; Young, Sharleen; Donald, Maria; Jackson, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Most people die of non-malignant disease, but most patients of specialist palliative care services have cancer. Adequate end of life care for people with non-malignant disease requires acknowledgement of their limited prognosis and appropriate care planning. Case conferences between specialist palliative care services and GPs improve outcomes in cancer-based populations. We report a pilot study of case conferences between the patient's GP and specialist staff to facilitate care planning for people with end stage heart failure or non-malignant lung disease in a regional health service in Queensland Australia. Single face to face case conferences about patients with a primary diagnosis of advanced heart failure or respiratory failure from non-malignant disease were conducted between a palliative care consultant, a case management nurse and the patient's GP. Annualised rates of service utilisation (emergency department [ED] presentations, ED discharges back to home, hospital admissions, and admission length of stay) before and after case conference were calculated. Content and counts of case conference recommendations, and the rate of adherence to recommendations were also assessed. A process evaluation of case conferences was undertaken. Twenty-three case conferences involving 21 GPs were conducted between November 2011 and November 2012. One GP refused to participate. Ten patients died, three at home. Of 82 management recommendations made, 55 (67%) were enacted. ED admissions fell from 13.9 per annum (pa) to 2.1 (difference 11.8, 95% CI 2.2-21.3, p = 0.001); ED admissions leading to discharge home from 3.9 to 0.4 pa (difference 3.5, 95% CI -0.4-7.5, p = 0.05); hospital admissions from 11.4 to 3.5 pa (difference 7.9, 95% CI 2.2-13.7, p = 0.002); and length of stay from 7.0 to 3.7 days (difference 3.4, 95% CI 0.9-5.8, p = 0.007). Participating health professionals were enthusiastic about the process. This pilot is the initial step in the development and testing of a

  14. MIDNY -- CASE STUDY #11: Testing the MIDNY Project Pilot Results in the Greater Egypt Region of Southern Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Martin G.

    Results of a six-year pilot program in community resource development, carried out in the five-county Central New York planning region are summarized. The program, administered by New York Cooperative Extension, involving Extension Service of U. S. Department of Agriculture and Colleges of Human Ecology and Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell…

  15. A PILOT STUDY COMPARING THE BLOCK SYSTEM AND THE INTERMITTENT SYSTEM OF SCHEDULING SPEECH CORRECTION CASES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEAVER, JOHN B.; WOLLERSHEIM, JANET P.

    TO DETERMINE THE MOST EFFICIENT USES OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SPEECH CORRECTIONIST'S SKILLS AND TIME, A STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE INTERMITTENT SYSTEM AND THE BLOCK SYSTEM OF SCHEDULING SPEECH CASES. WITH THE INTERMITTENT SYSTEM THE CORRECTIONIST IS ASSIGNED TO A NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND GENERALLY SEES CHILDREN TWICE A…

  16. Socialisation as a Factor in Poverty Identity Formation: A Pilot Case Study of the Poor in Selected Areas of Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raditloaneng, Wapula Nelly

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illuminate that acquisition of knowledge, positive attitudes, skills and identity formation are by-products of primary socialisation and secondary interaction with people and institutions from all walks of family life, environmental experiences, and lifestyles. Based on the first phase of a qualitative case study on…

  17. Socialisation as a Factor in Poverty Identity Formation: A Pilot Case Study of the Poor in Selected Areas of Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raditloaneng, Wapula Nelly

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illuminate that acquisition of knowledge, positive attitudes, skills and identity formation are by-products of primary socialisation and secondary interaction with people and institutions from all walks of family life, environmental experiences, and lifestyles. Based on the first phase of a qualitative case study on…

  18. Case-Control Pilot Study on Acute Diarrheal Disease in a Geographically Defined Pediatric Population in a Middle Income Country.

    PubMed

    Farfán-García, Ana E; Zhang, Chengxian; Imdad, Aamer; Arias-Guerrero, Monica Y; Sánchez-Alvarez, Nayibe T; Shah, Rikhil; Iqbal, Junaid; Tamborski, Maria E; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2017-01-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Understanding of the etiology of ADD is lacking in most low and middle income countries because reference laboratories detect limited number of pathogens. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility to conduct a comprehensive case-control study to survey diarrheal pathogens among children with and without moderate-to-severe ADD. Microbiology and molecular-based techniques were used to detect viral, bacterial, and parasitic enteropathogens. The study was conducted in Bucaramanga, Colombia, after Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Ninety children less than 5 years of age were recruited after a written informed consent was obtained from parents or guardians. Forty-five subjects served as cases with ADD and 45 as controls. Thirty-six subjects out of 90 (40.0%) were positive for at least one enteropathogen, that is, 20 (44.4%) cases and 16 (35.5%) controls. The three most common enteric pathogens were enteroaggregative E. coli (10.0%), Norovirus (6.7%), and Salmonella spp. (5.6%). The E. coli pathogens were 18.8% of all infections making them the most frequent pathogens. Half of ADD cases were negative for any pathogens.

  19. Case-Control Pilot Study on Acute Diarrheal Disease in a Geographically Defined Pediatric Population in a Middle Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Farfán-García, Ana E.; Zhang, Chengxian; Imdad, Aamer; Arias-Guerrero, Monica Y.; Sánchez-Alvarez, Nayibe T.; Shah, Rikhil; Iqbal, Junaid; Tamborski, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Understanding of the etiology of ADD is lacking in most low and middle income countries because reference laboratories detect limited number of pathogens. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility to conduct a comprehensive case-control study to survey diarrheal pathogens among children with and without moderate-to-severe ADD. Materials and Methods Microbiology and molecular-based techniques were used to detect viral, bacterial, and parasitic enteropathogens. The study was conducted in Bucaramanga, Colombia, after Institutional Review Board approval was obtained. Results Ninety children less than 5 years of age were recruited after a written informed consent was obtained from parents or guardians. Forty-five subjects served as cases with ADD and 45 as controls. Thirty-six subjects out of 90 (40.0%) were positive for at least one enteropathogen, that is, 20 (44.4%) cases and 16 (35.5%) controls. Conclusions The three most common enteric pathogens were enteroaggregative E. coli (10.0%), Norovirus (6.7%), and Salmonella spp. (5.6%). The E. coli pathogens were 18.8% of all infections making them the most frequent pathogens. Half of ADD cases were negative for any pathogens. PMID:28855919

  20. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Pilot Demonstration of Phased Retrofits in Florida Homes - Central and South Florida Homes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-01

    In this pilot project, the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction and Florida Power and Light are collaborating to retrofit a large number of homes using a phased approach to both simple and deep retrofits. This project will provide the information necessary to significantly reduce energy use through larger community-scale projects in collaboration with utilities, program administrators and other market leader stakeholders.

  1. Serotype 10A in case patients with invasive pneumococcal disease: a pilot study of PCR-based serotyping in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Samantha I; Apostolou, Andria; DasGupta, Sarmila; Delgado, Nelson; Kirn, Thomas J; Montana, Barbara; Tan, Christina; McHugh, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) identified a 21.1% increase in reported invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In 2009, NJDOH piloted nucleic acid-based serotyping to characterize serotypes causing IPD. From April through September, NJDOH received specimens from 149 of 302 (49%) case patients meeting our case definition. An uncommon serotype, 10A, accounted for 25.2% of IPD overall and was identified in 12 counties, but it was associated with one county (rate ratio = 5.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.1, 11.8). NJDOH subsequently conducted a case-control study to assess the presentation of and clinical risk factors for 10A IPD. Case patients with 10A IPD were more likely to have had immunosuppression, asthma, and multiple chronic medical conditions than control subjects had (odds ratio [OR] = 2.6, 95% CI 1.1, 6.3; OR=4.7, 95% CI 1.7, 13.2; and OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.0, 5.2, respectively). State-based pneumococcal serotype testing identified an uncommon serotype in New Jersey. Continued pneumococcal serotype surveillance might help the NJDOH identify and respond to future serotype-specific increases.

  2. Increasing Community Access to Fresh Fruits and Vegetables: A Case Study of the Farm Fresh Market Pilot Program in Cobb County, Georgia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Anne-Marie; Hermstad, April K.; Honeycutt, Sally; Munoz, Jennifer; Loh, Lorna; Brown, Agnes F.; Shipley, Rebecca; Kegler, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ecological models of health suggest that to effectively prevent chronic disease, community food environments must support healthy eating behaviors. However, disparities in access to healthy foods persist in the United States. Community Context The Farm Fresh Market (FFM) was a fruit and vegetable market that sold low-cost fresh produce in Cobb County, Georgia in 2014. Methods This case study describes the development of the FFM through a community engagement process and presents evaluation results from the project’s pilot implementation. Community engagement strategies included forming a community advisory board, conducting a needs assessment, and contracting with a community-based organization to implement the FFM. Outcome In the pilot year, the FFM served an average of 28.7 customers and generated an average of $140.20 in produce sales per market day. Most returning customers lived in the local community and reported a range of socioeconomic backgrounds. Most returning customers strongly agreed that the FFM made it easier (69.0%) and less expensive (79.0%) for them to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, reported that they ate more vegetables (65.0%) and fruit (55.0%) as a result of the FFM, and reported that they were very satisfied with the FFM overall (92.0%). Interpretation Results from this community case study underscore the importance of engaging communities in the development of community food environment interventions. Results also suggest that the FFM initiative was a feasible and acceptable way to respond to the community-identified public health priority of increasing access to healthy foods. PMID:26963860

  3. Increasing Community Access to Fresh Fruits and Vegetables: A Case Study of the Farm Fresh Market Pilot Program in Cobb County, Georgia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Rebecca C; Coleman, Anne-Marie; Hermstad, April K; Honeycutt, Sally; Munoz, Jennifer; Loh, Lorna; Brown, Agnes F; Shipley, Rebecca; Kegler, Michelle C

    2016-03-10

    Ecological models of health suggest that to effectively prevent chronic disease, community food environments must support healthy eating behaviors. However, disparities in access to healthy foods persist in the United States. The Farm Fresh Market (FFM) was a fruit and vegetable market that sold low-cost fresh produce in Cobb County, Georgia in 2014. This case study describes the development of the FFM through a community engagement process and presents evaluation results from the project's pilot implementation. Community engagement strategies included forming a community advisory board, conducting a needs assessment, and contracting with a community-based organization to implement the FFM. In the pilot year, the FFM served an average of 28.7 customers and generated an average of $140.20 in produce sales per market day. Most returning customers lived in the local community and reported a range of socioeconomic backgrounds. Most returning customers strongly agreed that the FFM made it easier (69.0%) and less expensive (79.0%) for them to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, reported that they ate more vegetables (65.0%) and fruit (55.0%) as a result of the FFM, and reported that they were very satisfied with the FFM overall (92.0%). Results from this community case study underscore the importance of engaging communities in the development of community food environment interventions. Results also suggest that the FFM initiative was a feasible and acceptable way to respond to the community-identified public health priority of increasing access to healthy foods.

  4. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  5. Investigating the impact of the properties of pilot points on calibration of groundwater models: case study of a karst catchment in Rote Island, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaas, Dua K. S. Y.; Imteaz, Monzur Alam

    2017-09-01

    A robust configuration of pilot points in the parameterisation step of a model is crucial to accurately obtain a satisfactory model performance. However, the recommendations provided by the majority of recent researchers on pilot-point use are considered somewhat impractical. In this study, a practical approach is proposed for using pilot-point properties (i.e. number, distance and distribution method) in the calibration step of a groundwater model. For the first time, the relative distance-area ratio ( d/ A) and head-zonation-based (HZB) method are introduced, to assign pilot points into the model domain by incorporating a user-friendly zone ratio. This study provides some insights into the trade-off between maximising and restricting the number of pilot points, and offers a relative basis for selecting the pilot-point properties and distribution method in the development of a physically based groundwater model. The grid-based (GB) method is found to perform comparably better than the HZB method in terms of model performance and computational time. When using the GB method, this study recommends a distance-area ratio of 0.05, a distance-x-grid length ratio ( d/ X grid) of 0.10, and a distance-y-grid length ratio ( d/ Y grid) of 0.20.

  6. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  7. Evaluation of hepatitis C virus intrafamilial transmission among families with one index case, a pilot study from Fars province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Lankarani, Kamran B.; Ardebili, Maryam; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Nejabat, Maryam; Hemmati Rad, Mohammad Amir; Hosseini, Seyed Younes

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to survey the rate and risk factors for Hepatitis C virus interfamilial transmission among families with one index case. Background: The role of intrafamilial transmission in Hepatitis C virus epidemiology is still debated. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 34 families (236 members) of HCV infected patients from Fars province, spring to summer 2013. All subjects were first evaluated for the risk factors of exposure and then their serum was checked for the presence of HCV antibody and the genome, using ELISA and PCR. The genotype of all PCR positive cases was also determined by a commercial assay. Two independent sample t test and Chi-Square test were used to compare groups together. Results: In 18 out of 34 families, HCV antibody was detected (52.9%) in new members. Among them, HCV transmission in 11 families (32%) was also confirmed by PCR. Having a history of intravenous drug abuse (P=0.006) and incarceration (P=0.01) showed to be important risk factors for interfamilial transmission. Hence, blade/needle sharing (P=0.016) just following molecular assay and sex (P=036) only in the serologic analysis were also determined as significant risk factors. Furthermore, based on serologic results, medium socioeconomic state was further associated with this manner of transmission (P=0.019 and P=0.328). Interestingly, among relatives, 13 cases were brothers while just 5 cases were couples. The genotypes 3a and 1a were more prevalent among the population. Conclusion: In conclusion, our finding highlighted a noticeable role of interfamilial transmission for HCV spread and supports the significant role of close relatives, especially brother relationship in this spread. Hence, the socioeconomic state was associated with the transmission rate of virus in the family. PMID:27895850

  8. Surgical correction of disc pathology in fighter pilots: a review of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Vallejo Desviat, Pilar; Esteban Benavides, Beatriz; López López, Jose A; Rios-Tejada, Francisco; Bárcena, Alejandro; Alvarez-Sala, Fernando; Alonso Rodríguez, Cesar

    2007-08-01

    Disorders of the spine are common in fighter crewmembers. The high cost of training and experience for pilots makes it important to use all reasonable clinical means to restore grounded pilots to their flying duties, provided that all safety standards are maintained. To date, there has been limited research into specific surgical treatment of spine injury in pilots. This study was designed to examine the efficacy of surgical procedures in Spanish Air Force fighter pilots with injuries to the spine, as well as the aeromedical disposition of such pilots. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 14 fighter pilots with symptomatic spinal disorders treated by surgery. The 14 pilots underwent surgery: 12 cases involved fusion of vertebral structures (arthrodesis), while 2 pilots underwent discectomy. All pilots were subsequently given waivers to resume flying duties. The successful return to flight status of these pilots indicates the practical application of surgical techniques that safely stabilize the spine. However, due the sample limited size of the sample, further studies are needed.

  9. Adolescent Project Pilot for an Outcome Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louden, Jenifer H.; Kamara, Sheku G.

    This report describes a 7-week pilot study conducted to estimate probable participation rates for a planned substance abuse treatment outcomes study. The pilot program tested whether acceptable response rates might be obtained by contacting clients whose records had been examined by an earlier study (retrospective) or by contacting current clients…

  10. Ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure and arterial stiffness measurement in Marfan syndrome patients: a case control feasibility and pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Matthias; Nouri, Ghazaleh; Hametner, Bernhard; Parragh, Stephanie; Köster, Jelena; Mortensen, Kai; Schwarz, Achim; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Wassertheurer, Siegfried

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this work is the investigation of measures of ambulatory brachial and aortic blood pressure and indices of arterial stiffness and aortic wave reflection in Marfan patients. A case-control study was conducted including patients with diagnosed Marfan syndrome following Ghent2 nosology and healthy controls matched for sex, age and daytime brachial systolic blood pressure. For each subject a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and 24 h pulse wave analysis measurement was performed. All parameters showed a circadian pattern whereby pressure dipping was more pronounced in Marfan patients. During daytime only Marfan patients with aortic root surgery showed increased pulse wave velocity. In contrast, various nighttime measurements, wave reflection determinants and circadian patterns showed a significant difference. The findings of our study provide evidence that ambulatory measurement of arterial stiffness parameters is feasible and that these determinants are significantly different in Marfan syndrome patients compared to controls in particular at nighttime. Further investigation is therefore indicated.

  11. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

    2012-05-18

    We estimate the long-run economic value of variable renewable generation with increasing penetration using a unique investment and dispatch model that captures long-run investment decisions while also incorporating detailed operational constraints and hourly time resolution over a full year. High time resolution and the incorporation of operational constraints are important for estimating the economic value of variable generation, as is the use of a modeling framework that accommodates new investment decisions. The model is herein applied with a case study that is loosely based on California in 2030. Increasing amounts of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) with and without thermal energy storage (TES) are added one at a time. The marginal economic value of these renewable energy sources is estimated and then decomposed into capacity value, energy value, day-ahead forecast error cost, and ancillary services. The marginal economic value, as defined here, is primarily based on the combination of avoided capital investment cost and avoided variable fuel and operations and maintenance costs from other power plants in the power system. Though the model only captures a subset of the benefits and costs of renewable energy, it nonetheless provides unique insights into how the value of that subset changes with technology and penetration level. Specifically, in this case study implementation of the model, the marginal economic value of all three solar options is found to exceed the value of a flat-block of power (as well as wind energy) by \\$20--30/MWh at low penetration levels, largely due to the high capacity value of solar at low penetration. Because the value of CSP per unit of energy is found to be high with or without thermal energy storage at low penetration, we find little apparent incremental value to thermal storage at low solar penetration in the present case study analysis. The marginal economic value of PV and CSP without thermal

  12. 30. PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS STARBOARD, WOODEN COMPASS CASE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. PILOT HOUSE, LOOKING TOWARDS STARBOARD, WOODEN COMPASS CASE AND HELM. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  13. The juvenile face as a suitable age indicator in child pornography cases: a pilot study on the reliability of automated and visual estimation approaches.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, M; Obertová, Z; Dose, M; Gabriel, P; Bröker, H M; Brauckmann, M; Barkus, A; Rizgeliene, R; Tutkuviene, J; Ritz-Timme, S; Marasciuolo, L; Gibelli, D; Cattaneo, C

    2014-09-01

    In cases of suspected child pornography, the age of the victim represents a crucial factor for legal prosecution. The conventional methods for age estimation provide unreliable age estimates, particularly if teenage victims are concerned. In this pilot study, the potential of age estimation for screening purposes is explored for juvenile faces. In addition to a visual approach, an automated procedure is introduced, which has the ability to rapidly scan through large numbers of suspicious image data in order to trace juvenile faces. Age estimations were performed by experts, non-experts and the Demonstrator of a developed software on frontal facial images of 50 females aged 10-19 years from Germany, Italy, and Lithuania. To test the accuracy, the mean absolute error (MAE) between the estimates and the real ages was calculated for each examiner and the Demonstrator. The Demonstrator achieved the lowest MAE (1.47 years) for the 50 test images. Decreased image quality had no significant impact on the performance and classification results. The experts delivered slightly less accurate MAE (1.63 years). Throughout the tested age range, both the manual and the automated approach led to reliable age estimates within the limits of natural biological variability. The visual analysis of the face produces reasonably accurate age estimates up to the age of 18 years, which is the legally relevant age threshold for victims in cases of pedo-pornography. This approach can be applied in conjunction with the conventional methods for a preliminary age estimation of juveniles depicted on images.

  14. No Association between Mycotoxin Exposure and Autism: A Pilot Case-Control Study in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Duringer, Jennifer; Fombonne, Eric; Craig, Morrie

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of environmental risk factors in the development of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is needed for a more complete understanding of disease etiology and best approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. A pilot experiment in 54 children (n = 25 ASD, n = 29 controls; aged 12.4 ± 3.9 years) screened for 87 urinary mycotoxins via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to assess current exposure. Zearalenone, zearalenone-4-glucoside, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and altenuene were detected in 9/54 (20%) samples, most near the limit of detection. No mycotoxin/group of mycotoxins was associated with ASD-diagnosed children. To identify potential correlates of mycotoxin presence in urine, we further compared the nine subjects where a urinary mycotoxin was confirmed to the remaining 45 participants and found no difference based on the presence or absence of mycotoxin for age (t-test; p = 0.322), gender (Fisher’s exact test; p = 0.456), exposure or not to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (Fisher’s exact test; p = 0.367), or to other medications (Fisher’s exact test; p = 1.00). While no positive association was found, more sophisticated sample preparation techniques and instrumentation, coupled with selectivity for a smaller group of mycotoxins, could improve sensitivity and detection. Further, broadening sampling to in utero (mothers) and newborn-toddler years would cover additional exposure windows. PMID:27447670

  15. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects, and was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  16. Transconjunctival retinopexy with active external drainage of subretinal fluid: a prospective pilot study of eight consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Jorge, Rodrigo; Scott, Ingrid Ursula

    2007-01-01

    To describe an alternative surgical technique for the management of retinal detachment with no or minimal proliferative vitreoretinopathy (grade B) using transconjunctival retinopexy with active external drainage of subretinal fluid. In a prospective, interventional study, eight consecutive patients with retinal detachment with no or minimal proliferative vitreoretinopathy (grade B) underwent transconjunctival retinopexy with active external drainage of subretinal fluid. Transconjunctival external drainage of subretinal fluid was achieved by using a 29 gauge needle placed in the subretinal space under indirect ophthalmoscopic monitoring. Active suction was performed (500 mmHg vacuum) using a vitrectomy line coupled to the needle. After retinal reattachment, cryotherapy was applied to the scleral region corresponding to the area of the retinal break(s). In all cases there was retinal attachment at the end of surgery. Retinal redetachment occurred in four pseudophakic patients who then underwent pars plana vitrectomy. The four phakic patients maintained retinal attachment during follow-up (13-20 months). Transconjunctival retinopexy with active external drainage of subretinal fluid represents a useful, faster, and cheaper alternative to scleral buckling for retinal detachments with no or minimal proliferative retinopathy in phakic patients and, unlike scleral buckling, is not associated with induced myopia.

  17. Treating breast cancer radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation with a traditional Chinese medicine formula: a case series pilot study.

    PubMed

    Xiaoshan, Wang; Zhixi, Li; Liang, Liang; Shuchun, Luo; Xia, Wang; Yuyi, Wang; Feng, Luo

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Objective: A case series is presented to investigate the efficacy and safety of Erhegao for patients with breast cancer who have radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation. Eighteen women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy and developed moist desquamation were enrolled. Erhegao cream, a Traditional Chinese Medicine formula consisting of zinc oxide powder, calamine powder, and lithospermum oil, was applied on areas of moist desquamation. Application was repeated once a day until healing. The primary end point for efficacy was the time to healing of the moist desquamation areas. A numerical rating scale was used to measure wound pain relief daily. Incidence of toxicity was also assessed. The average time to healing of the moist desquamation area was 13.56 days. The mean pain scores on the first, third, and seventh days were 5.22, 2.94, and 0.83, respectively. Eight-three percent of patients reported pain relief after the first 3 days, and 94%, after the first week. The mean daily reduction in the pain score was 0.40. None of the patients developed clinical infections or reported any toxicity. This formula is effective and safe, especially for pain relief, and may be an alternative treatment for radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation in patients with breast cancer. Future randomized, controlled studies are needed to better evaluate the efficacy of Erhegao cream.

  18. A Lead ANRIL Polymorphism Is Associated with Elevated CRP Levels in Periodontitis: A Pilot Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Teeuw, Wijnand J; Laine, Marja L; Bizzarro, Sergio; Loos, Bruno G

    2015-01-01

    Elevated high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker for systemic inflammation and a risk marker for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD), and has also been associated with periodontitis. Inter-individual variation for hsCRP in periodontitis has been shown. ANRIL is the strongest genetic susceptibility locus for both periodontitis and ACVD, and it is speculated that genetic variation in ANRIL may modulate inflammatory processes. Therefore, we explored the possible association between hsCRP plasma levels and a leading ANRIL single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in periodontitis patients and controls. 171 healthy subjects with North European descent (115 periodontitis and 56 controls) were included in this case-control study. hsCRP levels were determined and subjects were genotyped for the leading ANRIL SNP rs1333048. In a multivariate analysis, periodontitis, female gender, increasing BMI and homozygosity for the major allele (AA-genotype) of rs1333048 were significantly associated with elevated hsCRP plasma levels (p = 0.012, p = 0.004, p = 0.007 and p = 0.003, respectively). Periodontitis patients with rs1333048 AA-genotype showed higher levels of hsCRP than those carrying the minor C allele (median: 4.5 mg/L vs. 1.6 mg/L, padjusted = 0.007). This study is the first to show that, in addition to gender and BMI, also a leading SNP in ANRIL is explanatory for inter-individual variation in hsCRP levels in periodontitis patients of North European descent.

  19. Drug-related problems in geriatric rehabilitation patients after discharge - A prevalence analysis and clinical case scenario-based pilot study.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Johanna; Hueter, Lucie; Kasprick, Lysann; Frese, Thomas; Sultzer, Ralf; Schiek, Susanne; Bertsche, Thilo

    2017-07-25

    Geriatric patients bear a high risk for having drug-related problems (DRPs). Transitions of care are especially susceptible to these DRPs. To highlight the prevalence of DRPs in geriatric patients' post-discharge medication lists and to assess physicians' ability to identify DRPs by using clinical case scenarios. A sequential prospective mixed-method study was performed. In a DRP prevalence analysis, an expert panel of clinical pharmacists analyzed DRPs in post-discharge medication lists of long-term hospitalized patients from a German inpatient geriatric rehabilitation center. Based on these results, the expert panel created two clinical case scenarios with applicable medication history. The cases were reflective of the most commonly identified DRPs. They were provided to hospital physicians and general practitioners (GPs) for assessment. Physicians were asked whether they approve the prescriptions in the clinical case scenarios. If a physician had not identified a prescription containing a defined DRP, the clinical pharmacist then provided drug information about it. With this, physicians' ability to identify DRPs and their response to a theoretical intervention was assessed. DRP prevalence analysis: A total of 639 prescriptions were analyzed from 63 enrolled patients of whom 52 (83%) were affected by at least one DRP. Twenty-eight hospital physicians and 26 GPs have been assessed. They identified 172 (46%) from 378 possible DRPs (seven DRPs multiplied by 54 physicians). For unidentified DRPs, physicians received tailored drug information and the number of identified DRPs rose to 298 (79%). A clear majority of patients were affected by DRPs. However, the results from the following pilot study confirm that many DRPs at care transitions can be reduced by providing applicable medication history and drug information. This intervention can be done by clinical pharmacists as part of the multidisciplinary care team in routine care. Geriatric patients bear a high risk

  20. Evaluation of a Pilot Project on Information and Communication Technology for Rural Education Development: A Cofimvaba Case Study on the Educational Use of Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phiri, Acheson Charles; foko, Thato; Mahwai, Nare

    2014-01-01

    In an endeavour to find solutions to the country's improving but ailing education system the South African government through some of its departments is attempting to find out if the introduction of technology in the class room has the potential to improve teaching and learning. The paper is based on a pilot study currently underway in Cofimvaba…

  1. Comparison of organochlorine chemical body burdens of female breast cancer cases with cancer free women in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil--Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, C.A.; Petreas, M.X.; Caleffi, M.; Barbosa, F.S.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    1999-12-01

    This pilot study collected preliminary data to examine known and suspected breast cancer risk factors among women living in rural and urban areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil by questionnaire. In addition, the body burden levels of a panel of organochlorines was measured in a small clinic-based prospective sample.

  2. A Hybrid Approach Using Case-Based Reasoning and Rule-Based Reasoning to Support Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Renata M; Bezerra, João; Perkusich, Mirko; Almeida, Hyggo; Siebra, Clauirton

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in applying information technology to support the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In this paper, we present a hybrid approach using case-based reasoning (CBR) and rule-based reasoning (RBR) to support cancer diagnosis. We used symptoms, signs, and personal information from patients as inputs to our model. To form specialized diagnoses, we used rules to define the input factors' importance according to the patient's characteristics. The model's output presents the probability of the patient having a type of cancer. To carry out this research, we had the approval of the ethics committee at Napoleão Laureano Hospital, in João Pessoa, Brazil. To define our model's cases, we collected real patient data at Napoleão Laureano Hospital. To define our model's rules and weights, we researched specialized literature and interviewed health professional. To validate our model, we used K-fold cross validation with the data collected at Napoleão Laureano Hospital. The results showed that our approach is an effective CBR system to diagnose cancer.

  3. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  4. BIMOMASS GASIFICATION PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a gasification pilot program using two biomass feedstocks: bagasse pellets and wood chips. he object of the program was to determine the properties of biomass product gas and its suitability as a fuel for gas-turbine-based power generation cycles. he f...

  5. Prospective Assessment of Nocturnal Awakenings in a Case Series of Treatment-Seeking Chronic Insomnia Patients: A Pilot Study of Subjective and Objective Causes

    PubMed Central

    Krakow, Barry; Romero, Edward; Ulibarri, Victor A.; Kikta, Shara

    2012-01-01

    assessment of nocturnal awakenings in a case series of treatment-seeking chronic insomnia patients: a pilot study of subjective and objective causes. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1685-1692. PMID:23204611

  6. Improving proprioceptive deficits after stroke through robot-assisted training of the upper limb: a pilot case report study.

    PubMed

    Colombo, R; Sterpi, I; Mazzone, A; Delconte, C; Pisano, F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a conventional robot-assisted therapy of the upper limb was able to improve proprioception and motor recovery of an individual after stroke who exhibited proprioceptive deficits. After robotic sensorimotor training, significant changes were observed in kinematic performance variables. Two quantitative parameters evaluating position sense improved after training. Range of motion during shoulder and wrist flexion improved, but only wrist flexion remained improved at 3-month follow-up. These preliminary results suggest that intensive robot-aided rehabilitation may play an important role in the recovery of sensory function. However, further studies are required to confirm these data.

  7. Impact of Windows and Daylight Exposure on Overall Health and Sleep Quality of Office Workers: A Case-Control Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Boubekri, Mohamed; Cheung, Ivy N.; Reid, Kathryn J.; Wang, Chia-Hui; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: This research examined the impact of daylight exposure on the health of office workers from the perspective of subjective well-being and sleep quality as well as actigraphy measures of light exposure, activity, and sleep-wake patterns. Methods: Participants (N = 49) included 27 workers working in windowless environments and 22 comparable workers in workplaces with significantly more daylight. Windowless environment is defined as one without any windows or one where workstations were far away from windows and without any exposure to daylight. Well-being of the office workers was measured by Short Form-36 (SF-36), while sleep quality was measured by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). In addition, a subset of participants (N = 21; 10 workers in windowless environments and 11 workers in workplaces with windows) had actigraphy recordings to measure light exposure, activity, and sleep-wake patterns. Results: Workers in windowless environments reported poorer scores than their counterparts on two SF-36 dimensions—role limitation due to physical problems and vitality—as well as poorer overall sleep quality from the global PSQI score and the sleep disturbances component of the PSQI. Compared to the group without windows, workers with windows at the workplace had more light exposure during the workweek, a trend toward more physical activity, and longer sleep duration as measured by actigraphy. Conclusions: We suggest that architectural design of office environments should place more emphasis on sufficient daylight exposure of the workers in order to promote office workers' health and well-being. Citation: Boubekri M, Cheung IN, Reid KJ, Wang CH, Zee PC. Impact of windows and daylight exposure on overall health and sleep quality of office workers: a case-control pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(6):603-611. PMID:24932139

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid markers of central nervous system injury in decompression illness - a case-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shahim, Pashtun; Arnell, Per; Kvarnström, Andreas; Rosén, Anders; Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) may cause a wide variety of symptoms, including central nervous system (CNS) manifestations. The main objective of this study was to examine whether DCS is associated with neuronal injury, and whether DCS could result in altered amyloid metabolism. Seven, male divers with DCS and seven age-matched controls were included in the study. All the divers were treated by recompression but the controls did not receive hyperbaric oxygen. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 7-10 days after the diving injury and at three months follow-up. CSF biomarkers of neuronal injury, astroglial Injury/activation, and a range of markers of amyloid β (Aβ) metabolism, as well as two proinflammatory interleukins, were analysed using immunochemical methods. There were no significant differences in the best-established CSF markers of neuronal injury, total tau (T-tau) and neurofilament light, between DCS patients and controls or between the two sampling time points. Also, there were no significant changes in the astroglial or amyloid (Aβ)-related markers between DCS patients and controls. However, the only diver with CNS symptoms had the highest levels of CSF T-tau, Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42. The results of our study speak against subclinical CNS injury or induction of inflammation or amyloid build-up in the brain among the six DCS patients without neurological symptoms. Further research, including on divers with CNS DCS, is justified.

  9. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  10. Job Rotation at Cardiff University Library Service: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earney, Sally; Martins, Ana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents case study research of a job rotation pilot involving six library assistants in Cardiff University Library Service (ULS). Firstly, it investigates whether job rotation improves motivation and secondly, whether there is an improvement in skills, both technical and "soft". Following a review of the literature,…

  11. Assessing the Flipped Classroom in Operations Management: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prashar, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The author delved into the results of a flipped classroom pilot conducted for an operations management course module. It assessed students' perception of a flipped learning environment after making them experience it in real time. The classroom environment was construed using a case research approach and students' perceptions were studied using…

  12. Piloting a classroom‐based intervention in after‐school programmes: a case study in science migration

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Kathryn; Smith, Emilie Phillips; Perkins, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Policy-makers are looking to after-school programs to improve family and child well-being and are searching for evidence-based ways to improve the quality of after-school programs. This study examines whether the Good Behavior Game, a behavior management curriculum designed for school classrooms, can be easily migrated to academically-focused after-school programs. Our results are based on program observations, qualitative interviews, and ratings of implementation fidelity. We provide a description of the structure and activities in these after-school programs, then identify challenges to implementing and evaluating classroom-based interventions in the after-school setting. PMID:26609315

  13. An open-label pilot study of apremilast for the treatment of moderate to severe lichen planus: a case series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Joan; Foss, Clare E; Hirano, Stefanie A; Cunningham, Tina D; Pariser, David M

    2013-02-01

    Current treatments for chronic lichen planus (LP) are often ineffective and may have significant adverse side effects. An alternative safe and effective treatment for recalcitrant LP is needed. We sought to study the safety and efficacy of apremilast in the treatment of moderate to severe LP. Ten patients with biopsy-proven LP received 20 mg of apremilast orally twice daily for 12 weeks with 4 weeks of treatment-free follow-up. The primary efficacy end point was the proportion of patients achieving a 2-grade or more improvement in the Physician Global Assessment (PGA) after 12 weeks of treatment. Three (30%) of the 10 patients achieved a 2-grade or more improvement in the PGA after 12 weeks of treatment; however, all patients demonstrated statistically significant clinical improvement with respect to secondary parameters between baseline and the end of treatment. It may be difficult to generalize the results of this study to a larger patient population with LP because of our small sample size and lack of a control group. In addition, a longer treatment period or higher dose may have been needed for therapeutic efficacy. The safety and efficacy of long-term apremilast therapy is currently unknown. Apremilast may be efficacious in the treatment of LP, but double-blinded, controlled trials are necessary to thoroughly evaluate its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The involvement of men in maternal health care: cross-sectional, pilot case studies from Maligita and Kibibi, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Singh, Debra; Lample, May; Earnest, Jaya

    2014-09-05

    The International Conference on Population Development held in Cairo in 1994 identified the importance of male involvement in reproductive health programs. Since then, there has been an increase in reproductive health initiatives that target both men and women in an attempt to fulfill the 5th Millenium Development Goal. Yet, while the benefits of male involvement have been acknowledged, there continues to be a challenge in creating a space for and engaging men in maternal health. This is problematic due to the role of men as the head of the household in many countries, especially developing countries, which suffer from higher rates of maternal mortality. Furthermore, men are important as partners, fathers and health care professionals and as such it is important to involve and engage with men in maternal health education, and antenatal care. The purpose of this study undertaken in two rural villages in southeastern Uganda, was twofold: firstly to understand men's current participation in antenatal, pregnancy care and childbirth and secondly to gain insight into both men and women's attitudes toward increased male involvement. Focus group discussions and semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect information from 35 men and women. The women were either pregnant or had been involved in a birth experience in the past 3 years and the men had wives who were pregnant or had given birth recently. Men interviewed in the two villages believed that issues related to pregnancy and childbirth were the domain of women. Involvement tended to be confined (to removed) strictly to traditional gender roles, with men's main responsibility being provision of funds. The women, on the other hand, were interested in receiving more support from their husband through planning, attendance to antenatal care and physical presence in the vicinity of where the birth was taking place. This cross-sectional study has highlighted the space for increased male involvement and participation

  15. Association between IRS1 Gene Polymorphism and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Case-Control Study in Korean Males

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Su Kang; Kang, Won Sub; Park, Jin Kyung; Kim, Young Jong; Nam, Min; Kim, Jong Woo; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway is thought to play an important role in brain development. Altered levels of IGFs and their signaling regulators have been shown in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. In this study, we investigated whether coding region single-nucleotide polymorphisms (cSNPs) of the insulin receptor substrates (IRS1 and IRS2), key mediators of the IGF pathway, were associated with ASD in Korean males. Two cSNPs (rs1801123 of IRS1, and rs4773092 of IRS2) were genotyped using direct sequencing in 180 male ASD patients and 147 male control subjects. A significant association between rs1801123 of IRS1 and ASD was shown in additive (p = 0.022, odds ratio (OR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.46–0.95) and dominant models (p = 0.013, OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.37–0.89). Allele frequency analysis also showed an association between rs1801123 and ASD (p = 0.022, OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). These results suggest that IRS1 may contribute to the susceptibility of ASD in Korean males. PMID:27483248

  16. Language improvements after TMS plus modified CILT: Pilot, open-protocol study with two, chronic nonfluent aphasia cases.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paula I; Treglia, Ethan; Naeser, Margaret A; Ho, Michael D; Baker, Errol H; Martin, Elizabeth G; Bashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate: 1) the feasibilty of administering a modified CILT (mCILT) treatment session immediately after TMS; and 2) if this combined therapy could improve naming and elicited propositional speech in chronic, nonfluent aphasia. Two chronic stroke patients with nonfluent aphasia (mild-moderate and severe) each received twenty minutes of rTMS to suppress the right pars triangularis, followed immediately by three hours of mCILT (5 days/week, 2 weeks). (Each patient had received TMS alone, 2-6 years prior.) Language evaluations were performed pre- TMS+mCILT, and post- at 1-2 months, and 6 or 16 months. Both patients showed significant improvements in naming pictures, and elicited propositional speech at 1-2 months post- TMS+mCILT. The improved naming was still present at 6 months post- TMS+mCILT for P2; but not at 16 months post- TMS+mCILT for P1. It is feasible to administer mCILT for three hours immediately after a TMS session. It is unknown if the significant improvements in naming pictures, and elicited propositional speech were associated with the second series of TMS, or this first series of mCILT, or a combination of both. A larger, sham controlled clinical trial is warranted.

