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Sample records for pin irradiation test

  1. Thermal analysis of the FSP-1 fuel pin irradiation test

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.F. III.

    1990-07-25

    Thermal analysis of a pin from the FSP-1 fuels irradiation test has been completed. The purpose of the analysis was to provide predictions of fuel pin temperatures, determine the flow regime within the lithium annulus of the test assembly, and provide a standardized model for a consistent basis of comparison between pins within the test assembly. The calculations have predicted that the pin is operating at slightly above the test design temperatures and that the flow regime within the lithium annulus is a laminar buoyancy driven flow. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Comparison of proton microbeam and gamma irradiation for the radiation hardness testing of silicon PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, M.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Majer, M.; Jung, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, N. H.

    2013-09-01

    Simple and cost-effective solutions using Si PIN diodes as detectors are presently utilized in various radiation-related applications in which excessive exposure to radiation degrades their charge transport properties. One of the conventional methods for the radiation hardness testing of such devices is time-consuming irradiation with electron beam or gamma-ray irradiation facilities, high-energy proton accelerators, or with neutrons from research reactors. Recently, for the purpose of radiation hardness testing, a much faster nuclear microprobe based approach utilizing proton irradiation has been developed. To compare the two different irradiation techniques, silicon PIN diodes have been irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source and with a 6 MeV proton microbeam. The signal degradation in the silicon PIN diodes for both irradiation conditions has been probed by the IBIC (ion beam induced charge) technique, which can precisely monitor changes in charge collection efficiency. The results presented are reviewed on the basis of displacement damage calculations and NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) concept.

  3. Design, fabrication, and operation of capsules for the irradiation testing of candidate advanced space reactor fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoms, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments were designed, built, and operated to test uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad in tungsten-lined T-111 and uranium dioxide fuel clad in both tungsten-lined T-111 and tungsten-lined Nb-1% Zr. A total of nine fuel pins was irradiated at average cladding temperatures ranging from 931 to 1015 C. The UN experiments, capsules UN-4 and -5, operated for 10,480 and 10,037 hr, respectively, at an average linear heat generation rate of 10 kW/ft. The UO2 experiment, capsule UN-6, operated for 8333 hr at an average linear heat generation rate of approximately 5 kW/ft. Following irradiation, the nine fuel pins were removed from their capsules, externally examined, and sent to the NASA Plum Brook Facility for more detailed postirradiation examination. During visual examination, it was discovered that the cladding of the fuel pin containing dense UN in each of capsules UN-4 and -5 had failed, exposing the UN fuel to the NaK in which the pins were submerged and permitting the release of fission gas from the failed pins. A rough analysis of the fission gas seen in samples of the gas in the fuel pin region indicated fission gas release-to-birth rates from these fuel pins in the range of .00001.

  4. First Tests for the Detection of the LINAC Irradiation Field Using PIN Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, C. E. Ojeda; Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.; Navarro, L. F. Villaseñor; Cruz, M. Durán

    2008-08-01

    The employment of the technology of semiconductor detectors, in the medical physics environment is of great importance due to its versatility and dependability. In this work we present the first results and the experimental arrangement employed with PIN diodes that are conditioned for the measurement of the field of irradiation of a lineal accelerator (LINAC) used in radiotherapy. In our tests we used a PIN photodiode. In former experiments, this diode presented a response to the intensity of the applied field when it was exposed to an X-ray beam in medical and industrial radiography equipments. This diode is a low cost and easy acquisition one in the field. These characteristics transform it into a serious candidate as detector to be used in electronic arrangements for the detection of radiation fields in radio-therapy with X-rays. Experiments were designed to obtain the response of this diode when it was exposed to X-ray beams of a LINAC used in radiotherapy. Firstly the tests were carried out for a 6 MeV photon beam with a source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm, obtaining very encouraging results. We seek to carry out tests for more energy values in order to obtain the energy response of this detector as a radiation sensor device. This device could be applied in the design of working tools, for example, for the quality control in procedures of radiotherapy.

  5. Behaviour of irradiated PHWR fuel pins during high temperature heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, U. K.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Mishra, Prerna; Banerjee, Suparna; Anantharaman, S.; Sah, D. N.

    2008-12-01

    Fuel pins removed from an irradiated pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle discharged after an extended burn up of 15,000 MWd/tU have been subjected to isothermal heating tests in temperature range 700-1300 °C inside hot-cells. The heating of the fuel pins was carried out using a specially designed remotely operable furnace, which allowed localized heating of about 100 mm length of the fuel pin at one end under flowing argon gas or in air atmosphere. Post-test examination performed in the hot-cells included visual examination, leak testing, dimension measurement and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Fuel pins having internal pressure of 2.1-2.7 MPa due to fission gas release underwent ballooning and micro cracking during heating for 10 min at 800 °C and 900 °C but not at 700 °C. Fuel pin heated at 1300 °C showed complete disruption of cladding in heating zone, due to the embrittlement of the cladding. The examination of fuel from the pin tested at 1300 °C showed presence of large number of bubbles; both intragranular as well as intergranular bubbles. Details of the experiments and the results are presented in this paper.

  6. Metallography and fuel cladding chemical interaction in fast flux test facility irradiated metallic U-10Zr MFF-3 and MFF-5 fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Chichester, H. M.; Porter, D. L.; Wootan, D. W.

    2016-05-01

    The Mechanistic Fuel Failure (MFF) series of metal fuel irradiations conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) provides an important comparison between data generated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) and that expected in a larger-scale fast reactor. The MFF fuel operated with a peak cladding temperature at the top of the fuel column, but developed peak burnup at the centerline of the core. This places the peak fuel temperature midway between the core center and the top of fuel, lower in the fuel column than in EBR-II experiments. Data from the MFF-3 and MFF-5 assemblies are most comparable to the data obtained from the EBR-II X447 experiment. The two X447 pin breaches were strongly influenced by fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) at the top of the fuel column. Post irradiation examination data from MFF-3 and MFF-5 are presented and compared to historical EBR-II data.

  7. Design of unique pins for irradiation of higher actinides in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Basmajian, J.A.; Birney, K.R.; Weber, E.T.; Adair, H.L.; Quinby, T.C.; Raman, S.; Butler, J.K.; Bateman, B.C.; Swanson, K.M.

    1982-03-01

    The actinides produced by transmutation reactions in nuclear reactor fuels are a significant factor in nuclear fuel burnup, transportation and reprocessing. Irradiation testing is a primary source of data of this type. A segmented pin design was developed which provides for incorporation of multiple specimens of actinide oxides for irradiation in the UK's Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay Scotland. Results from irradiation of these pins will extend the basic neutronic and material irradiation behavior data for key actinide isotopes.

  8. Irradiation of TZM: Uranium dioxide fuel pin at 1700 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A fuel pin clad with TZM and containing solid pellets of uranium dioxide was fission heated in a static helium-cooled capsule at a maximum surface temperature of 1700 K for approximately 1000 hr and to a total burnup of 2.0 percent of the uranium-235. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) A transverse, intergranular failure of the fuel pin occurred when the fuel pin reached 2.0-percent burnup. This corresponds to 1330 kW-hr/cu cm, where the volume is the sum of the fuel, clad, and void volumes in the fuel region. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pin was less than 1.5 percent on the fuel-pin diameter. (3) There was no visible interaction between the TZM clad and the UO2. (4) Irradiation at 1700 K produced a course-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.02 centimeter and with some of the grains extending one-half of the thickness of the clad. (5) Below approximately 1500 K, the irradiation of the clad produced a moderately fine-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.004 centimeter.

  9. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  10. Results from the run-beyond-cladding breach irradiation of a predefected fuel pin (RBCB-7). [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Langstaff, D.C.; Almassy, M.Y.; Washburn, D.F.

    1980-02-01

    A slit was machined through the cladding of an irradiated fuel pin and irradiation in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was resumed. The condition of the fuel pin was continuously followed with delayed neutron (DN) monitors. When the DN signal increased to a previously established administrative limit of 800 counts per second, the test was terminated. Postirradiation examination showed the sodium-fuel reaction caused fuel pin swelling and extension of the machined slit. There was no evidence of fuel washout nor was there any indiction of impending pin-to-pin failure propagation. This test supports an increase in DN signal for subsequent run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) tests.

  11. Lightning Pin Injection Testing on MOSFETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Sankalita

    2009-01-01

    Lightning transients were pin-injected into metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) to induce fault modes. This report documents the test process and results, and provides a basis for subsequent lightning tests. MOSFETs may be present in DC-DC power supplies and electromechanical actuator circuits that may be used on board aircraft. Results show that unprotected MOSFET Gates are susceptible to failure, even when installed in systems in well-shielded and partial-shielded locations. MOSFET Drains and Sources are significantly less susceptible. Device impedance decreased (current increased) after every failure. Such a failure mode may lead to cascading failures, as the damaged MOSFET may allow excessive current to flow through other circuitry. Preliminary assessments on a MOSFET subjected to 20-stroke pin-injection testing demonstrate that Breakdown Voltage, Leakage Current and Threshold Voltage characteristics show damage, while the device continues to meet manufacturer performance specifications. The purpose of this research is to develop validated tools, technologies, and techniques for automated detection, diagnosis and prognosis that enable mitigation of adverse events during flight, such as from lightning transients; and to understand the interplay between lightning-induced surges and aging (i.e. humidity, vibration thermal stress, etc.) on component degradation.

  12. Thermal analysis of the FSP-1RR irradiation test

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.; Lyon, W.F. III

    1992-10-14

    The thermal analysis of four unirradiated fuel pins to be tested in the FSP-1RR fuels irradiation experiment was completed. This test is a follow-on experiment in the series of fuel pin irradiation tests conducted by the SP-100 Program in the Fast Flux Test Facility. One of the pins contains several meltwire temperature monitors within the fuel and the Li annulus. A post-irradiation examination will verify the accuracy of the pre-irradiation thermal analysis. The purpose of the pre-irradiation analysis was to determine the appropriate insulating gap gas compositions required to provide the design goal cladding operating temperatures and to ensure that the meltwire temperature ranges in the temperature monitored pin bracket peak irradiation temperatures. This paper discusses the methodology and summarizes the results of the analysis.

  13. Retractable pin dual in-line package test clip

    DOEpatents

    Bandzuch, Gregory S.; Kosslow, William J.

    1996-01-01

    This invention is a Dual In-Line Package (DIP) test clip for use when troubleshooting circuits containing DIP integrated circuits. This test clip is a significant improvement over existing DIP test clips in that it has retractable pins which will permit troubleshooting without risk of accidentally shorting adjacent pins together when moving probes to different pins on energized circuits or when the probe is accidentally bumped while taking measurements.

  14. Retractable pin dual in-line package test clip

    SciTech Connect

    Bandzuch, G.S.; Kosslow, W.J

    1993-12-31

    This invention is a Dual In-line Package (DIP) test clip for use when troubleshooting circuits containing DIP integrated circuits. This test clip is a significant improvement over existing DIP test clips in that it has retractable pins which will permit troubleshooting without risk of accidentally shorting adjacent pins together when moving probes to different pins on energized circuits or when the probe is accidentally bumped while taking measurements.

  15. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

    2011-09-01

    The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  16. EXFILE: A program for compiling irradiation data on UN and UC fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, J. T.; Smith, R. L.; Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN-4 computer program for handling fuel pin data is described. Its main features include standardized output, easy access for data manipulation, and tabulation of important material property data. An additional feature allows simplified preparation of input decks for a fuel swelling computer code (CYGRO-2). Data from over 300 high temperature nitride and carbide based fuel pin irradiations are listed.

  17. Irradiation of three T-111 clad uranium nitride fuel pins for 8070 hours at 990 C (1815 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.; Siegel, B. L.; Gedeon, L.; Galbo, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The design and successful operation of three tantalum alloy (Ta-8W-2Hf) clad uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins irradiated for 8070 hr at 990 C (1815 F) is described. Two pin diameters having measured burnups of 0.47 and 0.90 uranium atom percent were tested. No clad failures or swelling was detected; however, postirradiation clad samples tested failed with 1 percent strain. The fuel density decrease was 2 percent, and the fission gas release was less than 0.05 percent. Isotropic fuel swelling, which averaged about 0.5 percent, was less than fuel pin assembly clearances. Thus the clad was not strained. Thermocouples with a modified hot zone operated at average temperatures to 1100 C (2012 F) without failure. Factors that influence the ability to maintain uniform clad temperature as well as the results of the heat transfer calculations are discussed.

  18. Evidence of new pinning centers in irradiated MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantini, C.; Martinelli, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Palenzona, A.; Pallecchi, I.; Putti, M.; Ferdeghini, C.; Cimberle, M. R.

    2008-03-01

    It has been shown that C or SiC addictions can strongly enhance upper critical field of MgB2, leading to an in-field increase of critical current, but without introducing pinning centers other than grain boundaries. On the contrary neutron irradiation introduces new pinning centers, as highlighted by a significant shift of the maximum of pinning force and by a strong improvement of Jc at high field. This effect can be correlated to the defects that neutron irradiation produces. In fact TEM images show the presence of nanometric amorphous regions whose sizes are compatible with the coherence length and such as to act as pinning centers through two different mechanisms. The influence that neutron irradiation induces on MgB2 is also confirmed by magnetization decays that, differently by doped samples, show an important enhancement of pinning energies at high field. These measurements highlight as the increase of pinning energy with irradiation fluence is strongly correlated with Jc improvement.

  19. Examination of T-111 clad uranium nitride fuel pins irradiated up to 13,000 hours at a clad temperature of 990 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.; Siegel, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    The examination of 27 fuel pins irradiated for up to 13,000 hours at 990 C is described. The fuel pin clad was a tantalum alloy with uranium nitride as the nuclear fuel. Two nominal fuel pin diameters were tested with a maximum burnup of 2.34 atom percent. Twenty-two fuel pins were tested for fission gas leaks; thirteen pins leaked. Clad ductility tests indicated clad embrittlement. The embrittlement is attributed to hydrogen from an n,p reaction in the fuel. Fuel swelling was burnup dependent, and the amount of fission gas release was low, generally less than 0.5 percent. No incompatibilities between fuel, liner, and clad were in evidence.

  20. Depletion analysis of mixed-oxide fuel pins in light water reactors and the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    2000-03-01

    An experiment containing weapons-grade mixed-oxide (WG-MOX) fuel has been designed and is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The ability to accurately predict fuel pin performance is an essential requirement for the MOX fuel test assembly design. Detailed radial fission power and temperature profile effects and fission gas release in the fuel pin are a function of the fuel pin's temperature, fission power, and fission product ad actinide concentration profiles. In addition, the burnup-dependent profile analyses in irradiated fuel pins is important for fuel performance analysis to support the potential licensing of the MOX fuel made from WG-plutonium and depleted uranium for use in US reactors. The MCNP Coupling With ORIGEN2 burnup calculation code (MCWO) can analyze the detailed burnup profiles of WG-MOX and reactor-grade mixed-oxide (RG-MOX) fuel pins. The validated code MCWO can provide the best-estimate neutronic characteristics of fuel burnup performance analysis. Applying this capability with a new minicell method allows calculation of detailed nuclide concentration and power distributions within the MOX pins as a function of burnup. This methodology was applied to MOX fuel in a commercial pressurized water reactor and in an experiment currently being irradiated in the ATR. The prediction of nuclide concentration profiles and power distributions in irradiated MOX plus via this new methodology can provide insights into MOX fuel performance.

  1. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  2. Effects of neutron irradiation on pinning force scaling in state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, T.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Flükiger, R.; Scheuerlein, C.; Bottura, L.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive irradiation study involving five state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wires which were subjected to sequential neutron irradiation up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.6 × 1022 m-2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The volume pinning force of short wire samples was assessed in the temperature range from 4.2 to 15 K in applied fields of up to 7 T by means of SQUID magnetometry in the unirradiated state and after each irradiation step. Pinning force scaling computations revealed that the exponents in the pinning force function differ significantly from those expected for pure grain boundary pinning, and that fast neutron irradiation causes a substantial change in the functional dependence of the volume pinning force. A model is presented, which describes the pinning force function of irradiated wires using a two-component ansatz involving a point-pinning contribution stemming from radiation induced pinning centers. The dependence of this point-pinning contribution on fast neutron fluence appears to be a universal function for all examined wire types.

  3. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    DOE PAGES

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; et al

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remainmore » superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.« less

  4. Lightning Pin Injection Test: MOSFETS in "ON" State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Mielnik, John J.; Vaughan, Roger K.; Saha, Sankalita; Wysocki, Philip F.; Celaya, Jose R.

    2011-01-01

    The test objective was to evaluate MOSFETs for induced fault modes caused by pin-injecting a standard lightning waveform into them while operating. Lightning Pin-Injection testing was performed at NASA LaRC. Subsequent fault-mode and aging studies were performed by NASA ARC researchers using the Aging and Characterization Platform for semiconductor components. This report documents the test process and results, to provide a basis for subsequent lightning tests. The ultimate IVHM goal is to apply prognostic and health management algorithms using the features extracted during aging to allow calculation of expected remaining useful life. A survey of damage assessment techniques based upon inspection is provided, and includes data for optical microscope and X-ray inspection. Preliminary damage assessments based upon electrical parameters are also provided.

  5. Flux Pinning and Critical Current Densities in Proton Irradiated Single Crystal Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Hema Krishnan

    Radiation damage has been traditionally used to introduce artificial pinning centers into superconducting material in order to enhance their critical current densities. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of defects induced by irradiation with 3.5 MeV protons on the critical current densities and to investigate the structure of the defects using SQUID magnetization and magnetoresistive measurements. There are three general types of defects produced by proton irradiation at room temperature. They are (1) a relatively high concentration of point defects on all the sublattices, (2) clusters of point defects, and (3) the defect cascades. SQUID magnetization measurements suggest that the defect clusters and cascades are effective in pinning the vortices at 70 K for vec{rm H}|vec{rm c} axis. Additional contribution to pinning at 10 K for vec{rm H}|vec {rm c} axis comes from the vacancies formed upon irradiation with protons. The defect clusters seem to be the only contributors to pinning for vec{rm H}|vec{ rm ab} plane. The anisotropy of the critical current densities in detwinned crystals between field orientations parallel to the vec{ rm a} and vec{rm b} axes determined from magnetization measurements at 10 K consistently show that rm J_sp {c}{c}(vec H|vec b)>J_sp{c}{c}(vec H| vec a) at all fields after 2 irradiations and annealing for 2 and 4 weeks. The effect of proton irradiation on the resistive transition and the anisotropy of the defect structure was studied using angular dependence of the resistivity in rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} single crytals. The expected drop in resistivity when the field is aligned parallel to the vec{rm c} axis due to the alignment of the vortices with the defect cluster as observed in the case of the twin boundaries was absent.

  6. Carbide fuel pin and capsule design for irradiations at thermionic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, B. L.; Slaby, J. G.; Mattson, W. F.; Dilanni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    The design of a capsule assembly to evaluate tungsten-emitter - carbide-fuel combinations for thermionic fuel elements is presented. An inpile fuel pin evaluation program concerned with clad temperture, neutron spectrum, carbide fuel composition, fuel geometry,fuel density, and clad thickness is discussed. The capsule design was a compromise involving considerations between heat transfer, instrumentation, materials compatibility, and test location. Heat-transfer calculations were instrumental in determining the method of support of the fuel pin to minimize axial temperature variations. The capsule design was easily fabricable and utilized existing state-of-the-art experience from previous programs.

  7. Effect of high dose γ-ray irradiation on GaAs p-i-n photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Khamari, Shailesh K.; Manwani, Sapna; Porwal, S.; Alexander, K.; Sharma, T. K.; Kher, S.; Oak, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown GaAs p-i-n photodetector devices are fabricated and tested for the assessment of practical usage of the detector after the exposure to high radiation doses of γ-ray. Increased values of saturation current, ideality factor and leakage current after 360 kGy γ-ray irradiation confirm a substantial increase in the number of generation-recombination centers. It is further observed that the leakage current density, current per unit volume (Jv), increases linearly with the radiation fluence (Φ). The slope (α=ΔJv/ΔΦ) of the leakage current density versus γ-ray radiation fluences curve is two order less (4-5×10-l9 A/cm) for GaAs compared to Si (4-6×10-l7 A/cm). The lower value of α (radiation damage constant) confirms that GaAs is radiation harder than Si. Subsequently, it is also observed that the photo response of 360 kGy γ-ray irradiated GaAs device is reduced by ~50% due to the reduction of quantum efficiency by the radiation induced generation-recombination centers. The functionality of the irradiated sensor is verified by comparing the response of the pristine and irradiated detectors to the photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum well structures.

  8. Control of domain wall pinning by localised focused Ga {sup +} ion irradiation on Au capped NiFe nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, D. M. Atkinson, D.

    2014-10-28

    Understanding domain wall pinning and propagation in nanowires are important for future spintronics and nanoparticle manipulation technologies. Here, the effects of microscopic local modification of the magnetic properties, induced by focused-ion-beam intermixing, in NiFe/Au bilayer nanowires on the pinning behavior of domain walls was investigated. The effects of irradiation dose and the length of the irradiated features were investigated experimentally. The results are considered in the context of detailed quasi-static micromagnetic simulations, where the ion-induced modification was represented as a local reduction of the saturation magnetization. Simulations show that domain wall pinning behavior depends on the magnitude of the magnetization change, the length of the modified region, and the domain wall structure. Comparative analysis indicates that reduced saturation magnetisation is not solely responsible for the experimentally observed pinning behavior.

  9. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  10. Advances in tribological testing of artificial joint biomaterials using multidirectional pin-on-disk testers

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, D.; Siskey, R.S.; Haider, H.; Saikko, V.; Ahlroos, T.; Kurtz, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of numerous formulations of Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), which is widely used as a bearing material in orthopedic implants, necessitated screening of bearing couples to identify promising iterations for expensive joint simulations. Pin-on-disk (POD) testers capable of multidirectional sliding can correctly rank formulations of UHMWPE with respect to their predictive in vivo wear behavior. However, there are still uncertainties regarding POD test parameters for facilitating clinically relevant wear mechanisms of UHMWPE. Studies on the development of POD testing were briefly summarized. We systematically reviewed wear rate data of UHMWPE generated by POD testers. To determine if POD testing was capable of correctly ranking bearings and if test parameters outlined in ASTM F732 enabled differentiation between wear behavior of various formulations, mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional (25–50 kGy) and highly crosslinked (≥90 kGy) UHMWPE were grouped and compared. The mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPEs were 7.03, 5.39 and 0.67 mm3/MC. Based on studies that complied with the guidelines of ASTM F732, the mean wear rates of non-irradiated, conventional and highly crosslinked UHMWPEs were 0.32, 0.21 and 0.04 mm3/km, respectively. In both sets of results, the mean wear rate of highly crosslinked UHMPWE was smaller than both conventional and non-irradiated UHMWPEs (p<0.05). Thus, POD testers can compare highly crosslinked and conventional UHMWPEs despite different test parameters. Narrowing the allowable range for standardized test parameters could improve sensitivity of multi-axial testers in correctly ranking materials. PMID:23831149

  11. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2015-01-23

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131mXe – 0.12 mBq/m3 (0.12 mBq/m3); 133Xe – 0.18 mBq/m3 (0.21 mBq/m3); 133mXe – 0.07 mBq/m3 (0.15 mBq/m3); 135Xe – 0.45 mBq/m3 (0.67 mBq/m3). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131mXe and 133mXe, but similar for 133Xe and 135Xe. Another important factor is the amount of “memory effect” or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is

  12. Engineering test plan for US/UK higher actinides irradiations tests

    SciTech Connect

    Basmajian, J A

    1981-03-01

    The objective of the Higher Actinides Irradiations Program is to verify the neutronic and irradiation performance of americium and curium oxides in a fast reactor. The data obtained from the irradiation will be used to assess the basic neutronics parameters for actinide elements and determine the irradiation potential of the oxides of {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm. This information has application in breeder reactor physics, fuel cycle analysis and assessment of waste management options. The irradiation test program is a cooperative effort wherein the US is supplying the completed irradiation test pins, while the UK will perform the irradiation in their Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR). Postirradiation examination and data analyses will be conducted on a cooperative basis, with some examinations performed in the UK and others in the US. 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The real structure of columnar pinning centers in heavy-ion-irradiated cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.O.; Zhu, Y.; Budhani, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    There has been considerable recent interest in the use of columnar defects produced by irradiation with energetic heavy ions to raise the irreversibility line and improve the critical current density of cuprate superconductors. In the interpretation and theoretical modeling of the flux-pinning characteristics of heavy-ion tracks, it is generally assumed that they are simply columns of non-superconducting material. In this paper we present a more realistic description, based both on resistivity measurements and on detailed, quantitative transmission electron microscope methods (both imaging and analytical studies), of the nature of heavy-ion damage, including defects, disorder, strain fields, and oxygen deficiencies in the matrix of the superconductor surrounding the amorphous columns. The presence of such disorder appears to be a consequence of the mechanism of track formation, which involves partial epitaxial regrowth of a molten region which follows the passage of sufficiently energetic ions.

  14. Swelling and creep observed in AISI 304 fuel pin cladding from three MOX fuel assemblies irradiated in EBR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Makenas, B. J.; Chastain, S. A.

    2011-06-01

    Three 37-pin MOX-fueled experimental subassemblies were irradiated in EBR-II with fuel pin cladding constructed from annealed AISI 304 stainless steel. Analysis of the swelling and irradiation creep of the cladding showed that the terminal swelling rate of AISI 304 stainless steel appears to be ˜1%/dpa and that swelling is very reproducible for identical irradiation conditions. The swelling at a given neutron fluence is rather sensitive to both irradiation temperature and especially to the neutron flux, however, with the primary influence residing in the transient regime. As the neutron flux increases the duration of the transient regime is increased in agreement with other recent studies. The duration of the transient regime is also decreased by increasing irradiation temperature. In these assemblies swelling reached high levels rather quickly, reducing the opportunity for fuel pin cladding interaction and thereby reducing the contribution of irradiation creep to the total deformation. It also appears that in this swelling-before-creep scenario that the well-known "creep disappearance" phenomenon was operating strongly.

  15. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  16. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  17. Flux pinning and flux creep in neutron irradiated (Y,Gd)Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O. Superconductivity Research Lab., Tokyo ); Sickafus, K.E.; Peterson, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Powder samples of Y{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were irradiated with mixed spectrum ({approximately}50% E<0.5eV, 50% E>0.5eV) neutrons with most interactions expected to occur at the Gd site. As a function of fluence the samples showed increased ({approximately}X3-X8) magnetically measured critical current densities J{sub c} at low fluences, falling off at the highest values. An analysis of magnetic relaxation data, which allows for a nonlinear pinning potential U vs J relationship, revealed substantial increases in U at constant J, indicating that the irradiation introduced more effective pinning centers than those originally present. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  19. Development of a Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Bundle Deformation Analysis Code - BAMBOO: Development of a Pin Dispersion Model and Verification by the Out-of-Pile Compression Test

    SciTech Connect

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2004-02-15

    To analyze the wire-wrapped fast breeder reactor fuel pin bundle deformation under bundle/duct interaction conditions, the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute has developed the BAMBOO computer code. This code uses the three-dimensional beam element to calculate fuel pin bowing and cladding oval distortion as the primary deformation mechanisms in a fuel pin bundle. The pin dispersion, which is disarrangement of pins in a bundle and would occur during irradiation, was modeled in this code to evaluate its effect on bundle deformation. By applying the contact analysis method commonly used in the finite element method, this model considers the contact conditions at various axial positions as well as the nodal points and can analyze the irregular arrangement of fuel pins with the deviation of the wire configuration.The dispersion model was introduced in the BAMBOO code and verified by using the results of the out-of-pile compression test of the bundle, where the dispersion was caused by the deviation of the wire position. And the effect of the dispersion on the bundle deformation was evaluated based on the analysis results of the code.

  20. Nondestructive microimaging during preclinical pin-on-plate testing of novel materials for arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Langohr, G Daniel G; Medley, John B; Holdsworth, David W

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of micro-computed tomography to quantify wear in preclinical pin-on-plate testing of materials for use in joint arthroplasty. Wear testing of CoCr pins articulating against six polyetheretherketone plates was performed using a pin-on-plate apparatus over 2 million cycles. Change in volume due to wear was quantified with gravimetric analysis and with micro-computed tomography, and the volumes were compared. Separately, the volume of polyetheretherketone pin-on-plate specimens that had been soaking in fluid for 52 weeks was quantified with both gravimetric analysis and micro-computed tomography, and repeated after drying. The volume change with micro-computed tomography was compared to the mass change with gravimetric analysis. The mean wear volume measured was 8.02 ± 6.38 mm(3) with gravimetric analysis and 6.76 ± 5.38 mm(3) with micro-computed tomography (p = 0.06). Micro-computed tomography volume measurements did not show a statistically significant change with drying for either the plates (p = 0.60) or the pins (p = 0.09), yet drying had a significant effect on the gravimetric mass measurements for both the plates (p = 0.03) and the pins (p = 0.04). Micro-computed tomography provided accurate measurements of wear in polyetheretherketone pin-on-plate test specimens, and no statistically significant change was caused by fluid uptake. Micro-computed tomography quantifies wear depth and wear volume, mapped to the specific location of damage on the specimen, and is also capable of examining subsurface density as well as cracking. Its noncontact, nondestructive nature makes it ideal for preclinical testing of materials, in which further additional analysis techniques may be utilized.

  1. Measurement of the Modified Conversion Ratio of 238U by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry on AN Irradiated Fuel Pin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudelot, J. P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S.

    2003-06-01

    Within the frameworks of plutonium recycling, of transmutation, of waste management and of the increase of fuel loading length, controlling and improving the accuracy on 238U conversion ratio becomes necessary. Indeed, 238U neutron capture generates transuranian elements as for instance the isotopes of plutonium, americium or curium. This study focuses on a new technique for measuring by gamma-spectrometry, the modified conversion ratio of 238U defined as the ratio of the capture rate of 238U to the total fission rate, in an irradiated fuel pin of a critical assembly.

  2. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  3. Chemical thermodynamics of Cs and Te fission product interactions in irradiated LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, M. G.; Aitken, E. A.; Lindemer, T. B.

    1985-02-01

    A combination of fuel chemistry modelling and equilibrium thermodynamic calculations has been used to predict the atom ratios of Cs and Te fission products (Cs:Te) that find their way into the fuel-cladding interface region of irradiated stainless steel-clad mixed-oxide fast breeder reactor fuel pins. It has been concluded that the ratio of condensed, chemically-associated Cs and Te in the interface region,Čs:Te, which in turn determines the Te activity, is controlled by an equilibrium reaction between Cs 2Te and the oxide fuel, and that the value of Čs:Te is, depending on fuel 0:M, either equal to or slightly less than 2:1. Since Cs and Te fission products are both implicated as causative agents in FCCI (fission product-assisted inner surface attack of stainless steel cladding) and in FPLME (fission product-assisted liquid metal embrittlement of AISI-Type 316), the observed out-of-pile Cs:Te thresholds for FCCI (4˜:1) and FPLME (2˜:1) have been rationalized in terms of Cs:Te thermochemistry and phase equilibria. Also described in the paper is an updated chemical evolution model for reactive/volatile fission product behavior in irradiated oxide pins.

  4. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te).

    PubMed

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J C Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-05-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, J C, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because J C amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSe x Te1-x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or "columnar defects," plus a higher density of single atomic site "point" defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields.

  5. Imaging atomic-scale effects of high-energy ion irradiation on superconductivity and vortex pinning in Fe(Se,Te).

    PubMed

    Massee, Freek; Sprau, Peter Oliver; Wang, Yong-Lei; Davis, J C Séamus; Ghigo, Gianluca; Gu, Genda D; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2015-05-01

    Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, J C, is crucial to high-current applications of superconductivity. To achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high-current applications of iron-based superconductors because J C amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds, virtually nothing is known about the atomic-scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. We visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSe x Te1-x with 249-MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or "columnar defects," plus a higher density of single atomic site "point" defects probably from secondary scattering. We directly show that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former and suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest vortex pinning occurring at metallic core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of point-like defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields. PMID:26601180

  6. AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    John T. Maki

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

  7. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  8. LISA PathFinder radiation monitor proton irradiation test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, I.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Hollington, D.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.

    2012-06-01

    The design of the Radiation Monitor in the LISA Technology Package on board LISA Pathnder is based on two silicon PIN diodes, placed parallel to each other in a telescopic configuration. One of them is able to record spectral information of the particle hitting the diode. A test campaign for the flight model Radiation Monitor was done in the Paul Scherrer Institute Proton Irradiation Facility in September 2010. Its purpose was to check correct functionality of the Radiation Monitor under real high energy proton fluxes. Here we present the results of the experiments done and their assessment by means of a simulated flight model geometry using GEANT4 toolkit. No deviation from nominal RM performance was detected, which means the instrument is fully ready for flight.

  9. PIN photodiodes irradiated with 40- and 85-MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reft, C. S.; Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    PIN photodiodes were bombarded with 40- and 85-MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5 x 10 to the 11th p/sq cm, and the resulting change in spectral response in the near infrared was determined. The photocurrent, dark current, and pulse amplitude were measured as a function of proton fluence. Changes in these three measured properties are discussed in terms of changes in the diode's spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length, and depletion width. A simple model of induced radiation effects is presented which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The model assumes that incident protons produce charged defects within the depletion region simulating donor type impurities.

  10. BPX insulation irradiation program test results

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J. ); Kanemoto, G. ); Snook, P.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    The toroidal field coil insulation for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) is expected to receive a radiation dose of nearly 10{sup 10} rad and to withstand significant mechanical stresses. An irradiation test program was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) using the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) for irradiations to doses on the order of 3 {times} 10{sup 10} rad. The flexure and shear strength with compression of commercially procured sheet material were reported earlier. A second series of tests has been performed to slightly higher dose levels with vacuum impregnated materials, glass strand material, and Spaulrad-S sheet samples. Vacuum impregnation with a Shell 9405 resin and 9470 hardener was used to produce bonded copper squares and flexure samples of both pure resin and resin with S-glass. A new test fixture was developed to test the bonded samples in shear without applied compression. The Spaulrad-S flexure samples demonstrated a loss of strength with irradiation, similar to previous results. The pure resin lost nearly all flexibility, while the S-glass-reinforced samples retained between 30% and 40% of the initial flexure strength. The S-glass strands showed a 30% loss of strength at the higher dose level when tested in tension. The bonded copper squares had a low room-temperature shear strength of approximately 17 MPa before irradiation, which was unchanged in the irradiated samples. Shear testing of unirradiated bonded copper squares with ten different types of surface treatment revealed that the low shear strength resulted from the polyurethane primer used. In the later series of test, the epoxy-based primers and DZ-80 from Ciba-Geigy did much better, with shear strengths on the order of 40 MPa. These samples also demonstrated a resistance to cryogenic shock. One irradiated bonded sample was tested up 10 210 MPa in compression, the limit of the test fixture, without failure.

  11. Inert matrix fuel behaviour in test irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Streit, M.; Blair, P.; Tverberg, T.; Klaassen, F. C.; Schram, R. P. C.; Vettraino, F.; Yamashita, T.

    2006-06-01

    Among others, three large irradiation tests on inert matrix fuels have been performed during the last five years: the two irradiation tests IFA-651 and IFA-652 in the OECD Halden Material Test Reactor and the OTTO irradiation in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. While the OTTO irradiation is already completed, the other two irradiations are still ongoing. The objectives of the experiments differ: for OTTO, the focus was on the comparison of different concepts of IMF, i.e. homogeneous fuel versus different types of heterogeneous fuel. In IFA-651, single phase yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) doped with Pu is compared with MOX. In IFA-652, the potential of calcia stabilized zirconia (CSZ) as a matrix with and without thoria is evaluated. The design of the three experiments is explained and the current status is reviewed. The experiments show that the homogeneous, single phase YSZ-based or CSZ-based fuel show good and stable irradiation behaviour. It can be said that homogeneous stabilized zirconia based fuel is the most promising IMF concept for an LWR environment. Nevertheless, the fuel temperatures were relatively high due to the low thermal conductivity, potentially leading to high fission gas release, and must be taken into account in the fuel design.

  12. Nuclear fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Bramblett, Richard L.; Preskitt, Charles A.

    1987-03-03

    Systems and methods for inspection of nuclear fuel pins to determine fiss loading and uniformity. The system includes infeed mechanisms which stockpile, identify and install nuclear fuel pins into an irradiator. The irradiator provides extended activation times using an approximately cylindrical arrangement of numerous fuel pins. The fuel pins can be arranged in a magazine which is rotated about a longitudinal axis of rotation. A source of activating radiation is positioned equidistant from the fuel pins along the longitudinal axis of rotation. The source of activating radiation is preferably oscillated along the axis to uniformly activate the fuel pins. A detector is provided downstream of the irradiator. The detector uses a plurality of detector elements arranged in an axial array. Each detector element inspects a segment of the fuel pin. The activated fuel pin being inspected in the detector is oscillated repeatedly over a distance equal to the spacing between adjacent detector elements, thereby multiplying the effective time available for detecting radiation emissions from the activated fuel pin.

  13. Measurement of Diameter Changes during Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Crepeau, J. C.; Solstad, S.

    2015-03-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in advanced and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant dimensional and physical changes during irradiation. Currently in the US, such changes are measured by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and handling may disturb the phenomena of interest. In-pile detection of changes in geometry is sorely needed to understand real-time behavior during irradiation testing of fuels and materials in high flux US Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). This paper presents development results of an advanced Linear Variable Differential Transformer-based test rig capable of detecting real-time changes in diameter of fuel rods or material samples during irradiation in US MTRs. This test rig is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory and will provide experimenters with a unique capability to measure diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of fetal calf skull as a model for testing halo-pin designs for use in children.

    PubMed

    Beall, McPherson S; Copley, Lawson A B; Niemann, Joshua J; Lankachandra, Kamani; Williams, John L

    2007-01-01

    Rigid immobilization of the cervical spine in children is normally accomplished with a halo ring attached to the skull with pins. Concern exists about the risk of halo pin complications in small children due to their diminished skull thickness. More data are needed on biomechanical properties of the immature skull and on safe levels for halo pin penetration forces. The study included halo pin penetration tests on 43 skull samples obtained from eight fetal calves, radial compression tests of 11 skull samples, and histology. Compressive composite elastic modulus (15-139MPa), yield stress (1-5MPa) and composite consolidation modulus (188-479MPa) were measured in the skull's radial direction. Pin penetration force (F) in Newtons at a pin-penetration depth equal to the original skull thickness (T) in mm, was related to T as: F=100+4.3e(T) (R(2)=0.76, p<0.0001). However, the 95% confidence limits on individual predictions were wide, e.g., 0-475MPa for T=1.5mm and 0-700MPa for T=4mm. These results suggest that skull thickness cannot be reliably used to predict halo pin penetration loads in a skull with similar structural and mechanical properties to that of the fetal calf. Due to the lack of available human data for comparison, the relevance of using the fetal calf skull as a model for human infants and young children remains inconclusive. Clinical recommendations regarding pediatric halo pin penetration loads cannot be made without further study of children's skull structure and biomechanical properties.

  15. Aspheric surface testing by irradiance transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomali, Ramin; Darudi, Ahmad; Nasiri, Sadollah; Asgharsharghi Bonab, Armir

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a method for aspheric surface testing is presented. The method is based on solving the Irradiance Transport Equation (ITE).The accuracy of ITE normally depends on the amount of the pick to valley of the phase distribution. This subject is investigated by a simulation procedure.

  16. Experimental friction coefficients for bovine cartilage measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer: testing configuration and lubricant effects.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The friction coefficient between wet articular cartilage surfaces was measured using a pin-on-disk tribometer adopting different testing configurations: cartilage-on-pin vs. alumina-on-disk (CA); cartilage-on-pin vs. cartilage-on-disk (CC); and alumina-on-pin vs. cartilage-on-disk (AC). Several substances were dissolved in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution to act as lubricants: 10,000 molecular weight (MW) polyethylene glycol (PEG), 100,000 MW PEG, and chondroitin sulfate (CS), all at 100 mg/mL concentration. Scanning electron microscopy photographs of the cartilage specimens revealed limited wear due to the experiment. Conducting the experiments in PBS solutions we provide evidence according to which a commercial pin-on-disk tribometer allows us to assess different lubrication mechanisms active in cartilage. Specifically, we find that the measured friction coefficient strongly depends on the testing configuration. Our results show that the friction coefficient measured under CC and AC testing configurations remains very low as the sliding distance increases, probably because during the pin displacement the pores present in the cartilage replenish with PBS solution. Under such conditions the fluid phase supports a large load fraction for long times. By systematically altering the composition of the PBS solution we demonstrate the importance of solution viscosity in determining the measured friction coefficient. Although the friction coefficient remains low under the AC testing configuration in PBS, 100 mg/mL solutions of both CS and 100,000 MW PEG in PBS further reduce the friction coefficient by ~40%. Relating the measured friction coefficient to the Hersey number, our results are consistent with a Stribeck curve, confirming that the friction coefficient of cartilage under the AC testing configuration depends on a combination of hydrodynamic, boundary, and weep bearing lubrication mechanisms.