  17. Abnormally Increased Secretion in Olfactory Neuronal Precursors from a Case of Schizophrenia Is Modulated by Melatonin: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cercós, Montserrat G.; Galván-Arrieta, Tania; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Argueta, Jesús; Benítez-King, Gloria; Trueta, Citlali

    2017-01-01

    The alterations that underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ) include the dysregulation of structural and functional properties of neurons. Among these, the secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones, which plays a key role for neuronal communication and development, is altered. Neuronal precursors from the human olfactory epithelium have been recently characterized as a reliable model for studying the etiopathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Our previous work has shown that melatonin enhances the development of morphological and functional features of cloned olfactory neuronal precursors (ONPs) from a healthy subject. In this work we found that primary cultures of ONPs obtained from a schizophrenic patient display an increased potassium-evoked secretion, when compared with ONPs from an age- and gender-matched healthy control subject (HCS). Secretion was evaluated by FM1-43 fluorescence cumulative changes in response to depolarization. Interestingly, a 12 h-melatonin treatment modulated the abnormally increased secretion in SCZ ONPs and brought it to levels similar to those found in the HCS ONPs. Our results suggest that the actin cytoskeleton might be a target for melatonin effects, since it induces the thickening of actin microfilament bundles. Further research will address the mechanisms by which melatonin modulates neurochemical secretion from ONPs. PMID:28703738

  18. Abnormally Increased Secretion in Olfactory Neuronal Precursors from a Case of Schizophrenia Is Modulated by Melatonin: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Cercós, Montserrat G; Galván-Arrieta, Tania; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Argueta, Jesús; Benítez-King, Gloria; Trueta, Citlali

    2017-07-13

    The alterations that underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ) include the dysregulation of structural and functional properties of neurons. Among these, the secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones, which plays a key role for neuronal communication and development, is altered. Neuronal precursors from the human olfactory epithelium have been recently characterized as a reliable model for studying the etiopathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. Our previous work has shown that melatonin enhances the development of morphological and functional features of cloned olfactory neuronal precursors (ONPs) from a healthy subject. In this work we found that primary cultures of ONPs obtained from a schizophrenic patient display an increased potassium-evoked secretion, when compared with ONPs from an age- and gender-matched healthy control subject (HCS). Secretion was evaluated by FM1-43 fluorescence cumulative changes in response to depolarization. Interestingly, a 12 h-melatonin treatment modulated the abnormally increased secretion in SCZ ONPs and brought it to levels similar to those found in the HCS ONPs. Our results suggest that the actin cytoskeleton might be a target for melatonin effects, since it induces the thickening of actin microfilament bundles. Further research will address the mechanisms by which melatonin modulates neurochemical secretion from ONPs.

  19. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa -The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-02-14

    Careful site characterization is critical for successfulgeologic sequestration of CO2, especially for sequestration inbrine-bearing formations that have not been previously used for otherpurposes. Traditional site characterization techniques such asgeophysical imaging, well logging, core analyses, interference welltesting, and tracer testing are all valuable. However, the injection andmonitoring of CO2 itself provides a wealth of additional information.Rather than considering a rigid chronology in which CO2 sequestrationoccurs only after site characterization is complete, we recommend thatCO2 injection and monitoring be an integral part of thesite-characterization process. The advantages of this approach arenumerous. The obvious benefit of CO2 injection is to provide informationon multi-phase flow properties, which cannot be obtained from traditionalsitecharacterization techniques that examine single-phase conditions.Additionally, the low density and viscosity of CO2 compared to brinecauses the two components to flow through the subsurface differently,potentially revealing distinct features of the geology. Finally, tounderstand sequestered CO2 behavior in the subsurface, there is nosubstitute for studying the movement of CO2 directly. Making CO2injection part of site characterization has practical benefits as well.The infrastructure for surface handling of CO2 (compression, heating,local storage) can be developed, the CO2 injection process can bedebugged, and monitoring techniques can be field-tested. Prior to actualsequestration, small amounts of CO2 may be trucked in. Later, monitoringaccompanying the actual sequestration operations may be used tocontinually refine and improve understanding of CO2 behavior in thesubsurface.

  20. Cranial neuronavigation with direct integration of (11)C methionine positron emission tomography (PET) data -- results of a pilot study in 32 surgical cases.

    PubMed

    Braun, V; Dempf, S; Weller, R; Reske, S-N; Schachenmayr, W; Richter, H P

    2002-08-01

    MRI detects small intracranial lesions, but has difficulties in differentiating between tumour, gliosis and edema. (11)C methionine-PET may help to overcome this problem. For its appropriate intra-operative use, it must be integrated into neuronavigation. We present the results of our pilot study with this method. 32 patients with 34 intracranial lesions detected by MRI underwent additional (11)C methionine-PET, because the pathophysiological behaviour or the tumour delineation was unclear. All lesions were treated surgically. In 25 patients PET data could be integrated directly into cranial neuronavigation. (11)C methionine uptake was observed in 27/34 lesions, 26 of them were tumours: 14 malignant and 7 benign gliomas, 3 gliomas without further histological typing, one Ewing sarcoma and one non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Only one (11)C methionine positive lesion was non-tumourous: it was staged as post-irradiation necrosis in a patient operated on for a malignant glioma. 3/7 (11)C-methionine negative lesions were classified as gliosis (n=2) and M. Whipple (n=1), but 4/7 were tumours: 2 astrocytomas WHO(degrees)II, 1 DNT and one astrocytoma WHO(degrees)III. The sensitivity of (11)C methionine-PET was 87%, the specificity 75%, the positive predictive value 96% and the negative predictive value 43%. In all tumourous cases with positive tracer uptake the borderline area of the tumour was better defined by (11)C methionine-PET than by MRI. A positive (11)C methionine-PET is highly suspicious of a tumour, a negative one does not exclude it. (11)C methionine-PET seems to be more sensitive than MRI for differentiating between tumour and edema or gliosis. Simultaneous integration MRI and (11)C methionine-PET into cranial neuronavigation can facilitate cross total tumour removal in glioma surgery.

  1. Inferior vestibular neuritis in a fighter pilot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xie, Su Jiang; Jia, Hong Bo; Xu, Po; Zheng, Ying Juan

    2013-06-01

    Spatial disorientation in airplane pilots is a leading factor in many fatal flying accidents. Spatial orientation is the product of integrative inputs from the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems. One condition that can lead to sudden pilot incapacitation in flight is vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis is commonly diagnosed by a finding of unilateral vestibular failure, such as a loss of caloric response. However, because caloric response testing reflects the function of only the superior part of the vestibular nerve, it cannot detect cases of neuritis in only the inferior part of the nerve. We describe the case of a Chinese naval command fighter pilot who exhibited symptoms suggestive of vestibular neuritis but whose caloric response test results were normal. Further testing showed a unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We believe that this pilot had pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. VEMP testing plays a major role in the diagnosis of inferior nerve vestibular neuritis in pilots. We also discuss this issue in terms of aeromedical concerns.

  2. Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Greenbelt Homes, Inc. Pilot Retrofit Program; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    In the fall of 2010, a multiyear pilot energy efficiency retrofit project was undertaken by Greenbelt Homes, Inc, (GHI) a 1,566 home cooperative of circa 1930 and 1940 homes in Greenbelt, Maryland. GHI established this pilot project to serve as a basis for decision making for the rollout of a decade-long community-wide upgrade program that will incorporate energy efficiency improvements to the building envelope and mechanical equipment. With the community upgrade fully funded by the cooperative through their membership without outside subsidies, this project presents a unique opportunity to evaluate and prioritize the wide-range of benefits of high-performance retrofits based on member experience with and acceptance of the retrofit measures implemented during the pilot project. Addressing the complex interactions between benefits, trade-offs, construction methods, project management implications, realistic upfront costs, financing, and other considerations, serves as a case study for energy retrofit projects to include high-performance technologies based on the long-term value to the homeowner. The pilot project focused on identifying the added costs and energy savings benefits of improvements. Phase 1: baseline evaluation for a representative set of 28 homes sited in seven buildings; Phase 2: installation of the building envelope improvements and continued monitoring of the energy consumption for the heating season and energy simulations supporting recommendations for HVAC and water heating upgrades to be implemented in Phase 3.

  3. PILOT STUDY: THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools for children in the age range of 1-5 years old. The pilot study focused on (a) simple, cost-...

  4. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  5. Human Challenge Pilot Study with Cyclospora cayetanensis

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Mark L.; Seed, John R.; Weber, David J.; Won, Kimberly Y.; Nace, Eva K.; Moe, Christine L.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a pilot study that attempted to infect human volunteers with Cyclospora cayetanensis. Seven healthy volunteers ingested an inoculum of Cyclospora oocysts (approximately 200–49,000 oocysts). The volunteers did not experience symptoms of gastroenteritis, and no oocysts were detected in any stool samples during the 16 weeks volunteers were monitored. PMID:15200870

  6. Integrated in-line coagulation-aerated ultrafiltration for drinking-water production: A case study from laboratory to pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Serrano, Fátima; Pérez, Jorge I; Gómez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    A pilot-scale study was made for drinking-water production from low-quality influents with in-line coagulation as pre-treatment of aerated ultrafiltration. Optimum flocculation parameters were previously determined in the laboratory, searching for large and strong flocs that could resist aeration without increasing the membrane fouling. Nevertheless, the comparison of the jar tests and the pilot-scale results showed that the former could help pre-dimensioning the flocculation facilities but could not precisely reproduce the behavior of the flocs in the membrane tank. The optimum coagulant dosage enabled the highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal without affecting membrane fouling. Additionally, as opposed to the jar-test results, long retention times led to the lowest fouling rates while the velocity gradient affected neither the effluent quality nor the membrane fouling. These findings suggested that the influence of the flocculation parameters was masked by aeration inside the membrane tank but, even so, 43% and 82% DOC and UVA254 removals, respectively, were reached. Furthermore, the growth of the total membrane resistance with time was logarithmic instead of linear, confirming the suitability of the pre-treatment for low-quality influents.

  7. Standard case management of asthma in Sudan: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    El Sony, A I; Chiang, C-Y; Malik, E; Hassanain, S A; Hussien, H; Khamis, A H; Bassilli, A F; Enarson, D A

    2013-09-21

    A pilot project for asthma management in selected hospitals in Khartoum and Gezira States, Sudan. To assess standard case management of asthma in 2007-2008. Local adaptation of guidelines, followed by situational analysis, pre-intervention study, training and implementation. Treatment outcome was assessed 1 year after patient enrolment. Situational analysis revealed that inhaled beclometasone was not available in the public sector. During the project, 2068 patients were enrolled: severity of asthma was intermittent in 185 (9.0%), mild persistent in 231 (11.2%), moderate persistent in 640 (31.0%), severe persistent in 812 (39.3%) and unclassified in 200 (9.7%). Of the 1654 patients with persistent asthma who were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, 1157 (70.0%) had treatment cards available for outcome assessment. Of these, 652 (56.4%) did not attend their annual evaluation, among whom 1 (0.1%) died and 651 (56.3%) were lost to follow-up. Of the 505 patients who attended their annual evaluation, 417 (82.6%) improved, 32 (6.3%) were stable and 56 (11.1%) were worse. The frequency of emergency visits and hospitalisation decreased substantially among those who presented for the 1 year follow-up assessment. The results of standard case management of asthma were encouraging; however, a high proportion of patients did not return for long-term management.

  8. Image processing of angiograms: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, L. E.; Evans, R. A.; Roehm, J. O., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The technology transfer application this report describes is the result of a pilot study of image-processing methods applied to the image enhancement, coding, and analysis of arteriograms. Angiography is a subspecialty of radiology that employs the introduction of media with high X-ray absorption into arteries in order to study vessel pathology as well as to infer disease of the organs supplied by the vessel in question.

  9. Ketogenic diet benefits body composition and well-being but not performance in a pilot case study of New Zealand endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Caryn; Wood, Matthew; Williden, Mikki; Chatterton, Simon; Maunder, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate, high-fat and ketogenic diets are increasingly adopted by athletes for body composition and sports performance enhancements. However, as yet, there is no consensus on their efficacy in improving performance. There is also no comprehensive literature on athletes' experiences while undertaking this diet. The purpose of this pilot work was two-fold: i. to examine the effects of a non-calorie controlled ketogenic diet on body composition and performance outcomes of endurance athletes, and ii. to evaluate the athletes' experiences of the ketogenic diet during the 10-week intervention. Using a case study design, five New Zealand endurance athletes (4 females, 1 male) underwent a 10-week ketogenic dietary intervention. Body composition (sum of 8 skinfolds), performance indicators (time to exhaustion, VO2 max, peak power and ventilatory threshold), and gas exchange thresholds were measured at baseline and at 10 weeks. Mean change scores were calculated, and analysed using t-tests; Cohen's effect sizes and 90% confidence limits were applied to quantify change. Individual interviews conducted at 5 weeks and a focus group at 10 weeks assessed athletes' ketogenic diet experiences. Data was transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. All athletes increased their ability to utilise fat as a fuel source, including at higher exercise intensities. Mean body weight was reduced by 4 kg ± SD 3.1 (p = 0.046; effect size (ES):0.62), and sum of 8 skinfolds by 25.9 mm ± SD 6.9; ES: 1.27; p = 0.001). Mean time to exhaustion dropped by ~2 min (±SD 0.7; p = 0.004; ES: 0.53). Other performance outcomes showed mean reductions, with some increases or unchanged results in two individuals (VO2 Max: -1.69 ml.kg.min ± SD 3.4 (p = 0.63); peak power: -18 W ± SD 16.4 (p = 0.07), and VT2: -6 W ± SD 44.5 (p = 0.77). Athletes reported experiencing reduced energy levels initially, followed by a return of high levels thereafter, especially during

  10. Seaside, Oregon, Tsunami Vulnerability Assessment Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Varner, J.

    2006-12-01

    The results of a pilot study to assess the risk from tsunamis for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon region will be presented. To determine the risk from tsunamis, it is first necessary to establish the hazard or probability that a tsunami of a particular magnitude will occur within a certain period of time. Tsunami inundation maps that provide 100-year and 500-year probabilistic tsunami wave height contours for the Seaside-Gearhart, Oregon, region were developed as part of an interagency Tsunami Pilot Study(1). These maps provided the probability of the tsunami hazard. The next step in determining risk is to determine the vulnerability or degree of loss resulting from the occurrence of tsunamis due to exposure and fragility. The tsunami vulnerability assessment methodology used in this study was developed by M. Papathoma and others(2). This model incorporates multiple factors (e.g. parameters related to the natural and built environments and socio-demographics) that contribute to tsunami vulnerability. Data provided with FEMA's HAZUS loss estimation software and Clatsop County, Oregon, tax assessment data were used as input to the model. The results, presented within a geographic information system, reveal the percentage of buildings in need of reinforcement and the population density in different inundation depth zones. These results can be used for tsunami mitigation, local planning, and for determining post-tsunami disaster response by emergency services. (1)Tsunami Pilot Study Working Group, Seaside, Oregon Tsunami Pilot Study--Modernization of FEMA Flood Hazard Maps, Joint NOAA/USGS/FEMA Special Report, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006, Final Draft. (2)Papathoma, M., D. Dominey-Howes, D.,Y. Zong, D. Smith, Assessing Tsunami Vulnerability, an example from Herakleio, Crete, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 3, 2003, p. 377-389.

  11. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  12. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  13. Breakthrough Listen on MWA Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Siemion, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Tremblay, S.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a pilot study, using the Voltage Capture System, for Breakthrough Listen on the MWA. Breakthrough Listen (BL) is a major new project that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of parameter space in the search for intelligent life beyond Earth. BL has already deployed hardware and software to the Green Bank Telescope, and will bring a similar program with the Parkes Telescope online in the second half of 2016. The low frequency sky is however currently very poorly explored. The superb capabilities of the MWA (large field of view, low frequency of operation, and location in a very radio quiet site) provide a unique opportunity for a pilot study to obtain voltage data for a SETI (Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence) study of the Galactic Plane. We propose commensal observations, piggybacking on the proposed pulsar search of Tremblay et al. Using existing VCS software, combined with the pipeline developed for Breakthrough Listen at GBT and Parkes, we will perform a blind search for candidate signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Although the chances of a detection are not large, particularly for a pilot study such as that proposed here, the Breakthrough Listen team plan to perform extensive testing and analysis on the data obtained which should be useful for other users of the MWA VCS. We will make the secondary SETI data products and associated documentation available as a resource to the community via the Breakthrough Listen online archive.

  14. The Role and Interpretation of Pilot Studies in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Andrew C.; Davis, Lori L.; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies represent a fundamental phase of the research process. The purpose of conducting a pilot study is to examine the feasibility of an approach that is intended to be used in a larger scale study. The roles and limitations of pilot studies are described here using a clinical trial as an example. A pilot study can be used to evaluate the feasibility of recruitment, randomization, retention, assessment procedures, new methods, and implementation of the novel intervention. A pilot study is not a hypothesis testing study. Safety, efficacy and effectiveness are not evaluated in a pilot. Contrary to tradition, a pilot study does not provide a meaningful effect size estimate for planning subsequent studies due to the imprecision inherent in data from small samples. Feasibility results do not necessarily generalize beyond the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the pilot design. A pilot study is a requisite initial step in exploring a novel intervention or an innovative application of an intervention. Pilot results can inform feasibility and identify modifications needed in the design of a larger, ensuing hypothesis testing study. Investigators should be forthright in stating these objectives of a pilot study. Grant reviewers and other stakeholders should expect no more. PMID:21035130

  15. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Providing a web-based digital information management system of information for scientists and the public, including a system that supports the work of those officials who must make decisions that affect the state of the bay. The Tampa Bay Study is in its sixth year and will continue through September 2007. This paper presents a non-inclusive summary of key findings associated with the six primary project components listed above. Component 4 (above) is described in detail in the following chapter 13. More information on the Tampa Bay Study is available from our on-line digital information system for the Tampa Bay Study at http://gulfsci.usgs.gov.

  16. Centrifuge Study of Pilot Tolerance to Acceleration and the Effects of Acceleration on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creer, Brent Y.; Smedal, Harald A.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    A research program the general objective of which was to measure the effects of various sustained accelerations on the control performance of pilots, was carried out on the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory centrifuge, U.S. Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, PA. The experimental setup consisted of a flight simulator with the centrifuge in the control loop. The pilot performed his control tasks while being subjected to acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a forward-facing pilot flying an atmosphere entry vehicle. The study was divided into three phases. In one phase of the program, the pilots were subjected to a variety of sustained linear acceleration forces while controlling vehicles with several different sets of longitudinal dynamics. Here, a randomly moving target was displayed to the pilot on a cathode-ray tube. For each combination of acceleration field and vehicle dynamics, pilot tracking accuracy was measured and pilot opinion of the stability and control characteristics was recorded. Thus, information was obtained on the combined effects of complexity of control task and magnitude and direction of acceleration forces on pilot performance. These tests showed that the pilot's tracking performance deteriorated markedly at accelerations greater than about 4g when controlling a lightly damped vehicle. The tentative conclusion was also reached that regardless of the airframe dynamics involved, the pilot feels that in order to have the same level of control over the vehicle, an increase in the vehicle dynamic stability was required with increases in the magnitudes of the acceleration impressed upon the pilot. In another phase, boundaries of human tolerance of acceleration were established for acceleration fields such as might be encountered by a pilot flying an orbital vehicle. A special pilot restraint system was developed to increase human tolerance to longitudinal decelerations. The results of the tests showed that human tolerance

  17. Farmers' loss due to Guinea worm disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Guyer, J

    1990-04-01

    Guinea worm disease has been blamed for much disability and loss of productivity among farmers in Africa and South Asia. Many studies have tried to equate days lost in illness to monetary values. These attempts often overlook the process of disability in relation to farming patterns. This pilot effort uses a qualitative case study approach to learn about how Guinea worm can cause loss to farmers. Twenty in-depth interviews with affected farmers showed that their losses are related to the time of year they are affected by Guinea worm. Some crops with flexible planting times, e.g. cassava, may not be as affected. Duration of disability is another determining factor. Insights from this pilot study can be used to design more appropriate large-scale survey instruments and guide development of longitudinal research.

  18. Learner Intonation -- A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, Nancy

    This study is concerned with problems in language learners' intonation of English. Ten intonation problems were found in the learner speech of two adult Spanish-speaking males: (1) range of pitch, (2) initial rise, (3) final fall, (4) rise to final stressed syllable, (5) placement of prominence, (6) final rise for questions, (7) total question…

  19. Pre-Study Walkthrough with a Commercial Pilot for a Preliminary Single Pilot Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor-Dreher, Ryan; Roberts, Z.; Ziccardi, J.; Vu, K-P. L.; Strybel, T.; Koteskey, Robert William; Lachter, Joel B.; Vi Dao, Quang; Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, V.

    2013-01-01

    The number of crew members in commercial flights has decreased to two members, down from the five-member crew required 50 years ago. One question of interest is whether the crew should be reduced to one pilot. In order to determine the critical factors involved in safely transitioning to a single pilot, research must examine whether any performance deficits arise with the loss of a crew member. With a concrete understanding of the cognitive and behavioral role of a co-pilot, aeronautical technologies and procedures can be developed that make up for the removal of the second aircrew member. The current project describes a pre-study walkthrough process that can be used to help in the development of scenarios for testing future concepts and technologies for single pilot operations. Qualitative information regarding the tasks performed by the pilots can be extracted with this technique and adapted for future investigations of single pilot operations.

  20. Tinnitus Treatment with Oxytocin: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Andreia Aparecida; Figueiredo, Ricardo Rodrigues; Elgoyhen, Ana Belen; Langguth, Berthold; Penido, Norma De Oliveira; Schlee, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound in the absence of an external stimulus. It is a frequent condition for which there is as yet no pharmacological treatment approved. Auditory and non-auditory pathways are involved in tinnitus' pathophysiology. Oxytocin is a neurohormone and eventual neurotransmitter that plays a complex role in social cognition and behavior. To evaluate the potential of oxytocin as a tinnitus treatment. Two studies were performed. Study 1 was a long-term open pilot study, while study 2 investigated short-term effects with a double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over study. Ambulatory ENT care. In study 1, 15 patients were investigated over a 10-week period in an open pilot study. In study 2, 16 patients were included in a placebo-controlled crossover trial to investigate short-term effects following a single dose. For the long-term study (study 1), analysis of variance revealed a significant decrease in tinnitus sensation, both for the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Clinical Global Impression (CGI). Also, the short-term effects in study 2 revealed a significant reduction of tinnitus because of the oxytocin nasal spray as measured with the Visual Analog Scale and the CGI Scale. These preliminary studies demonstrated that oxytocin may represent a helpful tool for treating tinnitus and further larger controlled studies are warranted.

  1. Helicopter pilot back pain: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, D F; Reading, T E

    1984-02-01

    Because of the high prevalence of back pain experienced by U.S. Army helicopter pilots, a study was conducted to ascertain the feasibility of reproducing these symptoms in the laboratory. A mock-up of a UH-1H seat and control configuration was mounted to a multi-axis vibration simulator (MAVS). Eleven subjects were tested on the apparatus for two 120-min periods. During one period, the MAVS was programmed to reproduce vibrations recorded from a UH-1H in cruise flight. The subjects received no vibration during the other test period. All subjects reported back pain which they described as identical to the pain they experience during flight, during one or more of their test periods. There was no statistical difference between the vibration and nonvibration test conditions (p greater than 0.05) in terms of time of onset of pain or intensity of pain as measured by a visual analog scale. It appears the vibration at the frequencies and amplitudes tested plays little or no role in the etiology of the back symptoms reported by these pilots. It is proposed that the primary etiological factor for these symptoms is the poor posture pilots are obliged to assume for extended periods while operating helicopters.

  2. Probing the Process of Information Source Selection Using Palm Pilots: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik

    2002-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using PDAs (personal digital assistants or palm pilots) as a data collection device in studying information seeking behaviors of undergraduate students. Discusses results that shows heavy use of Internet search engines and that most information searches do not extend beyond the first…

  3. [Pilot study on hairdresser eczema].

    PubMed

    Zelger, J

    1999-11-01

    From 1990 to 1992 the allergy profile of 1042 prospective hairdressers (personal and family history, atopic skin, serum IgE, patch and prick tests) was determined and their occupational suitability was evaluated. Up to 1997 a follow up of 375 hairdressers was obtained by way of questionnaires, re-examination, official reports and expert opinions of the social accident insurance. The frequency of initial eczema was 30%. A change of occupation on account of hairdresser eczema was documented in 11%. The prognostic evaluation of occupational suitability proved to be unsatisfactory. In this longitudinal study, the frequency of pre-occupational skin symptoms increased from 13 to 18%. The other atopic criteria indicated no uniform tendency. There was a significant increase in nickel allergy from 18.7 to 45.5% resulting partly from sensitization after entering the occupation and partly from an increase in nickel allergy at time of entry. Both atopic skin and pre-occupational nickel allergy increase the risk of hairdresser eczema, it is not so great as to justify dissuading such young people from entering the profession.

  4. Pilot study of the relationship between drug misuse and violence among drug addicts in Greater Accra, Ghana: the south of Saharan Africa case.

    PubMed

    Affinnih, Yahya H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between drug use/misuse and the prevalence of violence in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was undertaken as a pilot study to provide direction for a large-scale, systematic, countrywide or regional analysis. Hypotheses tested include the following: 1) drug use/misuse is related to violent behavior; 2) drug use/misuse is related to predatory violent behavior; and 3) drug use/misuse increases the likelihood that those addicted to drugs will commit violent acts. In order to test these hypotheses, two data sets were used to increase the robustness of the study. The first data set was collected during the summer of 1996, and was based on a self-reported survey of 117 subjects (17 women and 100 men), from different neighborhoods in Greater Accra and from different ethnic groups, mean age of 32, most were unemployed. The second data set was collected during the summer of 1997, based on a self-reported survey of 216 (45 women and 171 men) subjects from different neighborhoods in Greater Accra, from different ethnic groups, mean age of 31, most of whom were also unemployed. All hypotheses were confirmed by analysis of the data collected. This suggests that an expanded, countrywide study using the same procedures and instrumentation would provide a meaningful foundation for sound decisions by governmental officials and policy-makers in dealing with drug use and violence in Ghana. Further, the approach could serve as a model for other countries addressing similar problems.

  5. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A pilot study of a spaceborne sidelooking radar is summarized. The results of the system trade studies are given along with the electrical parameters for the proposed subsystems. The mechanical aspects, packaging, thermal control and dynamics of the proposed design are presented. Details of the data processor are given. A system is described that allows the data from a pass over the U. S. to be in hard copy form within two hours. Also included are the proposed schedule, work breakdown structure, and cost estimate.

  6. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  7. Fighter Pilot Ejection Study as an Educational Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Garry; Jovanoski, Zlatko

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we apply the well-known equations of projectile motion to the case of a fighter pilot ejecting from an aircraft, the aim being to establish under what conditions there is danger of impact with the rear vertical stabilizer. The drag force on the pilot after ejection is assumed to vary as the velocity squared and the aircraft motion…

  8. NORTHWEST ORGEON PILOT STUDY AREA (USA): THE USE OF LANDSCAPE SCIENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northwest Oregon Pilot Study Area encompasses approximately 59,167 km2 and varies in elevation from sea level to 3,200 m. Annual precipitation varies with elevation and meridian and ranges from 25 - 460cm. The study area comprises a mixture of federal, state, and privately ow...

  9. NORTHWEST ORGEON PILOT STUDY AREA (USA): THE USE OF LANDSCAPE SCIENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Northwest Oregon Pilot Study Area encompasses approximately 59,167 km2 and varies in elevation from sea level to 3,200 m. Annual precipitation varies with elevation and meridian and ranges from 25 - 460cm. The study area comprises a mixture of federal, state, and privately ow...

  10. Swine manure-based pilot-scale algal biomass production system for fuel production and wastewater treatment--a case study.

    PubMed

    Min, Min; Hu, Bing; Mohr, Michael J; Shi, Aimin; Ding, Jinfeng; Sun, Yong; Jiang, Yongcheng; Fu, Zongqiang; Griffith, Richard; Hussain, Fida; Mu, Dongyan; Nie, Yong; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Wenguang; Ruan, Roger

    2014-02-01

    Integration of wastewater treatment with algae cultivation is one of the promising ways to achieve an economically viable and environmentally sustainable algal biofuel production on a commercial scale. This study focused on pilot-scale algal biomass production system development, cultivation process optimization, and integration with swine manure wastewater treatment. The areal algal biomass productivity for the cultivation system that we developed ranged from 8.08 to 14.59 and 19.15-23.19 g/m(2) × day, based on ash-free dry weight and total suspended solid (TSS), respectively, which were higher than or comparable with those in literature. The harvested algal biomass had lipid content about 1.77-3.55%, which was relatively low, but could be converted to bio-oil via fast microwave-assisted pyrolysis system developed in our lab. The lipids in the harvested algal biomass had a significantly higher percentage of total unsaturated fatty acids than those grown in lab conditions, which may be attributed to the observed temperature and light fluctuations. The nutrient removal rate was highly correlated to the biomass productivity. The NH₃-N, TN, COD, and PO₄-P reduction rates for the north-located photo-bioreactor (PBR-N) in July were 2.65, 3.19, 7.21, and 0.067 g/m(2) × day, respectively, which were higher than those in other studies. The cultivation system had advantages of high mixotrophic growth rate, low operating cost, as well as reduced land footprint due to the stacked-tray bioreactor design used in the study.

  11. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and iron deposition on susceptibility-weighted imaging in patients with multiple sclerosis: a pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, R; Schirda, C; Dwyer, M G; Haacke, M E; Weinstock-Guttman, B; Menegatti, E; Heininen-Brown, M; Magnano, C; Malagoni, A M; Wack, D S; Hojnacki, D; Kennedy, C; Carl, E; Bergsland, N; Hussein, S; Poloni, G; Bartolomei, I; Salvi, F; Zamboni, P

    2010-04-01

    Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a vascular phenomenon recently described in multiple sclerosis (MS) that is characterized by stenoses affecting the main extracranial venous outflow pathways and by a high rate of cerebral venous reflux that may lead to increased iron deposition in the brain. Aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CCSVI and iron deposition in the brain of MS patients by correlating venous hemodynamic (VH) parameters and iron concentration in deep-gray matter structures and lesions, as measured by susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), and to preliminarily define the relationship between iron measures and clinical and other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcomes. Sixteen (16) consecutive relapsing-remitting MS patients and 8 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) were scanned on a GE 3T scanner, using SWI. All 16 MS patients fulfilled the diagnosis of CCSVI (median VH=4), compared to none of the HC. In MS patients, the higher iron concentration in the pulvinar nucleus of the thalamus, thalamus, globus pallidus, and hippocampus was related to a higher number of VH criteria (P<0.05). There was also a significant association between a higher number of VH criteria and higher iron concentration of overlapping T2 (r=-0.64, P=0.007) and T1 (r=-0.56, P=0.023) phase lesions. Iron concentration measures were related to longer disease duration and increased disability as measured by EDSS and MSFC, and to increased MRI lesion burden and decreased brain volume. The findings from this pilot study suggest that CCSVI may be an important mechanism related to iron deposition in the brain parenchyma of MS patients. In turn, iron deposition, as measured by SWI, is a modest-to-strong predictor of disability progression, lesion volume accumulation and atrophy development in patients with MS.

  12. What can a pilot congestive heart failure disease management program tell us about likely return on investment?: A case study from a program offered to federal employees.

    PubMed

    vanVonno, Catherine J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Smith, Mark W; Thomas, Eileen G; Kelley, Doniece; Goetzel, Ron; Berg, Gregory D; Jain, Susheel K; Walker, David R

    2005-12-01

    In 1999, the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Federal Employee Program (FEP) implemented a pilot disease management program to manage congestive heart failure (CHF) among members. The purpose of this project was to estimate the financial return on investment in the pilot CHF program, prior to a full program rollout. A cohort of 457 participants from the state of Maryland was matched to a cohort of 803 nonparticipants from a neighboring state where the CHF program was not offered. Each cohort was followed for 12 months before the program began and 12 months afterward. The outcome measures of primary interest were the differences over time in medical care expenditures paid by FEP and by all payers. Independent variables included indicators of program participation, type of heart disease, comorbidity measures, and demographics. From the perspective of the funding organization (FEP), the estimated return on investment for the pilot CHF disease management program was a savings of $1.08 in medical expenditure for every dollar spent on the program. Adding savings to other payers as well, the return on investment was a savings of $1.15 in medical expenditures per dollar spent on the program. The amount of savings depended upon CHF risk levels. The value of a pilot initiative and evaluation is that lessons for larger-scale efforts can be learned prior to full-scale rollout.

  13. The Application of a New Maximum Color Contrast Sensitivity Test to the Early Prediction of Chiasma Damage in Cases of Pituitary Adenoma: The Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liutkeviciene, Rasa; Glebauskiene, Brigita; Zaliuniene, Dalia; Kriauciuniene, Loresa; Bernotas, Giedrimantas; Tamasauskas, Arimantas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to estimate the maximum color contrast sensitivity (MCCS) thresholds in individuals with chiasma opticum damage. Methods The pilot study tested 41 people with pituitary adenoma (PA) and 100 age- and gender-matched controls. Patients were divided into two groups according to PA size, PA ≤1 cm or PA >1 cm. A new MCCS test program was used for color discrimination. Results The mean total error score (TES) of MCCS was 1.8 in the PA ≤1 cm group (standard deviation [SD], 0.38), 3.5 in the PA >1 cm group (SD, 0.96), and 1.4 in the control group (SD, 0.31; p < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between tumor size and MCCS result (r = 0.648, p < 0.01). In the group that had PA-producing hormones, the TES was 2.5 (SD, 1.09), compared to 4.2 value in the non-functioning PA group of patients that did not have clinically significant hormone excess (SD, 3.16; p < 0.01). In patients with normal visual acuity (VA) or visual field MCCS, the TES was 3.3 (SD, 1.8), while that in patients with VA <0.00 was 4.6 (SD, 2.9). Conclusions Results of the MCCS test TES were 1.9 times better in patients with PA ≤1 cm compared to patients with PA >1 cm (p < 0.01). In PA patients with normal VA, the TES was 2.35 times worse than that of healthy persons (p < 0.01). PMID:27478357

  14. Ballet and stress. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tomei, G; Casale, T; Rosati, M V; Melcarne, R; Sinibaldi, F; Capozzella, A; Di Giorgio, V; Giubilati, R; Sacco, C; Tomei, F; Sancini, A

    2015-01-01

    Work-related stress is a complex problem requiring a work environment-based assessment. Artists like dancers represent a category of atypical workers potentially at high risk for work-related stress. Aim of our pilot study is to evaluate organizational stress in a population of professional dancers, using the HSE Indicator Tool for Work Related Stress. We administered the Italian version of the HSE Indicator Tool to 38 ballet dancers, males and females. The questionnaire evaluates 7 key organizational dimensions: demand, control, managers' support, peer support, relationships, role and change. The standards required-ideal conditions are achieved in none of the above-mentioned dimensions. Change is the only dimension for which results fall between the 20th and the 50th percentile, while for other dimensions results fall below the 20th percentile suggesting the need for immediate corrective action. In male dancers an acceptable situation is highlighted for the dimension "change" compared to female dancers. In both sexes there is a high frequency of subjects complaining of verbal abuse, bullying and harassment. Despite the small sample size, our pilot study highlights the presence of heightened levels of organizational stress. Preventive measures targeted towards improving communication between managers and dancers and aimed at team building should be implemented.

  15. Personal travel blogs as texts for studying intercultural interactions: a pilot test case study of an American sojourner's blogs from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Malleus, Rick; Slattery, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes the argument that personal travel blogs are an important site for studying self-reports of face-to-face intercultural interaction. The guiding research question is "Are personal travel blogs good sources of intercultural communication data?" A content analysis of an American woman's travel blog, written on a sojourn to Zimbabwe, was performed using four intercultural communication constructs that served as frameworks for developing a rubric and for analysis. Those constructs are: culture shock, intercultural communication challenges, cross-cultural comparison and intercultural adaptation. Results provide evidence of written reflections by the blogger in all four coding categories. The evidence of culture shock provided in the blog was multifold, multifaceted, and congruent with many of the well-established elements of culture shock reported in the field. The evidence of cross-cultural comparison in the personal travel blog was, overwhelmingly, comprised of reflections comparing host and home cultures, both in environment and cultural practices. There was limited evidence of reflections about communication challenges or adaptation by the blogger on her sojourn. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications these findings have for the potential travel blogs might provide for analysis of intercultural communication as well as addressing the limitations of the study's findings.

  16. Voluntary Agreements for Increasing Energy-Efficiency in Industry: Case Study of a Pilot Project with the Steel Industry in Shandong Province, China

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes international experience with the use of Voluntary Agreements for increasing industrial sector energy-efficiency, drawing lessons learned regarding the essential elements of the more successful programs. The paper focuses on a pilot project for implementation of a Voluntary Agreement with two steel mills in Shandong Province that was developed through international collaboration with experts in China, the Netherlands, and the U.S. Designing the pilot project involved development of approaches for energy-efficiency potential assessments for the steel mills, target-setting to establish the Voluntary Agreement energy-efficiency goals, preparing energy-efficiency plans for implementation of energy-saving technologies and measures, and monitoring and evaluating the project's energy savings.

  17. Centrifuge-induced neck and back pain in F-16 pilots: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Britt; Nielsen, René Tyranski; Skejø, Pernille Bro; Toft, Palle

    2013-07-01

    Early in their careers, as an important part of their training to become fighter pilots, pilots undergo centrifuge training in order to learn effective anti-G straining maneuvers (AGSM) and to test their G tolerance. The exposure of pilots, especially early in their careers, to training that could lead to injuries should be avoided. This is a report of four cases of neck pain experienced during G-tolerance training, some of which may have caused ongoing problems for the pilot. Four cases, describing four different injuries experienced during G-tolerance training, are presented, including the history of the incident, radiographic description, and physical examination. Three main questions were identified in regards to the training of fighter pilots in centrifuges: 1) should the seat be positioned to imitate a specific aircraft's seat? 2) should the pilot wear a helmet and a mask? 3) what is the appropriate amount of head support? Based on the four cases reported it is recommended that pilots should be given the best possible conditions concerning neck support and load on the neck and the back for G-tolerance testing. Training the pilot in an anatomical neutral sitting position, without a helmet, and with maximal neck support minimizes head movements in cases of conscious or unconscious loss of muscle control. To test the stability of the neck in a setup similar to the environment where the pilot is going to operate, the pilot should be given the opportunity to prepare himself or herself accordingly in advance.

  18. Community parenteral therapy project: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foster, L; McMurray, A

    1998-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this paper was devised to develop and compare service delivery models that would achieve the provision of high quality parenteral therapy care to patients in the Gold Coast District Health Service community. All data were collected on 113 patients for a 12-month period, January to December 1996. The study compared the provision of outreach nursing services and contracted nursing services on measures of satisfaction and cost. The study showed that patient and carers indicated a preference for community care, medical officers advocated the benefits of administering parenteral therapies in the community, general practitioners were interested in managing future community parenteral therapies, and contracted (nurse) service providers endorsed the development of a parenteral therapy resource centre. The findings also revealed considerable potential cost savings in community-based care.

  19. Inspectors' ethical challenges in health care regulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Seekles, W; Widdershoven, G; Robben, P; van Dalfsen, G; Molewijk, B

    2017-01-27

    There is an increasing body of research on what kind of ethical challenges health care professionals experience regarding the quality of care. In the Netherlands the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate is responsible for monitoring and regulating the quality of health care. No research exists on what kind of ethical challenges inspectors experience during the regulation process itself. In a pilot study we used moral case deliberation as method in order to reflect upon inspectors' ethical challenges. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the ethical challenges which health care inspectors encounter in their daily work. A thematic qualitative analysis was performed on cases (n = 69) that were collected from health care inspectors in a moral case deliberation pilot study. Eight themes were identified in health care regulation. These can be divided in two categories: work content and internal collaboration. The work of the health care inspectorate is morally loaded and our recommendation is that some form of ethics support is provided for health care inspectors.

  20. Piloted studies of Enhanced or Synthetic Vision display parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Parrish, Russell V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several studies conducted at Langley Research Center over the past few years. The purposes of these studies were to investigate parameters of pictorial displays and imaging sensors that affect pilot approach and landing performance. Pictorial displays have demonstrated exceptional tracking performance and improved the pilots' spatial awareness. Stereopsis cueing improved pilot flight performance and reduced pilot stress. Sensor image parameters such as increased field-of-view. faster image update rate, and aiding symbology improved flare initiation. Finer image resolution and magnification improved attitude control performance parameters.

  1. DU-AGG pilot plant design study

    SciTech Connect

    Lessing, P.A.; Gillman, H.

    1996-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing new methods to produce high-density aggregate (artificial rock) primarily consisting of depleted uranium oxide. The objective is to develop a low-cost method whereby uranium oxide powder (UO[sub 2], U[sub 3]O[sub ]8, or UO[sub 3]) can be processed to produce high-density aggregate pieces (DU-AGG) having physical properties suitable for disposal in low-level radioactive disposal facilities or for use as a component of high-density concrete used as shielding for radioactive materials. A commercial company, G-M Systems, conducted a design study for a manufacturing pilot plant to process DU-AGG. The results of that study are included and summarized in this report. Also explained are design considerations, equipment capacities, the equipment list, system operation, layout of equipment in the plant, cost estimates, and the proposed plan and schedule.

  2. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  3. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. The Pilot Staffing Conundrum: A Delphi Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-2. School of Logistics and Acquisition Management, Air Force Institute of Technology (AU), Wright Patterson AFB, OH, June...Kafer, John H. Relationship of Airline Pilot Demand and Air Force Pilot Retention. Graduate Research Project, AFIT/ GMO /LAL/98J-11. School of Logistics

  5. Immigration and HIV infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Loue, S; Oppenheim, S

    1994-02-01

    This pilot study was conducted to determine areas in which additional education regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is needed by the undocumented and recently immigrated HIV-infected population, and to obtain preliminary information on the ability of this community to access medical treatment for HIV. Information regarding health status, immigration status, and the use of medical services was obtained from all HIV-infected undocumented and recently immigrated individuals who sought services from a Southern California nonprofit agency between July 1, 1990 and December 31, 1990. A total of 54 such individuals presented for services. Thirteen individuals reported participating in shared needle usage for the administration of medication or vitamins, in addition to other known risk factors for HIV. Only one of these 13 individuals had access to nonemergency medical care. Additional research is necessary to determine the reasons for these needle sharing behaviors. Educational outreach is needed to address these behaviors as a possible risk factor for HIV transmission.

  6. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODS DEVELOPMENT PILOTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are needed to link exposure with health effects. EPA began methods development pilot studies in 2000 to address general questions about exposures and outcome measures. Selected pilot studies are highlighted in this poster. The “Literature Re...

  7. School Nurses' Support for Bereaved Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohan, Janet A.

    2006-01-01

    Children may have difficulty with schoolwork because of grief over the death of an important person in their lives. School nurses provide support to these children. This pilot study consisted of a Web-based survey completed by 6 school nurses in a 3-county area in Washington state. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the need for…

  8. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT METHODS DEVELOPMENT PILOTS FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are needed to link exposure with health effects. EPA began methods development pilot studies in 2000 to address general questions about exposures and outcome measures. Selected pilot studies are highlighted in this poster. The “Literature Re...

  9. Spinal MRI in fighter pilots and controls: a 13-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Sovelius, Roope; Salonen, Oili; Lamminen, Antti; Huhtala, Heini; Hämäläinen, Olavi

    2008-07-01

    Although it is known that some degenerative changes occur in the spines of fighter pilots, it is not clear whether their frequent exposure to high acceleration is associated with premature development of such changes. This case-control study was designed help answer that question. There were 12 Finnish Air Force pilot cadets and their controls who were examined using cervical and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before the pilots started fighter training (baseline) and 13 yr later (follow-up) when the pilots had accumulated a total of 1200 +/- 470 h in fighter aircraft. No statistical differences were found between groups with respect to the frequency of degenerative changes in either the cervical or lumbar spine. Cervical changes in pilots were for the most part observed in the lower part of the neck, while controls showed more variability as to location. In the lumbar region, pilots showed a non-significant tendency toward more changes in disks L4-S1, including changes in signal intensity, height, protrusions, and end plates. Occupational exposure to acceleration in fighter aircraft did not cause significant radiological changes in the spinal column during the first 13 yr of a fighter pilot's flying career. Assessments for the need of a fighter pilot's follow-up imaging should be based on clinical outcome, not on periodic imaging.

  10. Pharmacogenetics of Ketamine-Induced Emergence Phenomena: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Aroke, Edwin N; Crawford, Sybil L; Dungan, Jennifer R

    Up to 55% of patients who are administered ketamine experience an emergence phenomena (EP) that closely mimics schizophrenia and increases their risk of injury; however, to date, no studies have investigated genetic association of ketamine-induced EP in healthy patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and sample sizes required to explore the relationship between CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP. This cross-sectional, pharmacogenetic candidate, gene pilot study recruited 75 patients having minor elective outpatient surgeries. EP was measured with the Clinician Administered Dissociative State Scale. Genetic association of CYP2B6*6 and GRIN2B (rs1019385 and rs1806191) single-nucleotide polymorphisms and ketamine-induced EP occurrence and severity were tested using logistic and linear regression. Forty-seven patients (63%) received ketamine and were genotyped, and 40% of them experienced EP. Occurrence and severity of EP were not associated with CYP2B6*6 or GRIN2B (p > .10). Exploratory analysis of nongenotype models containing age, ketamine dose, duration of anesthesia, and time from ketamine administration to assessment for EP significantly predicted EP occurrence (p = .001) and severity (p = .007). This pilot study demonstrates feasibility for implementing a pharmacogenetic study in a clinical setting, and we estimate that between 380 and 570 cases will be needed to adequately power future genetic association studies. Younger age, higher dose, and longer duration of anesthesia significantly predicted EP occurrence and severity among our pilot sample. Although the small sample size limited our ability to demonstrate significant genotype differences, we generated effect sizes, sample size estimates, and nongenetic covariates information in order to support future pharmacogenetic study design for evaluating this adverse event.

  11. 3D time-lapse seismic traveltime tomography for detecting near surface velocity variations: a case study from the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Juhlin, Christopher; Huang, Fei; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Time-lapse seismic methods are an important tool for monitoring CO2 migration and storage in geological formations. Near surface variations are one of the major problems which may introduce time-lapse noise in the application of land based seismic monitoring. Conventional reflection seismic methods have difficulties in imaging near surface structures (10-30 m depth) due to the limitation of the methods themselves. Traveltime tomography is a commonly used method to reconstruct the subsurface velocity model. It can often provide extra information on near surface structures which is difficult to obtain by the conventional reflection seismic method. In this study, we apply traveltime tomography to 3D time-lapse seismic data sets acquired from at the Ketzin CO2 storage site. We also test different inversion strategies for traveltime tomography to investigate which one is more suitable for this case study. The results show good correlation with near surface variations obtained by other studies.

  12. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  13. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  14. Voluntary agreements for increasing energy-efficiency in industry: Case study of a pilot project with the steel industry in Shandong Province, China

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2003-03-01

    China faces a significant challenge in the years ahead to continue to provide essential materials and products for a rapidly-growing economy while addressing pressing environmental concerns. China's industrial sector is heavily dependent on the country's abundant, yet polluting, coal resources. While tremendous energy conservation and environmental protection achievements were realized in the industrial sector in the past, there remains a great gulf between the China's level of energy efficiency and that of the advanced countries of the world. Internationally, significant energy efficiency improvement in the industrial sector has been realized in a number of countries using an innovative policy mechanism called Voluntary Agreements. This paper describes international experience with Voluntary Agreements in the industrial sector as well as the development of a pilot program to test the use of such agreements with two steel mills in Shandong Province, China.

  15. The potential of nutrient reuse from a source-separated domestic wastewater system in Indonesia--case study: ecological sanitation pilot plant in Surabaya.

    PubMed

    Malisie, A F; Prihandrijanti, M; Otterpohl, R

    2007-01-01

    Human excreta (faeces and urine) contribute only a small volume in domestic wastewater but are one of the main causes of water pollution. On the other hand, they contain very valuable nutrients to be reused as anthropogenic fertiliser through proper collection, treatment and hygienisation processes. To know the potential of nutrient recovery and reuse in Indonesia, a pilot scale source separation domestic wastewater system has been built in Surabaya and, so far, has shown promising results. Using urine diverting toilets, up to 86% nitrogen, 21% phosphorus and 69% potassium from urine and 12% of nitrogen, 68% of phosphorus and 20% of potassium from the faecal matter can be recovered. The separated urine was stored for 6 months before usage as fertiliser for hygienic reasons, while the separated faecal matter was composted with worms (vermicomposting). In order to investigate the fertilising effect, a preliminary cultivation experiment has been carried out on young rose plants using different fertilisers for 2 months.

  16. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devesh; Singh, Jai Vir; Kharwar, Poonam S

    2011-01-01

    Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI) test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening.

  17. Study of occupational stress among railway engine pilots

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Devesh; Singh, Jai Vir; Kharwar, Poonam S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traffic volume and speed is going to be increased in Indian Railways successively, leading to higher stress in staff connected with train operations. The jobs of railway engine pilots come under the category of high-strain jobs, necessitating a need to conduct multicentric study to unfold the factors associated with occupational stress and organizational strategies. Materials and Methods: Present study covered 185 railway engine pilots and office clerks working in various railway zones by incidental method. Occupational Stress Index (OSI) test developed by Srivastva and Singh, questionnaire of specific stressors constructed by authors and laboratory test battery for psychological screening of high-speed train pilots were used as tools. Results: Means of OSI and all the 12 occupational stressors of railway engine pilots were found significantly higher to that of office clerks. Means of OSI and occupational stressors of goods train pilots were significantly higher in comparison to high-speed train pilots and passenger train pilots. Study revealed positive correlation of speed perception and complex reaction time tests and negative correlation of other constituent tests of laboratory test battery to OSI test. Highest subgroup of stressor observedwas role overload followed by role conflict. Conclusions: These findings provide a prima facie evidence of higher occupational stress among railway engine pilots because of identified specific stressors prevalent in their job and explore the possible intervention strategies for its reduction. Significant correlation is noticed between OSI and laboratory test results, indicating its relevant utility in preliminary psychological screening. PMID:21808497

  18. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Iragüen, D; Urcelay, S; San Martín, B

    2011-04-01

    Iragüen, D., Urcelay, S., San Martín, B. Pharmacovigilance in veterinary medicine in Chile: a pilot study. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap.34, 108-115. In Chile, there is no present government policy to survey and analyse adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the field of veterinary medicine. The intent of this study is to assess, for the first time, ADR frequency in treated animals. To this purpose, a 6-month period pilot study based on WHO recommendations was conducted to monitor ADRs in cats and dogs for frequently used drugs and common labelled signs. Of a total of 149 detected ADRs, 29 (6 in cats and 23 in dogs) were notified by means of ADR report forms, while the rest was identified after reviewing patient clinical records, thus evidencing strong under-reporting problems. More than 70% of ADRs were related to antimicrobials, vaccines and tranquilizers. In dogs, there was a significant effect on ADRs' presentation when acepromazine, amoxicillin, carprofen, ivermectin, sextuple vaccine (polyvalent vaccine that confers immunity against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, Leptospira canicola, L. icterohemmoragiae, canine adenovirus type 2 and canine parainfluenza virus) and phytomenadione (subcutaneous injection) were administered. In the case of cats, a significant influence on ADRs was detected when acepromazine, amoxicillin or vitamin K was administered. Present results suggest the need for a pharmacovigilance programme in veterinary medicine for timely ADR-presenting drug detection and drug safety improvement.

  19. The effectiveness of auxiliary prescription labels: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, J B; Kotzan, J A; Cooper, J W

    1983-03-01

    Affixed auxiliary prescription labels are widely used in the practice of pharmacy because they supposedly provide the patient with pertinent information that is not contained within the prescription signature. Yet, whether the labels are effective is not known, nor is it known whether the label's elements, such as color, form, and logo, affect perception of the written text. Sound scientific analyses of these questions are limited. Therefore, a pilot study involving a series of experiments was designed to determine whether individual perception of pertinent information is affected by the use of affixed auxiliary prescription labels. The second objective of this study was to evaluate how color and logo differences affected perception of the label's written text. Participants were selected for the experiments after being screened for color blindness, corrected vision, and, in some cases, previous pharmacy employment. Subjects viewed labels affixed to prescription vials via a two-channel tachistoscope. The tachistoscopic methodology measured perception, and its accuracy was verified through a forced-choice instrument. Results from the pilot study were threefold: (1) a sound scientific analysis found affixed auxiliary labels to be effective, (2) significant variance could be attributed to both individual and subject differences, and (3) the unique effects of color and logo could not be determined.

  20. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (p<.1). The denture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  1. Climatotherapy in Japan: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Hitomi; Kusaka, Yukinori; Hirai, Takayoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko; Schuh, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Twenty-nine urban inhabitants participated in a half-day climatotherapy programme at the moderate mountain area and lowland area in the northwest part of the main island of Japan. The current study was aimed to investigate physically and mentally the objective and subjective influence of our short programme, which was a prospective pilot study of single intervention. Blood pressure was significantly descended during terrain cure at the uphill mountain path and returned after fresh-air rest cure, while there was no significant change throughout the programme at lowland flat path. Heart rate was significantly ascended and descended at both area, and more clearly changed at the mountain path. Profile of Mood Status brief form Japanese version administered before and after our half-day programme. Age adjusted T score of negative subscales, `tension-anxiety', `depression', `anger-hostility', `fatigue' and `confusion' were significantly lower after climatotherapy at both sites. Whereas, there was no significant change concerning `vigour' score. This short-version climatotherapy programme has been designed for people without enough time for long stay at health resort. It turned out our half-day climatotherapy programme contribute to mood status improvement. In addition, repeated practice of our short-version programme including endurance exercise with cool body shell using uphill path can be expected that blood pressure will go toward the normal range and heart rate will decrease both in usual time and during exercise. Therefore, health benefits can be expected of this climatotherapy programme.

  2. A pilot study of intraoral temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Youngson, C C; Barclay, C W

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this in vivo pilot study was to record variations in temperature at various sites in a subject's mouth in response to a standardised thermal challenge and to determine a more realistic thermocycling regimen for future use. A volunteer who suffered from no dentinal hypersensitivity had modified study models prepared for constructing vacuum-formed PVC splints. Perforations 2 mm in diameter were placed for thermocouples facially and lingually in the midcoronal sites of the upper and lower central incisors, canines, second premolars, and second molars to measure temperatures at these sites. A standardised drinking regimen was followed of hot black coffee (72.5 degrees C) followed by cold orange juice (6.0 degrees C). Contralateral sites experienced similar temperature changes of short duration. A maximum of 68.0 degrees C and a minimum of 15.4 degrees C were recorded. Less extreme temperatures were experienced posteriorly, and little or no discernible changes were noted at the facial aspects of the upper second molars or lingually on the lower second molars. Most commonly used thermocycling regimens are clinically unrealistic, and temperatures vary widely throughout the mouth when hot or cold drinks are taken.

  3. The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

    2003-09-20

    A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

  4. Common genetic variants of MUTYH are not associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma: application of molecular screening by means of high-resolution melting technique in a pilot case-control study.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Paradisi, Andrea; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Torti, Eleonora; Lanza-Silveri, Sara; Penitente, Romina; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2011-01-01

    MUTYH glycosylase recognizes the 8-oxoG:A mismatch and is able to excise the adenine base using proofreading mechanisms. Some papers have reported a strong association between cancer development or aggressiveness and MUTYH gene mutations. The aim of this study was to find a possible association between the most frequent MUTYH mutations and melanoma in the context of a case-control pilot study. One hundred ninety-five melanoma patients and 195 healthy controls were matched for sex and age. Clinical and laboratory data were collected in a specific database and all individuals were analyzed for MUTYH mutations by high-resolution melting and direct sequencing techniques. Men and women had significantly different distributions of tumor sites and phototypes. No significant associations were observed between the Y165C, G382D and V479F MUTYH mutations and risk of melanoma development or aggressiveness. Our preliminary findings therefore do not confirm a role for MUTYH gene mutations in the melanoma risk. Further studies are necessary for the assessment of MUTYH not only in melanoma but also other cancer types with the same embryonic origin, in the context of larger arrays studies of genes involved in DNA stability or integrity.

  5. The challenge of integrating community pharmacists into the primary health care team: a case study of local pharmaceutical services (LPS) pilots and interprofessional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Fay; Elvey, Rebecca; Ashcroft, Darren M; Hassell, Karen; Kendall, Juliette; Sibbald, Bonnie; Noyce, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate interprofessional collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists involved in the delivery of enhanced pharmacy services under the local pharmaceutical services (LPS) contract in England. Previous research suggests that a number of interprofessional barriers exist between community pharmacists and GPs which hinders the integration of community pharmacists into the primary health care team (PHCT). One of the aims of the LPS contract, introduced in England in 2002 as an alternative to national contractual arrangements, was to enable pharmacists to work more closely with other health care professionals. A two-stage survey was distributed to all pharmacists involved in the first wave of LPS and in-depth interviews undertaken with pharmacists and GPs at six of the LPS sites. Overall the level to which the LPS pharmacists felt integrated into the PHCT did not substantially increase with the introduction of LPS, although co-location was reported to have facilitated integration. New relationships were formed with GPs and existing ones strengthened. A good existing working relationship with GPs was found to be an important factor in the successful operation of the pilots as many were dependent on GPs for patient referrals. The findings suggest that establishing interprofessional collaboration between GPs and pharmacists is a piecemeal process, with a reliance on goodwill and trust-based relationships.

  6. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken; Lawrie, Sean; Niedermuller, Josef

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are

  7. Prevention of postoperative pain and of epidural fibrosis after lumbar microdiscectomy: pilot study in a series of forty cases treated with epidural vaseline-sterile-oil-morphine compound.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Luciano; Pappagallo, Marco; Tatta, Carlo; Roperto, Raffaelino; Elsawaf, Ahmed; Ferrante, Luigi

    2008-06-15

    was 22.23 +/- 1.97 days. At 1-week and 2-week control, mean pain intensity score was 10.7 +/- 2.3 and 9.3 mm +/- 1.3, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 34.3 months (range, 24-48) 12 patients episodes of transient lumbar and/or sciatic pain. At the last neuroradiological control, according to the 5-grade scale of Ross et al (Neurol Res 1999), epidural fibrosis scored 0 in 8 cases and 1 in 32 cases. Epidural application of morphine-vaseline sterile-oil compound after lumbar microdiscectomy proved to be safe and effective, improving postoperative pain control and return to function. At clinical and neuroradiological follow-up epidural fibrosis was acceptable. To confirm the efficacy of the compound, large prospective studies are warranted.

  8. Piloted simulation study of two tilt-wing control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1992-01-01

    A two phase piloted simulation study was conducted to investigate alternative wing and flap controls for tilt-wing aircraft. The initial phase of the study compared the flying qualities of both a conventional (programmed) flap and an innovative geared flap. The second phase of the study introduced an alternate method of pilot control for the geared flap and further studied the flying qualities of the programmed flap, and two geared flap configurations. In general, the pilot ratings showed little difference between the programmed flap and the geared flap control concepts, although differences between the two control concepts were noticed and are discussed in this paper. The addition of pitch attitude stabilization in the second phase of the study greatly enhanced the aircraft flying qualities. This paper describes the simulated tilt-wing aircraft and the flap control concepts, and presents the results of both the first and second phases of the piloted simulation study.

  9. Pilot study on agricultural pesticide poisoning in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, Mustapha; Ouedraogo, Richard; Ilboudo, Sylvain; Guissou, Pierre I.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiologic data related to agricultural pesticide poisoning cases in Burkina Faso were collected. The study was carried out using retrospective (from January 2002 to June 2010) surveys conducted among farmers and healthcare centers. One hundred and fifty-three (153) pest control products were recorded during the survey and 56 active ingredients were identified. Out of the 153 pest control products, 49 (i.e. 32%) were authorized for sale in Burkina Faso. The main risk factors are socio-demographic characteristics of farmers, their low education level, and some attitudes and practices on using agricultural pesticides. Pesticide poisonings are relatively frequent and their management was not always efficacious. Actions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning as a global public health problem and to improve management of pesticide poisoning. To this purpose, advanced investigations should be carried out over a longer period of time to complement the present pilot study. PMID:24678256

  10. Transport and fate of silver as polymer-stabilised nanoparticles and ions in a pilot wastewater treatment plant, followed by sludge digestion and disposal of sludge/soil mixtures: A case study.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Jonas; Baresel, Christian; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    A case study of transport and changes in properties of polymer-stabilised Ag NPs is presented in this paper investigating their interaction in different treatment steps within a fully realistic pilot wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), in anaerobic digested sludge, and in soil/sludge mixtures. The fate of the same Ag NPs was tracked in these environments, hence taking the history of the Ag NPs into account. The results show that most of the Ag NPs end up in the sludge (80-100%), also after anaerobically digestion. Furthermore, the fraction of silver in the supernatant was very low after 48 h incubation with silver-containing digested sludge mixed with different soil types. However, when Ag NPs were added directly to the sludge/soil mixture, soluble silver was present in the supernatant with sandy soil, but not with clayey soil. In all, generated findings show that risk assessments and toxicological studies of Ag NPs suspensions must take into account possible chemical and particle transformations upon environmental entry, as silver in general become less soluble when transported to WWTPs and interacting with sludge, and soil.

  11. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  12. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  13. Answering Fixed Response Items in Chemistry: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hateley, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a pilot study on student thinking in chemistry. Verbal comments of a group of six college students were recorded and analyzed to identify how each student arrives at the correct answer in fixed response items in chemisty. (HM)

  14. A Pilot Study of Integrated Listening Systems for Children with Sensory Processing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Sarah A.; Miller, Lucy J.; Sullivan, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study explored the effects of Integrated Listening Systems (iLs) Focus Series on individualized parent goals for children with sensory processing impairments. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline, repeated measure across participants, single-case study design was employed (n = 7). The 40-session intervention was delivered at home and in…

  15. A Pilot Study of Integrated Listening Systems for Children with Sensory Processing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Sarah A.; Miller, Lucy J.; Sullivan, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study explored the effects of Integrated Listening Systems (iLs) Focus Series on individualized parent goals for children with sensory processing impairments. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline, repeated measure across participants, single-case study design was employed (n = 7). The 40-session intervention was delivered at home and in…

  16. Freshman Strategy Seminar. A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magid, Annette; And Others

    In fall 1987, a Freshman Strategy Seminar (FSS) was pilot tested and evaluated at Erie Community College's (ECC's) South Campus to assist students lacking basic English and mathematics skills. Developmental class sections in writing, reading and math were reserved for the FSS students, in the hope that a cluster course approach would reduce…

  17. The Pilot Training Study: Precommissioning Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, J. W.

    The cost of training, as conducted by the Air Force Academy, Reserve Officer Training Corps, and Officer Training School, and leading to the commissioning of new Air Force officers is presented. The student flows, personnel resources required to support the flows, and costs of pilot candidates graduating from each of the three commissioning…

  18. Where have all the pilot studies gone? A follow-up on 30 years of pilot studies in Clinical Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navaldeep; Figueiredo, Sabrina; Bouchard, Vanessa; Moriello, Carolina; Mayo, Nancy

    2017-09-01

    Pilot studies are meritorious for determining the feasibility of a definitive clinical trial in terms of conduct and potential for efficacy, but their possible applications for planning a future trial are not always fully realized. The purpose of this review was to estimate the extent to which pilot/feasibility studies: (i) addressed needed objectives; (ii) led to definitive trials; and (iii) whether the subsequent undertaking of a definitive trial was influenced by the strength of the evidence of outcome improvement. Trials published in the journal Clinical Rehabilitation, since its inception, were eligible if the word 'pilot' or 'feasibility' was specified somewhere in the article. A total of 191 studies were reviewed, results were summarized descriptively, and between-group effect sizes were computed. The specific purposes of piloting were stated in only 58% ( n = 110) of the studies. The most frequent purpose was to estimate the potential for efficacy (85%), followed by testing the feasibility of the intervention (60%). Only 12% of the studies were followed by a definitive trial; <4% of studies had a main study underway or a published study protocol. There was no relationship between observed effect size and follow-up of pilot studies, although the confidence intervals were very wide owing to small number of trials that followed on. Labelling and reporting of pilot studies needs to be improved to be concordant with the recently issued CONSORT guidelines. Feasibility needs to be fully tested and demonstrated prior to committing considerable human and monetary resources.

  19. CASE STUDY CRITIQUE; UPPER CLINCH CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case study critique: Upper Clinch case study (from Research on Methods for Integrating Ecological Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Trade-off Weighted Index Approach to Integrating Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment). This critique answers the questions: 1) does ...

  20. Debriefing of American Red Cross personnel: pilot study on participants' evaluations and case examples from the 1994 Los Angeles earthquake relief operation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, K; Zatzick, D; Metzler, T; Weiss, D S; Marmar, C R; Garma, S; Ronfeldt, H; Roepke, L

    1998-01-01

    The Multiple Stressor Debriefing (MSD) model was used to debrief 112 American Red Cross workers individually or in groups after their participation in the 1994 Los Angeles earthquake relief effort. Two composite case examples are presented that illustrate individual and group debriefings using the MSD model. A questionnaire which evaluated workers' experience of debriefing, was completed by 95 workers. Results indicated that workers evaluated the debriefings in which they participated positively. In addition, as participant to facilitator ratio increased, workers shared less of their feelings and reactions about the disaster relief operation. These findings, as well as more specific issues about debriefing, are discussed.

  1. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SOIL STABILIZATION PILOT STUDY, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY AND HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM, UNITED CHROME NPL SITE PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a project plan for a pilot study at the United Chrome NPL site, Corvallis, Oregon and includes the health and safety and quality assurance/quality control plans. The plan reports results of a bench-scale study of the treatment process as iieasured by the ...

  2. Keratoconus in Civil Aviation Pilots in a Report of Six Cases.

    PubMed

    Rebello, Albert; Rodrigues, Bênesson; Pereira, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive noninflammatory ectatic corneal dystrophy, characterized by corneal thinning and increased curvature with central or paracentral tapered protrusion. Such changes in corneal morphology induce irregular astigmatism and myopia, resulting in visual acuity impairment. This report assesses cases in which keratoconus is not an absolute disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Six cases of keratoconus in active pilots are presented. This report includes cases which were treated with crosslinking therapy and even corneal transplantation. In such cases, the civil aviation medical authority considered four aspects in the medical assessment: best corrected visual acuity, condition stability, risk of sudden incapacitation, and pilot category. Six civil pilots with ages between 19 and 45 yr of age presented with keratoconus in different stages. Using the Snellen scale, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured in 12 eyes, all of them having equal or better than 20/30 (20/20, N = 9; 20/25, N = 2; 20/30, N = 1). All of them are currently fit for aviation activity and have been given an aviation medical certificate with limitation of use of corrective lenses by the Brazilian Civil Aviation Authority (ANAC in Portuguese). Among these cases, there is a pilot who had undergone treatment with crosslinking therapy and another that had undergone corneal transplantation. These cases demonstrate that keratoconus is not always a disabling condition for civil aviation pilots. Nevertheless, it has to be analyzed on a case-by-case basis.Rebello A, Rodrigues B, Pereira M. Keratoconus in civil aviation pilots in a report of six cases. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(6):574-578.

  3. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  4. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  5. Reading against All Odds: A Pilot Study of Two Deaf Students with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, Charlotte; Lafond, Lori Dustan

    2007-01-01

    Learning to read and write is a challenge for most deaf children due to their limited experiences with, and access to, spoken language. In the case of deaf students who have difficulty processing visual print, literacy becomes an even greater challenge. The study piloted an intervention procedure that incorporated the principles of automaticity,…

  6. Creating Connections: A Pilot Study on an Online Community of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, H. Carol

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a pilot study that investigated the uses of computer-mediated communication in an educational psychology course for pre-service teachers that focused on problem-based learning via CD-ROM-based case analysis. Thirty-nine pre-service teachers and eight practicing teachers participated in the development of an…

  7. Creating Connections: A Pilot Study on an Online Community of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, H. Carol

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a pilot study that investigated the uses of computer-mediated communication in an educational psychology course for pre-service teachers that focused on problem-based learning via CD-ROM-based case analysis. Thirty-nine pre-service teachers and eight practicing teachers participated in the development of an…

  8. Quantifying lifetime exposure to ultraviolet radiation in the epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.S.; Selvin, S. |; Buffler, P.A.; Scotto, J.; Berwick, M.

    1992-10-01

    This pilot study uses a unique method to calculate cumulative lifetime exposure to, ultraviolet radiation-b to determine if this refined method would indicate differences in lifetime cumulative UVB exposure between age and sex matched controls. Forty-four age and sex matched cases and controls demonstrated no significant difference in mean cumulative lifetime UVB exposure based on the duration and location of residence. This pilot study suggests that further analysis of the dataset should be conducted to determine if the cumulative lifetime exposure hypothesis is of primary importance regarding the association between UVB exposure and development of cutaneous malignant melanoma.

  9. Quantifying lifetime exposure to ultraviolet radiation in the epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, C.S.; Selvin, S. . Dept. of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Buffler, P.A. . Dept. of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences); Scotto, J. . Biostatistics Branch); Berwick, M. (Cancer Pre

    1992-10-01

    This pilot study uses a unique method to calculate cumulative lifetime exposure to, ultraviolet radiation-b to determine if this refined method would indicate differences in lifetime cumulative UVB exposure between age and sex matched controls. Forty-four age and sex matched cases and controls demonstrated no significant difference in mean cumulative lifetime UVB exposure based on the duration and location of residence. This pilot study suggests that further analysis of the dataset should be conducted to determine if the cumulative lifetime exposure hypothesis is of primary importance regarding the association between UVB exposure and development of cutaneous malignant melanoma.

  10. Piloted simulation study of two tilt-wing control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birckelbaw, Lourdes G.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1994-01-01

    A two-phase piloted simulation study was conducted to investigate alternative wing and flap controls for tilt-wing aircraft. The initial phase of the study compared the flying qualities of both a conventional (programmed) flap and an innovative geared flap. The second phase of the study introduced an alternate method of pilot control for the geared flap and further studied the flying qualities of the programmed flap, and two geared flap configurations. In general, the pilot rating showed little variation between the programmed flap and the geared flap control concepts. Some differences between the two concepts were noticed and are discussed in this paper. The addition of pitch attitude stabilization in the second phase of the study greatly enhanced the aircraft flying qualities. This paper describes the simulated tilt-wing aircraft and the flap control concepts and presents the results of both phases of the simulation study.

  11. Piloting a programme tool to evaluate malaria case investigation and reactive case detection activities: results from 3 settings in the Asia Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Chris; Sudathip, Prayuth; Herdiana, Herdiana; Cao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yaobao; Luo, Alex; Ranasinghe, Neil; Bennett, Adam; Cao, Jun; Gosling, Roly D

    2017-08-22

    Case investigation and reactive case detection (RACD) activities are widely-used in low transmission settings to determine the suspected origin of infection and identify and treat malaria infections nearby to the index patient household. Case investigation and RACD activities are time and resource intensive, include methodologies that vary across eliminating settings, and have no standardized metrics or tools available to monitor and evaluate them. In response to this gap, a simple programme tool was developed for monitoring and evaluating (M&E) RACD activities and piloted by national malaria programmes. During the development phase, four modules of the RACD M&E tool were created to assess and evaluate key case investigation and RACD activities and costs. A pilot phase was then carried out by programme implementers between 2013 and 2015, during which malaria surveillance teams in three different settings (China, Indonesia, Thailand) piloted the tool over a period of 3 months each. This study describes summary results of the pilots and feasibility and impact of the tool on programmes. All three study areas implemented the RACD M&E tool modules, and pilot users reported the tool and evaluation process were helpful to identify gaps in RACD programme activities. In the 45 health facilities evaluated, 71.8% (97/135; min 35.3-max 100.0%) of the proper notification and reporting forms and 20.0% (27/135; min 0.0-max 100.0%) of standard operating procedures (SOPs) were available to support malaria elimination activities. The tool highlighted gaps in reporting key data indicators on the completeness for malaria case reporting (98.8%; min 93.3-max 100.0%), case investigations (65.6%; min 61.8-max 78.4%) and RACD activities (70.0%; min 64.7-max 100.0%). Evaluation of the SOPs showed that knowledge and practices of malaria personnel varied within and between study areas. Average monthly costs for conducting case investigation and RACD activities showed variation between study

  12. Characterization of brain tumours with spin-spin relaxation: pilot case study reveals unique T 2 distribution profiles of glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Laule, Cornelia; Bjarnason, Thorarin A; Vavasour, Irene M; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Wayne Moore, G R; Li, David K B; MacKay, Alex L

    2017-09-11

    Prolonged spin-spin relaxation times in tumour tissue have been observed since some of the earliest nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of the brain. Over the last three decades, numerous studies have sought to characterize tumour morphology and malignancy using quantitative assessment of T 2 relaxation times, although attempts to categorize and differentiate tumours have had limited success. However, previous work must be interpreted with caution as relaxation data were typically acquired using a variety of multiple echo sequences with a range of echoes and T 2 decay curves and were frequently fit with monoexponential analysis. We defined the distribution of T 2 components in three different human brain tumours (glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma, meningioma) using a multi-echo sequence with a greater number of echoes and a longer acquisition window than previously used (48 echoes, data collection out to 1120 ms) with no a priori assumptions about the number of exponential components contributing to the T 2 decay. T 2 relaxation times were increased in tumour tissue and each tumour showed a distinct T 2 distribution profile. Tumours have complex and unique compartmentalization characteristics. Quantitative assessment of T 2 relaxation in brain cancer may be useful in evaluating different grades of brain tumours on the basis of their T 2 distribution profile, and has the potential to be a non-invasive diagnostic tool which may also be useful in monitoring therapy. Further study with a larger sample size and varying grades of tumours is warranted.

  13. Dynamic response of woody vegetation on fencing protection in semi-arid areas; Case study: Pilot exclosure on the Firmihin Plateau, Socotra Island.

    PubMed

    Habrova, Hana; Pavlis, Jindrich

    2017-02-01

    Woody vegetation dynamics and Dracaena cinnabari regeneration have been studied for five years in the conditions of Socotra Island. Woody plants were measured regularly inside and outside the exclosure area, and the growth and survival of D. cinnabari seedlings were observed. In the exclosure of about 1000 m(2) a total of 49 species were identified, including 23 endemics, growing in the average density of 3.82 specimens per m(2). The fenced area was overgrown relatively rapidly by dense grass cover - reaching approx. 2.7 t/ha. Species growth dynamics inside and outside the exclosure shows that grazing had a marked impact, leading to the elimination of trees and shrubs. All grazed species grew noticeably in the exclosure, in the average of 50 cm in 5 years. D. cinnabari as the dominant flagship species of Socotra has been studied with regards to regeneration dynamics. Observations indicate that probability of its seedlings survival increases with their age. No seedlings germinated from the seeds sown in the experiment, however, outplanted seedlings performed relatively well. Field observations show that D. cinnabari seed germination is triggered when the seed reaches a protected micro-habitat with a developed humus layer and high relative humidity in the soil lasts for at least two days.

  14. Comparative prognostic relevance of breast intra-tumoral microvessel density evaluated by CD105 and CD146: A pilot study of 42 cases.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Leandro Marcelo; Labovsky, Vivian; Calcagno, María de Luján; Davies, Kevin Mauro; Rivello, Hernán Garcia; Wernicke, Alejandra; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process for metastatic progression. While it has been established that the evaluation of breast tumoral microvessel density by CD105 marker is a potential prognostic parameter, its evaluation by CD146 marker has been poorly studied. The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic value of intra-tumoral microvessel density assayed by CD105 and CD146 in early breast cancer patients. 42 women with breast infiltrative ductal carcinoma (I and II-stages) were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-tumoral microvessel density was immunohistochemically examined using antibodies anti-CD105 and CD146 in paraffin-embedded tissues, and their association with classical prognostic-markers, metastatic recurrence, metastasis-free survival and overall survival was analyzed. High microvessel density assessed by CD146 was significantly associated with a higher risk of developing metastasis (p=0.0310) and a shorter metastasis-free survival (p=0.0197). In contrast, when we used the CD105-antibody, we did not find any significant association. Finally, CD146 showed to be an independent predictive indicator for metastasis-free survival (p=0.0055). Our data suggest that the intra-tumoral microvessel density evaluated by CD146 may be a more suitable predictor of metastatic development than that evaluated by CD105 in early breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A pilot study of a mobile-phone-based home monitoring system to assist in remote interventions in cases of acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hang; Karunanithi, Mohan; Kanagasingam, Yogi; Vignarajan, Janardhan; Moodley, Yuben

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a six-month feasibility study of a mobile-phone-based home monitoring system, called M-COPD. Patients with a history of moderate Acute Exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) were given a mobile phone to record major symptoms (dyspnoea, sputum colour and volume), minor symptoms (cough and wheezing) and vital signs. A care team remotely monitored the recorded data and provided clinical interventions. Eight patients (mean age 65 years) completed the trial. Ten acute exacerbations occurred during the trial and were successfully treated at home. Prior to the AECOPD episode, the combined score of the major symptoms increased significantly (P < 0.05). Following the intervention, it decreased significantly (P < 0.05) within two weeks and returned to the baseline. The score of the minor symptoms also increased significantly (P < 0.05), but the decrease following the intervention was not significant. There were significantly fewer hospital admissions during the trial, fewer ED presentations and fewer GP visits than in a six-month matched period in the preceding year. The results demonstrate the potential of home monitoring for analysing respiratory symptoms for early intervention of AECOPD.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors accounting for true silent myocardial ischemia: a pilot case-control study comparing type 2 diabetic with non-diabetic control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given the elevated risk of cardiovascular events and the higher prevalence of silent coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients, the need to screen asymptomatic diabetic patients for CAD assumes increasing importante. The aims of the study were to assess prospectively the prevalence and risk factor predictors of true silent myocardial ischemia (myocardial perfusion defects in the absence of both angina and ST-segment depression) in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Stress myocardial perfusion gated SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) was carried out in 41 type 2 diabetic patients without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 41 nondiabetic patients matched by age and gender. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding either the classic CVD risk factors or left ventricular function. True silent ischemia was detected in 21.9% of diabetic patients but only in 2.4% of controls (p < 0.01). The presence of myocardial perfusion defects was independently associated with male gender and the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The probability of having myocardial perfusion defects in an asymptomatic diabetic patient with DR in comparison with diabetic patients without DR was 11.7 [IC95%: 3.7-37]. Conclusions True silent myocardial ischemia is a high prevalent condition in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Male gender and the presence of DR are the risk factors related to its development. PMID:21255408

  17. Oral health and dental late adverse effects in children in remission from malignant disease. A pilot case-control study in Italian children.

    PubMed

    Bagattoni, S; D'Alessandro, G; Prete, A; Piana, G; Pession, A

    2014-03-01

    To investigate with a reliable method the oral features in Italian patients in remission from cancer, highlighting the relationship with age at cancer therapy and to compare the data with healthy controls. Twenty five childhood cancer survivors treated under the age of 10 years with chemotherapy w/wo Haemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and/or head-neck Radiotherapy, in remission from cancer for at least 3 years, were examined for dental caries and enamel defects. To assess dental age and dental abnormalities a panoramic radiograph was taken. Patients were grouped according to age at cancer therapy (<3 years: subgroup Y; 3.1-5 years: subgroup M; >5 years: subgroup O). A control group of 26 healthy children was included. There was not a statistically significant difference in caries prevalence between the two groups. A statistically significant difference between the two groups was found for enamel defects, dental abnormalities and dental age. The chi-squared test revealed a relationship between age at therapy and specific dental abnormalities. This study shows that cancer therapy may increase the risk of development of enamel defects and dental abnormalities, especially in children treated under the age of 3 years.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THERMAL ENVIRONMENT ON LEARNING, A PILOT STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PECCOLO, CHARLES

    THIS IS A REPORT OF A FIRST PILOT STUDY WHICH PRECEDES A SERIES OF STUDIES BEING CONDUCTED BY THE IOWA CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND LENNOX INDUSTRIES INC., MARSHALLTOWN, IOWA. IT IS A DIGEST OF A THESIS BY DR. CHARLES PECCOLO WHO SERVED AS RESEARCHER ON THIS FIRST STUDY. THE STUDY AIMED AT MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL…

  19. Pilot Biofeedback Training in the Cognitive Awareness Training Study (CATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenking, M.