  17. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  18. Proton irradiation test on the flight model radiation monitor for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, I.; Lobo, A.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Wass, P. J.; Grimani, C.

    2010-05-01

    The design of the Radiation Monitor in the LISA Technology Package on board LISA Pathfinder is based on two silicon PIN diodes, placed parallel to each other in a telescopic configuration. One of them will be able to record spectral information of the particle hitting the diode. A test campaign for the Flight Model Radiation Monitor is proposed to verify its performance. This paper shows the results obtained with a simulated flight model geometry using GEANT4, to be compared with the real data that will be obtained in a proton irradiation facility.

  19. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  20. [The influence of irradiation into the wear behaviour of polyethylene (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ungethüm, M; Hinterberger, J

    1979-10-01

    Irradiated specimens of UHMW-PE have been tested by a "Pin-on-disc"-method against a metal pin. Increasing irradiation doses are leading to obviously increasing wear-rates. Irradiation in presence of nitrogen gives no advantage in comparison to normal air as an crosslinking agents, concerning tribological properties. PMID:549337

  1. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  2. Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-10-16

    This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

  3. Experimental testing of heavy ions mass search procedure in the measurements with PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Yu V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Ilić, S.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Malaza, V.; Mishinsky, G. V.; Strekalovsky, O. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the quality of heavy ions (HI) mass reconstruction in the wide range of HI energies and masses using Si PIN diodes for measuring both energy and time-of-flight. The results are based on the experimental data obtained at the IC-100 accelerator in the Flerov Laboratory of the JINR (Dubna, Russia).

  4. Measured and Simulated Dark J-V Characteristics of a-Si:H Single Junction p-i-n Solar Cells Irradiated with 40 keV Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth; Woodyard, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 40 keV electron irradiation on a-Si:H p-i-n single-junction solar cells was investigated using measured and simulated dark J-V characteristics. EPRI-AMPS and PC-1D simulators were explored for use in the studies. The EPRI-AMPS simulator was employed and simulator parameters selected to produce agreement with measured J-V characteristics. Three current mechanisms were evident in the measured dark J-V characteristics after electron irradiation, namely, injection, shunting and a term of the form CV(sup m). Using a single discrete defect state level at the center of the band gap, good agreement was achieved between measured and simulated J-V characteristics in the forward-bias voltage region where the dark current density was dominated by injection. The current mechanism of the form CV(sup m) was removed by annealing for two hours at 140 C. Subsequent irradiation restored the CV(sup m) current mechanism and it was removed by a second anneal. Some evidence of the CV(sup m) term is present in device simulations with a higher level of discrete density of states located at the center of the bandgap.

  5. Neutron Flux Characterization of Irradiation Holes for Irradiation Test at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO) is a unique research reactor in the Republic of Korea, and has been used for irradiation testing since 1998. To conduct irradiation tests for nuclear materials, the irradiation holes of CT and OR5 have been used due to a high fast-neutron flux. Because the neutron flux must be accurately calculated to evaluate the neutron fluence of irradiated material, it was conducted using MCNP. The neutron flux was measured using fluence monitor wires to verify the calculated result. Some evaluations have been conducted, however, more than 20% errors have frequently occurred at the OR irradiation hole, while a good agreement between the calculated and measured data was shown at the CT irradiation hole.

  6. Technical Review Report for the Justification for Shipment of Sodium-Bonded Carbide Fuel Pins in the T-3 Cask

    SciTech Connect

    West, M; DiSabatino, A

    2008-01-04

    This report documents the review of the Fluor Submittal (hereafter, the Submittal), prepared by Savannah River Packaging Technology (SRPT) of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), at the request of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office, for the shipment of unirradiated and irradiated sodium-bonded carbide fuel pins. The sodium-bonded carbide fuel pins are currently stored at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) awaiting shipment to Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Normally, modified contents are included into the next revision of the SARP. However, the contents, identified to be shipped from FFTF to Idaho National Laboratory, are a one-way shipment of 18 irradiated fuel pins and 7 unirradiated fuel pins, where the irradiated and unirradiated fuel pins are shipped separately, and can be authorized with a letter amendment to the existing Certificate of Compliance (CoC).

  7. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  8. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  9. SIMULATE-4 pin power calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Lindahl, S. Oe

    2006-07-01

    A new pin power reconstruction module has been implemented in Studsvik Scandpower's next generation nodal code, SIMULATE-4. Heterogeneous pin powers are calculated by modulating multi-group pin powers from the sub-mesh solver of SIMULATE-4 with pin form factors from single-assembly CASMO-5 lattice calculations. The multi-group pin power model captures instantaneous spectral effects, and actinide tracking on the assembly sub-mesh describes exposure-induced pin power variations. Model details and verification tests against high order multi-assembly transport methods are presented. The accuracy of the new methods is also demonstrated by comparing SIMULATE-4 calculations with measured critical experiment pin powers. (authors)

  10. Fuel pin failure in the PFR/TREAT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, R.; Hunter, C.W.; Kramer, J.M.; Wood, M.H.; Wright, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    The PFR/TREAT safety testing programme involves the transient testing of fresh and pre-irradiated UK and US fuel pins. This paper summarizes the experimental and calculational results obtained to date on fuel pin failure during transient overpower (resulting from an accidental addition of resolivity) and transient undercooling followed by overpower (arising from an accidental stoppage of the primary sodium circulating pumps) accidents. Companion papers at this conference address: (I) the progress and future plans of the programme, and (II) post-failure material movements.

  11. Discuss the testing problems of ultraviolet irradiance meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun'an; Lin, Fangsheng

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet irradiance meters are widely used in many areas such as medical treatment, epidemic prevention, energy conservation and environment protection, computers, manufacture, electronics, ageing of material and photo-electric effect, for testing ultraviolet irradiance intensity. So the accuracy of value directly affects the sterile control in hospital, treatment, the prevention level of CDC and the control accuracy of curing and aging in manufacturing industry etc. Because the display of ultraviolet irradiance meters is easy to change, in order to ensure the accuracy, it needs to be recalibrated after being used period of time. By the comparison with the standard ultraviolet irradiance meters, which are traceable to national benchmarks, we can acquire the correction factor to ensure that the instruments working under accurate status and giving the accurate measured data. This leads to an important question: what kind of testing device is more accurate and reliable? This article introduces the testing method and problems of the current testing device for ultraviolet irradiance meters. In order to solve these problems, we have developed a new three-dimensional automatic testing device. We introduce structure and working principle of this system and compare the advantages and disadvantages of two devices. In addition, we analyses the errors in the testing of ultraviolet irradiance meters.

  12. Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2006-10-01

    Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

  13. Irradiation testing of high density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-10-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 microplates. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U{sub 2}Mo, or U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of 40% and 80%. Of particular interest is the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions.

  14. USE OF SILICON CARBIDE MONITORS IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; B. Chase; T. Unruh; D. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. For example, silicon carbide (SiC) monitors are now available to detect peak irradiation temperatures between 200°C and 800°C. Using a resistance measurement approach, specialized equipment installed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) and specialized procedures were developed to ensure that accurate peak irradiation temperature measurements are inferred from SiC monitors irradiated at the ATR. Comparison examinations were completed by INL to demonstrate this capability, and several programs currently rely on SiC monitors for peak temperature detection. This paper discusses the use of SiC monitors at the ATR, the process used to evaluate them at the HTTL, and presents representative measurements taken using SiC monitors.

  15. J{sub c} and vortex pinning enhancements in Bi-, Tl-, and Hg-based cuprate superconductors via GeV proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R. |; Ossandon, J.G.; Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Song, K.J.; Christen, D.K.; Paranthaman, M.; Wu, J.Z.; Ullmann, J.L.

    1997-12-01

    Randomly oriented columnar defects provide an efficient mechanism for stabilizing the magnetic flux and current density in a variety of high-{Tc} superconductors. Protons with 0.8 GeV energy cause heavy constituent nuclei (Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi,...) to fission and the resultant fragments generate isotropically distributed columnar tracks. The main results are a significant enhancement of the persistent current density J, a shift of the irreversibility line towards higher fields and temperatures, and a marked reduction in the rate of current decay with time. With increasing crystalline disorder, {Tc} decreases at the rate of {approximately} 0.1--1 K per 10{sup 16} proton/cm{sup 2}. The optimal proton fluence lies in the range of (5--20) x 10{sup 16} p/cm{sup 2}. At these levels, J is enhanced by one or more orders of magnitude compared with unirradiated virgin materials and can be significantly large at T {ge} 100 K in tesla fields. In addition, the logarithmic decay rate dln(J/dln(t)) is diminished. By analyzing the decay rate of J with time in a Maley framework, the authors obtain the effective pinning energy U(J) of irradiated materials for comparison with the virgin superconductors.

  16. Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Carlo; Cadoni, Ezio; Solomos, George

    2014-05-13

    A brief review of the technological advances of the Hopkinson bar technique in tension for the study of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and the development of this technology for large specimens is presented. Comparisons are made of the dynamic behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated materials previously subjected to creep, low cycle fatigue and irradiation (2, 10 and 30 displacements per atom). In particular, complete results of the effect of irradiation on the dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304L steel, tested at 20, 400 and 550°C are presented. These high strain rate tests have been performed with a modified Hopkinson bar (MHB), installed inside a hot cell. Examples of testing large nuclear steel specimens with a very large Hopkinson bar are also shown. The results overall demonstrate the capability of the MHB to efficiently reproduce the material stress conditions in case of accidental internal and external dynamic loadings in nuclear reactors, thus contributing to the important process of their structural assessment.

  17. Dowel pin

    DOEpatents

    Wojcik, Thaddeus A.

    1978-01-01

    Two abutting members are locked together by reaming a hole entirely through one member and at least partly through the other, machining a circular groove in each through hole just below the surface of the member, press fitting a dowel pin having a thin wall extension on at least one end thereof into the hole in both members, a thin wall extension extending into each through hole, crimping or snapping the thin wall extension into the grooves to positively lock the dowel pin in place and, if necessary, tack welding the end of the thin-wall extension in place.

  18. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2007-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR’s unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments.

  19. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC – formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world’s data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities1. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens.

  20. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  1. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damagemore » around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.« less

  2. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: 1. Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. 2. Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. 3. Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tristructural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S.-produced fuel.

  3. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel.

  4. TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

  5. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  6. In situ nano-compression testing of irradiated copper

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, D.; Hosemann, P.; Maloy, S. A.; Minor, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing demand for energy and reduction of CO2 emissions has revived interest in nuclear energy. Designing materials for radiation environments necessitates fundamental understanding of how radiation-induced defects alter mechanical properties. Ion beams create radiation damage efficiently without material activation, but their limited penetration depth requires small-scale testing. However, strength measurements of nano-scale irradiated specimens have not been previously performed. Here we show that yield strengths approaching macroscopic values are measured from irradiated ~400 nm diameter copper specimens. Quantitative in situ nano-compression testing in a transmission electron microscope reveals that the strength of larger samples is controlled by dislocation-irradiation defect interactions, yielding size-independent strengths. Below ~400 nm, size-dependent strength results from dislocation source limitation. This transition length-scale should be universal, but depend on material and irradiation conditions. We conclude that for irradiated copper, and presumably related materials, nano-scale in situ testing can determine bulk-like yield strengths and simultaneously identify deformation mechanisms. PMID:21706011

  7. Self-shearing retentive pins: a laboratory evaluation of pin channel penetration before shearing.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1979-09-01

    This laboratory study determined the depth reached by self-shearing pins in dentin pin channels. Pin channels were prepared with the self-limiting shoulder twist drill for each of the four systems tested. Mean channel depth reached for the various pin systems was: Stabilok (small), 2.31 mm; Stabilok (medium), 1.78 mm; Reten Pin, 1.40 mm; and TMS (Regular), 2.04 mm. A coparison was also made by calculating the mean percent of penetration in relation to the depth of prepared pin channel: Stabilok (small), 92.50%; Stabilok (medium), 63.62%; Reten Pin, 66.67%; and TMS (Regular) 81.75%.

  8. Metallographic analysis of irradiated RERTR-3 fuel test specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.; Clark, C. R.; Stuart, J. R.

    2000-11-08

    The RERTR-3 irradiation test was designed to investigate the irradiation behavior of aluminum matrix U-MO alloy dispersion fuels under high-temperature, high-fission-rate conditions. Initial postirradiation examination of RERTR-3 fuel specimens has concentrated on binary U-MO atomized fuels. The rate of matrix aluminum depletion was found to be higher than predictions based on low temperature irradiation data. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (WDS) indicates that aluminum is present in the interior of the fuel particles. WDS data is supported by a mass and volume balance calculation performed on the basis of image analysis results. The depletion of matrix aluminum seems to have no detrimental effects on fuel performance under the conditions tested to date.

  9. The Development of a Pin-on-Twin Scuffing Test to Evaluate Materials for Heavy Duty Diesel Fuel Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, John J.; Ott, Ronald D

    2007-01-01

    In order to meet stricter emissions requirements, advanced heavy-duty diesel fuel injection systems will be required to operate at higher pressures and temperatures and in fuels that have poorer lubricity. Scuffing, as a mode of failure, severely limits injector life, and new materials and processes are required to resist scuffing in these more stringent operating conditions. Consequently, there is a need to test the ability of candidate fuel system materials to resist scuffing in fuel-lubricated environments. This paper describes a pin-on-twin reciprocating wear test in which a cylindrical specimen slides, under load, across two fixed, parallel cylindrical specimens that are perpendicular to the axis of the upper sliding specimen. Cylinders of annealed AISI 52100 were tested dry and lubricated by Jet A fuel and on-highway no. 2 diesel fuel. The friction force was found to give a reliable real-time determination of the onset of scuffing as verified by the morphology of the wear scar. The scar width and surface roughness profiles either did not reliably detect the onset or were difficult to carry out with this geometry.

  10. Micromechanical tests of ion irradiated materials: Atomistic simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigated irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloys by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. We modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We could extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. SiC micro-pillars of various sizes were fabricated by mask and inductively coupled plasma etching technique and compressed by using flat punch nano-indentation. Compressive fracture strength showed a clear specimen size effect. Brittle-to-Ductile transition at room temperature was observed as the specimen size decreases. The effect of irradiation on the fracture strength of SiC micro-pillars was evaluated by performing ion irradiation with Si ions. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nano-indentation and nano-pillar compression tests. Radiation effect was observed which is found to be due to the interaction of dislocations nucleated by spherical indenter with pre-existing radiation defects (voids). These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials. (authors)

  11. Production of LEU Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Irradiation Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Kiggans Jr, James O; McMurray, Jake W; Jolly, Brian C; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Trammell, Michael P; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles embedded inside a SiC matrix. This fuel inherently possesses multiple barriers to fission product release, namely the various coating layers in the TRISO fuel particle as well as the dense SiC matrix that hosts these particles. This coupled with the excellent oxidation resistance of the SiC matrix and the SiC coating layer in the TRISO particle designate this concept as an accident tolerant fuel (ATF). The FCM fuel takes advantage of uranium nitride kernels instead of oxide or oxide-carbide kernels used in high temperature gas reactors to enhance heavy metal loading in the highly moderated LWRs. Production of these kernels with appropriate density, coating layer development to produce UN TRISO particles, and consolidation of these particles inside a SiC matrix have been codified thanks to significant R&D supported by US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program. Also, surrogate FCM pellets (pellets with zirconia instead of uranium-bearing kernels) have been neutron irradiated and the stability of the matrix and coating layer under LWR irradiation conditions have been established. Currently the focus is on production of LEU (7.3% U-235 enrichment) FCM pellets to be utilized for irradiation testing. The irradiation is planned at INL s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This is a critical step in development of this fuel concept to establish the ability of this fuel to retain fission products under prototypical irradiation conditions.

  12. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  13. Energy efficient engine pin fin and ceramic composite segmented liner combustor sector rig test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubiel, D. J.; Lohmann, R. P.; Tanrikut, S.; Morris, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored Energy Efficient Engine program, Pratt and Whitney has successfully completed a comprehensive test program using a 90-degree sector combustor rig that featured an advanced two-stage combustor with a succession of advanced segmented liners. Building on the successful characteristics of the first generation counter-parallel Finwall cooled segmented liner, design features of an improved performance metallic segmented liner were substantiated through representative high pressure and temperature testing in a combustor atmosphere. This second generation liner was substantially lighter and lower in cost than the predecessor configuration. The final test in this series provided an evaluation of ceramic composite liner segments in a representative combustor environment. It was demonstrated that the unique properties of ceramic composites, low density, high fracture toughness, and thermal fatigue resistance can be advantageously exploited in high temperature components. Overall, this Combustor Section Rig Test program has provided a firm basis for the design of advanced combustor liners.

  14. Insulation interlaminar shear strength testing with compression and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Brasier, J.E.; Snook, P.; Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID; Princeton Univ., NJ )

    1989-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) project identified the need for research and development for the insulation to be used in the toroidal field coils. The requirements included tolerance to a combination of high compression and shear and a high radiation dose. Samples of laminate-type sheet material were obtained from commercial vendors. The materials included various combinations of epoxy, polyimide, E-glass, S-glass, and T-glass. The T-glass was in the form of a three-dimensional weave. The first tests were with 50 {times} 25 {times} 1 mm samples. These materials were loaded in compression and then to failure in shear. At 345-MPa compression, the interlaminar shear strength was generally in the range of 110 to 140 MPa for the different materials. A smaller sample configuration was developed for irradiation testing. The data before irradiation were similar to those for the larger samples but approximately 10% lower. Limited fatigue testing was also performed by cycling the shear load. No reduction in shear strength was found after 50,000 cycles at 90% of the failure stress. Because of space limitations, only three materials were chosen for irradiation: two polyimide systems and one epoxy system. All used boron-free glass. The small shear/compression samples and some flexure specimens were irradiated to 4 {times} 10{sup 9} and 2 {times} 10{sup 10} rad in the Advanced Technology Reactor at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. A lead shield was used to ensure that the majority of the dose was from neutrons. The shear strength with compression before and after irradiation at the lower dose was determined. Flexure strength and the results from irradiation at the higher dose level will be available in the near future. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Shock characterization of toad pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degree}, 60{degree} and 80{degree}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degree}C (125{degree}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degree}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degree}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Shock characterization of TOAD pins

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Navarro, N.J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to characterize Time Of Arrival Detectors (TOAD) pins response to shock loading with respect to risetime, amplitude, repeatability and consistency. TOAD pins were subjected to impacts of 35 to 420 kilobars amplitude and approximately 1 ms pulse width to investigate the timing spread of four pins and the voltage output profile of the individual pins. Sets of pins were also aged at 45{degrees}, 60{degrees}, and 80{degrees}C for approximately nine weeks before shock testing at 315 kilobars impact stress. Four sets of pins were heated to 50.2{degrees}C (125{degrees}F) for approximately two hours and then impacted at either 50 or 315 kilobars. Also, four sets of pins were aged at 60{degrees}C for nine weeks and then heated to 50.2{degrees}C before shock testing at 50 and 315 kilobars impact stress, respectively. Particle velocity measurements at the contact point between the stainless steel targets and TOAD pins were made using a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) to monitor both the amplitude and profile of the shock waves.

  17. Fusion materials irradiation test facility test-cell instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, J. L.; Burke, R. J.

    1982-05-01

    Many of the facility instrumentation components and systems currently under development, though specifically designed for FMIT purposes, are similar to those useful for fusion reactors. Various ceramic-insulated signal-cable components are being evaluated for 14-MeV neutron tolerance. Thermocouples are shown to decalibrate in high energy fields. Nondestructive optical viewing of deuteron-induced residual gas flow is planned for beam profiling in real space and phase space. Various optics were irradiated to 10(18) n/cm(2) at 14 MeV with good results. Feasibility of neutron and gamma field imaging was demonstrated using pinhole collimator and microchannel plate devices. Infrared thermography and optical monitoring of the target surface is being investigated. Considerable experience on the compatibility of optical and insulator materials with (highly reactive) lithium was obtained.

  18. Irradiation testing of an asphalt-based grout vault sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    In general, Nokorode 705M (a) showed only minimal effects from irradiation at the levels calculated for a 300-year lifetime, while in contact with the basic fluids expected in actual use. In no instance was loss of adhesion on concrete or loss of water tightness encountered in this testing. In contrast to simpler materials tested over 30 years ago, the Nokorode showed only small changes in density and virtually no changes in the mechanical properties examined. The much higher dose rate used to perform these tests within a reasonable time presumably amplified all irradiation effects, and nevertheless produced no changes which would make the material obviously unsuitable for its intended use. Although the effects observed were not examined in enough detail to determine the dominant degradation mechanism(s), the material is qualified from an engineering point of view.

  19. Evaluation of irradiated fuel during RIA simulation tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1996-08-01

    A critical assessment of the RIA-simulation experiments performed to date on previously irradiated test rods is presented. Included in this assessment are the SPERT-CDC, the NSRR, and the CABRI REP Na experimental programs. Information was collected describing the base irradiation, test rod characterization, and test procedures and conditions. The representativeness of the test rods and test conditions to anticipated LWR RIA accident conditions was evaluated using analysis results from fuel behavior and three-dimensional spatial kinetics simulations. It was shown that the pulse characteristics and coolant conditions are significantly different from those anticipated in an LWR-Furthermore, the unrepresentative test conditions were found to exaggerate the mechanisms that caused cladding failure. The data review identified several test rods which contained unusual cladding damage incurred prior to the RIA-simulation test that produced the observed failures. The mechanisms responsible for the observed test rod failures have been shown to result from processes that have a second order effect of burnup. A correlation with burnup could not be appropriately established for the fuel enthalpy at failure. However, the successful test rods can be used to construct a conservative region of success for fuel rod behavior during an RIA event.

  20. Nondestrucive analysis of fuel pins

    DOEpatents

    Stepan, I.E.; Allard, N.P.; Suter, C.R.

    1972-11-03

    Disclosure is made of a method and a correspondingly adapted facility for the nondestructive analysis of the concentation of fuel and poison in a nuclear reactor fuel pin. The concentrations of fuel and poison in successive sections along the entire length of the fuel pin are determined by measuring the reactivity of a thermal reactor as each successive small section of the fuel pin is exposed to the neutron flux of the reactor core and comparing the measured reactivity with the reactivities measured for standard fuel pins having various known concentrations. Only a small section of the length of the fuel pin is exposed to the neutron flux at any one time while the remainder of the fuel pin is shielded from the neutron flux. In order to expose only a small section at any one time, a boron-10-lined dry traverse tube is passed through the test region within the core of a low-power thermal nuclear reactor which has a very high fuel sensitivity. A narrow window in the boron-10 lining is positioned at the core center line. The fuel pins are then systematically traversed through the tube past the narrow window such that successive small sections along the length of the fuel pin are exposed to the neutron flux which passes through the narrow window.

  1. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsell, Brian; Campbell, Michael; Fitton, Michael; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; Nakadaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  2. Photopatch and UV-irradiated patch testing in photosensitive dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Thomas, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: The photopatch test is used to detect photoallergic reactions to various antigens such as sunscreens and drugs. Photosensitive dermatitis can be caused due to antigens like parthenium, fragrances, rubbers and metals. The photopatch test does not contain these antigens. Therefore, the Indian Standard Series (ISS) along with the Standard photopatch series from Chemotechnique Diagnostics, Sweden was used to detect light induced antigens. Aim: To detect light induced antigens in patients with photosensitive dermatitis. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive, observer blinded manner. Photopatch test and ISS were applied in duplicate on the patient's back by the standard method. After 24 hours, readings were recorded according to ICDRG criteria. One side was closed and other side irradiated with 14 J/cm2 of UVA and a second set of readings were recorded after 48 hrs. Result: The highest positivity was obtained with parthenium, with 18 out of 35 (51%) patients showing a positive patch test reaction with both photoallergic contact dermatitis and photoaggravation. Four patients (11%) showed positive patch test reaction suggestive of contact dermatitis to potassium dichromate and fragrance mix. Six patients had contact dermatitis to numerous antigens such as nickel, cobalt, chinoform and para-phenylenediamine. None of these patients showed photoaggravation on patch testing. Conclusion: Parthenium was found to cause photoallergy, contact dermatitis with photoaggravation and contact allergy. Hence, photopatch test and UV irradiated patch test can be an important tool to detect light induced antigens in patients with photosensitive dermatitis. PMID:26955581

  3. Neutron irradiation and compatibility testing of Li 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Krsul, J. R.; Laug, M. T.; Walters, L. C.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-05-01

    A study was made of the neutron irradiation behavior of 6Li-enriched Li 2O in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test the compatibility of Li 2O with a variety of stainless steels. The irradiation tests showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li 2O (˜ 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure, and the retentions appear to approach a steady-state after ˜ 1% 6Li burnup. The stress corrosion studies, using 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li 2O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe because a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time which greatly reduced corrosion rates.

  4. Super-flat wafer chucks: from simulation and testing to a complete 300mm wafer chuck with low wafer deformation between pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Renate; Afanasiev, Kanstantin; Ziemann, Marcel; Schmidt, Volker

    2014-04-01

    Berliner Glas is a privately owned, mid-sized manufacturer of precision opto-mechanics in Germany. One specialty of Berliner Glas is the design and production of high performance vacuum and electrostatic wafer chucks. Driven by the need of lithography and inspection for smaller overlay values, we pursue the production of an ideally flat wafer chuck. An ideally flat wafer chuck holds a wafer with a completely flat backside and without lateral distortion within the wafer surface. Key parameters in influencing the wafer chucks effective flatness are thermal performance and thermal management, roughness of the surface, choice of materials and the contact area between wafer and wafer chuck. In this presentation we would like to focus on the contact area. Usually this is decreased as much as possible to avoid sticking effects and the chance of trapped particles between the chuck surface and the backside of the wafer. This can be realized with a pin structure on the chuck surface. Making the pins smaller and moving pins further apart from each other makes the contact area ever smaller but also adds new challenges to achieve a flat and undistorted wafer on the chuck. We would like to address methods of designing and evaluating such a pin structure. This involves not only the capability to simulate the ideal pattern of pins on the chuck's surface, for which we will present 2D and 3D simulation results. As well, we would like to share first results of our functional models. Finally, measurement capability has to be ensured, which means improving and further development of Fizeau flatness test interferometers.

  5. Radiation hardness characteristics of Si-PIN radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee; Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Han Soo; Ha, Jang Ho

    2015-06-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors with low leakage current, high resistivity (>11 kΩ cm) and low capacitance for high-energy physics and X-ray spectroscopy. Floating-zone (FZ) 6-in. diameter N-type silicon wafers, with <1 1 1> crystal orientation and 675 μm thick, were used in the detector fabrication. The active areas are 3 mm×3 mm, 5 mm×5 mm and 10 mm×10 mm. We used a double deep-diffused structure at the edge of the active area for protection from the surface leakage path. We also compared the electrical performance of the Si-PIN detector with anti-reflective coating (ARC). For a detector with an active area of 3 mm×3 mm, the leakage current is about 1.9 nA and 7.4 nA at a 100 V reverse bias voltage, and 4.6 pF and 4.4 pF capacitance for the detector with and without an ARC, respectively. In addition, to compare the energy resolution in terms of radiation hardness, we measured the energy spectra with 57Co and 133Ba before the irradiation. Using developed preamplifiers (KAERI-PA1) that have ultra-low noise and high sensitivity, and a 3 mm×3 mm Si-PIN radiation detector, we obtained energy resolutions with 122 keV of 57Co and 81 keV of 133Ba of 0.221 keV and 0.261 keV, respectively. After 10, 100, 103, 104 and 105 Gy irradiation, we tested the characteristics of the radiation hardness on the Si-PIN radiation detectors in terms of electrical and energy spectra performance changes. The fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors are working well under high dose irradiation conditions.

  6. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  7. Updated FY12 Ceramic Fuels Irradiation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    2012-05-24

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is currently devoting resources to study of numerous fuel types with the aim of furthering understanding applicable to a range of reactors and fuel cycles. In FY11, effort within the ceramic fuels campaign focused on planning and preparation for a series of rabbit irradiations to be conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The emphasis of these planned tests was to study the evolution of thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide and derivative compositions as a function of damage induced by neutron damage. Current fiscal realities have resulted in a scenario where completion of the planned rabbit irradiations is unlikely. Possibilities for execution of irradiation testing within the ceramic fuels campaign in the next several years will thus likely be restricted to avenues where strong synergies exist both within and outside the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Opportunities to augment the interests and needs of modeling, advanced characterization, and other campaigns present the most likely avenues for further work. These possibilities will be pursued with the hope of securing future funding. Utilization of synthetic microstructures prepared to better understand the most relevant actors encountered during irradiation of ceramic fuels thus represents the ceramic fuel campaign's most efficient means to enhance understanding of fuel response to burnup. This approach offers many of the favorable attributes embraced by the Separate Effects Testing paradigm, namely production of samples suitable to study specific, isolated phenomena. The recent success of xenon-imbedded thick films is representative of this approach. In the coming years, this strategy will be expanded to address a wider range of problems in conjunction with use of national user facilities novel characterization techniques to best utilize programmatic resources to support a science-based research program.

  8. Proposed Design and Operation of a Heat Pipe Reactor using the Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Test Facility and Existing UZrH Fuel Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Pandya, Tara; Peters, Curtis

    2005-02-01

    Heat Pipe Reactors (HPR) for space power conversion systems offer a number of advantages not easily provided by other systems. They require no pumping, their design easily deals with freezing and thawing of the liquid metal, and they can provide substantial levels of redundancy. Nevertheless, no reactor has ever been operated and cooled with heat pipes, and the startup and other operational characteristics of these systems remain largely unknown. Signification deviations from normal reactor heat removal mechanisms exist, because the heat pipes have fundamental heat removal limits due to sonic flow issues at low temperatures. This paper proposes an early prototypic test of a Heat Pipe Reactor (using existing 20% enriched nuclear fuel pins) to determine the operational characteristics of the HPR. The proposed design is similar in design to the HOMER and SAFE-300 HPR designs (Elliot, Lipinski, and Poston, 2003; Houts, et. al, 2003). However, this reactor uses existing UZrH fuel pins that are coupled to potassium heat pipes modules. The prototype reactor would be located in the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor Facility where the fuel pins currently reside. The proposed reactor would use the heat pipes to transport the heat from the UZrH fuel pins to a water pool above the core, and the heat transport to the water pool would be controlled by adjusting the pressure and gas type within a small annulus around each heat pipe. The reactor would operate as a self-critical assembly at power levels up to 200 kWth. Because the nuclear heated HPR test uses existing fuel and because it would be performed in an existing facility with the appropriate safety authorization basis, the test could be performed rapidly and inexpensively. This approach makes it possible to validate the operation of a HPR and also measure the feedback mechanisms for a typical HPR design. A test of this nature would be the world's first operating Heat Pipe Reactor. This reactor is therefore called "HPR-1".

  9. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  10. Characterization of nuclear transmutations in materials irradiated test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents a comparison of nuclear transmutation rates for candidate fusion first wall/blanket structural materials in available, fission test reactors with those produced in a typical fusion spectrum. The materials analyzed in this study include a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti), a reduced activation martensitic steel (Fe-9Cr-2WVTa), a high conductivity copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr), and the SiC compound. The fission irradiation facilities considered include the EBR-II fast reactor, and two high flux mixed spectrum reactors, HFIR (High Flux Irradiation Reactor) and SM-3 (Russian reactor). The transmutation and dpa rates that occur in these test reactors are compared with the calculated transmutation and dpa rates characteristic of a D-T fusion first wall spectrum. In general, past work has shown that the displacement damage produced in these fission reactors can be correlated to displacement damage in a fusion spectrum; however, the generation of helium and hydrogen through threshold reactions [(n,x,{alpha}) and (n,xp)] are much higher in a fusion spectrum. As shown in this study, the compositional changes for several candidate structural materials exposed to a fast fission reactor spectrum are very low, similar to those for a characteristic fusion spectrum. However, the relatively high thermalized spectrum of a mixed spectrum reactor produces transmutation rates quite different from the ones predicted for a fusion reactor, resulting in substantial differences in the final composition of several candidate alloys after relatively short irradiation time.

  11. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Furstenau, R.V.; Ingrahm, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA and is owned and regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). The ATR is operated for the US DOE by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies. In recent years, prime irradiation space in the ATR has been made available for use by customers having irradiation service needs in addition to the reactor`s principal user, the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. To enhance the reactor`s capabilities, the US DOE has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and temperature control for up to 28 experiments. The ATR-ITV will have the flexibility to simultaneously support a variety of experiments requiring fast, thermal or mixed spectrum neutron environments. Temperature control is accomplished by varying the thermal conductivity across a gas gap established between the experiment specimen capsule wall and the experiment `in-pile tube (IPT)` inside diameter. Thermal conductivity is adjusted by alternating the control gas mixture ratio of two gases with different thermal conductivities.

  12. Insulation irradiation test programme for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManamy, T. J.; Kanemoto, G.; Snook, P.

    The electrical insulation for the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is expected to be exposed to radiation doses of the order of 10 10 rad with ≈ 90% of the dose from neutrons. The coils are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and then heated during the pulse to a peak temperature ; 300 K. In a programme to evaluate the effects of radiation exposure on the insulators, three types of boron-free insulation were irradiated at room temeprature in the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) and tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The materials were Spaulrad-S, Shikishima PG5-1 and Shikishima PG3-1. The first two use a bismaleimide resin and the third an aromatic amine hardened epoxy. Spaulrad-S is a two-dimensional (2-D) weave of S-glass, while the others are 3-D weaves of T-glass. Flexure and shear/compression samples were irradiated to ≈ 5 × 10 9 and 3 × 10 10 rad with 35-40% of the total dose from neutrons. The shear/compression samples were tested in pairs by applying an average compression of 345 MPa and then a shear load. After static tests were completed, fatigue testing was performed by cycling the shear load for up to 30 000 cycles with a constant compression. The static shear strength of the samples that did not fail was then determined. Generally, shear strengths of the order of 120 MPa were measured. The behaviour of the flexure and shear/compression samples was significantly different; large reductions in the flexure strength were observed, while the shear strength stayed the same or increased slightly. The 3-D weave material demonstrated higher strength and significantly less radiation damage than the 2-D material in flexure but performed almost identically when tested with combined shear and compression. The epoxy system was much more sensitive to fatigue damage than the bismaleimide materials. No swelling was measured; however, the epoxy samples did twist slightly. Shear tests of bonded samples without

  13. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation.

  14. Can pin-on-disk testing be used to assess the wear performance of retrieved UHMWPE components for total joint arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Steven M; MacDonald, Daniel W; Kocagöz, Sevi; Tohfafarosh, Mariya; Baykal, Doruk

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the suitability of using multidirectional pin-on-disk (POD) testing to characterize wear behavior of retrieved ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The POD wear behavior of 25 UHMWPE components, retrieved after 10 years in vivo, was compared with 25 that were shelf aged for 10-15 years in their original packaging. Components were gamma sterilized (25-40 kGy) in an air or reduced oxygen (inert) package. 9 mm diameter pins were fabricated from each component and evaluated against CoCr disks using a super-CTPOD with 100 stations under physiologically relevant, multidirectional loading conditions. Bovine serum (20 g/L protein concentration) was used as lubricant. Volumetric wear rates were found to vary based on the aging environment, as well as sterilization environment. Volumetric wear rates were the lowest for the pins in the gamma inert, shelf aged cohort. These results support the utility of using modern, multidirectional POD testing with a physiologic lubricant as a novel method for evaluating wear properties of retrieved UHMWPE components. The data also supported the hypothesis that wear rates of gamma-inert liners were lower than gamma-air liners for both retrieved and shelf aging conditions. However, this difference was not statistically significant for the retrieved condition.

  15. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  16. Calculation of the Fast Flux Test Facility fuel pin tests with the WIMS-E and MCNP codes

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.; Wittekind, W.D.; Toffer, H.

    1991-10-01

    The Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) at the Fast Flux Test Facility site on the Hanford Site at Richland, Washington currently is being prepared to fabricate mixed oxide fuel (U, Pu) for the FFTF. Calculational tools are required to perform criticality safety analyses for various process locations and to establish safe limits for fissile material handling at the FAA. These codes require validation against experimental data appropriate for the compositions that will be handled. Critical array experiments performed by Bierman provide such data for mixed oxide fuel in the range Pu/(U+Pu) = 22 wt %, and with Pu-240 contents equal to 12 wt %. Both the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) and the Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS-E) computer codes were used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for explicit models of the various critical arrays. The W-CACTUS modules within the WIMS-E code system was used to calculate k{infinity} for the explicit array configuration, as well as few-group cross sections that were then used in a three-dimensional diffusion theory code for the calculation of k{sub eff} for the finite array. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  18. Anisotropic flux pinning in high Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleśnik, S.; Igalson, J.; Skośkiewicz, T.; Szymczak, R.; Baran, M.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of the results of FC magnetization measurements on several PbSr(Y,Ca)CuO crystals representing various levels of flux pinning. The pinning centers in our crystals have been set up during the crystal growth process or introduced by neutron irradiation. Some possible explanations of the observed effects, including surface barrier, flux-center distribution and sample-shape effects, are discussed.

  19. Fabrication of FFTF fuel pin wire wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Lateral spacing between FFTF fuel pins is required to provide a passageway for the sodium coolant to flow over each pin to remove heat generated by the fission process. This spacing is provided by wrapping each fuel pin with type 316 stainless steel wire. This wire has a 1.435mm (0.0565 in.) to 1.448mm (0.0570 in.) diameter, contains 17 +- 2% cold work and was fabricated and tested to exacting RDT Standards. About 500 kg (1100 lbs) or 39 Km (24 miles) of fuel pin wrap wire is used in each core loading. Fabrication procedures and quality assurance tests are described.

  20. Failure Analysis of Electrical Pin Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Smith, Stephen W.; Herath, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine the root cause of failure for circuit board electrical connection pins that failed during vibRatory testing. The circuit board is part of an unmanned space probe, and the vibratory testing was performed to ensure component survival of launch loading conditions. The results of this study show that the pins failed as a result of fatigue loading.

  1. The insulation irradiation test program for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J. ); Kanemoto, G. ); Snook, P. )

    1990-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is expected to be exposed to radiation doses on the order of 10{sup 10} rad with {approx}90% of the dose from neutrons. The coils are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature and then heated during the pulse to a peak temperature >300 K. In a program to evaluate the effects of radiation exposure on the insulators, three types of boron-free insulation were irradiated at room temperature in the Advanced Technology Reactor (ATR) and tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The materials were Spaulrad-S, Shikishima PG5-1, and Shikishima PG3-1. The first two use a bismaleimide resin and the third an aromatic amine hardened epoxy. Spaulrad-S is a two-dimensional (2-D) weave of S-glass, while the others are 3-D weaves of T-glass. Flexure and shear/compression samples were irradiated to approximately 5 {times} 10{sup 9} rad and 3 {times} 10{sup 10} rad with 35 to 40% of the total dose from neutrons. The shear/compression samples were tested in pairs by applying an average compression of 345 MPa and then a shear load. After static tests were completed, fatigue testing was done by cycling the shear load for up to 30,000 cycles with a constant compression. The static shear strength of the samples that did not fail was then determined. Generally, shear strengths on the order of 120 MPa were measured. The behavior of the flexure and shear/compression samples was significantly different; large reductions in the flexure strength were observed, while the shear strength stayed the same or increased slightly. The 3-D weave material demonstrated higher strength and significantly less radiation damage than the 2-D material in flexure but performed nearly identically when tested with combined shear and compression. The epoxy system was much more sensitive to fatigue damage than the bismaleimide materials. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List III, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  3. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    DOE PAGES

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List III, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results showmore » that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.« less

  4. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose ion irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in irradiative environments. Three different tapes, each with unique and tailored as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in, for example, a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that, at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  5. Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo; Park, Su Ki; Seo, Chul Gyo

    2007-07-01

    A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

  6. Shaking table test and numerical analysis of a 1:12 scale model of a special concentrically braced steel frame with pinned connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haifeng; Zhang, Wenyuan; Zhang, Yaochun; Sun, Yusong

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes shaking table tests of a 1:12 scale model of a special concentrically braced steel frame with pinned connections, which was fabricated according to a one-bay braced frame selected from a typical main factory building of a large thermal power plant. In order to investigate the seismic performance of this type of structure, several ground motion accelerations with different levels for seismic intensity VIII, based on the Chinese Code for Seismic Design of Buildings, were selected to excite the model. The results show that the design methods of the members and the connections are adequate and that the structural system will perform well in regions of high seismicity. In addition to the tests, numerical simulations were also conducted and the results showed good agreement with the test results. Thus, the numerical model is shown to be accurate and the beam element can be used to model this structural system.