    2000-01-01

    One of the ongoing problems that pilots face today is a diminished state of awareness such as boredom, sleepiness, or fatigue during cruise conditions that could result in various pilot errors. This study utilized a cognitive training exercise to sharpen the pilot's awareness during simulated flight thereby providing them with a means to overcome these diminished states of awareness. This study utilizes psychophysiological methods in an attempt to assess a pilot's state of awareness more directly. In turn, the pilots will be able to train themselves to recognize these states of awareness and be more mentally sharp during mundane tasks such as those experienced in cruise conditions. The use of these measurement tools may be beneficial for researchers working within the NASA Aviation Safety Program. This paper will provide the reader with some background information concerning the motivation for the study, a brief description of the experimental setup and design matrix, the dependent and independent variables that were employed, and some preliminary findings based on some of the subjective and objective data that was collected. These preliminary findings are of part of an ongoing study being conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

  20. Preparation, piloting and validation for a longitudinal birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Golding, Jean

    2009-07-01

    No longitudinal study should go into the field prior to detailed piloting and validation studies of the measures and techniques to be used. Preparation should also involve the training of staff, the acquisition of space and appropriate equipment, and liaison with the community and ethical committees as well as with scientific collaborators. Because different measures will continually be introduced as the participants age, the preparation, piloting and validation studies have to be ongoing. Here we describe some of the different strategies that should be used.

  1. Automatic Generation of Test Oracles - From Pilot Studies to Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Smith, Ben

    1998-01-01

    There is a trend towards the increased use of automation in V&V. Automation can yield savings in time and effort. For critical systems, where thorough V&V is required, these savings can be substantial. We describe a progression from pilot studies to development and use of V&V automation. We used pilot studies to ascertain opportunities for, and suitability of, automating various analyses whose results would contribute to V&V. These studies culminated in the development of an automatic generator of automated test oracles. This was then applied and extended in the course of testing an Al planning system that is a key component of an autonomous spacecraft.

  2. [Incidence of strokes in Spain: the Iberictus study. Data from the pilot study].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Guzmán, J; Egido-Herrero, J A; Fuentes, B; Fernández-Pérez, C; Gabriel-Sánchez, R; Barberà, G; Abilleira, S

    In a population-based study of the incidence of stroke conducted on a broad denominator, it is wise first to carry out a pilot study. To present the results of the pilot phase of the study on stroke incidence in Spain, entitled Iberictus. Population of the study: all cases involving the first episode of acute cerebrovascular disease (stroke or transient ischaemic attack) diagnosed among residents over 17 years of age with their habitual place of abode registered in the areas of study between 15th and 31st October 2005 (total denominator: 1,440,997 inhabitants). prospective, hospital records (basic minimum data set, discharge abstracts) and casualty department registers. Standardised definitions: diagnostic categorisation and pathological, topographical and aetiological classification. Inter-observer agreement analysis among researchers (kappa). A total of 128 cases were identified. Age range, 37-103 years; mean age, 75.7 +/- 13.4 years; 54% were females. In all, 71.1% of the cases were collected by means of a basic minimum data set. There were 91 ischaemic events (29.7% atherothrombotic and 29.7% cardioembolic). Of the 15 haemorrhagic strokes, 40% due to arterial hypertension, six were lobar hemispheric, six were deep basal ganglia, and there were three cerebellar haemorrhages. The incidence of stroke was seen to increase exponentially with age. Inter-observer agreement was good for the classifications that were employed (range of kappa indices, 0.57-0.78). Several problems were detected and corrected in the fieldwork. The Iberictus pilot study yielded data that were consistent with the literature and provided us with the opportunity to detect and correct issues that would hinder us from conducting the main study.

  3. Feasibility, acceptability and impact of integrating malaria rapid diagnostic tests and pre-referral rectal artesunate into the integrated community case management programme. A pilot study in Mchinji district, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Phiri, Themba B; Kaunda-Khangamwa, Blessings N; Bauleni, Andrew; Chimuna, Tiyese; Melody, David; Kalengamaliro, Humphreys; Sande, John H; Nsona, Humphreys Kampira; Mathanga, Don P

    2016-03-21

    The World Health Organization recommends that persons of all ages suspected of malaria should receive a parasitological confirmation of malaria by use of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) at community level, and that rectal artesunate should be used as a pre-referral treatment for severe malaria to rapidly reduce parasitaemia. This paper reports on findings from a pilot study that assessed the feasibility, acceptability and effects of integrating RDTs and pre-referral rectal artesunate into the integrated Community Case Management programme in Malawi. This study used mixed methods to collect information for this survey. Pre- and post-intervention, cross-sectional, household surveys were carried out. A review of integrated community case management reports, including supervision checklists was conducted. Quantitative data were collected in tablets running on open data kit software, and then data were transferred to STATA version 12 for analysis. For key indicators, proportions were calculated at 95% confidence intervals. Qualitative data were recorded onto digital recorders, translated into English and transcribed for analysis. Out of 86 observed RDT performances, a total of 83 (97%) were performed correctly with a proper disposal of sharps and biohazard wastes. Only two (2%) febrile children who had an RDT negative result were treated with artemether-lumefantrine, contrary to malaria treatment guidelines. Utilization of community health workers (CHWs) as a first source of care increased from (33.9%) (95% CI; 25.5-42.3) at baseline to (89.7%) (95% CI; 83.5-95.5) at end line in the intervention villages. There was a corresponding decrease in the proportion of caregivers that first sought care from informal sources from 12.9% (95% CI; 6.9-18.9) to 1.9% (95% CI; 0.9-4.4) in the intervention villages. Acceptability of the use of RDTs and pre-referral rectal artesunate at the community level was relatively high. Integration of RDTs and pre-referral rectal at artesunate

  4. Art as an Evaluative Tool: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sontag, Mary-Ann; Graham, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a pilot study completed in preparation for a multisite study of the effectiveness of children's grief support groups. Uses art therapy to assess children's perspectives of their experience in a grief support group. Results of study support the use of art as an effective qualitative tool that can be utilized in future evaluations of…

  5. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  6. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. Say yes to life: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wood, C; Keen, A

    1988-03-01

    In an attempt to assess whether there are any characteristics which a majority of ordinary people regard as life-affirming or life-denying, a questionnaire was given to a pilot group of 167 respondents, representing three different age and social categories. Five life-affirming and five life-denying characteristics were mentioned by more than 10% of respondents. Of the former, Drive, Sociability, Happiness and Optimism were endorsed by 15-20%. Of the latter, Unsociability and Poor Coping were mentioned by 22%, making them distinctly more frequent than the following categories of Pessimism, Lack of Drive and Unhappiness (11-14%). It is suggested that a number of these subjectively determined characteristics, which the general public perceive as being life-affirming or denying, do indeed influence physical or mental health, illness or illness behaviour. It may therefore be of value to utilize this set of public perceptions in future programmes of health education.

  8. Say yes to life: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, C; Keen, A

    1988-01-01

    In an attempt to assess whether there are any characteristics which a majority of ordinary people regard as life-affirming or life-denying, a questionnaire was given to a pilot group of 167 respondents, representing three different age and social categories. Five life-affirming and five life-denying characteristics were mentioned by more than 10% of respondents. Of the former, Drive, Sociability, Happiness and Optimism were endorsed by 15-20%. Of the latter, Unsociability and Poor Coping were mentioned by 22%, making them distinctly more frequent than the following categories of Pessimism, Lack of Drive and Unhappiness (11-14%). It is suggested that a number of these subjectively determined characteristics, which the general public perceive as being life-affirming or denying, do indeed influence physical or mental health, illness or illness behaviour. It may therefore be of value to utilize this set of public perceptions in future programmes of health education. PMID:3357158

  9. PILOT STUDY: CCQM-P13 pilot study. Metals in artificial food digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff Briche, C. S. J.

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of elemental analyses in complex matrices is usually assessed by analysis of a suitable matrix reference material. The reference value is ascribed by consensus mean and by application of primary methods of analysis. However, the quality of this value will be affected by problems such as matrix-induced interferences, moisture corrections and heterogeneity. Pilot study CCQM-P13 was undertaken to assess the capabilities of National Metrology Institutes to analyse Ca, Cu and Cd in an acidic solution that simulates the digest of a food sample. This study filled the gap between the analysis of a gravimetrically prepared calibration solution and the analysis of an unknown in a complex matrix requiring extensive sample preparation. Having an independent reference value, with a small uncertainty, allowed a more rigorous estimation of the reliability of the institutes' analysis and uncertainty estimates, without including issues around sample digestion. The reference values were: 1.6617 +/- 0.0020 µmol/g for Ca, 7.037 +/- 0.012 nmol/g for Cu and 45.57 +/- 0.10 pmol/g for Cd (expanded uncertainties are quoted with coverage factor of 2). The other elements in the matrix were: Na (~25 µg/g), K (~90 µg/g), Cl (~120 µg/g), Fe (~100 ng/g), Mg (~5 µg/g), P (~5 µg/g), Sn (~80 ng/g) and Zn (~200 ng/g). Twelve international laboratories, representing eight countries, determined the amount content of the analytes. A range of techniques that include ID-ICP-MS (high resolution and collision cell), ICP-MS, ICP-OES, AAS, voltametry and potentiometry were used. The results for this pilot study averaged: 1.654 +/- 0.058 µmol/g for Ca (n = 10), 7.26 +/- 0.53 nmol/g for Cu (n = 12) and 45.2 +/- 5.1 pmol/g for Cd (n = 11) where the values associated with the averages are the standard deviations of n participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database

  10. Soil vapor extraction pilot study at a Piedmont UST site

    SciTech Connect

    Widdowson, M.A.; Aelion, C.M.; Ray, R.P.; Reeves, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot study of soil vapor extraction (SVE) at a gasoline-contaminated site in the Piedmont physiographic region of South Carolina is presented. The objective of the pilot study is to determine the efficacy of SVE in remediating petroleum-contaminated Piedmont sites. Soil of the Piedmont region is characterized by fine-grained materials that exhibit a stratified, anisotropic structure, often dominated by zones of low permeability. The pilot remediation project consists of a multiple-well SVE and air sparging system located in the contaminant source area. Hourly measurement of mass extraction rates show elevated hydrocarbon (HC) concentrations during the first hour of operation and a rapid decline to asymptotic values. Time-averaged hydrocarbon mass extraction rates range from 22 to 68 kg HC per day for eight SVE wells operating 6 to 8 h per day. Elevated levels of CO{sub 2} in extracted soil vapors indicate microbial activity contributing to bioremediation at the site.

  11. First Breath prenatal smoking cessation pilot study: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Jehn, Lisette; Lokker, Nicole; Matitz, Debra; Christiansen, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Despite the many dangers associated with smoking during pregnancy, it remains a salient public health problem for Wisconsin women. The First Breath pilot program was developed in an attempt to reduce rates of smoking during pregnancy among low-income women. Preliminary results suggest that the First Breath counseling-based approach is effective, with a quit rate of 43.8% among First Breath enrollees at 1 month postpartum. Women receiving First Breath cessation counseling also had higher quit rates at every measurement period versus women in a comparison group who were receiving whatever cessation care was available in their county in the absence of First Breath. The First Breath pilot study has demonstrated success in helping pregnant women quit smoking and in creating a model for integration of cessation services into prenatal health care service provision. It is through this success that First Breath is expanding beyond the pilot study stage to a statewide program in 2003.

  12. Evaluating midwifery units (EMU): lessons from the pilot study.

    PubMed

    Monk, Amy R; Tracy, Sally K; Foureur, Maralyn; Tracy, Mark

    2013-08-01

    this paper describes the pilot study that was undertaken to test the feasibility of the recruitment plan designed to recruit women who booked to give birth in two freestanding midwifery units in NSW, Australia. The pilot preceded the full prospective cohort study, Evaluating Midwifery Units (EMU), which aimed to examine the antenatal, birth and postnatal outcomes of women planning to give birth in freestanding midwifery units compared to those booked to give birth in tertiary level maternity units in Australia and New Zealand. a prospective cohort study with two mutually-exclusive cohorts. two freestanding midwifery units in NSW and their corresponding tertiary referral hospitals. a total of 146 women with few identified risk factors recruited between 13 September 2009 and 31 March 2010 whose planned place of birth was either a freestanding midwifery unit or tertiary maternity unit. the pilot study identified the feasibility of relying on the booking midwife to recruit eligible women from several antenatal booking clinics to the study. Low rates of eligible women were invited resulting in a lower than expected consent rate. In addition, although mostly only low-risk women were invited to participate, some women requiring medical consultation at the time of booking were inadvertently recruited into the study. The results of this pilot study led us to revise the study protocol to find ways of including the outcomes of all women without identified risk factors who booked at either the freestanding midwifery units or the tertiary referral hospital in that area. This paper describes the revisions that were made to the study plan. five lessons were learned from the pilot study. We found that recruitment protocols employed for the cohort study were too complicated and required simplification to maximise the potential of the study. The study protocol needed to be changed for the main study to ensure a larger sample size and to ensure the risk profile of each cohort was as

  13. A Computerized Adaptive Mathematics Screening Test: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, James R.

    A pilot study of a computerized adaptive test of mathematics achievement was conducted in May and June 1989 in selected schools of the San Diego Unified School District. The study evaluated the usefulness of the test for determining eligibility for Chapter 1 programs in mathematics. The test was a prototype battery of three adaptive tests: (1)…

  14. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  15. Technical Writing Redesign and Assessment: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Gaye Bush

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare scores on writing assignments from traditional, fully online courses in technical writing to pilot, hybrid courses at a southern university. A total of 232 students' assignments were compared in this study. All writing assignments were scored by six trained instructors of English using the same five point…

  16. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  17. Indonesian EFL Students' Perspective on Writing Process: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermilinda Abas, Imelda; Aziz, Noor Hashima Abd

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at understanding the EFL Indonesian students' perspective on the writing process. The pilot study involved two male Indonesian postgraduate students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. The Indonesian students were selected based on the following criteria: (1) had enough knowledge in English writing, indicated by the completion of…

  18. G-induced vestibular dysfunction ('the wobblies') among aerobatic pilots: a case report and review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Thomas Upson

    2002-01-01

    G-induced vestibular dysfunction (GIVD) is a condition well known to aircraft pilots who experience high positive and negative G loads during unlimited-aerobatic competitions and air-show demonstrations. After landing and walking from their aircraft, pilots with GIVD manifest an extremely unstable gait, which they call the wobblies. This article includes a report of one such case of GIVD, which to the author's knowledge is the first published case report of this condition in the medical literature. The author also discusses what is known and theorized about the pathogenesis of GIVD, and he reviews its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  19. G-induced vestibular dysfunction ('the wobblies') among aerobatic pilots: a case report and review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Thomas Upson

    2002-01-01

    G-induced vestibular dysfunction (GIVD) is a condition well known to aircraft pilots who experience high positive and negative G loads during unlimited-aerobatic competitions and air-show demonstrations. After landing and walking from their aircraft, pilots with GIVD manifest an extremely unstable gait, which they call the wobblies. This article includes a report of one such case of GIVD, which to the author's knowledge is the first published case report of this condition in the medical literature. The author also discusses what is known and theorized about the pathogenesis of GIVD, and he reviews its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  20. Understanding nutritional health in older adults. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Callen, Bonnie

    2004-01-01

    A pilot study of adults ages 65 and older admitted to an acute care setting was conducted to compare nutritional risk as measured by hospital dieticians with two Nutrition Screening Initiative tools, the DETERMINE Your Nutritional Health Checklist and the Level I Screen, and to elicit from patients their own perceptions of nutritional health. Ten community-living older adults were interviewed. Although all 10 were at nutritional risk as measured by both hospital assessment and nutritional risk screening tools, none of these patients believed themselves to be at risk. One conclusion of this pilot is that interventions and education need to be tailored to the perceptions of targeted individuals.

  1. 78 FR 23941 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... the Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program to May 8... ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies, Including...

  2. 76 FR 70152 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... technologies to participate in a pilot program for early feasibility study investigational device exemption... entitled ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies...

  3. Testimony psychotherapy in Bosnian refugees: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Weine, S M; Kulenovic, A D; Pavkovic, I; Gibbons, R

    1998-12-01

    The authors sought to describe the use of the testimony method of psychotherapy in a group of traumatized adult refugees from genocide in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The subjects were 20 Bosnian refugees in Chicago who gave written informed consent to participate in a case series study of testimony psychotherapy. All subjects received testimony psychotherapy, averaging six sessions, approximately 90 minutes, weekly or biweekly. Subjects received standardized instruments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, traumatic events, global functioning, and prior psychiatric history. The instruments were administered before treatment, at the conclusion of the treatment, and at the 2- and 6-month follow-ups. The posttreatment assessments demonstrated significant decreases in the rate of PTSD diagnosis, PTSD symptom severity, and the severity of reexperiencing, avoidance, and hyperarousal symptom clusters. Depressive symptoms demonstrated a significant decrease, and there was a significant increase in scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Two-month and 6-month follow-up assessments demonstrated further significant decreases in all symptoms and an increase in scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. This pilot study provides preliminary evidence that testimony psychotherapy may lead to improvements in PTSD and depressive symptoms, as well as to improvement of functioning, in survivors of state-sponsored violence.

  4. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders.

  5. Photoacoustic analysis of thyroid cancer in vivo: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeesu; Kim, Min-Hee; Jo, Kwanhoon; Ha, Jeonghoon; Kim, Yongmin; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Chulhong

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers. About 3-8% of the people in the United States have thyroid nodules, and 5-15% of these nodules are malignant. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a standard procedure to diagnose malignity of nodules. However, about 10-20% of FNABs produce indeterminable results, which leads to repeat biopsies and unnecessary surgical operations. We have explored photoacoustic (PA) imaging as a new method to identify cancerous nodules. In a pilot study to test its feasibility, we recruited patients with thyroid nodules (currently 36 cases with 21 malignant and 15 benign nodules), acquired in vivo PA and ultrasound (US) images of the nodules in real time using a recently-developed clinical PA/US imaging system, and analyzed the acquired data offline. The preliminary results show that malignant and benign nodules could be differentiated by utilizing their PA amplitudes at different excitation wavelengths. This is the first in vivo PA analysis of thyroid nodules. Although a larger-scale study is needed for statistical significance, the preliminary results show the good potential of PA imaging as a non-invasive tool for triaging thyroid cancer.

  6. Acute intravenous synaptamine complex variant KB220™ "normalizes" neurological dysregulation in patients during protracted abstinence from alcohol and opiates as observed using quantitative electroencephalographic and genetic analysis for reward polymorphisms: part 1, pilot study with 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Miller, David K; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Manka, Matthew; Miller, Merlene; Stokes, Stanley; Manka, Debra; Allen, Cameron; Gant, Charles; Downs, B William; Smolen, Andrew; Stevens, Emily; Yeldandi, Swetha; Blum, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    It is well established that in both food- and drug-addicted individuals, there is dopamine resistance due to an association with the DRD2 gene A1 allele. Evidence is emerging whereby the potential of utilizing a natural, nonaddicting, safe, putative D2 agonist may find its place in recovery from reward deficiency syndrome (RDS) in patients addicted to psychoactive chemicals. Utilizing quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) as an imaging tool, we show the impact of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™ as a putative activator of the mesolimbic system. We demonstrate for the first time that its intravenous administration reduces or "normalizes" aberrant electrophysiological parameters of the reward circuitry site. For this pilot study, we report that the qEEGs of an alcoholic and a heroin abuser with existing abnormalities (ie, widespread theta and widespread alpha activity, respectively) during protracted abstinence are significantly normalized by the administration of 1 intravenous dose of Synaptamine Complex Variant KB220™. Both patients were genotyped for a number of neurotransmitter reward genes to determine to what extent they carry putative dopaminergic risk alleles that may predispose them for alcohol or heroin dependence, respectively. The genes tested included the dopamine transporter (DAT1, locus symbol SLC6A3), dopamine D4 receptor exon 3 VNTR (DRD4), DRD2 TaqIA (rs1800497), COMT val158 met SNP (rs4680), monoamine oxidase A upstream VNTR (MAOA-uVNTR), and serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR, locus symbol SLC6A4). We emphasize that these are case studies, and it would be unlikely for all individuals to carry all putative risk alleles. Based on previous research and our qEEG studies (parts 1 and 2 of this study), we cautiously suggest that long-term activation of dopaminergic receptors (ie, DRD2 receptors) will result in their proliferation and lead to enhanced "dopamine sensitivity" and an increased sense of happiness

  7. Tantrums and Anxiety in Early Childhood: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireault, Gina; Trahan, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    Tantrums, or emotional reactions that are out of proportion to a situation, appear to be a common childhood phenomenon--yet have drawn little research attention. This pilot study describes tantrum precipitants; their frequency, intensity, and duration; and parental responses in a small community sample (N = 33) of 3- to 5-year-olds. Tantrum…

  8. Tai Chi for People with Visual Impairments: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miszko, Tanya A.; Ramsey, Vincent K.; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the physical and psychological outcomes of a tai chi exercise program for eight adults with visual impairments. It found that after eight weeks of orientation and mobility training and tai chi practice, the participants' single leg-stance time and total knee flexion work and power improved, as did their frequency of,…

  9. Results of the "In Control: No Alcohol!" Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mares, Suzanne H. W.; van der Vorst, Haske; Vermeulen-Smit, Evelien; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Verdurmen, Jacqueline E. E.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    More than 50% of Dutch 12-year olds already started drinking. Since it is known that delaying the onset of alcohol use results in a lower risk of alcohol-related problems, the recently developed "In control: No alcohol!" prevention program is targeted at elementary school children and their mothers. In this pilot study, the success of…

  10. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  11. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  12. Assessing Student Engagement: HSSSE Pilot Study with Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    NAIS and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation recently launched a three-year pilot study on the use of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) among independent schools. HSSSE, administered by Indiana University, is a survey designed to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of high school students about their work. This…

  13. Initial Scale Development: Sample Size for Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George A.; Brooks, Gordon P.

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies are often recommended by scholars and consultants to address a variety of issues, including preliminary scale or instrument development. Specific concerns such as item difficulty, item discrimination, internal consistency, response rates, and parameter estimation in general are all relevant. Unfortunately, there is little discussion…

  14. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  15. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  16. Physical activity in Georgia state parks: A pilot study

    Treesearch

    Lincoln R. Larson; Jason W. Whiting; Gary T. Green

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Georgia State Parks in the promotion of physical activity among different racial/ethnic and age groups. Data were collected at three state parks in north Georgia during the summer of 2009 using two research methods: behavior observations (N=2281) and intercept surveys (N=473).

  17. Evaluation Study of "Language, Literacy, & Vocabulary!" Spring 2006 Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNabb, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A pilot study of the "Language, Literacy, & Vocabulary!" program was conducted by Learning Gauger, Inc., for National Geographic School Publishing, in spring 2006. The program evaluation examined the classroom adoption approaches used by participating teachers and the subsequent impact of the "Language, Literacy, &…

  18. CSO DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY: SPRING CREEK CSO STORAGE FACILITY UPGRADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research summary presents the results of a pilot-scale disinfection study performed for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under a contract to Camp Dresser & McKee of Woodbury, New York. The main ob...

  19. Elderly Homosexual Women and Men: Report on a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnigerode, Fred A.; Adelman, Marcy R.

    1978-01-01

    A pilot study is described in which four- to five-hour tape-recorded interviews were conducted with 11 homosexual women and men, 60-77 years of age. Areas examined included: physical change and physical health; work, retirement and leisure time; social behavior; psychological functioning; sexual behavior; and personal perspectives on the life…

  20. Pasadena City College SIGI Project Research Design. Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risser, John J.; Tulley, John E.

    A pilot study evaluation of SIGI (System of Interactive Guidance and Information) at Pasadena City College in 1974-75 tested the effectiveness of an experimental research design for an expanded field test of the system the following year. (SIGI is a computer based career guidance program designed by Educational Testing Service to assist community…

  1. Pasadena City College SIGI Project Research Design. Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risser, John J.; Tulley, John E.

    A pilot study evaluation of SIGI (System of Interactive Guidance and Information) at Pasadena City College in 1974-75 tested the effectiveness of an experimental research design for an expanded field test of the system the following year. (SIGI is a computer based career guidance program designed by Educational Testing Service to assist community…

  2. Outcome evaluation of a pilot study using "nudges"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Every school day, over 31 million U.S. children eat school lunches. Unfortunately, students often do not choose the healthy options in the school cafeteria. This paper describes outcome results of a pilot study using "nudges" to improve elementary school students' fruits and vegetables selections. A...

  3. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  4. Will More Diversified Staffs Diversify Newspaper Content? A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; and Others

    A pilot study asked 94 students enrolled in introductory newswriting classes at three separate universities to evaluate 18 news stories. About half the stories concerned topics that proponents of multiculturalism have suggested would receive more emphasis if newspapers employed more women and minorities: topics such as breast cancer, divorce,…

  5. Causes of Mortality among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The…

  6. SIGI: Report of a Pilot Study Under Field Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Warren; And Others

    This paper describes the procedures and results of a pilot study of a computer-based System of Interactive Guidance and Information (SIGI) which was designed to help community college students make rational career decisions. A number of the important features of the system are summarized in terms of the source of the value dimensions used in SIGI,…

  7. Causes of Mortality among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The…

  8. Assessing Student Engagement: HSSSE Pilot Study with Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    NAIS and the NAIS Commission on Accreditation recently launched a three-year pilot study on the use of the High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) among independent schools. HSSSE, administered by Indiana University, is a survey designed to investigate the attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs of high school students about their work. This…

  9. Achieving Competence: Army-VOTEC School Partnership Pilot Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Mary W.

    To reduce Army training costs, the Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) investigated use of training at civilian secondary and postsecondary vocational-technical (VOTEC) institutions as an alternative to initial job training in Army service schools. Three models were used in the pilot study: the preservice training model in which…

  10. Human Exposures to PAHs: an Eastern United States Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD and in four surrounding counties (NHEXAS-Maryland). An objective of this effort was to esta...

  11. CSO DISINFECTION PILOT STUDY: SPRING CREEK CSO STORAGE FACILITY UPGRADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research summary presents the results of a pilot-scale disinfection study performed for the New York City Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under a contract to Camp Dresser & McKee of Woodbury, New York. The main ob...

  12. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  13. Consumer Understanding of Nutrition Marketing Terms: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haroldson, Amber; Yen, Chih-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the validity of a questionnaire developed to assess adult consumer understanding of nutrition marketing terms and the resulting impact on consumer behavior. Participants (n = 40) completed an electronic questionnaire. Efforts to establish validity and reliability suggest that the questionnaire is a…

  14. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  15. Teaching Speech Communication with a Foreign Accent: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Guo-Ming; Chung, Jensen

    A pilot study examined problems encountered by foreign instructors teaching in American colleges. Fourteen Chinese-born instructors teaching in Speech Communication answered a questionnaire containing 12 open-ended questions. Recurring themes were coded from the answers, and then organized into three categories: cultural differences; linguistic…

  16. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  17. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  18. The CITRA pilot studies program: mentoring translational research.

    PubMed

    Wethington, Elaine; Breckman, Risa; Meador, Rhoda; Reid, M Carrington; Sabir, Myra; Lachs, Mark; Pillemer, Karl A

    2007-12-01

    We developed an innovative pilot studies program to foster partnerships between university researchers and agencies serving older people in New York City. The development of researchers willing to collaborate with frontline service agencies and service agencies ready to partner with researchers is critical for translating scientific research into evidence-based practice that benefits community-dwelling older adults. We adapted the traditional academic pilot studies model to include key features of community-based participatory research. In partnership with a network of 265 senior centers and service agencies, we built a multistep program to recruit and educate scientific investigators and agencies in the principles of community-based research and to fund research partnerships that fulfilled essential elements of research translation from university to community: scientific rigor, sensitivity to community needs, and applicability to frontline practice. We also developed an educational and monitoring infrastructure to support projects. Pilot studies programs developing community-based participatory research require an infrastructure that can supplement individual pilot investigator efforts with centralized resources to ensure proper implementation and dissemination of the research. The financial and time investment required to maintain programs such as those at the Cornell Institute for Translational Research on Aging, or CITRA, may be a barrier to establishing similar programs.

  19. GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret; Marentette, Christina; Bujosa, Robert; Taylor, Jessica; Lewis, Preston

    2016-01-01

    During the spring of 2016, from April 4 - May 27, sixteen GLOBE schools participated in the GLOBE Aerosol Field Campaign - U.S. Pilot Study. Thirteen teachers from these schools had previously participated in the NASA LEARN program (Long-term Experience in Authentic Research with NASA) where they were GLOBE trained in Atmosphere protocols, and engaged in 1-3 years of research under the mentorship of NASA scientists. Each school was loaned two aerosol instruments for the Campaign duration, either 2 GLOBE sun photometers, 2 Calitoo sun photometers, or 1 of each. This allowed for students to make measurements side-by-side and in the case of the Calitoos, to compare AOT results immediately with each other for better consistency in data collection. Additionally, as part of the Field Campaign evaluation, multiple instruments allow for an assessment of the ease of use of each instrument for grade level of students, whether in middle school or high school. Before the Campaign, all GLOBE and Calitoo instruments were 'checked out' against an AERONET, then checked again upon return after the Campaign. By examining all data, before, during and after the Campaign, this gives an indication of instrument performance and proficiency obtained by the students. Support was provided to each teacher and their students at the level requested, via email, phone or video conferencing.

  20. Booking patients for hospital admissions: evaluation of a pilot programme for day cases

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Hugh; Ham, Chris; Kipping, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    Problem NHS patients requiring elective surgery usually have to wait before being treated and are usually told when a date becomes available. Design 18 month pilot programme to enable day case patients to book date of hospital admission at time of decision to operate. Background and setting 24 pilot sites in England with relatively short waiting times and some experience of booking appointments. Key measures for improvement Proportion of patients with booked or “to come in” date during and after pilot programme, proportion not attending for admission, and proportion waiting ≥ 6 months. Comparison of pilot sites with non-pilot sites. Strategies for change National Patients' Access Team established to help pilot sites enable patients to book admission dates. Provision of £9.9m to pilot sites to employ project managers, purchase equipment, buy extra time from clinical and other staff, and invest in information and communications technology. Effects of change Proportion of patients with booked or “to come in” date increased from 51.1% to 72.7% between end of March 1999 and end of March 2000, and then fell to 66.2% by end of March 2001. Over the same periods, the proportion of patients waiting ≥ 6 months fell from 10.9% to 10.5% and then increased to 11.9%. The proportion of patients failing to attend fell from 5.7% to 3.1% between the first quarter of 1999 and the first quarter of 2000, and then increased to 4.0% in the first quarter of 2001. Pilot sites varied widely in performance during and after the pilot phase. Pilot sites had higher proportions of patients with booked or “to come in” date than non-pilot sites at end of each period. Lessons learnt Increasing the proportion of patients who book their date of hospital admission is possible, but there are difficulties in sustaining this. Several factors facilitated or hindered the implementation of booking, and the roll out of the programme across the NHS is seeking to incorporate these factors. PMID

  1. Physiological Effects of Acceleration Observed During a Centrifuge Study of Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Creer, Brent Y.; Wingrove, Rodney C.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center, and the Naval Air Development Center, Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, to study the effects of acceleration on pilot performance and to obtain some meaningful data for use in establishing tolerance to acceleration levels. The flight simulator used in the study was the Johnsville centrifuge operated as a closed loop system. The pilot was required to perform a control task in various sustained acceleration fields typical of those that Might be encountered by a pilot flying an entry vehicle in which he is seated in a forward-facing position. A special restraint system was developed and designed to increase the pilot's tolerance to these accelerations. The results of this study demonstrated that a well-trained subject, such as a test pilot, can adequately carry out a control task during moderately high accelerations for prolonged periods of time. The maximum levels of acceleration tolerated were approximately 6 times that of gravity for approximately 6 minutes, and varied slightly with the acceleration direction. The tolerance runs were in each case terminated by the subject. In all but two instances, the cause was extreme fatigue. On two occasions the subject terminated the run when he "grayed out." Although there were subjective and objective findings involving the visual and cardiovascular systems, the respiratory system yielded the more critical limiting factors. It would appear that these limiting factors were less severe during the "eyeballs-out" accelerations when compared with the "eyeballs-in" accelerations. These findings are explained on the basis of the influence that the inertial forces of acceleration have on the mechanics of respiration. A condensed version of this report was presented at the Annual Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association, Miami Beach, May 5-11, 1960, in a paper entitled "Ability of Pilots to Perform a Control Task in

  2. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated {gt}95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  3. Dissolution Studies With Pilot Plant and Actual INTEC Calcines

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Garn, Troy Gerry

    1999-04-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/ Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive A1(NO3)3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt. % of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt. % dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt. % dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines.

  4. Reevaluation of Friedman's Labor Curve: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cesario, Sandra K

    2004-01-01

    To reevaluate the average length of each phase/stage of labor for multiparous and primiparous women in North America who received no regional anesthesia or oxytocin augmentation or induction, to describe a range of labor lengths associated with good childbirth outcomes, and to determine if there is a consensus among labor and delivery nurse managers responding to the survey regarding the need to revise Friedman's Labor Curve. This pilot study used a descriptive and anonymous cross-sectional survey design. Surveys were mailed to 500 maternity care agencies in the United States, Canada, and Mexico with a return rate of 17.8% (n = 89). Each participating agency was asked to submit five patient cases to be included in the analysis. The sample of patient cases (n = 419) was drawn from randomly selected maternity care agencies throughout North America representing all sizes of agencies and geographic locations. The cases submitted for analysis represented women 14 to 44 years of age with varying ethnicities who received no regional anesthesia or oxytocin augmentation or induction. Twenty-three percent of the women in the sample (n = 97) were primigravidas. The average length of labor for primiparous and multiparous women today is similar to the average length of labor described by Friedman in 1954. However, a wider range of "normal" was found in cases included in the current study. Primiparous women remained in the first stage of labor for up to 26 hours and the second stage of labor up to 8 hours with no adverse effects to mother or infant. Multiparous women remained in the first stage of labor for up to 23 hours and the second stage of labor for up to 4.5 hours with good birth outcomes. In addition, 87.6% of nurse managers responding to the survey believed that Friedman's Labor Curve should be revised to meet the needs of current patient populations, technological advances, and nursing responsibilities. This study suggests that the parameters to determine if a labor is

  5. A Study of the Characteristics of Human-Pilot Control Response to Simulated Aircraft Lateral Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatham, Donald C

    1954-01-01

    Report presents the results of studies made in an attempt to provide information on the control operations of the human pilot. These studies included an investigation of the ability of pilots to control simulated unstable yawing oscillations, a study of the basic characteristics of human-pilot control response, and a study to determine whether and to what extent pilot control response can be represented in an analytical form.

  6. Piloted Simulation Study of Wake Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this current research is to determine an acceptable level of vortex roll disturbance for worst-case encounter geometries during normal, routine operations. This includes: determining the boundary & metric(s), and defining evaluation factors & procedures. The discussion includes: simulation hardware, research simulator software, and research approach & observations.

  7. Introducing technology into medical education: two pilot studies.

    PubMed

    George, Paul; Dumenco, Luba; Dollase, Richard; Taylor, Julie Scott; Wald, Hedy S; Reis, Shmuel P

    2013-12-01

    Educators are integrating new technology into medical curriculum. The impact of newer technology on educational outcomes remains unclear. We aimed to determine if two pilot interventions, (1) introducing iPads into problem-based learning (PBL) sessions and (2) online tutoring would improve the educational experience of our learners. We voluntarily assigned 26 second-year medical students to iPad-based PBL sessions. Five students were assigned to Skype for exam remediation. We performed a mixed-method evaluation to determine efficacy. Pilot 1: Seventeen students completed a survey following their use of an iPad during the second-year PBL curriculum. Students noted the iPad allows for researching information in real time, annotating lecture notes, and viewing sharper images. Data indicate that iPads have value in medical education and are a positive addition to the curriculum. Pilot 2: Students agreed that online tutoring is at least or more effective than in-person tutoring. In our pilot studies, students experienced that iPads and Skype are beneficial in medical education and can be successfully employed in areas such as PBL and remediation. Educators should continue to further examine innovative opportunities for introducing technology into medical education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nursing Student Perceptions of Digital Textbooks: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A

    2016-01-01

    Digital textbooks are increasing in popularity, often resulting from the perception that students demand the use of technology in academics. However, few studies have been done on student perceptions of digital textbooks. A pilot study was conducted with students enrolled in a nursing research course; 123 nursing students participated. This study found that students overwhelmingly preferred print textbooks over digital textbooks. More research needs to be done before assuming students would prefer digital textbooks over print.

  9. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  10. 76 FR 12367 - Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study AGENCY... Control Number 1024-0255). The purpose of this IC is to conduct a pilot study to test the survey... collection. Title: Visibility Valuation Survey Pilot Study. Type of Request: New. Affected Public...

  11. Case study research.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth; Thomas-Gregory, Annette

    2015-06-10

    This article describes case study research for nursing and healthcare practice. Case study research offers the researcher an approach by which a phenomenon can be investigated from multiple perspectives within a bounded context, allowing the researcher to provide a 'thick' description of the phenomenon. Although case study research is a flexible approach for the investigation of complex nursing and healthcare issues, it has methodological challenges, often associated with the multiple methods used in individual studies. These are explored through examples of case study research carried out in practice and education settings. An overview of what constitutes 'good' case study research is proposed.

  12. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment: the Seaside, Oregon Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Geist, E. L.; Synolakis, C.; Titov, V. V.