  7. DOE uses transportable irradiator for demonstration and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), has a transportable irradiator that was built to travel to various locations to demonstrate the benefits of low-dose irradiation for the processing of food. Part of a DOE program designed to establish irradiation facilities in Alaska, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Washington, the mobile unit can also be used for research, pilot-scale processing, operator training, and education. The irradiation unit consists of two lead-lined cylindrical chambers-an irradiation chamber and a source chamber-inside a steel casing. During operation, the item to be irradiated is placed inside the irradiation chamber, which is then rotated until a window in the chamber lines up with a screened window in the source chamber. The source chamber contains the transportation cask containing the four capsules of cesium-137 that are used as the source of gamma radiation. During operation, the lid of the cask is raised, pulling the capsules into operating position. In this alignment, the product is irradiated for a predetermined length of time. Then the lid of the cask is lowered and the irradiation chamber is rotated back to its original position for removal of the product.

  8. Pulse irradiation tests of rock-like oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okonogi, K.; Nakamura, T.; Yoshinaga, M.; Ishijima, K.; Akie, H.; Takano, H.

    1999-08-01

    Pulse irradiation tests of special oxide fuel designed for plutonium disposal, called rock-like oxide (ROX), have been conducted in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate the transient behavior of ROX fuel under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. An uranium free ROX, (Zr,Y)O 2-MgAl 2O 4-PuO 2, is proposed for once-through use of Pu in light water reactors. However, because of smaller negative Doppler and void reactivity coefficients in the ROX fuel, higher peak fuel enthalpies are expected under RIAs than for UO 2 fuel. Thus, the tests of simulated ROX, in which Pu was replaced by U for easier realization, were conducted to a peak fuel enthalpy of 0.96 kJ g -1 (230 cal g -1), which is above current Japanese safety limits for UO 2. The transient behavior of the simulated ROX fuel was quite different from that of UO 2, because of its different thermo-physical properties. Fuel failure was associated with fuel melting at peak fuel enthalpies of 1.63 kJ g -1 (390 cal g -1) to 2.22 kJ g -1 (530 cal g -1). Significant mechanical energy generation, the reason for the limit, however, was not observed.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-07-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 371 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at both CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 8, 2009, through February 16, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 371 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface soil. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within the Johnnie Boy crater and the fissure at Pin Stripe. Due to the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken

  10. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  11. Preirradiation Data summary for the GRIT-II HTGR irradiation test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    This document comprises a report of preirradiation data on the NPR-5 and NPR-8 fuel types tested in the GRIT-II HTGR Irradiation Test in the Advanced Test Reactor. A summary of fuel characterization, GRIT-II test fabrication data, outlines of fabrication procedures, and a discussion of the GRIT technique for individual fuel bead testing is presented. Objective of the test is to provide individual irradiated HTGR fuel beads for post-irradiation valuation with total target burnups of 25, 50, and 75% fissions of initial metal atoms (FIMA).

  12. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOEpatents

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

  13. AFCI Fuel Irradiation Test Plan, Test Specimens AFC-1Æ and AFC-1F

    SciTech Connect

    D. C. Crawford; S. L. Hayes; B. A. Hilton; M. K. Meyer; R. G. Ambrosek; G. S. Chang; D. J. Utterbeck

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository (DOE, 2003). One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. There are little irradiation performance data available on non-fertile fuel forms, which would maximize the destruction rate of plutonium, and low-fertile (i.e., uranium-bearing) fuel forms, which would support a sustainable nuclear energy option. Initial scoping level irradiation tests on a variety of candidate fuel forms are needed to establish a transmutation fuel form design and evaluate deployment of transmutation fuels.

  14. Radiation hardness tests of highly irradiated full-3D sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haughton, Iain; DaVia, Cinzia; Watts, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Several full-3D silicon sensors (with column electrodes going fully through the bulk) were irradiated up to a fluence of (2.14±0.18)×1016 neq cm-2. An infra-red laser was used to induce a homogeneous signal within each sensor's bulk. The signal degradation, measured as a signal efficiency (signal after irradiation normalised to its value before irradiation) was determined for each fluence. The experimental set-up allowed for monitoring of the beam spot diameter, position and reflection intensity on the sensor's surface. Corrections, dependent on the measured reflection intensity, were made when calculating the signal efficiency. The sensor irradiated to the highest fluence showed a signal efficiency of (50 ± 5) %.

  15. Ion irradiation testing of Improved Accident Tolerant Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-01-14

    This report summarizes the results of ion irradiations conducted on two FeCrAl alloys (named as ORNL A&B) for improving the accident tolerance of LWR nuclear fuel cladding. After irradiation with 1.5 MeV protons to ~0.5 to ~1 dpa and 300°C nanoindentations were performed on the cross-sections along the ion range. An increase in hardness was observed in both alloys. Microstructural analysis shows radiation induced defects.

  16. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Peterman, Dean R.; Olson, Lonnie G.; McDowell, Rocklan G.

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  17. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M.; Barat, P.

    2014-10-01

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  18. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M. Barat, P.

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  19. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  20. Half-embryo test for identification of irradiated citrus fruit: collaborative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Sugita, Takiko; Yamada, Takashi; Saito, Yukio

    1996-11-01

    A collaborative study on the use of the half-embryo test for the detection of irradiated citrus fruit was undertaken. Collaborative samples of seeds removed from citrus fruit, which were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.2 and 0.5 kGy, were examined by 12 participating laboratories. The percentage of correct identifications, whether irradiated or unirradiated, was 92% of 48 samples after 4 days incubation and 98% after 7 days incubation. Only one sample, irradiated with 0.2 kGy, was incorrectly identified. This collaborative study shows that irradiated citrus fruit can be identified using the half-embryo test and that the test can be applied in practice.

  1. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  2. Straight SU-8 pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavieh, R.; Pla Roca, M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Mirzaei, M.; Juncker, D.

    2010-05-01

    SU-8 can be patterned with high resolution, is flexible and tough. These characteristics qualify SU-8 as a material for making spotting pins for printing DNA and protein microarrays, and it can potentially replace the commonly used silicon and steel pins that are expensive, brittle in the case of silicon and can damage the substrate during the printing process. SU-8, however, accumulates large internal stress during fabrication and, as a consequence, thin and long SU-8 structures bend and coil up, which precludes using it for long, freestanding structures such as pins. Here we introduce (i) a novel fabrication process that allows the making of 30 mm long, straight spotting pins that feature (ii) a new design and surface chemistry treatments for better capillary flow control and more homogeneous spotting. A key innovation for the fabrication is a post-processing annealing step with slow temperature ramping and mechanical clamping between two identical substrates to minimize stress buildup and render it symmetric, respectively, which together yield a straight SU-8 structure. SU-8 pins fabricated using this process are compliant and resilient and can buckle without damage during printing. The pins comprise a novel flow stop valve for accurate metering of fluids, and their surface was chemically patterned to render the outside of the pin hydrophobic while the inside of the slit is hydrophilic, and the slit thus spontaneously fills when dipped into a solution while preventing droplet attachment on the outside. A single SU-8 pin was used to print 1392 protein spots in one run. SU-8 pins are inexpensive, straightforward to fabricate, robust and may be used as disposable pins for microarray fabrication. These pins serve as an illustration of the potential application of ultralow stress SU-8 for making freestanding microfabricated polymer microstructures.

  3. Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemoto, G.K.; Sherick, M.J.; Sparks, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil insulation materials. Insulation samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in a large I-hole. The insulation samples were irradiated within a lead shield to reduce exposure to gamma radiation to better approximate the desired ration of neutron to gamma exposure. Two different exposure levels were specified for the insulation samples. To accomplish this, the samples were encapsulated in two separate aluminum capsules; the capsules positioned at the ATR core mid-plane and at the top of the fueled region to take advantage of the axial cosine distribution of the neutron and gamma flux; and by varying the length of irradiation time of the two capsules. Disassembly of the irradiated capsules and testing of the insulation samples were performed at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cell Facilities. Testing of the samples included shear compression static, shear compression fatigue, flexure static, and electrical resistance measurements.

  4. Photoactive TiO₂ antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation.

  5. Photoactive TiO2 antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation. PMID:26005347

  6. Photoactive TiO₂ antibacterial coating on surgical external fixation pins for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Villatte, Guillaume; Massard, Christophe; Descamps, Stéphane; Sibaud, Yves; Forestier, Christiane; Awitor, Komla-Oscar

    2015-01-01

    External fixation is a method of osteosynthesis currently used in traumatology and orthopedic surgery. Pin tract infection is a common problem in clinical practice. Infection occurs after bacterial colonization of the pin due to its contact with skin and the local environment. One way to prevent such local contamination is to create a specific coating that could be applied in the medical field. In this work, we developed a surface coating for external fixator pins based on the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide, producing a bactericidal effect with sufficient mechanical strength to be compatible with surgical use. The morphology and structure of the sol-gel coating layers were characterized using, respectively, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The resistance properties of the coating were investigated by mechanical testing. Photodegradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of the titanium dioxide layers under ultraviolet irradiation. The bactericidal effect induced by the process was evaluated against two strains, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and multiresistant Staphylococcus epidermidis. The coated pins showed good mechanical strength and an efficient antibacterial effect after 1 hour of ultraviolet irradiation. PMID:26005347

  7. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  8. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of

  9. The GfW handbook for data compilation of irradiation tested electronic components, volume 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, F.; Braeunig, D.; Boden, A.

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-three standardized reports of spacecraft electronic components irradiation tests are presented. Statistical values are given which enable reader to evaluate the components life time in a radiative environment.

  10. Identification of irradiated foodstuffs: results of a European test intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Raffi, J; Belliardo, J J; Agnel, J P; Vincent, P

    1993-01-01

    The results of an intercomparison, organized by the Community Bureau of Reference (Commission of the European Communities), on the use of Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy for the identification of irradiated food are presented. A qualitative intercomparison was carried out using beef and trout bones, sardine scales, pistachio nut shells, dried grapes and papaya. Protocols are proposed for meat bones, fish bones (with some restrictions) and fruits such as dried grapes and papaya. The protocol for pistachio nuts and fruits such strawberries is more complicated and further research is needed prior the organization of future intercomparisons. A quantitative intercomparison on poultry bones was also organized. Laboratories were able to distinguish between chicken bones irradiated at 1 to 3 kGy or 7 to 10 kGy.

  11. Unrestrained swelling of uranium-nitride fuel irradiated at temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1400 K (1980 to 2520 R)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Six fuel pins were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a stainless steel (type 304L) clad. The pins were irradiated for approximately 4000 hours to burnups of about 2.0 atom percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation was about 1100 K (1980 deg R). Since stainless steel has a very low creep strength relative to that of UN at this temperature, these tests simulated unrestrained swelling of UN. The tests indicated that at 1 percent uranium atom burnup the unrestrained diametrical swelling of UN is about 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 percent at 1223, 1264, and 1306 K (2200, deg 2273 deg, and 2350 deg R), respectively. The tests also indicated that the irradiation induced swelling of unrestrained UN fuel pellets appears to be isotropic.

  12. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  13. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  14. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  15. Reweldability test of irradiated SS316 by the TIG welding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Oyamada, Rokuro

    1996-10-01

    Stainless steel is a candidate material for the structural material in fusion reactors. Rewelding of irradiated materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of in-vessel components. In the present work, the welding specimens made of type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) to a fast neutron fluence of ˜2.0 × 10 20 n/cm 2 ( E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of ˜200°C. The rewelding of unirradiated and/or irradiated stainless steel was performed by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method and the weldments of unirradiated and/or irradiated SS316 were characterized by tensile testing (test temp.: 20°C and 200°C), hardness, metallographical observation and SEM/XMA analyses.

  16. JOYO-1 Irradiation Test Campaign Technical Close-out, For Information

    SciTech Connect

    G. Borges

    2006-01-31

    The JOYO-1 irradiation testing was designed to screen the irradiation performance of candidate cladding, structural and reflector materials in support of space reactor development. The JOYO-1 designation refers to the first of four planned irradiation tests in the JOYO reactor. Limited irradiated material performance data for the candidate materials exists for the expected Prometheus-1 duration, fluences and temperatures. Materials of interest include fuel element cladding and core materials (refractory metal alloys and silicon carbide (Sic)), vessel and plant structural materials (refractory metal alloys and nickel-base superalloys), and control and reflector materials (BeO). Key issues to be evaluated were long term microstructure and material property stability. The JOYO-1 test campaign was initiated to irradiate a matrix of specimens at prototypical temperatures and fluences anticipated for the Prometheus-1 reactor [Reference (1)]. Enclosures 1 through 9 describe the specimen and temperature monitors/dosimetry fabrication efforts, capsule design, disposition of structural material irradiation rigs, and plans for post-irradiation examination. These enclosures provide a detailed overview of Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) progress in specific areas; however, efforts were in various states of completion at the termination of NRPCT involvement with and restructuring of Project Prometheus.

  17. PIN Diode Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.

    2008-07-01

    A review of the application of PIN diodes as radiation detectors in particle counting, X- and γ-ray spectroscopy, medical applications and charged particle spectroscopy is presented. As a practical example of its usefulness, a PIN diode and a low noise preamplifier are included in a nuclear spectroscopy chain for X-ray measurements. This is a laboratory session designed to review the main concepts needed to set up the detector-preamplifier array and to make measurements of X-ray energy spectra with a room temperature PIN diode. The results obtained are compared with those obtained with a high resolution cooled Si-Li detector.

  18. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W.

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  19. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  20. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    DOE PAGES

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of themore » samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.« less

  1. Advanced Test Reactor In-Canal Ultrasonic Scanner: Experiment Design and Initial Results on Irradiated Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Wachs; J. M. Wight; D. T. Clark; J. M. Williams; S. C. Taylor; D. J. Utterbeck; G. L. Hawkes; G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek; N. C. Craft

    2008-09-01

    An irradiation test device has been developed to support testing of prototypic scale plate type fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor. The experiment hardware and operating conditions were optimized to provide the irradiation conditions necessary to conduct performance and qualification tests on research reactor type fuels for the RERTR program. The device was designed to allow disassembly and reassembly in the ATR spent fuel canal so that interim inspections could be performed on the fuel plates. An ultrasonic scanner was developed to perform dimensional and transmission inspections during these interim investigations. Example results from the AFIP-2 experiment are presented.

  2. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  3. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  4. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  5. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  6. The actuated latch pin and its development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawlor, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An actuated latch pin developed to meet the need for a reusable locking device is described. The unit can function as a pin puller or as a pin pusher latch. Initial prototype testing demonstrated the feasibility of the device with the unit being driven from a 28 V dc supply and using 15 W to drive a 12 mm diameter pin through a stroke of 10 mm with a side load of 100 N in 120 ms. High wear rates with a MOS2 lubrication on the ballscrew and angular contact bearings have necessitated the reduction in the duty cycle from 1000 cycles in air and vacuum to 100 in air and 1000 in vacuum.

  7. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  8. Irradiation test of tungsten clad uranium carbide-zirconium carbide ((U,Zr)C) specimens for thermionic reactor application at conditions conductive to long-term performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creagh, J. W. R.; Smith, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Uranium carbide fueled, thermionic emitter configurations were encapsulated and irradiated. One capsule contained a specimen clad with fluoride derived chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. The other capsule used a duplex clad specimen consisting of chloride derived on floride derived CVD tungsten. Both fuel pins were 16 millimeters in diameter and contained a 45.7-millimeter length of fuel.

  9. SUMMARY OF ‘AFIP’ FULL SIZED PLATE IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Adam B; Wachs, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    Recent testing at the Idaho National Laboratory has included four AFIP (ATR Full Size plate In center flux trap Position) experiments. These experiments included both dispersion plates and monolithic plates fabricated by both hot isostatic pressing and friction bonding utilizing both thermally sprayed inter-layers and zirconium barriers. These plates were tested between 100 and 350 w/cm2 at low temperatures and high burn-ups. The post irradiation exams performed have indicated good performance under the conditions tested and a summary of the findings and irradiation history are included herein.

  10. Study of PIN diode energy traps created by neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Chren, D.; Dammer, J.

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of radiation defects is still ongoing and finds greater application in the increasing radiation doses on semiconductor detectors in experiments. Studying the changes of silicon PIN diode for high doses of radiation is the fundamental motivation for our measurements. In this article we describe the behavior of the PIN diode and development of the disorder caused by neutrons from a 252Cf and doses up to 8 Gy. The calibration curve for PIN diode shows the effect of disorders as the changes of the voltampere characteristics depending on the dose of neutron irradiation. The measured values for defects are in good agreement with created energy traps.

  11. A double tuned rail damper—increased damping at the two first pinned-pinned frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, J.; Sol, H.

    2003-10-01

    Railway-induced vibrations are a growing matter of environmental concern. The rapid development of transportation, the increase of vehicle speeds and vehicle weights have resulted in higher vibration levels. In the meantime vibrations that were tolerated in the past are now considered to be a nuisance. Numerous solutions have been proposed to remedy these problems. The majority only acts on a specific part of the dynamic behaviour of the track. This paper presents a possible solution to reduce the noise generated by the 'pinned-pinned' frequencies. Pinned-pinned frequencies correspond with standing waves whose nodes are positioned exactly at the sleeper supports. The two first pinned-pinned frequencies are situated approximately at 950 and 2200 Hz (UIC60-rail and sleeper spacing of 0.60 m). To attenuate these vibrations, the Department of MEMC at the VUB has developed a dynamic vibration absorber called the Double Tuned Rail Damper (DTRD). The DTRD is mounted between two sleepers on the rail and is powered by the motion of the rail. The DTRD consists of two major parts: a steel plate which is connected to the rail with an interface of an elastic layer, and a rubber mass. The two first resonance frequencies of the steel plate coincide with the targeted pinned-pinned frequencies of the rail. The rubber mass acts as a motion controller and energy absorber. Measurements at a test track of the French railway company (SNCF) have shown considerable attenuation of the envisaged pinned-pinned frequencies. The attenuation rate surpasses 5 dB/m at certain frequency bands.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor Capabilities and Future Irradiation Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the most versatile operating research reactors in the Untied States. The ATR has a long history of supporting reactor fuel and material research for the US government and other test sponsors. The INL is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and currently operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The ATR is the third generation of test reactors built at the Test Reactor Area, now named the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), whose mission is to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of customers--US DOE, foreign governments and private researchers, and commercial companies that need neutrons. The ATR has several unique features that enable the reactor to perform diverse simultaneous tests for multiple test sponsors. The ATR has been operating since 1967, and is expected to continue operating for several more decades. The remainder of this paper discusses the ATR design features, testing options, previous experiment programs, future plans for the ATR capabilities and experiments, and some introduction to the INL and DOE's expectations for nuclear research in the future.

  13. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  14. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  15. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  16. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  17. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  18. PINS-3X Operations

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury

    2013-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS) non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. The PINS-3X variant of the system is used to identify explosives and uses a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) as the neutron source. Use of the system, including possession and use of the neutron generator and shipment of the system components requires compliance with a number of regulations. This report outlines some of these requirements as well as some of the requirements in using the system outside of INL.

  19. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a

  20. Optimization of pin bearing joint strength for segmented graphite/epoxy filament wound case in Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munjal, A. K.; Wilks, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to demonstrate the feasibility of a composite joint in a segmented, graphite/epoxy filament-wound composite case for the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motors. The joint's required ultimate line load is of the of 82,000 lb/in. By optimizing composite layup, and the ratios of pin diameter/specimen thickness, edge distance/pin diameter, and specimen width/pin diameter, a pin bearing joint strength of 85 ksi was obtained. Double pin testing disclosed that the pin close to the composite joint carries a higher load than the outboard pin. Pin bearing strength is noted to vary with matrix resin system.

  1. Diffusion inspires selection of pinning nodes in pinning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; He, Xingsheng; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Liao, Hao; Cai, Shi-min; Zhuo, Zhao

    2016-03-01

    The outstanding problem of controlling a complex network via pinning is related to network dynamics and has the potential to master large-scale real-world systems as well. This paper addresses the heart issue about how to choose pinning nodes for pinning control, where pinning control aims to control a network to an identical state by injecting feedback control signals to a small fraction of nodes. We explore networks' controllability from not only mathematical analysis, but also the aspects of network topology and information diffusion. Then, the connection between pinning control and information diffusion is given, and pinning node selection is transferred into multi-spreader problem in information diffusion. Based on information diffusion, a heuristic method is proposed to select pinning nodes by optimizing the spreading ability of multiple spreaders. The proposed method greatly improves the controllability of large practical networks, and provides a new perspective to investigate pinning node selection.

  2. Identification of irradiated wheat by germination test, DNA comet assay and electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Adilson C.; Freund, Maria Teresa L.; Villavicencio, Ana Lúcia C. H.; Delincée, Henry; Arthur, Valter

    2002-03-01

    In several countries, there has been an increase in the use of radiation for food processing thus improving the quality and sanitary conditions, inhibiting pathogenic microorganisms, delaying the natural aging process and so extending product lifetime. The need to develop analytical methods to detect these irradiated products is also increasing. The goal of this research was to identify wheat irradiated using different radiation doses. Seeds were irradiated with a gamma 60Co source (Gammacell 220 GC) in the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura and the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. Dose rate used were 1.6 and 5.8kGy/h. Applied doses were 0.0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, and 2.0kGy. After irradiation, seeds were analysed over a 6 month period. Three different detection methods were employed to determine how irradiation had modified the samples. Screening methods consisted of a germination test measuring the inhibition of shooting and rooting and analysis of DNA fragmentation. The method of electron spin resonance spectroscopy allowed a better dosimetric evaluation. These techniques make the identification of irradiated wheat with different doses possible.

  3. Fuel plate and fusion insulator irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1980-11-01

    As the prices of fuel fabricating, shipping, and reprocessing continue to rise at rapid rates, research people look for alternate methods to keep their reactor fuel costs within limited funds. Extending fuel element lifetimes without jeopardizing reactor safety can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. But to gain this factor, some fuel plate tests must be performed to the higher burnup to verify burnup fuel plate performance. In this proposed test, fuel plates will be constructed to a maximum fuel loading which can be produced on a commercial basis, contain a maximum boron content as used in ATR to reduce initial reactor reactivity, and will be loaded with UAl/sub 2/ to obtain higher uranium content and better operating performance over UAl/sub 3/.

  4. Gamma-irradiation tests of IR optical fibres for ITER thermography--a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, R.; Pocheau, C.; Jouve, M.

    2008-03-12

    In the course of the development of a concept for a spectrally resolving infrared thermography diagnostic for the ITER divertor we have tested 3 types of infrared (IR) fibres in Co{sup 60} irradiation facilities under {gamma} irradiation. The fibres were ZrF{sub 4} (and HfF{sub 4}) fibres from different manufacturers, hollow fibres (silica capillaries with internal Ag/AgJ coating) and a sapphire fibre. For the IR range, only the latter fibre type encourages to go further for neutron tests in a reactor. If one restricted the interest onto the near infrared range, high purity core silica fibres could be used. This study might be seen as a typical example of the relation between diagnostic development for a nuclear environment and irradiation experiments.

  5. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, William Jonathan; Barrett, Kristine Eloise; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  6. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  7. "Start With a Pin"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jennifer

    1970-01-01

    Describes first grade science activity using soda straws, piNs, blocks of wood, paper clips, and washers as an introduction to weights and measures. Children worked independently in a problem solving manner with materials and recorded results by writing, drawing or tape recording. Varying student approaches, responses, and conclusions are…

  8. Thermal shock testing of ceramics with pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, R.; Naoumidis, A.; Nickel, H.

    1987-10-01

    The need for a high temperature material, capable of withstanding power densities of 15 kW/cm 2, for the first wall of nuclear fusion devices has led to the comparative testing of ceramics for their resistance to thermal shock by different pulse loading techniques, photon, proton, and electron beams. The parameter φ √ t, where φ is the impinging energy flux and t is the pulse length, has been used as an index of thermal shock damage threshold for comparing published results on different kinds of beams over a range of temperatures and pulse lengths. Measurements were made of the thermal damage threshold by pulsed ruby laser radiation on a series of ceramics including TiC coated graphite, TiC coated Mo, TiN coated IN 625. pyrocarbon, and others. The results show reasonably good agreement between the different testing methods within a range of different power densities and pulse lengths from 5 μs to 3 s.

  9. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below

  10. Lever-Arm Pin Puller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Malcolm

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism holds retaining pins in place except when actuated to release pins quickly. Mechanism is integral part of cover designed to be removed with simple downward motion of hand. Before removal, mechanism secures cover in place. After removal, mechanism holds retaining pins for reuse.

  11. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area • 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. • Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total

  13. Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Characteristics in Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2006-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2(MCWO). MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements and the irradiated WG-MOX post irradiation examination (PIE) data.

  14. Monte-Carlo Code (MCNP) Modeling of the Advanced Test Reactor Applicable to the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Test Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; R. C. Pederson

    2005-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, and 40 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO, a welldeveloped tool that couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements.

  15. Results of the Irradiation of R6R018 in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Adam B Robinson; Daniel Wachs; Pavel Medvedev; Curtis Clark; Gray Chang; Misti Lillo; Jan-Fong Jue; Glenn Moore; Jared Wight

    2010-04-01

    For over 30 years the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has worked to provide the fuel technology and analytical support required to convert research and test reactors from nuclear fuels that utilize highly enriched uranium (HEU) to fuels based on low-enriched uranium (LEU) (defined as <20% U-235). This effort is driven by a desire to minimize international civilian commerce in weapons usable materials. The RERTR fuel development program has executed a wide array of fuel tests over the last decade that clearly established the viability of research reactor fuels based on uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys. Fuel testing has included a large number of dispersion type fuels capable of providing uranium densities up to approximately 8.5 g U/cc (~1.7 g U-235/cc at 20% enrichment). The dispersion fuel designs tested are very similar to existing research test reactor fuels in that the U-Mo particles simply replace the current fuel phase within the matrix. In 2003 it became evident that the first generation U-Mo-based dispersion fuel within an aluminum matrix exhibited significant fuel performance problems at high power and burn-up. These issues have been successfully addressed with a modest modification to the matrix material composition. Testing has shown that small additions of silicon (2–5 wt%) to the aluminum (Al) matrix stabilizes the fuel performance. The fuel plate R6R018 which was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the RERTR-9B experiment was part of an investigation into the role of the silicon content in the matrix. This plate consisted of a U-7Mo fuel phase dispersed in an Al-3.5Si matrix clad in Al-6061. This report outlines the fabrication history, the as fabricated analysis performed prior to irradiation, the irradiation conditions, the post irradiation examination results, and an analysis of the plates behavior.

  16. Status of the Norwegian thorium light water reactor (LWR) fuel development and irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect

    Drera, S.S.; Bjork, K.I.; Kelly, J.F.; Asphjell, O.

    2013-07-01

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels and should thus be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. In order for thorium based fuel to be licensed for use in current LWRs, material properties must be well known for fresh as well as irradiated fuel, and accurate prediction of fuel behavior must be possible to make for both normal operation and transient scenarios. Important parameters are known for fresh material but the behaviour of the fuel under irradiation is unknown particularly for low Th content. The irradiation campaign aims to widen the experience base to irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel and (Th,U)O{sub 2} with low Th content and to confirm existing data for fresh fuel. The assumptions with respect to improved in-core fuel performance are confirmed by our preliminary irradiation test results, and our fuel manufacture trials so far indicate that both (Th,U)O{sub 2} and (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels can be fabricated with existing technologies, which are possible to upscale to commercial volumes.

  17. Post irradiation examination of thermal reactor fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, D. N.; Viswanathan, U. K.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Anantharaman, S.

    2008-12-01

    The post irradiation examination (PIE) facility at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been in operation for more than three decades. Over these years this facility has been utilized for examination of experimental fuel pins and fuels from commercial power reactors operating in India. In a program to assess the performance of (U,Pu)O 2 MOX fuel prior to its introduction in commercial reactors, three experimental MOX fuel clusters irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS up to burnup of 16 000 MWd/tU were examined. Fission gas release from these pins was measured by puncture test. Some of these fuel pins in the cluster contained controlled porosity pellets, low temperature sintered (LTS) pellets, large grain size pellets and annular pellets. PIE has also been carried out on natural UO 2 fuel bundles from Indian PHWRs, which included two high burnup (˜15 000 MWd/tU) bundles. Salient investigations carried out consisted of visual examination, leak testing, axial gamma scanning, fission gas analysis, microstructural examination of fuel and cladding, β, γ autoradiography of the fuel cross-section and fuel central temperature estimation from restructuring. A ThO 2 fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) up to a nominal fuel burnup of ˜11 000 MWd/tTh was also examined to evaluate its in-pile performance. The performance of the BWR fuel pins of Tarapur Atomic Power Stations (TAPS) was earlier assessed by carrying out PIE on 18 fuel elements selected from eight fuel assemblies irradiated in the two reactors. The burnup of these fuel elements varied from 5000 to 29 000 MWd/tU. This paper provides a brief review of some of the fuels examined and the results obtained on the performance of natural UO 2, enriched UO 2, MOX, and ThO 2 fuels.

  18. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  19. AGR-2: The first irradiation of French HTR fuel in Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lambert; B. Grover; P. Guillermier; D. Moulinier; F. Imbault Huart

    2012-10-01

    AGR-2, the second irradiation of the US program for qualification of the NGNP fuel, is open to international participation within the scope of the Generation IV International Forum. In this frame, it includes in its multi-capsule irradiation rig an irradiation of French HTR fuel manufactured in the CAPRI line (GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache and AREVA/CERCA compacting line at Romans). The AGR-2 irradiation is designed to place our first fabrications of HTR particles under operating conditions that are representative of ANTARES project while keeping close to the test range of the German fuel as much as possible, which is the reference in terms of irradiation behavior. A few batches of particles and 12 fuel compacts were produced and characterized in 2009 by CEA and CERCA. The fuel main characteristics are in conformity with our specifications and in compliance with INL requirements. The AGR-2 experiment is based on the design and devices used in the first experiment of the AGR program. The design makes it possible to monitor the irradiation conditions and in particular, the temperature, the power and the fission products released from fuel particles. The in pile equipment consists of a multi-capsule device designed to simultaneously irradiate six independent capsules with temperature control. The out-of-core part consists of the equipment for actively controlling temperature and measuring the fission products release on-line. The target conditions for the irradiation experiment were defined with the aim of comparing the results obtained under irradiation with German particles along with the objectives of reaching burn-up and fluence targets to validate the behavior of our fuel in a significant range (15% FIMA – 5 × 1025 n/m2 at 600 EFPD with centerline fuel temperature about 1100 degrees C). These conditions have to be representative of ANTARES project characteristics. These target conditions were compared with final results from neutron and thermal design studies

  20. Anisotropic shift of the irreversibility line by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerzopf, F.M.; Wiesinger, H.P.; Weber, H.W. ); Crabtree, G.W.; Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A. )

    1991-09-01

    The irreversibility line of high-{Tc} superconductors is shifted considerably by irradiating the material with fast neutrons. The anisotropic and non-monotonous shift is qualitatively explained by a simple model based on an interaction between three pinning mechanisms, the intrinsic pinning by the ab-planes, the weak pinning by the pre-irradiation defect structure, and strong pinning by neutron induced defect cascades. A correlation between the cascade density and the position of the irreversibility line is observed.

  1. New Pin Puller Based on SMA Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Nestor; Collado, Marcelo; Cabás, Ramiro

    2014-07-01

    Two different versions of the Pin Puller were designed during this activity, such as one with 100 N and other with 500 N of pull force. The design of both versions is based on spheres which support the pin at the initial position and a compression spring driving once the release takes place by means of the SMA. The mechanical design of the Pin Pullers has been conceived in order to optimize the device's weight, reduce the parts complexity, and achieve a suitable stiffness. A qualification test campaign for the Pin Puller with 500 N of pull force has been developed in order to check the success of the proposed mechanism for space applications. The main performed tests have been thermal-vacuum actuation, thermal-vacuum cycling, sine vibration, and random vibration. The Pin Puller has presented successful results of actuation during the test campaign

  2. Doses from external irradiation to Marshall Islanders from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Beck, Harold L; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Annual doses from external irradiation resulting from exposure to fallout from the 65 atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted in the Marshall Islands at Bikini and Enewetak between 1946 and 1958 have been estimated for the first time for Marshallese living on all inhabited atolls. All tests that deposited fallout on any of the 23 inhabited atolls or separate reef islands have been considered. The methodology used to estimate the radiation doses at the inhabited atolls is based on test- and location-specific radiation survey data, deposition density estimates of 137Cs, and fallout times-of-arrival provided in a companion paper (Beck et al.), combined with information on the radionuclide composition of the fallout at various times after each test. These estimates of doses from external irradiation have been combined with corresponding estimates of doses from internal irradiation, given in a companion paper (Simon et al.), to assess the cancer risks among the Marshallese population (Land et al.) resulting from exposure to radiation from the nuclear weapons tests. PMID:20622549

  3. Doses from external irradiation to Marshall Islanders from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Beck, Harold L; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Annual doses from external irradiation resulting from exposure to fallout from the 65 atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted in the Marshall Islands at Bikini and Enewetak between 1946 and 1958 have been estimated for the first time for Marshallese living on all inhabited atolls. All tests that deposited fallout on any of the 23 inhabited atolls or separate reef islands have been considered. The methodology used to estimate the radiation doses at the inhabited atolls is based on test- and location-specific radiation survey data, deposition density estimates of 137Cs, and fallout times-of-arrival provided in a companion paper (Beck et al.), combined with information on the radionuclide composition of the fallout at various times after each test. These estimates of doses from external irradiation have been combined with corresponding estimates of doses from internal irradiation, given in a companion paper (Simon et al.), to assess the cancer risks among the Marshallese population (Land et al.) resulting from exposure to radiation from the nuclear weapons tests.

  4. TS-1 and TS-2 transient overpower tests on FFTF fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, A.L.; Ferrell, P.C.; Culley, G.E.; Weber, E.T.

    1985-10-03

    The TS-1 and TS-2 TREAT transient experiments subjected a low burnup (2 MWd/kg) and a medium burnup (58 MWd/kg), respectively, FFTF irradiated fuel pin to unprotected 5 cents/s overpower transient conditions. The fuel pin failure response was similar in the two tests, which demonstrated a large margin to failure (P/P/sub 0/ > 3) and a favorable upper level failure location. Thus, for these transient conditions, burnup effects on transient performance appeared to be minimal in the range tested. Pin disruption in the medium burnup TS-2 test was more severe due to the higher fission gas pressurization, but failure occurred at only a 5% lower power level than for the low burnup TS-1 fuel pin. Both tests exhibited axial extrusion of molten fuel to the region above the fuel column several seconds before pin failure, demonstrating a potentially beneficial inherent safety mechanism to delay failure and mitigate accident consequences.

  5. Application of the Pin Diode as a Dosimeter for Dose Measurement of Several Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopko, Vit; Dammer, Jiri; Chren, Dominik; Sopko, Bruno; Latal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    Experimental PIN diodes produced for measurement of low energy gamma radiation were exposed to neutron, proton and gamma radiation sources, in an attempt to expand the area of their application. Irradiation of the PIN diode resulted in changes of IV curve. The changes of voltage at certain current were recorded and depicted in graphs.

  6. Low-temperature neutron irradiation tests of superconducting magnet materials using reactor neutrons at KUR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Nakamoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Xu, Q.; Itahashi, T.; Kuno, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Mori, Y.; Qin, B.; Sato, A.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation resistant superconducting magnets are required for high intensity particle accelerators and associated secondary particle beamlines, such as the LHC upgrade and the COMET experiment at J-PARC. Expected neutron fluence on the superconducting coils reaches 1021 n/m2 or higher, therefore the magnet should be designed taking into account the irradiation effects. Irradiation tests for superconducting magnet materials have been carried out using reactor neutrons at Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Institute. As a first step of the experiment, aluminum alloy stabilizer for superconducting cable was exposed to the reactor neutrons at low temperature and the resistance has been measured in situ during neutron exposure. After the irradiation at 12 K-15 K, the sample resistance increase was proportional to the integrated neutron fluence, and reached almost double for a fast-neutron fluence of 2.3×1020 n/m2 (>0.1 MeV). It is also confirmed that the induced resistance is fully recovered by thermal cycling to room temperature. Details of the irradiation test and the prospects are described.

  7. Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food I. Seedling growth test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiongying, Liu; Yanhua, Kuang; Yuemei, Zheng

    1993-07-01

    A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds as: rice ( Oryza sativa), peanut ( Arachis hypogaea), maize ( Zeamays), soybean ( Glycine max), red bean ( Phaseolus angularis), mung bean ( Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea ( Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds can reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose.

  8. Independent Review of AFC 2A, 2B, and 2E ATR Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    M. Cappiello; R. Hobbins; K. Penny; L. Walters

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle program, a series of fuels development irradiation tests have been performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. These tests are providing excellent data for advanced fuels development. The program is focused on the transmutation of higher actinides which best can be accomplished in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Because a fast test reactor is no longer available in the US, a special test vehicle is used to achieve near-prototypic fast reactor conditions (neutron spectra and temperature) for use in ATR (a water-cooled thermal reactor). As part of the testing program, there were many successful tests of advanced fuels including metals and ceramics. Recently however, there have been three experimental campaigns using metal fuels that experienced failure during irradiation. At the request of the program, an independent review committee was convened to review the post-test analyses performed by the fuels development team, to assess the conclusions of the team for the cause of the failures, to assess the adequacy and completeness of the analyses, to identify issues that were missed, and to make recommendations for improvements in the design and operation of future tests. Although there is some difference of opinion, the review committee largely agreed with the conclusions of the fuel development team regarding the cause of the failures. For the most part, the analyses that support the conclusions are sufficient.

  9. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Garrison, L M; Zenobia, S J; Egle, B J; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10(14) ions/(cm(2) s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  10. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  11. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, Samuel J.; Egle, Brian J.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.; Santarius, John F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000°C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ionmore » gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. In conclusion, the MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.« less

  12. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Garrison, L M; Zenobia, S J; Egle, B J; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10(14) ions/(cm(2) s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials. PMID:27587118

  13. Characterization of an in-core irradiator for testing of microelectronics in a mixed radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, Sukesh K.

    In recent years, the space industry is increasingly in search of easily available commercial and emerging technology devices in order to meet rigorous spacecraft requirements such as weight, power, and cost. Before an electronic device is put in a radiation environment, it is pre-tested and certified for space applications. This process of radiation testing and certification is costly and time intensive. Development of a test methodology and a facility to perform these tests quickly and cost effectively, would facilitate the radiation effects community and NASA to fulfill the "Faster, Better, Cheaper". With the rapid developments in the field of satellite-based telecommunications, the move from analog to digital controls for all electronic devices is imminent; hence, need for radiation-hardened mixed signal processing devices is obvious. Digital-to-Analog Converters (DAC) are of particular interest due to their complex design and performance and their importance in digital signal processing. Limited literature exists for radiation effects on DAC; most of these studies were performed with gamma-ray irradiations (Total Ionization Dose, TID) but the much needed displacement damage data is absent. In the first phase of this work, an in-core mixed radiation (neutron and gamma-ray) test facility at the University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor was fully characterized. Further, a test methodology to perform radiation testing on complex "off-the-shelf" semiconductor circuits in a time and cost effective manner was developed. In the second phase, the characterized test facility and the methodology were then employed to successfully assess performance degradation of three commercially available DAC circuits: DAC 0808, MC 1408 (DIP package) and MC 1408 (SOIC package). This research has resulted in the development of a unique in-core fast neutron irradiation facility from a research reactor source. The average fast flux of 1.2E9 n/cm2-s at 1 k

  14. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  15. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  16. Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Gerry L. McCormick; Shannon J. Corrigan

    2010-06-01

    2010 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP’10) ANS Annual Meeting Imbedded Topical San Diego, CA June 13 – 17, 2010 Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Author: A. Joseph Palmer, Mechanical Engineer, Irradiation Test Programs, 208-526-8700, Joe.Palmer@INL.gov Affiliation: Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, MS-3840 Idaho Falls, ID 83415 INL/CON-10-17680 ABSTRACT Most test reactors are equipped with shuttle facilities (sometimes called rabbit tubes) whereby small capsules can be inserted into the reactor and retrieved during power operations. With the installation of Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) this capability has been restored to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The general design and operating principles of this system were patterned after the hydraulic rabbit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which has operated successfully for many years. Using primary coolant as the motive medium the HSIS system is designed to simultaneously transport fourteen shuttle capsules, each 16 mm OD x 57 mm long, to and from the B-7 position of the reactor. The B-7 position is one of the higher flux positions in the reactor with typical thermal and fast (>1 Mev) fluxes of 2.8E+14 n/cm2/sec and 1.9E+14 n/cm2/sec respectively. The available space inside each shuttle is approximately 14 mm diameter x 50 mm long. The shuttle containers are made from titanium which was selected for its low neutron activation properties and durability. Shuttles can be irradiated for time periods ranging from a few minutes to several months. The Send and Receive Station (SRS) for the HSIS is located 2.5 m deep in the ATR canal which allows irradiated shuttles to be easily moved from the SRS to a wet loaded cask, or transport pig. The HSIS system first irradiated (empty) shuttles in September 2009 and has since completed

  17. Minimum bar size for flexure testing of irradiated SiC/SiC composite

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    This report covers material presented at the IEA/Jupiter Joint International Workshop on SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion structural Applications held in conjunction with ICFRM-8, Sendai, Japan, Oct. 23-24, 1997. The minimum bar size for 4-point flexure testing of SiC/SiC composite recommended by PNNL for irradiation effects studies is 30 {times} 6 {times} 2 mm{sup 3} with a span-to-depth ratio of 10/1.