    2004-12-01

    A pilot study of Seaside, Oregon is underway, to develop methodologies for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments that can be incorporated into Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) developed by FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Current NFIP guidelines for tsunami hazard assessment rely on the science, technology and methodologies developed in the 1970s; although generally regarded as groundbreaking and state-of-the-art for its time, this approach is now superseded by modern methods that reflect substantial advances in tsunami research achieved in the last two decades. In particular, post-1990 technical advances include: improvements in tsunami source specification; improved tsunami inundation models; better computational grids by virtue of improved bathymetric and topographic databases; a larger database of long-term paleoseismic and paleotsunami records and short-term, historical earthquake and tsunami records that can be exploited to develop improved probabilistic methodologies; better understanding of earthquake recurrence and probability models. The NOAA-led U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), in partnership with FEMA, USGS, NSF and Emergency Management and Geotechnical agencies of the five Pacific States, incorporates these advances into site-specific tsunami hazard assessments for coastal communities in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington. NTHMP hazard assessment efforts currently focus on developing deterministic, "credible worst-case" scenarios that provide valuable guidance for hazard mitigation and emergency management. The NFIP focus, on the other hand, is on actuarial needs that require probabilistic hazard assessments such as those that characterize 100- and 500-year flooding events. There are clearly overlaps in NFIP and NTHMP objectives. NTHMP worst-case scenario assessments that include an estimated probability of occurrence could benefit the NFIP; NFIP probabilistic assessments of 100- and 500-yr

  13. Free online otolaryngology educational modules: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Bryson, Paul C; Sykes, Kevin J; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-04-01

    Otolaryngology residents need concise, easily accessible modules to expand educational opportunities between surgical cases. These modules should be inexpensive to create and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether otolaryngology residents at multiple institutions used online video modules to supplement their studying for the Otolaryngology Training Exam, whether the modules had any effect on their Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores, and to obtain survey feedback about the modules. This randomized trial was conducted in 3 academic departments of otolaryngology in the United States among 37 residents enrolled in 3 otolaryngology residency programs. Residents were randomized into 2 groups, one with access to the educational modules and the other with no access. Otolaryngology training examination scores were obtained from the year prior to the intervention (2012) and the year following module access (2013). Residents with access to the modules were also surveyed to assess use and obtain feedback about the modules. Otolaryngology training examination scores improved significantly from 2012 to 2013 among both residents who had access to the modules and those who did not in the sections of head and neck, laryngology, and sleep medicine. However, scores in the sections of pediatric otolaryngology (8% increase, P = .03), otology (7% increase, P = .02), and facial plastic surgery (10% increase, P = .02) improved from 2012 to 2013 only among residents with access to the modules. All respondents rated the videos as very helpful, with a rating of 4 of 5 on a Likert scale. Online otolaryngology educational modules are an inexpensive way to expand resident learning opportunities. Despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in otolaryngology training examination scores in this study, use of online modules sends a message to otolaryngology residents that their education is a priority; self-study outside the hospital

  14. Structural Differences in Gray Matter between Glider Pilots and Non-Pilots. A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed, Tosif; Kawanabe, Motoaki; Ishii, Shin; Callan, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Glider flying is a unique skill that requires pilots to control an aircraft at high speeds in three dimensions and amidst frequent full-body rotations. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of flying a glider using voxel-based morphometry. The comparison between gray matter densities of 15 glider pilots and a control group of 15 non-pilots exhibited significant gray matter density increases in left ventral premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and the supplementary eye field. We posit that the identified regions might be associated with cognitive and motor processes related to flying, such as joystick control, visuo-vestibular interaction, and oculomotor control. PMID:25506339

  15. Brief intervention addressing excessive cannabis use in young people consulting their GP: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haller, Dagmar M; Meynard, Anne; Lefebvre, Danièle; Tylee, André; Narring, Françoise; Broers, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    When excessive cannabis consumption occurs in adolescence, the adverse consequences extend into adulthood. Interventions by GPs are effective in preventing harm associated with alcohol use. Similar interventions have potential in addressing cannabis use. To develop and pilot test a brief intervention targeting excessive cannabis use (defined as > or = 1x/week) in young people in primary care. Pilot intervention trial. Seven family practices in Switzerland. The team collaborated with GPs and young people to develop the intervention. Seven GPs piloted its use in their consultations. Patients aged 15 to 24 years consulting for any health problem were recruited before the consultation. Cannabis use, other substance use, and their psychosocial correlates were assessed with a short confidential questionnaire administered before the consultation and 1 month later. GPs, staff, and patients were asked to comment on the study and its feasibility. Of 81 young people invited to participate, 78 (70% female) agreed (participation rate: 96%). One in seven (13.2%, 95% confidence interval = 7.5% to 18.9%) used cannabis at least once a week. Data at 1 month were available for 42% who had provided email contact details and 91% of those who had provided their mobile phone number (63% overall). In most cases, the intervention lasted no more than 5 minutes. Comments from participants added favourable data towards the feasibility of the study. This pilot study provides a solid base on which to build a randomised trial of a brief intervention addressing cannabis use in young people consulting in family practice.

  16. Treatment of premenstrual depression with nortriptyline: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harrison, W M; Endicott, J; Nee, J

    1989-04-01

    There are no reports on treatment of premenstrual syndrome with antidepressants, although depression is a common symptom of the syndrome. Eleven women who met DSM-III-R criteria for late luteal phase dysphoric disorder were treated with nortriptyline in an open pilot study after they failed to respond to placebo or another medication. Eight of 11 patients had a good therapeutic response. The efficacy of antidepressants in the treatment of premenstrual depression needs confirmation with double-blind studies.

  17. Operational impact of tongue piercing on French military pilots during overseas deployments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gunepin, Mathieu; Derache, Florence; Audoual, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Piercing in general and particularly tongue piercing is gaining popularity in the Western world. The French army and so the French air force are concerned by this phenomenon. A case report of a pilot suffering from dental pain with operational consequences due to a dental fracture during Operation Trident (Kosovo) is presented. The dental examination highlighted the fact that the dental fracture was directly due to the presence of a tongue piercing. Tongue piercing and wearing tongue jewelry have numerous adverse effects, especially frequent dental complications. If these complications do not result in death, they can generate sufficient pain to disturb the vigilance and concentration of pilots and can have a major impact on flight security. For these reasons, tongue piercing is in total contradiction to a professional army and particularly to military pilots and aircrews.

  18. A remotely piloted aircraft system in major incident management: concept and pilot, feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Håkon B

    2015-06-10

    Major incidents are complex, dynamic and bewildering task environments characterised by simultaneous, rapidly changing events, uncertainty and ill-structured problems. Efficient management, communication, decision-making and allocation of scarce medical resources at the chaotic scene of a major incident is challenging and often relies on sparse information and data. Communication and information sharing is primarily voice-to-voice through phone or radio on specified radio frequencies. Visual cues are abundant and difficult to communicate between teams and team members that are not co-located. The aim was to assess the concept and feasibility of using a remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) system to support remote sensing in simulated major incident exercises. We carried out an experimental, pilot feasibility study. A custom-made, remotely controlled, multirotor unmanned aerial vehicle with vertical take-off and landing was equipped with digital colour- and thermal imaging cameras, a laser beam, a mechanical gripper arm and an avalanche transceiver. We collected data in five simulated exercises: 1) mass casualty traffic accident, 2) mountain rescue, 3) avalanche with buried victims, 4) fisherman through thin ice and 5) search for casualties in the dark. The unmanned aerial vehicle was remotely controlled, with high precision, in close proximity to air space obstacles at very low levels without compromising work on the ground. Payload capacity and tolerance to wind and turbulence were limited. Aerial video, shot from different altitudes, and remote aerial avalanche beacon search were streamed wirelessly in real time to a monitor at a ground base. Electromagnetic interference disturbed signal reception in the ground monitor. A small remotely piloted aircraft can be used as an effective tool carrier, although limited by its payload capacity, wind speed and flight endurance. Remote sensing using already existing remotely piloted aircraft technology in pre

  19. Central serous retinopathy with permanent visual deficit in a commercial air transport pilot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Newman, David G

    2002-11-01

    This report describes a case of central serous retinopathy (CSR) in the right eye of a commercial air transport pilot which resulted in a permanent reduction in visual acuity and the loss of his license. The previously fit and well pilot developed sudden loss of central vision, which resolved spontaneously. He then went on to experience recurrent episodes of fluctuating visual acuity (down to 6/60) and visual dysfunction in the right eye. His left eye remained unaffected. Eventually his condition stabilized, and he was left with a permanent reduction in right visual acuity (6/36) with intact peripheral visual fields and a completely normal left eye. After a period of grounding of 12 mo, he sought to have his license reinstated. He was considered to be a functionally monocular pilot, and as such was granted a conditional Class 1 medical category. The aeromedical disposition of this pilot and the issues involved in determining the fitness to fly of pilots with permanent visual defects arising from CSR are discussed.

  20. Increased neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in delirium: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Egberts, Angelique; Mattace-Raso, Francesco Us

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is a common and severe complication among older hospitalized patients. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but it has been suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress may play a role. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate levels of the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) - a marker of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress - in patients with and without delirium. This pilot study was performed within a retrospective chart review study that included acutely ill patients, 65 years and older, who were admitted to the ward of geriatrics of the Erasmus University Medical Center. All patients in whom the differential white blood cell (WBC) counts as well as the C-reactive protein (CRP) level were determined within 24 h after admission were included in the present study. Differences in NLR between patients with and without delirium were investigated using univariate analysis of variance, with adjustments for age, sex, comorbidities, CRP level, and total WBC count. Eighty-six patients were included. Thirteen patients were diagnosed with delirium. In adjusted models, higher mean NLR values were found in patients with, than in those without, delirium (9.10 vs 5.18, P=0.003). In this pilot study, we found increased NLR levels in patients with delirium. This finding might suggest that an inadequate response of the immune system and oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of delirium. Further studies are needed to confirm the association between NLR and delirium.

  1. Aircraft accidents with student pilots flying solo: analysis of 390 cases.

    PubMed

    Uitdewilligen, Sjir; de Voogt, Alexander Johan

    2009-09-01

    This study involves an investigation of accidents of student pilots flying solo. We analyzed NTSB probable cause reports of 390 crashes that occurred in the period 2001-2005. The results indicate that despite the apparent dangers of unsupervised flights, this type of accident manifests lower rates of injuries and fatalities than those found with other types of instructional flights. A relatively high number of accidents occurred in the landing phase, particularly during the flare maneuver, which confirms earlier research on accidents with instructional flights. Compared to all solo pilots, student pilots on their first solo flight had a relatively low risk of injury, while students with more than 100 h of flight experience had a relatively high risk of injury. More research is needed into methods for teaching the flare maneuver to student pilots. Furthermore, there is an important role for the flight instructor in continuing to check on solo flying student pilots, in particular when they have accumulated a considerable number of flight hours without obtaining a private pilot license and in remedying planning and decision-making errors by assisting in flight preparations.

  2. Life and Microgravity Sciences Spacelab Mission: Human Research Pilot Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B. (Editor); Walker, Karen R. (Editor); Hargens, Alan (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Life Sciences, Microgravity Science and Spacelab Mission contains a number of human experiments directed toward identifying the functional, metabolic and neurological characteristics of muscle weakness and atrophy during space flight. To ensure the successful completion of the flight experiments, a ground-based pilot study, designed to mimic the flight protocols as closely as possible, was carried out in the head-down tilt bed rest model. This report records the rationales, procedures, preliminary results and estimated value of the pilot study, the first of its kind, for 12 of the 13 planned experiments in human research. The bed rest study was conducted in the Human Research Facility at Ames Research Center from July 11 - August 28, 1995. Eight healthy male volunteers performed the experiments before, during and after 17 days bed rest. The immediate purposes of this simulation were to integrate the experiments, provide data in a large enough sample for publication of results, enable investigators to review individual experiments in the framework of a multi-disciplinary study and relay the experience of the pilot study to the mission specialists prior to launch.

  3. Prioritization strategies in clinical practice guidelines development: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few methodological studies address the prioritization of clinical topics for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs). The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for Priority Determination of Topics (PDT) of CPGs. Methods and results Firstly, we developed an instrument for PDT with 41 criteria that were grouped under 10 domains, based on a comprehensive systematic search. Secondly, we performed a survey of stakeholders involved in CPGs development, and end users of guidelines, using the instrument. Thirdly, a pilot testing of the PDT procedure was performed in order to choose 10 guideline topics among 34 proposed projects; using a multi-criteria analysis approach, we validated a mechanism that followed five stages: determination of the composition of groups, item/domain scoring, weights determination, quality of the information used to support judgments, and finally, topic selection. Participants first scored the importance of each domain, after which four different weighting procedures were calculated (including the survey results). The process of weighting was determined by correlating the data between them. We also reported the quality of evidence used for PDT. Finally, we provided a qualitative analysis of the process. The main domains used to support judgement, having higher quality scores and weightings, were feasibility, disease burden, implementation and information needs. Other important domains such as user preferences, adverse events, potential for health promotion, social effects, and economic impact had lower relevance for clinicians. Criteria for prioritization were mainly judged through professional experience, while good quality information was only used in 15% of cases. Conclusion The main advantages of the proposed methodology are supported by the use of a systematic approach to identify, score and weight guideline topics selection, limiting or exposing the influence of personal biases. However, the methodology was

  4. Teledermatology in pharmacies: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Manahan, Melissa N; Soyer, H Peter; Nissen, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    We investigated community pharmacists' management of skin conditions in order to identify a need for further educational support. Twenty community pharmacists in Queensland completed a questionnaire regarding their management of skin conditions and their opinions regarding the usefulness of a potential teledermatology service. The pharmacists' accuracy in managing skin conditions was tested by a dermatologist who reviewed the pharmacists' advice in 33 cases obtained by 14 pharmacists. Overall agreement between the pharmacists and the dermatologist was moderate, with a kappa statistic of 0.58 (P < 0.05) The uptake of a potential teledermatology service was investigated in one pharmacy over one month. Five patients were offered the teledermatology service. Of these, two patients consented and three refused. All pharmacists (n = 20) indicated a desire for further education and supported the idea of a teledermatology service.

  5. A pilot study of energy efficient air cleaning for ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Gundel, Lara A.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Katsapov, Gregory Y.; Fisk, William J.

    2002-11-01

    A laboratory pilot study has been undertaken with the material that showed the most promise (high capacity and low pressure drop) based on the literature review and associated calculations. The best-performing air cleaner was a commercially available pleated filter that contained a thin layer of small activated carbon particles between two sheets of non-woven fibrous webbing. We will refer to this unit as the ''ozone filter'' although it is marketed for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from automobile passenger compartments. This pilot study strongly suggests that ozone air cleaning can be practical in commercial air handling systems; however, further tests are needed to assess air cleaner performance under a wider range of conditions.

  6. A pilot feasibility study of neurofeedback for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Naomi J; Frenette, Elizabeth; Hynes, Caitlin; Pisarik, Elizabeth; Tomasetti, Kathryn; Perrin, Ellen C; Rene, Kirsten

    2014-06-01

    Neurofeedback (NFB) is an emerging treatment for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This pilot study examined the feasibility of NFB for children with ASD. Ten children ages 7-12 with high functioning ASD and attention difficulties received a NFB attention training intervention. A standardized checklist captured feasibility, including focus during exercises and academic tasks, as well as off-task behaviors. Active behaviors and vocalizations were the most frequent off-task behaviors. Positive reinforcement and breaks including calm breathing exercises were the most common supports. Low motivation was associated with higher feasibility challenges, yet parental involvement and accommodations were helpful. This pilot study shows that it is feasible to conduct NFB sessions with children with high functioning autism and attention difficulties.

  7. Teaching billing and coding to medical students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jiaxin; Cennimo, David; Chen, Sophia; Altschuler, Eric L

    2013-08-12

    Complex billing practices cost the US healthcare system billions of dollars annually. Coding for outpatient office visits [known as Evaluation & Management (E&M) services] is commonly particularly fraught with errors. The best way to insure proper billing and coding by practicing physicians is to teach this as part of the medical school curriculum. Here, in a pilot study, we show that medical students can learn well the basic principles from lectures. This approach is easy to implement into a medical school curriculum.

  8. Teaching Billing and Coding to Medical Students: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jiaxin; Cennimo, David; Chen, Sophia; Altschuler, Eric L

    2013-01-01

    Complex billing practices cost the US healthcare system billions of dollars annually. Coding for outpatient office visits [known as Evaluation & Management (E&M) services] is commonly particularly fraught with errors. The best way to insure proper billing and coding by practicing physicians is to teach this as part of the medical school curriculum. Here, in a pilot study, we show that medical students can learn well the basic principles from lectures. This approach is easy to implement into a medical school curriculum.

  9. [Pilot study on facial palsy correction with suture suspension].

    PubMed

    Navarrete Álvaro, María Luisa; Knäpper, Jennifer; Boemo, Rafael; Torrent, Lluisa

    2011-01-01

    We present a pilot study to evaluate the benefit of static facial suspension with Silhouette sutures. We operated on a female patient with complete facial palsy secondary to otic tuberculosis. The patient has currently achieved satisfactory facial symmetry, mastication and speech production. As a result, self-esteem and social interaction have also been recovered. Static facial suspension with Silhouette sutures is an alternative to dynamic techniques in patients who do not wish to or cannot undergo those more complex surgeries.

  10. CE: Defining and Understanding Pilot and Other Feasibility Studies.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nancy S; Rosenbloom, Deborah A

    2017-03-01

    : Nurses are becoming increasingly involved in conducting clinical research in which feasibility studies are often the first steps. Understanding why and how these studies are conducted may encourage clinical nurses to engage with researchers and take advantage of opportunities to participate in advancing nursing science. This article provides an overview of feasibility studies, including pilot studies, and explains the type of preliminary data they seek to provide in order to make larger, future studies more efficient and successful. By way of example, the authors discuss a feasibility study they conducted that illustrates the key components and necessary steps involved in such work.

  11. Restoring effective sleep tranquility (REST): A feasibility and pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Arlene A; Henry, Kimberly L; Rolle, Natalie R; Schelly, Catherine; Pott, Christine E; Burns, Joshua E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this pilot study was to establish the feasibility of completing a future controlled trial of a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia program for military veterans with sleep disturbance. Method This was a single-arm feasibility and pilot study. Participants were United States post-9/11 veterans with service-connected injuries, university students, and had self-reported sleep disturbances. Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility was a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia intervention consisting of seven sessions of group therapy and eight 1:1 sessions delivered by occupational therapists. Feasibility and pilot indicators were process, resources, management, and scientific, including pre–post-assessments of sleep difficulties, dysfunctional sleep beliefs, participation, and pain interference. Findings Indicators were supportive of feasibility, including reduced sleep difficulties (for example Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Measure [t = 3.29, p = .02]), reduced nightmares: t = 2.79, p = .03; fewer dysfunctional sleep beliefs: t = 3.63, p = .01, and greater ability to participate in social roles: t = –2.86, p = .03, along with trends towards improved satisfaction with participation and reduced pain interference. Conclusion The Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility program may reduce sleep difficulties and improve participation in US veterans with service-connected injuries, and evidence indicates a controlled trial would be feasible to deliver. PMID:28626295

  12. Novel nanostructured scaffold for osteochondral regeneration: pilot study in horses.

    PubMed

    Kon, E; Mutini, A; Arcangeli, E; Delcogliano, M; Filardo, G; Nicoli Aldini, N; Pressato, D; Quarto, R; Zaffagnini, S; Marcacci, M

    2010-06-01

    The present in vivo preliminary experiment is aimed at testing mechanical and biological behaviour of a new nano-structured composite multilayer biomimetic scaffold for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects. The three-dimensional biomimetic scaffold (Fin-Ceramica Faenza S.p.A., Faenza-Italy) was obtained by nucleating collagen fibrils with hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, in two configurations, bi- and tri-layered, to reproduce, respectively, chondral and osteochondral anatomy. Chondral defects (lateral condyle) and deep osteochondral defects (medial condyle) were made in the distal epiphysis of the third metacarpal bone of both forelimbs of two adult horses and treated respectively with the chondral and osteochondral grafts. Both animals were euthanised six months follow up. The images obtained at the second look arthroscopy evaluation, performed two months after surgery, demonstrated good filling of the chondral and osteo-chondral defects without any inflammatory reaction around and inside the lesions. At the histological analysis the growth of trabecular bone in the osteochondral lesion was evident. Only in one case, the whole thickness of the osteochondral lesion was filled by fibrocartilaginous tissue. The formation of a tidemark line was evident at the interface with the newly formed bone. Newly formed fibrocartilaginous tissue was present in the area of the chondral defect. Initial alignment of the collagen fibres was recognisable with polarised light in both groups. The results of the present pilot study showed that this novel osteochondral and chondral scaffold may act as a suitable matrix to facilitate orderly regeneration of bone and hyaline-like cartilage. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Experiences with a new nonbiodegradable hydrogel (Aquamid): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Cássia Novaes, Wilse; Berg, Agnes

    2003-01-01

    Aquamid represents a new generation of soft-tissue fillers thanks to the lack of particles and a very high concentration of water. Aquamid is the result of a new, patented production method called "In line Cross-Linking Technology" (ILX Technology). The Aquamid gel contains 2.5% polyacrylamide (PAAG) and 97.5% water. It is homogenous, perfectly stable and nonbiodegradable and has optimum viscosity and elasticity. Aquamid has been authorized for sale in Europe since March 2001 as a new medical device (CE-mark 0543). This pilot study presents our experiences with Aquamid based on 59 subjects treated with 77 doses mainly used for aesthetic correction but even on medical indication. Lip augmentation was the most frequent procedure (72%), dominated by the age groups from 20 to 25 and from 50 to 60 years. Cheekbone enlargement was carried out in 13% of the cases. The rest concerned augmentation of deep naso-labial fold, glabella, and chin with 5% representation of each. The patient satisfaction was almost 100% with the aesthetic results and either short time or long time side effect reported during a follow-up period of 9 months (range: 2 to 16 months). Aquamid is easy to use without any pretest. Considering its long-lasting effect and the need for sterile conditions with use, only qualified and experienced staff, preferably physicians, should administrate the gel. Adequate indication, correct handling, and thoughtful following of the recommendations/cautions are of vital importance. Given that, aquamid seems to be a promising long-lasting soft tissue filler.

  14. Re-use of pilot data and interim analysis of pivotal data in MRMC studies: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijie; Samuelson, Frank; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Novel medical imaging devices are often evaluated with multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) studies in which radiologists read images of patient cases for a specified clinical task (e.g., cancer detection). A pilot study is often used to measure the effect size and variance parameters that are necessary for sizing a pivotal study (including sizing readers, non-diseased and diseased cases). Due to the practical difficulty of collecting patient cases or recruiting clinical readers, some investigators attempt to include the pilot data as part of their pivotal study. In other situations, some investigators attempt to perform an interim analysis of their pivotal study data based upon which the sample sizes may be re-estimated. Re-use of the pilot data or interim analyses of the pivotal data may inflate the type I error of the pivotal study. In this work, we use the Roe and Metz model to simulate MRMC data under the null hypothesis (i.e., two devices have equal diagnostic performance) and investigate the type I error rate for several practical designs involving re-use of pilot data or interim analysis of pivotal data. Our preliminary simulation results indicate that, under the simulation conditions we investigated, the inflation of type I error is none or only marginal for some design strategies (e.g., re-use of patient data without re-using readers, and size re-estimation without using the effect-size estimated in the interim analysis). Upon further verifications, these are potentially useful design methods in that they may help make a study less burdensome and have a better chance to succeed without substantial loss of the statistical rigor.

  15. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  16. Piloted Simulation Study of Rudder Pedal Force/Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    2007-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted in 2006 to determine optimum rudder pedal force/feel characteristics for transport aircraft. As part of this research, an evaluation of four metrics for assessing rudder pedal characteristics previously presented in the literature was conducted. This evaluation was based upon the numerical handling qualities ratings assigned to a variety of pedal force/feel systems used in the simulation study. It is shown that, with the inclusion of a fifth metric, most of the rudder pedal force/feel system designs that were rated poorly by the evaluation pilots could be identified. It is suggested that these metrics form the basis of a certification requirement for transport aircraft.

  17. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  18. On continuity case studies.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, David; Lombardo, Timothy

    This article is divided into three sections. The first section provides a taxonomy of case studies within the field of business continuity along with a brief commentary. The second section discusses the proper use of case studies in general pedagogy and provides research-based recommendations for their employment. The third section provides suggestions and examples of how business continuity case studies might be utilised specifically for instruction in the discipline of business continuity planning.

  19. THE NORTH CAROLINA HERALD PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory



    The sampling design for the National Children's Study (NCS) calls for a population-based, multi-stage, clustered household sampling approach. The full sample is designed to be representative of both urban and rural births in the United States, 2007-2011. While other sur...

  20. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  1. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  2. THE NORTH CAROLINA HERALD PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory



    The sampling design for the National Children's Study (NCS) calls for a population-based, multi-stage, clustered household sampling approach. The full sample is designed to be representative of both urban and rural births in the United States, 2007-2011. While other sur...

  3. Motivation in the Classroom: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Deanna E.

    Purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the validity of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as it applies to young children; (2) determine developmental shifts in expressed motivational needs; (3) gather information concerning the worries and fears of young children, particularly those of low socioeconomic status; and (4) gather data regarding…

  4. DISCOVER in Lebanon: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouphim, Ketty M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of DISCOVER, a performance-based assessment, in identifying gifted students in Lebanon. DISCOVER is grounded in Gardner's MI theory and consists of tasks involving problem-solving and creative abilities. The sample consisted of 49 middle-class 5-th graders, with a mean age of 10.2…

  5. Children's Use of Radio: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Jerry; Mitchell, Nancy

    A study explored how children make decisions to use radio. Thirty 8-9 year olds were interviewed in depth and 71 9-12 year olds filled out a questionnaire. Results indicated that children were capable of describing their radio listening behavior on a day-to-day basis, and that listening processes appeared to be similar to that reported in studies…

  6. Commercial conspiracy theories: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There are many ways to categorise conspiracy theories. In the present study, we examined individual and demographic predictors of beliefs in commercial conspiracy theories among a British sample of over 300 women and men. Results showed many people were cynical and sceptical with regard to advertising tricks, as well as the tactics of organisations like banks and alcohol, drug and tobacco companies. Beliefs sorted into four identifiable clusters, labelled sneakiness, manipulative, change-the-rules and suppression/prevention. The high alpha for the overall scale suggested general beliefs in commercial conspiracy. Regressions suggested that those people who were less religious, more left-wing, more pessimistic, less (self-defined as) wealthy, less Neurotic and less Open-to-Experience believed there was more commercial conspiracy. Overall the individual difference variables explained relatively little of the variance in these beliefs. The implications of these findings for the literature on conspiracy theories are discussed. Limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:23818886

  7. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  8. The Pilot Training Study: A Cost-Estimating Model for Advanced Pilot Training (APT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knollmeyer, L. E.

    The Advanced Pilot Training Cost Model is a statement of relationships that may be used, given the necessary inputs, for estimating the resources required and the costs to train pilots in the Air Force formal flying training schools. Resources and costs are computed by weapon system on an annual basis for use in long-range planning or sensitivity…

  9. High-Resolution Scintimammography: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel F. Brem; Joelle M. Schoonjans; Douglas A. Kieper; Stan Majewski; Steven Goodman; Cahid Civelek

    2002-07-01

    This study evaluated a novel high-resolution breast-specific gamma camera (HRBGC) for the detection of suggestive breast lesions. Methods: Fifty patients (with 58 breast lesions) for whom a scintimammogram was clinically indicated were prospectively evaluated with a general-purpose gamma camera and a novel HRBGC prototype. The results of conventional and high-resolution nuclear studies were prospectively classified as negative (normal or benign) or positive (suggestive or malignant) by 2 radiologists who were unaware of the mammographic and histologic results. All of the included lesions were confirmed by pathology. Results: There were 30 benign and 28 malignant lesions. The sensitivity for detection of breast cancer was 64.3% (18/28) with the conventional camera and 78.6% (22/28) with the HRBGC. The specificity with both systems was 93.3% (28/30). For the 18 nonpalpable lesions, sensitivity was 55.5% (10/18) and 72.2% (13/18) with the general-purpose camera and the HRBGC, respectively. For lesions 1 cm, 7 of 15 were detected with the general-purpose camera and 10 of 15 with the HRBGC. Four lesions (median size, 8.5 mm) were detected only with the HRBGC and were missed by the conventional camera. Conclusion: Evaluation of indeterminate breast lesions with an HRBGC results in improved sensitivity for the detection of cancer, with greater improvement shown for nonpalpable and 1-cm lesions.

  10. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  11. The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study (Pak-NEDS): Introducing a pilot surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based decision making is essential for appropriate prioritization and service provision by healthcare systems. Despite higher demands, data needs for this practice are not met in many cases in low- and middle-income countries because of underdeveloped sources, among other reasons. Emergency departments (EDs) provide an important channel for such information because of their strategic position within healthcare systems. This paper describes the design and pilot test of a national ED based surveillance system suitable for the Pakistani context. Methods The Pakistan National Emergency Department Surveillance Study (Pak-NEDS) was pilot tested in the emergency departments of seven major tertiary healthcare centres across the country. The Aga Khan University, Karachi, served as the coordinating centre. Key stakeholders and experts from all study institutes were involved in outlining data needs, development of the study questionnaire, and identification of appropriate surveillance mechanisms such as methods for data collection, monitoring, and quality assurance procedures. The surveillance system was operational between November 2010 and March 2011. Active surveillance was done 24 hours a day by data collectors hired and trained specifically for the study. All patients presenting to the study EDs were eligible participants. Over 270,000 cases were registered in the surveillance system over a period of four months. Coverage levels in the final month ranged from 91-100% and were highest in centres with the least volume of patients. Overall the coverage for the four months was 79% and crude operational costs were less than $0.20 per patient. Conclusions Pak-NEDS is the first multi-centre ED based surveillance system successfully piloted in a sample of major EDs having some of the highest patient volumes in Pakistan. Despite the challenges identified, our pilot shows that the system is flexible and scalable, and could potentially be adapted for many other

  12. Treadmill Desks at LANL - Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Samara Kia

    2016-07-28

    It is well established that sedentariness is the largest, preventable contributor to premature death, eclipsing smoking in recent years. One approach to reduce sedentariness is by using a treadmill desk to perform office work while walking at a low speed.We found an increased interest level when the treadmill desks were first introduced to LANL, but after a few months interest appeared to drop. It is possible that treadmill desk use was occurring, but subjects did not record their use. The treadmill desks will not be readily available for purchase by employees due to the study outcome. Additionally, conclusive changes in body measurements could not be performed due to lack of follow up by 58% of the participants.

  13. [Case and studies].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types.

  14. Social dysfunction in bipolar disorder: pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Rocca, Cristiana Castanho; de Macedo-Soares, Marcia Britto; Gorenstein, Clarice; Tamada, Renata Sayuri; Issler, Cilly Kluger; Dias, Rodrigo Silva; Schwartzmann, Angela Maria; Lafer, Beny

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the social skills of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. A group of 25 outpatients with bipolar disorder type I were evaluated in comparison with a group of 31 healthy volunteers who were matched in terms of level of education, age, sex and intelligence. Both groups were assessed using a self-report questionnaire, the Brazilian Inventario de Habilidades Sociais (IHS, Social Skills Inventory). Two Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtests (Picture Arrangement and Comprehension) were also used in order to assess subject ability to analyse social situations and to make judgements, respectively. Patients with bipolar disorder had lower IHS scores for the domains that assessed conversational skills/social self-confidence and social openness to new people/situations. Patients with anxiety disorders had high scores for the domain that assessed self-confidence in the expression of positive emotions. No differences were found between patients and controls in performance on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Picture Arrangement and Comprehension subtests. Euthymic patients with bipolar disorder present inhibited and overattentive behaviour in relation to other people and their environment. This behaviour might have a negative impact on their level of social functioning and quality of life.

  15. SERDP munition disposal source characterization pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Couch, R.G.; Fried, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting studies to develop and implement technologies for the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal of obsolete munitions and propellants which are stored at various locations across the country. One proposed disposal technique is the open-air burning or detonation (OB/OD) of this material. Although OB/OD is viewed as an efficient and cost-effective method for reducing the inventory of unwanted munitions and propellants, questions regarding its safety and environmental impacts must be addressed. Since very large amounts of munitions and propellants must be consumed inexpensively in relatively short time periods and with the very restrictive Federal and State regulations on environmental issues, it is clear that traditional OB/OD procedures will not be acceptable and that it is necessary to develop modified or advanced OB/OD technology. The effectiveness and environmental impact of the OB/OD technology must be verified by experimental data and with validated numerical models for acceptance by Federal and State regulators. Specifically, technology must be developed and tested that minimizes toxic bum and detonation products the noise (peak pressure) and destructive effect (impulse) of the explosive blast generation and travel distance of shrapnel, and entrainment of dust. Three explosion attenuation scenarios are analyzed: Contained water, aqueous foams, and wet sand.

  16. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through…

  17. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  18. Work Sharing Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Maureen E.; And Others

    Designed to provide private sector employers with the practical information necessary to select and then to design and implement work sharing arrangements, this book presents case studies of some 36 work sharing programs. Topics covered in the case studies include the circumstances leading to adoption of the program, details of compensation and…

  19. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  20. Preliminary Hydrogeologic Characterization Results from the Wallula Basalt Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. McGrail; E. C. Sullivan; F. A. Spane; D. H. Bacon; G. Hund; P. D. Thorne; C. J. Thompson; S. P. Reidel; F. S. Colwell

    2009-12-01

    The DOE's Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership has completed drilling the first continental flood basalt sequestration pilot borehole to a total depth (TD) of 4,110 feet on the Boise White Paper Mill property at Wallula, Washington. Site suitability was assessed prior to drilling by the 2007-2008 acquisition, processing and analysis of a four-mile, five-line three component seismic swath, which was processed as a single data-dense line. Analysis of the seismic survey data indicated a composite basalt formation thickness of {approx}8,000 feet and absence of major geologic structures (i.e., faults) along the line imaged by the seismic swath. Drilling of Wallula pilot borehole was initiated on January 13, 2009 and reached TD on April 6, 2009. Based on characterization results obtained during drilling, three basalt breccia zones were identified between the depth interval of 2,716 and 2,910 feet, as being suitable injection reservoir for a subsequent CO2 injection pilot study. The targeted injection reservoir lies stratigraphically below the massive Umtanum Member of the Grande Ronde Basalt, whose flow-interior section possesses regionally recognized low-permeability characteristics. The identified composite injection zone reservoir provides a unique and attractive opportunity to scientifically study the reservoir behavior of three inter-connected reservoir intervals below primary and secondary caprock confining zones. Drill cuttings, wireline geophysical logs, and 31one-inch diameter rotary sidewall cores provided geologic data for characterization of rock properties. XRF analyses of selected rock samples provided geochemical characterizations of the rocks and stratigraphic control for the basalt flows encountered by the Wallula pilot borehole. Based on the geochemical results, the pilot borehole was terminated in the Wapshilla Ridge 1 flow of the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation. Detailed hydrologic test characterizations of 12 basalt interflow reservoir

  1. The Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study: adverse events.

    PubMed

    Beck, James D; Couper, David J; Falkner, Karen L; Graham, Susan P; Grossi, Sara G; Gunsolley, John C; Madden, Theresa; Maupome, Gerardo; Offenbacher, Steven; Stewart, Dawn D; Trevisan, Maurizio; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Genco, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    During the last 15 years, a substantial number of population-based, clinical, laboratory, and animal studies have been published that reported findings on the relationship between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. The Periodontitis and Vascular Events (PAVE) pilot study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of a randomized secondary prevention trial to test whether treatment of periodontal disease reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease. This article describes the occurrence of adverse events during the pilot study. The PAVE pilot study was a multicenter, randomized trial comparing periodontal therapy to community dental care. Baseline and follow-up clinic visits included a periodontal examination; blood, subgingival plaque, and crevicular fluid specimen collection; and medical and dental histories. Telephone follow-up contacts were scheduled to occur 3 months after randomization and every 6 months thereafter to assess adverse events or endpoints. Cardiovascular adverse events occurred with similar frequency (23 versus 24 [P = 0.85] in the community control and the treatment groups, respectively). There were 15 serious adverse events (SAEs) with a non-significantly higher percentage occurring in the community care group (6.6% versus 3.3%; P = 0.19). A time-to-event analysis of patterns of SAEs indicated that subjects in the periodontal therapy group tended to be less likely to experience an SAE over the entire 25 months of the study. For those individuals who remained in the study, it appears that provision of periodontal scaling and root planing treatment to individuals with heart disease resulted in a similar pattern of adverse events as seen in the community care group, which also received some treatment.

  2. A new piloted premixed jet burner to study strong finite-rate chemistry effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Matthew J.; Masri, Assaad R.; Bilger, Robert W.

    2007-10-15

    This paper describes the initial characterization of a piloted premixed jet burner (PPJB) designed to investigate finite-rate chemistry effects in highly turbulent lean premixed combustion. The PPJB consists of a high-velocity lean premixed central jet, piloted by a low-velocity stoichiometric premixed pilot, surrounded by a large-diameter coflow of lean premixed hydrogen-air combustion products. The configuration of a lean central jet supported by a stoichiometric pilot is similar to that of a lean premixed gas turbine combustor, but without additional complications such as swirl, recirculation, and complex boundary conditions. A significant feature of the PPJB is that under certain conditions the central jet combustion process appears to undergo an extinction-reignition process. It is considered likely that intense turbulent mixing after the nozzle drives an initial extinction process that reduces flame luminosity, with reignition occurring downstream where turbulent mixing has decreased, causing an increase in flame luminosity. Four flames are selected for further study, each with an equivalence ratio of 0.5 and with central jet velocities of 50, 100, 150, and 200 m/s. Simultaneous two-dimensional (2D) Rayleigh-OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging results are presented for the selected flames, showing that in the ''extinction'' region OH concentrations occur at reduced levels in isolated patchy regions, supporting the idea that extinction is predominantly occurring. Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) data are also reported for the flow field turbulence statistics, with the most significant result being that for the reacting cases the pilot delays the occurrence of peak turbulence intensity downstream to near the observed ''extinction'' region. (author)

  3. Colombian Lay People's Willingness to Forgive Different Actors of the Armed Conflict: Results from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Lopez, Wilson; Pineda Marin, Claudia; Murcia Leon, Maria Camila; Perilla Garzon, Diana Carolina; Mullet, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study examined lay people's willingness to forgive acts that were committed by actors of the armed conflicts in Colombia. The participants (100 persons living in Bogota) were shown vignettes describing cases in which a member of the guerilla or a member of the former paramilitary forces asks for forgiveness to a victim's family, and were…

  4. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  5. Development of a Coordinated National Soil Moisture Network: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucido, J. M.; Quiring, S. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Baker, B.; Cosgrove, B.; Escobar, V. M.; Strobel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture data is critical for accurate drought prediction, flood forecasting, climate modeling, prediction of crop yields and water budgeting. However, soil moisture data are collected by many agencies and organizations in the United States using a variety of instruments and methods for varying applications. These data are often distributed and represented in disparate formats, posing significant challenges for use. In recognition of these challenges, the President's Climate Action Plan articulated the need for a coordinated national soil moisture network. In response to this action plan, a team led by the National Integrated Drought Information System has begun to develop a framework for this network and has instituted a proof-of-concept pilot study. This pilot is located in the south-central plains of the US, and will serve as a reference architecture for the requisite data systems and inform the design of the national network. The pilot comprises both in-situ and modeled soil moisture datasets (historical and real-time) and will serve the following use cases: operational drought monitoring, experimental land surface modeling, and operational hydrological modeling. The pilot will be implemented using a distributed network design in order to serve dispersed data in real-time directly from data providers. Standard service protocols will be used to enable future integration with external clients. The pilot network will additionally contain a catalog of data sets and web service endpoints, which will be used to broker web service calls. A mediation and aggregation service will then intelligently request, compile, and transform the distributed datasets from their native formats into a standardized output. This mediation framework allows data to be hosted and maintained locally by the data owners while simplifying access through a single service interface. These data services will then be used to create visualizations, for example, views of the current soil

  6. Field Collection Methods for an EPA Pilot Study Evaluating ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This compilation of field collection standard operating procedures (SOPs) was assembled for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Pilot Study add-on to the Green Housing Study (GHS). A detailed description of this add-on study can be found in the peer reviewed research protocol entitled “An EPA Pilot Study Evaluating Personal, Housing, and Community Factors Influencing Children’s Potential Exposures to Indoor Contaminants at Various Lifestages –Research Protocol” 1. Briefly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Green Housing Study (GHS) follows changes in environmental measurements [pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (i.e., PM2.5 and 1.0), indoor allergens, and fungi] in both U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) green-renovated and comparison (no renovation) homes and relates these changes to asthma morbidity in children ages 7-12 years. Green-renovations include (but are not limited to) use of low VOC materials, use of energy efficient appliances, and integrated pest management. The EPA has leveraged this opportunity to collect additional multimedia measurements and questionnaire data from the index children actively participating in the GHS and a sibling in order to characterize personal, housing, and community factors. The purpose of this document is to publish the methodology EPA used for a specific study for reference and use by other scientists both within the Agency

  7. [Multifocal, bone manifestation of decompression sickness in a professional pilot: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kuśmierska, Anna; Gać, Paweł; Szymański, Marcin; Bienias, Mariusz; Plucińska, Irena; Wodzisławski, Wojciech; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Decompression sickness is a group of pathological processes occurring in the body, following its exposure to an excessive drop in atmospheric pressure. The paper presents a case of a 62-year-old patient with no substantial disease history, a long-standing professional military pilot who was diagnosed with multifocal, bone manifestation of decompression sickness during the diagnosis of right knee joint injury following a torsion injury. The case was presented to draw attention to the usefulness of occupational history in the process of diagnosing osteoarticular system diseases.