  18. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept.

  19. High irradiance UV/condensation testers allow faster accelerated weathering test results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.J.; Fedor, G.R.

    1993-12-31

    Because outdoor exposures are so time consuming, accelerated laboratory testing is used extensively by industry. One of the more popular laboratory weathering testers is the ASTM G53 UV/Condensation device, also known as the QUV. This paper examines an enhancement to the G53 weather tester that allows precise control of light output and higher than previous light intensity levels. Data is presented on the accelerating effect of higher irradiance on several common polymers.

  20. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. )

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  2. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  3. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  4. Completion of the first NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiment, AGR-1, in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover; John Maki; David Petti

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The design of AGR-1 test train and support systems used to monitor and control the experiment during

  5. Pip pin reliability and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skyles, Lane P.

    1994-01-01

    Pip pins are used in many engineering applications. Of particular interest to the aerospace industry is their use in various mechanism designs. Many payloads that fly aboard our nation's Space Shuttle have at least one actuated mechanism. Often these mechanisms incorporate pip pins in their design in order to fasten interfacing parts or joints. Pip pins are most often used when an astronaut will have a direct interface with the mechanism. This interfacing can be done during Space Shuttle mission EVA's (ExtraVehicular Activity). The main reason for incorporating pip pins is convenience and their ability to provide a quick release for interfacing parts. However, there are some issues that must be taken into account when using them in a design. These issues include documented failures and quality control problems when using substandard pip pins. A history of pip pins as they relate to the aerospace industry as well as general design features is discussed.

  6. Controlling flux flow dissipation by changing flux pinning in superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, G.; Leo, A.; Nigro, A.; Pace, S.; Silhanek, A. V.; Verellen, N.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Milosevic, M. V.; Casaburi, A.; Cristiano, R.

    2012-05-14

    We study the flux flow state in superconducting materials characterized by rather strong intrinsic pinning, such as Nb, NbN, and nanostructured Al thin films, in which we drag the superconducting dissipative state into the normal state by current biasing. We modify the vortex pinning strength either by ion irradiation, by tuning the measuring temperature or by including artificial pinning centers. We measure critical flux flow voltages for all materials and the same effect is observed: switching to low flux flow dissipations at low fields for an intermediate pinning regime. This mechanism offers a way to additionally promote the stability of the superconducting state.

  7. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  8. Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as a potential source for maintaining the nation`s supply of tritium. The Proposed Action discussed in this environmental assessment is a limited scale confirmatory test that would provide DOE with information needed to assess that option. This document contains the environmental assessment results for the Lead test assembly irradiation and analysis for the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee, and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington.

  9. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  10. In vitro analysis of self-shearing retentive pins.

    PubMed

    Collard, E W; Caputo, A A; Standlee, J P; Duncanson, M G

    1981-02-01

    Combining stress, analysis, microscopic examination, mechanical testing of the shear mechanism, and retention of the Reten Pin leads to the following conclusions: 1. The suggested 0.006 inch pin-channel mismatch induces high lateral and apical stresses. Microscopically, this was seen to correlate with injury to the dentin. 2. The degree of retention was increased by using a smaller pin-channel mismatch. This correlates with smaller stresses and reduced dentinal damage. 3. The shear mechanism acts in a uniform manner, with a relatively small variation from the mean. It is suggested that for the best results the manufacturer should supply larger twist drills and pins with a somewhat deeper self-shearing groove to minimize apical involvement during shearing of the handle from the pin.

  11. Ion irradiation testing and characterization of FeCrAl candidate alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Aydogan, Eda; Maloy, Stuart Andrew; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-10-29

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels. This effort involves development of fuel cladding materials that will be resistant to oxidizing environments for extended period of time such as loss of coolant accident. Ferritic FeCrAl alloys are among the promising candidates due to formation of a stable Al₂O₃ oxide scale. In addition to being oxidation resistant, these promising alloys need to be radiation tolerant under LWR conditions (maximum dose of 10-15 dpa at 250 – 350°C). Thus, in addition to a number of commercially available alloys, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys developed at ORNL were tested using high energy proton irradiations and subsequent characterization of irradiation hardening and damage microstructure. This report summarizes ion irradiation testing and characterization of three nuclear grade FeCrAl cladding materials developed at ORNL and four commercially available Kanthal series FeCrAl alloys in FY14 toward satisfying FCRD campaign goals.

  12. First tests of the ion irradiation and implantation beamline at the CMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Rey, D.; Benedicto, M.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Bachiller-Perea, D.; Olivares, J.; Climent-Font, A.; Gómez-Ferrer, B.; Rodríguez, A.; Narros, J.; Maira, A.; Álvarez, J.; Nakbi, A.; Zucchiatti, A.; de Aragón, F.; García, J. M.; Vila, R.

    2014-07-01

    The implantation and irradiation beamline of the Tandem ion accelerator of the Centro de Micro Análisis de Materiales (CMAM), in Madrid, has been recently completed with a beam sweep and monitoring system, and a cryostat/furnace. These new implementations convert the beamline into a versatile tool to implant ions, between H and Au2, in different materials with precise control of the sample temperature, which may be varied between -180 °C and 600 °C. The size of the swept area on target may be as large as 10 × 10 cm2. The implantation chamber also allows carrying out in situ or/and on line analyses during the irradiations by means of advanced optical measurements, as well as ion beam analyses (IBA). These advancements can be employed in novel applications such as the fabrication of optical waveguides and irradiation tests of structural and functional materials for future fusion reactors. The results of beam tests and first experiments are shown.

  13. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed.

  14. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  15. Heat transfer coefficients for staggered arrays of short pin fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    Short pin fins are often used to increase that heat transfer to the coolant in the trailing edge of a turbine blade. Due primarily to limits of casting technology, it is not possible to manufacture pins of optimum length for heat transfer purposes in the trailing edge region. In many cases the pins are so short that they actually decrease the total heat transfer surface area compared to a plain wall. A heat transfer data base for these short pins is not available in the literature. Heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for several staggered arrays of short pin fins. The measured Nusselt numbers when plotted versus Reynolds numbers were found to fall on a single curve for all surfaces tested. The heat transfer coefficients for the short pin fins (length to diameter ratios of 1/2 and 2) were found to be about a factor of two lower than data from the literature for longer pin arrays (length to diameter ratios of about 8).

  16. Heat transfer coefficients for staggered arrays of short pin fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1981-03-01

    Short pin fins are often used to increase the heat transfer to the coolant in the trailing edge of a turbine blade. Due primarily to limits of casting technology, it is not possible to manufacture pins of optimum length for heat transfer purposes in the trailing edge region. In many cases the pins are so short that they actually decrease the total heat transfer surface area compared to a plain wall. A heat transfer data base for these short pins is not available in the literature. Heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for several staggered arrays of short pin fins. The measured Nusselt numbers when plotted versus Reynolds numbers were found to fall on a single curve for all surfaces tested. The heat transfer coefficients for the short pin fins (length to diameter ratios of 1/2 and 2) were found to be about a factor of two lower than data from the literature for longer pin arrays (length to diameter ratios of about 8).

  17. Four-point Bend Testing of Irradiated Monolithic U-10Mo Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B. H.; Lloyd, W. R.; Schulthess, J. L.; Wright, J. K.; Lind, R. P.; Scott, L.; Wachs, K. M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents results of recently completed studies aimed at characterizing the mechanical properties of irradiated U-10Mo fuel in support of monolithic base fuel qualification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in four-point bending. Specimens were taken from fuel plates irradiated in the RERTR-12 and AFIP-6 Mk. II irradiation campaigns, and tests were conducted in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The monolithic fuel plates consist of a U-10Mo fuel meat covered with a Zr diffusion barrier layer fabricated by co-rolling, clad in 6061 Al using a hot isostatic press (HIP) bonding process. Specimens exhibited nominal (fresh) fuel meat thickness ranging from 0.25 mm to 0.64 mm, and fuel plate average burnup ranged from approximately 0.4 x 1021 fissions/cm3 to 6.0 x 1021 fissions/cm3. After sectioning the fuel plates, the 6061 Al cladding was removed by dissolution in concentrated NaOH. Pre- and post-dissolution dimensional inspections were conducted on test specimens to facilitate accurate analysis of bend test results. Four-point bend testing was conducted on the HFEF Remote Load Frame at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/min using custom-designed test fixtures and calibrated load cells. All specimens exhibited substantially linear elastic behavior and failed in a brittle manner. The influence of burnup on the observed slope of the stress-strain curve and the calculated fracture strength is discussed.

  18. Irradiation tests of prototype self-powered gamma and neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeeren, L.; Carcreff, H.

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of the SCK.CEN-CEA Joint Instrumentation Laboratory, we are developing and optimizing a self-powered detector for selective in-core monitoring of the gamma field. Several prototypes with bismuth emitters were developed and tested in a pure gamma field (the PAGURE gamma irradiation facility at CEA) and in mixed neutron and gamma fields (in the OSIRIS reactor at CEA and in the BR2 reactor at SCK.CEN). Detailed MCNP modelling was performed to calculate the gamma and neutron sensitivities. Apart from a few failing prototypes, all detectors showed equilibrium signals proportional to the gamma field with a good long-term stability (under irradiation during several weeks). A tubular geometry design was finally selected as the most appropriate for in-core gamma detection, coupling a larger sensitivity with better response characteristics. In the same experiment in BR2 six prototype Self-Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs) with continuous sheaths (i.e. without any weld between the sensitive part and the cable) were extensively tested: two SPNDs with Co emitter, two with V emitter and two with Rh emitters, with varying geometries. All detector responses were verified to be proportional to the reactor power. The prompt and delayed response contributions were quantified. The signal contributions due to the impact of gamma rays were experimentally determined. The evolution of the signals was continuously followed during the full irradiation period. The signal-to-noise level was observed to be well below 1% in typical irradiation conditions. The absolute neutron and gamma responses for all SPNDs are consistent. (authors)

  19. A novel on chip test method to characterize the creep behavior of metallic layers under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapouge, P.; Onimus, F.; Vayrette, R.; Raskin, J.-P.; Pardoen, T.; Bréchet, Y.

    2016-08-01

    An on chip test method has been developed to characterize the irradiation creep behavior of thin freestanding films under uniaxial tension. The method is based on the use of a long beam involving large internal stress protected from the irradiation flux that imposes a spring like deformation to a specimen beam. These elementary freestanding structures fabricated using a combination of deposition, lithography and release steps are multiplied with different dimensions in order to test different levels of stress and of initial plastic deformation. The method has been validated on 200 and 500 nm thick copper films under heavy copper ions irradiation. The irradiation creep rate is shown to be at least one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of irradiation.

  20. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  1. Stepped-Pin Clevis Resists Jamming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killgrove, T. O.

    1985-01-01

    Pin modification allows pyrotechnic release devices to operate more smoothly. New clevis pin has stepped diameters to prevent bending as it exits yoke. In contrast, conventional unstepped clevis pin bends and jams as it is withdrawn. Stepped pin design suitable for explosive and possible hammer driven pin sullers.

  2. Length to diameter ratio and row number effects in short pin fin heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The relative effects of pin length to diameter ratio and of pin row geometry on the heat transfer from pin fins, was determined. Array averaged heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for two configurations of staggered arrays of short pin fins (length to diameter ratio of 4). One configuration contained eight streamwise rows of pins, while the other contained only four rows. Results showed that both the 8-row and the 4-row configurations for an L sub p/D of 4, exhibit higher heat transfer than in similar tests on shorter pin fns (L sub p/D of 1/2 and 2). It was also found that for this L sub p/D ratio, the array averaged heat transfer was slightly higher with eight rows of staggered pins than with only four rows.

  3. Length to diameter ratio and row number effects in short pin fin heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The relative effects of pin length to diameter ratio and of pin row geometry on the heat transfer from pin fins, was determined. Array averaged heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for two configurations of staggered arrays of short pin fins (length to diameter ratio of 4). One configuration contained eight streamwise rows of pins, while the other contained only four rows. Results showed that both the 8-row and the 4-row configurations for an L sub p/D of 4, exhibit higher heat transfer than in similar tests on shorter pin fins (L sub p/D of 1/2 and 2). It was also found that for this L sub p/D ratio, the array averaged heat transfer was slightly higher with eight rows of staggered pins than with only four rows. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14431

  4. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in

  5. Performance of AGR-1 high-temperature reactor fuel during post-irradiation heating tests

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Robert N.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Reber, Edward L.

    2016-05-18

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts from the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor 1 (AGR-1) experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600–1800 °C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4% to 19.1% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium,more » and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 °C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 × 10–6 after 300 h at 1600 °C or 100 h at 1800 °C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 °C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with failed SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 °C in one compact. As a result, post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers

  6. Performance of AGR-1 High-Temperature Reactor Fuel During Post-Irradiation Heating Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A; Hunn, John D; Demkowicz, Paul; Reber, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600 1800 C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4 to 19.1% FIMA have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 10-6 after 300 h at 1600 C or 100 h at 1800 C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with breached SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 C in one compact. Post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers to understand particle behavior.

  7. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  8. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Ellen M. Rabenberg; Brian J. Jaques; Bulent H. Sencer; Frank A. Garner; Paula D. Freyer; Taira Okita; Darryl P. Butt

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  9. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la} of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10{degrees}C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280{degrees}C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284{degrees}C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K{sub la} curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. AGR-1 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; Lance Cole; Scott Ploger; Philip Winston; Binh Pham; Michael Abbott

    2011-01-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment ended on November 6, 2009, after 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor, achieving a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in March 2010 for post-irradiation examination. The first PIE activities included non-destructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and the graphite fuel holders. Dimensional measurements of the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsules shells were performed using a custom vision measurement system (for outer diameters and lengths) and conventional bore gauges (for inner diameters). Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Neutron radiography of the intact Capsule 2 showed a high degree of detail of interior components and confirmed the observation that there was no major damage to the capsule. Disassembly of the capsules was initiated using procedures qualified during out-of-cell mockup testing. Difficulties were encountered during capsule disassembly due to irradiation-induced changes in some of the capsule components’ properties, including embrittled niobium and molybdenum parts that were susceptible to fracture and swelling of the graphite fuel holders that affected their removal from the capsule shells. This required various improvised modifications to the disassembly procedure to avoid damage to the fuel compacts. Ultimately the capsule disassembly was successful and only one compact from Capsule 4 (out of 72 total in the test train) sustained damage during the disassembly process, along with the associated graphite holder. The compacts were generally in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor

  11. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1986-01-28

    Disclosed is an improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients. 2 figs.

  12. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Adamson, M.G.

    1983-12-16

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, is described which consist of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel an/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  13. Fuel pin cladding

    DOEpatents

    Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Adamson, Martyn G.

    1986-01-01

    An improved fuel pin cladding, particularly adapted for use in breeder reactors, consisting of composite tubing with austenitic steel on the outer portion of the thickness of the tube wall and with nickel and/or ferritic material on the inner portion of the thickness of the tube wall. The nickel forms a sacrificial barrier as it reacts with certain fission products thereby reducing fission product activity at the austenitic steel interface. The ferritic material forms a preventive barrier for the austenitic steel as it is immune to liquid metal embrittlement. The improved cladding permits the use of high density fuel which in turn leads to a better breeding ratio in breeder reactors, and will increase the threshold at which failure occurs during temperature transients.

  14. Developing and testing solar irradiance forecasting techniques in the Hawaiian Islands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. K.; Souza, J. M.; Stein, K.

    2014-12-01

    Irradiance variability, primarily driven by cloud formation and advection, can be problematic in the state of Hawaíi, because of the high penetration of distributed solar and the small scale of the island electrical grids. The Hawaíi Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is developing an operational system in order to research and test new techniques to generate solar forecasts for the Hawaiian Islands. The operational system comprises the following three components.(i) A ground-observation-based advection model, using sky imagers and a ceilometer located at the University of Hawaíi at Mānoa. Every 10 minutes (during daylight hours), this component generates a high-resolution 1 hour Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) prediction for a region that is within ~15 km of the instrumentation. (ii) A satellite-image-based advection model, using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery and the Heliosat-II method. Every 30 minutes (during daylight hours), this component generates a 1 km resolution, 6 hour GHI prediction for the entire Hawaiian Archipelago. (iii) A coupled ocean-atmosphere model, using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, including newly available microphysics, shallow convection parameterization, and radiative transfer model options. Nightly, this component generates 48 hour GHI, Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI), and Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance (DHI) predictions for (a) a 10 km resolution domain covering the full Hawaiian Archipelago and (b) a nested 2 km resolution domain covering the islands of Maui, Óahu, and Hawaíi. We discuss the development and validation of the system, and the scales of forecasting accuracy for each component. We also examine the impact of the coupled model on the simulations of surface flux processeses and ocean-atmosphere feedbacks, both of which influence the prediction of regional cloud properties.

  15. Proton irradiation test to scintillator-directory-coupled CCD onboard FFAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagino, Ryo; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Anabuki, Naohisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2013-09-01

    FFAST is a large area sky survey mission at hard X-ray region by using a spacecraft formation flying. It consists of two small satellites, a telescope satellite, carrying a multilayer super mirror, and a detector satellite, carrying scintillator-deposited CCDs (SD-CCDs). SD-CCD is the imaging device which realized sensitivity to 80 keV by pasting up a scintillator on CCD directly. Soft X-ray events are directly detected in the CCD. On the other hand, Hard X-ray events are converted to optical photons by the scintillator and then the CCD detects the photons. We have obtained the spectrum with 109Cd and successfully detected the events originated from the CsI. For a space use of a CCD, we have to understand aged deterioration of CCD in high radiative environments. In addition, in the case of SD-CCD, we must investigate the influence of radio-activation of a scintillator. We performed experiments of proton irradiation to the SD-CCD as space environmental tests of cosmic rays. The SD-CCD is irradiated with the protons with the energy of 100 MeV and neglected for about 150 hours. As a result, the derived CTI profile of SD-CCD is similarly to ones of XIS/Suzaku and NeXT4 CCD/ASTRO-H. In contrast, CTIs derived from the data within 4 hours after irradiation is 10 times or more larger than the ones after 150 hours. This may be due to influence of an annealing. We also report a performance study of SD-CCD, including the detection of scintillation events, before proton irradiation.

  16. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any

  17. Foolproof quick-release locking pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. P.; Othman, T. E.; Zmuda, L. J.

    1970-01-01

    Locking pin can be withdrawn only when stress on the joint is negligible. Pin consists of a forward-pointing sleeve, a spring-loaded sliding handle, and a sliding plunger. Plunger movement controls installation and withdrawal of pin.

  18. First irradiation tests results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Røed, K.; Alme, J.; Costa, F.; Lippmann, C.; Rehman, A. Ur; Nikolai Torsvik, I.; Kiss, T.; David, E.; Velure, A.; Bratrud, L.; Torgersen, C.; Röhrich, D.; Ullaland, K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will present the first results from irradiation tests performed on the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). The RCU2 is developed in order to double the readout speed with respect to the present RCU1, which then will fulfil the requirements for LHC RUN2. While the present RCU1 is based on an SRAM based FPGA, whose configuration memory has shown to be sensitive to single event upsets, the newly released Flash-based Smartfusion2 FPGA from Microsemi has been chosen for the RCU2.

  19. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  20. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  1. Irradiation testing of full-sized, reduced-enrichment fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Copeland, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of the irradiation testing of full-sized, reduced-enrichment fuel elements and fuel rods under the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is reported. Being tested are UAl/sub x/-Al, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Al, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al, and U/sub 3/Si-Al dispersion fuels and UZrH/sub x/ (TRIGA) fuel at uranium densities in the fuel meat ranging from 1.7 to 6.0 Mg/m/sup 3/. Generally good performance has been experienced to date. Some preliminary results of postirradiation examinations are also included. A whole-core demonstration in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor is planned. Some details of this demonstration are provided.

  2. AGR-2 Irradiated Test Train Preliminary Inspection and Disassembly First Look

    SciTech Connect

    Ploger, Scott; Demkowciz, Paul; Harp, Jason

    2015-05-01

    The AGR 2 irradiation experiment began in June 2010 and was completed in October 2013. The test train was shipped to the Materials and Fuels Complex in July 2014 for post-irradiation examination (PIE). The first PIE activities included nondestructive examination of the test train, followed by disassembly of the test train and individual capsules and detailed inspection of the capsule contents, including the fuel compacts and their graphite fuel holders. Dimensional metrology was then performed on the compacts, graphite holders, and steel capsule shells. AGR 2 disassembly and metrology were performed with the same equipment used successfully on AGR 1 test train components. Gamma spectrometry of the intact test train gave a preliminary look at the condition of the interior components. No evidence of damage to compacts or graphite components was evident from the isotopic and gross gamma scans. Disassembly of the AGR 2 test train and its capsules was conducted rapidly and efficiently by employing techniques refined during the AGR 1 disassembly campaign. Only one major difficulty was encountered while separating the test train into capsules when thermocouples (of larger diameter than used in AGR 1) and gas lines jammed inside the through tubes of the upper capsules, which required new tooling for extraction. Disassembly of individual capsules was straightforward with only a few minor complications. On the whole, AGR 2 capsule structural components appeared less embrittled than their AGR 1 counterparts. Compacts from AGR 2 Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6 were in very good condition upon removal. Only relatively minor damage or markings were visible using high resolution photographic inspection. Compact dimensional measurements indicated radial shrinkage between 0.8 to 1.7%, with the greatest shrinkage observed on Capsule 2 compacts that were irradiated at higher temperature. Length shrinkage ranged from 0.1 to 0.9%, with by far the lowest axial shrinkage on Capsule 3 compacts

  3. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  4. 3D-FBK Pixel Sensors: Recent Beam Tests Results with Irradiated Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Micelli, A.; Helle, K.; Sandaker, H.; Stugu, B.; Barbero, M.; Hugging, F.; Karagounis, M.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kruger, H.; Tsung, J.W.; Wermes, N.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Susinno, G.; Gallrapp, C.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; La Rosa, A.; Pernegger, H.; Roe, S.; /CERN /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Hawaii U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /New Mexico U. /New Mexico U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /VTT Electronics, Espoo /VTT Electronics, Espoo

    2012-04-30

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider, and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary vertices from the collisions and secondary vertices produced by short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradiated 3D devices produced at FBK (Trento, Italy). The performance of these devices, all bump-bonded with the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 read-out chip, is compared to that observed before irradiation in a previous beam test.

  5. Fabrication Control Plan for ORNL RH-LOCA ATF Test Specimens to be Irradiated in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin G. Field; Richard Howard; Michael Teague

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this fabrication plan is (1) to summarize the design of a set of rodlets that will be fabricated and then irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and (2) provide requirements for fabrication and acceptance criteria for inspections of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) – Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) rodlet components. The functional and operational (F&OR) requirements for the ATF program are identified in the ATF Test Plan. The scope of this document only covers fabrication and inspections of rodlet components detailed in drawings 604496 and 604497. It does not cover the assembly of these items to form a completed test irradiation assembly or the inspection of the final assembly, which will be included in a separate INL final test assembly specification/inspection document. The controls support the requirements that the test irradiations must be performed safely and that subsequent examinations must provide valid results.

  6. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.; Steffen, Jim M.

    1985-01-01

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inserted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  7. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.; Steffen, J.M.

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inerted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  8. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang Yeob; Hien, Tran Thi; Lim, Sung Chul; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. {yields} UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. {yields} UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation ({lambda} = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  9. MOX Average Power Test 30 GWd/MT PIE: Quick Look

    SciTech Connect

    MORRIS, RN

    2001-02-14

    This report summarizes the early results of the post irradiation examination of the 30 GWd/MT MOX Average Power Test Capsules (numbers 3 and 10). The purpose of this preliminary examination is to document and monitor the progress of the MOX Average Power Test Irradiation. The capsules and their fuel pins were found to be in excellent condition. Measurement of the fission gas release fraction (about 1.50 to 2.26%), preliminary fuel stack gamma scan measurements, and preliminary fuel pin diameter measurements indicate that the fuel is behaving as expected.

  10. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.

    1984-05-30

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pins passageway extending through the assembly.

  11. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-02-03

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  12. Differential pressure pin discharge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a discharge assembly for allowing elongate pins to be discharged from an area of relatively low pressure to an area of relatively greater pressure. The discharge assembly includes a duck valve having a lip piece made of flexible material. The flexible lip piece responds to a fluctuating pressure created downstream by an aspirator. The aspirator reduces the downstream pressure sensed by the duck valve when the discharge assembly is in the open position. This allows elongate pins to be moved through the duck valve with no backflow because the aspirator pressure is less than the pressure in the low pressure area from which the pins originate. Closure of the assembly causes the aspirator static pressure to force the flexible duck valve lip piece into a tightly sealed position also preventing backflow. The discharge assembly can be easily controlled using a single control valve which blocks the flow of aspirator gas and closes the pin passageway extending through the assembly.

  13. Irradiation Test Plan for the ATR National Scientific User Facility - University of Wisconsin Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heather J. MacLean; Kumar Sridharan; Timothy A. Hyde

    2008-06-01

    The performance of advanced nuclear systems critically relies on the performance of the materials used for cladding, duct, and other structural components. In many proposed advanced systems, the reactor design pushes the temperature and the total radiation dose higher than typically seen in a light water reactor. Understanding the stability of these materials under radiation is critical. There are a large number of materials or material systems that have been developed for greater high temperature or high dose performance for which little or no information on radiation response exists. The goal of this experiment is to provide initial data on the radiation response of these materials. The objective of the UW experiment is to irradiate materials of interest for advanced reactor applications at a variety of temperatures (nominally 300°C, 400°C, 500°C, and 700°C) and total dose accumulations (nominally 3 dpa and 6 dpa). Insertion of this irradiation test is proposed for September 2008 (ATR Cycle 143A).

  14. Development and irradiation test of lost alpha detection system for ITER.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, M; Nagasaka, T; Fujioka, K; Fujimoto, Y; Tanaka, T; Ido, T; Yamamoto, S; Kashiwa, S; Sasao, M

    2010-10-01

    We developed a lost alpha detection system to use in burning plasma experiments. The scintillators of Ag:ZnS and polycrystalline Ce:YAG were designed for a high-temperature environment, and the optical transmission line was designed to transmit from the scintillator to the port plug. The required optical components of lenses and mirrors were irradiated using the fission reactor with the initial result that there was no clear change after the irradiation with a neutron flux of 9.6×10(17) nm(-2)  s(-1) for 48 h. We propose a diagnostic of alpha particle loss, so-called alpha particle induced gamma ray spectroscopy. The initial laboratory test has been carried out by the use of the Ce doped Lu(2)SiO(5) scintillator detector and an Am-Be source to detect the 4.44 MeV high energy gamma ray due to the (9)Be(α,nγ)(12)C reaction.

  15. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds. Phase 2: Results of duplex-type experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degrees}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. {open_quotes}Mean{close_quote} curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K{sub la} curve were fit to the data with only the {open_quotes}reference temperature{close_quotes} as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined.

  16. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  17. Post-refinement multiscale method for pin power reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, B.; Seker, V.; Downar, T.; Xu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The ability to accurately predict local pin powers in nuclear reactors is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause fuel pin failure during steady state and transient operation. In the research presented here, methods are developed to improve the local solution using high order methods with boundary conditions from a low order global solution. Several different core configurations were tested to determine the improvement in the local pin powers compared to the standard techniques based on diffusion theory and pin power reconstruction (PPR). The post-refinement multiscale methods use the global solution to determine boundary conditions for the local solution. The local solution is solved using either a fixed boundary source or an albedo boundary condition; this solution is 'post-refinement' and thus has no impact on the global solution. (authors)

  18. Effects of post-irradiation annealing and re-irradiation on microstructure in surveillance test specimens of the Loviisa-1 reactor studied by atom probe tomography and positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Kuramoto, A.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Nozawa, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Valo, M.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a microstructural study of a surveillance test specimen from the Loviisa-1 reactor in Finland, which is a Russian-type pressurized water reactor (VVER-440), after initial irradiation to a neutron fluence of 2.5 × 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV), post-irradiation annealing at 475 °C for 100 h and re-irradiation to three different fluences up to 2.7 × 1019 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) were used to characterize the test specimens. APT results showed the formation of Cu-rich solute clusters (SCs) during the initial irradiation and their subsequent coarsening during annealing. After re-irradiation, a small number of SCs formed once again. The hardening due to the SCs was estimated using the Russell-Brown model based on the APT results, and was in good agreement with the measured hardening after the initial irradiation and post-irradiation annealing. In contrast, during the first-step of re-irradiation, the estimated hardening due to the SCs was smaller than the measured hardening. This suggested that the hardening after re-irradiation was due to some microstructure other than the observed SCs. This difference was attributed to newly-formed matrix defects during re-irradiation, which was supported by the PAS results. However in subsequent steps of re-irradiation, the hardening was almost constant.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in liver after the test exposition of laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrzynski, A.; Roszkiewicz, A.; Bautembach, S.

    1986-12-01

    The aim of this research was to verify characteristic morphological changes in the liver with regard to survival time after laser irradiation. The duration of irradiation was constant. For the purpose of irradiation we used a helium-neon laser. The value of the energy absorbed during the exposition amounted to about 2.5 J. Segments from the irradiated liver field of rats were taken directly after decapitation following different times of survival, and the changes were estimated in an ultrastructural microscope. Our results showed dependence of certain morphological changes (perceptible only by ultrastructural examination) on the time of survival after irradiation.

  20. Gamma irradiation test report of simulated grout specimens for gas generation/liquid advection

    SciTech Connect

    Hinman, C.A.

    1994-10-14

    This report presents the results from an irradiation test performed on four specimens of grout that were fabricated from synthetic Double Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) liquid waste. The objective was to investigate the radiolytic generation of gases and the potential for advective rejection of waste liquids from the grout matrix and to provide experimental information for the validation of the C-Cubed calculated model. It has been demonstrated that a number of gases can be formed within the grout due to radiolytic decomposition of various chemical components that make up the grout. This observation leads to the conjecture that the potential exists for the rejection of a portion of the 60 vol% free liquid from the grout matrix driven by pressurization by these gases. It was found that, for the specimen geometries used in this test series, and for peak radiation dose accumulation rates on the order of 4 to 60 times of the initial rate expected in the grout vaults (300 Rads/hr), no liquid rejection was observed from 2% to 35% of the target exposure expected in the grout vaults (1E+08 Rads). When the irradiation rate exceeded the projected grout vault dose rate by a factor of 200 a small amount of liquid rejection was observed from one of two specimens that had received 20% more than the goal exposure. Because of the differences in the magnitudes of the relative radiation field strengths between this study and an actual grout vault, it is concluded that the potential for liquid rejection by internal gas pressurization from presently configured grout waste forms is very low for the expected conditions.

  1. The "Good, Bad and Ugly" pin site grading system: A reliable and memorable method for documenting and monitoring ring fixator pin sites.

    PubMed

    Clint, S A; Eastwood, D M; Chasseaud, M; Calder, P R; Marsh, D R

    2010-02-01

    Although there is much in the literature regarding pin site infections, there is no accepted, validated method for documenting their state. We present a system for reliably labelling pin sites on any ring fixator construct and an easy-to-remember grading system to document the state of each pin site. Each site is graded in terms of erythema, pain and discharge to give a 3-point scale, named "Good", "Bad" and "Ugly" for ease of recall. This system was tested for intra- and inter-observer reproducibility. 15 patients undergoing elective limb reconstruction were recruited. A total of 218 pin sites were independently scored by 2 examiners. 82 were then re-examined later by the same examiners. 514 pin sites were felt to be "Good", 80 "Bad" and 6 "Ugly". The reproducibility of the system was found to be excellent. We feel our system gives a quick, reliable and reproducible method to monitor individual pin sites and their response to treatment.

  2. High intensity solar irradiation testing of UV optics. [OSO-8 instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greyerbiehl, J. M.; Oberright, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (OSO-8 in orbit) incorporates two high resolution solar pointing spectrometers operating from 1000 A to 4000 A. Energy from the sun enters a Cassegrainian telescope and is focused on a slit while the solar disk is scanned to one arc-second resolution. The stability of the secondary mirrors reflectance was of concern since they would be exposed to intense focused solar energy up to 27 suns. A test program was initiated to simulate this energy input on sample UV mirrors of the MgF2 and LiF types and to evaluate their performance after irradiation. Tests were conducted to simulate the solar spectrum at high intensities (25 suns) and at a single wavelength near Lyman-alpha, but with twenty times the solar intensity at Lyman-alpha. Post-test measurements after every exposure were made at wavelengths from 1025 A to 1849 A. After 75 simulated 'orbits', reflectance changes due to temperature effects were noted to be less than 10%. Reductions in reflectance under high intensity solar radiation were generally greater than 10%. Polymerization of surface contaminations on the LiF mirrors reduced reflectances at short wavelengths by 40%.

  3. Fabrication of U-10 wt.%Zr Metallic Fuel Rodlets for Irradiation Test in BOR-60 Fast Reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Oh, Seok-Jin; Lee, Jung-Won; Lee, Ho-Jin; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication technology for metallic fuel has been developed to produce the driver fuel in a PGSFR in Korea since 2007. In order to evaluate the irradiation integrity and validate the in-reactor of the starting metallic fuel with FMS cladding for the loading of the metallic fuel, U-10 wt.%Zr fuel rodlets were fabricated and evaluated for a verification of the starting driver fuel through an irradiation test in the BOR-60 fast reactor. The injection casting method was applied to U-10 wt.%Zr fuel slugs with a diameter of 5.5 mm. Consequently, fuel slugs per melting batch without casting defects were fabricated through the developmentmore » of advanced casting technology and evaluation tests. The optimal GTAW welding conditions were also established through a number of experiments. In addition, a qualification test was carried out to prove the weld quality of the end plug welding of the metallic fuel rodlets. The wire wrapping of metallic fuel rodlets was successfully accomplished for the irradiation test. Thus, PGSFR fuel rodlets have been soundly fabricated for the irradiation test in a BOR-60 fast reactor.« less

  4. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    DOE PAGES

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design andmore » implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.« less

  5. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design and implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.

  6. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  7. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; R. Schley; J. Palmer; K. Condie

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support the growth of nuclear science and technology in the United States (US). By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this initial review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR, and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. Since 2009, annual reports have been issued to provide updates on the program strategy and the progress made on implementing the strategy. This report provides an update reflecting progress as of January 2014.

  8. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw

    2011-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR; and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this instrumentation development strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing instrumentation development program objectives. This document reports progress toward implementing this strategy in 2010.

  9. A proton irradiation test facility for space research in Ankara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, Ayşenur; Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation often affects the electronic components' performance during the mission duration. In order to ensure reliable performance, the components must be tested to at least the expected dose that will be received in space, before the mission. Accelerator facilities are widely used for such irradiation tests around the world. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) has a 15MeV to 30MeV variable proton cyclotron in Ankara and the facility's main purpose is to produce radioisotopes in three different rooms for different target systems. There is also an R&D room which can be used for research purposes. This paper will detail the design and current state of the construction of a beamline to perform Single Event Effect (SEE) tests in Ankara for the first time. ESA ESCC No.25100 Standard Single Event Effect Test Method and Guidelines is being considered for these SEE tests. The proton beam kinetic energy must be between 20MeV and 200MeV according to the standard. While the proton energy is suitable for SEE tests, the beam size must be 15.40cm x 21.55cm and the flux must be between 10 ^{5} p/cm ^{2}/s to at least 10 ^{8} p/cm ^{2}/s according to the standard. The beam size at the entrance of the R&D room is mm-sized and the current is variable between 10μA and 1.2mA. Therefore, a defocusing beam line has been designed to enlarge the beam size and reduce the flux value. The beam line has quadrupole magnets to enlarge the beam size and the collimators and scattering foils are used for flux reduction. This facility will provide proton fluxes between 10 ^{7} p/cm ^{2}/s and 10 ^{10} p/cm ^{2}/s for the area defined in the standard when completed. Also for testing solar cells developed for space, the proton beam energy will be lowered below 10MeV. This project has been funded by Ministry of Development in Turkey and the beam line construction will finish in two years and SEE tests will be performed for the first time in Turkey.

  10. Preliminary results from Charpy impact testing of irradiated JPDR weld metal and commissioning of a facility for machining of irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Hutton, J.T.; Creech, L.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Rosseel, T.M.; Bishop, P.S.

    1999-09-01

    Forty two full-size Charpy specimens were machined from eight trepans that originated from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). They were also successfully tested and the preliminary results are presented in this report. The trends appear to be reasonable with respect to the location of the specimens with regards to whether they originated from the beltline or the core regions of the vessel, and also whether they were from the inside or outside regions of the vessel wall. A short synopsis regarding commissioning of the facility to machine irradiated materials is also provided.

  11. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X

  12. Evaluating thin film fluid lubricants in a drain and dry mode using a pin and vee block test machine. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-2 on Petroleum Products and Lubricants and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D02.L0.05 on Solid Lubricants. The current edition was approved Oct. 15, 1994 and published December 1994.

  13. Cryogenically cooled detector pin mount

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Jr., William E; Chrisp, Michael P

    2014-06-03

    A focal plane assembly facilitates a molybdenum base plate being mounted to another plate made from aluminum. The molybdenum pin is an interference fit (press fit) in the aluminum base plate. An annular cut out area in the base plate forms two annular flexures.

  14. Dosimetric characteristics of a PIN diode for radiotherapy application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Sharma, S D; Philomina, A; Topkar, A

    2014-08-01

    The PIN diode developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) was modified for its use as a dosimeter in radiation therapy. For this purpose the diode was mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB) and provided with necessary connections so that its response against irradiation can be recorded by a standard radiotherapy electrometer. The dosimetric characteristics of the diode were studied in Co-60 gamma rays as well as high energy X-rays. The measured sensitivity of this PIN diode is 4 nC/cGy which is about ten times higher than some commercial diode dosimeters. The leakage current from the diode is 0.04 nA. The response of the PIN diode is linear in the range of 20-1000 cGy which covers the full range of radiation dose encountered in radiotherapy treatments. The non-linearity of the diode response is 3.5% at 20 cGy and it is less than 1.5% at higher dose values. Its repeatability is within 0.5%. The angular response variation is about 5.6% within 6608 with respect to normal beam incidence. The response of the PIN diode at 6 and 18 MV X-rays varies within 2% with respect to its response at Co-60 gamma rays. The source to surface distance (SSD) dependence of the PIN diode was studied for Co-60 beam. It was found that the response of the diode decreases almost linearly relative to given dose for beams with constant collimator setting but increasing SSD (decreasing dose-rate). Within this study the diode response varied by about 2.5% between the maximum and minimum SSD. The dose-rate dependence of the PIN diode for 6 and 15 MV-rays was studied. The variation in response of diode for both energies in the studied dose range is less than 1%. The field size dependence of the PIN diode response is within 1% with respect to the response of ionisation chamber. These studies indicate that the characteristics of the PIN diode are suitable for use in radiotherapy dosimetry.

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of a PIN diode for radiotherapy application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Sharma, S D; Philomina, A; Topkar, A

    2014-08-01

    The PIN diode developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) was modified for its use as a dosimeter in radiation therapy. For this purpose the diode was mounted on a printed circuit board (PCB) and provided with necessary connections so that its response against irradiation can be recorded by a standard radiotherapy electrometer. The dosimetric characteristics of the diode were studied in Co-60 gamma rays as well as high energy X-rays. The measured sensitivity of this PIN diode is 4 nC/cGy which is about ten times higher than some commercial diode dosimeters. The leakage current from the diode is 0.04 nA. The response of the PIN diode is linear in the range of 20-1000 cGy which covers the full range of radiation dose encountered in radiotherapy treatments. The non-linearity of the diode response is 3.5% at 20 cGy and it is less than 1.5% at higher dose values. Its repeatability is within 0.5%. The angular response variation is about 5.6% within 6608 with respect to normal beam incidence. The response of the PIN diode at 6 and 18 MV X-rays varies within 2% with respect to its response at Co-60 gamma rays. The source to surface distance (SSD) dependence of the PIN diode was studied for Co-60 beam. It was found that the response of the diode decreases almost linearly relative to given dose for beams with constant collimator setting but increasing SSD (decreasing dose-rate). Within this study the diode response varied by about 2.5% between the maximum and minimum SSD. The dose-rate dependence of the PIN diode for 6 and 15 MV-rays was studied. The variation in response of diode for both energies in the studied dose range is less than 1%. The field size dependence of the PIN diode response is within 1% with respect to the response of ionisation chamber. These studies indicate that the characteristics of the PIN diode are suitable for use in radiotherapy dosimetry. PMID:24325130

  16. Gage measures electrical connector pin retention force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The retention force of a female connector pin is measured by observing the action of a calibrated spring in a gage consisting of housing, a plunger terminating in a male subminiature connector pin, and the tension spring.

  17. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-04-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called ';Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, …) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program.

  18. 49 CFR 230.97 - Crank pins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crank pins. 230.97 Section 230.97 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Driving Gear § 230.97 Crank pins. (a) General provisions. Crank pins shall be securely applied. Securing the fit of...

  19. Irradiation test report: Foxboro E11GM, Bailey BY3X31A, and flame retardant ethylene propylene instrumentation cable

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, M E

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program designed to resolve whether or not pressure transmitters located on the core flood tanks at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) during the accident of March 28, 1979 performed within their calibration limits during the periods of high radiation. Two Foxboro transmitters and one Bailey transmitter, each with associated cabling, were subjected to irradiation at a test facility at INEL. The irradiation test was designed to simulate, as closely as possible, the accident conditions experienced on the actual transmitters at TMI. The Bailey Meter Co. transmitter exhibited a definite sensitivity to total integrated dose (TID) of radiation with a 4% zero shift at 5.5 x 10/sup 4/ R TID and increasing to 16% at 5.4 x 10/sup 6/ R TID. The Foxboro units had negligible shift. The associated cabling exhibited a change in insulation resistance of -10% at 1.35 x 10/sup 7/ R TID.

  20. Dy-IP characterization and its application for experimental neutron radiography tests under realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Iida, Kazuhiro; Mori, Noriaki; Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Vontobel, Peter; Estermann, Mirko

    2005-04-01

    Imaging plates containing Dy for neutron radiography have been designed, fabricated and tested experimentally. Using the imaging plates combined with the developed NR system and the honeycomb collimator, quantitative neutron radiograph, which is free from scattered neutron and γ-ray, has been obtained. Application has been conducted for the post-irradiation examination for the nuclear fuel pin.

  1. On the (in)adequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2007-02-01

    Irradiation embrittlement studies rely very often on Charpy impact data, in particular the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, while the DBTT-shift is equivalent to the increase of the fracture toughness transition temperature of ferritic steels, it is not the case for ferritic/martensitic steels. The aim of this study is to critically assess experimental data obtained on a 9%Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, Eurofer-97, to better understand the underlying mechanisms involved during the fracture process. More specifically, a dedicated analysis using the load diagram approach allows to unambiguously reveal the actual effects of irradiation on physically rather than empirically based parameters. A comparison is made between a ferritic and ferritic/martensitic steel to better identify the possible similarities and differences. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests data are examined in a global approach to assess the actual rather than apparent irradiation effects. The adequacy or inadequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects is extensively discussed.

  2. An Altered Treatment Plan Based on Direct to Consumer (DTC) Genetic Testing: Personalized Medicine from the Patient/Pin-cushion Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Jessica D; James, Andra; Paulyson-Nuñez, Kristin

    2012-10-30

    Direct to consumer (DTC) genomic services facilitate the personalized and participatory aspects of "P4" medicine, but raise questions regarding use of genomic data in providing predictive and preventive healthcare. We illustrate the issues involved by describing a pregnancy management case in which a treatment plan was modified based on a DTC result. A woman whose personal and family history were otherwise unremarkable for thromboembolism learned through DTC testing about the presence of a prothrombin (factor 2) gene mutation (rs1799963). Twice daily injections of enoxaparin were recommended throughout pregnancy for this patient who, without prior knowledge of this mutation, would not have been offered such therapy. Moreover, genetically based medical guidelines are a moving target, and treatment of thrombophilic conditions in asymptomatic patients is controversial. We address the state of the art in actionable personalized medicine with respect to clotting disorders in pregnancy, as well as other factors at play- economics, patient preference, and clinical decision support. We also discuss what steps are needed to increase the utility of genomic data in personalized medicine by collecting information and converting it into actionable knowledge.

  3. Evaluation of the limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotter, Susan L.; Wood, Roger; McWeeny, David J.

    A study to evaluate the potential of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test in conjuction with a Gram negative bacteria (GNB) plate count for detecting the irradiation of chicken is described. Preliminary studies demonstrated that chickens irradiated at an absorbed dose of 2.5 kGy could be differentiated from unirradiated birds by measuring levels of endotoxin and of numbers of GNB on chicken skin. Irradiated birds were found to have endotoxin levels similar to those found in unirradiated birds but significantly lower numbers of GNB. In a limited study the test was found to be applicable to birds from different processors. The effect of temperature abuse on the microbiological profile, and thus the efficacy of the test, was also investigated. After temperature abuse, the irradiated birds were identifiable at worst up to 3 days after irradiation treatment at the 2.5 kGy level and at best some 13 days after irradiation. Temperature abuse at 15°C resulted in rapid recovery of surviving micro-organisms which made differentiation of irradiated and unirradiated birds using this test unreliable. The microbiological quality of the bird prior to irradiation treatment also affected the test as large numbers of GNB present on the bird prior to irradiation treatment resulted in larger numbers of survivors. In addition, monitoring the developing flora after irradiation treatment and during subsequent chilled storage also aided differentiation of irradiated and unirradiated birds. Large numbers of yeasts and Gram positive cocci were isolated from irradiated carcasses whereas Gram negative oxidative rods were the predominant spoilage flora on unirradiated birds.

  4. Improved charge collection of the buried p-i-n a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.; Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA )

    1989-09-01

    Charge collection in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by adding thin intrinsic layers to the usual p-i-n structure. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher bias and the electric field is enhanced. When irradiated by 5.8 MeV {alpha} particles, the 5.7 {mu}m thick buried p-i-n detector with bias 300V gives a signal size of 60,000 electrons, compared to about 20,000 electrons with the simple p-i-n detectors. The improved charge collection in the new structure is discussed. The capability of tailoring the field profile by doping a-Si:H opens a way to some interesting device structures. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Pinning control of chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-08-01

    The position of the coherent and incoherent domain of a chimera state in a ring of nonlocally coupled oscillators is strongly influenced by the initial conditions, making nontrivial the problem of confining them in a specific region of the structure. In this paper we propose the use of spatial pinning to induce a chimera state where the nodes belonging to one domain, either the coherent or the incoherent, are fixed by the control action. We design two different techniques according to the dynamics to be forced in the region of pinned nodes, and validate them on FitzHugh-Nagumo and Kuramoto oscillators. Furthermore, we introduce a suitable strategy to deal with the effects of finite size in small structures.

  6. Pinning control of chimera states.

    PubMed

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-08-01

    The position of the coherent and incoherent domain of a chimera state in a ring of nonlocally coupled oscillators is strongly influenced by the initial conditions, making nontrivial the problem of confining them in a specific region of the structure. In this paper we propose the use of spatial pinning to induce a chimera state where the nodes belonging to one domain, either the coherent or the incoherent, are fixed by the control action. We design two different techniques according to the dynamics to be forced in the region of pinned nodes, and validate them on FitzHugh-Nagumo and Kuramoto oscillators. Furthermore, we introduce a suitable strategy to deal with the effects of finite size in small structures. PMID:27627316

  7. Pinning control of chimera states.

    PubMed

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-08-01

    The position of the coherent and incoherent domain of a chimera state in a ring of nonlocally coupled oscillators is strongly influenced by the initial conditions, making nontrivial the problem of confining them in a specific region of the structure. In this paper we propose the use of spatial pinning to induce a chimera state where the nodes belonging to one domain, either the coherent or the incoherent, are fixed by the control action. We design two different techniques according to the dynamics to be forced in the region of pinned nodes, and validate them on FitzHugh-Nagumo and Kuramoto oscillators. Furthermore, we introduce a suitable strategy to deal with the effects of finite size in small structures.

  8. Irradiation creep properties of a near-isotropic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, T.; Fujisaki, K.; Eto, M.

    1988-05-01

    Two irradiation creep tests on near-isotropic graphite (SM1-24) for HTGRs were performed at around 900 °C in the JMTR. Neutron fluences ranged from 5.50 × 10 24 n/m 2 (E> 29 fJ) to 12.4 × 10 24 n/m 2 (E> 29 fJ) , depending on the position of the specimen. Irradiation creep strain (ɛ 0) was obtained from the equation ɛ c = (σ/E 0)[1-exp(-bΦ)] + KσΦ , by measuring dimensional changes in unloaded and loaded tensile specimens before and after irradiation, where E 0 is the Young's modulus before irradiation, K the creep coefficient, and b a constant. The value of K was estimated assuming that 1-exp(-bΦ) ˜-1 over the range of neutron fluence tested here. Mercury porosimetry was employed to add consideration to the mechanism of irradiation creep using unloaded and loaded specimens. The irradiation creep strain is proportional to stress and to neutron fluence for larger fluences. The irradiation creep coefficient is in inverse proportion to Young's modulus before irradiation, KE 0 = 0.247 . From the values of the average Young's moduli before irradiation for two irradiation creep tests, the creep coefficient was estimated to be 3.03 × 10 -29 (MPa/m 2) -1 and 3.18 × 10 -29(MPa/m 2) -1, respectively. The mercury pore diameter distribution changes upon irradiation, that is pores smaller than 10 μm disappear partly, the total porosity decreases, and the stress tends to facilitate disappearance of the pores. The Young's modulus increases as a result of irradiation. The increase in Young's modulus after a creep tests is smaller than that after irradiation only. The experimental result obtained here is consistent with the explanation for the mechanism of irradiation creep in which two to six interstitial clusters as a pinning point to basal slip disappear during the irradiation creep test.

  9. Effect of behavioral testing on spine density of basal dendrites in the CA1 region of the hippocampus modulated by (56)Fe irradiation.

    PubMed

    Raber, Jacob; Allen, Antiño R; Weber, Sydney; Chakraborti, Ayanabha; Sharma, Sourabh; Fike, John R

    2016-04-01

    A unique feature of the space radiation environment is the presence of high-energy charged particles, including (56)Fe ions, which can present a significant hazard to space flight crews during and following a mission. (56)Fe irradiation-induced cognitive changes often involve alterations in hippocampal function. These alterations might involve changes in spine morphology and density. In addition to irradiation, performing a cognitive task can also affect spine morphology. Therefore, it is often hard to determine whether changes in spine morphology and density are due to an environmental challenge or group differences in performance on cognitive tests. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the ability of exploratory behavior to increase specific measures of hippocampal spine morphology and density is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. In sham-irradiated mice, exploratory behavior increased basal spine density in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the enclosed blade of the dentate gyrus. These effects were not seen in irradiated mice. In addition, following exploratory behavior, there was a trend toward a decrease in the percent stubby spines on apical dendrites in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in (56)Fe-irradiated, but not sham-irradiated, mice. Other hippocampal regions and spine measures affected by (56)Fe irradiation showed comparable radiation effects in behaviorally naïve and cognitively tested mice. Thus, the ability of exploratory behavior to alter spine density and morphology in specific hippocampal regions is affected by (56)Fe irradiation. PMID:26801826

  10. Re-weldability tests of irradiated 316L(N) stainless steel using laser welding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hirokazu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kalinin, George; Kohno, Wataru; Morishima, Yasuo

    2002-12-01

    SS316L(N)-IG is the candidate material for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of fusion reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper describes a study on re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated SS316L(N)-IG and the effect of helium generation on the mechanical properties of the weld joint. The laser welding process is used for re-welding of the water cooling branch pipeline repairs. It is clarified that re-welding of SS316L(N)-IG irradiated up to about 0.2 dpa (3.3 appm He) can be carried out without a serious deterioration of tensile properties due to helium accumulation. Therefore, repair of the ITER blanket cooling pipes can be performed by the laser welding process.

  11. Investigation of the bulk pinning force in YBCO superconducting films with nano-engineered pinning centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A.; Dang, V. S.; Yearwood, G.; Mikheenko, P.; Huhtinen, H.; Paturi, P.

    2014-08-01

    For practical applications of superconducting materials in applied magnetic fields, artificial pinning centres in addition to natural ones are required to oppose the Lorentz force. These pinning centres are actually various types of defects in the superconductor matrix. The pinning centres can be categorised on their dimension (volume, surface, or point) and on their character (normal cores or Δκ cores). We have used the Dew Hughes approach to determine the types of pinning centres present in various samples, with various thicknesses, temperatures and nanostructured additions to the superconducting matrix. Results show that normal surface pinning centres are present throughout almost all the samples, as dominant pinning mechanism. Such 2D extended pinning centres are mainly due to dislocations, grain boundaries, nanorods. Strong normal point pinning centres were found to be common in BZO doped YBCO samples. Other types of pinning centres, in various (minor) concentrations were also found in some of the samples.

  12. Pin1At regulates PIN1 polar localization and root gravitropism

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Wanyan; Gong, Ximing; Yang, Qiaoyun; Yu, Hao; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2016-01-01

    Root gravitropism allows plants to establish root systems and its regulation depends on polar auxin transport mediated by PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transporters. PINOID (PID) and PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) act antagonistically on reversible phosphorylation of PINs. This regulates polar PIN distribution and auxin transport. Here we show that a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1At regulates root gravitropism. Downregulation of Pin1At suppresses root agravitropic phenotypes of pp2aa and 35S:PID, while overexpression of Pin1At affects root gravitropic responses and enhances the pp2aa agravitropic phenotype. Pin1At also affects auxin transport and polar localization of PIN1 in stele cells, which is mediated by PID and PP2A. Furthermore, Pin1At catalyses the conformational change of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs of PIN1. Thus, Pin1At mediates the conformational dynamics of PIN1 and affects PID- and PP2A-mediated regulation of PIN1 polar localization, which correlates with the regulation of root gravitropism. PMID:26791759

  13. Alignment Pins for Assembling and Disassembling Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Oliver C.

    2008-01-01

    Simple, easy-to-use, highly effective tooling has been devised for maintaining alignment of bolt holes in mating structures during assembly and disassembly of the structures. The tooling was originally used during removal of a body flap from the space shuttle Atlantis, in which misalignments during removal of the last few bolts could cause the bolts to bind in their holes. By suitably modifying the dimensions of the tooling components, the basic design of the tooling can readily be adapted to other structures that must be maintained in alignment. The tooling includes tapered, internally threaded alignment pins designed to fit in the bolt holes in one of the mating structures, plus a draw bolt and a cup that are used to install or remove each alignment pin. In preparation for disassembly of two mating structures, external supports are provided to prevent unintended movement of the structures. During disassembly of the structures, as each bolt that joins the structures is removed, an alignment pin is installed in its place. Once all the bolts have been removed and replaced with pins, the pins maintain alignment as the structures are gently pushed or pulled apart on the supports. In assembling the two structures, one reverses the procedure described above: pins are installed in the bolt holes, the structures are pulled or pushed together on the supports, then the pins are removed and replaced with bolts. The figure depicts the tooling and its use. To install an alignment pin in a bolt hole in a structural panel, the tapered end of the pin is inserted from one side of the panel, the cup is placed over the pin on the opposite side of the panel, the draw bolt is inserted through the cup and threaded into the pin, the draw bolt is tightened to pull the pin until the pin is seated firmly in the hole, then the draw bolt and cup are removed, leaving the pin in place. To remove an alignment pin, the cup is placed over the pin on the first-mentioned side of the panel, the draw

  14. Critical processes and parameters in the development of accident tolerant fuels drop-in capsule irradiation tests

    DOE PAGES

    Barrett, K. E.; Ellis, K. D.; Glass, C. R.; Roth, G. A.; Teague, M. P.; Johns, J.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program is to develop the next generation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels with improved performance, reliability, and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions and with reduced waste generation. An irradiation test series has been defined to assess the performance of proposed ATF concepts under normal LWR operating conditions. The Phase I ATF irradiation test series is planned to be performed as a series of drop-in capsule tests to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operated by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Design, analysis, and fabrication processes formore » ATR drop-in capsule experiment preparation are presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of special design considerations, parameter sensitivity analysis, and precise fabrication and inspection techniques for figure innovative materials used in ATF experiment assemblies. A Taylor Series Method sensitivity analysis approach was used to identify the most critical variables in cladding and rodlet stress, temperature, and pressure calculations for design analyses. The results showed that internal rodlet pressure calculations are most sensitive to the fission gas release rate uncertainty while temperature calculations are most sensitive to cladding I.D. and O.D. dimensional uncertainty. The analysis showed that stress calculations are most sensitive to rodlet internal pressure uncertainties, however the results also indicated that the inside radius, outside radius, and internal pressure were all magnified as they propagate through the stress equation. This study demonstrates the importance for ATF concept development teams to provide the fabricators as much information as possible about the material properties and behavior observed in prototype testing, mock-up fabrication and assembly, and chemical and mechanical testing of the materials that may have been performed in the concept development phase

  15. Critical processes and parameters in the development of accident tolerant fuels drop-in capsule irradiation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, K. E.; Ellis, K. D.; Glass, C. R.; Roth, G. A.; Teague, M. P.; Johns, J.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program is to develop the next generation of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels with improved performance, reliability, and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions and with reduced waste generation. An irradiation test series has been defined to assess the performance of proposed ATF concepts under normal LWR operating conditions. The Phase I ATF irradiation test series is planned to be performed as a series of drop-in capsule tests to be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) operated by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Design, analysis, and fabrication processes for ATR drop-in capsule experiment preparation are presented in this paper to demonstrate the importance of special design considerations, parameter sensitivity analysis, and precise fabrication and inspection techniques for figure innovative materials used in ATF experiment assemblies. A Taylor Series Method sensitivity analysis approach was used to identify the most critical variables in cladding and rodlet stress, temperature, and pressure calculations for design analyses. The results showed that internal rodlet pressure calculations are most sensitive to the fission gas release rate uncertainty while temperature calculations are most sensitive to cladding I.D. and O.D. dimensional uncertainty. The analysis showed that stress calculations are most sensitive to rodlet internal pressure uncertainties, however the results also indicated that the inside radius, outside radius, and internal pressure were all magnified as they propagate through the stress equation. This study demonstrates the importance for ATF concept development teams to provide the fabricators as much information as possible about the material properties and behavior observed in prototype testing, mock-up fabrication and assembly, and chemical and mechanical testing of the materials that may have been performed in the concept development phase. Special

  16. Initial tensile test results from J316 stainless steel irradiated in the HFIR spectrally tailored experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel alloys. In this experiment, the spectrum has been tailored to reduce the thermal neutron flux and achieve a He/dpa level near that expected in a fusion reactor.

  17. Dynamic characteristics of a magnetorheological pin joint for civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun

    2014-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) pin joint is a novel device in which its joint moment resistance can be controlled in real-time by altering the applied magnetic field. The smart pin joint is intended to be used as a controllable connector between the columns and beams of a civil structure to instantaneously shift the structural natural frequencies in order to avoid resonance and therefore to reduce unwanted vibrations and hence prevent structural damage. As an intrinsically nonlinear device, modelling of this MR fluid based device is a challenging task and makes the design of a suitable control algorithm a cumbersome situation. Aimed at its application in civil structure, the main purpose of this paper is to test and characterise the hysteretic behaviour of MR pin joint. A test scheme is designed to obtain the dynamic performance of MR pin joint in the dominant earthquake frequency range. Some unique phenomena different from those of MR damper are observed through the experimental testing. A computationally-efficient model is proposed by introducing a hyperbolic element to accurately reproduce its dynamic behaviour and to further facilitate the design of a suitable control algorithm. Comprehensive investigations on the model accuracy and dependences of the proposed model on loading condition (frequency and amplitude) and input current level are reported in the last section of this paper.

  18. Microbial analysis and survey test of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried fruits for patient's food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Hong; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Kyung-A.; Son, Eun-Joo; Lyu, Eun-Soon

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the microbiological and organoleptic qualities of gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, pears, strawberries, pineapples, and grapes, and evaluated the organoleptic acceptability of the sterilized freeze-dried fruits for hospitalized patients. The freeze-dried fruits were gamma-irradiated at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, and 15 kGy, and their quality was evaluated. Microorganisms were not detected in apples after 1 kGy, in strawberries and pears after 4 kGy, in pineapples after 5 kGy, and in grapes after 12 kGy of gamma irradiation. The overall acceptance score, of the irradiated freeze-dried fruits on a 7-point scale at the sterilization doses was 5.5, 4.2, 4.0, 4.1, and 5.1 points for apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The sensory survey of the hospitalized cancer patients (N=102) resulted in scores of 3.8, 3.7, 3.9, 3.9, and 3.7 on a 5-point scale for the gamma-irradiated freeze-dried apples, strawberries, pears, pineapples, and grapes, respectively. The results suggest that freeze-dried fruits can be sterilized with a dose of 5 kGy, except for grapes, which require a dose of 12 kGy, and that the organoleptic quality of the fruits is acceptable to immuno-compromised patients. However, to clarify the microbiological quality and safety of freeze-dried fruits should be verified by plating for both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms.

  19. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  20. Radiation-induced changes in melanization and phenoloxidase in Caribbean fruit fly larvae (diptera:tephritidae) as the basis for a simple test of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.L.; Milne, K.; Smittle, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    First instars of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), were irradiated with 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 75, 100, and 150 Gy doses from a Cs-137 source, and observed for whole body melanization as late third instars. Control larvae rapidly melanized, whereas larvae irradiated at {ge}20 Gy failed to show typical melanization after freezing and thawing. Assays of phenoloxidase in control and irradiated larvae showed greatly decreased enzyme activity at {ge}20 Gy and substantial reduction at lower doses. Larvae were also irradiated on the 1st d of each instar, and phenoloxidase activity was determined when they became late third instars. Larvae irradiated on the 1st d of the first instar and on 1st d of the second instar has {approx}90% or greater reduction in phenoloxidase activity as late third instars. Larvae irradiated on the 1st d of the instar had {approx}50% reduction in phenoloxidase activity at the time they became late third instars leaving the food to pupate. A simple spot test for phenoloxidase was developed that produced a red color with a crushed control larvae and no color with a larva irradiated at {ge}25 Gy. The radiation induced changes in melanization and phenoloxidase activity, and a simple spot test may serve as tests for irradiation treatment of Caribbean fruit fly larvae. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  2. Nuclear reactor with fuel pin bracing grid

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, R.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel pin bracing grid for a nuclear fuel sub-assembly comprises a honeycomb array of unit cells formed from discrete strips. The cells are hexagonal, three alternate sides having windows and the remaining sides have linear groups of three embossments to provide guide pads for fuel pins. The openings provide a measure of compliancy for the grid to facilitate insertion and withdrawal of the pins. A fuel sub-assembly for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor has a central fuel section with end extensions, the fuel section comprising a bundle of fuel pins in a hexagonal wrapper the pins being braced by a series of grids according to the invention. Reprocessing of the fuel is facilitated because the pins are withdrawable collectively from the compliant grids and wrapper combination merely by cutting an end extension from the wrapper. 4 claims.

  3. The kinetics of root gravitropism in PIN mutants suggest redundancy in the signal transduction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolverton, Chris

    As nonmotile organisms, plants rely on differential growth responses to maximize exposure to the resources necessary for growth and reproduction. One of the primary environmental cues causing differential growth in roots is gravity, which is thought to be sensed predominately in the root cap. This gravity perception event is thought to be transduced into information in the form of an auxin gradient across the cap and propagating basipetally toward the elongation zone. The discovery of several families of auxin efflux and influx carriers has provided significant insight into the mechanisms of directional auxin transport, and the identification of mutants in the genes encoding these carriers provides the opportunity to test the roles of these transporters in plant gravitropism. In this study, we report the results of a systematic, high-resolution study of the kinetics of root gravitropism of mutants in the PIN family of auxin efflux carriers. Based on reported expression and localization patterns, we predicted mutations in PIN2, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 to cause the greatest reduction in root gravitropism. While pin2 mutants showed severe gravitropic deficiencies in roots as reported previously, several alleles of pin3, pin4 and pin7 remained strongly gravitropic. PIN3 has been localized to the central columella cells, the purported gravisensing cells in the root, and shown to rapidly relocate to the lower flank of the columella cells upon gravistimulation, suggesting an early role in auxin gradient formation. Mutant alleles of PIN3 showed an early delay in response, with just 7 deg of curvature in the first hour compared to approximately 15 deg h-1 in wild-type, but their rate of curvature recovered to near wild-type levels over the ensuing 3 h. Pin3 mutants also showed a slower overall growth rate (124 µm h-1 ), elongating at approximately half the rate of wild-type roots (240 µm h-1 ). PIN4 has been localized to the quiescent center in the root, where it presumably

  4. UV testing of solar cells: Effects of antireflective coating, prior irradiation, and UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1993-01-01

    Short-circuit current degradation of electron irradiated double-layer antireflective-coated cells after 3000 hours ultraviolet (UV) exposure exceeds 3 percent; extrapolation of the data to 10(exp 5) hours (11.4 yrs.) gives a degradation that exceeds 10 percent. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences in degradation were observed in cells with double- and single-layer antireflective coatings. The effects of UV-source age were observed and corrections were made to the data. An additional degradation mechanism was identified that occurs only in previously electron-irradiated solar cells since identical unirradiated cells degrade to only 6 +/- 3 percent when extrapolated 10(exp 5) hours of UV illumination.

  5. UV testing of solar cells: Effects of antireflective coating, prior irradiation, and UV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1993-05-01

    Short-circuit current degradation of electron irradiated double-layer antireflective-coated cells after 3000 hours ultraviolet (UV) exposure exceeds 3 percent; extrapolation of the data to 10(exp 5) hours (11.4 yrs.) gives a degradation that exceeds 10 percent. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences in degradation were observed in cells with double- and single-layer antireflective coatings. The effects of UV-source age were observed and corrections were made to the data. An additional degradation mechanism was identified that occurs only in previously electron-irradiated solar cells since identical unirradiated cells degrade to only 6 +/- 3 percent when extrapolated 10(exp 5) hours of UV illumination.

  6. Heat Exchanger With Internal Pin Elements

    DOEpatents

    Gerstmann, Joseph; Hannon, Charles L.

    2004-01-13

    A heat exchanger/heater comprising a tubular member having a fluid inlet end, a fluid outlet end and plurality of pins secured to the interior wall of the tube. Various embodiments additionally comprise a blocking member disposed concentrically inside the pins, such as a core plug or a baffle array. Also disclosed is a vapor generator employing an internally pinned tube, and a fluid-heater/heat-exchanger utilizing an outer jacket tube and fluid-side baffle elements, as well as methods for heating a fluid using an internally pinned tube.

  7. Los Alamos Hot-Cell-Facility modifications for examining FFTF fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.M.; Ledbetter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Commissioned in 1960, the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos was recently modified to meet the needs of the 1980s. Because fuel pins from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) are too long for examination in the original hot cells, we modified cells to accommodate longer fuel pins and to provide other capabilities as well. For instance, the T-3 shipping cask now can be opened in an inert atmosphere that can be maintained for all nondestructive and destructive examinations of the fuel pins. The full-length pins are visually examined and photographed, the wire wrap is removed, and fission gas is sampled. After the fuel pin is cropped, a cap is seal-welded on the section containing the fuel column. This section is then transferred to other cells for gamma-scanning, radiography, profilometry, sectioning for metallography, and chemical analysis.

  8. Investigating the Effects of Pin Tool Design on Friction Stir Welded Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubisoff, H. A.; Querin, J. A.; Schneider, Judy A.; Magee, D.

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSWing), a solid state joining technique, uses a non-consumable rotating pin tool to thermomechanically join materials. Heating of the weldment caused by friction and deformation is a function of the interaction between the pin tool and the work piece. Therefore, the geometry of the pin tool is in part responsible for the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. In this study microwave sintered tungsten carbide (WC) pin tools with tapers and flats were used to FSW Ti-6Al-4V. Transverse sections of welds were mechanically tested, and the microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning election microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to characterize the texture within the welds produced from the different pin tool designs.

  9. Synchronization for an array of neural networks with hybrid coupling by a novel pinning control strategy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dawei; Lewis, Frank L; Wang, Liping; Xu, Ke

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a novel pinning synchronization (synchronization with pinning control) scheme for an array of neural networks with hybrid coupling is investigated. The main contributions are as follows: (1) A novel pinning control strategy is proposed for the first time. Pinning control schemes are introduced as an array of column vector. The controllers are designed as simple linear systems, which are easy to be analyzed or tested. (2) Augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is applied to introduce more relax variables, which can alleviate the requirements of the positive definiteness of the matrix. (3) Based on the appropriate LKF, by introducing some free weighting matrices, some novel synchronization criteria are derived. Furthermore, the proposed pinning control scheme described by column vector can also be expanded to almost all the other array of neural networks. Finally, numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  10. Update on PIN or Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyas, Vashek

    We promised a year back some data on the experiment that we ran with chip and PIN. If you recall, it was the first phase that we reported on here last year, where we used the University bookstore, and two PIN pads, one with very solid privacy shielding, the other one without any. We ran 17 people through the first one, 15 people through the second one, and we also had the students do, about half of them forging the signature, half of them signing their own signature, on the back of the card that is used for purchasing books, or whatever.We had a second phase of the experiment, after long negotiations, and very complicated logistics, with a supermarket in Brno where we were able to do anything that we wanted through the experiment for five hours on the floor, with only the supermarket manager, the head of security, and the camera operators knowing about the experiment. So the shop assistants, the ground floor security, everybody basically on the floor, did not know about the experiment. That was one of the reasons why the supermarket, or management, agreed to take part, they wanted to control their own internal security procedures.

  11. Development of a multi-physics calculation platform dedicated to irradiation devices in a material testing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorsi, T.; Di Salvo, J.; Aggery, A.; D'Aletto, C.; Doederlein, C.; Sireta, P.; Willermoz, G.; Daniel, M.

    2006-07-01

    The physical phenomena involved in irradiation devices within material testing reactors are complex (neutron and photon interactions, nuclear heating, thermal hydraulics, ...). However, the simulation of these phenomena requires a high precision in order to control the condition of the experiment and the development of predictive models. Until now, physicists use different tools with several approximations at each interface. The aim of this work is to develop a calculation platform dedicated to numerical multi-physics simulations of irradiation devices in the future European Jules Horowitz Reactor [1], This platform is based on a multi-physics data model which describes geometries, materials and state parameters associated with a sequence of thematic (neutronics, thermal hydraulics...) computations of these devices. Once the computation is carried out, the results can be returned to the data model (DM). The DM is encapsulated in a dedicated module of the SALOME platform [2] and exchanges data with SALOME native modules. This method allows a parametric description of a study, independent of the code used to perform the simulation. The application proposed in this paper concerns neutronic calculation of a fuel irradiation device with the new method of characteristics implemented in the APOLLO2 code [3]. The device is located at the periphery of the OSIRIS core. This choice is motivated by the possibility to compare the calculation with experimental results, which cannot be done for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, currently in design study phase. (authors)

  12. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the

  13. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

  14. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  15. [Behavior of cats following gamma-irradiation of the head: the induced pleasure test].

    PubMed

    Davydov, B I; Ushakov, I B; Razgovorov, B L

    1985-01-01

    A decrease in the degree of manifestation of the induced pleasure response of male cats to the administration of valerian tincture was observed during the first 1-2 h following gamma-irradiation of the head with a dose of 1.29 C/kg. It is suggested that the absence of the reaction during the first 10-15 min after exposure is indicative of the presence of the phase of a pronounced excitation in the C.N.S. of the exposed animals. PMID:3975366

  16. Pin bearing evaluation of LTM25 composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes pin bearing evaluations of LTM25 composite materials. Northrop Grumman Corporation conducted pin bearing testing and fabricate two panels from composite materials that cure at low temperatures. These materials are being incorporated into Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS) to reduce manufacturing costs since they allow the use of low-cost tooling and facilities. Two composite prepreg product forms were evaluated; MR50/LTM25 unidirectional tape, batch 2881vd and CFS003/LTM25 woven cloth, batch 2216. Northrop Grumman fabricated, machined, and tested specimens to determine the bearing strength in accordance with MIL-HDBK-17D, Volume 1, Section 7.2.4. Quasi-isotropic laminates from the two product forms were fabricated for these tests. In addition, 2 quasi-isotropic panels of dimensions 12 in. x 28 in. were fabricated (one each from the two product forms), inspected, and shipped to NASA Langley for further evaluation.

  17. Generation of plate tectonics via grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, D.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2012-12-01

    Weakening and shear localization in the lithosphere are essential ingredients for understanding how and whether plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. The grain-damage and pinning mechanism of Bercovici & Ricard (2012) for lithospheric shear--localization proposes that damage to the interface between phases in a polycrystalline material like peridotite (composed primarily of olivine and pyroxene) increases the number of small Zener pinning surfaces that constrain mineral grains to ever smaller sizes regardless of creep mechanism. This effect allows a self-softening feedback in which damage and grain-reduction can co-exist with a grain-size dependent diffusion creep rheology; moreoever, grain growth and weak-zone healing are greatly impeded by Zener pinning thereby leading to long-lived relic weak zones. This mechanism is employed in two-dimensional flow calculations to test its ability to generate toroidal (strike-slip) motion from convective type flow and to influence plate evolution. The fluid dynamical calculations employ source-sink driven flow as a proxy for convective poloidal flow (upwelling/downwelling and divergent/convergent motion), and the coupling of this flow with non-linear rheological mechanisms excites toroidal or strike-slip motion. The numerical experiments show that pure dislocation-creep rheology, and grain-damage without Zener pinning (as occurs in a single-phase assemblages) permit only weak localization and toroidal flow; however, the full grain-damage with pinning readily allows focussed localization and intense, plate-like toroidal motion and strike-slip deformation. Rapid plate motion changes are also tested with abrupt rotations of the source-sink field after a plate-like configuration is developed; the post-rotation flow and material property fields are found to never recover or lose memory of the original configuration, leading to suboptimally aligned plate boundaries (e.g., strike-slip margins non

  18. Irradiation performance of nitride fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and advantages of nitride fuels are well documented in the literature. Basically the high thermal conductivity and uranium density of nitride fuels permit high power density, good breeding ratios, low reactivity swings, and large diameter pins compared to oxides. Nitrides are compatible with cladding alloys and liquid metal coolants, thereby reducing fuel/cladding chemical interactions and permitting the use of sodium-bonded pins and the operation of breached pins. Recent analyses done under similar operating conditions show that - compared to metal - fuels mixed nitrides operate at lower temperatures, produce less cladding strain, have greater margins to failure, result in lower transient temperatures, and have lower sodium void reactivity. Uranium nitride fuel pellet fabrication processes were demonstrated during the SP-100 program, and irradiated nitride fuels can be reprocessed by the PUREX process. Irradiation performance data suggest that nitrides have low fission gas release and swelling rates thereby permitting favorable pin designs and long lifetime. The objective of this report is to summarize the available nitride irradiation performance data base and to recommend optimum nitride characteristics for use in advanced liquid metal reactors.

  19. Re-weldability tests of irradiated austenitic stainless steel by a TIG welding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kalinin, George

    2000-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel (SS) is widely used for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of fusion reactors. In particular, SS316L(N)-IG (IG-ITER Grade) is used for the vacuum vessel (VV), pipe lines, blanket modules, branch pipe lines connecting the module coolant system with the manifold and for the other structures of ITER. One of the most important requirements for the VV and the water cooling branch pipelines is the possibility to repair different defects by welding. Those components which may require re-welding should be studied carefully. The SS re-weldability issue has a large impact on the design of in-vessel components, in particular, the design and efficiency of radiation shielding by the modules. Moreover, re-welded components should operate for the lifetime of the reactor. This paper deals with the study of re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated SS316L(N)-IG and the effect of helium generation on the mechanical properties of the weld joint. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding was used for re-welding of the SS.

  20. Pinning of fermionic occupation numbers.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Christian; Gross, David; Christandl, Matthias

    2013-01-25

    The Pauli exclusion principle is a constraint on the natural occupation numbers of fermionic states. It has been suspected since at least the 1970s, and only proved very recently, that there is a multitude of further constraints on these numbers, generalizing the Pauli principle. Here, we provide the first analytic analysis of the physical relevance of these constraints. We compute the natural occupation numbers for the ground states of a family of interacting fermions in a harmonic potential. Intriguingly, we find that the occupation numbers are almost, but not exactly, pinned to the boundary of the allowed region (quasipinned). The result suggests that the physics behind the phenomenon is richer than previously appreciated. In particular, it shows that for some models, the generalized Pauli constraints play a role for the ground state, even though they do not limit the ground-state energy. Our findings suggest a generalization of the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  1. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  2. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  3. Post-irradiation examinations and high-temperature tests on undoped large-grain UO2 discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirot, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Yagnik, S.; Turnbull, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Within the Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) programme, several fuel variants -in the form of thin circular discs - were irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) at burn-ups up to ∼100 GWd/tHM. The design of the fuel assembly was similar to that used in other HBWR programmes: the assembly contained several rods with fuel discs sandwiched between Mo discs, which limited temperature differences within each fuel disc. One such variant was made of large-grain UO2 discs (3D grain size = ∼45 μm) which were subjected to three burn-ups: 42, 72 and 96 GWd/tHM. Detailed characterizations of some of these irradiated large-grain UO2 discs were performed in the CEA Cadarache LECA-STAR hot laboratory. The techniques used included electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Comparisons were then carried out with more standard grain size UO2 discs irradiated under the same conditions. Examination of the high burn-up large-grain UO2 discs revealed the limited formation of a high burn-up structure (HBS) when compared with the standard-grain UO2 discs at similar burn-up. High burn-up discs were submitted to temperature transients up to 1200 °C in the heating test device called Merarg at a relatively low temperature ramp rate (0.2 °C/s). In addition to the total gas release during these tests, the release peaks throughout the temperature ramp were monitored. Tests at 1600 °C were also conducted on the 42 GWd/tHM discs. The fuels were then characterized with the same microanalysis techniques as those used before the tests, to investigate the effects of these tests on the fuel's microstructure and on the fission gas behaviour. This paper outlines the high resistance of this fuel to gas precipitation at high temperature and to HBS formation at high burn-up. It also shows the similarity of the positions, within the grains, where HBS forms at high burn-up and where bubbles appear during the low

  4. /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested /sup 14/C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p less than 0.05). In Group II, the percentage reductions were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p greater than 0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption.

  5. /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests during pelvic radiotherapy: the effect of the amount of small bowel irradiated

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.G.; Stryker, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    Thirty patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy had /sup 14/C-lactose breath tests performed in the first and fifth weeks of treatment. In Group I (21 patients), a significant portion of the small intestine was irradiated, and in Group II (9 patients), only a small portion of the small intestine was irradiated. In Group I, the average reductions in the excretion of ingested /sup 14/C between the first- and fifth-week tests were 41.5% at 1/2 hour postingestion (p<0.05), and 21.8% at 1 hour postingestion (p<0.05). In Group II, the prercentage reduction were 11.8% and 3.7% at 1/2 and 1 hour, respectively (p>0.05). The data suggest that lactose malabsorption is a factor in the etiology of the nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced by patients who are undergoing pelvic radiotherapy, and that the amount of bowel included in the treatment volume significantly influences the degree of malabsorption.

  6. HEDL W-1 SLSF experiment LOPI transient and boiling test results. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.M.; Wood, S.A.; Rothrock, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment was designed to study the heat release characteristics of fast reactor fuel pins under Loss-of-Piping-Integrity (LOPI) accident conditions and determine stable sodium boiling initiation and recovery limits in a prototypic fuel pin bundle array. The results of the experiment address major second level of assurance (LOA-2) safety issues and provide increased insight and understanding of phenomena that would inherently terminate hypothesized accidents with only limited core damage. The irradiation phase of the experiment, consisting of thirteen individual transients, was performed between May 27 and July 20, 1979. The final transient produced approximately two seconds of coolant boiling, cladding dryout, and incipient fuel pin failure. The facility and test hardware performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and achievement of all test objectives.

  7. Pin-Retraction Mechanism On Quick-Release Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Malcolm

    1994-01-01

    Quick-release cover includes pin-retraction mechanism releasing cover quickly from lower of two sets of pin connections holding cover. Cover released at top by pulling lever as described in "Lever-Arm Pin Puller" (NPO-18788). Removal of cover begins when technician or robot pulls upper-pin-release lever. Cover swings downward until tabs on lower pins are pulled through slots in their receptacles. Lower pins are then free.