  8. Nursing Students' Clinical Experience With Death: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Heise, Barbara A; Gilpin, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Although debriefing in simulation settings is routine in nursing education, debriefing does not routinely take place in clinical settings with nursing students after a patient has died. This pilot study sought to explore nursing students' perceptions of their first experience with the death of a patient. Students reported emotional distress and feelings of inadequacy with regard to communicating with and supporting the family of the dying patient. Only half the students sampled reported debriefing by their clinical instructor or staff. Nurse educators must include debriefing and student support following a patient death in the clinical setting.

  9. Stepped Care for Mandated College Students: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Borsari, Brian; O’Leary Tevyaw, Tracy; Barnett, Nancy P.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Monti, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, colleges and universities have seen a large increase in the number of students referred for the violation of alcohol policies. Stepped care assigns individuals to different levels of care according to treatment response, thereby maximizing efficiency. This pilot study implemented stepped care with students mandated to attend an alcohol program at a private northeastern university. High retention rates and participant satisfaction ratings suggest the promise of implementing stepped care with this population. Considerations for future applications of stepped care with mandated students are discussed. PMID:17453615

  10. An EPA Pilot Study Evaluating Personal, Housing, and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA pilot studyAddresses how young children’s exposures to various indoor pollutants (both chemical and biological agents) change as a result of building renovation-based interventions, potentially affecting their asthma exacerbation and morbidityProvide additional information on chemical exposures and children’s interactions with their environments to enhance ongoing research in the Green Housing Study’s evaluation of green housing and impacts on childhood asthma Invited presentation to the NC Lead and Healthy Homes Task Force Meeting, Wednesday, February 24, 2016, UNC Institute for the Environment, Chapel Hill, NC

  11. Congestive Heart Failure home monitoring pilot study in urban Denver.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Saba; Li, Xin; Semenov, Nikolay; Apodaca-Madrid, Jesús; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Newman, Kimberly E; Long, Carlin S; Neuman, Christine

    2011-01-01

    With a growing number of low-income patients developing Congestive Heart Failure in urban Denver, accessible and affordable solutions are needed to provide home management options. A multidisciplinary team evaluated currently available options for telemonitoring and developed a solution for an initial pilot study. This system is currently used in the Denver Metro area (Colorado) for 44 CHF patients. Preliminary results show this approach is effective and has reduced the patients' average length of stay at the hospital compared to historical data and control patients who do not use a remote monitoring system.

  12. A pilot study to Doppler-image an accretion spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz Guenther, Hans

    2009-10-01

    Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are young, accreting systems. The accretion is thought to cause a soft X-ray excess and unusual line ratios in the He-like triplets. The accretion spots can also be seen with optical Doppler-imaging; however, the final test to correlate these signatures - simultaneous X-ray and ground-based observations - is still missing. We propose a 15 ks pilot study of MN Lup, the prime target for simultaneous observations from the optical point of view, to confirm its CTTS status and characterize its X-ray properties.

  13. Cognitive training for divergent thinking in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Yamazawa, Ryoko; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Nobuharu; Chino, Bun; Fujii, Chiyo; Kashima, Haruo; Rassovsky, Yuri; Green, Michael F; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2009-11-13

    Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrate deficits in divergent thinking. This ability is indispensable for generating creative solutions and navigating the complexities of social interactions. In a pilot study, seventeen stable schizophrenia outpatients were randomly assigned to a training program for divergent thinking or a control program on convergent thinking. After eight weeks of training, participants in the divergent thinking program had significantly greater improvements on measures of idea fluency, negative symptoms, and interpersonal relations than did participants receiving the control program. These preliminary results suggest that interventions for divergent thinking in schizophrenia may lead to improvements in patients' social functioning.

  14. Therapeutic touch with HIV-infected children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ireland, M

    1998-01-01

    In this pilot study, 20 HIV-infected children, 6 to 12 years of age, were randomly assigned into therapeutic touch (TT) and mimic TT groups. The effectiveness of TT in reducing anxiety was evaluated. The self-report measure, the A-State Anxiety subscale of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory For Children, was administered before and immediately after interventions. As predicted, the TT intervention resulted in lower overall mean anxiety scores, whereas the mimic TT did not. These findings provide preliminary support for the use of TT in reducing the state anxiety of children with HIV infection.

  15. Enhancing Access to Patient Education Information: A Pilot Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Denise E.; Rocha, Roberto A.; Tse, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Health care organizations are developing Web-based portals to provide patient access to personal health information and enhance patient-provider communication. This pilot study investigates two navigation models (“serial” and “menu-driven”) for improving access to education materials available through a portal. There was a trend toward greater user satisfaction with the menu-driven model. Model preference was influenced by frequency of Web use. Results should aid in the improvement of existing portals and in the development of new ones. PMID:16779179

  16. Pilot Research as Advocacy: The Case of Sayana Press in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Binanga, Arsene; Bertrand, Jane T

    2016-01-01

    and qualitative studies to assess acceptability and feasibility, and (6) disseminating the findings to family planning stakeholders. Before the pilot, Sayana Press was relatively unknown in the DRC, and there was no precedent for medical and nursing students providing family planning methods or giving injections at the community level. In less than 12 months, the approach gained legitimacy and acceptance. The key Ministry of Health decision maker orchestrated the closing session of the dissemination meeting on next steps, paving the way for pilot tests of 3 new task-shifting approaches: insertion of Implanon NXT by medical and nursing students, self-injection for Sayana Press with supervision by students, and injection of Sayana Press by community health workers with no formal clinical training. PMID:27979874

  17. Pilot Research as Advocacy: The Case of Sayana Press in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Binanga, Arsene; Bertrand, Jane T

    2016-12-23

    qualitative studies to assess acceptability and feasibility, and (6) disseminating the findings to family planning stakeholders. Before the pilot, Sayana Press was relatively unknown in the DRC, and there was no precedent for medical and nursing students providing family planning methods or giving injections at the community level. In less than 12 months, the approach gained legitimacy and acceptance. The key Ministry of Health decision maker orchestrated the closing session of the dissemination meeting on next steps, paving the way for pilot tests of 3 new task-shifting approaches: insertion of Implanon NXT by medical and nursing students, self-injection for Sayana Press with supervision by students, and injection of Sayana Press by community health workers with no formal clinical training.

  18. Mantram Repetition With Homeless Women: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Weinrich, Sally P; Bormann, Jill E; Glaser, Dale; Hardin, Sally; Barger, Mary; Lizarraga, Cabiria; Del Rio, Juan; Allard, Carolyn B

    Women and families are the fastest growing segment of the homeless population. Negative attitudes of nurses toward homeless women are a major barrier to homeless women seeking health care. This cross-sectional, mixed-methods pilot study, conducted primarily by nurses, tested the Mantram Repetition Program for the first time with 29 homeless women. The Mantram Repetition Program is a spiritually based skills training that teaches mantram (sacred word) repetition as a cost-effective, personalized, portable, and focused strategy for reducing stress and improving well-being. For the cross-sectional, pretest-posttest design portion of the study, the hypothesis that at least half of the homeless women would repeat their mantram at least once a day was supported with 88% of the women repeating their mantram 1 week later. The qualitative portion of this study using phenomenology explored the women's thoughts on mantram week 2. Themes of mantram repetition, mantram benefits, and being cared for emerged. This groundbreaking, interventional, mixed-methods pilot study fills a gap in interventional homeless research.

  19. Atlas occipitalization in a supersonic fighter pilot involved in a midair collision: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gips, Hadas; Hiss, Jehuda; Davidson, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    We report a case of a midair collision between two F16 fighter aircraft, in which one pilot survived and the other was ejected upon impact and his remains recovered from sea. In autopsy, no patholgy was detected, other than the expected evidence of mechanical trauma. No defects in the aircraft or faults in the parachute or ejection mechanism were found. Reconstruction of the shattered skull base and the cervical vertebrae revealed fusion of the atlanto-occipital joint (occipitalization) and a left paracondylar process. The effective diameter of the spinal canal was decreased by the abnormal articulation. Such malformations can cause a wide range of neurologic deficits. Considering the skill and alertness needed to operate a supersonic fighter aircraft, with the pressure applied by the heavy protective head gear and various G forces endured by the spinal column during flight, we postulate that the collision was related to the pilot's sudden incapacitation.

  20. Septic Systems Case Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A collection of septic systems case studies to help community planners, elected officials, health department staff, state officials, and interested citizens explore alternatives for managing their decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

  1. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  2. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  3. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  4. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  5. Can exposure to electromagnetic radiation in diathermy operators be estimated from interview data A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A.I.; Skotte, J. )

    1991-01-01

    As preparation for a case-control study dealing with possible teratogenic property of short waves, a pilot study was conducted in order to compare exposure assessment from different sources. In 11 physiotherapy clinics, exposure assessments based on interviews within 1 week among the exposed physiotherapists were compared with exposure assessments based on observations including measurements. It was possible to discriminate between recent high and low peak exposure. Furthermore, an interview index reflecting the duration of the exposure correlated to some extent with the corresponding measurements.

  6. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Brief intervention addressing excessive cannabis use in young people consulting their GP: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Dagmar M; Meynard, Anne; Lefebvre, Danièle; Tylee, André; Narring, Françoise; Broers, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Background When excessive cannabis consumption occurs in adolescence, the adverse consequences extend into adulthood. Interventions by GPs are effective in preventing harm associated with alcohol use. Similar interventions have potential in addressing cannabis use. Aim To develop and pilot test a brief intervention targeting excessive cannabis use (defined as ≥1×/week) in young people in primary care. Design of the study Pilot intervention trial. Setting Seven family practices in Switzerland. Method The team collaborated with GPs and young people to develop the intervention. Seven GPs piloted its use in their consultations. Patients aged 15 to 24 years consulting for any health problem were recruited before the consultation. Cannabis use, other substance use, and their psychosocial correlates were assessed with a short confidential questionnaire administered before the consultation and 1 month later. GPs, staff, and patients were asked to comment on the study and its feasibility. Results Of 81 young people invited to participate, 78 (70% female) agreed (participation rate: 96%). One in seven (13.2%, 95% confidence interval = 7.5% to 18.9%) used cannabis at least once a week. Data at 1 month were available for 42% who had provided email contact details and 91% of those who had provided their mobile phone number (63% overall). In most cases, the intervention lasted no more than 5 minutes. Comments from participants added favourable data towards the feasibility of the study. Conclusion This pilot study provides a solid base on which to build a randomised trial of a brief intervention addressing cannabis use in young people consulting in family practice. PMID:19275832

  8. Topographical anatomy of the intercondylar roof. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R L; Feagin, J A

    1994-09-01

    Anatomical features of the intercondylar roof with respect to the native anterior cruciate ligament and proposed substitute ligament attachment sites in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery were investigated. Using cadaveric knees and K wires, radiographs were obtained with markers placed on the roof and the tibial and femoral attachment sites. In the knees studied, the intercondylar roof was V shaped with distinct anterior and posterior limbs. The posterior limb corresponded to the radiographic line commonly called Blumensaat's line. The anterior limb was oriented 25 degrees more vertical than the posterior limb and impinged on the anterior cruciate ligament in extension. In this pilot study, estimates of the degree of impingement in full extension were made by drawing lines representative of 10-mm grafts at selected sites on lateral radiographs. A graft placed at the central portion of the native femoral site to the normal tibial site did not impinge, while a graft placed at the traditional femoral site to an anteromedial tibial site impinged as much as 8 mm throughout its entire extent. This pilot study presents preliminary, provocative information suggesting that the intercondylar roof is actually V shaped and that substitute ligaments placed at attachment sites commonly used today may impinge over most of their length.

  9. Homeopathic Secretin in autism: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T W

    2001-04-01

    Autism is a condition characterised by impairments of social communication, social interaction and social imagination. The exact aetiology of autism is unknown but some autistic features have been explained by the 'opioid excess theory' in which excess brain peptide levels have a morphine-like activity. Reduction of peptide levels by administration of the duodenal enzyme Secretin has been found to improve social and language skills in autistic patients. Homeopathic Secretin has been said to produce similar effects. A pilot study was undertaken to study these effects by administration of Secretin to a group of autistic patients. Weekly assessment for 12 weeks was performed by the patients' care workers. Statistical analysis of the mean pre-treatment results compared with the mean treatment results suggested a worsening in the autistic symptoms during treatment. Discussion with the care workers revealed changes and some improvements that were not recordable on the scoring system. Further research into Secretin treatment of autism using a more detailed and customized scoring system would be justified. Following this pilot study a randomised controlled trial of Secretin vs placebo would be appropriate.

  10. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; Madland, Geir; Feinmann, Charlotte; El Maaytah, Mohammed; Kumar, Mahesh; Hopper, Colin; Upile, Tahwinder; Newman, Stanton

    2007-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70) participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system), the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd) were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st), however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here. PMID:17381840

  11. Pilot study dismantlement of 20 lead-lined shipping casks

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmond, S.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes a pilot study conducted at the INEL to dismantle lead-lined casks and shielding devices, separate the radiologically contaminated and hazardous materials, and recycle resultant scrap lead. The facility areas where the work was performed, dismantlement methods, and process equipment are described. Issues and results associated with recycling the lead as a free-released scrap metal are presented and discussed. Data and results from the pilot study are summarized and presented. The study concluded that cask dismantlement at the INEL can be performed as a legitimate recycling activity for scrap lead. Ninety-one percent of the lead recovered passed free-release criteria. The value of the 50,375 lb of recovered lead is approximately $0.45/lb. Resultant waste streams can be satisfactorily treated and disposed. Only very low levels of bulk radiological contamination (47 picocuries/gram of 137 Cs and 3.2 picocuries/gram of {sup 6O}Co) were detected in the lead rejected for free release.

  12. Pilot study of a personalized feedback intervention for problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John A; Hodgins, David C; Toneatto, Tony; Rai, Aanchal; Cordingley, Joanne

    2009-09-01

    A pilot study was conducted of a personalized feedback intervention for problem gamblers. Respondents (N=61) were recruited from an ongoing gambling research study to take part in another study to help us "develop and evaluate self-help materials for gamblers." Respondents were randomly assigned to receive a personalized feedback summary or to a waiting list control. At 3-month follow-up (80.3% follow-up rate, N=49), after controlling for baseline demographic characteristics and gambling severity, respondents in the feedback condition displayed some evidence that they were spending less money on gambling than those in the control condition. Further, ratings of the usefulness of the feedback summary were positive and most recipients (96%) recommended that they be made available to other gamblers interested in evaluating or modifying their gambling. Given these promising pilot results, a full-scale evaluation of these personalized feedback materials would appear justified. An online version of the intervention is now also available at www.CheckYourGambling.net.

  13. Pilot study for collection of bridge-scour data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R.D.; Boyle, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Scour around bridges is a serious problem on many rivers; bridge failure often is attributed to undermining of piers or abutments by scour. A pilot study was made at four bridge sites in Colorado to develop and test guidelines for collecting scour data onsite during high flows. These guidelines potentially could be used to conduct bridge-scour studies or to establish a nationwide bridge-scour data collection program in conjunction with normal high-flow measurements. The methods tested are intended to be compatible with equipment and procedures commonly used in the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging program. Thirteen scour-prediction equations were evaluated using data collected during this study. Two alternative approaches for future, proposed scour studies are indicated. The type of approach selected would depend on the objectives of the scour study and the flow conditions in the study area. (USGS)

  14. H-Coal-pilot-plant startup-oil study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This bench-unit program simulated the Catlettsburg H-Coal Pilot Plant start-up procedure in Run 6, which used catalytic cracker slurry oil, an aromatic petroleum oil. The program was designed to explore the reasons for Pilot Plant operational difficulties which included reactor product instability, vacuum pumping difficulties and unexpected product yields. Startup oil, hydroclone overflow and withdrawn catalyst were obtained from the Pilot Plant for use in this run with Illinois No. 6 coal. In this run the ratio of startup oil/coal was varied in Periods 1-10, from 2 to 0.2, while the ratio of recycle oil to coal was increased from 0 to 1.8. Recycle oils generated during this run were used as slurry oils in Periods 11 and 12. Initially, the C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F total distillate yield was 57.4 W %. As the startup oil feed was eliminated later in the run, the C/sub 4/-974/sup 0/F yield fell to 45.4 W %. Ancillary studies were performed on separator bottoms in order to establish their viscosity and settling characteristics as a function of time. Viscosity measurements were also made on bottoms containing 1 to 30 W % 975/sup 0/F/sup -/ distillate. For comparison, viscosities were measured as a function of temperature using PDU Run 5 hydroclone overflow samples which were vacuum distilled to contain < 33 W % 975/sup 0/F distillate. The propensity toward carbon formation was investigated by a series of Ramsbottom carbon residue (RCR) measurements on separator bottoms which covered the range of startup oil/coal ratios from 2 to 0. Finally, microautoclave tests were performed on startup oil and hydroclone overflow oils in order to assess their ability to dissolve coal.

  15. Interim Evaluation of the Pilot Program of the Truancy Case Management Partnership Intervention in the District of Columbia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberman, Akiva; Cahill, Meagan; Cramer, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The Case Management Partnership Initiative (CMPI) addresses chronic truancy by linking truant ninth graders and their families to social services and case management, along with regular interagency case management meetings. A pilot was conducted at Anacostia and Ballou High Schools in 2011-2012. The implementation evaluation found that the pilot…

  16. Acupuncture Treatment of Lateral Elbow Pain: A Nonrandomized Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-Song; Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Guo-Xue; Liu, Hao; Wang, Fu-Chun; Zaslawski, Christopher; Li, Tie; Tan, Yuan-Sheng; Berle, Christine; Li, Wei-Hong; Bangrazi, Sergio; Liguori, Stefano; Zhang, Shi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In planning for a large-scale multicenter trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture for the treatment of lateral elbow pain, a pilot study was conducted. This was a prospective, investigator- and patient-blinded, nonrandomized, placebo controlled trial. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, before fourth, seventh, and ninth treatment, and at a two-week posttreatment follow-up. The treatment group received unilateral acupuncture at LI 10 and LI 11 at the affected side with manual needle manipulation; the control group received sham-laser acupuncture at the same acupoints. Measures included (i) disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire, (ii) pain-free grip strength (PFGS), and (iii) a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Significant differences in DASH score, PFGS, and VAS between treatment and control group were found at the ninth treatment (n = 20 for each group, P < 0.05). Only DASH showed significant differences compared to the control for all the measurement time points after treatment commenced and appears to be a sensitive and appropriate primary outcome measure for the future multisite trial. Results from this pilot study provided relevant information about treatment efficacy, credibility of control treatment, and sensitivity of different outcome measures for the planning of the future trial. PMID:27006679

  17. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  18. [Dental caries and early childhood development: a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Núñez, F Loreto; Sanz, B Javier; Mejía, L Gloria

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between dental caries and early childhood development in 3-year-olds from Talca, Chile. A pilot study with a convenience sample of 3-year-olds from Talca (n = 39) who attend public healthcare centers. Child development was measured by the Psychomotor Development Index (PDI), a screening tool used nationally among pre-school children to assess language development, fine motor skills and coordination areas. Dental caries prevalence was evaluated by decayed, missing, filled teeth (DFMT) and decayed, missing, filled tooth surfaces (DFMS) ceo-d and ceo-s indexes. The children were divided into two groups according to the PDIscore: those with a score of 40 or more were considered developmentally normal (n = 32), and those with a score below 40 were considered as having impaired development (n = 7). The severity of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with PDI (r = -0.82), and children with the lowest TEPSI score had the highest DFMT values. The average DMFT in children with normal development was 1.31, and 3.57 for those with impaired development. This pilot study indicates that the severity of dental caries is correlated with early childhood development. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  19. Quality assurance project plan: 1991 EMAP wetlands southeastern pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.M.; Lee, J.M.; Turner, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    The goal of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program - Wetlands (EMAP-Wetlands) Southeastern Pilot Study is to develop field indicators of salt marsh condition. These indicators are of four general types: (1) vegetation; (2) hydrology; (3) soil parameters; and (4) soil constituents. Field measurements and samples will be collected during late summer/early fall in 1991 and will be analyzed to identify which indicators and measurements best delineate salt marsh in good condition from that in impaired condition. Thus the project will involve field work, laboratory analysis, and data analysis. Results from this project will be used to establish criteria and parameters for long-term monitoring and assessment of salt marshes, particularly those parameters that may serve as indicators of healthy salt marsh and deteriorated salt marsh. Since EMAP-Wetlands-Southeastern is a pilot study, the measurement criteria will be evaluated as one of the project goals. Of concern will be how well the standardized sampling methods performed in actual field conditions, and which of these methods can be used to assess and characterize salt marshes.

  20. Feasibility Pilot Study: Training Soft Skills in Virtual Worlds.

    PubMed

    Abshier, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    In a world where funding is limited, training for healthcare professionals is turning more and more to distance learning in an effort to maintain a knowledgeable and skilled work force. In 2010, Cicatelli Associates, Inc. began exploring the feasibility of using games and virtual worlds as an alternative means to teach skills-training in a distance-learning environment. The pilot study was conducted with six individuals familiar with general counseling and communication skills used by the healthcare industry to promote behavior change. Participants reported that the venue, although challenging at first, showed great potential for use with healthcare providers, as it allowed for more interaction and activities than traditional Webinars. However, there are significant limitations that must be overcome in order for this healthcare training modality to be utilized on a large scale. These limitations included a lack of microgestures and issues regarding the technology being used. In spite of the limitations, however, the potential use of virtual worlds for the training of healthcare providers exists and should be researched further. This article discusses the need and intended benefits of virtual world training as well as the results and conclusions of the pilot study.

  1. Binary constructs of forensic psychiatric nursing: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mason, T; Dulson, J; King, L

    2009-03-01

    The aim was to develop an Information Gathering Schedule (IGS) relevant to forensic psychiatric nursing in order to establish the perceived differences in the three levels of security, high, medium and low. Perceived differences in the role constructs of forensic psychiatric nursing is said to exist but the evidence is qualitative or anecdotal. This paper sets out a pilot study beginning in 2004 relating to the development of two rating scales for inclusion into an IGS to acquire data on the role constructs of nurses working in these environments. Following a thematic analysis from the literature two sets of binary frameworks were constructed and a number of questions/statements relating to them were tested. The Thurstone Scaling test was applied to compute medians resulting in a reduction to 48 and 20 items for each respective framework. Two 7-point Likert scales were constructed and test-retest procedures were applied on a sample population of forensic psychiatric nurses. Student's t-test was conducted on the data and the results suggest that the IGS is now suitable for application on a larger study. The IGS was piloted on a small sample of forensic psychiatric nurses. The two scales were validated to coefficient values ranging from 0.7 to 0.9. Amendments were made and the IGS was considered acceptable.

  2. Traffic scenario generation technique for piloted simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies of cockpit traffic display concepts require the development of representative traffic scenarios. With the exception of specific aircraft interaction issues, most research questions can be addressed using traffic scenarios consisting of prerecorded aircraft movements merged together to form a desired traffic pattern. Prerecorded traffic scenarios have distinct research advantages, allowing control of traffic encounters with repeatability of scenarios between different test subjects. A technique is described for generation of prerecorded jet transport traffic scenarios suitable for use in piloted simulation studies. Individual flight profiles for the aircraft in the scenario are created interactively with a computer program designed specifically for this purpose. The profiles are then time-correlated and merged into a complete scenario. This technique was used to create traffic scenarios for the Denver, Colorado area with operations centered at Stapleton International Airport. Traffic scenarios for other areas may also be created using this technique, with appropriate modifications made to the navigation fix locations contained in the flight profile generation program.

  3. A palliative care hotline for multiple sclerosis: A pilot feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Knies, Andrea K; Golla, Heidrun; Strupp, Julia; Galushko, Maren; Schipper, Sabine; Voltz, Raymond

    2015-08-01

    Research findings suggest that patients severely affected by multiple sclerosis benefit from palliative care. Our objectives were to (1) implement a pilot palliative care counseling hotline for severely affected multiple sclerosis patients and their caregivers in order to connect them to palliative care, and (2) evaluate its preliminary feasibility through a pilot study. The hotline was designed in cooperation with the local state association of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society and based on a review of the literature. The initial study setting for the hotline was the broader region of the cities Cologne and Bonn in Germany. The hotline was introduced through a magazine published by the German Multiple Sclerosis Society and leaflets sent to local healthcare providers. Calls were conducted using a semistructured interview guide and documented by a standardized case report form. Measures to assess feasibility were both quantitative (e.g., number of calls) and qualitative (e.g., criteria for eligibility for palliative care). During its pilot year, the hotline received 18 calls. Some 15 callers were included in the analysis, and 10 of these 15 were deemed eligible for palliative care due to such criteria as medical characteristics, care or nursing conditions, caregiver strain, and concerns regarding death and dying. Access to palliative care services could be provided for all 10 callers. Based on our pilot feasibility study, the hotline seems to be a valuable service for patients severely affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) and their caregivers in order to gain information about and access to palliative care. It will be extended on a nationwide scale through a grant of the German Multiple Sclerosis Society. Awareness of the hotline needs to be enhanced in order to attract and support a significant number of new callers.

  4. Patient satisfaction with colonoscopy: A literature review and pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas; Arthurs, Erin; Sewitch, Maida J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend that colonoscopic colorectal cancer screening be undertaken every 10 years after the age of 50 years. However, because the procedure does not meet criteria that promote screening uptake, patient satisfaction with colonoscopy may encourage repeat screening. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature and conduct a pilot study of patient satisfaction with the colonoscopy experience. METHODS: All cohort studies from January 1997 to August 2008 in the MEDLINE database that measured either patient satisfaction with colonoscopy, patient willingness to return for colonoscopy under the same conditions or patient preference for colonoscopy compared with other large bowel procedures were identified. The search was supplemented by journal citation lists in the retrieved articles. RESULTS: Of the 29 studies identified, 15 met the inclusion criteria. Consistently, the vast majority of patients (approximately 95%) were very satisfied with their colonoscopy experience. Patient satisfaction was similar for screening and nonscreening colonoscopy. Patient willingness to return for the procedure ranged from 73% to 100%. Of the five studies that examined modality preference, three studies reported the majority of patients preferred colonography to colonoscopy and two studies reported the reverse. Our pilot study findings mirrored those of other studies that were conducted in the United States. The major limitation of the included studies was that patients who were most dissatisfied may have gone elsewhere to have their colonoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were very satisfied with colonoscopy. The majority were willing to return for repeat testing under the same conditions, and colonoscopy was not preferred over other modalities. However, studies were limited by methodological shortcomings. PMID:19319384

  5. Breast cancer and personal environmental risk factors in Marin County - Pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, C.A.; Farren, G.; Baltzell, K.; Chew, T.; Clarkson, C.; Fleshman, R.; Leary, C.; Mizroch, M.; Orenstein, F.; Russell, M.L.; Souders-Mason, V.; Wrensch, M.

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, they used a community-based research approach. In the collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process.

  6. TF Inner Leg Space Allocation for Pilot Plant Design Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. Titus and Ali Zolfaghari

    2012-09-06

    A critical design feature of any tokamak is the space taken up by the inner leg of the toroidal field (TF) coil. The radial build needed for the TF inner leg, along with shield thickness , size of the central solenoid and plasma minor radius set the major radius of the machine. The cost of the tokamak core roughly scales with the cube of the major radius. Small reductions in the TF build can have a big impact on the overall cost of the reactor. The cross section of the TF inner leg must structurally support the centering force and that portion of the vertical separating force that is not supported by the outer structures. In this paper, the TF inner leg equatorial plane cross sections are considered. Out-of- Plane (OOP) forces must also be supported, but these are largest away from the equatorial plane, in the inner upper and lower corners and outboard sections of the TF coil. OOP forces are taken by structures that are not closely coupled with the radial build of the central column at the equatorial plane. The "Vertical Access AT Pilot Plant" currently under consideration at PPPL is used as a starting point for the structural, field and current requirements. Other TF structural concepts are considered. Most are drawn from existing designs such as ITER's circular conduits in radial plates bearing on a heavy nose section, and TPX's square conduits in a case, Each of these concepts can rely on full wedging, or partial wedging. Vaulted TF coils are considered as are those with some component of bucking against a central solenoid or bucking post. With the expectation that the pilot plant will be a steady state machine, a static stress criteria is used for all the concepts. The coils are assumed to be superconducting, with the superconductor not contributing to the structural strength. Limit analysis is employed to assess the degree of conservatism in the static criteria as it is applied to a linear elastic stress analysis. TF concepts, and in particular the PPPL AT

  7. Cervical Spine Motion During Extrication: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Jeffery S.; Naunheim, Rosanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal immobilization is one of the most commonly performed pre-hospital procedures. Little research has been done on the movement of the neck during immobilization and extrication. In this study we used a sophisticated infrared six-camera motion-capture system (Motion Analysis Corporation, Santa Rosa, CA), to study the motion of the neck and head during extrication. A mock automobile was constructed to scale, and volunteer patients, with infrared markers on bony prominences, were extricated by experienced paramedics. We found in this pilot study that allowing an individual to exit the car under his own volition with cervical collar in place may result in the least amount of motion of the cervical spine. Further research should be conducted to verify these findings. In addition, this system could be utilized to study a variety of methods of extrication from automobile accidents. PMID:19561822

  8. Flight simulation using a Brain-Computer Interface: A pilot, pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kryger, Michael; Wester, Brock; Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Rich, Matthew; John, Brendan; Beaty, James; McLoughlin, Michael; Boninger, Michael; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C

    2017-01-01

    As Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) systems advance for uses such as robotic arm control it is postulated that the control paradigms could apply to other scenarios, such as control of video games, wheelchair movement or even flight. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether our BCI system, which involves decoding the signals of two 96-microelectrode arrays implanted into the motor cortex of a subject, could also be used to control an aircraft in a flight simulator environment. The study involved six sessions in which various parameters were modified in order to achieve the best flight control, including plane type, view, control paradigm, gains, and limits. Successful flight was determined qualitatively by evaluating the subject's ability to perform requested maneuvers, maintain flight paths, and avoid control losses such as dives, spins and crashes. By the end of the study, it was found that the subject could successfully control an aircraft. The subject could use both the jet and propeller plane with different views, adopting an intuitive control paradigm. From the subject's perspective, this was one of the most exciting and entertaining experiments she had performed in two years of research. In conclusion, this study provides a proof-of-concept that traditional motor cortex signals combined with a decoding paradigm can be used to control systems besides a robotic arm for which the decoder was developed. Aside from possible functional benefits, it also shows the potential for a new recreational activity for individuals with disabilities who are able to master BCI control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Connecting Primary Health Care: A Comprehensive Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudloo, Mehran; Abolhassani, Farid; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin

    2016-07-01

    The collection of data within the primary health care facilities in Iran is essentially paper-based. It is focused on family's health, monitoring of non-infectious and infectious diseases. Clearly due to the paper-based nature of the tasks, timely decision making at most can be difficult if not impossible. As part of an on-going electronic health record implementation project at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, for the first time in the region, based on a comprehensive pilot project, four urban healthcare facilities are connected to their headquarters and beyond, covering all aspects of primary health care, for the last four years. Without delving into the technical aspects of its software engineering processes, the progress of the implementation is reported, selection of summarized data is presented, and experience gained thus far are discussed. Four years passed and if time is any important reason to go by, then it is safe to accept that the software architecture and electronic health record structural model implemented are robust and yet extensible. Aims and duration of a pilot study should be clearly defined prior to start and managed till its completion. Resistance to change and particularly to information technology, apart from its technical aspects, is also based on human factors.

  10. Using singing to nurture children's hearing? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Saunders, Jo; Edwards, Sian; Palmer, Zoe; Himonides, Evangelos; Knight, Julian; Mahon, Merle; Griffin, Susanna; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-09-01

    This article reports a pilot study of the potential benefits of a sustained programme of singing activities on the musical behaviours and hearing acuity of young children with hearing impairment (HI). Twenty-nine children (n=12 HI and n=17 NH) aged between 5 and 7 years from an inner-city primary school in London participated, following appropriate ethical approval. The predominantly classroom-based programme was designed by colleagues from the UCL Institute of Education and UCL Ear Institute in collaboration with a multi-arts charity Creative Futures and delivered by an experienced early years music specialist weekly across two school terms. There was a particular emphasis on building a repertoire of simple songs with actions and allied vocal exploration. Musical learning was also supported by activities that drew on visual imagery for sound and that included simple notation and physical gesture. An overall impact assessment of the pilot programme embraced pre- and post-intervention measures of pitch discrimination, speech perception in noise and singing competency. Subsequent statistical data analyses suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participant children's singing range, particularly (but not only) for HI children with hearing aids, and also in their singing skills. HI children's pitch perception also improved measurably over time. Findings imply that all children, including those with HI, can benefit from regular and sustained access to age-appropriate musical activities.

  11. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    PubMed

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A piloted simulation study of data link ATC message exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1989-01-01

    Data link Air Traffic Control (ATC) and Air Traffic Service (ATS) message and data exchange offers the potential benefits of increased flight safety and efficiency by reducing communication errors and allowing more information to be transferred between aircraft and ground facilities. Digital communication also presents an opportunity to relieve the overloading of ATC radio frequencies which hampers message exchange during peak traffic hours in many busy terminal areas. A piloted simulation study to develop pilot factor guidelines and assess potential flight crew benefits and liabilities from using data link ATC message exchange was completed. The data link ATC message exchange concept, implemented on an existing navigation computer Control Display Unit (CDU) required maintaining a voice radio telephone link with an appropriate ATC facility. Flight crew comments, scanning behavior, and measurements of time spent in ATC communication activities for data link ATC message exchange were compared to similar measures for simulated conventional voice radio operations. The results show crew preference for the quieter flight deck environment and a perception of lower communication workload.

  13. Sustaining walk-in counselling services: an economic assessment from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Horton, Susan; Stalker, Carol A; Cait, Cheryl-Anne; Josling, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Introducing single-session walk-in counselling services in a counselling agency virtually eliminated a lengthy wait list and reduced costly no-shows for scheduled counselling. A pilot study found that client distress decreased significantly following the single session, and a high proportion of clients were "ready for change." The service diverts clients from using hospitals and family doctors/walk-in clinics and toward using community social services. It also enables an earlier return to work and usual activities. The social benefits (reduced hospital use and faster return to work) exceed the cost of the service. This information is helping to make the case for sustaining and expanding these services.

  14. Sun protection practices among children with a family history of melanoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Beth A; Bastani, Roshan; Chang, L Cindy; Khanna, Rachna; Chen, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this pilot study was to assess sun protection practices and correlates among children with a family history of melanoma, a high risk and understudied group. Sixty-eight melanoma cases, recruited through the Los Angeles County cancer registry, completed a survey. Survivors provided data on 110 children (mean age = 8.11 years). Although most children used sunscreen (79 %), half experienced a recent sunburn. The mean sun protection level for the sample was similar to levels observed among average risk children. Efforts to reduce sunburn frequency and improve sun protection among these vulnerable children appear warranted.

  15. Social Organization and Educational Change: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Harry F.

    Efforts to analyze a case study of the implementation of Program Planning Budgeting System (PPBS) materials for a pilot study in a school district are discussed from a descriptive, ethnographic approach. Antagonism, anxiety, and accusations characterize the extreme we-they split among those interviewed. Anthropology describes such a society with…

  16. Instructional Resources in Ontario: Case Studies and Literature Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lewis

    This two-part report describes a pilot study initiated by the Ontario Ministry of Education in 1981 to define the methodology for a subsequent research project on the current use of different types of instructional resources in Ontario public schools. The first section reports on case studies based on personal interviews with both staff and…

  17. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakre, Tushar P.; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Methods: Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Results: Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Conclusions: Students were not

  18. Distance Learning Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    The Office of Technology Assessment authorized a series of case studies in 1989 to investigate how technologies, services, and programs are implemented in distance education projects. The studies were also intended to look at the role of local, state, and federal agencies, and other public and private entities in providing educational services to…

  19. Pilot study of INSIGHT therapy in African American women.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, Sarah; Wicks, Mona; Bolden, Lois

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if treatment with INSIGHT therapy, designed specifically for women, could reduce depressive and anxiety symptoms, hopelessness, and loneliness in African American women. Prevalence of mental illness differs in African Americans and Caucasians. The nonexperimental one-group pretest posttest design study examined the effectiveness of a 12-week INSIGHT group intervention. Due to the stigma of mental illness, groups met at an African American church. Reliability and validity of instruments were effectively demonstrated. Statistically significant difference was found in the level of depression but the study was underpowered to detect statistically significant differences in anxiety, hopelessness, and loneliness. Clinically significant improvement occurred for some participants in anxiety, hopelessness, and loneliness.

  20. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  1. Implementation of the NASA Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Warren, L Elisabeth; Reinertson, Randal; Camacho, Maria E; Paloski, William H

    2007-07-01

    The NASA Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Pilot Study was the first cross-institutional study to investigate the effectiveness of intermittent artificial gravity (AG) as a multi-system countermeasure to bed rest deconditioning in human subjects. Daily treatments by 60 min exposures to short radius centrifugation (SRC) were used to load the longitudinal body axis of eight male human subjects during 21 days of head down tilt bed rest as a means of protecting the bone, muscle, and cardiovascular systems from deconditioning. Data from these treatment subjects were compared with those from seven male human control subjects who were not exposed to SRC loading. This paper reports on implementation issues and lessons learned during the conduct of this complex study.

  2. Development and pilot of Case Manager: a virtual-patient experience for veterinary students.

    PubMed

    Byron, Julie K; Johnson, Susan E; Allen, L Clare V; Brilmyer, Cheryl; Griffiths, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in veterinary education to engage students, teach and reinforce clinical reasoning, and provide access anytime/anywhere to quality learning opportunities. In addition, accrediting bodies are asking for more concrete documentation of essential clinical-skills outcomes. Unfortunately, during the clinical year in a referral hospital setting, students are at the mercy of chance regarding the types of cases they will encounter and the opportunities they will have to participate. Patient- and case-simulation technology is becoming more popular as a way to achieve these objectives in human and veterinary medical education. Many of the current options available to the veterinary medical education community to develop virtual-patient cases are too time-consuming, cost prohibitive, or difficult for the instructor or learner to use. In response, we developed a learning tool, Case Manager, which is low-cost and user-friendly. Case Manager was designed to meet the demands of veterinary education by providing students with an opportunity to cultivate clinical reasoning skills and allowing for real-time student feedback. We launched a pilot test with 37 senior veterinary medical students as part of their Small Animal Internal Medicine clinical rotation. Students reported that Case Manager increased their engagement with the material, improved diagnostic and problem-solving skills, and broadened their exposure to a variety of cases. In addition, students felt that Case Manager was superior to a more traditional, less interactive case presentation format.