  8. Engineered pinning landscapes for enhanced 2G coil wire

    DOE PAGES

    Rupich, Martin W.; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Fleshler, Steven; Li, Qiang; Solovyov, Vyacheslav; Ozaki, Toshinori; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai -Kwong; Leroux, Maxime; Koshelev, Alexei E.; et al

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a twofold increase in the in-field critical current of AMSC's standard 2G coil wire by irradiation with 18-MeV Au ions. The optimum pinning enhancement is achieved with a dose of 6 × 1011 Au ions/cm2. Although the 77 K, self-field critical current is reduced by about 35%, the in-field critical current (H//c) shows a significant enhancement between 4 and 50 K in fields > 1 T. The process was used for the roll-to-roll irradiation of AMSC's standard 46-mm-wide production coated conductor strips, which were further processed into standard copper laminated coil wire. The long-length wires show the samemore » enhancement as attained with short static irradiated samples. The roll-to-roll irradiation process can be incorporated in the standard 2G wire manufacturing, with no modifications to the current process. In conclusion, the enhanced performance of the wire will benefit rotating machine and magnet applications.« less

  9. Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D; Jain, Prashant K; Hobbs, Randy W

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

  10. The Mean-Field Flux Pinning Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejic, George

    We develop the Mean-Field Flux Pinning Theory, designed to model the flux line lattice (FLL) as it interacts with itself, the flux pinning centers and the geometry of the superconductor. Like other mean-field theories, the mean-field flux pinning theory does not attempt to model the FLL completely. Instead, it utilizes a simplified model for the FLL, termed the mean-field FLL, in which the FLL is modelled as a continuous vector field rather than as discrete fluxons as in other theories. By so doing, the interactions of the FLL are greatly simplified and more easily modelled. One application of the mean-field flux pinning theory is to predict J_{c} from microstructural data, which we use to determine the optimal Nb-Ti microstructures with (1) alpha -Ti pinning centers and (2) Nb pinning centers. The microstructure is modelled on a grid in which the local values of T_{c} and kappa reflect the spatial distribution of the pinning centers and the superconductor. Using this model, we solve the G-L equations and calculate the pinning potential defined as the vortex free energy as a function of position. We conclude that the ideal Nb-Ti microstructure with alpha-Ti pinning centers would require 40 volume percent of alpha -Ti and have 6nm thick pinning centers. In the Nb pinning center case, the ideal microstructure requires 50 volume percent of Nb and would have 6nm pinning centers. Another application for the mean-field flux pinning theory is to model the FLL as it interacts with the penetrating magnetic fields within lambda of the superconducting surface. Using this theory, we study the effects of sample geometry on the FLL and J _{c} for the thin film geometry. We find that the FLL becomes increasingly distorted as the film thickness is reduced and that J_{c } increases sharply for dimensions less that lambda. These predictions are experimentally evaluated in Nb-Ti thin films. Our results show that J_{c} values as high as 1/3 of J_{d} and a strong orientational

  11. Pinning controllability of complex networks with community structure.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingying; Tang, Yang; Kurths, Jürgen; Fang, Jian-an; Wong, W K

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we study the controllability of networks with different numbers of communities and various strengths of community structure. By means of simulations, we show that the degree descending pinning scheme performs best among several considered pinning schemes under a small number of pinned nodes, while the degree ascending pinning scheme is becoming more powerful by increasing the number of pinned nodes. It is found that increasing the number of communities or reducing the strength of community structure is beneficial for the enhancement of the controllability. Moreover, it is revealed that the pinning scheme with evenly distributed pinned nodes among communities outperforms other kinds of considered pinning schemes. PMID:24089950

  12. METAPHIX-1 non destructive post irradiation examinations in the irradiated elements cell at Phenix

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, Laurent; Masson, M.; Garces, E.; Desjardins, S.; Fontaine, B.; Lacroix, B.; Martella, T.; Loubet, L.; Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.

    2007-07-01

    Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been developing minor actinide (MA) transmutation technology in homogeneous loading mode by use of metal fuel fast reactors in cooperation with Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Fast reactor metal fuel pins of Uranium- Plutonium-Zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloy containing 2 wt% MAs and 2 wt% rare earth elements (REs), 5 wt% MAs, and 5 wt% MAs and 5 wt% REs were irradiated in the PHENIX French fast reactor as METAPHIX experiments. In these METAPHIX experiments, three rigs each consisting of three metal fuel experimental pins and sixteen oxide fuel driver pins were irradiated. The target burnup of the three rigs is 2.4 at%, 7 at% and 11 at% which corresponds to 120, 360 and 600 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in terms of irradiation periods, respectively. The low burnup rig of 2.4 at%, METAPHIX-1, was discharged from the core in August 2004. After cooling, the non-destructive post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of the rig (visual examination, measurement of rig length and deformation) and of the metal fuel pins (visual examination, measurement of pin length and deformation, {gamma}-spectrometry and neutron radiography) were conducted in the Irradiated Elements Cell (IEC) at PHENIX. (authors)

  13. Analysis and results of a hydrogen-moderated isotope production assembly in the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.W.; Rawlins, J.A.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper reports on a cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full-power days at a power level of 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal used to produce {sup 60}Co and a set of four pins with europium oxide to produce {sup 153}Gd, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease osteoporosis. Postirradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the {sup 60}Co production to be predictable to an accuracy of {approximately} 5%. The measured {sup 60}Co spatially distributed concentrations were within 20% of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average {sup 60}Co measured activity was 4% less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes {sup 152}Eu and {sup 154}Eu to an absolute accuracy of {approx equal} 10%. The measured europium radioisotope and {sup 153}Gd concentrations were within 20% of calculated values. The hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many FFTF isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate the accuracy of the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for predicting isotope production rates in this type of assembly.

  14. The sodium-bonding pin concept for advanced fuels part II: analysis of the cladding carburization

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchi, C.; Blank, M.; Coguerelle, M.; Rouault, J.

    1984-10-01

    Cladding carburization in irradiated liquid-metal fast breeder reactor carbide pins is analyzed with particular emphasis on sodium-bonding conditions. Original data from the French Project for advanced fuels and the Swelling Project performed by the European Institute for Transuranium Elements are discussed and compared with published results. The mechanisms of carbon transfer from the fuel to the steel cladding are examined and evaluated concluding that cladding carburization cannot be avoided with the present sodium-bonded pin design if hyperstoichiometric fuel is adopted. An assessment of the pin failure risks involved is made for different steels. Austenitic steels customarily used for cladding do not exhibit a fully satisfactory carburization resistance. Recently developed ferritic alloys are suggested for carbide fuel cladding in future applications.

  15. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  16. Electroanalytical devices with pins and thread.

    PubMed

    Glavan, Ana C; Ainla, Alar; Hamedi, Mahiar M; Fernández-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the adaptive use of conventional stainless steel pins-used in unmodified form or coated with carbon paste-as working, counter, and quasi-reference electrodes in electrochemical devices fabricated using cotton thread or embossed omniphobic R(F) paper to contain the electrolyte and sample. For some applications, these pin electrodes may be easier to modify and use than printed electrodes, and their position and orientation can be changed as needed. Electroanalytical devices capable of multiplex analysis (thread-based arrays or 96-well plates) were easily fabricated using pins as electrodes in either thread or omniphobic R(F) paper.

  17. Ultrasonic measurement of stress in pin and hanger connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Al V.; Hehman, C. S.; Gallagher, D.; Lozev, Margarit G.; Fuchs, P. A.

    1998-03-01

    Pin and hanger connections can sometimes lock up due to corrosion. As the stresses in the connection are cycled due to thermal expansion and contraction of the bridge, fatigue cracking and failure may occur. We constructed an apparatus to simulate a locked-up pin and hanger connection. It consists of a 12 tooth spline bolted to the base of a mechanical testing machine. Hangers were mounted on the spline, which constrains their ends against rotation. The free ends of the hangers were loaded by the test machine's piston. We performed proof of concept tests of a method to detect stresses in pin and hanger connections prior to cracking. The method uses the fact that stress causes change in sound velocity. We propagated shear waves polarized parallel and perpendicular to the hanger axis. The normalized difference in shear wave velocities is called the birefringence. We measured the birefringence near the outer fibers of the hangers, at midsection. We simulated 3 scenarios: continuous monitoring of hanger status; intermittent monitoring from a known initial state; measurement with no a priori knowledge of hanger status. Good agreement with strain gauge data was obtained for all three scenarios.

  18. Interaction between age of irradiation and age of testing in the disruption of operant performance using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Bernard M; Joseph, James A; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty L

    2012-02-01

    Previous research has shown a progressive deterioration in cognitive performance in rats exposed to (56)Fe particles as a function of age. The present experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of age of irradiation independently of the age of testing. Male Fischer-344 rats, 2, 7, 12, and 16 months of age, were exposed to 25-200 cGy of (56)Fe particles (1,000 MeV/n). Following irradiation, the rats were trained to make an operant response on an ascending fixed-ratio reinforcement schedule. When performance was evaluated as a function of both age of irradiation and testing, the results showed a significant effect of age on the dose needed to produce a performance decrement, such that older rats exposed to lower doses of (56)Fe particles showed a performance decrement compared to younger rats. When performance was evaluated as a function of age of irradiation with the age of testing held constant, the results indicated that age of irradiation was a significant factor influencing operant responding, such that older rats tested at similar ages and exposed to similar doses of (56)Fe particles showed similar performance decrements. The results are interpreted as indicating that the performance decrement is not a function of age per se, but instead is dependent upon an interaction between the age of irradiation, the age of testing, and exposure to HZE particles. The nature of these effects and how age of irradiation affects cognitive performance after an interval of 15 to 16 months remains to be established.

  19. Load monitoring of pin-connected structures using piezoelectric impedance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yabin; Li, Dongsheng; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Song, Gangbing

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study on a developed impedance-based technique using Lead Zirconate Titanate patches for load monitoring of pin-connected structures, which are widely used in construction industry. The basic principle behind the load-monitoring technique is to utilize a high-frequency excitation signal (typically >30 kHz) through a surface-bonded piezoelectric sensor/actuator to detect changes in mechanical impedance of the structure due to the variations in structural loads. In order to verify the effectiveness of the developed technique, a tension-controllable structure with a pin connection was fabricated and investigated in this study. A load monitoring index was used to correlate the dominating peak frequency of the real part of the electrical impedance signature to the pin connection load. Experimental results obtained from twenty repeated tests prove that the proposed load-monitoring index increases as the load on the pin connection increases due to the enlarging true contact area of the pin connection. A 3D finite element method was also used to simulate and analyze the impedance signature of a pin connection model. Very good agreement exists between the numerical simulation’s results and the experimental results which demonstrates that the impedance-based technique can successfully be used to monitor the loading status of pin connections in practical applications.

  20. Experimental study of the mechanical behaviour of pin reinforced foam core sandwich materials under shear load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimassi, M. A.; Brauner, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Sandwich structures with a lightweight closed cell hard foam core have the potential to be used in primary structures of commercial aircrafts. Compared to honeycomb core sandwich, the closed cell foam core sandwich overcomes the issue of moisture take up and makes the manufacturing of low priced and highly integrated structures possible. However, lightweight foam core sandwich materials are prone to failure by localised external loads like low velocity impacts. Invisible cracks could grow in the foam core and threaten the integrity of the structure. In order to enhance the out-of-plane properties of foam core sandwich structures and to improve the damage tolerance (DT) dry fibre bundles are inserted in the foam core. The pins are infused with resin and co-cured with the dry fabric face sheets in an out-of-autoclave process. This study presents the results obtained from shear tests following DIN 53294-standard, on flat sandwich panels. All panels were manufactured with pin-reinforcement manufactured with the Tied Foam Core Technology (TFC) developed by Airbus. The effects of pin material (CFRP and GFRP) and pin volume fraction on the shear properties of the sandwich structure and the crack propagation were investigated and compared to a not pinned reference. It has been concluded that the pin volume fraction has a remarkable effect on the shear properties and damage tolerance of the observed structure. Increasing the pin volume fraction makes the effect of crack redirection more obvious and conserves the integrity of the structure after crack occurrence.

  1. Physics Characterization of TLD-600 and TLD-700 and Acceptance Testing of New XRAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yanan

    2: Acceptance testing of new X-RAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator. Purpose: An X-RAD 160 Biological X-Ray Irradiator was recently installed at Duke University to serve as a key device for cellular radiobiology research. The purpose of this study is to perform acceptance testing on the new irradiator for operator radiation safety and irradiation specifications. Methods: The acceptance testing included tests of the following components: (1) Leakage radiation survey, (2) Half-value layer (beam quality), (3) Uniformity, (4) KVp accuracy, (5) Exposure at varying mA (linearity of mA), (6) Exposure at varying kVp, (7) Inverse square measurements, (8) Field size measurement, (9) Exposure constancy. The irradiation parameters for each components of first round of acceptance testing performed on September 21, 2012 were: Leakage radiation survey (none, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 200s), Beam quality (40cm, 50-140 kVp in 10 kVp incensement, 1 mA, 10s, none), Uniformity (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 15s, F1), KVp accuracy (40cm, 50-150 kVp in 10 kVp incensement, 10 mA, 15s, none), Linearity of mA (40cm, 160 kVp, 2-18 mA, 15s, none), Inverse square measurements (20-63cm, 160 kVp, 1mA, 30s, none), Field size measurement (40cm, 160 kVp, 10 mA, 15s, none), Exposure constancy (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 20s, none). The irradiation parameters for each components for each components of second round of acceptance testing performed on November 18, 2012 were: Beam quality (40cm, 35-150 kVp, 1 mA, 10s, F1), KVp accuracy (40cm, 35-150 kVp, 1 mA, 10s, F1), Variation of kVp (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1), Linearity of mA (40cm, 160 kVp, 1-18 mA, 30s, F1), Uniformity (40cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1), Inverse square measurements (20-63cm, 160 kVp, 18 mA, 30s, F1). Results: The first round of acceptance testing performed on September 21, 2012 failed due to the fact that the measured exposure along the X-axis was significantly non-uniform; the exposure greatly decreases going in the left direction, which is a clear

  2. Developing and testing solar irradiance forecasting techniques in the Hawaiian Islands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Hawaíi Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is developing an operational solar forecasting for the Hawaiian Islands. The system comprises the following three components, covering forecasting horizons from seconds to days ahead. (i) A ground-observation driven advection model, using sky imagery and cloud height data. (ii) A satellite-image based advection model, primarily driven by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imagery. (iii) A coupled ocean-atmosphere model, using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, including newly available microphysics, shallow convection parameterization, and radiative transfer physics options. The satellite and NWP components provide coverage for the entire island chain, however, lack the resolution in time and space, to accurately forecast ramp events (large changes in irradiance that occur over a short period of time). Knowledge of the magnitude, duration and timing of ramp events are particularly important in Hawaíi due to the small size of the electric grids. Currently, HNEI employs a sky imager and ceilometer installed on the University of Hawaíi campus for high resolution forecasting, however, instrument design and cost limit widespread deployment. We discuss the development and preliminary validation of a new forecasting system based on inexpensive, panoramic (large FOV), off-the-shelf cameras with a cloud base height retrieval algorithm that does not require additional instrumentation.

  3. The effect of channel convergence on heat transfer in a passage with short pin fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brigham, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    Array averaged heat transfer coefficients were obtained for two configurations of short pin fins in a converging channel and for two flat plate configurations in a converging channel. The effect of flow acceleration due to channel convergence and the effect of varying pin length on the heat transfer was determined. Results are presented in the form of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number for the four geometries tested.

  4. Mechanical Property Analysis in the Retracted Pin-Tool (RPT) Region of Friction Stir Welded (FSW) Aluminum Lithium 2195

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding", was developed at The Marshall Space Flight Center to address process deficiencies unique to the FSW process. The auto-adjustable pin tool, also called the retractable pin-tool (R.PT) automatically withdraws the welding probe of the pin-tool into the pin-tool's shoulder. The primary function of the auto-adjustable pin-tool is to allow for keyhole closeout, necessary for circumferential welding and localized weld repair, and, automated pin-length adjustment for the welding of tapered material thickness. An overview of the RPT hardware is presented. The paper follows with studies conducted using the RPT. The RPT was used to simulate two capabilities; welding tapered material thickness and closing out the keyhole in a circumferential weld. The retracted pin-tool regions in aluminum- lithium 2195 friction stir weldments were studied through mechanical property testing and metallurgical sectioning. Correlation's can be =de between retractable pin-tool programmed parameters, process parameters, microstructure, and resulting weld quality.

  5. High flux pinning efficiency by columnar defects dispersed in three directions in YBCO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Takanori; Mitsugi, Fumiaki; Ikegami, Tomoaki; Ishikawa, Norito

    2016-10-01

    A systematic investigation of flux pinning by widely direction-dispersed columnar defects (CDs) in YBa2Cu3O y thin films was carried out by using heavy-ion irradiation: a parallel configuration of CDs aligned along the c-axis, and two trimodal splay configurations composed of CDs crossing at 0° and ± 45° relative to the c-axis, where the splay plane defined by the three irradiation angles is perpendicular (trimodal-A) or parallel (trimodal-B) to the transport current direction. The trimodal configurations show high pinning efficiency over a wide range of magnetic field orientations compared to the parallel one at low magnetic field. In particular, trimodal-B shows the higher critical current density of the two trimodal configurations. The crossed CDs at ± 45° in the trimodal configurations provide uncorrelated flux pinning at B || c due to the large tilting angle off the c-axis, which effectively reinforce the flux pinning of CDs parallel to the c-axis. This assist effect is more remarkable for trimodal-B: a kink sliding motion of flux lines along the CDs is more effectively reduced by the splay plane, not only at B || c but also at inclined magnetic fields off the c-axis.

  6. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 <20 pct) U-Mo dispersion fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  7. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, S.; Baselga, M.; Boscardin, M.; Christophersen, M.; Da Via, C.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Darbo, G.; Fadeyev, V.; Fleta, C.; Gemme, C.; Grenier, P.; Jimenez, A.; Lopez, I.; Micelli, A.; Nelist, C.; Parker, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Phlips, B.; Pohl, D.-L.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sicho, P.; Tsiskaridze, S.

    2013-12-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  8. Annealing tests of in-pile irradiated oxide coated U-Mo/Al-Si dispersed nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweifel, T.; Valot, Ch.; Pontillon, Y.; Lamontagne, J.; Vermersch, A.; Barrallier, L.; Blay, T.; Petry, W.; Palancher, H.

    2014-09-01

    U-Mo/Al based nuclear fuels have been worldwide considered as a promising high density fuel for the conversion of high flux research reactors from highly enriched uranium to lower enrichment. In this paper, we present the annealing test up to 1800 °C of in-pile irradiated U-Mo/Al-Si fuel plate samples. More than 70% of the fission gases (FGs) are released during two major FG release peaks around 500 °C and 670 °C. Additional characterisations of the samples by XRD, EPMA and SEM suggest that up to 500 °C FGs are released from IDL/matrix interfaces. The second peak at 670 °C representing the main release of FGs originates from the interaction between U-Mo and matrix in the vicinity of the cladding.

  9. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  10. Imminent: Irradiation Testing of (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} Fuel - 13560

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Julian F.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    Commercial-prototype thorium-plutonium oxide (Th-MOX) fuel pellets have been loaded into the material test reactor in Halden, Norway. The fuel is being operated at full power - with instrumentation - in simulated LWR / PHWR conditions and its behaviour is measured 'on-line' as it operates to high burn-up. This is a vital test on the commercialization pathway for this robust new thoria-based fuel. The performance data that is collected will support a fuel modeling effort to support its safety qualification. Several different samples of Th-MOX fuel will be tested, thereby collecting information on ceramic behaviours and their microstructure dependency. The fuel-cycle reasoning underpinning the test campaign is that commercial Th- MOX fuels are an achievable intermediate / near-term SNF management strategy that integrates well with a fast reactor future. (authors)

  11. Quick-Release Pin With Lever Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Lever-action quick-release pin operated more easily. Mechanism operated with gloved hand. In modified version, lever added to handle to facilitate actuation. Lever action reduces actuation force. Lever-action pin operated by squeezing on any point of moveable ends of lever and handle together between thumb and forefinger or by simply grasping and squeezing handle and lever with entire hand in more natural grasp.

  12. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Kramer, G. ); Collins, T.; Worley, S. ); Wilburn, C.D. ); Skubic, P. )

    1990-10-01

    We report the successful development of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a series of room-temperature measurements in a high-energy pion beam at FNAL. A PMOS VLSI 256 {times} 256 readout array having 30 {mu}m square pixels was indium-bump bonded to a mating PIN diode detector array. Preliminary measurements on the resulting hybrid show excellent signal-to-noise at room temperature. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Vortex pinning by compound defects in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-delta}.

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, J.; Welp, U.; Schlueter, J.; Kayani, A.; Xiao, Z. L.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Northern Illinois Univ.; Western Michigan Univ.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of vortex pinning by compound defects that are composed of correlated and point defects in a pristine untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystal. Initial irradiation by high-energy heavy ions to a dose matching field of B{sub {psi}} = 2.0 T increases vortex pinning via columnar defects. Subsequent proton irradiation further enhances the critical current J{sub c}(H) by localizing the vortices near the columnar defects. Measurements of the shift of the irreversibility line for H {parallel} ab plane demonstrate that compound defects consisting of correlated and point disorder may reduce the pinning anisotropy and increase the overall critical current.

  14. Paralogous radiations of PIN proteins with multiple origins of noncanonical PIN structure.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tom; Brockington, Samuel F; Rothfels, Carl; Graham, Sean W; Stevenson, Dennis; Kutchan, Toni; Rolf, Megan; Thomas, Philip; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Leyser, Ottoline; Glover, Beverley J; Harrison, C Jill

    2014-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a conserved regulator of development which has been implicated in the generation of morphological novelty. PIN-FORMED1 (PIN) auxin efflux carriers are central to auxin function by regulating its distribution. PIN family members have divergent structures and cellular localizations, but the origin and evolutionary significance of this variation is unresolved. To characterize PIN family evolution, we have undertaken phylogenetic and structural analyses with a massive increase in taxon sampling over previous studies. Our phylogeny shows that following the divergence of the bryophyte and lycophyte lineages, two deep duplication events gave rise to three distinct lineages of PIN proteins in euphyllophytes. Subsequent independent radiations within each of these lineages were taxonomically asymmetric, giving rise to at least 21 clades of PIN proteins, of which 15 are revealed here for the first time. Although most PIN protein clades share a conserved canonical structure with a modular central loop domain, a small number of noncanonical clades dispersed across the phylogeny have highly divergent protein structure. We propose that PIN proteins underwent sub- and neofunctionalization with substantial modification to protein structure throughout plant evolution. Our results have important implications for plant evolution as they suggest that structurally divergent PIN proteins that arose in paralogous radiations contributed to the convergent evolution of organ systems in different land plant lineages.

  15. Paralogous Radiations of PIN Proteins with Multiple Origins of Noncanonical PIN Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Tom; Brockington, Samuel F.; Rothfels, Carl; Graham, Sean W.; Stevenson, Dennis; Kutchan, Toni; Rolf, Megan; Thomas, Philip; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Leyser, Ottoline; Glover, Beverley J.; Harrison, C. Jill

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a conserved regulator of development which has been implicated in the generation of morphological novelty. PIN-FORMED1 (PIN) auxin efflux carriers are central to auxin function by regulating its distribution. PIN family members have divergent structures and cellular localizations, but the origin and evolutionary significance of this variation is unresolved. To characterize PIN family evolution, we have undertaken phylogenetic and structural analyses with a massive increase in taxon sampling over previous studies. Our phylogeny shows that following the divergence of the bryophyte and lycophyte lineages, two deep duplication events gave rise to three distinct lineages of PIN proteins in euphyllophytes. Subsequent independent radiations within each of these lineages were taxonomically asymmetric, giving rise to at least 21 clades of PIN proteins, of which 15 are revealed here for the first time. Although most PIN protein clades share a conserved canonical structure with a modular central loop domain, a small number of noncanonical clades dispersed across the phylogeny have highly divergent protein structure. We propose that PIN proteins underwent sub- and neofunctionalization with substantial modification to protein structure throughout plant evolution. Our results have important implications for plant evolution as they suggest that structurally divergent PIN proteins that arose in paralogous radiations contributed to the convergent evolution of organ systems in different land plant lineages. PMID:24758777

  16. Improved Quick-Release Pin Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Jay M.

    2007-01-01

    An improved quick-release pin mechanism supplants a prior such mechanism in which the pin bears a shear load to hold two objects together. The prior mechanism, of a ball-locking design, can fail when vibrations cause balls to fall out. The load-bearing pin is an outer tube with a handle at one end (hereafter denoted the near end). Within the outer tube is a spring-loaded inner tube that includes a handle at its near end and a pivoting tab at its far end. The pin is inserted through holes in the objects to be retained and the inner tube is pushed against an offset pivot inside the outer tube to make the tab rotate outward so that it protrudes past the outer diameter of the outer tube, and the spring load maintains this configuration so that the pin cannot be withdrawn through the holes. Pushing the handles together against the spring load moves the locking tab out far enough that the tab becomes free to rotate inward. Then releasing the inner-tube handle causes the tab to be pulled into a resting position inside the outer tube. The pin can then be pulled out through the holes.

  17. Investigating Dynamic Interdomain Allostery in Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling proteins often sequester complementary functional sites in separate domains. How do the different domains communicate with one another? An attractive system to address this question is the mitotic regulator, human Pin1 (Lu et al. 1996). Pin-1 consists of two tethered domains: a WW domain for substrate binding, and a catalytic domain for peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity. Pin1 accelerates the cis-trans isomerization of phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro (pS/T-P) motifs within proteins regulating the cell cycle and neuronal development. The early x-ray (Ranganathan et al. 1997; Verdecia et al. 2000) and solution NMR studies (Bayer et al. 2003; Jacobs et al. 2003) of Pin1 indicated inter- and intradomain motion. We became interested in exploring how such motions might affect interdomain communication, using NMR. Our accumulated results indicate substrate binding to Pin1 WW domain changes the intra/inter domain mobility, thereby altering substrate activity in the distal PPIase domain catalytic site. Thus, Pin1 shows evidence of dynamic allostery, in the sense of Cooper and Dryden (Cooper and Dryden 1984). We highlight our results supporting this conclusion, and summarize them via a simple speculative model of conformational selection. PMID:26495045

  18. ESD testing of the 8S actuator (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Mchugh, Douglas C

    2010-12-03

    The 8S actuator is a hot-wire initiated explosive component used to drive the W76-1 2X Acorn 1V valve. It is known to be safe from human electrostatic discharge (ESD) pin-to-pin and all pin-to-cup stimuli as well as 1 amp/1 watt safe. However low impedance (furniture) ESD stimuli applied pin-to-pin has not been evaluated. Components were tested and the results analyzed. The 8S actuator has been shown to be immune to human and severe furniture ESD, whether applied pin-to-pin or pin-to-cup.

  19. Effect of pin location on stability of pelvic external fixation.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Hearn, T C; Seleem, O; Mahalingam, E; Stephen, D; Tile, M

    1999-04-01

    Pelvic external fixators allow two locations of pin purchase: anterosuperior (into the iliac crest) and anteroinferior (into the supraacetabular dense bone, between the anterior superior and anterior inferior iliac spine). The purpose of this study was to compare the stability of these two methods of fixation on Tile Type B1 (open book) and C (unstable) pelvic injuries. Five unembalmed cadaveric pelves (mean age, 68 years; four males and one female) were loaded vertically in a servohydraulic testing machine in a standing posture. The AO tubular system and Orthofix were used. On each pelvis, a Type B1 injury was simulated. Each external fixator was applied in each location in random order. Cyclic loads were applied through the sacral body to a maximum of approximately 200 N while force and displacement of the pelvic ring were recorded digitally. Sacroiliac joint motion was quantified tridimensionally with displacement transducers, mounted on the sacrum and contacting a target fixed to the posterior superior iliac spine. A Type C injury was created and augmented with two iliosacral lag screws, and the tests were repeated. For the Type B1 injuries with anteroinferior pin purchase, the mean stiffness was 201.2 N/mm for the AO frame and 203.2 N/mm for the Orthofix. For the anterosuperior frames the mean stiffness was 143.9 N/mm for the AO frame and 163.3 N/mm for the Orthofix. For Type B1 and Type C injuries, the anteroinferior location of pin purchase resulted in significantly reduced sacroiliac joint separation. There were no significant differences between the frame types. Dissection of the preinserted anatomic specimen revealed no evidence of injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve after blunt dissection and drilling with protective drill sleeves. It is concluded that the anteroinferior location of external fixation pins is a safe technique with the potential for increased stability of fixation.

  20. Growth hormone response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulation test in a population-based study following cranial irradiation of childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, M; Lassen, S; Poulsen, H S; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Schmiegelow, K; Hertz, H; Müller, J

    2000-01-01

    Children with brain tumors are at high risk of developing growth hormone deficiency (GHD) after cranial irradiation (CI) if the hypothalamus/pituitary (HP) axis falls within the fields of irradiation. The biological effective dose (BED) of irradiation to the HP region was determined, since BED gives a means of expressing the biological effect of various irradiation treatment schedules in a uniform way. Hypothalamic versus pituitary damage as cause of GHD was distinguished in 62 patients by comparing the growth hormone (GH) peak response to an insulin tolerance test (ITT)/arginine stimulation test and the GH response to a growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulation test. Peak GH response to a GHRH test was significantly higher (median 7.3 mU/l; range: 0.5--79.0 mU/l) than that of an ITT/arginine test (median 4.7 mU/l; range: 0.01--75.0 mU/l) (p = 0.017). Peak GH after a GHRH test was significantly inversely correlated to follow-up time (r(s) = -0.46, p < 0.0001) and to BED (R(s) = -0.28, p = 0.03), and both were found to be of significance in a multivariante regression analysis. We speculate that a significant number of patients developed hypothalamic radiation-induced damage to the GHRH secreting neurons, and secondary to this the pituitary gland developed decreased responsiveness to GHRH following CI in childhood.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  2. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-10-25

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor. fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10{sup 21} neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10{sup 21}, but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum.

  3. Self-locking double retention redundant full pin release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killgrove, T. O. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A double retention redundant pull pin release system is disclosed. The system responds to a single pull during an intentional release operation. A spiral threaded main pin is seated in a mating bore in a housing, which main pin has a flange fastened thereon at the part of the main pin which is exterior to the housing. Accidental release tends to rotate the main pin. A secondary pin passes through a slightly oversized opening in the flange and is seated in a second bore in the housing. The pins counteract against one another to prevent accidential release. A frictional lock is shared between the main and secondary pins to enhance further locking of the system. The secondary pin, in response to a first pull, is fully retracted from its bore and flange hole. Thereafter the pull causes the main pin to rotate free of the housing to release, for example, a parachute mechanism.

  4. Self-locking double retention redundant pull pin release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killgrove, Thomas O. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A double-retention redundant pull pin release system is disclosed. The system responds to a single pull during an intentional release operation. A spiral-threaded main pin is seated in a mating bore in a housing, which main pin has a flange fastened thereon at the part of the main pin which is exterior to the housing. Accidental release tends to rotate the main pin. A secondary pin passes through a slightly oversized opening in the flange and is seated in a second bore in the housing. The pins counteract against one another to prevent accidental release. A frictional lock is shared between the main and secondary pins to enhance further locking of the system. The secondary pin, in response to a first pull, is fully retracted from its bore and flange hole. Thereafter the pull causes the main pin to rotate free of the housing to release, for example, a parachute mechanism.

  5. Relaxation and pinning in spark-plasma sintered MgB2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirsa, M.; Rames, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Berger, K.; Douine, B.

    2016-02-01

    The model of thermally activated relaxation developed and successfully tested on high-T c superconductors (Jirsa et al 2004 Phys. Rev. B 70 0245251) was applied to magnetic data of a bulk spark-plasma sintered MgB2 sample to elucidate its magnetic relaxation behavior. MgB2 and the related borides form a superconductor class lying between classical and high-T c superconductors. In accord with this classification, the relaxation phenomena were found to be about ten times weaker than in cuprates. Vortex pinning analyzed in terms of the field dependence of the pinning force density indicates a combined pinning by normal point-like defects and by grain surfaces. An additional mode of pinning at rather high magnetic fields (of still unknown origin) was observed.

  6. Are fern stomatal responses to different stimuli coordinated? Testing responses to light, vapor pressure deficit, and CO2 for diverse species grown under contrasting irradiances.

    PubMed

    Creese, Chris; Oberbauer, Steve; Rundel, Phil; Sack, Lawren

    2014-10-01

    The stomatal behavior of ferns provides an excellent system for disentangling responses to different environmental signals, which balance carbon gain against water loss. Here, we measured responses of stomatal conductance (gs ) to irradiance, CO2 , and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) for 13 phylogenetically diverse species native to open and shaded habitats, grown under high- and low-irradiance treatments. We tested two main hypotheses: that plants adapted and grown in high-irradiance environments would have greater responsiveness to all stimuli given higher flux rates; and that species' responsiveness to different factors would be correlated because of the relative simplicity of fern stomatal control. We found that species with higher light-saturated gs had larger responses, and that plants grown under high irradiance were more responsive to all stimuli. Open habitat species showed greater responsiveness to irradiance and CO2 , but lower responsiveness to VPD; a case of plasticity and adaptation tending in different directions. Responses of gs to irradiance and VPD were positively correlated across species, but CO2 responses were independent and highly variable. The novel finding of correlations among stomatal responses to different stimuli suggests coordination of hydraulic and photosynthetic signaling networks modulating fern stomatal responses, which show distinct optimization at growth and evolutionary time-scales.

  7. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  8. Pretransplant pulmonary function tests predict risk of mortality following fractionated total body irradiation and allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anurag K. . E-mail: singan@mail.nih.gov; Karimpour, Shervin E.; Savani, Bipin N.; Guion, Peter M.S.; Hope, Andrew J.; Mansueti, John R.; Ning, Holly; Altemus, Rosemary M. Ph.D.; Wu, Colin O.; Barrett, A. John

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) done before peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in predicting mortality after total body irradiation (TBI) performed with or without dose reduction to the lung. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2004, 146 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies received fractionated TBI before PBSCT. With regimen A (n = 85), patients were treated without lung dose reduction to 13.6 gray (Gy). In regimen B (n = 35), total body dose was decreased to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice per day for 4 days) and lung dose was limited to 9 Gy by use of lung shielding. In regimen C (n = 26), lung dose was reduced to 6 Gy. All patients received PFTs before treatment, 90 days after treatment, and annually. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (range, 12-90 months). Sixty-one patients had combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits defined as both a forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV{sub 1}) and a diffusion capacity of carbon dioxide (DLCO) <100% predicted. In this group, there was a 20% improvement in one-year overall survival with lung dose reduction (70 vs. 50%, log-rank test p = 0.042). Conclusion: Among those with combined ventilation/diffusion capacity deficits, lung dose reduction during TBI significantly improved survival.

  9. The Maize PIN Gene Family of Auxin Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Forestan, Cristian; Farinati, Silvia; Varotto, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of plant development and its differential distribution in plant tissues, established by a polar cell to cell transport, can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. A few members of the two families of auxin efflux transport proteins, PIN-formed (PIN) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB/PGP), have so far been characterized in maize. Nine new Zea mays auxin efflux carriers PIN family members and two maize PIN-like genes have now been identified. Four members of PIN1 (named ZmPIN1a–d) cluster, one gene homologous to AtPIN2 (ZmPIN2), three orthologs of PIN5 (ZmPIN5a–c), one gene paired with AtPIN8 (ZmPIN8), and three monocot-specific PINs (ZmPIN9, ZmPIN10a, and ZmPIN10b) were cloned and the phylogenetic relationships between early-land plants, monocots, and eudicots PIN proteins investigated, including the new maize PIN proteins. Tissue-specific expression patterns of the 12 maize PIN genes, 2 PIN-like genes and ZmABCB1, an ABCB auxin efflux carrier, were analyzed together with protein localization and auxin accumulation patterns in normal conditions and in response to drug applications. ZmPIN gene transcripts have overlapping expression domains in the root apex, during male and female inflorescence differentiation and kernel development. However, some PIN family members have specific tissue localization: ZmPIN1d transcript marks the L1 layer of the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem during the flowering transition and the monocot-specific ZmPIN9 is expressed in the root endodermis and pericycle. The phylogenetic and gene structure analyses together with the expression pattern of the ZmPIN gene family indicate that subfunctionalization of some maize PINs can be associated to the differentiation and development of monocot-specific organs and tissues and might have occurred after the divergence between dicots and monocots. PMID:22639639

  10. The Maize PIN Gene Family of Auxin Transporters.

    PubMed

    Forestan, Cristian; Farinati, Silvia; Varotto, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of plant development and its differential distribution in plant tissues, established by a polar cell to cell transport, can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. A few members of the two families of auxin efflux transport proteins, PIN-formed (PIN) and P-glycoprotein (ABCB/PGP), have so far been characterized in maize. Nine new Zea mays auxin efflux carriers PIN family members and two maize PIN-like genes have now been identified. Four members of PIN1 (named ZmPIN1a-d) cluster, one gene homologous to AtPIN2 (ZmPIN2), three orthologs of PIN5 (ZmPIN5a-c), one gene paired with AtPIN8 (ZmPIN8), and three monocot-specific PINs (ZmPIN9, ZmPIN10a, and ZmPIN10b) were cloned and the phylogenetic relationships between early-land plants, monocots, and eudicots PIN proteins investigated, including the new maize PIN proteins. Tissue-specific expression patterns of the 12 maize PIN genes, 2 PIN-like genes and ZmABCB1, an ABCB auxin efflux carrier, were analyzed together with protein localization and auxin accumulation patterns in normal conditions and in response to drug applications. ZmPIN gene transcripts have overlapping expression domains in the root apex, during male and female inflorescence differentiation and kernel development. However, some PIN family members have specific tissue localization: ZmPIN1d transcript marks the L1 layer of the shoot apical meristem and inflorescence meristem during the flowering transition and the monocot-specific ZmPIN9 is expressed in the root endodermis and pericycle. The phylogenetic and gene structure analyses together with the expression pattern of the ZmPIN gene family indicate that subfunctionalization of some maize PINs can be associated to the differentiation and development of monocot-specific organs and tissues and might have occurred after the divergence between dicots and monocots. PMID:22639639

  11. Dynamics and Stability of Pinned-Clamped and Clamped-Pinned Cylindrical Shells Conveying Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. K.; Wong, S. S. T.; Païdoussis, M. P.

    2001-11-01

    The paper examines the dynamics and stability of fluid-conveying cylindrical shells having pinned-clamped or clamped-pinned boundary conditions, where ``pinned'' is an abbreviation for ``simply supported''. Flügge's equations are used to describe the shell motion, while the fluid-dynamic perturbation pressure is obtained utilizing the linearized potential flow theory. The solution is obtained using two methods - the travelling wave method and the Fourier-transform approach. The results obtained by both methods suggest that the negative damping of the clamped-pinned systems and positive damping of the pinned-clamped systems, observed by previous investigators for any arbitrarily small flow velocity, are simply numerical artefacts; this is reinforced by energy considerations, in which the work done by the fluid on the shell is shown to be zero. Hence, it is concluded that both systems are conservative.

  12. Irradiation creep of SA 304L and CW 316 stainless steels: Mechanical behaviour and microstructural aspects. Part II: Numerical simulation and test of SIPA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J.; Bréchet, Y.; Delnondedieu, M.; Renault, A.; Pokor, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Massoud, J.-P.

    2011-06-01

    A cluster dynamic model has been adapted to test the Stress Induced Preferential Absorption of Defect (SIPA) on Frank loops hypothesis concerning irradiation creep, to reproduce quantitatively both microstructure evolution and its stress induced anisotropy and macroscopic creep rate. It is concluded that SIPA on Frank loops model can account for the observed defects structure, but is unable to reproduce quantitatively the creep rate.

  13. De-pinning of disordered bosonic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, N.; Cole, J. H.; Shnirman, A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider onset of transport (de-pinning) in one-dimensional bosonic chains with a repulsive boson–boson interaction that decays exponentially on large length-scales. Our study is relevant for (i) de-pinning of Cooper-pairs in Josephson junction arrays; (ii) de-pinning of magnetic flux quanta in quantum-phase-slip ladders, i.e. arrays of superconducting wires in a ladder-configuration that allow for the coherent tunneling of flux quanta. In the low-frequency, long wave-length regime these chains can be mapped onto an effective model of a one-dimensional elastic field in a disordered potential. The standard de-pinning theories address infinitely long systems in two limiting cases: (a) of uncorrelated disorder (zero correlation length); (b) of long range power-law correlated disorder (infinite correlation length). In this paper we study numerically chains of finite length in the intermediate case of long but finite disorder correlation length. This regime is of relevance for, e.g., the experimental systems mentioned above. We study the interplay of three length scales: the system length, the interaction range, the correlation length of disorder. In particular, we observe the crossover between the solitonic onset of transport in arrays shorter than the disorder correlation length to onset of transport by de-pinning for longer arrays.

  14. Characterization of the Influence of Tool Pin Profile on Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Javad; Akbari, Mostafa; Asadi, Parviz; Safaee, Samad

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the effect of tool pin profile on mechanical properties, microstructural, material flow, thermal and strain distributions of friction stir welding of AA5083 was investigated. Two different tools with cylindrical and square pin profiles were employed to produce the welds. A numerical model is developed for investigating the effect of tool pin profiles on material flow, thermal and strain distributions based on thermo-mechanically coupled rigid-viscoplastic 3D FEM. Then, optical microscopy was employed to characterize the microstructures features of the weld. Finally, tensile test was carried out to characterize the mechanical properties of the weld. Obtained results showed that square pin profile produced finer grain structure and higher ultimate strength relative to cylindrical one. These results may be related to higher eccentricity, larger stirred zone, and higher temperature in the weld zone of the square pin profile.

  15. The effect of temperature on pinning mechanisms in HTS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, A. P.; Rudnev, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    Pinning mechanism in samples of second generation tapes (2G) of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was studied The critical current and the pinning force were calculated from the magnetization curves measured in the temperature range of 4.2 - 77 K in magnetic fields up to 14 Tesla using vibration sample magnetometer. To determine the pinning mechanism the dependences of pinning force on magnetic field were constructed according to the Dew-Hughes model and Kramer's rule. The obtained dependences revealed a significant influence of the temperature on effectiveness of different types of pinning. At low temperatures the 2G HTS tapes of different manufacturers demonstrated an equal efficiency of the pinning centers but with temperature increase the differences in pinning mechanisms as well as in properties and effectiveness of the pinning centers become obvious. The influence of the pinning mechanism on the energy losses in HTS tapes was shown.

  16. The Contribution of Pin End-Cup Interactions to Clot Strength Assessed with Thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Viscoelastic methods have been developed to assess the contribution of plasma proteins and platelets to coagulation in vitro to guide clinical transfusion therapy. One of the cardinal precepts of determining clot strength is making sure that the viscoelastic technique includes complete exposure of the plastic pin in the testing chamber with the fluid analyzed so as to assure maximal interaction of the cup wall with the pin surface. However, the various contributions of the pin surface area to final clot strength have not been investigated. That is, it is not clear what is more important in the in vitro determination of clot strength, the surface area shared between the cup and pin filled with fluid or the final viscoelastic resistance of the gel matrix formed. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the clot strength when only the tip of the pin was engaged with plasma thrombus and to compare these values with clot strength values obtained when the pin was completely in plasma. After determining the minimal amount of plasma required to cover a pin tip in a thrombelastographic system (30 μL), clot strength (elastic modulus, G) was determined in plasma samples of 30 or 360 μL final volume (n = 12 per condition) after tissue factor activation. The G value with 30 μL volume was 1057 ± 601 dynes/cm (mean ± SD; 95% confidence interval, 675-1439 dynes/cm), which was (P = 0.0015) smaller than the G value associated with 360-μL sample volumes, that was 1712 ± 48 dynes/cm (confidence interval, 1681-1742 dynes/cm). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that clot strength is not determined by a simple ratio of surface area of pin and cup to volume of sample, but rather strength is importantly influenced by the viscoelastic resistance of the fluid assessed.

  17. Effects of Z-pins on Lamb waves in composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Eric D.; Kapoor, Hitesh; Soni, Som R.

    2010-04-01

    This experimental research investigates the effects of adding z-pins to a carbon fiber reinforced plate (CFRP) on Lamb wave propagation, such as mode conversion and reflections. The motivation for this study is derived from the current and expected future use of z-pins in aircraft structures coupled with the requirement to design structural health monitoring (SHM) systems for detecting damage in regions of composite structures with z-pins. This experimental study is conducted on two 4.8 mm thick CFRP test articles, where one plate has a 20 by 279 mm2 band of z-pins and the other does not. The z-pins have an average diameter of 0.28 mm and are inserted through the thickness of the panel with an area density of 4% before curing. A three-dimensional (3D) laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was employed to collect velocity measurements over a 1 mm uniformly-spaced grid of 17,899 scan points. Time-sequenced 3D LDV scans are presented to show that adding this relatively small amount of z-pins to a 4.8 mm thick CFRP has few measureable effects on Lamb wave propagation.

  18. A division in PIN-medicated patterning during lateral organ initiation in grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using phlyogenic and gene synteny analysis we identified an angiosperm PIN clade sister to PIN1, here termed SISter-of-PIN1 (soPIN1), which is present in all sampled angiosperms except for Brassicaceae. Additionally, we identified a conserved duplication of PIN1 in the grasses: PIN1a and PIN1b. In...

  19. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA.

  20. Genetic screening test for psoriatic arthritis and UVB irradiation potential responders: A new tool to identify psoriasis subpopulation patients?

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Torello; Tognetti, Linda; Galeone, Massimiliano; Bruscino, Nicola; Moretti, Silvia; Giorgini, Simonetta

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory disease of the joints and enthuses. The occurrence of PsA is linked to the complex interplay of gene environment, and immune system. Genetic factors have long been recognized to play an important role in PsA. Genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region have been shown to be associated with PsA. These include genes coded in the HLA region, (especially Class I antigens) and non-HLA genes (i.e., MHC class I chain-related antigen A, MICA, and TNF-α genes). Association studies in PsA have also identified a number of genes outside MHC region, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster, killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), and IL-23R genes. Established systemic treatments for moderate-severe psoriasis and PsA may be potentially dangerous and usually time consuming for the patient and often expensive for the National Health Systems. Tests which could predict which subset of psoriatic patients could develop the most severe forms of the disease (i.e., PsA) or will respond to well-established (UVB irradiation) or other systemic treatments are now required. The goal of genetic test screening is to rapidly and safely identify subjects for preventive or early treatment or extended surveillance prior to the onset of signs and symptoms. Genetic tests today represent a reliable investigation procedure which could rapidly and consistently improve the diagnostic ability of the dermatologist and contribute to the early and correct treatment of the different subsets of PsA. PMID:23130225

  1. An experimental study of rate effects on Mode I delamination of z-pinned composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Andrew M.

    Z-pinned laminates are designed to suppress interlaminar fracture. Much interlaminar fracture damage is due to impact, so an experiment was devised to examine loading rate effects on z-pinned composite laminates. Loading rate effects on the Mode I fracture of IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy composite laminates with and without pultruded carbon/epoxy z-pins were investigated using a Flying Wedge test method. Unpinned laminates were found to fracture in continuous stable crack propagation, with a positive correlation between critical Mode I strain energy release rate, GIc, and wedge velocity. Two different fracture regimes were found in the z-pinned laminates. From quasi-static to 40 m/s wedge velocities fracture occurred in a series of unstable crack propagations followed by complete arrest of the crack. At high velocity, 250 m/s, steady-state crack propagation was observed, where there was continuous crack propagation and the crack tip and wedge traveled at identical velocities. The possibility of a third transitional fracture regime was noted, as it appears that the 50 m/s wedge velocity resulted in a continuously propagating crack whose velocity oscillated about the wedge's constant velocity. These z-pinned laminates show that both p0, the critical peak crack closure traction exerted by the z-pins, and GIc decrease with increasing wedge velocity in the stop-and-go fracture regime which holds from quasi-static through a wedge velocity of 40 m/s. At a wedge velocity of 40 m/s, there is a maximum reduction from the quasi-static values of over 30% in p0 and over 35% in GIc. The rate effects on p 0 were also found to dominate those directly on the base laminate GIc when determining the total strain energy release rate of the z-pinned laminate. The ratio of GIc for the 2% z-pin specimens toGIc for the 0.5% z-pin specimens was found to remain relatively constant over the range of wedge velocities studied; no discernible relationship was found between wedge velocity and that ratio

  2. Termination of pinned spirals by local stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Guo, Ming-Ming; Ma, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The termination of pinned spirals on a defect by means of local stimuli is studied. On a completely unexcitable defect, the elimination process is discussed and its corresponding mechanism is presented. Especially, the mechanism of unpinning spirals on a partially unexcitable defect, which has not been investigated so far, is explored. With fixed pacing frequency ω L , there exists a maximal radius R max above which the pinned spiral cannot be removed. It is found that the value of R max does not increase as ω L in a dynamical regime, forming a platform in the R\\textit{max}\\text-ωL curves. Based on analyzing the dispersion relation on the spiral tip around the obstacle, the underlying mechanism is clarified. Also, it is found that when multiple spirals are pinned, the value of R max decreases on a partially unexcitable defect while the change is very slight on a completely unexcitable one.

  3. Pin solar cells made of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaettner, R. D.; Kruehler, W. W.

    Investigations leading to solar cells with a structure SnO2-pin and an efficiency up to 9.8% are reviewed. The production of large-surface metal/pin/transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-solar cells is discussed. A two-chamber reactor, grid structure and tinning of cells, and an a-Si-module are described. The production of glass/TCO/pin/metal-solar cells and a-SiGe:H-compounds is outlined. Measurements on solar cells and diodes including the efficiency of a-Si:H-solar cells, spectral sensitivity, diffusion lengths, field effect measurements, and modifications of solar cells (space-charge limited currents, reduction of solar cells aging) are treated.

  4. Testing of uranium nitride fuel in T-111 cladding at 1200 K cladding temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohal, R. G.; Tambling, T. N.; Smith, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Two groups of six fuel pins each were assembled, encapsulated, and irradiated in the Plum Brook Reactor. The fuel pins employed uranium mononitride (UN) in a tantalum alloy clad. The first group of fuel pins was irradiated for 1500 hours to a maximum burnup of 0.7-atom-percent uranium. The second group of fuel pins was irradiated for about 3000 hours to a maximum burnup of 1.0-atom-percent uranium. The average clad surface temperature during irradiation of both groups of fuel pins was approximately 1200 K. The postirradiation examination revealed the following: no clad failures or fuel swelling occurred; less than 1 percent of the fission gases escaped from the fuel; and the clad of the first group of fuel pins experienced clad embrittlement whereas the second group, which had modified assembly and fabrication procedures to minimize contamination, had a ductile clad after irradiation.

  5. Correlation of intermediate ion energy induced extended defect continuity to enhanced pinning potential in Tl-2212 films

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, P.P.; Venturini, E.L.; Doyle, B.L.; Brice, D.K.; Schoene, H.

    1998-09-01

    Lattice defects are introduced into the structure to suppress the motion of magnetic vortices and enhance the critical current density in high temperature superconductors. Point defects are not very effective pinning sites for the cuprate superconductors; however, extended defects, such as linear tracks, have been shown to be strong pinning sites. The authors study the superconducting cuprate Tl-2212 (the numbers designate Ti-Ba-Ca-Cu stoichiometry). Large enhancements of vortex pinning potential were observed in Tl-2212 after high-intermediate energy heavy-ion irradiations where non-continuous extended defects were induced at dE/dx of 9 to 15.2 keV/nm (60 MeV Au, 60 MeV Cu, and 30 MeV Au) and continuous linear defects were induced at 19.5keV/nm (88 MeV Au). Their research addresses the question of pinning in highly anisotropic materials like Tl-2212 where the vortices are pancakes rather than rods and suitable defect structures may be discontinuous extended damage domains. The defect microstructure and the effectiveness of the pinning potential in Tl-2212 after irradiation by intermediate energy Au at lower dE/dx of 5--15 keV/nm, where recoils are more significant, is studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy digital imaging and a SQUID magnetometer. The nature of the ion irradiation damage at these intermediate dE/dx will be correlated to the average vortex pinning potential and the TRIMRC calculations for recoils.

  6. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated. PMID:27694953

  7. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated.

  8. Flows in Pinned Arrays Simulating Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Flows through idealized pin arrays were investigated using an unstructured grid finite difference model and the simplified Ergun model to predict leakage flows and pressure drops in brush seals. The models are in good agreement in the laminar region with departures in the laminar-turbulent transition region defined by the simplified Ergun model. No local disturbances in the velocity or pressure fields, symptomatic of turbulence were found in the numerical results. The simplified model failed to predict the pressure drop of a 32-pin anisotropic array. Transitional and anisotropic behavior requires

  9. Self-Pinning on a Liquid Surface.

    PubMed

    Antoine, C; Irvoas, J; Schwarzenberger, K; Eckert, K; Wodlei, F; Pimienta, V

    2016-02-01

    We report on the first experimental evidence of a self-pinning liquid drop on a liquid surface. This particular regime is observed for a miscible heavier oil drop (dichloromethane) deposited on an aqueous solution laden by an ionic surfactant (hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide). Experimental characterization of the drop shape evolution coupled to particle image velocimetry points to the correlation between the drop profile and the accompanying flow field. A simple model shows that the observed pinned stage is the result of a subtle competition between oil dissolution and surfactant adsorption.

  10. Theoretical analysis of swelling characteristics of cylindrical uranium dioxide fuel pins with a niobium - 1-percent-zirconium clad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The relations between clad creep strain and fuel volume swelling are shown for cylindrical UO2 fuel pins with a Nb-1Zr clad. These relations were obtained by using the computer code CYGRO-2. These clad-strain - fuel-volume-swelling relations may be used with any fuel-volume-swelling model, provided the fuel volume swelling is isotropic and independent of the clad restraints. The effects of clad temperature (over a range from 118 to 1642 K (2010 to 2960 R)), pin diameter, clad thickness and central hole size in the fuel have been investigated. In all calculations the irradiation time was 500 hours. The burnup rate was varied.

  11. Test Standard Revision Update: JESD57, "Procedures for the Measurement of Single-Event Effects in Semiconductor Devices from Heavy-Ion Irradiation"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The JEDEC JESD57 test standard, Procedures for the Measurement of Single-Event Effects in Semiconductor Devices from Heavy-Ion Irradiation, is undergoing its first revision since 1996. In this talk, we place this test standard into context with other relevant radiation test standards to show its importance for single-event effect radiation testing for space applications. We show the range of industry, government, and end-user party involvement in the revision. Finally, we highlight some of the key changes being made and discuss the trade-space in which setting standards must be made to be both useful and broadly adopted.

  12. Computed tomography of bridge pins, cast aluminum automotive components and human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E

    1999-04-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) have seen increasing use in an array of industrial, environmental, military, and medical applications (Goebbels, et al., 1999). A brief overview and three diverse application studies of x-ray CT at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be discussed. (1) Bridge pins are fracture critical elements for some multi-span steel bridges. Recently, pins were removed from their hanger pin assemblies. These pins were selected for further examination by laboratory NDE techniques. High-energy x-ray radiography and CT were used to characterize these pins. (2) Cast light metals, aluminum and magnesium, are being used in an ever increasing number of applications to reduce automobile weight for improved gas mileage and lower emissions. After mechanical testing, the damage in notched Al-tensile test specimens was first determined using CT and subsequently by metallography analysis intended to benchmark the CT technique. (3) A computational approach to normal joint kinematics and prosthetic joint analysis offers an opportunity to evaluate and improve prosthetic joint replacements before they are manufactured or surgically implanted. Computed tomography data are combined with computational analysis to reveal regions where the joint design can be improved for better performance and longevity, prior to expensive manufacturing, laboratory tests, and clinical evaluation.

  13. A novel challenge test incorporating irradiation (60Co) of compost sub-samples to validate thermal lethality towards pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, Andrew; Cherie Millar, B; Rao, Juluri R

    2009-01-01

    Maturing compost heaps normally attaining temperatures ranging from 55 to 65 degrees C is generally regarded to conform to recommended biological risks and sanitation standards for composts stipulated by either EU or US-EPA. Composted products derived from animal sources are further required by EU biohazard safety regulatory legislation that such composts either attain 70 degrees C for over 3h during maturation or via treatment at 70 degrees C for 1h before being considered for dispensation on land. The setting of the upper limit of thermal lethality at 70 degrees C/1h for achieving biosecurity of the animal waste composted products (e.g. pelleted fertilizer formulations) is not properly substantiated by specific validation tests, comprising a 'wipe-out' step (usually via autoclaving) followed by inoculation of a prescribed bacterium, exposure to 70 degrees C/1h and the lethality determined. Pelleted formulations of composts are not amenable for wet methods (autoclaving) for wipe-out sterilization step as this is detrimental to the pellet and compromises sample integrity. This study describes a laboratory method involving the employment of ((60)Co) irradiation 'wipe-out' step to: (a) compost sub-samples drawn from compost formulation heaps and (b) pelleted products derived from composted animal products while determining the thermal lethality of a given time/temperature (70 degrees C/1h) treatment process and by challenging the irradiated sample (not just with one bacterium but), out with 10 potential food-poisoning organisms from the bacterial genera (Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Yersinia) frequently detected in pig and poultry farm wastes. This challenge test on compost sub-samples can be a useful intervention ploy for 'inspection and validation' technique for composters during the compost maturity process, whose attainment of temperatures of 55-65 degrees C is presumed sufficient for attainment of sanitation. Stringent measures are further

  14. U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R&D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication.

  15. Vortex pinning properties in Fe-chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, A.; Grimaldi, G.; Guarino, A.; Avitabile, F.; Nigro, A.; Galluzzi, A.; Mancusi, D.; Polichetti, M.; Pace, S.; Buchkov, K.; Nazarova, E.; Kawale, S.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among the families of iron-based superconductors, the 11-family is one of the most attractive for high field applications at low temperatures. Optimization of the fabrication processes for bulk, crystalline and/or thin film samples is the first step in producing wires and/or tapes for practical high power conductors. Here we present the results of a comparative study of pinning properties in iron-chalcogenides, investigating the flux pinning mechanisms in optimized Fe(Se{}1-xTe x ) and FeSe samples by current-voltage characterization, magneto-resistance and magnetization measurements. In particular, from Arrhenius plots in magnetic fields up to 9 T, the activation energy is derived as a function of the magnetic field, {U}0(H), whereas the activation energy as a function of temperature, U(T), is derived from relaxation magnetization curves. The high pinning energies, high upper critical field versus temperature slopes near critical temperatures, and highly isotropic pinning properties make iron-chalcogenide superconductors a technological material which could be a real competitor to cuprate high temperature superconductors for high field applications.

  16. Rotary pin-in-maze discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, Gilbert L.

    1997-01-01

    A discriminator apparatus and method that discriminates between a unique signal and any other (incorrect) signal. The unique signal is a sequence of events; each event can assume one of two possible event states. Given the unique signal, a maze wheel is allowed to rotate fully in one direction. Given an incorrect signal, both the maze wheel and a pin wheel lock in position.

  17. 49 CFR 230.97 - Crank pins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crank pins. 230.97 Section 230.97 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Driving...

  18. Valve for fuel pin loading system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    A cyclone valve surrounds a wall opening through which cladding is projected. An axial valve inlet surrounds the cladding. Air is drawn through the inlet by a cyclone stream within the valve. An inflatable seal is included to physically engage a fuel pin subassembly during loading of fuel pellets.

  19. Miniaturized disk-bend testing, nano-indentation and the microstructure of ion-irradiated titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Petouhoff, N.L.; Ardell, A.J.; Oliver, W.C.; Lucas, B.N.

    1993-09-01

    Effect of ion irradiation on microstructures and mechanical properties of Ti-52Al (TiAl) and Ti-26Al (Ti{sub 3}Al) were investigated. The alloys were irradiated with 2 MeV protons and Ar{sup +} ions at low temperatures ({minus}175 to {minus}135C) to max fluences of 4.5 {times} 10{sup 15} Ar{sup +}/cm{sup 2} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Yield strengths of unirradiated TiAl and the fracture strength of unirradiated Ti{sub 3}Al were 367 {plus_minus} 33 MPa and 536 {plus_minus} 30 MPa, respectively, in excellent agreement with published data. Yield strength of TiAl and fracture strength of Ti{sub 3}Al increased as a result of irradiation. Strengths of both alloys were lowest for the samples irradiated to the highest Ar{sup +}-ion dose, but otherwise there was no correlation of strength with dose. The nanohardness of irradiated specimens generally increased with dose, but influence of dose on Young`s modulus was erratic. Plate-shaped defects vacancy in character, and helical dislocations were observed in irradiated TiAl by TEM. The Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation-induced microstructure of Ti{sub 3}Al contained defects producing mottled contrast at 1 dpa and black-spot contrast at 5 dpa. Irradiation-induced loss of long-range order was also observed in both alloys. Influence of these microstructural variables on mechanical behavior is discussed.

  20. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. ); Straka, M. )

    1992-09-01

    This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

  1. Auxin transport through PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3) controls shade avoidance and fitness during competition.

    PubMed

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Pollmann, Stephan; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Peeters, Anton J M; Pierik, Ronald

    2010-12-28

    Plants grow in dense vegetations at the risk of being out-competed by neighbors. To increase their competitive power, plants display adaptive responses, such as rapid shoot elongation (shade avoidance) to consolidate light capture. These responses are induced upon detection of proximate neighbors through perception of the reduced ratio between red (R) and far-red (FR) light that is typical for dense vegetations. The plant hormone auxin is a central regulator of plant development and plasticity, but until now it has been unknown how auxin transport is controlled to regulate shade-avoidance responses. Here, we show that low R:FR detection changes the cellular location of the PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3) protein, a regulator of auxin efflux, in Arabidopsis seedlings. As a result, auxin levels in the elongating hypocotyls are increased under low R:FR. Seedlings of the pin3-3 mutant lack this low R:FR-induced increase of endogenous auxin in the hypocotyl and, accordingly, have no elongation response to low R:FR. We hypothesize that low R:FR-induced stimulation of auxin biosynthesis drives the regulation of PIN3, thus allowing shade avoidance to occur. The adaptive significance of PIN3-mediated control of shade-avoidance is shown in plant competition studies. It was found that pin3 mutants are outcompeted by wild-type neighbors who suppress fitness of pin3-3 by 40%. We conclude that low R:FR modulates the auxin distribution by a change in the cellular location of PIN3, and that this control can be of great importance for plants growing in dense vegetations.

  2. Effects of Pin Detached Space on Heat Transfer and Pin-Fin Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Siw, Sin C.; Chyu, Minking K.; Shih, Tom I-P.; Alvin, Mary Anne

    2012-08-01

    Heat transfer and pressure characteristics in a rectangular channel with pin-fin arrays of partial detachment from one of the endwalls have been experimentally studied. The overall channel geometry (W = 76.2 mm, E = 25.4 mm) simulates an internal cooling passage of wide aspect ratio (3:1) in a gas turbine airfoil. With a given pin diameter, D = 6.35 mm = ¼E, three different pin-fin height-to-diameter ratios, H/D = 4, 3, and 2, were examined. Each of these three cases corresponds to a specific pin array geometry of detachment spacing (C) between the pin tip and one of the endwalls, i.e., C/D = 0, 1, 2, respectively. The Reynolds number, based on the hydraulic diameter of the unobstructed cross-section and the mean bulk velocity, ranges from 10,000 to 25,000. The experiment employs a hybrid technique based on transient liquid crystal imaging to obtain the distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient over all of the participating surfaces, including the endwalls and all the pin elements. Experimental results reveal that the presence of a detached space between the pin tip and the endwall has a significant effect on the convective heat transfer and pressure loss in the channel. The presence of pin-to-endwall spacing promotes wall-flow interaction, generates additional separated shear layers, and augments turbulent transport. In general, an increase in detached spacing, or C/D, leads to lower heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop. However, C/D = 1, i.e., H/D = 3, of a staggered array configuration exhibits the highest heat transfer enhancement, followed by the cases of C/D = 0 and C/D = 2, i.e., H/D = 4 or 2, respectively.

  3. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  4. PIN silicon diode fast neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunzhi; Zhao, Jianxing; Xiao, Wuyun

    2005-01-01

    Two batches of diodes, with different structural ratios (the ratio of area and thickness), were made using different manufacturing processes. The energy response of the first batch to 15 kinds of monoenergetic neutrons ranging from 180 keV to 17.56 MeV was tested, and the neutron source response of both batches to 239Pu-Be neutron source was measured. The energy deposition in the diodes irradiated by 1 keV to 20 MeV monoenergetic neutrons was calculated with simulation procedure. The response curve of the experimental results showed an approximately similar trend to that of theoretical computation. Based on the results of the neutron source response experiments, it was concluded that the response of fast neutron varied linearly with the structural ratio of the detectors. PMID:15972359

  5. Pin Load Control Applied to Retractable Pin Tool Technology and its Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Until the development of retractable pin tool (RPT) technology, friction stir welding (FSW) was limited to constant thickness joining of aluminum materials and the choices of keyhole elimination focused on traditional fusion and plug weld repair techniques. An invention, US Patent Number 5,893,507, "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding" assigned to NASA, demonstrated an approach to resolve these serious drawbacks. This approach brings forth a technique that allows the crater, or keyhole, to be closed out automatically at the end of the weld joint without adding any additional equipment or material. Also the probe length can be varied automatically in the weld joint to compensate for material thickness changes, such as, in a tapered joint. This paper reports the effects of pin extension and retraction rates in the weld joint and its correlation to weld quality. The investigation utilized a pin load-detecting device that was integrated in the Phase 2A RPT designed by Boeing for NASA/MSFC. The RPT modification provided pin load data that was accessed and used to eliminate root side indications and determine pin manipulation rates necessary to produce consistence homogeneous joints.

  6. Pin Load Control Applied to Retractable Pin Tool Technology and its Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Until the development of retractable pin tool (RPT) technology, friction stir welding (FSW) was limited to constant thickness joining of aluminum materials and the choices of keyhole elimination focused on traditional fusion and plug weld repair techniques. An invention, US Patent Number 5,893.507, "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding" assigned to NASA, demonstrated an approach to resolve these serious drawbacks. This approach brings forth a technique that allows the crater, or keyhole, to be closed out automatically at the end of the weld joint without adding any additional equipment or material. Also the probe length can be varied automatically in the weld joint to compensate for material thickness changes, such as, in a tapered joint. This paper reports the effects of pin extension and retraction rates in the weld joint and its correlation to weld quality. The investigation utilized a pin load-detecting device that was integrated in the Phase 2A RPT designed by Boeing for NASA/MSFC. The RPT modification provided pin load data that was accessed and used to eliminate root side indications and determine pin manipulation rates necessary to produce consistence homogeneous joints.

  7. Pin Load Control Applied to Retractable Pin Tool Technology and Its Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olegoetz, P.

    1999-01-01

    Until the development of retractable pin tool (RPT) technology, friction stir welding (FSW) was limited to constant thickness joining of aluminum materials and the choices of keyhole elimination focused on traditional fusion and plug weld repair techniques. An invention, US Patent Number 5,893,507, "Auto-Adjustable Pin Tool for Friction Stir Welding" assigned to NASA, demonstrated an approach to resolve these serious drawbacks. This approach brings forth a technique that allows the crater, or keyhole, to be closed out automatically at the end of the weld joint without adding any additional equipment or material. Also the probe length can be varied automatically in the weld joint to compensate for material thickness changes, such as, in a tapered joint. This paper reports the effects of pin extension and retraction rates in the weld joint and its correlation to weld quality. The investigation utilized a pin load-detecting device that was integrated in the Phase IIA RPT designed by Boeing for NASA/MSFC. The RPT modification provided pin load data that was accessed and used to eliminate root side indications and determine pin manipulation rates necessary to produce consistence homogeneous joints.

  8. 18. SHEAR PIN, UNIT 24 GORGE POWERHOUSE. THE WICKET GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. SHEAR PIN, UNIT 24 GORGE POWERHOUSE. THE WICKET GATES ON THE TURBINE ARE EACH EQUIPPED WITH A SHEAR PIN AND OIL PRESSURE GAUGE. IF A GATE JAMS, THE PIN SMEARS AND THE CHANGE IN OIL PRESSURE TRIGGERS AN ALARM, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Gorge Powerhouse, On Skagit River, 0.4 mile upstream from Newhalem, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  9. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  11. RF impedance of intrinsic Josephson junction in flux-flow state with a periodic pinning potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of Josephson vortices interacting with electromagnetic waves in Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ y intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks by means of millimeter wave irradiation and numerical simulations based on coupled sine-Gordon equations while taking into account a sinusoidal form of the periodic pinning potential. The numerical simulation results for the influence of the electromagnetic waves on the flux-flow properties reveal that the periodic pinning potential induces the in-phase motion of Josephson vortices over the junctions. In order to prove from another viewpoint, we investigate RF impedance of IJJ in flux-flow state in this study. A remarkable negative real part region appears at 1st harmonic step, it means that the IJJ in flux-flow state acts as an oscillator at the negative real part region.

  12. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Shear punch testing of {sup 59}Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    A series of three model alloys, Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr45Ni were irradiated side-by-side in FFTF-MOTA in both the annealed and the cold worked condition in each of two variants, one using naturally occurring isotopic mixtures, and another doped with {sup 59}Ni to generate relatively high helium-to-dpa ratios. Previous papers in this series have addressed the influence of helium on radiation-induced evolution of microstructure, dimensional stability and mechanical properties, the latter using miniature-tensile specimens. In the final paper of this experimental series, three sets of irradiations conducted at different temperatures and displacement rates were examined by shear punch testing of standard microscopy disks. The results were used to determine the influence of helium generation rate, alloy starting condition, irradiation temperature and total neutron exposure. The results were also compared with the miniature tensile data obtained earlier. In general, all alloys approached saturation levels of strength and ductility that were relatively independent of He/dpa ratio and starting condition, but were sensitive to the irradiation temperature and total exposure. Some small influence of helium/dpa ratio on the shear strength is visible in the two series that ran at {approximately}490 C, but is not evident at 365 C.

  14. A Biomechanical Comparison Of Pin Configurations Used For Percutaneous Pinning Of Distal Tibia Fractures In Children

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Justin; Majumdar, Aditi; Jobe, J. Taylor; Kallur, Antony; Salas, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous pin fixation is often used in conjunction with closed-reduction and cast immobilization to treat pediatric distal tibia fractures. The goal of this procedure is to maintain reduction and provide improved stabilization, in effort to facilitate a more anatomic union. We conducted a biomechanical study of the torsional and bending stability of three commonly used pin configurations in distal tibia fracture fixation. Methods A transverse fracture was simulated at the metaphyseal/diaphyseal junction in 15 synthetic tibias. Each fracture was reduced and fixed with two Kirschner wires, arranged in one of three pin configurations: parallel, retrograde, medial to lateral pins entering at the medial malleolus distal to the fracture (group A); parallel, antegrade, medial to lateral pins entering at the medial diaphysis proximal to the fracture (group B); or a cross-pin configuration with one retrograde, medial to lateral pin entering the medial malleolus distal to the fracture and the second an antegrade, medial to lateral pin entering at the medial diaphysis proximal to the fracture (group C). Stability of each construct was assessed by resistance to torsion and bending. Results Resistance to external rotation stress was significantly higher in group A than group B (P = 0.044). Resistance to internal rotation stress was significantly higher in group C than group B (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference in torsional stiffness when comparing group A with group C. Under a medial-directed load, group B and C specimens were significantly stiffer than those in group A (28 N/mm and 24 N/mm vs. 14 N/mm for A; P = 0.001 and P = 0.009, respectively) Conclusions None of the three pin configurations produced superior results with respect to all variables studied. Group A configuration provided the highest resistance to external rotation forces, which is the most clinically relevant variable under short-cast immobilization. Parallel, retrograde, medial

  15. Full-length U-xPu-10Zr (x=0, 8, 19 wt%) Fast Reactor Fuel Test in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter; H.C. Tsai

    2012-08-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor-1 (IFR-1) experiment performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was the only U-Pu-10Zr (Pu-0, 8 and 19 wt%) metallic fast reactor test with commercial-length (91.4 cm active fuel column length) conducted to date. With few remaining test reactors there is little opportunity for performing another test with a long active fuel column. The assembly was irradiated to the goal burnup of 10 at.%. The beginning of life (BOL) peak cladding temperature of the hottest pin was 608?C, cooling to 522?C at end of life (EOL). Selected fuel pins were examined non destructively using neutron radiography, precision axial gamma scanning, and both laser and spiral contact cladding profilometry. Destructive exams included plenum gas pressure, volume, and gas composition determinations on a number of pins followed by optical metallography, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and alpha and beta gamma autoradiography on a single U-19Pu-10Zr pin. The post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) showed very few differences compared to the short-pin (34.3 cm fuel column) testing performed on fuels of similar composition in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The fuel column grew axially slightly less than observed in the short pins, but with the same pattern of decreasing growth with increasing Pu content. There was a difference in the fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) in that the maximum cladding penetration by interdiffusion with fuel/fission products did not occur at the top of the fuel column where the cladding temperature is highest, as observed in EBR-II tests. Instead, the more exaggerated fission-rate profile of the FFTF pins resulted in a peak FCCI at ~0.7 X/L axial location along the fuel column. This resulted from a lower production of rare earth fission products higher in the fuel column as well as a much smaller delta-T between fuel center and cladding, and therefore less FCCI, despite the higher cladding temperature. This behavior could

  16. PtdIns5P and Pin1 in oxidative stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Keune, Willem-Jan; Jones, David R; Divecha, Nullin

    2013-05-01

    Oxidative signaling is important in cellular health, involved in aging and contributes to the development of several diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and diabetes. Correct management of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevents oxidative stress within cells and is imperative for cellular wellbeing. A key pathway that is regulated by oxidative stress is the activation of proline-directed stress kinases (p38, JNK). Phosphorylation induced by these kinases is often translated into cellular outcome through the recruitment of the prolyl-isomerase Pin1. Pin1 binds to phosphorylated substrates using its WW-domain and can induce conformational changes in the target protein through its prolyl-isomerase activity. We show that exposure of cells to UV irradiation or hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), induces the synthesis of the phosphoinositide second messenger PtdIns5P in part by inducing the interaction between phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4K) enzymes that remove PtdIns5P, with Pin1. In response to H₂O₂ exposure, Murine Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Pin1⁻/⁻ mice showed increased cell viability and an increased abundance of PtdIns5P compared to wild-type MEFs. Decreasing the levels of PtdIns5P in Pin1⁻/⁻ MEFs decreased both their viability in response to H₂O₂ exposure and the expression of genes required for cellular ROS management. The decrease in the expression of these genes manifested itself in the increased accumulation of cellular ROS. These data strongly argue that PtdIns5P acts as a stress-induced second messenger that can calibrate how cells manage ROS.

  17. Results from irradiation tests on D0 Run 2a silicon detectors at the Radiation Damage Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.; Cerber, C.; Ke, Z.; Korjanevsky, S.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lipton, R.; Lackey, J.; Merkin, M.; Rapidis, P.; Rykalin, V.; Shabalina, E.; Spiegel, L.; Stutte, L.; Webber, B.; /Kansas U. /Kansas State U. /Illinois U., Chicago /Fermilab /Moscow State U. /Zurich U. /NICADD, DeKalb

    2006-03-01

    Several different spare modules of the D0 experiment Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) have been irradiated at the Fermilab Booster Radiation Damage Facility (RDF). The total dose received was 2.1 MRads with a proton flux of {approx} 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} p/cm{sup 2} sec. The irradiation was carried out in steps of 0.3 or 0.6 MRad, with several days between the steps to allow for annealing and measurements. The leakage currents and depletion voltages of the devices increased with dose, as expected from bulk radiation damage. The double sided, double metal devices showed worse degradation than the less complex detectors.

  18. Evaluation of vortex pinning across low angle grain boundary in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} film

    SciTech Connect

    Horide, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Kaname

    2012-09-10

    Vortex pinning potential across a 5 Degree-Sign tilt low angle grain boundary (GB) was evaluated by measuring angular dependences of critical current density in a bicrystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} film under the variable Lorentz force configuration. Trapping angles of the GB depend on directions in the GB plane (70 Degree-Sign -80 Degree-Sign and 15 Degree-Sign -45 Degree-Sign for the c-axis direction and the ab plane one, respectively), due to anisotropic pinning of GB dislocations. Pinning potential across a GB is as large as that of heavy ion irradiated columnar defects, indicating that density and distribution of GBs should be controlled to improve vortex pinning in coated conductors.

  19. Characterization of superconductors with artificial pinning microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Dietderich, D.R.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    Extension of the APC approach to Nb{sub 3}Sn requires that a second phase be introduced into the Nb{sub 3}S reaction layer with the intent of increasing the volume pinning strength. This can be achieved by either the refinement of the Nb{sub 3}S grains due to the presence of a second phase or by the second phase itself pinning flux. If a bronze-type process is to be used a different addition than Zr is required since internal oxidation of Nb is not possible. The criteria for elements to be candidates for the APC approach are discussed. The results for one of the candidates (Ag) show that it is not incorporated into the Nb{sub 3}S, however, its addition did increase the growth rate.

  20. Dynamics of rotating superfluid systems with pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrakyan, A.D.; Sedrakyan, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    Equations describing the dynamics of motion of superfluid systems with pinning are derived, and analytical solutions of these equations are established for the case where the difference between the angular velocities of the superfluid and normal components is small. The solutions can be used to explain the time-dependent behavior of the angular velocity of the Vela pulsar. It is shown that vortex pinning in the period between two consecutive jumps in the pulsar angular velocity can redistribute the vortex number density so as to produce both the observed jump and the after-jump relaxation of the pulsar. For one thing, the formulas obtained are shown to provide an explanation of the 1988 Christmas discontinuity in the angular velocity of the Vela pulsar. 8 refs.

  1. Scroll waves pinned to moving heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Hua; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can self-organize vortex patterns that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities called filaments. In experiments with the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and numerical simulations, we pin these scroll waves to translating inert cylinders and demonstrate the controlled repositioning of their rotation centers. If the pinning site extends only along a portion of the filament, the phase singularity is stretched out along the trajectory of the heterogeneity, which effectively writes the singularity into the system. Its trailing end point follows the heterogeneity with a lower velocity. This velocity, its dependence on the placement of the anchor, and the shape of the filament are explained by a curvature flow model.

  2. High energy x-ray radiography and computed tomography of bridge pins

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R E; Logan, C M; Martz, H E; Updike, E; Waters, A M

    1999-05-01

    Bridge pins were used in the hanger assemblies for some multi-span steel bridges built prior to the 1980's, and are sometimes considered fracture critical elements of a bridge. During a test on a bridge conducted by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ultrasonic field inspection results indicated that at least two pins contained cracks. Several pins were removed and selected for further examination. This provided an excellent opportunity to learn more about these pins and the application of x-ray systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), as well as to learn more about the application of different detectors recently obtained by LLNL. Digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) were used to characterize the bridge pins, using a LINAC x-ray source with a 9-MV bremsstrahlung spectrum. We will describe the performance of two different digital radiographic detectors. One is a detector system frequently used at LLNL consisting of a scintillator glass optically coupled to a CCD camera. The other detector is a new amorphous silicon detector recently acquired by LLNL.

  3. Genetic studies: dominant lethal study, sex linked recessive lethal, ames mutagenicity, and heritable translocation test of thermal processed, frozen, electron irradiated, and gamma irradiated chicken. Final report Jun 76-Aug 83

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.; Lusskin, R.M.; Thomson, G.M.; Kuzdas, C.D.; Ronning, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Four samples of chicken meat identified as the frozen control, thermally processed, gamma sterilized (5.9 Mrad), and electron sterilized (5.9 MeV), along with negative and positive controls, were evaluated for genetic activity. The samples were evaluated for ability to induce dominant lethal mutations in spermatid and spermatozoan stages of spermatogenesis in mice fed 35 percent chicken meat. The test meat samples were not observed to have an effect on the incidence of the dominant lethal mutations. However, the positive control failed to give a positive response. The meat samples were investigated for mutagenic activity employing Drosophila melanogaster in the sex linked recessive lethal test. The samples were determined to be nonmutagenic in this test and the positive control gave a significant response. Reduced production of offspring in cultures of Drosophila reared on gamma irradiated chicken which could not be overcome by the addition of vitamins was observed. Pre-incubation tests with and without added mutagens revealed that in no case was a positive result observed in the Ames test from chicken meat without an added mutagen. The manner in which chicken meat was processed had no effect upon the response to the Ames test. A heritable translocation test in mice failed to reveal any cytological evidence of translocation heterozygosity in any of the chicken-containing diets.

  4. Fabrication of NRD-guide PIN switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, Y.; Nishida, S.; Yoneyama, T.

    1986-04-01

    A novel type of NRD-guide PIN switch is developed for millimeter wave use. An emphasis is placed on the design of a compact, rigid and reliable diode mount structure. The fabricated switch exhibits 1.5 to 2.0 dB insertion loss and more than 25 dB isolation over 2 GHz bandwidth at center frequency of 35 GHz.

  5. Rotary pin-in-maze discriminator

    DOEpatents

    Benavides, G.L.

    1997-05-06

    A discriminator apparatus and method that discriminates between a unique signal and any other (incorrect) signal are disclosed. The unique signal is a sequence of events; each event can assume one of two possible event states. Given the unique signal, a maze wheel is allowed to rotate fully in one direction. Given an incorrect signal, both the maze wheel and a pin wheel lock in position. 4 figs.

  6. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. ); Straka, M. )

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  7. Recording dowel pin position with plastic logs.

    PubMed

    Titus, H W; Draheim, R N

    1986-01-01

    Six readily available plastic materials were evaluated for use as a log for locating the ends of die dowel pins. Seven criteria were divided into two main categories of adherence qualities of the material and useability. Cost was the third category evaluated and compared. Color and availability were also considered. Forty-two sophomore dental students accomplished 84 evaluations. Plasticine and Weatherstrip Caulking Cord were found to meet all criteria best. PMID:3511239

  8. Channelized coplanar waveguide pin-diode switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G. E.; Simons, R. N.

    1989-01-01

    Three different types of p-i-n diode, reflective CPW switches are presented. The first two switches are the series and the shunt mounted diode switches. Each has achieved greater than 15 dB of isolation over a broad bandwidth. The third switch is a narrow band, high isolation switched filter which has achieved 19 dB of isolation. Equivalent circuits and measured performance for each switch is presented.