  3. A Case Study of a Three-Year Pilot Program on One District's Attempt to Increase the Gifted Identification of Diverse Elementary School Students by Having a Talent Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Robin Kesterson

    2009-01-01

    This case study examined ways elementary school students from diverse populations (minorities and children from low socioeconomic status environments) were included in a talent development program, and determined if that inclusion proved to be beneficial for gifted identification. With intentional regard for the idea of talent development, this…

  4. Acupressure for smoking cessation – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    White, Adrian R; Moody, Russell C; Campbell, John L

    2007-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking is a serious risk to health: several therapies are available to assist those who wish to stop. Smokers who approach publicly funded stop-smoking clinics in the UK are currently offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or bupropion, and group behaviour therapy, for which there is evidence of effectiveness. Acupuncture and acupressure are also used to help smokers, though a systematic review of the evidence of their effectiveness was inconclusive. The aim of this pilot project was to determine the feasibility of a study to test acupressure as an adjunct to one anti-smoking treatment currently offered, and to inform the design of the study. Methods An open randomised controlled pilot study was conducted within the six week group programme offered by the Smoking Advice Service in Plymouth, UK. All participants received the usual treatment with NRT and group behavioural therapy, and were randomised into three groups: group A with two auricular acupressure beads, group B with one bead, and group C with no additional therapy. Participants were taught to press the beads when they experienced cravings. Beads were worn in one ear for four weeks, being replaced as necessary. The main outcome measures assessed in the pilot were success at quitting (expired CO ≤ 9 ppm), the dose of NRT used, and the rating of withdrawal symptoms using the Mood and Symptoms Scale. Results From 49 smokers attending four clinics, 24 volunteered to participate, 19 attended at least once after quitting, and seven remained to the final week. Participants who dropped out reported significantly fewer previous quit attempts, but no other significant differences. Participants reported stimulating the beads as expected during the initial days after quitting, but most soon reduced the frequency of stimulation. The discomfort caused by the beads was minor, and there were no significant side effects. There were technical problems with adhesiveness of the dressing. Reporting of

  5. Acupressure for smoking cessation--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, Adrian R; Moody, Russell C; Campbell, John L

    2007-03-14

    Tobacco smoking is a serious risk to health: several therapies are available to assist those who wish to stop. Smokers who approach publicly funded stop-smoking clinics in the UK are currently offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or bupropion, and group behaviour therapy, for which there is evidence of effectiveness. Acupuncture and acupressure are also used to help smokers, though a systematic review of the evidence of their effectiveness was inconclusive. The aim of this pilot project was to determine the feasibility of a study to test acupressure as an adjunct to one anti-smoking treatment currently offered, and to inform the design of the study. An open randomised controlled pilot study was conducted within the six week group programme offered by the Smoking Advice Service in Plymouth, UK. All participants received the usual treatment with NRT and group behavioural therapy, and were randomised into three groups: group A with two auricular acupressure beads, group B with one bead, and group C with no additional therapy. Participants were taught to press the beads when they experienced cravings. Beads were worn in one ear for four weeks, being replaced as necessary. The main outcome measures assessed in the pilot were success at quitting (expired CO < or = 9 ppm), the dose of NRT used, and the rating of withdrawal symptoms using the Mood and Symptoms Scale. From 49 smokers attending four clinics, 24 volunteered to participate, 19 attended at least once after quitting, and seven remained to the final week. Participants who dropped out reported significantly fewer previous quit attempts, but no other significant differences. Participants reported stimulating the beads as expected during the initial days after quitting, but most soon reduced the frequency of stimulation. The discomfort caused by the beads was minor, and there were no significant side effects. There were technical problems with adhesiveness of the dressing. Reporting of NRT consumption was poor

  6. Study to determine the IFR operational profile and problems of the general aviation single pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    General aviation single pilot operating under instrument flight rules (GA SPIFR) was studied. The objectives of the study were to (1) develop a GA SPIFR operational profile, (2) identify problems experienced by the GA SPIFR pilot, and (3) identify research tasks which have the potential for eliminating or reducing the severity of the problems. To obtain the information necessary to accomplish these objectives, a mail questionnaire survey of instrument rated pilots was conducted. The general aviation IFR single pilot operational profile and selected data analysis examples are presented.

  7. Touch massage: a pilot study of a complex intervention.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Lenita; Lehtipalo, Stefan; Winsö, Ola; Karlsson, Marcus; Wiklund, Urban; Brulin, Christine

    2013-11-01

    To report and evaluate a complex touch massage intervention according to the British Medical Research Council framework. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of touch massage on levels of anxiety and physiological stress in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery. The use of touch massage has increased during the past decade but no systematic studies have been implemented to investigate the effectiveness of such treatment. It is important to conduct multidisciplinary investigations into the effects of complex interventions such as touch massage. For this, the British Medical Research Council has provided a useful framework to guide the development, piloting, evaluation and reporting of complex intervention studies. A pilot study with a randomized controlled design including 20 patients (10 + 10) scheduled for elective aortic surgery. Selected outcome parameters included; self-reported anxiety, measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y instrument, and physiological stress, measured by heart rate variability, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, oxygen saturation and concentrations of cortisol, insulin and glucose in serum. There were significant differences in self-reported anxiety levels before and after touch massage (p = 0.007), this was not observed in the control group (p = 0.833). There was a significant difference in self-reported anxiety levels between the touch massage group and the control group after touch massage and rest (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences in physiological stress-related outcome parameters between patients who received touch massage and controls. In our study, touch massage decreased anxiety levels in patients scheduled for elective aortic surgery, and the British Medical Research Council framework was a useful guideline for the development, evaluation and reporting of a touch massage intervention. Touch massage can reduce patients' anxiety levels and is thus an important nursing intervention in

  8. A human laboratory pilot study with baclofen in alcoholic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Leggio, Lorenzo; Zywiak, William H.; McGeary, John E.; Edwards, Steven; Fricchione, Samuel R.; Shoaff, Jessica R.; Addolorato, Giovanni; Swift, Robert M.; Kenna, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen may represent a pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence (AD). However, the mechanisms by which baclofen affects drinking are not well characterized; thus this pilot study investigated possible baclofen’s biobehavioral mechanisms. The design was a double-blind controlled randomized human laboratory pilot study. Fourteen non-treatment seeking alcohol-dependent heavy drinking subjects received either baclofen 10 mg t.i.d. or an active placebo (cyproheptadine 2 mg t.i.d., to control for sedation) for a 7-day period. At day 8, participants performed an alcohol cue-reactivity (CR) followed by an alcohol self-administration (ASA). Additionally, we explored possible moderators that might guide future larger studies, i.e. anxiety, family history and onset of alcoholism, and D4 dopamine receptor (DRD4) and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. The main results were a significant effect of baclofen for increasing stimulation (p=.001) and sedation (p<.01). Furthermore, when drinking during the ASA and the 2 days before was analyzed as a composite variable, there was a significant effect of baclofen to reduce alcohol consumption (p<.01). As for the exploratory analyses, baclofen’s effects to increase alcohol sedation and to reduce alcohol consumption were limited to those individuals with DRD4 ≥7 repeats (DRD4L). Yet, baclofen’s effects on alcohol consumption were also moderated by 5-HTTLPR LL genotype. In conclusion, baclofen’s ability to reduce alcohol drinking may be related to its effects on the biphasic effects of alcohol, but larger studies are needed to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:23262301

  9. Pilot implementation of a contact tracing intervention for tuberculosis case detection in Kisumu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Okelloh, D.; Agaya, J.; Cain, K.; Ooko, B.; Malika, T.; Burton, D.

    2016-01-01

    Leveraging an existing community health strategy, a contact tracing intervention was piloted under routine programmatic conditions at three facilities in Kisumu County, Kenya. Data collected during a 6-month period were compared to existing programmatic data. After implementation of the intervention, we found enhanced programmatic contact tracing practices, noting an increase in the proportions of index cases traced, symptomatic contacts referred, referred contacts presenting to a facility for tuberculosis screening, and eligible contacts started on isoniazid preventive therapy. As contact tracing is scaled up, health ministries should consider the adoption of similar contact tracing interventions to improve contact tracing practices. PMID:28123956

  10. A case of Opisthorchis felineus infestation in a pilot from Greece.

    PubMed

    Tselepatiotis, E; Mantadakis, E; Papoulis, S; Vassalou, E; Kotsakis, P; Samonis, G

    2003-12-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year-old man from Greece with Opistorchis felineus infestation. The patient presented with intense abdominal pain, bilious emesis and eosinophilia. He probably acquired the infection overseas, since he was a commercial airline pilot who used to fly to endemic areas and to consume raw or undercooked fish. He was successfully treated with praziquantel administered in divided doses over a single day. Opisthorchiasis is common to eastern Europe and areas of the former Soviet Union, but extremely rare in Greece. Medical personnel should be cognizant of this parasitic infection, since world travel can spread it to areas of the world unaccustomed to it.

  11. Pilot implementation of a contact tracing intervention for tuberculosis case detection in Kisumu County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, T; Okelloh, D; Agaya, J; Cain, K; Ooko, B; Malika, T; Burton, D

    2016-12-21

    Leveraging an existing community health strategy, a contact tracing intervention was piloted under routine programmatic conditions at three facilities in Kisumu County, Kenya. Data collected during a 6-month period were compared to existing programmatic data. After implementation of the intervention, we found enhanced programmatic contact tracing practices, noting an increase in the proportions of index cases traced, symptomatic contacts referred, referred contacts presenting to a facility for tuberculosis screening, and eligible contacts started on isoniazid preventive therapy. As contact tracing is scaled up, health ministries should consider the adoption of similar contact tracing interventions to improve contact tracing practices.

  12. A Spanish Pilot Investigation for a Crosslinguistic Study in Protracted Phonological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Peon, Mario E.; Bernhardt, Barbara May; Adler-Bock, Marcy; Avila, Carmen; Carballo, Gloria; Fresneda, Dolores; Lleo, Conxita; Mendoza, Elvira; Perez, Denisse; Stemberger, Joseph Paul

    2012-01-01

    A crosslinguistic study is underway concerning children's protracted phonological development (i.e. speech sound disorders). The current article reports pilot Spanish data for this study from two 4-year-old boys with protracted phonological development. The purposes of the pilot study were to: (1) develop and evaluate a word list for elicitation…

  13. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Tajima, Fumihiro; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Nakamura, Takeshi; Ishihara, Masahiro; Hosomi, Koichi; Ninomiya, Koshi; Moriwaki, Takashi; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-06-15

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury.

  14. Canine heartworm disease: a review and pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haddock, K C

    1987-01-01

    Canine heartworm disease is a mosquito vectored illness resulting from parasitization by the filariid worm Dirofilaria immitis. While presenting some danger to humans, the filariid has its greatest impact on the canine population. In recent years the disease has become established throughout much of the United States, perhaps as the result of diffusion from a suspected hearth in the southeastern coastal plain. While its distribution is known in general terms, much research remains to be done to assess the pattern of distribution as well as the impact of D. immitis on canine populations and their human owners for many locales. The present study provides a review of the literature on the parasite; on its distribution, particularly in the United States; and on the ecology of canine heartworm disease. A pilot study is presented which emphasizes the problems encountered in establishing a data base for observations on the disease at the local level.

  15. A mentored cooperative group pilot study: atrophic vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Lester, Joanne L; Jarvis, Chandler; Bartholomew, Deborah; Yee, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    To review nursing research initiatives from two cooperative groups and outline a pilot study performed by a junior nurse researcher mentored by cooperative group nurse researchers and institutional physicians. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, World Wide Web. Nursing research can be initiated and led by nurses in the cooperative group setting. The team approach model of research includes several disciplines to examine multiple facets of the same problem, or of multiple problems that a cancer patient may face. This new model will enable a greater number of nurse researchers to investigate symptom management, survivorship, and quality-of-life issues. Nurse researchers should be included in every cooperative group study to investigate nurse-sensitive outcomes and issues related to symptom management, survivorship, and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Musical stimulation in the developmentally delayed child: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jones, N L; Molnar, E T; Knasel, A L

    1987-08-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated.

  17. Musical Stimulation in the Developmentally Delayed Child: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nanelle Lavina; Molnar, Eva T.; Knasel, Anne L.

    1987-01-01

    Music is a convenient way of bypassing barriers of communication and eliciting responses that may be helpful in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. The use of background music in elevators, in doctors' offices, and in stores are good examples of how music can be used to affect the subconscious mind. In this pilot study drums were used to better define the effects of particular elements of music and sound. When repetitive rhythms are presented as background music to a group of severely developmentally delayed children, three out of four subjects show a definite change in level of development in the unstructured task of free drawing. To discover more about the effects of the various elements of music and to better identify patterns in the environment that are conducive to optimal functioning, further studies are indicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:2468780

  18. Physiologic Pressure and Flow Changes During Parabolic Flight (Pilot Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, George; Sharp, M. Keith; Mathias, John R.; Hargens, Alan R.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Buckey, Jay C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain measurement of cutaneous tissue perfusion central and peripheral venous pressure, and esophageal and abdominal pressure in human test subjects during parabolic flight. Hemodynamic data recorded during SLS-I and SLS-2 missions have resulted in the paradoxical finding of increased cardiac stroke volume in the presence of a decreased central venous pressure (CVP) following entry in weightlessness. The investigators have proposed that in the absence of gravity, acceleration-induced peripheral vascular compression is relieved, increasing peripheral vascular capacity and flow while reducing central and peripheral venous pressure, This pilot study seeks to measure blood pressure and flow in human test subjects during parabolic flight for different postures.

  19. Potency and stability of compounded cyclophosphamide: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Robat, C; Budde, J

    2017-09-01

    Compounding of drugs for use in veterinary oncology is becoming increasingly common. We obtained 15 mg cyclophosphamide capsules from five different compounding pharmacies and performed potency analyses at two time points, as well as stability at 60 days. Potency results for four out of five and zero out of five (4/10) samples analysed were inadequate. Stability at 60 days was acceptable for all but one sample. This pilot study raises several important points of concern when compounding chemotherapy in dogs and cats. Further studies are necessary to solidify this data. Collaboration between pharmacists, veterinarians and regulatory bodies is needed to ensure safe and accurate delivery of compounded drugs to client-owned animals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  1. PTSD elderly war veterans: a clinical controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Rosa, Pedro; Morais, Diogo; Duarte, Nuno; Oliveira, Susana; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2010-02-01

    Around 25,000 war veterans in Portugal suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This clinically controlled study evaluates virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) as an alternative procedure to reduce PTSD symptoms. Ten patients were assigned to three groups: VRET, exposure in imagination (EI), and waiting list (WL). The patients were Portuguese veterans from a series of wars fought in former African colonies more than 30 years ago. While the EI group participated in traditional imagination therapy, the VRET group was exposed to a virtual reality (VR) war scenario. Cues such as ambush, mortar blasting, and waiting for rescue were used in the VR. Patients enrolled in the VRET group showed statistical reduction of PTSD-associated disorders like depression and anxiety. Far from being conclusive, this pilot study nonetheless presents some promising data on the use of VRET on old war veteran populations.

  2. Estimating the incidence of malignant mesothelioma in Vietnam: a pilot descriptive cancer registration study

    PubMed Central

    Soeberg, Matthew J.; Luong, Mai Anh; Tran, Van Thuan; Tran, Anh Thanh; Nguyen, Thị Thu Huyen; Bui, Dieu; Nguyen, Thi Hoai Nga; Takahashi, Ken; van Zandwijk, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Global asbestos consumption has shifted toward lower income countries, particularly in the Asian region including Vietnam where asbestos and asbestos-containing products have been imported since the late 1960s. Methods This pilot descriptive epidemiological study aimed to provide contemporary estimates of malignant mesothelioma incidence (histological subtype M9050/3; ICD-O-3) by gender and age group as recorded across nine cancer registries in Vietnam. Results We identified 148 incident cases of malignant mesothelioma during 1987–2013. The majority of cases were recorded in the Hanoi region (n = 93) and were aged 55 years or older (n = 96). Discussion By carefully reviewing existing cancer registry records in Vietnam, we identified a larger number of malignant mesothelioma cases than previously estimated. We recommend the use of cancer registry data in tracking future asbestos-related disease in Vietnam. PMID:27388204

  3. Estimating the influenza vaccine effectiveness in elderly on a yearly basis using the Spanish influenza surveillance network--pilot case-control studies using different control groups, 2008-2009 season, Spain.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Camelia; Valenciano, Marta; de Mateo, Salvador; Larrauri, Amparo

    2010-04-01

    We conducted a case-control and screening method studies to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) in the age group >or=65 years, based on the Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System (SISSS). Cases (influenza laboratory-confirmed) were compared to influenza-negative ILI patients (test-negative) and patients without ILI since the beginning of the season (non-ILI). For the screening method, cases' vaccination coverage was compared to the vaccination coverage of the GPs' catchment population. The results suggested a protective effect of the vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza in elderly in 2008-2009. The screening method and the test-negative control designs enable estimating IVE using exclusively SISSS data.

  4. The Pilot Training Study: A Cost-Estimating Model for Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, S. L.

    A means for estimating the resource requirements and attendant costs of any configuration of the undergraduate pilot training system (UPT) is described by inputs that are supplied by the user of the model. The inputs consist of data such as UPT graduate requirements, course syllabus requirements, instructor-student ratios, administrative and…

  5. Evidence-based medicine for diabetes educators: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G; Köpke, S; Lenz, M; Kasper, J; Mühlhauser, I

    2007-08-01

    Health-care professionals are increasingly asked to communicate research results to patients and consumers. Diabetes educators play a decisive role in the information process of patients with diabetes. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a regular part of their training in Germany. We performed a pilot study to test whether the inclusion of a short EBM module into the standard graduate programme is feasible and leads to a meaningful increase in knowledge and skills. The study group consisted of 121 diabetes educator trainees. The EBM modules were delivered in 1- to 3-day courses. Increase in knowledge and skills were assessed using a questionnaire covering three main elements: (i) general aspects of an intervention study, (ii) effect size calculation, (iii) general aspects of evidence-based patient information and communicating numbers as patient orientated statements. Two researchers independently rated the assessment sheets. The majority of participants rated the course as important and useful but too short. Knowledge and skills in EBM increased after the course by 2 points out of 13.5 (mean score before course 5 +/- 2 vs. 7 +/- 2; P < 0.001). Inter-rater reliability analysis using Cohen's Kappa coefficients demonstrated substantial to almost perfect agreement for 10 of the 13 items. Our pilot study demonstrates that EBM education for diabetes educator trainees is feasible. However, the increase in knowledge and skills appears not to be clinically relevant. Short EBM courses are unlikely to yield important effects. More intensified course formats are necessary to meet the needs of diabetes educators.

  6. Tai Chi for older nurses: a workplace wellness pilot study.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Wu, Ge; Shaner-McRae, Hollie; Rambur, Betty; McIntosh, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of a Tai Chi workplace wellness program as a cost effective way of improving physical and mental health, reducing work related stress, and improving work productivity among older nurses in a hospital setting Design A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). A randomized control trial of two groups (control and Tai Chi group). Northeastern academic medical center. A convenience sample of eleven female nurses (mean age 54.4 years). The Tai Chi group (n = 6) was asked to attend Tai Chi classes once a week offered at their worksite and to practice on their own for 10 minutes each day at least 4 days per week for 15 weeks. Controls (n = 5) received no intervention. SF-36 Health Survey, Nursing Stress Scale (NSS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Sit-and-Reach test, Functional Reach test, the Work Limitations Questionnaire, workplace injury and unscheduled time off. The two study groups were compared descriptively and changes across time in the intervention versus control were compared. The Tai Chi group took no unscheduled time-off hours, whereas, the control group was absent 49 hours during the study period. There was also a 3% increase in work productivity and significant improvement in functional reach (p=0.03) compared to the control group. Other outcomes were not statistically significant. This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of Tai Chi with older female workers as a cost effective wellness option in the workplace; thus encouraging replication with a larger sample. Methodological implications were also addressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Building a Greenway: Using EnviroAtlas in the Classroom. CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this hypothetical case study, funding to complete a pilot section of a greenway has been granted to a city Parks and Recreation Department. The proposed pilot section is being presented to the city council for review and approval. The proposal was drafted by the Parks and Recr...

  8. Building a Greenway: Using EnviroAtlas in the Classroom. CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this hypothetical case study, funding to complete a pilot section of a greenway has been granted to a city Parks and Recreation Department. The proposed pilot section is being presented to the city council for review and approval. The proposal was drafted by the Parks and Recr...

  9. Incidence of cancer among Nordic airline pilots over five decades: occupational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pukkala, Eero; Aspholm, Rafael; Auvinen, Anssi; Eliasch, Harald; Gundestrup, Maryanne; Haldorsen, Tor; Hammar, Niklas; Hrafnkelsson, Jón; Kyyrönen, Pentti; Linnersjö, Anette; Rafnsson, Vilhjálmur; Storm, Hans; Tveten, Ulf

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the incidence of cancer among male airline pilots in the Nordic countries, with special reference to risk related to cosmic radiation. Design Retrospective cohort study, with follow up of cancer incidence through the national cancer registries. Setting Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Participants 10 032 male airline pilots, with an average follow up of 17 years. Main outcome measures Standardised incidence ratios, with expected numbers based on national cancer incidence rates; dose-response analysis using Poisson regression. Results 466 cases of cancer were diagnosed compared with 456 expected. The only significantly increased standardised incidence ratios were for skin cancer: melanoma 2.3 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 3.0), non-melanoma 2.1 (1.7 to 2.8), basal cell carcinoma 2.5 (1.9 to 3.2). The relative risk of skin cancers increased with the estimated radiation dose. The relative risk of prostate cancer increased with increasing number of flight hours in long distance aircraft. Conclusions This study does not indicate a marked increase in cancer risk attributable to cosmic radiation, although some influence of cosmic radiation on skin cancer cannot be entirely excluded. The suggestion of an association between number of long distance flights (possibly related to circadian hormonal disturbances) and prostate cancer needs to be confirmed. What is already known on this topicAirline pilots are occupationally exposed to cosmic radiation and other potentially carcinogenic elementsIn the studies published so far, dose-response patterns have not been characterisedWhat this study addsNo marked risk of cancer attributable to cosmic radiation is observed in airline pilotsA threefold excess of skin cancers is seen among pilots with longer careers, but the influence of recreational exposure to ultraviolet light cannot be quantifiedA slight increase in risk of prostate cancer with increasing number of long haul flights suggests a need

  10. Study Skills Analysis: A Pilot Study Linking a Success and Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urciuoli, Jannette Alejandra; Bluestone, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    This study explored a concept that learning study skills in the context of the content area under study may transfer across courses, multiplying the benefits towards academic success. Methods that have been reported to influence academic growth at the community college level include success courses and applied study skills. In this pilot project…

  11. Social Media in Adolescent Health Literacy Education: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Carrie KW; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda SS

    2015-01-01

    Background While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual’s approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. Objective The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents’ oral health literacy (OHL) education. Methods A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. Results No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants’ sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further

  12. Smoking cessation referrals in optometric practice: a canadian pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ryan David; Spafford, Marlee M; Schultz, Annette S H; Iley, Matthew D; Zawada, Violet

    2011-06-01

    The current pilot study sought to understand optometrists' attitudes toward addressing tobacco use within the scope of their practice, and to identify opportunities within Canada to integrate optometrists as health care partners into the national tobacco cessation network. A descriptive qualitative design was used to conduct this pilot study. Five focus groups were conducted with 29 informants, including 11 practicing community optometrists and 18 senior Doctor of Optometry students from the University of Waterloo. Rationales, barriers, and opportunities to practice patterns were identified. Optometrists and optometry students knew the association of smoking with eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and cataract; however, some informants selectively asked patients about smoking behavior based on patient age or visit type. Most informants indicated that they did inform their patients who smoke of their increased risk of developing certain eye diseases; however, very few informants assessed whether their patients wanted to stop smoking and no informants reported that they had ever provided a patient with explicit support for tobacco cessation. This limited role in smoking cessation support for patients due, in part, to insufficient: financial incentives, training and educational tools and materials, knowledge of community resources for cessation treatments, and time during appointments. Several opportunities were identified to better integrate optometry into tobacco control efforts such as optometrists' access to patients, patients' fear of blindness as a tool to motivate behavior changes, and practitioners' openness to change. Optometrists can be a helpful addition to a smoking cessation healthcare network that already involves more than a dozen health care professions including medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dental hygiene. The findings of this study will be used to develop a national survey of Canadian optometrists' practice patterns

  13. Social media in adolescent health literacy education: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tse, Carrie Kw; Bridges, Susan M; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda Ss

    2015-03-09

    While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual's approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents' oral health literacy (OHL) education. A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants' sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further analyses with a larger study group is warranted.

  14. Pilot study of a submerged membrane bioreactor for water reclamation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Oo, Maung Htun; Tao, Guihe; Kekre, Kiran A; Hashimoto, Tomotaka

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the operational conditions of newly developed MBR modules for water reclamation under tropical conditions. MUDC-620A MBR modules with hollow fibre PVDF membranes from Asahi-Kasei Chemicals were used in the study. The pilot plant with capacity of 50 m(3)/d was operated continuously (24-hour) over four months on site of Ulu Pandan Water Reclamation Plant (UPWRP) in Singapore. During the study, the MLSS in membrane tank was in the range of 6,840 approximately 9,540 mg/L. Filtration operation mode of the membrane unit was 9 minutes on production and 1 minute backwash. The air scouring for the membranes was 0.18-0.30 Nm(3)/h per m(2) membrane area all of the time. Trials on different membrane fluxes were conducted to obtain the sustainable flux. The analytical results showed that COD, TOC, T-N and NH4-N of the treated water were <30 mg/L, 5-7 mg/L, <13 mg/L and <0.1 mg/L, respectively, which met the requirement of Industrial Water for reuse. TMP was in the range of 12-40 kPa and could be recovered after cleaning with 2,000 mg/L sodium hypochlorite solution. Sludge clogging could be a challenge for long-term operation with the current module design. It was concluded that it was feasible for MUDC-620A MBR to operate at a net flux of 25-29 LMH (or 0.6-0.7 m/d) for treating the municipal wastewater at UPWRP.

  15. Pilot Study of Massage in Veterans with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, Michael; Allen, Kelli D.; Dmitrieva, Natalia O.; Keever, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To (1) assess the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care users with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and (2) collect preliminary data on efficacy of Swedish massage in this patient group. Design: Experimental pilot study. Setting: Duke Integrative Medicine clinic and VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Patients: Twenty-five veterans with symptomatic knee OA. Interventions: Eight weekly 1-hour sessions of full-body Swedish massage. Outcome measures: Primary: Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and global pain (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]). Secondary: National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Pain Interference Questionnaire 6b (PROMIS-PI 6b), 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v1) and the EuroQol health status index (EQ-5D-5L), knee range of motion (ROM), and time to walk 50 feet. Results: Study feasibility was established by a 92% retention rate with 99% of massage visits and 100% of research visits completed. Results showed significant improvements in self-reported OA-related pain, stiffness and function (30% improvement in Global WOMAC scores; p=0.001) and knee pain over the past 7 days (36% improvement in VAS score; p<0.001). PROMIS-PI, EQ-5D-5L, and physical composite score of the SF-12 also significantly improved (p<0.01 for all), while the mental composite score of the SF-12 and knee ROM showed trends toward significant improvement. Time to walk 50 feet did not significantly improve. Conclusions: Results of this pilot study support the feasibility and acceptability of Swedish massage among VA health care users as well as preliminary data suggesting its efficacy for reducing pain due to knee OA. If results are confirmed in a larger randomized trial, massage could be an important component of regular care for these patients. PMID:25966332

  16. Why undertake a pilot in a qualitative PhD study? Lessons learned to promote success.

    PubMed

    Wray, Jane; Archibong, Uduak; Walton, Sean

    2017-01-23

    Background Pilot studies can play an important role in qualitative studies. Methodological and practical issues can be shaped and refined by undertaking pilots. Personal development and researchers' competence are enhanced and lessons learned can inform the development and quality of the main study. However, pilot studies are rarely published, despite their potential to improve knowledge and understanding of the research. Aim To present the main lessons learned from undertaking a pilot in a qualitative PhD study. Discussion This paper draws together lessons learned when undertaking a pilot as part of a qualitative research project. Important methodological and practical issues identified during the pilot study are discussed including access, recruitment, data collection and the personal development of the researcher. The resulting changes to the final study are also highlighted. Conclusion Sharing experiences of and lessons learned in a pilot study enhances personal development, improves researchers' confidence and competence, and contributes to the understanding of research. Implications for practice Pilots can be used effectively in qualitative studies to refine the final design, and provide the researcher with practical experience to enhance confidence and competence.

  17. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  18. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  19. Familial Paraphilia: A Pilot Study with the Construction of Genograms

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M. W.; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors. PMID:23738209

  20. Electronic Cigarette Use among Current Smokers: A Pilot Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Ban A; Stanton, Cassandra A; Dube, Shanta R; Sterling, Kymberle L; Burns, Joy D; Eriksen, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    This pilot study explored psychosocial influences of e-cigarette use among dual users. Two focus groups among adult current smokers who had ever used e-cigarettes were conducted in Georgia. Discussions were audio-recorded. Principles of grounded theory and thematic analysis were employed. Reasons for initial use included curiosity and social influence. Themes related to regular use included enjoyment of sensory experiences and perception of reduced harm. Nicotine craving, social image, and convenience were reasons for initial and regular dual use. Two patterns of use emerged - (1) using e-cigarettes to supplement combustible cigarettes; and (2) to replace combustible cigarettes. Reasons for dual use were related to nicotine dependence, social influence, product appeal, and perception of reduced harm. Understanding contextual nuances of dual use can inform policy and communication.

  1. Land use mapping in Erie County, Pennsylvania: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); May, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility of mapping land use in the Great Lakes Basin area utilizing ERTS-1 data. Small streams were clearly defined by the presence of trees along their length in predominantly agricultural country. Field patterns were easily differentiated from forested areas; dairy and beef farms were differentiated from other farmlands, but no attempt was made to identify crops. Large railroad lines and major highway systems were identified. The city of Erie and several smaller towns were identified, as well as residential areas between these towns, and docks along the shoreline in Erie. Marshes, forests, and beaches within Presque Isle State Park were correctly identified, using the DCLUS program. Bay water was differentiated from lake water, with a small amount of misclassification.

  2. A pilot binational study of health behaviors and immigration.

    PubMed

    Hennessy-Burt, Tamara E; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T; Meneses-González, Fernando; Schenker, Marc B

    2011-12-01

    In the US, Mexican immigrant women often have better health outcomes than non-Hispanic white women despite a greater health risk profile. This cross-sectional pilot study compared women living in Chavinda, Michoacán (n = 102) to women who had migrated from Mexico to Madera, California (n = 93). The interview gathered information on acculturation and risk behaviors including smoking, alcohol use and number of sexual partners. The results suggest that more acculturated women living in the US are more likely to consume alcohol. US residence and higher acculturation level was marginally associated with having more than one sexual partner. There were no differences between odds of smoking among Chavinda and Madera women. While results with acculturation are not consistently significant due to small sample sizes, the results are suggestive that acculturation among immigrant Hispanic women in the US may be associated with adverse health behaviors, and selective migration seems less likely to account for these differences.

  3. Electronic Cigarette Use among Current Smokers: A Pilot Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Ban A.; Stanton, Cassandra A.; Dube, Shanta R.; Sterling, Kymberle L.; Burns, Joy D.; Eriksen, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This pilot study explored psychosocial influences of e-cigarette use among dual users. Methods Two focus groups among adult current smokers who had ever used e-cigarettes were conducted in Georgia. Discussions were audio-recorded. Principles of grounded theory and thematic analysis were employed. Results Reasons for initial use included curiosity and social influence. Themes related to regular use included enjoyment of sensory experiences and perception of reduced harm. Nicotine craving, social image, and convenience were reasons for initial and regular dual use. Two patterns of use emerged – (1) using e-cigarettes to supplement combustible cigarettes; and (2) to replace combustible cigarettes. Conclusions Reasons for dual use were related to nicotine dependence, social influence, product appeal, and perception of reduced harm. Understanding contextual nuances of dual use can inform policy and communication.

  4. Lamotrigine in Rett syndrome: treatment experience from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stenbom, Y; Tonnby, B; Hagberg, B

    1998-03-01

    This open pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of Lamotrigine (LTG) in girls with Rett syndrome (RS) regarding seizure frequency, effect on gross motor dyspraxia and safety. Twelve girls with either the classical form of RS or the milder form fruste variants were included. The effect on epilepsy was evaluated as seizure frequency, motor performance (video comparison) and safety at clinical check up. The dosage of LTG was individualized and related to concomitant anti-epileptic drugs. Two of three girls with epilepsy responded relatively well to treatment, and for one of them even bad tantrums disappeared. LTG was useful in another four girls who became happier, more alert, more able to concentrate, and improved in contacting. Only mild adverse reactions as rash and tremor were seen. It is concluded that LTG could be worth trying as an adjunct in girls with RS, being aware of possible adverse reactions and no effect at all.

  5. Familial paraphilia: a pilot study with the construction of genograms.

    PubMed

    Labelle, Alain; Bourget, Dominique; Bradford, John M W; Alda, Martin; Tessier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Biological factors are likely predisposing and modulating elements in sexually deviant behavior. The observation that paraphilic behavior tends to cluster in some families is intriguing and potentially raises questions as to whether shared genetic factors may play a role in the transmission of paraphilia. This pilot study introduces five families in which we found presence of paraphilia over generations. We constructed genograms on the basis of a standardized family history. Results document the aggregation of sexual deviations within the sample of families and support a clinical/phenomenological heterogeneity of sexual deviation. The concept of paraphilia in relation to phenotypic expressions and the likelihood of a spectrum of related disorders must be clarified before conclusions can be reached as to family aggregation of paraphilia based on biological factors.

  6. Somnoplasty for simple snoring--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, G S; Vatts, A; Whinney, D; Kotecha, B; Croft, C B

    2003-10-01

    A prospective pilot study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) of the soft palate to treat simple snoring. Ten consecutive, consenting patients were recruited following history, examination, Epworth scoring, sleep nasendoscopy and full polysomnography. All the patients received two treatments of three lesional RFTA of the soft palate under local anaesthesia, using the Somnus S2 generator. Each treatment was separated by 6 weeks. Patients completed a questionnaire which used visual analogue scales to score pain during the procedure as well as the postoperative period. Snoring was also scored on visual analogue scales by both the patient and the partner. Objective assessment was based on full polysomnography 3 months after the second treatment. Sixty per cent of patients subjectively reported improvement in snoring. Objectively, only 30% showed improvement in duration of snoring (38-48% better) with no change in intensity. There was high patient acceptability of the procedure.

  7. Pilot-scale study of biomass reduction in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qunhui; Ai, Hengyu; Li, Xuesong; Liu, Haitao; Xie, Weimin

    2007-05-01

    Pilot-scale experiments were continuously carried out for more than 9 months to study the excess biomass reduction effect using a biophase-separation bioreactor, which was designed based on food-chain theory. By separating the biophase in the wastewater treatment system, bacteria, protozoa, and metazoa could be separated from each other and dominated in different microbial communities. After degrading organic matter, bacteria were consumed by protozoa or metazoa in the following process in such a reactor. Thus, both chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biomass were reduced. During the process of treating restaurant wastewater, the excess biomass yield in this biophase-separation technique varied from 0.13 to 0.22 kg/kg COD removed, 50% lower than that from the reference system. Apart from low biomass production, this biophase-separation technique can simultaneously achieve a high COD removal efficiency and improve settleability of biosolids at a hydraulic retention time of 6 to 13 hours.

  8. Shared Decision Making for Routine Infant Circumcision: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Teri M.; Beal, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is important that expectant parents receive accurate information about the benefits and risks of circumcision as well as the benefits and risks of having an intact foreskin when making a decision about routine infant circumcision (RIC). A pilot study was conducted using the shared decision making (SDM) conceptual model to guide expectant parents through a 3-phase decision-making program about RIC as part of their childbirth education class. The participants showed a high level of preparedness following each of the 3 phases. Preparedness score were highest for those who decided to keep their expected sons’ penises natural. This SDM program was an effective way of guiding expectant parents through the decision-making process for RIC. PMID:26834440

  9. Development of a new haptic perception instrument: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Leonardo Penteado; Martini, Joyce; Voos, Mariana Callil; Chien, Hsin Fen; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Hand sensory tests do not consider distinct physiological receptors, nor detect normal range variations concerning developmental or pathological changes. We developed an instrument with a set of tests with timing and scoring for assessing haptic perception, which is the interaction between sensory and motor systems, in surfaces exploration, by moving hands. Firstly, group meetings were set for test/manual conception and materials testing. The test/manual were submitted to 30 reviewers in 3 stages (10 reviewers on each stage). The Hand Haptic Perception Instrument (HHPI) evaluates hand sensorimotor performance on six domains: depression, elevation, texture, compressibility, weight (barognosis) and form perception. Each domain requires specific materials. Score ranges from 0 to 57, being 0 the worst rating. This methodological process allowed the development of six domains and instructions to assess haptic perception. This version of HHPI is a pilot model. Further studies will determine reliability and normality ranges.

  10. The Poverty and Housing Scale: report on a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Galambos, Colleen M; MacMaster, Samuel A

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of beliefs and attitudes on poverty and housing is important to researchers and social workers interested in examining the role that belief structures have on the development of policy and programs in these areas. This article reports pilot study findings of a new scale, The Poverty and Housing Scale (PHS), that measures this concept and evaluates its psychometric properties. Preliminary reliability was in the very good range. Examinations of content and face validity provided support of the instrument as a valid measure of beliefs and attitudes on poverty and housing. The factor analysis emerged a one factor, 13-item scale. Unlike other related scales, the PHS attempts to link the social factor of poverty and housing together. Theoretical and methodological strengths and weaknesses are considered and the implications for social work practice are discussed. The authors provide recommendations for additional testing of the instrument.

  11. Fraud Detection by Human Agents: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendra, Vinicius; Schwabe, Daniel

    Fraud is a constant problem for online auction sites. Besides failures in detecting fraudsters, the currently employed methods yield many false positives: bona fide sellers that end up harassed by the auction site as suspects. We advocate the use of human computation (also called crowdsourcing) to improve precision and recall of current fraud detection techniques. To examine the feasibility of our proposal, we did a pilot study with a set of human subjects, testing whether they could distinguish fraudsters from common sellers before negative feedback arrived and looking just at a snapshot of seller profiles. Here we present the methodology used and the obtained results, in terms of precision and recall of human classifiers, showing positive evidence that detecting fraudsters with human computation is viable.

  12. A pilot evaluation study of the Solihull Approach.

    PubMed

    Milford, Rebecca; Kleve, Liv; Lea, James; Greenwood, Rosemary

    2006-11-01

    The Solihull Approach is a psychotherapeutic and behavioural model for health visitors and other professionals working with children and families to address sleeping, toileting, feeding and behavioural difficulties in young children. This pilot study used quantitative methods to assess the effectiveness of the Solihull Approach compared to standard health visitor practice. At assessment, the parent completed the short form Parenting Stress Index and a visual analogue scale rating how severe the problem was. The health visitor also completed a visual analogue scale rating their perception of the severity of the problem. This process was repeated at the end of the intervention and again at three months follow-up. Results showed statistically significant better outcome on five out of six measures for the experimental group. Results are discussed in context of a small sample size.

  13. Development of a Korean family attitude scale: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heeyoung; Schepp, Karen G; Jung, Young-Mi

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop and pilot test a Korean version of the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). We developed the Korean FAS using the translation/back-translation method. Two English monolinguals assessed its translation validity by comparing the original with a back-translated English version. Translation equivalence of the FAS and the refined Korean FAS was evaluated in a convenience sample of 56 bilingual Korean college students. The internal consistency of the Korean FAS and the FAS was 0.96 and 0.76, respectively. Mean scores on the two versions did not differ (t = -0.14, p = 0.89). The test-retest correlation coefficient was 0.37 (p < .001). Although the Korean FAS needs further refinement and psychometric testing, it was translated to reflect the original version and was a reliable instrument for the Korean population.