  9. Performance measurements of hybrid PIN diode arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.F. . Space Sciences Lab.); Kramer, G. ); Collins, T.; Herring, J. ); Shapiro, S.L. ); Wilburn, C.D. )

    1990-05-01

    We report on the successful effort to develop hybrid PIN diode arrays and to demonstrate their potential as components of vertex detectors. Hybrid pixel arrays have been fabricated by the Hughes Aircraft Co. by bump bonding readout chips developed by Hughes to an array of PIN diodes manufactured by Micron Semiconductor Inc. These hybrid pixel arrays were constructed in two configurations. One array format having 10 {times} 64 pixels, each 120 {mu}m square, and the other format having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square. In both cases, the thickness of the PIN diode layer is 300 {mu}m. Measurements of detector performance show that excellent position resolution can be achieved by interpolation. By determining the centroid of the charge cloud which spreads charge into a number of neighboring pixels, a spatial resolution of a few microns has been attained. The noise has been measured to be about 300 electrons (rms) at room temperature, as expected from KTC and dark current considerations, yielding a signal-to-noise ratio of about 100 for minimum ionizing particles. 4 refs., 13 figs.

  10. "CLASPing" tungsten's effects on microtubules with "PINs".

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten, supplied as sodium tungstate, inhibits root elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana, which has been attributed to a diminishing of PIN2 and PIN3 auxin efflux carriers. In this work, we sought to analyze the effect of tungsten on cortical microtubules and CLASP (Cytoplasmic Linker Associated Protein), which are also involved in the anisotropic cell expansion of root cells. Seedlings grown in a tungsten-free substrate for 4 d and then transplanted into a tungsten-containing substrate exhibited randomly oriented microtubules in a time-dependent manner. While tungsten had no effect on roots treated for 3 h, microtubule alignment was obviously affected in the transition and elongation zones after a 6, 12, 24, 48 h tungsten treatment, at prolonged tungsten administrations and in seedlings grown directly in the presence of tungsten. This change in microtubule orientation may be associated with the reduction of CLASP protein expression induced by tungsten, as evidenced in experiments with plants expressing the CLASP-GFP protein. A possible mechanism, by which the coordinated functions of CLASP, PIN2 and microtubules are affected, as revealed by inhibited root growth, is discussed. PMID:26313814

  11. Formulation, predictions, and sensitivity analysis of a pyrotechnically actuated pin puller model

    SciTech Connect

    Gonthier, K.A.; Powers, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    This article presents an analysis for pyrotechnic combustion and pin motion in the NASA Standard Initiator (NSI) actuated pin puller. The conservation principles and constitutive relations for a multiphase system are posed and reduced to a set of five ordinary differential equations which are solved to predict the system`s performance. The model tracks the interactions of the unreacted, incompressible solid pyrotechnic, incompressible condensed phase combustion products, and gas phase combustion products. Predicted pressure histories for the firing of an NSI into (1) the pin puller device, (2) a 10 cm(sup 3) closed vessel, and (3) an apparatus known as the Dynamic Test Device compare well with experimental results. A sensitivity analysis reveals large regions in parameter space where system performance is insensitive to particular parametric values; smaller regions of high sensitivity are also found. 15 refs.

  12. Integrated photoreceivers with MSM and PIN photodetectors for high-frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlaczala, Marek J.

    2001-04-01

    The results of investigation of PIN and MSM photo detectors fabricated in our Semiconductor Device Laboratory are presented. Discrete chips of PIN and MSM photo detectors and similar photo detectors integrated with a MESFET amplifier within a single MMIC chip were tested and compared. The structures were designed for range of wavelengths from 870nm to 1000nm. To accomplish this, the InxGa1-xAs absorption layer with appropriate cantent of indium has been used as an active layer. All structures have been fabricated using Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (MOVPE) growth on GaAs substrates with the use of different buffer and matching layer configuration. I-V and spectral characteristics of the PIN and MSM photo detectors and also MMIC structures with the MSM photo detector were evaluated. Time response to the optical pulse excitation has been measured. All designs were compared from the point of view of their application in the optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  13. Pin-Align: A New Dynamic Programming Approach to Align Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To date, few tools for aligning protein-protein interaction networks have been suggested. These tools typically find conserved interaction patterns using various local or global alignment algorithms. However, the improvement of the speed, scalability, simplification, and accuracy of network alignment tools is still the target of new researches. In this paper, we introduce Pin-Align, a new tool for local alignment of protein-protein interaction networks. Pin-Align accuracy is tested on protein interaction networks from IntAct, DIP, and the Stanford Network Database and the results are compared with other well-known algorithms. It is shown that Pin-Align has higher sensitivity and specificity in terms of KEGG Ortholog groups. PMID:25435900

  14. Performance Boost in Industrial Multifilamentary Nb3Sn Wires due to Radiation Induced Pinning Centers

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, T.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Flükiger, R.; Scheuerlein, C.; Bottura, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report non-Cu critical current densities of 4 . 09 ⋅ 109 A/m2 at 12 T and 2.27 ⋅ 109 A/m2 at 15 T obtained from transport measurements on a Ti-alloyed RRP Nb3Sn wire after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 8.9 ⋅ 1021 m−2. These values are to our knowledge unprecedented in multifilamentary Nb3Sn, and they correspond to a Jc enhancement of approximately 60% relative to the unirradiated state. Our magnetometry data obtained on short wire samples irradiated to fast neutron fluences of up to 2.5 ⋅ 1022 m−2 indicate the possibility of an even better performance, whereas earlier irradiation studies on bronze-processed Nb3Sn wires with a Sn content further from stoichiometry attested a decline of the critical current density at such high fluences. We show that radiation induced point-pinning centers rather than an increase of the upper critical field are responsible for this Jc enhancement, and argue that these results call for further research on pinning landscape engineering. PMID:26030255

  15. Improved solar irradiance forecast with Weather Research and Forecasting model: A Sensitivity test of shallow cumulus clouds to the turbulence process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. K.; Betterton, E. A.; Leuthold, M.; Holmgren, W.; Cronin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of solar irradiance are required for electric utilities to economically integrate substantial amounts of solar power into their power generation portfolios. A common failing of numerical weather models is the prediction of shallow cumulus clouds which are generally difficult to be resolved due to complicated processes in the planetary boundary layer. The present study carried out the sensitivity test of turbulence parameterization for better predicting solar irradiance during the shallow cumulus events near the state of Arizona by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The results from the simulations show that increasing the exchange coefficient leads to enhanced vertical mixing and a deeper mixed layer. At the top of mixed layer, an adiabatically ascending air parcel achieved the water vapour saturation and finally shallow cumulus is generated. A detailed analysis will be discussed in the upcoming conference.

  16. Induced point and correlated disorder pinning in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, W.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Paulius, L.; Petrean, A.M. |; Lopez, D.; Safar, H.; Olsson, R.J. |

    1998-09-01

    The magnetic phase diagram of untwinned single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} is studied via transport measurements. The authors show that the first order vortex melting line which terminates at a critical point in high magnetic fields is strongly dependent on point disorder induced by proton irradiation. In addition, they report on the effect of heavy ion irradiation induced columnar defects on vortex pinning.

  17. The protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, as a non-sentient model to test laser light irradiation: The effects of an 808nm infrared laser diode on cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Unfortunately, conflicting literature has led to the labelling of PBM as a complementary or alternative medicine approach. However, past and ongoing clinical and research studies by reputable investigators have re-established the merits of PBM as a genuine medical therapy, and the technique has, in the last decade, seen an exponential increase in the numbers of clinical instruments available, and their applications. This resurgence has led to a clear need for appropriate experimental models to test the burgeoning laser technology being developed for medical applications. In this context, an ethical model that employs the protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, is proposed. We studied the possibility of using the measure of oxygen consumption to test PBM by irradiation with an infrared or near-infrared laser. The results show that an 808nm infrared laser diode (1W; 64J/cm²) affects cellular respiration in P. primaurelia, inducing, in the irradiated cells, a significantly (p < 0.05) increased oxygen consumption of about 40%. Our findings indicate that Paramecium can be an excellent tool in biological assays involving infrared and near-infrared PBM, as it combines the advantages of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro testing. This test represents a fast, inexpensive and straightforward assay, which offers an alternative to both traditional in vivo testing and more expensive mammalian cellular cultures. PMID:26256394

  18. The protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, as a non-sentient model to test laser light irradiation: The effects of an 808nm infrared laser diode on cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Unfortunately, conflicting literature has led to the labelling of PBM as a complementary or alternative medicine approach. However, past and ongoing clinical and research studies by reputable investigators have re-established the merits of PBM as a genuine medical therapy, and the technique has, in the last decade, seen an exponential increase in the numbers of clinical instruments available, and their applications. This resurgence has led to a clear need for appropriate experimental models to test the burgeoning laser technology being developed for medical applications. In this context, an ethical model that employs the protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, is proposed. We studied the possibility of using the measure of oxygen consumption to test PBM by irradiation with an infrared or near-infrared laser. The results show that an 808nm infrared laser diode (1W; 64J/cm²) affects cellular respiration in P. primaurelia, inducing, in the irradiated cells, a significantly (p < 0.05) increased oxygen consumption of about 40%. Our findings indicate that Paramecium can be an excellent tool in biological assays involving infrared and near-infrared PBM, as it combines the advantages of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro testing. This test represents a fast, inexpensive and straightforward assay, which offers an alternative to both traditional in vivo testing and more expensive mammalian cellular cultures.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on the friction and wear of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Hady, W. F.; Crugnola, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of sterilization gamma irradiation on the friction and wear properties of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) sliding against stainless steel 316L in dry air at 23 C is investigated, the results to be used in the development of artificial joints which are to surgically replace diseased human joints. A pin-on-disk sliding friction apparatus is used, a constant sliding speed in the range 0.061-0.27 m/s is maintained, a normal load of 1 kgf is applied with dead weight, and the irradiation dose levels are: 0, 2.5, and 5.0 Mrad. Wear and friction data and conditions for each of the ten tests are summarized, and include: (1) wear volume as a function of the sliding distance for the irradiation levels, (2) incremental wear rate, and (3) coefficient of friction as a function of the sliding distance. It is shown that (1) the friction and wear properties of UHMWPE are not significantly changed by the irradiation doses of 2.5 and 5.0 Mrad, (2) the irradiation increases the amount of insoluble gel as well as the amount of low molecular weight material, and (3) after run-in the wear rate is either steady or gradually decreases as a function of the sliding distance.

  20. Sorting signals for PIN1 trafficking and localization.

    PubMed

    Marcote, María Jesús; Sancho-Andrés, Gloria; Soriano-Ortega, Esther; Aniento, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    PIN-FORMED (PIN) family proteins direct polar auxin transport based on their asymmetric (polar) localization at the plasma membrane. In the case of PIN1, it mainly localizes to the basal (rootward) plasma membrane domain of stele cells in root meristems. Vesicular trafficking events, such as clathrin-dependent PIN1 endocytosis and polar recycling, are probably the main determinants for PIN1 polar localization. However, very little is known about the signals which may be involved in binding the μ-adaptin subunit of clathrin adaptor complexes (APs) for sorting of PIN1 within clathrin-coated vesicles, which can determine its trafficking and localization. We have performed a systematic mutagenesis analysis to investigate putative sorting motifs in the hydrophilic loop of PIN1. We have found that a non-canonical motif, based in a phenylalanine residue, through the binding of μA(μ2)- and μD(μ3)-adaptin, is important for PIN1 endocytosis and for PIN1 traffcking along the secretory pathway, respectively. In addition, tyrosine-based motifs, which also bind different μ-adaptins, could also contribute to PIN1 trafficking and localization. PMID:27603315

  1. Landscape of Pin1 in the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Han; Li, Hao-Yi; Lee, Yu-Cheng; Calkins, Marcus J; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Pin1 is a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase which plays a critical role in many diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The essential role of Pin1 is to affect stability, localization or function of phosphoproteins by catalyzing structural changes. Among the collection of Pin1 substrates, many have been shown to be involved in regulating cell cycle progression. The cell cycle disorder caused by dysregulation of these substrates is believed to be a common phenomenon in cancer. A number of recent studies have revealed possible functions of several important Pin1-binding cell cycle regulators. Investigating the involvement of Pin1 in the cell cycle may assist in the development of future cancer therapeutics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge regarding the network of Pin1 substrates and Pin1 regulators in cell cycle progression. In G1/S progression, cyclin D1, RB, p53, p27, and cyclin E are all well-known cell cycle regulators that are modulated by Pin1. During G2/M transition, our lab has shown that Aurora A suppresses Pin1 activity through phosphorylation at Ser16 and cooperates with hBora to modulate G2/M transition. We conclude that Pin1 may be thought of as a molecular timer which modulates cell cycle progression networks. PMID:25662955

  2. Performance of a neutron spectrometer based on a PIN diode.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; D'Angelo, G; Fazzi, A; Para, A Foglio; Pola, A; Ventura, L; Zotto, P

    2005-01-01

    The neutron spectrometer discussed in this work consists of a PIN diode coupled with a polyethylene converter. Neutrons are detected through the energy deposited by recoil-protons in silicon. The maximum detectable energy is -6 MeV and is imposed by the thickness of the fully depleted layer (300 microm for the present device). The minimum detectable energy which can be assessed with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is -0.9 MeV. PSD is performed with a crossover method and setting the diode in the 'reverse-injection' configuration (i.e. with the N+ layer adjacent to the converter). This configuration provides longer collection times for the electron-hole pairs generated by the recoil-protons. The limited interval of detectable energies restricts the application of this spectrometer to low-energy neutron fields, such as the ones which can be produced at facilities hosting low-energy ion accelerators. The capacity to reproduce continuous neutron spectra was investigated by optimising the electronic chain for pulse-shape discrimination. In particular, the spectrometer was irradiated with neutrons that were generated by striking a thick beryllium target with protons of several energies and the measured spectra were compared with data taken from the literature. PMID:16604623

  3. Irradiation experiment on fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides up to 7 at.% burnup

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ogata, T.; Inoue, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Fontaine, B.; Breton, L.

    2007-07-01

    Fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides (MAs: Np, Am, Cm) and rare earths (REs) have been irradiated in the fast reactor PHENIX. In this experiment, four types of fuel alloys, U-19Pu-10Zr, U-19Pu-10Zr-2MA-2RE, U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA-5RE and U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA (wt.%), are loaded into part of standard metal fuel stacks. The postirradiation examinations will be conducted at {approx}2.4, {approx}7 and {approx}11 at.% burnup. As for the low-burnup fuel pins, nondestructive postirradiation tests have already been performed and the fuel integrity was confirmed. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment for the intermediate burnup goal of {approx}7 at.% was completed in July 2006. For the irradiation period of 356.63 equivalent full-power days, the neutron flux level remained in the range of 3.5-3.6 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s at the axial peak position. On the other hand, the maximum linear power of fuel alloys decreased gradually from 305-315 W/cm (beginning of irradiation) to 250-260 W/cm (end of irradiation). The discharged peak burnup was estimated to be 6.59-7.23 at.%. The irradiation behavior of MA-containing metal fuels up to 7 at.% burnup was predicted using the ALFUS code, which was developed for U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel performance analysis. As a result, it was evaluated that the fuel temperature is distributed between {approx}410 deg. C and {approx}645 deg. C at the end of the irradiation experiment. From the stress-strain analysis based on the preliminarily employed cladding irradiation properties and the FCMI stress distribution history, it was predicted that a cladding strain of not more than 0.9% would appear. (authors)

  4. Remote fabrication and irradiation test of recycled nuclear fuel prepared by the oxidation and reduction of spent oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Il Park, Geun; Won Lee, Jung; Seung Yang, Myung

    2005-02-01

    A direct dry recycling process was developed in order to reuse spent pressurized light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel in CANDU reactors without the separation of sensitive nuclear materials such as plutonium. The benefits of the dry recycling process are the saving of uranium resources and the reduction of spent fuel accumulation as well as a higher proliferation resistance. In the process of direct dry recycling, fuel pellets separated from spent LWR fuel rods are oxidized from UO2 to U3O8 at 500 °C in an air atmosphere and reduced into UO2 at 700 °C in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is called OREOX (oxidation and reduction of oxide fuel). The pellets are pulverized during the oxidation and reduction processes due to the phase transformation between cubic UO2 and orthorhombic U3O8. Using the oxide powder prepared from the OREOX process, the compaction and sintering processes are performed in a remote manner in a shielded hot cell due to the high radioactivity of the spent fuel. Most of the fission gas and volatile fission products are removed during the OREOX and sintering processes. The mini-elements fabricated by the direct dry recycling process are irradiated in the HANARO research reactor for the performance evaluation of the recycled fuel pellets. Post-irradiation examination of the irradiated fuel showed that microstructural evolution and fission gas release behavior of the dry-recycled fuel were similar to high burnup UO2 fuel.

  5. Effects of mesh density and flow conditioning in simulating 7-pin wire wrapped fuel pins.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. G.; Babin, B. R.; Pointer, W. D.; Fischer, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the goals outlined by the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, Argonne National Laboratory has initiated an effort to create an integrated multi-physics multi-resolution thermal hydraulic simulation tool package for the evaluation of nuclear power plant design and safety. As part of this effort, the applicability of a variety of thermal hydraulic analysis methods for the prediction of heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the wire-wrapped fuel-rod bundles found in a fast reactor core is being evaluated. The work described herein provides an initial assessment of the capabilities of the general purpose commercial computational fluid dynamics code Star-CD for the prediction of fluid dynamic characteristics in a wire wrapped fast reactor fuel assembly. A 7-pin wire wrapped fuel rod assembly based on the dimensions of fuel elements in the concept Advanced Burner Test Reactor [1] was simulated for different mesh densities and domain configurations. A model considering a single axial span of the wire wrapped fuel assembly was initially used to assess mesh resolution effects. The influence of the inflow/outflow boundary conditions on the predicted flow fields in the single-span model were then investigated through comparisons with the central span region of models which included 3 and 5 spans. The change in grid refinement had minimal impact on the inter-channel exchange within the assembly resulting in roughly a 5 percent maximum difference. The central span of the 3-span and 5-span cases exhibits much higher velocities than the single span case,, with the largest deviation (15 to 20 percent) occurring furthest away from the wire spacer grids in the higher velocity regions. However, the differences between predicted flow fields in the 3-span and 5-span models are minimal.

  6. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  7. Evaluation of critical resolved shear strength and deformation mode in proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steel using micro-compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Kwon, Junhyun; Hwang, Seong Sik; Shin, Chansun

    2016-03-01

    Micro-compression tests were applied to evaluate the changes in the strength and deformation mode of proton-irradiated commercial austenitic stainless steel. Proton irradiation generated small dots at low dose levels and Frank loops at high dose levels. The increase in critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) was measured from micro-compression of pillars and the Schmid factor calculated from the measured loading direction. The magnitudes of the CRSS increase were in good agreement with the values calculated from the barrier hardening model using the measured size and density of radiation defects. The deformation mode changed upon increasing the irradiation dose level. At a low radiation dose level, work hardening and smooth flow behavior were observed. Increasing the dose level resulted in the flow behavior changing to a distinct heterogeneous flow, yielding a few large strain bursts in the stress-strain curves. The change in the deformation mode was related to the formation and propagation of defect-free slip bands. The effect of the orientation of the pillar or loading direction on the strengths is discussed.

  8. Contact stresses in pin-loaded orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Klang, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of pin elasticity, friction, and clearance on the stresses near the hole in a pin-loaded orthotropic plate are described. The problem is modeled as a contact elasticity problem using complex variable theory, the pin and the plate being two elastic bodies interacting through contact. This modeling is in contrast to previous works which assumed that the pin is rigid or that it exerts a known cosinusoidal radial traction on the hole boundary. Neither of these approaches explicitly involves a pin. A collocation procedure and iteration were used to obtain numerical results for a variety of plate and pin elastic properties and various levels of friction and clearance. Collocation was used to enforce the boundary and iteration was used to find the contact and no-slip regions on the boundary. Details of the numerical scheme are discussed.

  9. A mechanism to pin skyrmions in chiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye-Hua; Li, You-Quan

    2013-02-20

    We propose a mechanism to pin skyrmions in chiral magnetic thin films by introducing local maxima of magnetic exchange strength as pinning centers. The local maxima can be realized by engineering the local density of itinerant electrons. The stationary properties and the dynamical pinning and depinning processes of an isolated skyrmion around a pinning center are studied. We carry out numerical simulations of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and find a way to control the position of an isolated skyrmion in a pinning center lattice using electric current pulses. The results are verified by a Thiele equation analysis. We also find that the critical current to depin a skyrmion, which is estimated to have order of magnitude 10(7)-10(8) A m(-2), has linear dependence on the pinning strength.

  10. Pin1 inhibitors: Pitfalls, progress and cellular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jonathan D; Potter, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Compelling data supports the hypothesis that Pin1 inhibitors will be useful for the therapy of cancer: Pin1 deficient mice resist the induction of breast cancers normally evoked by expression of MMTV-driven Ras or Erb2 alleles. While Pin1 poses challenges for drug discovery, several groups have identified potent antagonists by structure based drug design, significant progress has been made designing peptidic inhibitors and a number of natural products have been found that blockade Pin1, notably epigallocatchechin gallate (EGCG), a major flavonoid in green tea. Here we critically discuss the modes of action and likely specificity of these compounds, concluding that a suitable chemical biology tool for probing the function of Pin1 has yet to be found. We conclude by outlining some open questions regarding the target validation of Pin1 and the prospects for identification of improved inhibitors in the future.

  11. Pin1 inhibitors: Pitfalls, progress and cellular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jonathan D; Potter, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Compelling data supports the hypothesis that Pin1 inhibitors will be useful for the therapy of cancer: Pin1 deficient mice resist the induction of breast cancers normally evoked by expression of MMTV-driven Ras or Erb2 alleles. While Pin1 poses challenges for drug discovery, several groups have identified potent antagonists by structure based drug design, significant progress has been made designing peptidic inhibitors and a number of natural products have been found that blockade Pin1, notably epigallocatchechin gallate (EGCG), a major flavonoid in green tea. Here we critically discuss the modes of action and likely specificity of these compounds, concluding that a suitable chemical biology tool for probing the function of Pin1 has yet to be found. We conclude by outlining some open questions regarding the target validation of Pin1 and the prospects for identification of improved inhibitors in the future. PMID:23796453

  12. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Poon, Siu-Joe; Duwez, Pol E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  13. Pinning synchronization of discrete dynamical networks with delay coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ranran; Peng, Mingshu; Zuo, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the pinning synchronization analysis for nonlinear coupled delayed discrete dynamical networks with the identical or nonidentical topological structure. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, pinning control method and linear matrix inequalities, several adaptive synchronization criteria via two kinds of pinning control method are obtained. Two examples based on Rulkov chaotic system are included to illustrate the effectiveness and verification of theoretical analysis.

  14. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization.

    PubMed

    Gobin, R; Bogard, D; Cara, P; Chauvin, N; Chel, S; Delferrière, O; Harrault, F; Mattei, P; Mosnier, A; Senée, F; Shidara, H; Okumura, Y

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  15. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility injector acceptance tests at CEA/Saclay: 140 mA/100 keV deuteron beam characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gobin, R. Bogard, D.; Chauvin, N.; Chel, S.; Delferrière, O.; Harrault, F.; Mattei, P.; Senée, F.; Mosnier, A.; Shidara, H.

    2014-02-15

    In the framework of the ITER broader approach, the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) deuteron accelerator (2 × 125 mA at 40 MeV) is an irradiation tool dedicated to high neutron flux production for future nuclear plant material studies. During the validation phase, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc) machine will be tested on the Rokkasho site in Japan. This demonstrator aims to produce 125 mA/9 MeV deuteron beam. Involved in the LIPAc project for several years, specialists from CEA/Saclay designed the injector based on a SILHI type ECR source operating at 2.45 GHz and a 2 solenoid low energy beam line to produce such high intensity beam. The whole injector, equipped with its dedicated diagnostics, has been then installed and tested on the Saclay site. Before shipment from Europe to Japan, acceptance tests have been performed in November 2012 with 100 keV deuteron beam and intensity as high as 140 mA in continuous and pulsed mode. In this paper, the emittance measurements done for different duty cycles and different beam intensities will be presented as well as beam species fraction analysis. Then the reinstallation in Japan and commissioning plan on site will be reported.

  16. Development of 3D pseudo pin-by-pin calculation methodology in ANC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.; Mayhue, L.; Huria, H.; Ivanov, B.

    2012-07-01

    Advanced cores and fuel assembly designs have been developed to improve operational flexibility, economic performance and further enhance safety features of nuclear power plants. The simulation of these new designs, along with strong heterogeneous fuel loading, have brought new challenges to the reactor physics methodologies currently employed in the industrial codes for core analyses. Control rod insertion during normal operation is one operational feature in the AP1000{sup R} plant of Westinghouse next generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) design. This design improves its operational flexibility and efficiency but significantly challenges the conventional reactor physics methods, especially in pin power calculations. The mixture loading of fuel assemblies with significant neutron spectrums causes a strong interaction between different fuel assembly types that is not fully captured with the current core design codes. To overcome the weaknesses of the conventional methods, Westinghouse has developed a state-of-the-art 3D Pin-by-Pin Calculation Methodology (P3C) and successfully implemented in the Westinghouse core design code ANC. The new methodology has been qualified and licensed for pin power prediction. The 3D P3C methodology along with its application and validation will be discussed in the paper. (authors)

  17. The Scaling Rule and Fluxon Core Pinning in a High-Field Superconductor with Artificially Introduced Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Lance David

    Flux pinning affects virtually every aspect of high-field superconductivity. Its fundamental mechanism(s) are in principle derived from a complicated theory, but are in practice generally accessed through measuring the field dependence of the bulk flux pinning force (F _{p}(B)). The central piece of information is the shape of the F_{p }(B) curve: It is generally accepted that if, and only if, the curve's shape is constant while the temperature or pin dimension changes, one pinning mechanism is dominant (the 'scaling rule'). During the course of this thesis, we established that the shape of F_{p}(B) is affected by the statistical distribution of the elementary pinning forces (f_{p}). Contrary to prior beliefs, it was concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve for fluxon core pinning is constant, when the distribution is broad, only if the microstructure is fractal. The peak of the F_ {p}(B) curve occurs at a lower field prior models predict, regardless of whether the shape of the curve is constant. When the distribution is narrow, a constant shape occurs, and has the shape predicted for core pinning and direct summation. Thus, the bulk pinning force curve and the elementary pinning mechanism are directly related by the scaling rule only when the f_ {p} distribution is narrow. Within this context, core pinning has been investigated with a specially fabricated Nb-Ti composite having artificially introduced pins, for which the f_{p } distribution is as narrow as can be made. By design, core pinning should be dominant; the shape of the F_{p}(B) curve does not, however, have the predicted form. The results can be explained by a new pinning mechanism, which incorporates the proximity effect and an anisotropic fluxon core, as proposed by Gurevich. It is concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve is very sensitive to the proximity effect, and it can have a peak at a higher field than was previously thought possible for core pinning. The scaling

  18. Epigallocatechin-gallate Suppresses Tumorigenesis by Directly Targeting Pin1

    SciTech Connect

    Urusova, Darya V.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Zykova, Tatyana A.; Carper, Andria; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2011-09-01

    The most active anticancer component in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The human peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (Pin1) plays a critical role in oncogenic signaling. Herein, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Pin1/EGCG complex resolved at 1.9 Å resolution. Notably, the structure revealed the presence of EGCG in both the WW and PPIase domains of Pin1. The direct binding of EGCG with Pin1 was confirmed and the interaction inhibited Pin1 PPIase activity. In addition, proliferation of cells expressing Pin1 was inhibited and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model was suppressed. The binding of EGCG with Arg17 in the WW domain prevented the binding of c-Jun, a well-known Pin1 substrate. EGCG treatment corresponded with a decreased abundance of cyclin D1 and diminution of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-l3-acetate–induced AP-1 or NF-κB promoter activity in cells expressing Pin1. Overall, these results showed that EGCG directly suppresses the tumor-promoting effect of Pin1.

  19. Raytrace procedure for interpretation of ultrasonic examination of bridge pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Sanjiv D.; Duke, John C., Jr.; Lozev, Margarit G.

    1998-03-01

    A computer algorithm that uses raytracing to simulate the ultrasonic inspection of a pin with and without scanning will be described. This algorithm allows the users to simulate the location and orientation of a crack, or wear groove, in the pin and model the ultrasonic reflections that will occur during inspection. The procedure is part of a larger effort to improve the reliability and interpretation of ultrasonic inspection results from steel bridge pins. The simulated results are compared with actual scan results obtained using an automated scanning system on a reference pin with slag and crack imperfections.

  20. Positioning and locking device for fuel pin to grid attachment

    DOEpatents

    Frick, Thomas M.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1976-01-01

    A positioning and locking device for fuel pin to grid attachment provides an inexpensive means of positively positioning and locking the individual fuel pins which make up the driver fuel assemblies used in nuclear reactors. The device can be adapted for use with a currently used attachment grid assembly design and insures that the pins remain in their proper position throughout the in-reactor life of the assembly. This device also simplifies fuel bundle assembly in that a complete row of fuel pins can be added to the bundle during each step of assembly.

  1. 327 to 324 Pin tube shipment quality management process plan

    SciTech Connect

    HAM, J.E.

    1998-11-05

    The B and W Hanford Company's (BWHC) 327 Facility, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, is preparing to ship five Pin Tubes to the 324 Facility for storage and eventual disposition. The Pin Tubes consist of legacy fuel pin pieces and drillings. They will be over-packed in new Pin Tubes and transported to 324 in three shipments. Once received at 324, two of the shipments will be combined for storage as a fissionable material batch, and the other shipment will be added to an existing batch.

  2. Bremsstrahlung γ-ray generation by electrons from gas jets irradiated by laser pulses for radiographic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2012-07-01

    Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally as a promising source of radiation for radioisotope-free γ-ray imaging systems. The calculated yield of γ-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range, produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets, exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 60 times. In addition, an effect of quasi-mono energetic electrons on γ-ray imaging is also discussed.

  3. Fast Flux Test Facility core system

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, J.L. ); Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.; Pitner, A.L.; Waltar, A.E. )

    1990-11-01

    A review of Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) core system accomplishments provides an excellent road map through the maze of issues that faced reactor designers 10 years ago. At that time relatively large uncertainties were associated with fuel pin and fuel assembly performance, irradiation of structural materials, and performance of absorber assemblies. The extensive core systems irradiation program at the US Department of Energy's Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has addressed each of these principal issues. As a result of the progress made, the attention of long-range LMR planners and designers can shift away from improving core systems and focus on reducing capital costs to ensure the LMR can compete economically in the 21st century with other nuclear reactor concepts. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs).

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ronald M; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived.

  5. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs)

    PubMed Central

    Clouse, Ronald M.; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Influences PIN Polarization by Controlling Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ischebeck, Till; Werner, Stephanie; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Lerche, Jennifer; Meijón, Mónica; Stenzel, Irene; Löfke, Christian; Wiessner, Theresa; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara Y.; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Busch, Wolfgang; Boss, Wendy F.; Teichmann, Thomas; Hause, Bettina; Persson, Staffan; Heilmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the minor phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] during vegetative plant growth remain obscure. Here, we targeted two related phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) PIP5K1 and PIP5K2, which are expressed ubiquitously in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant with reduced PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels showed dwarf stature and phenotypes suggesting defects in auxin distribution. The roots of the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant had normal auxin levels but reduced auxin transport and altered distribution. Fluorescence-tagged auxin efflux carriers PIN-FORMED (PIN1)–green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN2-GFP displayed abnormal, partially apolar distribution. Furthermore, fewer brefeldin A–induced endosomal bodies decorated by PIN1-GFP or PIN2-GFP formed in pip5k1 pip5k2 mutants. Inducible overexpressor lines for PIP5K1 or PIP5K2 also exhibited phenotypes indicating misregulation of auxin-dependent processes, and immunolocalization showed reduced membrane association of PIN1 and PIN2. PIN cycling and polarization require clathrin-mediated endocytosis and labeled clathrin light chain also displayed altered localization patterns in the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant, consistent with a role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further biochemical tests on subcellular fractions enriched for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) indicated that pip5k1 and pip5k2 mutants have reduced CCV-associated PI4P 5-kinase activity. Together, the data indicate an important role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the control of clathrin dynamics and in auxin distribution in Arabidopsis. PMID:24326589

  7. A novel phylogeny and morphological reconstruction of the PIN genes and first phylogeny of the ACC-oxidases (ACOs).

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ronald M; Carraro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The PIN and ACO gene families present interesting questions about the evolution of plant physiology, including testing hypotheses about the ecological drivers of their diversification and whether unrelated genes have been recruited for similar functions. The PIN-formed proteins contribute to the polar transport of auxin, a hormone which regulates plant growth and development. PIN loci are categorized into groups according to their protein length and structure, as well as subcellular localization. An interesting question with PIN genes is the nature of the ancestral form and location. ACOs are members of a superfamily of oxygenases and oxidases that catalyze the last step of ethylene synthesis, which regulates many aspects of the plant life cycle. We used publicly available PIN and ACO sequences to conduct phylogenetic analyses. Third codon positions of these genes in monocots have a high GC content, which could be historical but is more likely due to a mutational bias. Thus, we developed methods to extract phylogenetic information from nucleotide sequences while avoiding this convergent feature. One method consisted in using only A-T transformations, and another used only the first and second codon positions for serine, which can only take A or T and G or C, respectively. We also conducted tree-searches for both gene families using unaligned amino acid sequences and dynamic homology. PIN genes appear to have diversified earlier than ACOs, with monocot and dicot copies more mixed in the phylogeny. However, gymnosperm PINs appear to be derived and not closely related to those from primitive plants. We find strong support for a long PIN gene ancestor with short forms subsequently evolving one or more times. ACO genes appear to have diversified mostly since the dicot-monocot split, as most genes cluster into a small number of monocot and dicot clades when the tree is rooted by genes from mosses. Gymnosperm ACOs were recovered as closely related and derived. PMID

  8. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control.

    PubMed

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-12

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  9. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  10. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  11. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  12. Testing for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability (Biologics) HIV Home Test Kits Testing for HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  13. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  14. Squeaking and microcracks in a delta-delta ceramic coupling: pin-on-disc study.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami; Shintani, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    There is a rising concern about squeaking in ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA). In pin-on-disc testing of a delta-delta coupling, we reproduced squeaking and observed microcracks on worn surfaces. We used a pin-on-disc machine and made discs and pins by cutting delta ceramic to a diameter of 40 mm (D-D). Cross-linked polyethylene was used for a comparison disc (D-P). We performed the same test using another D-D coupling specimen to confirm reproducibility. Squeaking in the D-D specimen was reproduced in wet conditions, though it was not found in the D-P specimen. Fast Fourier transform analysis showed a peak frequency for squeaking of 2794 Hz. The noise occurred at about 6.6 km of sliding distance. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the worn surface of the pin in D-D at 10.8 km of sliding distance had some microcracks. However, there was no obvious damage to the worn surface of the pin in D-P at the same sliding distance. We confirmed the reproducibility of these findings, obtaining similar results, including squeaking, from another D-D coupling specimen. Our findings show that squeaking may occur in THA using delta ceramic bearings even if implants are placed to avoid extra-articular impingement of the femoral neck. Although the clinical relevance of microcracks is unknown, they may affect long-term outcomes in THA using delta ceramic bearings.

  15. Experimental analysis of a novel and low-cost pin photodiode dosimetry system for diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Suh, Kune Y.; Mahmoudieh, Afshin

    2016-07-01

    Silicon PIN photodiode has recently found broad and exciting applications in the ionizing radiation dosimetry. In this study a compact and novel dosimetry system using a commercially available PIN photodiode (BPW34) has been experimentally tested for diagnostic radiology. The system was evaluated with clinical beams routinely used for diagnostic radiology and calibrated using a secondary reference standard. Measured dose with PIN photodiode (Air Kerma) varied from 10 to 430 μGy for tube voltages from 40 to 100 kVp and tube current from 0.4 to 40 mAs. The minimum detectable organ dose was estimated to be 10 μGy with 20% uncertainty. Results showed a linear correlation between the PIN photodiode readout and dose measured with standard dosimeters spanning doses received. The present dosimetry system having advantages of suitable sensitivity with immediate readout of dose values, low cost, and portability could be used as an alternative to passive dosimetry system such as thermoluminescent dosimeter for dose measurements in diagnostic radiology.

  16. A Multi-port Low-Fluence Alpha-Particle Irradiator: Fabrication, Testing and Benchmark Radiobiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Neti, Prasad V. S. V.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Perumal, Venkatachalam; Azzam, Edouard I.; Howell, Roger W.

    2011-01-01

    A new multi-port irradiator, designed to facilitate the study of the effects of low fluences of α particles on monolayer cultures, has been developed. The irradiator consists of four individual planar 241Am α-particle sources that are housed inside a helium-filled Lucite chamber. Three of the radioactive sources consist of 20 MBq of 241Am dioxide foil. The fourth source, used to produce higher dose rates, has an activity of 500 MBq. The four sources are mounted on rotating turntables parallel to their respective 1.5-μm-thick Mylar exit windows. A stainless steel honeycomb collimator is placed between the four sources and their exit windows by a cantilever attachment to the platform of an orbital shaker that moves its table in an orbit of 2 cm. Each exit window is equipped with a beam delimiter to optimize the uniformity of the beam and with a high-precision electronic shutter. Opening and closing of the shutters is controlled with a high-precision timer. Custom-designed stainless steel Mylar-bottomed culture dishes are placed on an adapter on the shutter. The α particles that strike the cells have a mean energy of 2.9 MeV. The corresponding LET distribution of the particles has a mean value of 132 keV/μm. Clonogenic cell survival experiments with AG1522 human fibroblasts indicate that the RBE of the α particles compared to 137Cs γ rays is about 7.6 for this biological end point. PMID:15161346

  17. Prefoldin and Pins synergistically regulate asymmetric division and suppress dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Rai, Madhulika; Wang, Cheng; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone complex that regulates tubulin function in mitosis. Here, we show that Prefoldin depletion results in disruption of neuroblast polarity, leading to neuroblast overgrowth in Drosophila larval brains. Interestingly, co-depletion of Prefoldin and Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) leads to the formation of gigantic brains with severe neuroblast overgrowth, despite that Pins depletion alone results in smaller brains with partially disrupted neuroblast polarity. We show that Prefoldin acts synergistically with Pins to regulate asymmetric division of both neuroblasts and Intermediate Neural Progenitors (INPs). Surprisingly, co-depletion of Prefoldin and Pins also induces dedifferentiation of INPs back into neuroblasts, while depletion either Prefoldin or Pins alone is insufficient to do so. Furthermore, knocking down either α-tubulin or β-tubulin in pins- mutant background results in INP dedifferentiation back into neuroblasts, leading to the formation of ectopic neuroblasts. Overexpression of α-tubulin suppresses neuroblast overgrowth observed in prefoldin pins double mutant brains. Our data elucidate an unexpected function of Prefoldin and Pins in synergistically suppressing dedifferentiation of INPs back into neural stem cells. PMID:27025979

  18. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophic Signaling by Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Toko, Haruhiro; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Doroudgar, Shirin; Ormachea, Lucia; Joyo, Eri; Joyo, Anya Y.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie A.; Collins, Brett; Völkers, Mirko; Thuerauf, Donna J.; Glembotski, Christopher C.; Chen, Chun-Hau; Lu, Kun Ping; Müller, Oliver J.; Uchida, Takafumi; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac hypertrophy results from the complex interplay of differentially regulated cascades based upon the phosphorylation status of involved signaling molecules. While numerous critical regulatory kinases and phosphatases have been identified in the myocardium, the intracellular mechanism for temporal regulation of signaling duration and intensity remains obscure. In the non-myocyte context, control of folding, activity, and stability of proteins is mediated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1, but the role of Pin1 in the heart is unknown. Objective To establish the role of Pin1 in the heart. Methods and Results Here we show that either genetic deletion or cardiac over-expression of Pin1 blunts hypertrophic responses induced by transaortic constriction and consequent cardiac failure in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that Pin1 directly binds to Akt, MEK and Raf-1 in cultured cardiomyocytes following hypertrophic stimulation. Furthermore, loss of Pin1 leads to diminished hypertrophic signaling of Akt and MEK, while over-expression of Pin1 increases Raf-1 phosphorylation on the auto-inhibitory site Ser259 leading to reduced MEK activation. Conclusions Collectively, these data support a role for Pin1 as a central modulator of the intensity and duration of two major hypertrophic signaling pathways, thereby providing a novel target for regulation and control of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:23487407

  19. Alignment tool facilitates pin placement on irregular horizontal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. V.

    1966-01-01

    Alignment tool facilitates spotting and cementing plastic pins on the true vertical to irregular concave and convex surfaces. The tool consists of a wood tripod with individually adjustable legs, a wood block with a hole for placing the pins and two spirit levels at a 90 degree angle for easy alignment.

  20. 21 CFR 872.3740 - Retentive and splinting pin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retentive and splinting pin. 872.3740 Section 872.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3740 Retentive and splinting pin....