  14. Facilitating Student Involvement in Transition Assessment: A Pilot Study of the "Student Transition Questionnaire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Margo L.; Griffin, Megan M.; Wei, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the pilot study of an informal assessment, the "Student Transition Questionnaire" (STQ). The STQ is a 38-item assessment designed to elicit student perspectives on transition-related topics. In this mixed-methods study, we piloted the STQ with 186 participants, and then conducted focus groups with various…

  15. The Nonuse, Misuse, and Proper Use of Pilot Studies in Experimental Evaluation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlund, Erik; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the nonuse, misuse, and proper use of pilot studies in experimental evaluation research. The authors first show that there is little theoretical, practical, or empirical guidance available to researchers who seek to incorporate pilot studies into experimental evaluation research designs. The authors then discuss how pilot…

  16. The Internet and Some International Regulatory Issues Relating to Content: A Pilot Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Broadcasting Authority.

    In December 1996 UNESCO commissioned the Australian Broadcasting Authority to conduct a pilot study which considered a range of online issues; this report outlines the findings of the pilot study, based on data collected between February and May 1997 and updated in July 1997. The objective is to identify the main types of Internet content which…

  17. Facilitating Student Involvement in Transition Assessment: A Pilot Study of the "Student Transition Questionnaire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Margo L.; Griffin, Megan M.; Wei, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the pilot study of an informal assessment, the "Student Transition Questionnaire" (STQ). The STQ is a 38-item assessment designed to elicit student perspectives on transition-related topics. In this mixed-methods study, we piloted the STQ with 186 participants, and then conducted focus groups with various…

  18. 77 FR 12312 - Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Electronic Submission of Nonclinical Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participate in a pilot evaluation program to test the electronic submission of nonclinical study data using...

  19. Pilot study of a compassion meditation intervention in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Heather L; Darnall, Beth D; Seppala, Emma M; Doty, James R; Hah, Jennifer M; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of anger as an important predictor of chronic pain outcomes suggests that treatments that target anger may be particularly useful within the context of chronic pain. Eastern traditions prescribe compassion cultivation to treat persistent anger. Compassion cultivation has been shown to influence emotional processing and reduce negativity bias in the contexts of emotional and physical discomfort, thus suggesting it may be beneficial as a dual treatment for pain and anger. Our objective was to conduct a pilot study of a 9-week group compassion cultivation intervention in chronic pain to examine its effect on pain severity, anger, pain acceptance and pain-related interference. We also aimed to describe observer ratings provided by patients’ significant others and secondary effects of the intervention. Methods Pilot clinical trial with repeated measures design that included a within-subjects wait-list control period. Twelve chronic pain patients completed the intervention (F= 10). Data were collected from patients at enrollment, treatment baseline and post-treatment; participant significant others contributed data at the enrollment and post-treatment time points. Results In this predominantly female sample, patients had significantly reduced pain severity and anger and increased pain acceptance at post-treatment compared to treatment baseline. Significant other qualitative data corroborated patient reports for reductions in pain severity and anger. Conclusions Compassion meditation may be a useful adjunctive treatment for reducing pain severity and anger, and for increasing chronic pain acceptance. Patient reported reductions in anger were corroborated by their significant others. The significant other corroborations offer a novel contribution to the literature and highlight the observable emotional and behavioral changes in the patient participants that occurred following the compassion intervention. Future studies may further examine how

  20. Quantification of Forces During a Neurosurgical Procedure: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gan, Liu Shi; Zareinia, Kourosh; Lama, Sanju; Maddahi, Yaser; Yang, Fang Wei; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of tool-tissue interaction is mostly taught and learned in a qualitative manner because a means to quantify the technical aspects of neurosurgery is currently lacking. Neurosurgeons typically require years of hands-on experience, together with multiple initial trial and error, to master the optimal force needed during the performance of neurosurgical tasks. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a novel force-sensing bipolar forceps for neurosurgery and obtain preliminary data on specific tasks performed on cadaveric brains. A novel force-sensing bipolar forceps capable of measuring coagulation and dissection forces was designed and developed by installing strain gauges along the length of the bipolar forceps prongs. The forceps was used in 3 cadaveric brain experiments and forces applied by an experienced neurosurgeon for 10 surgical tasks across the 3 experiments were quantified. Maximal peak (effective) forces of 1.35 N and 1.16 N were observed for dissection (opening) and coagulation (closing) tasks, respectively. More than 70% of forces applied during the neurosurgical tasks were less than 0.3 N. Mean peak forces ranged between 0.10 N and 0.41 N for coagulation of scalp vessels and pia-arachnoid, respectively, and varied from 0.16 N for dissection of small cortical vessel to 0.65 N for dissection of the optic chiasm. The force-sensing bipolar forceps were able to successfully measure and record real-time tool-tissue interaction throughout the 3 experiments. This pilot study serves as a first step toward quantification of tool-tissue interaction forces in neurosurgery for training and improvement of instrument handling skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetotelluric pilot study in the Rio Grande Rift, southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    A magnetotelluric (MT) pilot study consisting of approximately 25 stations distributed in and around the Rio Grande Rift of the southwest United States was carried out in the summer of 2012. Both broadband (100 Hz to 1000 s) and long-period (up to 10 000 s) MT data were collected across two profiles that run perpendicular to the rift axis near Denver, Colorado and Taos, New Mexico, respectively. Time-domain EM data was also collected at each site to account for galvanic distortion in the near-surface. The tectonic forces and rheologic properties behind the initiation and propagation of the rift are poorly understood. Surface mapping of volcanism, normal faulting and sedimentary basins reveals a narrow band of crustal deformation confined to a region in close proximity to the rift axis while geophysical results suggest that deformation is distributed across a much broader and deeper region of the lithosphere. In particular, seismic tomography shows low seismic wave speeds into the lower crust and upper mantle. The magnetotelluric technique is a well-proven passive electromagnetic method that allows for the detection of apparent resistivity at a wide range of depth scales. Complimenting the seismic results with MT data will provide important new information on the geologic and geophysical properties that control the rifting process in this low-strain rate environment. Properties to which the MT method is particular sensitive include temperature, fluid content, and mineral alteration. Preliminary results from this most recent survey are encouraging, showing good data quality up to 10 000 s. In an important precursor to full 2D modeling, the magnetotelluric phase tensor has been used to assess the dimensionality of the electrical resistivity structure at depth. This pilot study provides proof of concept for a much larger magnetotelluric experiment planned to take place in the Rio Grande Rift in 2013.

  2. Prevalence and predictors of residential health hazards: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Susan; Caravanos, Jack; Deitcher, Deborah; Rothenberg, Laura; Belanoff, Candice; Kramer, Rachel; Cohen, Louise

    2005-06-01

    This article reports the results of a pilot study designed to ascertain the prevalence of lead-based paint (LBP), vermin, mold, and safety conditions and hazards and to validate observations and self-reports against environmental sampling data. Data are based on a convenience sample of 70 dwellings in a low-income, urban neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York. The vast majority of residences (96%) contained multiple conditions and/or hazards: LBP hazards (80%), vermin (79%), elevated levels of airborne mold (39%), and safety hazards (100%). Observations and occupant reports were associated with environmental sampling data. In general, the more proximate an observed condition was to an actual hazard, the more likely it was to be associated with environmental sampling results (e.g., peeling LBP was associated with windowsill dust lead levels, and cockroach sightings by tenants were associated with Blatella germanica [Bla g 1] levels). Conversely, the more distal an observed condition was to an actual hazard, the less likely it was to be associated with environmental sampling results (e.g., water damage, alone, was not statistically associated with elevated levels of dust lead, Bla g 1, or airborne mold). Based on the findings from this pilot study, there is a need for industrial hygienists and others to adopt more comprehensive and integrative approaches to residential hazard assessment and remediation. Further research--using larger, randomly drawn samples, representing a range of housing types and geographical areas--is needed to clarify the relationship between readily observable conditions, occupant reports, and environmental sampling data and to assess the cumulative impact on human health.

  3. Investigating the Feasibility and Utility of Bedside Balance Technology Acutely After Pediatric Concussion: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rhine, Tara D; Byczkowski, Terri L; Clark, Ross A; Babcock, Lynn

    2016-05-01

    To examine postural instability in children acutely after concussion, using the Wii Balance Board (WBB). We hypothesized that children with traumatic brain injury would have significantly worse balance relative to children without brain injury. Prospective case-control pilot study. Emergency department of a tertiary urban pediatric hospital. Cases were a convenience sample 11-16 years old who presented within 6 hours of sustaining concussion. Two controls, matched on gender, height, and age, were enrolled for each case that completed study procedures. Controls were children who presented for a minor complaint that was unlikely to affect balance. Not applicable. The participant's postural sway expressed as the displacement in centimeters of the center of pressure during a timed balance task. Balance testing was performed using 4 stances (single or double limb, eyes open or closed). Three of the 17 (17.6%) cases were too dizzy to complete testing. One stance, double limbs eyes open, was significantly higher in cases versus controls (85.6 vs 64.3 cm, P = 0.04). A simple test on the WBB consisting of a 2-legged standing balance task with eyes open discriminated children with concussion from non-head-injured controls. The low cost and feasibility of this device make it a potentially viable tool for assessing postural stability in children with concussion for both longitudinal research studies and clinical care. These pilot data suggest that the WBB is an inexpensive tool that can be used on the sideline or in the outpatient setting to objectively identify and quantify postural instability.

  4. Pilot-Scale Laboratory Instruction for Chemical Engineering: The Specific Case of the Pilot-Unit Leading Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billet, Anne-Marie; Camy, Severine; Coufort-Saudejaud, Carole

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an original approach for Chemical Engineering laboratory teaching that is currently applied at INP-ENSIACET (France). This approach, referred to as "pilot-unit leading group" is based on a partial management of the laboratories by the students themselves who become temporarily in charge of one specific laboratory. In…

  5. Adaptive interventions may optimize outcomes in drug courts: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Arabia, Patricia L; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Croft, Jason R

    2009-10-01

    Adaptive interventions apply a priori decision rules for adjusting treatment services in response to participants' clinical presentation or performance in treatment. This pilot study (n = 30) experimentally examined an adaptive intervention in a misdemeanor drug court. The participants were primarily charged with possession of marijuana (73%) or possession of drug paraphernalia (23%). Results revealed that participants in the adaptive condition had higher graduation rates and required significantly less time to graduate from the program and achieve a final resolution of the case. It took an average of nearly 4 fewer months for participants in the adaptive intervention to resolve their cases compared with those participating in drug court as usual. Participants in the adaptive condition also reported equivalent satisfaction with the program and therapeutic alliances with their counselors. These data suggest that adaptive interventions may enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of drug courts and justify examining adaptive interventions in large-scale drug court studies.

  6. Adaptive Interventions May Optimize Outcomes in Drug Courts: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Arabia, Patricia L.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Croft, Jason R.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive interventions apply a priori decision rules for adjusting treatment services in response to participants’ clinical presentation or performance in treatment. This pilot study (N = 30) experimentally examined an adaptive intervention in a misdemeanor drug court. The participants were primarily charged with possession of marijuana (73%) or possession of drug paraphernalia (23%). Results revealed that participants in the adaptive condition had relatively higher graduation rates and required significantly less time to graduate from the program and achieve a final resolution of the case. It took an average of nearly 4 fewer months for participants in the adaptive intervention to resolve their cases as compared to drug court as-usual. Participants in the adaptive condition also reported equivalent satisfaction with the program and therapeutic alliances with their counselors. These data suggest that adaptive interventions may enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of drug courts, and justify examining adaptive interventions in large-scale drug court studies. PMID:19785978

  7. Plasma Soluble Prion Protein, a Potential Biomarker for Sport-Related Concussions: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrPC in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrPC in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrPC is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making. PMID:25643046

  8. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  9. Pilot age and expertise predict flight simulator performance: a 3-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joy L; Kennedy, Quinn; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2007-02-27

    Expert knowledge may compensate for age-related declines in basic cognitive and sensory-motor abilities in some skill domains. We investigated the influence of age and aviation expertise (indexed by Federal Aviation Administration pilot ratings) on longitudinal flight simulator performance. Over a 3-year period, 118 general aviation pilots aged 40 to 69 years were tested annually, in which their flight performance was scored in terms of 1) executing air-traffic controller communications; 2) traffic avoidance; 3) scanning cockpit instruments; 4) executing an approach to landing; and 5) a flight summary score. More expert pilots had better flight summary scores at baseline and showed less decline over time. Secondary analyses revealed that expertise effects were most evident in the accuracy of executing aviation communications, the measure on which performance declined most sharply over time. Regarding age, even though older pilots initially performed worse than younger pilots, over time older pilots showed less decline in flight summary scores than younger pilots. Secondary analyses revealed that the oldest pilots did well over time because their traffic avoidance performance improved more vs younger pilots. These longitudinal findings support previous cross-sectional studies in aviation as well as non-aviation domains, which demonstrated the advantageous effect of prior experience and specialized expertise on older adults' skilled cognitive performances.

  10. [Protein-calorie nutritional state in elderly patients hospitalized in Lomé Campus university hospital: pilot study about 33 patients versus 30 reference cases registered in three care units].

    PubMed

    Kouassi, K C; Lamboni, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the protein-calorie nutritional status of elderly hospitalized patients admitted to the hepato-gastroenterology, cardiology and internal medicine departments of the Lomé Campus University Hospital and identify the endogenous and mixed undernutrition to provide patients with better nutrition and assistance. Methodology. This cross-sectional study conducted between April 1 and July 31, 2009, included 33 hospitalized case patients aged at least 55 years and 30 age-matched outpatient control subjects. Patients were evaluated according to body mass index (BMI), the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and their serum albumin, serum prealbumin and orosomucoid levels. Results. Among the hospitalized case patients, 37% had protein-calorie undernutrition (low serum albumin), and 73% were at risk of this undernutrition (low serum prealbumin). Five patients (16%) were endogenously undernourished and 17 (57%) exogenously undernourished. Six to 13% of the oupatient controls were undernourished and 33% at risk of undernutrition according to the MNA scale. A significant difference existed between the mean albumin values of case patients and controls (38 ± 9 g/L vs 46 ± 7 g/L, p = 0.002). Conclusion. Our results confirm that the elderly inpatients were regularly malnourished. Knowledge of their nutritional profile has allowed us to launch an improved nutritional assistance program and to supervise it properly.

  11. Use of whole slide imaging in surgical pathology quality assurance: design and pilot validation studies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jonhan; Parwani, Anil V; Jukic, Drazen M; Yagi, Yukako; Anthony, Leslie; Gilbertson, John R

    2006-03-01

    By imaging large numbers of slides automatically at high resolution, modem automated whole slide imaging (WSI) systems have the potential to become useful tools in pathology practice. This article describes a pilot validation study for use of automated high-speed WSI systems for surgical pathology quality assurance (QA). This was a retrospective comparative study in which 24 full genitourinary cases (including 47 surgical parts and 391 slides) were independently reviewed with traditional microscopy and whole slide digital images. Approximately half the cases had neoplasia in the diagnostic line. At the end of the study, diagnostic discrepancies were evaluated by a pathology consensus committee. The study pathologists felt that the traditional and WSI methods were comparable for case review. They reported no difference in perceived case complexity or diagnostic confidence between the methods. There were 4 clinically insignificant discrepancies with the signed-out cases: 2 from glass slide and 2 with WSI review. Of the 2 discrepancies reported by the WSI method, the committee agreed with the reviewer once and the original report once. At the end of the study, the participants agreed that automated WSI is a viable potential modality for surgical pathology QA, especially in multifacility health systems that would like to establish interfacility QA. The participants felt that major issues limiting the implementation of WSI-based QA did not involve image acquisition or quality but rather image management issues such as the pathologist's interface, the hospital's network, and integration with the laboratory information system.

  12. Qualitative Case Study Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    methods in public relations and marketing communications. New York, Routledge 166-185 13. Denzin , N. K. (1978) The Research Act: A Theoretical...Introduction to Sociological Methods. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill 14. Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2011) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative...The Art of Science. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage 19. GAO (1990) Case Study

  13. Remediation case studies: Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing bioremediation. This volume contains reports on nine projects that include bioventing and land treatment technologies, as well as a unique, large-scale slurry-phase project. In these projects, petroleum hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants of concern. Two land treatment projects in this volume represent completed cleanups at creosote sites.

  14. Ancillary Pilot Study for the Educational Policy Research Center Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson Inst., Croton-on-Hudson, NY.

    The role of the Hudson Institute in the policy research center program was to build on and adapt current studies of the future for the purpose of assisting the Office of Education and its five pilot centers. Part 1 of this report comments briefly on some methodological and substantive issues that arose during the pilot phase and suggests how…

  15. 78 FR 70954 - Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Transport Format for the Submission of Regulatory Study Data; Notice of Pilot Project AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center... the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are announcing a pilot project to evaluate the Clinical Data...

  16. 77 FR 13343 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational... Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... submission of nominations from sponsors of innovative device technologies to participate in a pilot program...

  17. Evaluation of the pseudo pilot effect on baseline controller study data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomb, Linda C.

    1988-01-01

    The Baseline Controller Study requires the support of pseudo pilots who input computer commands in response to air data in a simulated environment. Errors committed either by pseudo pilots, or by the computer's failure to accept commands, can result in data that is not representative of controller capabilities. Therefore, it became necessary to evaluate the actions of the pseudo pilots and determine what effect, if any, those actions had upon a given set of baseline data. The Pseudo Pilot Stations (PPS) associated with the Baseline Controller Study are user unfriendly. This fact, coupled with the human factor of the pilots themselves, required exploration of the degree the pseudo pilot's actions affected the subject air traffic controller actions during the collection of baseline data. Examination of the preliminary data collected by the Basline Controller Study subjectively determined that pseudo pilot actions do, indeed, affect the the research data. Further study is needed to quantify that affect and, perhaps, assign a value to the pseudo pilot factor rather than merely decide which simulations are valid and which are not.

  18. Mortuary based injury surveillance for low-mid income countries: process evaluation of pilot studies.

    PubMed

    Kipsaina, Chebiwot; Ozanne-Smith, Joan; Bartolomeos, Kidist; Routley, Virginia

    2015-08-01

    Globally, injury is the fourth major cause of death and the third leading contributor to Disability Adjusted Life Years lost due to health conditions, with the greatest burden borne by low-middle income countries (LMICs) where injury data is scarce. In the absence of effective vital registration systems, mortuaries have been shown to provide an alternative source of cause of death information for practitioners and policy makers to establish strategic injury prevention policies and programs. This evaluation sought to assess the feasibility of implementing a standardised fatal injury data collection process to systematically collect relevant fatal injury data from mortuaries. The process evaluation is described. A manual including a one page data collection form, coding guide, data dictionary, data entry and analysis program was developed through World Health Organization and Monash University Australia collaboration, with technical advice from an International Advisory Group. The data collection component was piloted in multiple mortuaries, in five LMICs (Egypt, India, Sri-Lanka, Tanzania and Zambia). Process evaluation was based on a questionnaire completed by each country's Principal Investigator. Questionnaires were completed for data collections in urban and rural mortuaries between September 2010 and February 2011. Of the 1795 reported fatal injury cases registered in the participating mortuaries, road traffic injury accounted for the highest proportion of cases, ranging from 22% to 87%. Other causes included burns, poisoning, drowning and falls. Positive system attributes were feasibility, acceptability, usefulness, timeliness, and simplicity and data field completeness. Some limitations included short duration of the pilot studies, limited injury data collector training and apparent underreporting of cases to the medico-legal system or mortuaries. The mortuary has been shown to be a potential data source for identifying injury deaths and their circumstances

  19. Efficacy of revascularization to induce apexification/apexogensis in infected, nonvital, immature teeth: a pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Naseem; Logani, Ajay; Bhaskar, Uday; Aggarwal, Vivek

    2008-08-01

    Endodontic treatment options for immature, nonvital teeth conventionally include surgical endodontics, apexification with calcium hydroxide, or single visit mineral trioxide aggregate plug. A new treatment option of revascularization has recently been introduced. It involves disinfecting the root canal system, providing a matrix of blood clot into which cells could grow, and sealing of the coronal access. The present pilot clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of revascularization in 14 cases of infected, immature teeth. Endodontic treatment was initiated, and after infection control, revascularization was performed. The access cavity was sealed with glass ionomer cement. The cases were followed up at regular intervals of 3 months; the range in follow-up was 0.5-3.5 years. The outcomes were as follows. Radiographic resolution of periradicular radiolucencies was judged to be good to excellent in 93% (13 of 14) of the cases. In the majority of cases, a narrowing of the wide apical opening was evident. In 3 cases, thickening of apical dentinal walls and increased root length were observed. The striking finding was complete resolution of clinical signs and symptoms and appreciable healing of periapical lesions in 78% (11 of 14) of cases. Thickening of lateral dentinal walls was evident in 57% (8/14) of cases, and increased root length was observed in 71% (10/14) of cases. None of the cases presented with pain, reinfection, or radiographic enlargement of preexisting apical pathology. This pilot study documented a favorable outcome of revascularization procedures conducted in immature nonvital, infected permanent teeth.

  20. Student Perceptions of International Education and Study Abroad: A Pilot Study at York University, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trilokekar, Roopa Desai; Rasmi, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    International student mobility has been identified as a key strategy for the internationalization of higher education. Although an institutional priority, Canada has among the lowest levels of international student mobility, with only 2% of full-time university students participating in study-abroad programs. This pilot study, conducted at a large…

  1. Mental Health Services in Pilot Study Areas: Report on a European Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) conducted a study to collect data on mental health resources of pilot areas within several European countries. This report presents data from the study and provides a detailed and reliable description of the development of mental health services within the WHO European Region. Part I of the report describes the…

  2. Study of the use of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter on pilot control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a filter on the pilot's control output could improve the performance of the pilot-aircraft system. What is needed is a filter with a sharp high frequency cut-off, no resonance peak, and a minimum of lag at low frequencies. The present investigation studies the usefulness of a nonlinear, rate limited, filter in performing the needed function. The nonlinear filter is compared with a linear, first order filter, and no filter. An analytical study using pilot models and a simulation study using experienced test pilots was performed. The results showed that the nonlinear filter does promote quick, steady maneuvering. It is shown that the nonlinear filter attenuates the high frequency remnant and adds less phase lag to the low frequency signal than does the linear filter. It is also shown that the rate limit in the nonlinear filter can be set to be too restrictive, causing an unstable pilot-aircraft system response.

  3. Lessons learned from a pilot study on the health status of children from itinerant populations.

    PubMed

    Kilanowski, Jill F

    2006-01-01

    The pilot study is used to guide development of a research design or to test an already developed plan; however, results of pilot work often are not reported. Pilot work can yield many valuable lessons and provide investigative training to the principal investigator and as well as evidence to funding agencies that the research is feasible and worthwhile. The pilot study described here is preliminary work on health disparities in two itinerant populations: carnival and migrant farmworker children. This pilot study had three aims: (a) identify the most productive methods to recruit subjects from these two "invisible" populations; (b) test feasibility of the research protocol; and (c) collect preliminary data on the children's health status for future research proposals.

  4. Effect of Volume Guarantee in Preterm Infants on High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Masahiro; Keszler, Martin; Sakuma, Mio; Kikuchi, Shin; Katayama, Yoshinori; Takei, Atsuko; Ikegami, Hitoshi; Minami, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although adding volume guarantee (VG) to conventional ventilation has been a well-established respiratory management for preterm infants, the evidence of VG combined with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) has not been studied well. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of VG added to HFOV on respiratory and other physiological parameters. Methods We conducted a pilot study in extremely low-birth-weight infants ventilated with HFOV + VG with stable pulmonary status after 28 days of age. VG was applied for 6 hours and removed for the following 6 hours, and data were collected during these 12 hours. Results Six neonates were included in this study (gestational age: 22w5d-23w6d, birthweight: 424-584 g). High-frequency expired tidal volume per weight and amplitude were similar between periods with and without VG. Fluctuation of SpO2, but not heart rate, was significantly smaller when babies were ventilated with VG than without VG. Fluctuation of minute volume and carbon dioxide diffusion coefficient significantly increased after VG removal. The proportion of time with SpO2 < 80% was decreased by VG overall, especially in three cases. Conclusion This pilot study suggests VG combined with HFOV attenuates fluctuation of SpO2 and CO2 clearance, which may prevent hypoxemia and hypocapnia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Pilots' age and incidents in helicopter emergency medical services: a 5-year observational study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Prohn, Maria J; Huster, Katharina M; Nowak, Dennis; Angerer, Peter; Herbig, Britta

    2014-05-01

    Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) are considered to have a higher risk of incidents compared to other airborne operations. As HEMS poses high cognitive demands, age-related cognitive changes of helicopter pilots might become a safety risk. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between the age of pilots and incidents in HEMS. We conducted a retrospective observational study of incidents during HEMS operations of one Austrian and two German air rescue organizations between 2007 and 2011. The sample included 257 regularly operating HEMS pilots. Age of the pilots varied between 44.52 yr (SD = 7.80) in 2007 and 46.57 yr (SD = 8.14) in 2011. Incidents were categorized as the number of HEMS operations with at least one liability damage (LD). Statistical analyses used multilevel growth curve modeling with generalized linear mixed models. 1770 LD were observed during 402.372 HEMS operations (approximately four LD per 1000 operations). From 2007 to 2011 the average number of LD per year varied between M = 0.95-1.77 for pilots < 35 yr to M = 0.25-1.53 for pilots > or = 60 yr. There was no statistically significant main effect of pilot's age on the number of LD. There was a trend of an interaction effect between age and time, which suggests that pilots with higher age tended to be involved in slightly fewer LD with time than younger pilots. In sum, findings provide no evidence that older pilots have a higher risk than younger pilots of being involved in an incident during HEMS operations.

  6. Public sharing of research datasets: a pilot study of associations

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2010-01-01

    The public sharing of primary research datasets potentially benefits the research community but is not yet common practice. In this pilot study, we analyzed whether data sharing frequency was associated with funder and publisher requirements, journal impact factor, or investigator experience and impact. Across 397 recent biomedical microarray studies, we found investigators were more likely to publicly share their raw dataset when their study was published in a high-impact journal and when the first or last authors had high levels of career experience and impact. We estimate the USA’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) data sharing policy applied to 19% of the studies in our cohort; being subject to the NIH data sharing plan requirement was not found to correlate with increased data sharing behavior in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Studies published in journals that required a database submission accession number as a condition of publication were more likely to share their data, but this trend was not statistically significant. These early results will inform our ongoing larger analysis, and hopefully contribute to the development of more effective data sharing initiatives. PMID:21339841

  7. What to Consider Before Beginning Graduate Education: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Imus, F Scott; Burns, Shari

    2015-10-01

    The literature supports a general theme that college students lack metacognitive awareness about learning, which leads to poor examination performance and ultimately high attrition rates. However, the literature emphasizes that when college students receive instruction about learning, examination performance goes up and attrition goes down. This pilot study focused on a specific subset of learners: graduate students in a nurse anesthesia program. Given new evidence-based wellness approaches to learning, the nurse anesthesia program conducted a descriptive study aimed at exploring student perceptions. The study goals were to provide students with evidence-based information about wellness factors that influence learning. The book The New Science of Learning by Doyle and Zakrajsek (Stylus Publishing, 2013) was used to provide students with neuroscience evidence about learning that might assist their transition to graduate school. The book was mailed to 34 student registered nurse anesthetists before matriculation. An 8-item Likert-style online survey evaluated the students' perceptions of the book along with identifying any changes the students made in anticipation of starting the rigorous nurse anesthesia program. The study demonstrated that student registered nurse anesthetists could benefit from instruction about wellness approaches that enhance learning before matriculation. Additionally, the study provided the framework for future research.

  8. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  9. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  10. A Case Study of SSP for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostavan, A.; Kaya, N.

    2002-01-01

    The market of the Solar Power Satellite must be worldwide, because it can be provide electricity anywhre in the world from the Earth's orbits. We have perform case studies of various countries to understand their benefits and disadvantages provide by the Space Solar Power, because each country has much different condition on energy from other countries. We are starting the international collaboration between Indonesia and Japan to carry out the case study for Indonesia. In Japan, METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) has already organized a committee to investigate the feasibility of the Space Solar Power and to make a plan to launch a space demonstration of the Solar Power Satellite. While, Indonesia is quickly developing economy and increasing their energy demand. We are investigating the detailed energy conditions of Indonesia and the benefits and disadvantages of he SSP for Indonesia. Especially, we will perform the investigation on the receiving system for the Japanese pilot SPS.

  11. Exploration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Jimmy M.

    1989-04-01

    NASA's Office of Exploration has undertaken four case studies for prospective expansion of manned space activities beyond earth orbit. The subjects of these studies are (1) an expedition to the Martian moon Phobos; (2) a three-mission expedition to Mars; (3) the construction of a man-tended lunar observatory; and (4) the construction of a lunar outpost to serve as the basis for construction of a Martian outpost. The fourth alternative would follow the recommendation of the National Commission on Space for the creation of a 'bridge between worlds' in which explorers would develop ways in which to 'live off the land' in a space environment.

  12. A randomized pilot study of acupuncture treatment for primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Gurkan; Gumusalan, Yakup; Ekerbicer, Hasan C; Kiran, Hakan; Coskun, Ayhan; Arikan, Deniz C

    2013-07-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of acupuncture and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy in primary dysmenorrhea patients. Thirty-five young women with a diagnosis of primary dysmenorrhea were recruited for the study. Their dysmenorrhea severity was rated by visual analog scale (VAS) immediately prior to entry into the study. They were randomly divided into two groups; and the following month they were given NSAID (group 1, n=24) or acupuncture treatment (group 2, n=11). Pain was rated again using VAS during menstruation in both groups. After one month's treatment, pain scores were significantly lower in both groups (p<0.05). Mean pain scores decreased by 52.2% and 69.5% in the NSAID and acupuncture groups, respectively. Acupuncture was as effective as NSAID therapy for patients with primary dysmenorrhea. Since this was a pilot study with a small sample size and short follow-up period, larger studies are needed to clarify the effect of acupuncture in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Working on asymmetry in Parkinson's disease: randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Ricciardi, Diego; Lena, Francesco; Plotnik, Meir; Petracca, Martina; Barricella, Simona; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Modugno, Nicola; Bernabei, Roberto; Fasano, Alfonso

    2015-08-01

    Posture, gait and balance problems are very disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). An increased stride-to-stri de variability, reduction of automaticity and asymmetry of lower limbs function characterize parkinsonian gait. These features predispose to freezing of gait (FOG), which often leads to falls. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the modulation of asymmetry through physiotherapy might improve gait and reduce FOG, thus preventing falls. Twenty-eight PD patients entered a double-blind pilot feasibility controlled study and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 months of a rehabilitative program (performed twice a week) by means of the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), Gait and Falls Questionnaire, Tinetti balance and gait scale, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), European Quality of Life questionnaire. Patients were randomly assigned to three treatment arms: (1) worst side improvement; (2) best side improvement; (3) standard therapy. All study arms showed a significant improvement of the Tinetti and SPPB scores. BSI led to a greater improvement than ST in terms of UPDRS-III (p = 0.01); Tinetti total score (p = 0.05) and Tinetti gait subscore (p = 0.01). Our study confirms the efficacy of physical therapy in the treatment of PD and, more importantly, suggests that specific intervention tailored on individual feature (e.g., asymmetry of motor condition) might be even more effective than standard rehabilitative programs.

  14. Caffeine Awareness in Children: Insights from a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Thakre, Tushar P; Deoras, Ketan; Griffin, Catherine; Vemana, Aarthi; Podmore, Petra; Krishna, Jyoti

    2015-07-15

    Caffeine, a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, can have significant effects on sleep. Caffeine intake among children is increasing, mainly in the form of sodas. However, adolescent caffeine consumers may lack knowledge about the caffeine content in common beverages. If true, this very fact may hamper the assessment of the effects of caffeine consumption on sleep in children if such assessments are a priori dependent on responders being able to reliably distinguish between caffeinated and noncaffeinated beverages. This preliminary study investigated adolescents' caffeine knowledge and intake at a Cleveland-area public middle school. Seventh- and eighth-grade students were surveyed using: (1) the Caffeine Literacy and Sleep Study (CLASS), a 15-question pilot instrument designed to assess caffeine knowledge and intake by type, quantity and timing, as well as sleep habits; and (2) the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a validated survey measuring excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. These questionnaires were distributed and collected during a specified class period. Of the 635 seventh- and eighth-grade students who attended school on the day of the study, 555 (87%) participated. Lack of knowledge about caffeine content of particular drinks was noted in seventh and eighth graders of both sexes with nearly 29% unaware that their favorite drinks contain caffeine and more than 50% unable to correctly identify the drinks with the most caffeine. A low percentage of students correctly identified light-colored sodas lacking caffeine: 7-Up (24.1%), Sierra Mist (38.9%), ginger ale (39.8%), Sprite (39.8%), and Fresca (53.7%). The percentages of students correctly identifying caffeinated light-colored beverages were: Arizona Green Tea (43.5%), Mello Yellow (50.9%), and A&W cream soda (67.6%). However, Mountain Dew was correctly identified by most (93.5%) as caffeinated. Students were not consistently able to identify caffeine content or lack

  15. Lessons from a One-to-One Laptop Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lana; Scharber, Cassandra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the process one district used to design, develop, and implement a one-to-one pilot at its high school as part of its broader commitment to contemporary learning. Specifically, this qualitative case study (a) outlines the process of the laptop pilot, (b) describes the pilot implementation experience for…

  16. Use of hyperbaric oxygenation in neonatal patients: a pilot study of 8 patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, E Cuauhtémoc

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a pilot study to determine the value of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO₂) in the acute management of neonatal hypoxia (hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy) and necrotizing enterocolitis. Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and NE were treated in a Sechrist monoplace chamber. Electroencephalogram, evoked potential, ophthalmic evaluation, ultrasonograph, laboratory exams, and radiographs were obtained before and after HBO₂. Treatment protocol was 2.0 atm abs/45 minutes. Preventive myringotomies were conducted in all patients. A follow-up was done at 3 and 6 months. All patients (n = 8) were ventilator-dependent and required bag-valve-mask ventilation by a neonatologist during the treatment. All showed a resolution after HBO₂. There was also a dramatic improvement (P < .05) in hemoglobin, hematocrit, total proteins, serum sodium, triglycerides, and pH. There were favorable changes in all other studies although they did not meet statistical significance. There was a marked reduction of the morbidity and mortality. There were no adverse effects on the ophthalmologic or Central Nervous System. When used promptly, HBO₂ can modify the local and systemic inflammatory response caused by intestinal inflammation or cerebral or systemic hypoxia. It helps to preserve the marginal tissue and recover the ischemic and metabolic penumbra. This pilot study suggests that HBO₂ could be a safe and effective treatment in the acute management of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. There is a need for a prospective, randomized, controlled, and double-blinded study to determine the real use of HBO₂ in these cases.

  17. Developing a Social Autopsy Tool for Dengue Mortality: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Arauz, María José; Ridde, Valéry; Hernández, Libia Milena; Charris, Yaneth; Carabali, Mabel; Villar, Luis Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is a public health problem in the tropical and sub-tropical world. Dengue cases have grown dramatically in recent years as well as dengue mortality. Colombia has experienced periodic dengue outbreaks with numerous dengue related-deaths, where the Santander department has been particularly affected. Although social determinants of health (SDH) shape health outcomes, including mortality, it is not yet understood how these affect dengue mortality. The aim of this pilot study was to develop and pre-test a social autopsy (SA) tool for dengue mortality. Methods and Findings The tool was developed and pre-tested in three steps. First, dengue fatal cases and ‘near misses’ (those who recovered from dengue complications) definitions were elaborated. Second, a conceptual framework on determinants of dengue mortality was developed to guide the construction of the tool. Lastly, the tool was designed and pre-tested among three relatives of fatal cases and six near misses in 2013 in the metropolitan zone of Bucaramanga. The tool turned out to be practical in the context of dengue mortality in Colombia after some modifications. The tool aims to study the social, individual, and health systems determinants of dengue mortality. The tool is focused on studying the socioeconomic position and the intermediary SDH rather than the socioeconomic and political context. Conclusions The SA tool is based on the scientific literature, a validated conceptual framework, researchers’ and health professionals’ expertise, and a pilot study. It is the first time that a SA tool has been created for the dengue mortality context. Our work furthers the study on SDH and how these are applied to neglected tropical diseases, like dengue. This tool could be integrated in surveillance systems to provide complementary information on the modifiable and avoidable death-related factors and therefore, be able to formulate interventions for dengue mortality reduction. PMID:25658485

  18. DATE: Depressed adolescents treated with exercise: Study rationale and design for a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Carroll W.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Cleaver, Joseph; Greer, Tracy L.; Emslie, Graham J.; Kennard, Beth; Dorman, Shauna; Bain, Tyson; Dubreuil, Judy; Barnes, Conrad

    2010-01-01

    There is an important need for non-medication interventions for depressed youth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a standardized aerobic exercise regime to treat non-medicated clinically depressed adolescents based on adherence and completion rates, including 1) establishing effect sizes for the primary outcomes including the Chidren’s Depression Rating Scale – Revised (CDRS-R) and Actical (energy expenditure data) as well as selected secondary outcomes; (e.g., Clinical Global Improvement, depression rating scales, exercise logs, attitudes), and 2) determining whether moderate to strenuous exercise (12 kcal/kg/week [KKW]) versus a control stretching activity (<4 KKW) for 12 weeks leads to a clinically meaningful reduction in depressive symptoms and/or improved psychosocial functioning. The challenge is to develop an exercise intervention that can motivate a typically sedentary depressed adolescent to exercise on a regular basis. The goal is to demonstrate that exercise alone can provide an important and effective non-medication intervention for adolescent depression. This paper reports on the rationale and design of a pilot study which aims to inform the design of a larger trial to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic exercise to treat adolescent depression. After describing the case for exercise within the broader context of the prevalence of adolescent depression and other treatments, the paper describes the intervention and procedures for data collection. PMID:20454641

  19. Confocal laser endomicroscopy in breast surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Esposito, Dario; Luglio, Gaetano; Limite, Gennaro; Accurso, Antonello; Sollazzo, Viviana; Maione, Francesco; Cassese, Gianluca; Siciliano, Saverio; Gennarelli, Nicola; Ilardi, Gennaro; Paternoster, Mariano; Giglio, Mariano C; Forestieri, Pietro

    2015-04-10

    Breast neoplasms include different histopathological entities, varying from benign tumors to highly aggressive cancers. Despite the key role of imaging, traditional histology is still required for a definitive diagnosis. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy (CLE) is a new technique, which enables to obtain histopathological images in vivo, currently used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases. This is a single-center pilot feasibility study; the main aim is to describe the basic morphological patterns of Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in normal breast tissue besides benign and malignant lesions. Thirteen female patients (mean age 52.7, range from 22 to 86) who underwent surgical resection for a palpable breast nodule were enrolled. CLE was performed soon after resection with the Cellvizio® Endomicroscopy System (Mauna Kea Technologies, Paris, France), by using a Coloflex UHD-type probe; intravenous fluorescein was used as contrast-enhancing agent. The surgical specimen was cut along the main axis; dynamic images were obtained and recorded using a hand-held probe directly applied both to the internal part of the lesion and to several areas of surrounding normal tissue. Each specimen was then sent for definitive histologic examination. Histopathology revealed a benign lesion in six patients (46%), while a breast cancer was diagnosed in seven women (54%). Confocal laser endomicroscopy showed some peculiar morphological patterns. Normal breast tissue was characterized by a honeycomb appearance with regular, dark, round or hexagonal glandular lobules on a bright stroma background; tubular structures, representing ducts or blood vessels, were also visible in some frames. Benign lesions were characterized by a well-demarcated "slit-like" structure or by lobular structures in abundant bright stroma. Finally, breast cancer was characterized by a complete architectural subversion: ductal carcinoma was characterized by ill-defined structures, with dark borders and irregular

  20. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods.